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1

Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or equivalent toxicological potency in which case they are not considered ?sufficiently? similar. Currently, this method is only useful for inhalation 4 routes of exposure because epidemiological data for human oral and dermal exposures are not yet... available. Consequently, it is only feasible to use in cases where inhalation risk will be the dominant contributor to the overall risk estimates. This method is not considered a viable option for mixtures that have originated from unknown sources...

Bruce, Erica Dawn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Nutrition Can Modulate the Toxicity of Environmental Pollutants: Implications in Risk Assessment and Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Western diet: health implications for the 21st century.Pollutants: Implications in Risk Assessment and Human Healthand their implications in risk assessment and human health.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Sustainable Material Selection of Toxic Chemicals in Design and Manufacturing From Human Health Impact Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in material selection processes for sustainable design andselection process for developing a sustainable materialintegrated sustainable material selection process of toxic

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

EMSL - human health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

human-health en Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsphysical-properties-ambient-and-labo...

5

Development of dioxin toxicity evaluation method in human milk by enzyme-linked immunosorbent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of dioxin toxicity evaluation method in human milk by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay Co. Ltd., Tokyo 105-8528, Japan b Dioxin Research Group, Saitama Institute of Public Health, Saitama, the development of a toxicity evaluation method for dioxins in human milk by enzyme-linked im- munosorbent assay

Hammock, Bruce D.

6

Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE Teaching Fellowship in Athletic of Science and Health, the School of Health and Human Performance at DCU is developing an international reputation in health and exercise science. As such, the School of Health and Human Performance is committed

Humphrys, Mark

7

College of Health & Human Services 349 College of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Health & Human Services 349 College of Health and Human Services www.health.uncc.edu Dean: Karen Schmaling Associate Dean: Jane Neese In the College of Health and Human Services at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, students and faculty help chart the course for health care

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

8

Guidance on health effects of toxic chemicals. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES), and Martin Marietta Utility Services, Inc. (MMUS), are engaged in phased programs to update the safety documentation for the existing US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facilities. The safety analysis of potential toxic hazards requires a methodology for evaluating human health effects of predicted toxic exposures. This report provides a consistent set of health effects and documents toxicity estimates corresponding to these health effects for some of the more important chemicals found within MMES and MMUS. The estimates are based on published toxicity information and apply to acute exposures for an ``average`` individual. The health effects (toxicological endpoints) used in this report are (1) the detection threshold; (2) the no-observed adverse effect level; (3) the onset of irritation/reversible effects; (4) the onset of irreversible effects; and (5) a lethal exposure, defined to be the 50% lethal level. An irreversible effect is defined as a significant effect on a person`s quality of life, e.g., serious injury. Predicted consequences are evaluated on the basis of concentration and exposure time.

Foust, C.B.; Griffin, G.D.; Munro, N.B.; Socolof, M.L.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; and translating and disseminating research findings to health care providers, researchers, policymakersDCP - 1 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH Drug Control Programs ..................................................................................................................................2 #12;DCP - 2 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Resource Summary

Levin, Judith G.

10

National Center for Environmental Health Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

healthy. But when your environment exposes you to dangerous events or toxic substances, your health canNational Center for Environmental Health Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry CDC's Climate and Health Program Environmental Health Your environment is everything around you--the air you

11

Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE Teaching Fellowship in Athletic Therapy (half time, 3 year contract) The School of Health and Human Performance invites applications from and assessment, have relevant qualifications and be experienced in emergency care training and be competent

Humphrys, Mark

12

Estimated human health risks of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste in salt caverns  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the contaminants` toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks.

Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Solar radiation and human health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Sun has played a major role in the development of life on Earth. In Western culture, people are warned against Sun exposure because of its adverse effects: erythema, photoimmunosuppression, photoageing, photocarcinogenesis, cataracts and photokeratitis. However, Sun exposure is also beneficial, since moderate doses give beneficial physiological effects: vitamin D synthesis, reduction of blood pressure and mental health. Shortage of Sun exposure may be even more dangerous to human health than excessive exposure. Avoiding Sun exposure leads to vitamin D deficiency which is associated not only with rickets and osteomalacia, but also with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, influenza, many types of cancer and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Solar radiation induces nitric oxide release in tissue and immediate pigment darkening which certainly play important roles, although these are still unknown. Action spectra relevant for health are described. We will also review what is known about spectral and intensity variations of terrestrial solar radiation as well as its penetration through the atmosphere and into human skin and tissue.

Asta Juzeniene; Pĺl Brekke; Arne Dahlback; Stefan Andersson-Engels; Jörg Reichrath; Kristin Moan; Michael F Holick; William B Grant; Johan Moan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Link Climate Change and Human Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Make Our Science Accessible Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally Link Climate Change and Human Health Print E-mail Health News Check out the latest climate change and human health news and announcements in our Health News Feed. Climate change poses unique challenges to human health. Unlike health threats caused by a particular toxin or disease pathogen, there are many ways that climate change can lead to potentially harmful health effects. Direct health impacts may include increased illnesses and deaths from extreme heat events, injuries and deaths from extreme weather events, and respiratory illnesses due to changes in air quality Indirect health impacts include illnesses and deaths that may arise from

15

Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HUMAN HEALTH SCIENCE BLDG GEO HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Principal Investigator Source Heat Pumps Demo Projects May 20, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential,...

16

Climate Change and Human Health National Center for Environmental Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change and Human Health National Center for Environmental Health Division of Environmental and Prevention October 17, 2012 #12;Coastal flooding Climate change effects: ·Temperature ·Sea level,civil conflict Anxiety,despair,depression Civil conflict Climate Change Health Effects Food & water Malnutrition

17

Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Services Review Group Type Activity Grant the obligation to comply with Public Health Services terms and conditions if a grant is awarded as a result/PI SUBTOTALS CONSULTANT COSTS EQUIPMENT (Itemize) SUPPLIES (Itemize by category) TRAVEL INPATIENT CARE COSTS

Baker, Chris I.

18

Power Generation and Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions from power generation are associated with adverse health and ecological effects. Fossil fuel-based power plants (such as coal, oil, and to a lesser extent, natural gas) are associated with emissions of particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and a variety of organic contaminants such as mercury and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Exposure to emissions from power plants has been associated with a variety of respiratory symptoms, typically based on short-term (e.g., from 5–10 min to 24 h) increases in ambient concentrations. In addition, exposure to constituents from emissions generated by fossil fuels has been associated with increases in premature mortality, particularly in the elderly, and a variety of respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses. Fossil fuels, particularly coal-fired power plants, are responsible for generating the majority of emissions to which humans are exposed.

K. von Stackelberg

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

College of Health and Human Sciences College of Health and Human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences Office in L.L. Gibbons Building, Room 217 (970) 491-6331 www.chhs.colostate.edu Professor Jeff McCollege of Health and Human Sciences _______________ 2.8 Page 1 College of Health and Human Management Family and Consumer Sciences Fermentation Science and Technology Health and Exercise Science Human

20

National Center for Environmental Health Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Center for Environmental Health Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry CS229334 from Health Threats. Saving Money Through Prevention. Environmental Health Your environment and healthy, you are more likely to stay healthy. But when your environment exposes you to dangerous events

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Chapter 14 - Human Resources for Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A health system is an expensive knowledge-based industry made up of professionals, paraprofessionals, and administrative and support personnel. Human resources to provide and manage public health and clinical services are crucial to developing and sustaining national and global health systems. High-income countries are replete with highly trained and motivated personnel, but face issues such as increasing costs of care for aging populations and using new categories of health workers. Low-income countries face severe human resource shortages as training programs are underdeveloped. Health workforce issues include urban–rural differentiation, promoting standards and quality of care, specialization versus primary care, tensions between public and private health systems, and integrating new health professions. Migration of health professionals from low-income to high-income countries hampers the buildup of a critical mass of leaders, providers, and teachers to expand the capacity of health systems. Strategic policies are crucial to this field.

Theodore H. Tulchinsky; Elena A. Varavikova

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps Project objectives: Construct a ground sourced heat pump, heating,...

23

Environmental Health & Safety HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and patient supervisors a work accommodation plan for the patient. Manages each patient's transition through T 650.725.1175 F 650.725.3468 Case Management specialist­ Stanford University Occupational Health Center programs. SUMMARY The Occupational Health Medical Case Management of occupational injury/illness claims

24

Appendix F Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Human Health Risk Assessment Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F This appendix presents the detailed calculations used to estimate risks to human health. It includes the exposure factors, equations, abbreviations, assumptions, and references. Separate spreadsheets for ground water ingestion for the near-term and 20-year assumptio~ls have also been provided. The following spreadsheets are included in this appendix: Overview (Exposure Factors, Equations, Abbreviations, and COPCs) .......................... F-3 * Contaminant Concentrations-Near-Tern1 Ground Water Concentrations .................... F-6 Toxicity Factors ...................................... .. ............................................................ F-8 * Lower Montezuma'creek Exposure Scenario-Reasonable Maximurn Exposure ...... F-10

25

College of Human and Health Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8988 College of Human and Health Sciences All research is delivered through discipline-focused research centres, which examine fields such as child research, ageing, psychology and social care, as well as midwifery, nursing and allied health professions. External funding from a number of prestigious bodies has

Harman, Neal.A.

26

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH &. HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH &. HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health of Intramural Research, OD Dr. James F. Taylor, Director Office ofAnimal Care and Use, OIR, OD Director, Division ofOccupational Health and Safety (DOHS) Scientific Resources, ORS Subject: Medical Surveillance of

Bandettini, Peter A.

27

Climate Change and Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...stabilize the climate. The good news is that we may also be underestimating the economic benefits of the clean-energy transition. When the financial incentives are adequate, renewable energy, energy-efficient and hybrid technologies, "green buildings," and expanded public transportation systems can constitute... Extreme weather events reflect massive and ongoing changes in our climate to which biologic systems on all continents are reacting. Dr. Paul Epstein writes about some of the health effects that may lie ahead if the increase in very extreme weather events ...

Epstein P.R.

2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

28

Is climate change affecting human health?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

First principles suggest that climate change is affecting human health, based on what is understood about the relationships between the mean and variability of temperature, precipitation, and other weather variables and climate-sensitive health outcomes, and the magnitude of climate change that has occurred. However, the complexity of these relationships and the multiple drivers of climate-sensitive health outcomes makes the detection and attribution of changing disease patterns to climate change very challenging. Nevertheless, efforts to do so are vital for informing policy and for prioritizing adaptation and mitigation options.

Kristie L Ebi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Exposure information in environmental health research: Current opportunities and future directions for particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutants  

SciTech Connect

Understanding and quantifying outdoor and indoor sources of human exposure are essential but often not adequately addressed in health-effects studies for air pollution. Air pollution epidemiology, risk assessment, health tracking and accountability assessments are examples of health-effects studies that require but often lack adequate exposure information. Recent advances in exposure modeling along with better information on time-activity and exposure factors data provide us with unique opportunities to improve the assignment of exposures for both future and ongoing studies linking air pollution to health impacts. In September 2006, scientists from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) along with scientists from the academic community and state health departments convened a symposium on air pollution exposure and health in order to identify, evaluate, and improve current approaches for linking air pollution exposures to disease. This manuscript presents the key issues, challenges and recommendations identified by the exposure working group, who used cases studies of particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutant exposure to evaluate health-effects for air pollution. One of the over-arching lessons of this workshop is that obtaining better exposure information for these different health-effects studies requires both goal-setting for what is needed and mapping out the transition pathway from current capabilities to meeting these goals. Meeting our long-term goals requires definition of incremental steps that provide useful information for the interim and move us toward our long-term goals. Another over-arching theme among the three different pollutants and the different health study approaches is the need for integration among alternate exposure assessment approaches. For example, different groups may advocate exposure indicators, biomonitoring, mapping methods (GIS), modeling, environmental media monitoring, and/or personal exposure modeling. However, emerging research reveals that the greatest progress comes from integration among two or more of these efforts.

McKone, Thomas E.; Ryan, P. Barry; Ozkaynak, Haluk

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Species-specific toxicity of troglitazone on rats and human by gel entrapped hepatocytes  

SciTech Connect

Troglitazone, despite passing preclinical trials on animals, was shortly withdrawn from market due to its severe hepatotoxicity in clinic. As rat hepatocyte monolayer consistently showed sensitive troglitazone toxicity as human hepatocyte monolayer in contrast to the species-specific toxicity in vivo, this paper utilized both hepatocytes in three-dimensional culture of gel entrapment to reflect the species difference on hepatotoxicity. Rat hepatocytes in gel entrapment did not show obvious cellular damage even under a long-term exposure for 21 days while gel entrapped human hepatocytes significantly displayed oxidative stress, steatosis, mitochondrial damage and cell death at a short exposure for 4 days. As a result, the detected species-specific toxicity of troglitazone between gel entrapped rat and human hepatocytes consisted well with the situation in vivo but was in a sharp contrast to the performance of two hepatocytes by monolayer culture. Such contradictory toxicity of rat hepatocytes between monolayer and gel entrapment culture could be explained by the fact that troglitazone was cleared more rapidly in gel entrapment than in monolayer culture. Similarly, the differential clearance of troglitazone in rat and human might also explain its species-specific toxicity. Therefore, gel entrapment of hepatocytes might serve as a platform for evaluation of drug toxicity at early stage of drug development by reducing costs, increasing the likelihood of clinical success and limiting human exposure to unsafe drugs. -- Highlights: ? Species-specific toxicity of troglitazone reflected by rat/human hepatocytes ? 3D hepatocytes in 21 days’ long-term culture used for drug hepatotoxicity ? Oversensitive toxicity in hepatocyte monolayer by slow troglitazone clearance.

Shen, Chong [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang 310027 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Meng, Qin, E-mail: mengq@zju.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang 310027 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Zhang, Guoliang [Institute of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Zhejiang 310012 (China)] [Institute of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Zhejiang 310012 (China)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Aspects of nitrogen dioxide toxicity in environmental urban concentrations in human nasal epithelium  

SciTech Connect

Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) as part of urban exhaust pollution are widely discussed as potential hazards to human health. This study focuses on toxic effects of NO{sub 2} in realistic environmental concentrations with respect to the current limit values in a human target tissue of volatile xenobiotics, the epithelium of the upper aerodigestive tract. Nasal epithelial cells of 10 patients were cultured as an air-liquid interface and exposed to 0.01 ppm NO{sub 2}, 0.1 ppm NO{sub 2}, 1 ppm NO{sub 2}, 10 ppm NO{sub 2} and synthetic air for half an hour. After exposure, genotoxicity was evaluated by the alkaline single-cell microgel electophoresis (Comet) assay and by induction of micronuclei in the micronucleus test. Depression of proliferation and cytotoxic effects were determined using the micronucleus assay and trypan blue exclusion assay, respectively. The experiments revealed genotoxic effects by DNA fragmentation starting at 0.01 ppm NO{sub 2} in the Comet assay, but no micronucleus inductions, no changes in proliferation, no signs of necrosis or apoptosis in the micronucleus assay, nor did the trypan blue exclusion assay show any changes in viability. The present data reveal a possible genotoxicity of NO{sub 2} in urban concentrations in a screening test. However, permanent DNA damage as indicated by the induction of micronuclei was not observed. Further research should elucidate the effects of prolonged exposure.

Koehler, C.; Ginzkey, C.; Friehs, G.; Hackenberg, S.; Froelich, K.; Scherzed, A.; Burghartz, M.; Kessler, M. [Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Kleinsasser, N., E-mail: Kleinsasser_N@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.d [Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wuerzburg (Germany)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Nanoparticle toxicity testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoparticle toxicity testing Nanoparticle toxicity testing 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Nanoparticle toxicity testing Assessing the potential health hazards of nanotechnology March 25, 2013 Robot In the search for more accurate and efficient techniques to evaluate the health hazards of nanoparticles, Los Alamos researchers are developing artificial human tissues and organs to replace animal test subjects. A new approach to toxicity testing under development at Los Alamos uses artificial tissue and artificial organs instead of animal testing Manufactured nanoparticles such as buckyballs and carbon nanotubes, used in products ranging from sunscreens to solar panels, are proliferating so quickly that safety testing for potential health hazards-similar to those

33

HEALTH & HUMANITYHEALTH & HUMANITYHEALTH & HUMANITY This major is intended for students interested in fields that inform the health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEALTH & HUMANITYHEALTH & HUMANITYHEALTH & HUMANITY This major is intended for students interested in fields that inform the health profession and in related questions about health and human experience the how health issues relate to different fields. Ethnographics Lab: The Ethnographics Laboratory

Krylov, Anna I.

34

Human Health Risk & Environmental Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the interplay between human health and environmental risks associated with energy production, hazardous waste, national security and natural disasters. Research findings...

35

Health Policy and Administration University Park, College of Health and Human Development (H P A)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health Policy and Administration University Park, College of Health and Human Development (H P A positions or graduate study in the field of health care. Students in the major develop the skills and knowledge needed to understand the complex societal problem of providing access to quality health care

Yener, Aylin

36

Human Resource Services Health Insurance Informational Session  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be defaulted to the Quality Care Health Plan Enrollment forms were mailed by Central Management Services February 1, 2013 Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) Quality Care Health Plan (D3) Open Access Plan (OAP) ­ Managed Care Coventry OAP (CH) HealthLink OAP (CF) Health Maintenance Organization (HMO

Karonis, Nicholas T.

37

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes May 2007 Page 23 of 58 Family and Contextual Influences on Development Rhonda Belue Assistant Professor Health Policy & Administration Email Address: RZB10@PSU.EDU Research Interests Health disparities in families and children, evaluation

Yener, Aylin

38

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.EDU Research Interests Health insurance; hospital care for children; use of medical care by the elderlyCollege of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes May 2007 Page 2 of 58 Behavior-Genetics in Health and Development Ingrid Blood Professor Communication Sciences & Disorders Email Address: i2b

Yener, Aylin

39

Human Resources hs_pro08 Page 1 of 12 Human Resources: Health, Safety & Wellbeing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Worksafe NZ , any restricted work as defined in regulation 2 and 26 of The Health and Safety in EmploymentHuman Resources ­ hs_pro08 Page 1 of 12 Human Resources: Health, Safety & Wellbeing Protocol & Safety Manager Contact: Health & Safety Team Table of Contents Introduction

Hickman, Mark

40

Putting climate change and human health science into practice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Putting climate change and human health science into practice Print E-mail Putting climate change and human health science into practice Print E-mail Landsat Data Continuity Mission Tuesday, March 26, 2013 Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program For the first time, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) formally brought together their grantees working on climate change and human health, to share their research findings and discuss practical strategies for implementing this knowledge. "The goal of this meeting was for grantees to share latest advances, as well as for participants to network with each other to build new relationships and plant the seeds for future collaborations toward solving one of the most critical public health issues facing our world," said Caroline Dilworth, Ph.D., NIEHS health scientist administrator.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume I: Human Health Evaluation Manual Supplemental Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-921314 1-921314 OSWER DIRECTIVE: 9285.6-03 March 25, 1991 RISK ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE FOR SUPERFUND VOLUME I: HUMAN HEALTH EVALUATION MANUAL SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE "STANDARD DEFAULT EXPOSURE FACTORS" INTERIM FINAL Office of Emergency and Remedial Response Toxics Integration Branch U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. 20460 (202)475-9486 REPRODUCED BY U.S.DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE SPRINGFIELD, VA 22161 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 MAR 25 1991 S O L I D W A S T E A N D E M E R G E N C Y R E S P O N S E O F F I C E O F OSWER Directive 9285.6-03 MEMORANDUM SUBJECT: FROM: Human Health Evaluation Manual, Supplemental Guidance: TO: Director, Waste Management Division, Regions I, IV, V, & VII Director, Emergency & Remedial Response Division,

42

{~.~ DEPARTMENT Of HEALTH & HUMAN ERVICES Public Health SaMea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~nt, (Fl.) Environmental Health Division's Swimming Pools and Spas Interactive Training CD-ROM_ A full Initiative: Swimming Pool Inspections". This comprehensive training program will enhance the knowledge Integrated Pest Mll1IIlgement Webcast · Morbidity MoTtality Weekly Repons - Surveillance Datafrom Swimming

43

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes May 2007 Page 16 of 58 Development and adults who stutter; curriculum reform in undergraduate education. J. Douglas Coatsworth Associate and to prevent mental health and behavioral problems in children and adolescents; resilience. Ann Crouter

Yener, Aylin

44

Human and animal health risk assessments of chemicals in the food chain: Comparative aspects and future perspectives  

SciTech Connect

Chemicals from anthropogenic and natural origins enter animal feed, human food and water either as undesirable contaminants or as part of the components of a diet. Over the last five decades, considerable efforts and progress to develop methodologies to protect humans and animals against potential risks associated with exposure to such potentially toxic chemicals have been made. This special issue presents relevant methodological developments and examples of risk assessments of undesirable substances in the food chain integrating the animal health and the human health perspective and refers to recent Opinions of the Scientific Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM) of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). This introductory review aims to give a comparative account of the risk assessment steps used in human health and animal health risk assessments for chemicals in the food chain and provides a critical view of the data gaps and future perspectives for this cross-disciplinary field. - Highlights: ? Principles of human and animal health risk assessment. ? Data gaps for each step of animal health risk assessment. ? Implications of animal risk assessment on human risk assessment. ? Future perspectives on chemical risk assessment.

Dorne, J.L.C.M., E-mail: jean-lou.dorne@efsa.europa.eu [Emerging Risk Unit, Via Carlo Magno 1A, 43126 Parma (Italy); Fink-Gremmels, J. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM Utrecht (Netherlands)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Human Capital: Education, Innovation and Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Table 5.15...shows that, despite the gradual increase in educational expenditure (both in absolute terms and as a ... in the size of the investment in human capital production. Finally, a substantial increase in....

Prof. Panagiotis Petrakis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Components of plastic: experimental studies in animals and relevance for human health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Plastics, the environment and human health' compiled by R. C. Thompson, C. J...studies in animals and relevance for human health Chris E. Talsness 1 * Anderson J. M...Toxicology, National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Structure-activity relationship of antioxidants for inhibitors of linoleic acid hydroperoxide-induced toxicity in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Structure-activity relationship of antioxidants for the protective effects on linoleic acid hydroperoxide (LOOH)-induced toxicity were examined in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. ?-Tocopherol,...

Takao Kaneko; Naomichi Baba; Mitsuyoshi Matsuo

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Impact evaluation of electrical equipments on human health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objectives of study: - Measure of the electric and magnetic field from electric power station: Darste - Brasov, Lacu Sarat-Braila, Bradu-Arges; - Evaluation of human health from electric power station: Darste - Brasov, Lacu Sarat-Braila, Bradu-Arges; ... Keywords: electric and megnetic field, electric power stations, melatonin

Alice Raducanu; Aurica Suvergel; Angela Stanca; Marin Stefan; Cornella Marcolt; Corneliu Neagu

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

DOE/FDA/EPA: Workshop on methylmercury and human health  

SciTech Connect

In the US the general population is exposed to methylmercury (MeHg) principally through the consumption of fish. There is continuing discussion about the sources of this form of mercury (Hg), the magnitudes and trends in exposures to consumers, and the significance of the sources and their contributions to human health. In response to these discussions, the US Department of Energy, the US Food and Drug Administration, and the US Environmental Protection Agency cosponsored a two-day workshop to discuss data and methods available for characterizing the risk to human health presented by MeHg. This workshop was attended by 45 individuals representing various Federal and state organizations and interested stakeholders. The agenda covered: Agency interests; probabilistic approach to risk assessment; emission sources; atmospheric transport; biogeochemical cycling; exposure assessment; health effects of MeHg; and research needs.

Moskowitz, P.D.; Saroff, L.; Bolger, M.; Cicmanec, J.; Durkee, S. [eds.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

Clean Slate transportation and human health risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

Public concern regarding activities involving radioactive material generally focuses on the human health risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation. This report describes the results of a risk analysis conducted to evaluate risk for excavation, handling, and transport of soil contaminated with transuranics at the Clean Slate sites. Transportation risks were estimated for public transport routes from the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to the Envirocore disposal facility or to the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for both radiological risk and risk due to traffic accidents. Human health risks were evaluated for occupational and radiation-related health effects to workers. This report was generated to respond to this public concern, to provide an evaluation of the risk, and to assess feasibility of transport of the contaminated soil for disposal.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A human pluripotent stem cell platform for assessing developmental neural toxicity screening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current methods of testing chemicals for developmental neural toxicity include animal testing...in vitro...testing using cultured primary cells or cell lines. Here, we review the current state of neural toxicity ...

Zhonggang Hou; Jue Zhang; Michael P Schwartz; Ron Stewart…

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Toxic effects of low doses of Bisphenol-A on human placental cells  

SciTech Connect

Humans are exposed daily to a great number of xenobiotics and their metabolites present as pollutants. Bisphenol-A (BPA) is extensively used in a broad range of products including baby bottles, food-storage containers, medical equipment, and consumer electronics. Thus, BPA is the most common monomer for polycarbonates intended for food contact. Levels of this industrial product are found in maternal blood, amniotic fluid, follicular fluid, placental tissue, umbilical cord blood, and maternal urine. In this study, we investigated toxic effects of BPA concentrations close to levels found in serum of pregnant women on human cytotrophoblasts (CTB). These cells were isolated from fresh placentas and exposed to BPA for 24 h. Our results showed that very low doses of BPA induce apoptosis (2 to 3 times) as assessed using M30 antibody immunofluorescent detection, and necrosis (1.3 to 1.7 times) as assessed through the cytosolic Adenylate Kinase (AK) activity after cell membrane damage. We also showed that BPA increased significantly the tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gene expression and protein excretion as measured by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA luminescent test, respectively. Moreover, we observed that induction of AK activation and TNF-alpha gene expression require lower levels of BPA than apoptosis or TNF-alpha protein excretion. Our findings suggest that exposure of placental cells to low doses of BPA may cause detrimental effects, leading in vivo to adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, prematurity and pregnancy loss.

Benachour, Nora [Laboratory of Research in Reproductive and Gestational Health, Quebec (Canada); Aris, Aziz, E-mail: aziz.aris@usherbrooke.c [Laboratory of Research in Reproductive and Gestational Health, Quebec (Canada); Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology, University of Sherbrooke Hospital Centre, Quebec (Canada)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

('~ DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and communicate research findings to patients and their families, health care providers, and the general public care professionals access to important health and science information from taxpayer to reach patients, health care providers, and our other audiences. While these communication efforts

Baker, Chris I.

54

National Center for Environmental Health Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's National Center for Environmental Health: Hawaii CDC 24/7: Saving Lives. Protecting People from Health concerns for asthma care. Elevated levels of air pollutants that make up vog have been linked to breathing, the Hawaii State Asthma Control Program and its partners have worked with community health centers to improve

55

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human Health Print E-mail National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human Health Print E-mail National Institutes of Health Research Portfolio Monday, April 22, 2013 Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program What are the potential effects of global climate change on human health? This is a question that a growing number of federally funded studies seek to answer. A new analysis recently published in the journal, Environmental Health Perspectives, looks at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) research portfolio on climate change and human health. Climate change is affecting human health through environmental consequences, such as sea-level rise, changes in precipitation, heat waves, changes in intensity of hurricanes and storms, and degraded air quality, according to the World Health Organization and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

56

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing human health Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

health Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: assessing human health Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Undergraduate Minor in Public Health A...

57

Use of terrestrial toxicity tests for Superfund site assessments  

SciTech Connect

Most risk assessment efforts that evaluate risk from hazardous waste sites have focused on potential human health effects. Concern for potential ecological risk has become a prominent factor in these assessments. The potential impact on all components of ecological systems at risk (including the human component) has prompted the regulatory community to take a more comprehensive approach to risk assessments, incorporating terrestrial toxicity testing. Terrestrial toxicity testing ultimately strengthens the overall risk assessment since responses of feral animals in their natural habitats have important implications in human health. Many biological indicators of stress in animals can be extrapolated to human health as well. Reliance on terrestrial toxicity testing for hazardous waste sites provides both a priori toxicity tests of single chemicals (generally conducted in a laboratory setting), or site-specific testing of extant contamination. Using bioassays of toxicity of environmental samples or in situ testing. Appropriate toxicity tests with representative chemicals and chemical bioavailability, on appropriate species will greatly enhance the information gained and widen mitigation options. Risk managers will be better able to integrate and evaluate toxicity information for the entire system at risk, including the human component. The authors present several matrices that relate chemical action, anticipated toxic effects, and possible terrestrial effects that can be used to provide more comprehensive and ecologically realistic risk assessments at hazardous waste sites.

Williams, B.A.; Kapustka, L.A.; Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Indoor air and human health revisited: A recent IAQ symposium  

SciTech Connect

Indoor Air and Human Health Revisited was a speciality symposium examining the scientific underpinnings of sensory and sensitivity effects, allergy and respiratory disease, neurotoxicity and cancer. An organizing committee selected four persons to chain the sessions and invite experts to give state-of-the-art presentations that will be published as a book. A summary of the presentations is made and some critical issues identified.

Gammage, R.B.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

Assessing human health risk in the USDA forest service  

SciTech Connect

This paper identifies the kinds of risk assessments being done by or for the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service. Summaries of data sources currently in use and the pesticide risk assessments completed by the agency or its contractors are discussed. An overview is provided of the agency`s standard operating procedures for the conduct of toxicological, ecological, environmental fate, and human health risk assessments.

Hamel, D.R. [Department of Agriculture-Forest Service, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics  

SciTech Connect

Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast Trade-Mark-Sign chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultures were evaluated for known and novel signatures that may be indicative of developmental toxicity. Significant fold changes in endogenous metabolites were detected for 83 putatively annotated mass features in response to the subset of ToxCast chemicals. The annotations were mapped to specific human metabolic pathways. This revealed strong effects on pathways for nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism pathways. Predictivity for adverse outcomes in mammalian prenatal developmental toxicity studies used ToxRefDB and other sources of information, including Stemina Biomarker Discovery's predictive DevTox Registered-Sign model trained on 23 pharmaceutical agents of known developmental toxicity and differing potency. The model initially predicted developmental toxicity from the blinded ToxCast compounds in concordance with animal data with 73% accuracy. Retraining the model with data from the unblinded test compounds at one concentration level increased the predictive accuracy for the remaining concentrations to 83%. These preliminary results on a 11-chemical subset of the ToxCast chemical library indicate that metabolomics analysis of the hES secretome provides information valuable for predictive modeling and mechanistic understanding of mammalian developmental toxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested 11 environmental compounds in a hESC metabolomics platform. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant changes in secreted small molecule metabolites were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perturbed mass features map to pathways critical for normal development and pregnancy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arginine, proline, nicotinate, nicotinamide and glutathione pathways were affected.

Kleinstreuer, N.C., E-mail: kleinstreuer.nicole@epa.gov [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Smith, A.M.; West, P.R.; Conard, K.R.; Fontaine, B.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Weir-Hauptman, A.M. [Covance, Inc., Madison, WI 53704 (United States)] [Covance, Inc., Madison, WI 53704 (United States); Palmer, J.A. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Knudsen, T.B.; Dix, D.J. [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States)] [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Donley, E.L.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Cezar, G.G. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States) [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Radioactivity levels in plant samples in Tulkarem district, Palestine and its impact on human health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Palestine and its impact on human health Kaleel M. Thabayneh * Mohannad...samples. The radiological health implication to the population...radiation research related to human health is to predict the biological...during their growth. These dangerous isotopes enter the cells and......

Kaleel M. Thabayneh; Mohannad M. Jazzar

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

PA-40-201 1 Department of Health and Human Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PA-40-201 1 Department of Health and Human Services Part 1. Overview Information Participating Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) National Institute on Aging (NIA) National Institute on Alcohol Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human

Baker, Chris I.

63

Depleted uranium human health risk assessment, Jefferson Proving Ground, Indiana  

SciTech Connect

The risk to human health from fragments of depleted uranium (DU) at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG) was estimated using two types of ecosystem pathway models. A steady-state, model of the JPG area was developed to examine the effects of DU in soils, water, and vegetation on deer that were hunted and consumed by humans. The RESRAD code was also used to estimate the effects of farming the impact area and consuming the products derived from the farm. The steady-state model showed that minimal doses to humans are expected from consumption of deer that inhabit the impact area. Median values for doses to humans range from about 1 mrem ({plus_minus}2.4) to 0.04 mrem ({plus_minus}0.13) and translate to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments (excess cancers) in the population. Monte Carlo simulation of the steady-state model was used to derive the probability distributions from which the median values were drawn. Sensitivity analyses of the steady-state model showed that the amount of DU in airborne dust and, therefore, the amount of DU on the vegetation surface, controlled the amount of DU ingested by deer and by humans. Human doses from the RESRAD estimates ranged from less than 1 mrem/y to about 6.5 mrem/y in a hunting scenario and subsistence fanning scenario, respectively. The human doses exceeded the 100 mrem/y dose limit when drinking water for the farming scenario was obtained from the on-site aquifer that was presumably contaminated with DU. The two farming scenarios were unrealistic land uses because the additional risk to humans due to unexploded ordnance in the impact area was not figured into the risk estimate. The doses estimated with RESRAD translated to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments to about 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} detriments. The higher risks were associated only with the farming scenario in which drinking water was obtained on-site.

Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

1994-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

64

Health and Human Rights--PH 393 Professor Juliet S. Sorensen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; how to maximize access to health; the health implications of war crimes and atrocities1 Health and Human Rights--PH 393 Professor Juliet S. Sorensen Rubloff 8th Floor, Bluhm Legal ­ 3 p.m. or by appointment Course description: The course examines the intersection of health

Contractor, Anis

65

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

school youth, development of youth competencies, healthy lifestyle & democratic behavior through leisure. Elizabeth Farmer Associate Professor Health Policy & Administration Email Address: emf13@psu.edu Research Interests Children's mental health services, effectiveness of mental health interventions, mental health

Yener, Aylin

66

E-Print Network 3.0 - ancillary human health Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

102010 Printed 612011 Premier HMO 5 Summary: and clarification on the new health care reform laws from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services... , you may also...

67

Human intake fraction of toxic pollutants: a model comparison between caltox and uses-lca  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of toxic substances in LCA. II: Assessing parameter06 iF fw- ingestion-USES-LCA (-) 1,0E-04 1,0E-02 Figure 5b04 iF fw-inhalation-USES-LCA (-) Figure 6a 1,0E-04 iF fw-

Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; Geelen, Loes M.J.; Hertwich, Edgar G.; McKone, Thomas E.; van de Meent, Dik

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Human exposure to mercury: A critical assessment of the evidence of adverse health effects  

SciTech Connect

The ubiquitous nature of mercury in the environment, its global atmospheric cycling, and its toxicity to humans at levels that are uncomfortably close to exposures experienced by a proportion of the population are some of the current concerns associated with this pollutant. The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate the scientific quality of published reports involving human exposures to mercury and associated health outcomes as an aid in the risk evaluation of this chemical. A comprehensive review of the scientific literature involving human exposures to mercury was performed and each publication evaluated using a defined set of criteria that are considered standards in epidemiologic and toxicologic research. Severe, sometimes fatal, effects of mercury exposure at high levels were primarily reported as case studies. The disasters in Minamata, Japan, in the 1950s and in Iraq in 1971-1972 clearly demonstrated neurologic effects associated with ingestion of methylmercury both in adults and in infants exposed in utero. The effects were convincingly Associated with methylmercury ingestion, despite limitations of the study design. Several well-conducted studies have investigated the effects of methylmercury at levels below those in the Iraq incident but have not provided clear evidence of an effect. The lower end of the dose-response curve constructed from the Iraq data therefore still needs to be confirmed. The studies of mercury exposure in the workplace were mainly of elemental or inorganic mercury, and effects that were observed at relatively low exposure levels were primarily neurologic and renal. Several studies have investigated effects associated with dental amalgam but have been rated as inconclusive because of methodologic deficiencies. In our overall evaluation, 29 of 110 occupational studies and 20 of 54 studies where exposure occurred in the natural environment provided at least suggestive evidence of an exposure-related effect. 259 refs., 4 tabs.

Ratcliffe, H.E.; Swanson, G.M.; Fischer, L.J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

1996-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

69

Exposure information in environmental health research: Current opportunities and future directions for particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

urban analysis of air pollution health effects, remainsderived from community air pollution health studies. Recentused to link them, in air pollution health studies including

McKone, Thomas E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

260 Volume 80THE QUARTERLY REVIEW OF BIOLOGY Climate Change and Human Health: Risks and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

negative impacts of global warming on human health by decreasing our use of fossil fuels. Specifically to the air by the burning of fossil fuels, and that such harm will only intensify in the future. How260 Volume 80THE QUARTERLY REVIEW OF BIOLOGY Climate Change and Human Health: Risks and Responses

Gotelli, Nicholas J.

71

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Dose Response · Building in vitro Models for Environmental Research · Early Life Determinants the life course and beyond, to future generations. Advancing our understanding of the environmental impacts of Air Pollution on Human Health · Water Pollution and Human Health · Multiple Exposures, Mixtures

Rau, Don C.

72

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-outcome relationships. Elizabeth Farmer Associate Professor Health Policy & Administration Email Address: emf13@psu.edu Research Interests Children's mental health services, effectiveness of mental health interventions, mental health in life course trajectories, community-based services for youth, role of schools in children

Yener, Aylin

73

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Elizabeth Farmer Associate Professor Health Policy & Administration Email Address: emf13@psu.edu Research Interests Children's mental health services, effectiveness of mental health interventions, mental health in life course trajectories, community-based services for youth, role of schools in children's mental

Yener, Aylin

74

Extreme weather-water-food linkage: Impact on human health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(poor sanitation and hygiene) SOURCE: WHO WORLD HEALTH REPORT 2002 J. Lee. Understanding Climate Change

Howat, Ian M.

75

U.S. Department of Health And Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is a dangerous situation that can bring on health emergencies in susceptible people, such as those withoutU.S. Department of Health And Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention #12;For more information on cold weather conditions and health, please contact: Centers for Disease Control

Khan, Javed I.

76

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. We receive many benefits from the oceans from seafood, recreation and transportation industriesNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative (OHHI) is taking a new look at how the health of our ocean impacts our own health and well- being, and in turn how

77

Toxic Pollution Prevention Act (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the purpose of this Act to reduce the disposal and release of toxic substances which may have adverse and serious health and environmental effects, to promote toxic pollution prevention as...

78

Effects of Lifestyle and Toxicants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A vast number of toxic chemicals encountered at the work place, in the environment or related to lifestyle have the potential to impair male reproductive health. The list of known male reproductive toxicants i...

J. P. Bonde

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Arsenic and selenium toxicity and their interactive effects in humans Hong-Jie Sun a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210046, China b Horticultural Sciences Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, United States c Suzhou Health College, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215000, China d Soil and Water Science Department, University

Ma, Lena

80

Human Reliability Program (HRP) - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program Medical Exam Scheduling Medical...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Lead (Pb) in sheep exposed to mining pollution: Implications for animal and human health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Livestock from the ancient mining area of Sierra Madrona and Alcudia Valley (Spain) is exposed to elevated levels of lead (Pb), as previous studies based on blood monitoring have revealed. Here we have studied blood, liver and muscle Pb levels in sheep in order to know if Pb exposure could represent a risk for human consumers of the meat and offal of these animals. A cross-sectional study was conducted with ?4 years old (adults) ewes from the mining area (n=46) and a control area (n=21). Blood samples were taken before the sacrifice at the slaughterhouse, and liver and muscle samples were taken thereafter. At the same time, 2–3 year old rams (subadults, n=17) were blood sampled in the mining area. Blood, liver and muscle Pb levels were higher in the mining than in the control area. Blood Pb concentration in the mining area (n= 44, mean: 6.7 ?g/dl in ewes and 10.9 ?g/dl in rams) was above background levels (>6 ?g/dl) in 73.3 percent of animals. Liver Pb concentration in 68 percent of sheep from the mining area (n=32, mean: 6.16 ?g/g dry weight, d.w.) exceeded the minimum level associated with toxic exposure (5 µg/g d.w.) and 87.5 percent of liver samples were above European Union Maximum Residue Levels (MRL) established for offal destined for human consumption (0.5 µg/g w.w.~1.4 µg/g d.w.). On the contrary, none of the muscle samples in ewes exceeded the EU MRL (0.1 µg/g w.w.~0.34 µg/g d.w.) established for meat, which may be related to the decline of blood Pb levels with age observed in the present study. These results suggest a potential health effect for sheep exposed to Pb pollution in this area and implications for food safety, but further research with lamb meat may be necessary to refine the risk assessment for human consumers.

Jennifer Pareja-Carrera; Rafael Mateo; Jaime Rodríguez-Estival

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Real and Theoretical Threats to Human Health Posed by the Epidemic of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter discusses the question of whether or not food, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics derived from animal tissues may pose a danger to human health. More specifically, can any of these products transmit C...

Richard T. Johnson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The coastal environment and human health: microbial indicators, pathogens, sentinels and reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Innovative research relating oceans and human health is advancing our understanding of disease-causing organisms in coastal ecosystems. Novel techniques are elucidating the loading, transport and fate of pathogens in coastal ...

Stewart, Jill R.

84

How Can Research on Plants Contribute to Promoting Human Health?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...significantly, the World Health Organization...the increasing consumption of unhealthy foods...Recent increases in consumption of more energy-dense, nutrient-poor...clarithromycin. World J. Gastroenterol...Quercetin consumption delays, but does...

Cathie Martin; Eugenio Butelli; Katia Petroni; Chiara Tonelli

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

85

Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy August 28, 2010 August 2010 Memorandum of Understanding between HHS and DOE regarding the authorities, responsibilities and procedures to conduc mandated activities relating to the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000. This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) serves to set forth the authorities, responsibilities, and procedures by which the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct statutorily mandated activities required to assist with claims processing

86

To advance and share knowledge, discover solutions and promote opportunities in food and agriculture, bioenergy, health, the environment and human well-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and agriculture, bioenergy, health, the environment and human well- being. Vision: To lead in science, innovation

Sheridan, Jennifer

87

Tree and forest effects on air quality and human health in the United David J. Nowak a, *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tree and forest effects on air quality and human health in the United States David J. Nowak a 26 May 2014 Available online xxx Keywords: Air pollution removal Air quality Ecosystem services Human and value of the effects of trees and forests on air quality and human health across the United States

88

Energy and Human Health Kirk R. Smith,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved Keywords coal, air pollution, biomass fuel, petroleum, nuclear energy accrue to the harvesting and burning of solid fuels, coal and biomass, mainly in the form of occupational health risks and household and general ambient air pollution. Lack of access to clean fuels

Mauzerall, Denise

89

Geography and physical and social environments have important implications for human health and health care. This course will explore the intersections among geography, environments and public health, with an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geography and physical and social environments have important implications for human health and health care. This course will explore the intersections among geography, environments and public health, with an emphasis on geographical analysis approaches for health data, to address two key questions: (1) How can

90

Arsenic species in raw and cooked rice: Implications for human health in rural Bengal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study compares the concentrations of total and different species of arsenic (As) in 29 pairs of raw and cooked rice samples collected from households in an area of West Bengal affected by endemic arsenicism. The aim is to investigate the effects of indigenous cooking practice of the rural villagers on As accumulation and speciation in cooked rice. It is found that inorganic As is the predominant species in both raw (93.8%) and cooked rice (88.1%). Cooking of rice with water low in As (health threat (in terms of chronic As toxicity) to the study population.

Dipti Halder; Ashis Biswas; Zdenka Šlejkovec; Debashis Chatterjee; Jerome Nriagu; Gunnar Jacks; Prosun Bhattacharya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Human health risk implications of multiple sources of faecal indicator bacteria in a recreational waterbody  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We simulate the influence of multiple sources of enterococci (ENT) as faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in recreational water bodies on potential human health risk by considering waters impacted by human and animal sources, human and non-pathogenic sources, and animal and non-pathogenic sources. We illustrate that risks vary with the proportion of culturable ENT in water bodies derived from these sources and estimate corresponding ENT densities that yield the same level of health protection that the recreational water quality criteria in the United States seeks (benchmark risk). The benchmark risk is based on epidemiological studies conducted in water bodies predominantly impacted by human faecal sources. The key result is that the risks from mixed sources are driven predominantly by the proportion of the contamination source with the greatest ability to cause human infection (potency), not necessarily the greatest source(s) of FIB. Predicted risks from exposures to mixtures comprised of approximately 30% ENT from human sources were up to 50% lower than the risks expected from purely human sources when contamination is recent and ENT levels are at the current water quality criteria levels (35 CFU 100 mL-1). For human/non-pathogenic, human/gull, human/pig, and human/chicken faecal mixtures with relatively low human contribution, the predicted culturable enterococci densities that correspond to the benchmark risk are substantially greater than the current water quality criteria values. These findings are important because they highlight the potential applicability of site specific water quality criteria for waters that are predominantly un-impacted by human sources.

Jeffrey A. Soller; Mary E. Schoen; Arun Varghese; Audrey M. Ichida; Alexandria B. Boehm; Sorina Eftim; Nicholas J. Ashbolt; John E. Ravenscroft

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Quantifying the health and economic impacts of mercury : an integrated assessment approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury is a toxic pollutant that endangers human and ecosystem health. Especially potent in the form of methyl mercury, exposure is known to lead to adverse neurological effects, and, a growing body of evidence suggests, ...

Giang, Amanda (Amanda Chi Wen)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Regional Characterization of Freshwater Use in LCA: Modeling Direct Impacts on Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Regional Characterization of Freshwater Use in LCA: Modeling Direct Impacts on Human Health ... Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a methodology that quantifies potential environmental impacts for comparative purposes in a decision-making context. ... While potential environmental impacts from pollutant emissions into water are characterized in LCA, impacts from water unavailability are not yet fully quantified. ...

Anne-Marie Boulay; Cécile Bulle; Jean-Baptiste Bayart; Louise Deschęnes; Manuele Margni

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

94

Essays on econometric modeling of subjective perceptions of risks in environment and human health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large body of literature studies the issues of the option price and other ex-ante welfare measures under the microeconomic theory to valuate reductions of risks inherent in environment and human health. However, it does not offer a careful...

Nguyen, To Ngoc

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

SUSTAINABILITY PRINCIPLES Harvard University is committed to developing and maintaining an environment that enhances human health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;SUSTAINABILITY PRINCIPLES Harvard University is committed to developing and maintaining species. · · · Developing planning tools to enable comparative analysis of sustainability implications an environment that enhances human health and fosters a transition toward sustainability. Sustainability should

Paulsson, Johan

96

Benzo(C)fluorine, PAH with possible human health implications. (To BAP or  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benzo(C)fluorine, PAH with possible human health implications. (To BAP or Benzo(C)fluorine, PAH with possible human health implications. (To BAP or not to BAP) Speaker(s): Larry Goldstein Date: November 7, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants with potential health consequences. Essentially all the cancer risk from exposure to coal tar, cigarette smoke and other products of incomplete combustion is thought to reflect the contributions of PAHs with 4 or more fused rings. In risk assessment as currently practiced the major contributor to overall risk is the 5-ring PAH benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P).However, recent studies using a lifetime feeding protocol indicate that B(a)P does not meet criteria for application to risk assessment since it does not induce lung tumors, the endpoint upon which risk assessments

97

Communications Assistant The College of Health and Human Sciences Dean's Office is seeking a dynamic individual to help us get  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Communications Assistant The College of Health and Human Sciences Dean's Office is seeking for various College and unit publications. Photography: Take photos with the office camera at College events of Communications College of Health and Human Sciences 226 L. L. Gibbons Building (970) 491-5182 | gretchen

98

Wildlife toxicity extrapolations: NOAEL versus LOAEL  

SciTech Connect

Ecotoxicological assessments must rely on the extrapolation of toxicity data from a few indicator species to many species of concern. Data are available from laboratory studies (e.g., quail, mallards, rainbow trout, fathead minnow) and some planned or serendipitous field studies of a broader, but by no means comprehensive, suite of species. Yet all ecological risk assessments begin with an estimate of risk based on information gleaned from the literature. One is then confronted with the necessity of extrapolating toxicity information from a limited number of indicator species to all organisms of interest. This is a particularly acute problem when trying to estimate hazards to wildlife in terrestrial systems as there is an extreme paucity of data for most chemicals in all but a handful of species. This section continues the debate by six panelists of the ``correct`` approach for determining wildlife toxicity thresholds by debating which toxicity value should be used for setting threshold criteria. Should the lowest observable effect level (LOAEL) be used or is it more appropriate to use the no observable effect level (NOAEL)? What are the short-comings of using either of these point estimates? Should a ``benchmark`` approach, similar to that proposed for human health risk assessments, be used instead, where an EC{sub 5} or EC{sub 10} and associated confidence limits are determined and then divided by a safety factor? How should knowledge of the slope of the dose-response curve be incorporated into determination of toxicity threshold values?

Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Berg, M. van den [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands). Research Inst. of Toxicology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Nanomaterials and nanoparticles: Sources and toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review is presented as a common foundation for scientists interested in nanoparticles their origin activity and biological toxicity. It is written with the goal of rationalizing and informing public health concerns related to this sometimes-strange new science of “nano ” while raising awareness of nanomaterials’ toxicity among scientists and manufacturers handling them. We show that humans have always been exposed to tiny particles via dust storms volcanic ash and other natural processes and that our bodily systems are well adapted to protect us from these potentially harmful intruders. The reticuloendothelial system in particular actively neutralizes and eliminates foreign matter in the body including viruses and nonbiological particles. Particles originating from human activities have existed for millennia e.g. smoke from combustion and lint from garments but the recent development of industry and combustion-based engine transportation has profoundly increased anthropogenic particulate pollution. Significantly technological advancement has also changed the character of particulate pollution increasing the proportion of nanometer-sized particles-“nanoparticles”-and expanding the variety of chemical compositions. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a strong correlation between particulate air pollution levels respiratory and cardiovascular diseases various cancers and mortality. Adverse effects of nanoparticles on human health depend on individual factors such as genetics and existing disease as well as exposure and nanoparticle chemistry size shape agglomeration state and electromagnetic properties. Animal and human studies show that inhaled nanoparticles are less efficiently removed than larger particles by the macrophage clearance mechanisms in the lungs causing lung damage and that nanoparticles can translocate through the circulatory lymphatic and nervous systems to many tissues and organs including the brain. The key to understanding the toxicity of nanoparticles is that their minute size smaller than cells and cellular organelles allows them to penetrate these basic biological structures disrupting their normal function. Examples of toxic effects include tissue inflammation and altered cellular redox balance toward oxidation causing abnormal function or cell death. The manipulation of matter at the scale of atoms “nanotechnology ” is creating many new materials with characteristics not always easily predicted from current knowledge. Within the nearly limitless diversity of these materials some happen to be toxic to biological systems others are relatively benign while others confer health benefits. Some of these materials have desirable characteristics for industrial applications as nanostructured materials often exhibit beneficial properties from UV absorbance in sunscreen to oil-less lubrication of motors. A rational science-based approach is needed to minimize harm caused by these materials while supporting continued study and appropriate industrial development. As current knowledge of the toxicology of “bulk” materials may not suffice in reliably predicting toxic forms of nanoparticles ongoing and expanded study of “nanotoxicity” will be necessary. For nanotechnologies with clearly associated health risks intelligent design of materials and devices is needed to derive the benefits of these new technologies while limiting adverse health impacts. Human exposure to toxic nanoparticles can be reduced through identifying creation-exposure pathways of toxins a study that may someday soon unravel the mysteries of diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. Reduction in fossil fuel combustion would have a large impact on global human exposure to nanoparticles as would limiting deforestation and desertification. While nanotoxicity is a relatively new concept to science this review reveals the result of life’s long history of evolution in the presence of nanoparticles and how the human body in particular has adapted to defend itself against nanoparticulate intruders.

Cristina Buzea; Ivan I. Pacheco; Kevin Robbie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Illustrative assessment of human health issues arising from the potential release of  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many countries have a programme for developing an underground geological disposal facility for radioactive waste. A case study is provided herein on the illustrative assessment of human health issues arising from the potential release of chemotoxic and radioactive substances from a generic geological disposal facility (GDF) for radioactive waste. The illustrative assessment uses a source–pathway–receptor methodology and considers a number of human exposure pathways. Estimated exposures are compared with authoritative toxicological assessment criteria. The possibility of additive and synergistic effects resulting from exposures to mixtures of chemical contaminants or a combination of radiotoxic and chemotoxic substances is considered. The case study provides an illustration of how to assess human health issues arising from chemotoxic species released from a GDF for radioactive waste and highlights potential difficulties associated with a lack of data being available with which to assess synergistic effects. It also highlights how such difficulties can be addressed.

James C Wilson; Michael C Thorne; George Towler; Simon Norris

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Human health risk assessment for off-shore media at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard  

SciTech Connect

A human health risk assessment for off-shore media was performed at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Kittery, Maine. The purpose was to determine whether any potential human health risks could be posed by exposures to the estuary. Included in the study were the evaluations of potential risks existing from human exposures to surface water and sediment, as well as potential risks posed by ingestion of various species of fish and shellfish which are caught commercially and recreationally in the estuary. Three species were chosen for study. They were lobsters, mussels, and flounder. The USEPA prescribed protocols for performing human health risk assessments under CERCLA and RCRA were followed to estimate risks associated with ingestion of these species caught in the lower estuary, in the vicinity of the Shipyard. USEPA required the evaluation of two potential seafood ingestion scenarios recreational fishermen and subsistence fishermen. The results indicated that the USEPA risk target of 10{sup {minus}6} for carcinogens or the hazard index of one was exceeded in at least one species for the subsistence ingestion scenario for some inorganics and organic compounds. Based on these results, it was necessary to propose Media Protection Standards in the biota, which would represent the USEPA target risk level for carcinogens and noncarcinogens, as potential cleanup targets. In performing this task, a review of regional background levels for these chemicals found in biota throughout the Great Bay Estuarine System, at locations removed from the Shipyard, was performed. Also examined were regional Maine data from the NOAA Mussel Watch Program. Biota concentrations near the Shipyard were found to be within the range of biota concentrations for most of these chemicals throughout the region, suggesting possible multiple, non-point sources for the contaminants found in seafood throughout the region.

Mahoney, E. [Eileen Mahoney Associates, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Overview: Using Mode of Action and Life Stage Information to Evaluate the Human Relevance of Animal Toxicity Data  

SciTech Connect

A complete mode of action human relevance analysis--as distinct from mode of action (MOA) analysis alone--depends on robust information on the animal MOA, as well as systematic comparison of the animal data with corresponding information from humans. In November 2003, the International Life Sciences Institute's Risk Science Institute (ILSI RSI) published a 2-year study using animal and human MOA information to generate a four-part Human Relevance Framework (HRF) for systematic and transparent analysis of MOA data and information. Based mainly on non-DNA-reactive carcinogens, the HRF features a ''concordance'' analysis of MOA information from both animal and human sources, with a focus on determining the appropriate role for each MOA data set in human risk assessment. With MOA information increasingly available for risk assessment purposes, this article illustrates the further applicability of the HRF for reproductive, developmental, neurologic, and renal endpoints, as well as cancer. Based on qualitative and quantitative MOA considerations, the MOA/human relevance analysis also contributes to identifying data needs and issues essential for the dose-response and exposure assessment steps in the overall risk assessment.

Seed, Jennifer; Carney, E W.; Corley, Rick A.; Crofton, Kevin M.; DeSesso, John M.; Foster, Paul M.; Kavlock, Robert; Kimmel, Gary; Klaunig, James E.; Meek, M E.; Preston, R J.; Slikker, William; Tabacova, Sonia; Williams, Gary M.; Wiltse, J; Zoeller, R T.; Fenner-Crisp, P; Patton, D E.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The functioning of natural ecosystems and the health of the human economy have been intrinsically linked since  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of its existence.With the development of the industrial revolution,massive increases in fossil-fuel use absolutely necessary for human existence (Costanza et al.1997,De Groot et al.2002), fossil-fuel use hasArticles The functioning of natural ecosystems and the health of the human economy have been

Hall, Charles A.S.

104

Increased European biofuel cultivation could harm human health1 by James Morgan for www.scienceomega.com2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased European biofuel cultivation could harm human health1 by James Morgan for www that the large-scale production of biofuels in4 Europe could result in increased human mortality and crop losses that many biofuel plant species, including poplar and willow, release more isoprene ­ an6 ozone precursor

South Bohemia, University of

105

Metal Toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Problems posed to plants by metal toxicity in the soils of the world are basically of two kinds. The first kind are of natural origin. These arise either as a consequence of the nature of the parent material f...

T. McNeilly

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A risk assessment software tool for evaluating potential risks to human health and the environment  

SciTech Connect

The Ecology and National Environmental Policy Act Division (END), is providing a sitewide evaluation of alternative strategies for the final disposition of the Rocky Flats Plant material inventory. This analysis is known as the Systems Engineering Analysis (SEA) for the Rocky Flats Plant. The primary intent of the SEA is to support the Rocky Flats Plant decision-making. As part of the SEA project, a risk assessment software tool has been developed which will assist in the analysis by providing an evaluation of potential risks to human health and the environment for the purpose of augmenting future decisions at the site.

Drendel, G. [ICF/Kaiser, Lakewood, CO (United States); Jones, M.; Shain, D. [EG & G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Allen, B.; Gentry, R.; Shipp, A.; Van Landingham, C. [ICF Kaiser, Ruston, LA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Testing for Toxic Algae By Tadd Barrow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing for Toxic Algae By Tadd Barrow UNL Extension Educator, Water Quality Algae is a microscopic plant that occurs in all water. However, only certain conditions bring algae to the surface, making it toxic to animals, especially humans and dogs. Toxic algae often are naturally occurring from high

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

108

Waste management programmatic environmental impact statement methodology for estimating human health risks  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has produced large quantities of radioactive and hazardous waste during years of nuclear weapons production. As a result, a large number of sites across the DOE Complex have become chemically and/or radiologically contaminated. In 1990, the Secretary of Energy charged the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM) with the task of preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS should identify and assess the potential environmental impacts of implementing several integrated Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) alternatives. The determination and integration of appropriate remediation activities and sound waste management practices is vital for ensuring the diminution of adverse human health impacts during site cleanup and waste management programs. This report documents the PEIS risk assessment methodology used to evaluate human health risks posed by WM activities. The methodology presents a programmatic cradle to grave risk assessment for EM program activities. A unit dose approach is used to estimate risks posed by WM activities and is the subject of this document.

Bergenback, B. [Midwest Technical, Inc. (United States); Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

UCRL-JC-1197l5 PREPRINT HUMAN HEALTH RISKS FROM TNT, RDX, and HMX  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

197l5 197l5 PREPRINT HUMAN HEALTH RISKS FROM TNT, RDX, and HMX IN ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA AND CONSIDERATION OF THE U.S. REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT Jeffrey I. Daniels John P. Knezovich This paper was pre ared for submittal to the Luxembourg, Luxembourg November 14-16,1994 Procee ap ings Demil '94 December 1994 Thisis apreprintof apaperintendedfor publicationin a journal orproceedings. Since changes may be made before publication, this preprint is made available with the understanding that it will not be cited or reproduced without the permission of the author. ~ T WSTRIBUTION OF THIS DOCUMENT tS UNLlMfTEa

110

On The Toxicity of Flame Retardants in Buildings and What Can Be Done About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On The Toxicity of Flame Retardants in Buildings and What Can Be Done About On The Toxicity of Flame Retardants in Buildings and What Can Be Done About It Speaker(s): Arlene Blum Date: November 3, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: William Fisk Polystyrene, polyisocyanurate, and polyurethane are insulation materials that increase energy efficiency and whose use in buildings, especially energy efficient buildings, is growing rapidly. At the same time, the flame retardants currently in use with these materials are often chemicals that are known to be toxic or have not been adequately evaluated for their impact on human health and the environment. For example, all polystyrene foam insulation used in buildings is treated with HBCD, a persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic flame retardant. The impacts of exposure to

111

Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment Work Plan Mud Pit Release Sites, Amchitka Island, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

This Work Plan describes the approach that will be used to conduct human health and ecological risk assessments for Amchitka Island, Alaska, which was utilized as an underground nuclear test site between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U.S. Department of Energy) conducted two nuclear tests (known as Long Shot and Milrow) and assisted the U.S. Department of Defense with a third test (known as Cannikin). Amchitka Island is approximately 42 miles long and located 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, in the western end of the Aleutian Island archipelago in a group of islands known as the Rat Islands. Historically including deep drilling operations required large volumes of drilling mud, a considerable amount of which was left on the island in exposed mud pits after testing was completed. Therefore, there is a need for drilling mud pit remediation and risk assessment of historical mud pit releases. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the constituents in soil, surface water, and sediment at these former testing sites. Its goal is the collection of data in sufficient quantity and quality to determine current site conditions, support a risk assessment for the site surfaces, and evaluate what further remedial action is required to achieve permanent closure of these three sites that will protect both human health and the environment. Suspected compounds of potential ecological concern for investigative analysis at these sites include diesel-range organics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, volatile organic compounds, and chromium. The results of these characterizations and risk assessments will be used to evaluate corrective action alternatives to include no further action, the implementation of institutional controls, capping on site, or off-sit e disposal of contaminated waste. The results of this evaluation will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

DOE /NV

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

112

Co-benefits of mitigating global greenhouse gas emissions for future air quality and human health  

SciTech Connect

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions also influences air quality. We simulate the co-benefits of global GHG reductions on air quality and human health via two mechanisms: a) reducing co-emitted air pollutants, and b) slowing climate change and its effect on air quality. Relative to a reference scenario, global GHG mitigation in the RCP4.5 scenario avoids 0.5±0.2, 1.3±0.6, and 2.2±1.6 million premature deaths in 2030, 2050, and 2100, from changes in fine particulate matter and ozone. Global average marginal co-benefits of avoided mortality are $40-400 (ton CO2)-1, exceeding marginal abatement costs in 2030 and 2050, and within the low range of costs in 2100. East Asian co-benefits are 10-80 times the marginal cost in 2030. These results indicate that transitioning to a low-carbon future might be justified by air quality and health co-benefits.

West, Jason; Smith, Steven J.; Silva, Raquel; Naik, Vaishali; Zhang, Yuqiang; Adelman, Zacariah; Fry, Meridith M.; Anenberg, Susan C.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Space Science Technology Health General Sci-fi & Gaming Oddities International Business Politics Education Entertainment Sports Electronic Nose Sniffs Out Toxic Gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at concentrations known to be immediately dangerous to life or health were included. The laboratory studies usedSpace Science Technology Health General Sci-fi & Gaming Oddities International Business Politics serious health risks in the workplace or through accidental exposure. "Our device is simply a digital

Suslick, Kenneth S.

114

Abstract--Accurate recognition of air pollutants and estimation of their concentrations are critical for human health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exposure to air pollutions has a serious effect on the health of humans and has become the leading cause Abstract--Accurate recognition of air pollutants and estimation of their concentrations of relevant gases. However, because there are several air pollutants that need to be monitored simultaneously

Mason, Andrew

115

Human health impacts for Renewable Energy scenarios from the EnerGEO Platform of Integrated Assessment (PIA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of renewable energy, affect concentrations of air pollutants and as a consequence affect human health. PM2.5 concentra- tions were estimated with the IIASA Greenhouse Gas and Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies). 1 Observation, Impacts, Energy Center, MINES ParisTech, Sophia Antipolis, France, mireille.lefevre@mines

Boyer, Edmond

116

Biomedical Optics Laser Laboratory The lab's objective is to improve human health through research and education in Biomedical Optics, a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomedical Optics Laser Laboratory The lab's objective is to improve human health through research and education in Biomedical Optics, a multidisciplinary field incorporating elements of the physical and life in Biomedical Optics involves developing and applying methods of optical science and engineering

Kamat, Vineet R.

117

Combustion & Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH Winifred J. Hamilton, PhD, SM Clear Air Through Energy Efficiency (CATEE) Galveston, TX October 9?11, 2012 FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH FFCOMBUSTION: THE THREAT ? Biggest threat to world ecosystems (and to human health...) ? Combustion of fossil fuels for ? Electricity ? Industrial processes ? Vehicle propulsion ? Cooking and heat ? Other ? Munitions ? Fireworks ? Light ? Cigarettes, hookahs? FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH FFCOMBUSTION: THE THREAT ? SCALE (think health...

Hamilton, W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

ANDERSON, DONALD M. Bloom dynamics of toxic Alexandrium ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

icity becomes dangerous. This is a particularly important feature, as the toxicity of ..... for certain marine biotoxins. Mass. Dep. Public Health. Final. Rep. 140 p.

119

E-waste vis-ŕ-vis human health and environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The social, economic and technological growth of a developing society has resulted in rapid product obsolescence which in turn has become a new environmental challenge - i.e., 'electronics waste' (e-waste). Electronic waste has not been a problem as long as there were a few computers or other electronic devices on earth. With the increasing use of computers/electronic devices, our planet has become a dump house for electronic wastes. Electronic products often contain hazardous materials that lead to environmental degradation when they are destroyed. It is an emerging problem given the volumes of e-waste being generated. E-waste, particularly, computer waste has complicated the immense task of solid waste management, with the developed countries dumping their outdated electronic products in developing countries as one of their e-waste management techniques. This paper highlights the damaging impact of e-waste on environment and human health as well as various approaches to deal with it, in the light of initiatives in developing countries. It broadly discusses the composition, criticality and control of e-waste in developing countries, particularly in India.

Adarsh Garg; Neena Singla

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Contact the College of Human and Health Sciences for more information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, doctors and other health and social care practitioners. This part-time provision extends to postgraduate be applied retrospectively to existing modules and programmes u Work closely with health and social care providers and professional bodies u Engage with employers across the health and social care, social policy

Martin, Ralph R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Human health-risk assessment for municipal-sludge disposal: benefits of alternative regulatory options. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses numerical criteria for the reuse and disposal of municipal sewage sludge and evaluates reductions in human health risks or benefits derived from controlling sludge-disposal practices. Quantitative aggregate risk estimates are projected for 31 contaminants for each of the key sludge-management practices: incineration; monofilling; land application (food chain and non-food chain); and distribution and marketing. The study utilizes state-of-the-art fate, transport, and exposure methodologies in predicting environmental concentrations. The analysis evaluates a number of human-exposure routes including dietary, drinking water, and inhalation pathways. The analysis couples this information with national and local populations exposed along with the Agency's most recent health-effects data in assessing risks. A methodology for quantitatively assessing non-carcinogenic effects from exposure to lead is introduced.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Deep Atomic Binding (DAB) Approach in Interpretation of Fission Products Behavior in Human Body, and Health Consequences  

SciTech Connect

According to models used to predict health effects of fission products enter the human body, a large number of fatalities, malignancies, thyroid cancer, born (genetic) defects,...etc.. But the actual data after Chernobyl and TMI accidents, and nuclear detonations in USA and Marshal Islands, were not consistent with these models. According to DAB, these data could be interpreted, and conflicts between former models predictions and actual field data explained. (author)

Ajlouni, Abdul-Wali M.S. [Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Amman 11814 (Jordan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

A Probabilistic Approach for Deriving Acceptable Human Intake Limits and Human Health Risks from Toxicological Studies: General Framework  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of uncertainty factors in the standard method for deriving acceptable intake or exposure limits for humans, such as the Reference Dose (RfD), may be viewed as a conservative method of taking various un...

W. Slob; M. N. Pieters

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Health Impacts Research - Emissions & Emission Controls - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Impacts Research Health Impacts Research Another aspect of the emissions research at ORNL focuses on Health Impacts. This effort concentrates on analyzing exhaust for Mobile Source Air Toxics (MSATs) or other unregulated exhaust species that have the potential to harm human health. MSATs are a group of chemical species defined by the U.S. EPA that may pose risk to humans; formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, 1,3-butadiene, benzene, and toluene are some example species. Engines operated with new combustion modes and alternative fuels are studied for MSAT emissions to determine insure that the advanced technologies being developed pose no additional risk to humans. A large part of the Health Impacts research effort at ORNL focuses on particulate matter (PM) which is also defined as an MSAT by the U.S. EPA.

125

Progress in Understanding the Toxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Exhaust Emissions  

SciTech Connect

To help guide heavy vehicle engine, fuel, and exhaust after-treatment technology development, the U.S. Department of Energy and the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute are conducting research not addressed elsewhere on aspects of the toxicity of particulate engine emissions. Advances in these technologies that reduce diesel particulate mass emissions may result in changes in particle composition, and there is concern that the number of ultrafine (<0.1 micron) particles may increase. All present epidemiological and laboratory data on the toxicity of diesel emissions were derived from emissions of older-technology engines. New, short-term toxicity data are needed to make health-based choices among diesel technologies and to compare the toxicity of diesel emissions to those of other engine technologies. This research program has two facets: (1) development and use of short-term in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays for comparing the toxicities of gasoline and diesel exhaust emissions; and (2) determination of the disposition of inhaled ultrafine particles deposited in the lung. Responses of cultured cells, cultured lung slices, and rodent lungs to various types of particles were compared to develop an improved short-term toxicity screening capability. To date, chemical toxicity indicators of cultured human A549 cells and early inflammatory and cytotoxic indicators of rat lungs have given the best distinguishing capability. A study is now underway to determine the relative toxicities of exhaust samples from in-use diesel and gasoline engines. The samples are being collected under the direction of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory with support from DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. The ability to generate solid ultrafine particles and to trace their movement in the body as particles and soluble material was developed. Data from rodents suggest that ultrafine particles can move from the lung to the liver in particulate form. The quantitative disposition of inhaled ultrafine particles will be determined in rodents and nonhuman primates.

Kristen J. Nikula; Gregory L. Finch; Richard A. Westhouse; JeanClare Seagrave; Joe L. Mauderly; Doughlas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

126

Submitted to: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 The Department of Veterans'Affairs Persian Gulf Health Registry and the Department of Defense-2510 File Contains Data for PostScript Printers Only Background Document on Gulf War-Related Research for The Health Impact of Chemical Exposures During the Gulf War: A Research Planning Conference February 28

127

Atmospheric Movement of Microorganisms in Clouds of Desert Dust and Implications for Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...A. Centeno. 2005. Health effects of natural dust-role of trace elements and compounds...enumeration of heterotrophic bacteria in natural mineral water. World J. Microbiol...coccidioidomycosis following a severe natural dust storm. An outbreak at the Naval...

Dale W. Griffin

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

MICROBES AND HUMAN HEALTH SCIENCE MEETS TROLLS FIGHTING SEPTIC SHOCK College of Agricultural & Life Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

food systems · environment · health · bioenergy grow Wisconsin cheesemakers get creative in meeting and grow that demand by developing varieties for specialized and global markets. By Bob MitchellBy Bob

Balser, Teri C.

129

Phthalates and other additives in plastics: human exposure and associated health outcomes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...medical applications, and can prevent electronics and other household items from starting or spreading fires (see Andrady Neal...were primarily Caucasian (77 per cent) with 13 per cent Hispanic/Latina, and 89 per cent reported having health insurance...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Animals as sentinels of environmental health hazards  

SciTech Connect

The Committee on Animals as Monitors of Environmental Hazards was formed when the Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry requested that the National Academy of Sciences gather an NRC committee to review and evaluate the usefulness of animal epidemiologic studies for human risk assessment and recommend the types of data that should be collected. With specific questions in mind, the committee attempted to determine how animals could be used for ecological and human health risk determinations as well as to provide an early-warning system for risk assessment and management.

Glickman, L.T.; Fairbrother, A.; Guarino, A.M.; Bergman, H.L.; Buck, W.B.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

UCRL-JC-1197l5 PREPRINT HUMAN HEALTH RISKS FROM TNT, RDX, and...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Protection Agency (USEPA) (1990), "40 CFR Part 300: National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan Final Rule," Fed Regist. 5 5 ( 4 6 ) , 8666-8865. 8 HUMAN...

132

Model of medical supply demand and astronaut health for long-duration human space flight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The medical care of space crews is the primary limiting factor in the achievement of long-duration space missions. (Nicogossian 2003) The goal of this thesis was to develop a model of long-duration human space flight ...

Assad, Albert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Environmental Health Perspectives volume 121 | number 1 | January 2013 23 Human variability underlies differences in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Schadt and Björkegren 2012). In addition to genetic differences, omics stud ies have examined the impact personalized medicine and environmental health protection (Khoury et al. 2011). In this review, we explore how The "sourcetooutcome continuum" [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 2007; NRC 2007] is a conceptual frame work

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

134

Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety, therefore generating high  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, electronics, and data analysis algorithms. Electrochemical sensors featuring ionic liquids were chosen can be found in underground coal mines [2]. To improve scientific understanding of the health impacts utilize ionic liquid interfaces for low-power room-temperature operation with low maintenance requirements

Mason, Andrew

135

Phytoremediation of Heavy Metal Toxicity and Role of soil in Rhizobacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract- Our surrounding is filled up with a large number of toxicants in different forms. They contaminate our water, land and atmosphere where we live. Heavy metal pollution of soil is a significant environmental problem and has its negative impact on human health and agriculture. Rhizosphere, as an important interface of soil and plant, plays a significant role in phytoremediation of contaminated soil by heavy metals, in which, microbial populations are known to affect heavy metal mobility and availability to the plant through release of chelating agents, acidification, phosphate solubilization and redox changes. Phytoremediation of toxic heavy metals could be carried out by using specific metallophytes. Green plants are the lungs of nature with unique ability to purifying impure air by photosynthesis and remove or minimize heavy metals toxicity from soil and water ecosystem by absorption, accumulation and biotransformation process. This article paper reviews some recent advances in effect and significance of rhizobacteria in phytoremediation of heavy metal toxicity in contaminated soils. There is also a need to improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the transfer and mobilization of heavy metals by rhizobacteria and to conduct research on the selection of microbial isolates from Rhizosphere of plants growing metal contaminated soils for specific restoration programmes. Index Terms- Environmental, heavy metal toxicity,

Rajendra Prasad Bharti; Abhilasha Shri Vastava; Kishor Soni; Asha Tiwari; Shivbhanu More

136

Lessons learned: Needs for improving human health risk assessment at USDOE Sites  

SciTech Connect

Realistic health risk assessments were performed in a pilot study of three U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites. These assessments, covering a broad spectrum of data and methods, were used to identify needs for improving future health risk assessments at USDOE sites. Topics receiving specific recommendations for additional research include: choice of distributions for Monte Carlo simulation; estimation of risk reduction; analysis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Database on food and nutrient intakes; investigations on effects of food processing on contaminant levels; background food and environmental concentrations of contaminants; method for handling exposures to groundwater plumes, methods for analyzing less than lifetime exposure to carcinogens; and improvement of bioaccumulation factors.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Report on the Human Genome Initiative for the Office of Health and Environmental Research  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The report urges DOE and the Nation to commit to a large, multi-year, multidisciplinary, technological undertaking to order and sequence the human genome. This effort will first require significant innovation in general capability to manipulate DNA, major new analytical methods for ordering and sequencing, theoretical developments in computer science and mathematical biology, and great expansions in our ability to store and manipulate the information and to interface it with other large and diverse genetic databases. The actual ordering and sequencing involves the coordinated processing of some 3 billion bases from a reference human genome. Science is poised on the rudimentary edge of being able to read and understand human genes. A concerted, broadly based, scientific effort to provide new methods of sufficient power and scale should transform this activity from an inefficient one-gene-at-a-time, single laboratory effort into a coordinated, worldwide, comprehensive reading of "the book of man". The effort will be extraordinary in scope and magnitude, but so will be the benefit to biological understanding, new technology and the diagnosis and treatment of human disease.

Tinoco, I.; Cahill, G.; Cantor, C.; Caskey, T.; Dulbecco, R.; Engelhardt, D. L.; Hood, L.; Lerman, L. S.; Mendelsohn, M. L.; Sinsheimer, R. L.; Smith, T.; Soll, D.; Stormo, G.; White, R. L.

1987-04-00T23:59:59.000Z

138

Memorandum of Understanding Between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES AND THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY I. INTRODUCTION This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) serves to set forth the authorities, responsibilities, and procedures by which the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct statutorily mandated activities required to assist with claims processing under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (EEOICP A). EEOICP A provides for timely, uniform, and adequate compensation of covered employees and, where applicable, survivors of such employees suffering from illnesses incurred by such employees in the performance of duty. HHS and DOE will make every effort to ensure that activities conducted under this MOU, as

139

Long-term fate of depleted uranium at Aberdeen and Yuma Proving Grounds: Human health and ecological risk assessments  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate and long-term consequences of depleted uranium (DU) in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) and Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) for the Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) of the US Army. Specifically, we examined the potential for adverse radiological and toxicological effects to humans and ecosystems caused by exposure to DU at both installations. We developed contaminant transport models of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at APG and terrestrial ecosystems at YPG to assess potential adverse effects from DU exposure. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of the initial models showed the portions of the models that most influenced predicted DU concentrations, and the results of the sensitivity analyses were fundamental tools in designing field sampling campaigns at both installations. Results of uranium (U) isotope analyses of field samples provided data to evaluate the source of U in the environment and the toxicological and radiological doses to different ecosystem components and to humans. Probabilistic doses were estimated from the field data, and DU was identified in several components of the food chain at APG and YPG. Dose estimates from APG data indicated that U or DU uptake was insufficient to cause adverse toxicological or radiological effects. Dose estimates from YPG data indicated that U or DU uptake is insufficient to cause radiological effects in ecosystem components or in humans, but toxicological effects in small mammals (e.g., kangaroo rats and pocket mice) may occur from U or DU ingestion. The results of this study were used to modify environmental radiation monitoring plans at APG and YPG to ensure collection of adequate data for ongoing ecological and human health risk assessments.

Ebinger, M.H.; Beckman, R.J.; Myers, O.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kennedy, P.L.; Clements, W.; Bestgen, H.T. [Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Including Pathogen Risk in Life Cycle Assessment of Wastewater Management. 2. Quantitative Comparison of Pathogen Risk to Other Impacts on Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of the presented study was to include pathogen risks to human health in life cycle assessment (LCA) of wastewater and sludge management systems, as this is commonly omitted from LCAs due to methodological limitations. ... Part 1 of this article series estimated the overall pathogen risk for such a system with agricultural use of the sludge, in a way that enables the results to be integrated in LCA. ... This article (part 2) presents a full LCA for two model systems (with agricultural utilization or incineration of sludge) to reveal the relative importance of pathogen risk in relation to other potential impacts on human health. ...

Sara Heimersson; Robin Harder; Gregory M. Peters; Magdalena Svanström

2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I-Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C, Risk C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/004 Publication 9285.7-01 C December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper NOTICE The policies set out in [his document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

142

Radiological accidents potentially important to human health risk in the U.S. Department of Energy waste management program  

SciTech Connect

Human health risks as a consequence of potential radiological releases resulting from plausible accident scenarios constitute an important consideration in the US Department of Energy (DOE) national program to manage the treatment, storage, and disposal of wastes. As part of this program, the Office of Environmental Management (EM) is currently preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) that evaluates the risks that could result from managing five different waste types. This paper (1) briefly reviews the overall approach used to assess process and facility accidents for the EM PEIS; (2) summarizes the key inventory, storage, and treatment characteristics of the various DOE waste types important to the selection of accidents; (3) discusses in detail the key assumptions in modeling risk-dominant accidents; and (4) relates comparative source term results and sensitivities.

Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Nabelssi, B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Jackson, R. [Science Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

DOE contractor's meeting on chemical toxicity  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) is required to determine the potential health and environmental effects associated with energy production and use. To ensure appropriate communication among investigators and scientific disciplines that these research studies represent, OHER has sponsored workshops. This document provides a compilation of activities at the Third Annual DOE/OHER Workshop. This year's workshop was broadened to include all OHER activities identified as within the chemical effects area. The workshop consisted of eight sessions entitled Isolation and Detection of Toxic chemicals; Adduct Formation and Repair; Chemical Toxicity (Posters); Metabolism and Genotoxicity; Inhalation Toxicology; Gene Regulation; Metals Toxicity; and Biological Mechanisms. This document contains abstracts of the information presented by session.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Depleted uranium contamination by inhalation exposure and its detection after ? 20 years: Implications for human health assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inhaled depleted uranium (DU) aerosols are recognised as a distinct human health hazard and DU has been suggested to be responsible in part for illness in both military and civilian populations that may have been exposed. This study aimed to develop and use a testing procedure capable of detecting an individual's historic milligram-quantity aerosol exposure to DU up to 20 years after the event. This method was applied to individuals associated with or living proximal to a DU munitions plant in Colonie New York that were likely to have had a significant DU aerosol inhalation exposure, in order to improve DU-exposure screening reliability and gain insight into the residence time of DU in humans. We show using sensitive mass spectrometric techniques that when exposure to aerosol has been unambiguous and in sufficient quantity, urinary excretion of DU can be detected more than 20 years after primary DU inhalation contamination ceased, even when DU constitutes only ? 1% of the total excreted uranium. It seems reasonable to conclude that a chronically DU-exposed population exists within the contamination ‘footprint’ of the munitions plant in Colonie, New York. The method allows even a modest DU exposure to be identified where other less sensitive methods would have failed entirely. This should allow better assessment of historical exposure incidence than currently exists.

Randall R. Parrish; Matthew Horstwood; John G. Arnason; Simon Chenery; Tim Brewer; Nicholas S. Lloyd; David O. Carpenter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Dose-Rate Dependence of High-Dose Health Effects in Humans from Photon Radiation with Application to Radiological Terrorism  

SciTech Connect

In 1981, as part of a symposium entitled ''The Control of Exposure of the Public to Ionizing Radiation in the Event of Accident or Attack,'' Lushbaugh, H?bner, and Fry published a paper examining ''radiation tolerance'' of various human health endpoints as a function of dose rate. This paper may not have received the notice it warrants. The health endpoints examined by Lushbaugh et al. were the lethal dose that will kill 50% of people within 60 days of exposure without medical care (LD50/60); severe bone marrow damage in healthy men; severe bone marrow damage in leukemia patients; temporary sterility (azoospermia); reduced male fertility; and late effects such as cancer. Their analysis was grounded in extensive clinical experience and anchored to a few selected data points, and based on the 1968 dose-rate dependence theory of J.L. Bateman. The Lushbaugh et al. paper did not give predictive equations for the relationships, although they were implied in the text, and the relationships were presented in a non-intuitive way. This work derives the parameters needed in Bateman's equation for each health endpoint, tabulates the results, and plots them in a more conventional manner on logarithmic scales. The results give a quantitative indication of how the human organism can tolerate more radiation dose when it is delivered at lower dose rates. For example, the LD50/60 increases from about 3 grays (300 rads) when given at very high dose rates to over 10 grays (1,000 rads) when given at much lower dose rates over periods of several months. The latter figure is borne out by the case of an individual who survived for at least 19 years after receiving doses in the range of 9 to 17 grays (900-1700 rads) over 106 days. The Lushbaugh et al. work shows the importance of sheltering when confronted with long-term exposure to radiological contamination such as would be expected from a radiological dispersion event, reactor accident, or ground-level nuclear explosion.

Strom, Daniel J.

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

146

E-Print Network 3.0 - apap toxicity unexpectedly Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

toxicity unexpectedly Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: apap toxicity unexpectedly Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The use of human and...

147

The role of antioxidant enzymes in adaptive responses to environmental toxicants in vascular disease  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Human exposure to environmental toxicants is known to contribute to the development of vascular disease. Inhalation of environmental toxicants induces inflammation and oxidative stress in the vascular system a...

Seung Eun Lee; Yong Seek Park

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States *Barbara L. Rowe1 , Patricia L. Toccalino2 , Michael J. Moran1 , John S. Zogorski1 , Curtis V. Price1 1 United States Geological Survey, Road, Rapid City, SD 57702 USA

149

Grant Writing Advice from the Experts Presented as part of the 2013 Education, Health & Human Development Grant Writing Training Boot Camp  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grant Writing Advice from the Experts Presented as part of the 2013 Education, Health & Human Development Grant Writing Training Boot Camp st 1, 2013 ~ 9:0011:00 aThursday, Augu .m. ~ Reid 301 ~ Refreshments will be served ~ oin us for presentations from three national experts on research grant

Dyer, Bill

150

Air quality is a societal concern, since it has impacts on human health and environment. Laws have been established to protect citizens and ecosystems, through monitoring of harmful  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air quality is a societal concern, since it has impacts on human health and environment. Laws have and implementation of emissions reduction measures. Currently, air quality is monitored at the surface. However dense for additional information, to be assimilated in Air Quality forecast models that are used to take steps

151

The potential human health effect(s) of the metal uranium in the environment. Report on the known human health effects associated with the exposure to the metal uranium  

SciTech Connect

Concern over the levels of the metal uranium in the environment as a result of industrial activities has been expressed by several Federal and State agencies. This concern is associated with potential human health effects of this metal on kidney function and bone formation. Although limits for the Metal uranium in the environment remain to be set, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently in the process of establishing guidance limits for this metal in water and soil. These limits will be established for both the metal and the associated radioactivity. The suggested limits currently being considered for water and soil are, 20 pCi/liter and 10 pCi/gram wet weight, respectively. For naturally occurring uranium EPA assumes that 1 ug of uranium metal equals 0.67 pCi at equilibrium (i.e. at equilibrium the mass ratio of {sup 234}uranium to {sup 238}uranium is small but their activities are equal). Thus the limits for water and soil on weight basis for the uranium metal would be 30 ug/liter and 15 ug/gram wet weight, respectively. These limits are being established based on the potential increase in cancer death in populations that exceed this limit. Since there does not appear to be a significant correlation between cancer deaths and.uranium metal exposure (see discussion below), these limits will probably be established based on the known association between radionuclides exposure and cancer deaths. The exposure limits for other health effects such as kidney damage and retardation in bone formation apparently are not being considered by EPA.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Health assessment for Pasco Sanitary Landfill, Pasco, Franklin County, Washington, Region 10. CERCLIS No. WAD991281874. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

In compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended, Health Assessments are also prepared for non-NPL sites in response to requests from States and individuals. In the report, the presence and nature of health hazards at this site are assessed, and the public health implications specific to this site are evaluated. The Health Assessment is based on such factors as the nature, concentration, toxicity, and extent of contamination at the site; the existence of potential pathways for the human exposure; the size and nature of the community likely to be exposed; and any other information available.

Not Available

1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

153

Characterizing Air Toxics Exposure and Risk and Evaluating EPA Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing Air Toxics Exposure and Risk and Evaluating EPA Modeling Characterizing Air Toxics Exposure and Risk and Evaluating EPA Modeling Tools for Policy Making Speaker(s): Jennifer Logue Date: October 27, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines air toxics as pollutants that are known or suspected to cause serious health effects. Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act established 189 chemicals as air toxics or hazardous air pollutants. Large uncertainties still exist regarding exposure, risks, and sources and there has been a heavy reliance on inventories and modeling to determine sources and risks. In January 2002, Carnegie Mellon University in collaboration with the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD) embarked on a project to investigate air toxics in Allegheny County. This

154

National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health Department of Health and HumanNational Institute of Mental Health Division of Intramural Research Programs http://intramural.nimh.nih.gov/ [NIMH of Fellowship Training] National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health Department of Health

Baker, Chris I.

155

Guidance manual for health risk assessment of chemically contaminated seafood. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report was written to assist in the evaluation and interpretation of the human health risks associated with chemical contaminate levels in seafood. High concentrations of toxic chemicals have been found in sediments and marine organisms in parts of Puget Sound. Since heavy consumption of contaminated seafood may pose a substantial human health risk, it's important that assessments of the risk associated with seafood consumption be conducted in a consistent, acceptable manner. The report provides an overview of risk assessment, and describes hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment and risk characterization. Guidance is provided on presentation and interpretation of results.

Pastorok, R.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

NDE measurements for understanding of performance: A few case studies on engineering components, human health and cultural heritage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life cycle management involves a seamless integration of materials design analysis production manufacturing and degradation plus a wide variety of disciplines relating to surveillance and characterisation with adequate feedback and control. Science and technology of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) links all these domains and disciplines together in a seamless and robust manner. A number of research programs on NDE science and technology have evolved during the last four decades world over including the one at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research Kalpakkam initiated and nurtured by the first author. Many engineering and technology challenges pertaining to fast spectrum reactors have been successfully solved by this Centre through development of innovative sensors procedures and coupled with strong basic science and modeling approaches. These technologies have also been selectively applied in gaining insights of human health and cultural heritage. This paper highlights some of the innovative NDE sensors and techniques developed in the field of electromagnetic NDE and their successful applications. A few interesting case studies pertaining to NDE in heritage and healthcare using acoustic and thermal methods are also presented.

Baldev Raj

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

of Health Care National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Health Care National Institutes of Health Expanding Horizons Strategic Plan 2005-2009 UR nesmohsirh retir,ztnelinaoJ #12;of Health Care Expanding Horizons Strategic Plan 2005-2009 National Center.S Department of Health and Human Services National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine #12;A M mo

Bandettini, Peter A.

158

MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS LOCAL IMPACTS ON HUMAN HEALTH RISK.  

SciTech Connect

A thorough quantitative understanding of the processes of mercury emissions, deposition, and translocation through the food chain is currently not available. Complex atmospheric chemistry and dispersion models are required to predict concentration and deposition contributions, and aquatic process models are required to predict effects on fish. However, there are uncertainties in all of these predictions. Therefore, the most reliable method of understanding impacts of coal-fired power plants on Hg deposition is from empirical data. A review of the literature on mercury deposition around sources including coal-fired power plants found studies covering local mercury concentrations in soil, vegetation, and animals (fish and cows). There is strong evidence of enhanced local deposition within 3 km of the chlor-alkali plants, with elevated soil concentrations and estimated deposition rates of 10 times background. For coal-fired power plants, the data show that atmospheric deposition of Hg may be slightly enhanced. On the scale of a few km, modeling suggests that wet deposition may be increased by a factor of two or three over background. The measured data suggest lower increases of 15% or less. The effects of coal-fired plants seem to be less than 10% of total deposition on a national scale, based on emissions and global modeling. The following summarizes our findings from published reports on the impacts of local deposition. In terms of excesses over background the following increments have been observed within a few km of the plant: (1) local soil concentration Hg increments of 30%-60%, (2) sediment increments of 18-30%, (3) wet deposition increments of 11-12%, and (4) fish Hg increments of about 5-6%, based on an empirical finding that fish concentrations are proportional to the square root of deposition. Important uncertainties include possible reductions of RGM to Hg{sub 0} in power plant plumes and the role of water chemistry in the relationship between Hg deposition and fish content. Soil and vegetation sampling programs were performed around two mid-size coal fired power plants. The objectives were to determine if local mercury hot-spots exist, to determine if they could be attributed to deposition of coal-fired power plant emissions, and to determine if they correlated with model predictions. These programs found the following: (1) At both sites, there was no correlation between modeled mercury deposition and either soil concentrations or vegetation concentrations. At the Kincaid plant, there was excess soil Hg along heavily traveled roads. The spatial pattern of soil mercury concentrations did not match the pattern of vegetation Hg concentrations at either plant. (2) At both sites, the subsurface (5-10 cm) samples the Hg concentration correlated strongly with the surface samples (0-5 cm). Average subsurface sample concentrations were slightly less than the surface samples; however, the difference was not statistically significant. (3) An unequivocal definition of background Hg was not possible at either site. Using various assumed background soil mercury concentrations, the percentage of mercury deposited within 10 km of the plant ranged between 1.4 and 8.5% of the RGM emissions. Based on computer modeling, Hg deposition was primarily RGM with much lower deposition from elemental mercury. Estimates of the percentage of total Hg deposition ranged between 0.3 and 1.7%. These small percentages of deposition are consistent with the empirical findings of only minor perturbations in environmental levels, as opposed to ''hot spots'', near the plants. The major objective of this study was to determine if there was evidence for ''hot-spots'' of mercury deposition around coal-fired power plants. Although the term has been used extensively, it has never been defined. From a public health perspective, such a ''hot spot'' must be large enough to insure that it did not occur by chance, and it must affect water bodies large enough to support a population of subsistence fishers. The results of this study support the hypothesis that n

SULLIVAN, T.M.; BOWERMAN, B.; ADAMS, J.; LIPFERT, F.; MORRIS, S.M.; BANDO, A.; PENA, R.; BLAKE, R.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health PROFILE 2007DIRECTOR'S ANNUAL REPORT NIH CLINICAL CENTER There's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for conducting clinical research to improve the health of humankind. It will also serve as a national resource unannounced survey of the hospital. At the end of three days, we received an outstanding report.The surveyors

160

Natural Toxicants in Foods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of exploring the potential naturally occurring toxic hazards of food plants is not to suggest an irrational avoidance of these common foods. However, it is important to identify, define, and invest...

Ross C. Beier; Herbert N. Nigg

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Supplemental results of the human health risk analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy draft waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended as an information supplement to the human health risk analysis performed for the US Department of Energy`s Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste, hereinafter called the PEIS. This report provides the installation-by-installation human health risk analysis results from which the risk estimate summaries for the PEIS were drawn. Readers should bear in mind that the risk estimates presented here are the result of a program-wide (as opposed to site-specific) study. They are based on best available data; systematically applied assumptions; and professional judgment about DOE waste inventories, waste volumes generated annually, currently available treatment and disposal technologies, technical limitations of treatment, and facility capacities across the numerous installations in the DOE complex.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Environmental Health Dedicated to the advancement of the environmental health professional Volume 72, No. 10 June 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Turtles and Implications for Human Health..................................14 International PerspectivesJOURNAL OF Environmental Health Dedicated to the advancement of the environmental health........................................23 Glo Germ.....................................................6 Health

163

Research priorities for mobile air toxics  

SciTech Connect

The Health Effects Institute, a cooperative effort of the auto industry and the EPA, whose mission is to provide health effects information to ensure that motor vehicle emissions do not pose unreasonable risks, recently undertook a project to define priorities for research that would decrease uncertainties in risk assessments for mobile air toxics. At a workshop held in December 1992, scientists from academia, industry, and government worked to identify uncertainties in understanding the potential risk of exposure to mobile air toxics, including methanol, an important potential alternate fuel. Although cancer risk was the primary concern regarding most compounds, there was also much discussion of non-cancer effects of potential importance. Participants discussed research priorities for scientific issues that apply across all compound groups, such as dosimetry, high-to-low dose extrapolation, exposure assessment, and molecular biology approaches.

Not Available

1993-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

164

human health | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on the substrate. Because they flatten less upon impaction, particles with higher viscosity and surface tension can be identified by a steeper slope on a plot of TCA vs. size....

165

transforming human health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are in clinical trials: forodesine for treating leukemia and lymphoma, and BCX4208 for gout. Drugs to treat

Kenny, Paraic

166

Health assessment for Industrial Latex Corporation, Wallington Borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NJD981178411. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has prepared Health Assessment reports for sites currently on, or proposed for, the National Priorities List. In the report, the presence and nature of health hazards at this site are assessed, and the public health implications specific to this site are evaluated. The Health Assessment is based on such factors as the nature, concentration, toxicity, and extent of contamination at the site; the existence of potential pathways for the human exposure; the size and nature of the community likely to be exposed; and any other information available.

Not Available

1990-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

167

Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies Health Services Bachelor of Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Six: [15 Credit Hours] NURS 45010 Health Care Policy and Delivery Systems or NURS 46000 Health CareRoadmap: Integrated Health Studies ­ Health Services ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-IHS-HLSV] College of Education, Health, and Human Services School of Health Sciences Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last

Sheridan, Scott

168

A tiered approach for the human health risk assessment for consumption of vegetables from with cadmium-contaminated land in urban areas  

SciTech Connect

Consumption of vegetables that are grown in urban areas takes place worldwide. In developing countries, vegetables are traditionally grown in urban areas for cheap food supply. In developing and developed countries, urban gardening is gaining momentum. A problem that arises with urban gardening is the presence of contaminants in soil, which can be taken up by vegetables. In this study, a scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables from cadmium-contaminated land. Starting from a contaminated site, the procedure follows a tiered approach which is laid out as follows. In Tier 0, the plausibility of growing vegetables is investigated. In Tier 1 soil concentrations are compared with the human health-based Critical soil concentration. Tier 2 offers the possibility for a detailed site-specific human health risk assessment in which calculated exposure is compared to the toxicological reference dose. In Tier 3, vegetable concentrations are measured and tested following a standardized measurement protocol. To underpin the derivation of the Critical soil concentrations and to develop a tool for site-specific assessment the determination of the representative concentration in vegetables has been evaluated for a range of vegetables. The core of the procedure is based on Freundlich-type plant–soil relations, with the total soil concentration and the soil properties as variables. When a significant plant–soil relation is lacking for a specific vegetable a geometric mean of BioConcentrationFactors (BCF) is used, which is normalized according to soil properties. Subsequently, a ‘conservative’ vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor is calculated as basis for the Critical soil concentration (Tier 1). The tool to perform site-specific human health risk assessment (Tier 2) includes the calculation of a ‘realistic worst case’ site-specific vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. -- Highlights: • A scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables. • Uptake characteristics of cadmium in a series of vegetables is represented by a vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. • Calculations and measurement steps are combined.

Swartjes, Frank A., E-mail: frank.swartjes@rivm.nl; Versluijs, Kees W.; Otte, Piet F.

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Brown University is an Ivy League school that competes for today's brightest students and faculty. Biomedical Engineering at Brown creates new knowledge and improves human health through cross-disciplinary research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Biomedical Engineering at Brown creates new knowledge and improves human health through cross, Biomechanics/Motion Sciences, Biosensing and Biomolecular Engineering, Biomaterials, and Biomedical device, mentoring the new generation of leaders in biomedical engineering, strong interest in undergraduate

Adams, Mark

171

Comparative Toxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Better information on the comparative toxicity of airborne emissions from different types of engines is needed to guide the development of heavy vehicle engine, fuel, lubricant, and exhaust after-treatment technologies, and to place the health hazards of current heavy vehicle emissions in their proper perspective. To help fill this information gap, samples of vehicle exhaust particles and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) were collected and analyzed. The biological activity of the combined particle-SVOC samples is being tested using standardized toxicity assays. This report provides an update on the design of experiments to test the relative toxicity of engine emissions from various sources.

JeanClare Seagrave; Joe L. Mauderly; Barbara Zielinska; John Sagebiel; Kevin Whitney; Doughlas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

172

Mountain Health Choices Beneficiary Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................................................ 42 I. Access to Health Care Mountain Health Choices Beneficiary Report A Report to the West Virginia Bureau for Medical of Health and Human Resources, Bureau for Medical Services. #12; 1 Table of Contents I. EXECUTIVE

Mohaghegh, Shahab

173

Occupational Health Nurse  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Occupational Health Nurse position is located in the Talent Sustainment group within the Human Capital Management (HCM) organization. The Talent Sustainment organization ensures that effective...

174

Toxics Use Reduction Act (Massachusetts)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act, revised significantly in 2006, seeks to mitigate the use of toxic substances and the production of toxic byproducts through reporting requirements as well as resource conservation plans...

175

Health Information Systems for Primary Health Care: Thinking About Participation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health Information Systems for Primary Health Care: Thinking About Participation Elaine Byrne in supporting primary health care functioning, the design, development and implementation of these systems information systems, human rights 1. Introduction: Primary health care is a crucial element of national health

Sahay, Sundeep

176

Beyond Patient Health Escalating populations, expanding urban environments, poverty,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resistance, ozone depletion, asthma and heavy metal toxicity · The program also supports student and facultyBeyond Patient Health Escalating populations, expanding urban environments, poverty, pollution

Denham, Graham

177

OFFICE: HardyTower 58 In the College of Health and Human Services TELEPHONE: (619) 594-5357  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Morris, Reed, Saarmann Assistant Professors: Bennett, Burt, Gilbert, Rapps Lecturers: Cervenka, introductory psychology, oral communication, general biology, human anatomy with lab- oratory, and microbiology (1 semester with laboratory) (anat- omy and microbiology must total 7 semester units with a minimum

Gallo, Linda C.

178

Overview of ozone human exposure and health risk analyses used in the U.S. EPA's review of the ozone air quality standard.  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the ozone human exposure and health risk analyses developed under sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These analyses are being used in the current review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The analyses consist of three principal steps: (1) estimating short-term ozone exposure for particular populations (exposure model); (2) estimating population response to exposures or concentrations (exposure-response or concentration-response models); and (3) integrating concentrations or exposure with concentration-response or exposure-response models to produce overall risk estimates (risk model). The exposure model, called the probabilistic NAAQS exposure model for ozone (pNEM/03), incorporates the following factors: hourly ambient ozone concentrations; spatial distribution of concentrations; ventilation state of individuals at time of exposure; and movement of people through various microenvironments (e.g., outdoors, indoors, inside a vehicle) of varying air quality. Exposure estimates are represented by probability distributions. Exposure-response relationships have been developed for several respiratory symptom and lung function health effects, based on the results of controlled human exposure studies. These relationships also are probabilistic and reflect uncertainties associated with sample size and variability of response among subjects. The analyses also provide estimates of excess hospital admissions in the New York City area based on results from an epidemiology study. Overall risk results for selected health endpoints and recently analyzed air quality scenarios associated with alternative 8-hour NAAQS and the current 1-hour standard for outdoor children are used to illustrate application of the methodology.

Whitfield, R. G.

1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

179

Human-animal interactions, relationships and bonds: a review and analysis of the literature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

human-animal bond: health implications across the lifespan.H. (2012). Mental health implications of human attachment to

Hosey, Geoff; Melfi, Vicky

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Office of International Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Health Studies International Health Studies Home Mission and Functions Japan Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) Studies Marshall Islands Program Russian Health Studies Program Russian Radiobiology Human Tissue Repository Spain (Palomares) Program Health and Safety HSS Logo Office of International Health Studies Reports to the Office of Health and Safety Mission and Functions Mission The Office of International Health Studies engages in the conduct of international scientific studies that may provide new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation in the workplace or people exposed in communities as a result of nuclear accidents. The mission includes providing health and environmental monitoring services to populations specified by law.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Proceedings from the 5th International Symposium on Light and Human Health: November 3-5, 2002, Orlando, Florida--EPRI Lighting Research Office  

SciTech Connect

The 5th EPRI/LRO Lighting Research Symposium (November, 2002) was organized to present and examine current research information on the subject of Light and Human Health in response to a growing sense that light--both electric lighting and daylighting--impacts human beings well beyond what has been traditionally studied as vision and visual performance. This Final Report of the Symposium is a collection of 23 presented and seven poster papers grouped under the following headings: (1) Medical Applications of Light; (2) Circadian Effects of Light; (3) Hazards of Optical Radiation; and (4) Environmental Applications and Human Factors. Research from the medical, measurement, elderly, lighting, psychological, and vision fields is included, as well as an extensive commentary and summary. The direction of the research, taken as a whole, indicates that the definition of ''good lighting'' should be expanded to include ''healthy lighting,'' and that ongoing research will require better measurement and specification tools such as a new system of circadian photometry. Enhanced interaction between the medical research and lighting design communities will be required to bring the benefits of what is being discovered into common lighting practice.

None

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Toxicity Is Mediated by a Dynamin-Dependent Protein-Trafficking Pathway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ARTICLE PATHOGENESIS AND IMMUNITY Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Toxicity Is Mediated...Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Ebola virus infection causes a highly lethal...effects, the molecular events that underlie Ebola virus cytopathicity are poorly understood...

Nancy J. Sullivan; Mary Peterson; Zhi-yong Yang; Wing-pui Kong; Heinricus Duckers; Elizabeth Nabel; Gary J. Nabel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

OFFICE: Hardy Tower 58 In the College of Health and Human Services TELEPHONE: (619) 594-5357  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Morris, Reed, Saarmann Assistant Professors: Burt, Gilbert, Rapps Lecturers: Hall, Hanscom, Jurf, Katzman, introductory psychology, oral communication, general biology, human anatomy with lab- oratory, and microbiology (1 semester with laboratory) (anat- omy and microbiology must total 7 semester units with a minimum

Gallo, Linda C.

184

OFFICE: Hardy Tower 58 In the College of Health and Human Services TELEPHONE: (619) 594-5357  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Professors: Gilbert, McLeod, Rapps Lecturers: Gaines, Hall, Hanscom, Jurf, Katzman, Lischke, Long, Mc psychology, oral communication, general biology, human anatomy with lab- oratory, and microbiology (1 semester with laboratory) (anat- omy and microbiology must total 7 semester units with a minimum grade of B

Gallo, Linda C.

185

EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK OF AERIAL ULTRA-LOW VOLUME APPLICATIONS OF PYRETHRINS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,1 DAVID A. BROWN1 AND ROBERT K. D. PETERSON2 ABSTRACT. The Sacramento and Yolo Mosquito and Vector of mosquitoes in Sacramento and Yolo counties in California. Following an increase in numbers and West Nile-level transmission to humans and horses in Sacramento and Yolo counties that year (Armijos et al. 2005, Hom et al

Peterson, Robert K. D.

186

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute health effects Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; effects of context on health and health-related behavior; disparities in children's health care access... College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes May...

187

Nanoparticle toxicity by the gastrointestinal route: evidence and knowledge gaps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The increasing interest in nanoparticles for advanced technologies, consumer products, and biomedical applications has led to great excitement about potential benefits but also concern over the potential for adverse human health effects. The gastrointestinal tract represents a likely route of entry for many nanomaterials, both directly through intentional ingestion or indirectly via nanoparticle dissolution from food containers or by secondary ingestion of inhaled particles. Additionally, increased utilisation of nanoparticles may lead to increased environmental contamination and unintentional ingestion via water, food animals, or fish. The gastrointestinal tract is a site of complex, symbiotic interactions between host cells and the resident microbiome. Accordingly, evaluation of nanoparticles must take into consideration not only absorption and extraintestinal organ accumulation but also the potential for altered gut microbes and the effects of this perturbation on the host. The existing literature was evaluated for evidence of toxicity based on these considerations. Focus was placed on three categories of nanomaterials: nanometals and metal oxides, carbon-based nanoparticles, and polymer/dendrimers with emphasis on those particles of greatest relevance to gastrointestinal exposures.

Ingrid L. Bergin; Frank A. Witzmann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Depleted Uranium Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Discussion of health effects of external exposure, ingestion, and inhalation of depleted uranium. Depleted uranium is not a significant health hazard unless it is taken into the body. External exposure to radiation from depleted uranium is generally not a major concern because the alpha particles emitted by its isotopes travel only a few centimeters in air or can be stopped by a sheet of paper. Also, the uranium-235 that remains in depleted uranium emits only a small amount of low-energy gamma radiation. However, if allowed to enter the body, depleted uranium, like natural uranium, has the potential for both chemical and radiological toxicity with the two important target organs

189

HEALTH & COUNSELLING Health Clinic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEALTH & COUNSELLING SERVICES Health Clinic 778.783.4615 - Burnaby 778.782.5200 - Vancouver_counsellor@sfu.ca Health Promotion 778.782.4674 Health & Counselling Services, SFU - 8888 University Drive, MBC 0164 health can suffer if you're under stress for a long time, especially if you are not eating well. You may

190

TOXNET and Beyond-Using the National Library of Medicine's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this training is to familiarize participants with reliable online environmental health and toxicology information, from the National Library of Medicine and other reliable sources. Skills and knowledge acquired in this training class will enable participants to access, utilize, and refer others to environmental health and toxicology information. After completing this course, participants will be able to: (1) Identify quality, accurate, and authoritative online resources pertaining to environmental health, toxicology, and related medical information; (2) Demonstrate the ability to perform strategic search techniques to find relevant online information; and (3) Apply the skills and knowledge obtained in this class to their organization's health information needs. NLMs TOXNET (Toxicology Data Network) is a free, Web-based system of databases on toxicology, environmental health, hazardous chemicals, toxic releases, chemical nomenclatures, and specialty areas such as occupational health and consumer products. Types of information in the TOXNET databases include: (1) Specific chemicals, mixtures, and products; (2) Unknown chemicals; and (3) Special toxic effects of chemicals in humans and/or animals.

Templin-Branner, Wilma

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B, B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/003 Publication 9285.7-01 B December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper N O T I C E The policies set out in this document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

192

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I. Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part D, Standardized Planning, Reporting, and Review of Superfund Risk Assessments)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publication 9285.7-01D Publication 9285.7-01D January 1998 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part D, Standardized Planning, Reporting, and Review of Superfund Risk Assessments) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Revision No. 0 ii January 1998 NOTICE This document provides guidance to EPA staff. The guidance is designed to communicate National policy on the planning, reporting and review of Superfund risk assessments. The document does not, however, substitute for EPA's statutes or regulations, nor is it a regulation itself. Thus, it cannot impose legally-binding requirements on EPA, States, or the regulated community, and may not apply to a particular situation based upon

193

Research Using Human Subjects/Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Using Human SubjectsMaterials (taken in part from "Research on Human Specimens", National Institutes of Health) A 'human subject' is a living individual about whom an...

194

Health Behavior Health Promotion -Prevention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chronic disease complications Improve quality of life Reduce health care costs #12;ImpactHealth Behavior Health Promotion - Prevention Modification of Health Attitudes and Health Behavior #12;Health Promotion: An Overview Basic philosophy Good health = individual and collective goal

Meagher, Mary

195

@jaybernhardt mCollegeHealth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Health and Human Performance #12;@jaybernhardt Epidemiology of mHealth Access http://rememberitnow.com/blog/tag/mhealth://www.ctia.org/advocacy/research/index.cfm/AID/10378 #12;@jaybernhardt #12;@jaybernhardt Mobile-Only Household Health #12;@jaybernhardt mHealth Dynamic://healthpopuli.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Adoption-of-mHealth-Initiatives-and-Phases-Globally.jpg #12;@jaybernhardt mHealth > SMS http

Watson, Craig A.

196

Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies Health Services Bachelor of Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requirement if not satisfied earlier Semester Six: [15 Credit Hours] NURS 45010 Health Care Policy and Delivery Systems or NURS 46000 Health Care Policy 3 NURS 46000 regional campuses only Human Development for the Health Professions 3 PHIL 40005 Health Care Ethics 3 General Electives (upper division) 9 Should

Sheridan, Scott

197

Assessment of ocean waste disposal. Task 5. Human-health impacts of waste constituents. 2. Pathogens and antibiotic- and heavy-metal-resistant bacteria. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Disposal of wastes in the ocean has been practiced by coastal nations for many decades. All areas of the ocean have been subject to disposal use, including estuaries, nearshore, open shelf, and deep ocean sites. Until recently, it was believed that pathogenic bacteria did not survive for any significant period of time in estuarine and marine environments. Scientists and public-health workers never bothered to ask the question could viable, virulent pathogens be present in water samples even though they could not be detected by conventional plating methods. This laboratory answered this question in the affirmative for several bacterial pathogens, and this is discussed in detail. What follows in the report is a description of potentially harmful constituents of wastes, ways in which those constituents could reach humans, known incidents of human disease contracted from wastes, detection of waste-borne disease agents, management technologies, and monitoring and predictive technologies. Since the report is not just a review of the literature, not all known literature has been discussed. However, every attempt is made to include very relevant material, regardless of its age. What follows then is both a literature review and a position paper.

Grimes, D.J.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

DEPARTMENTOFHEALTHANDHUMANSERVICES National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEPARTMENTOFHEALTHANDHUMANSERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Extramural Research 9000 Institutes of Health (NIH), part of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), is the principal health research agency of the U.S. Federal Government. The Office of Extramural Research (OER) provides

Baker, Chris I.

199

All mercury lamps contain small amounts of mercury. An electric current passes through the lamp and vaporizes the mercury to generate light. Recycling mercury containing lamps protects human health and our environment from heavy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All mercury lamps contain small amounts of mercury. An electric current passes through the lamp and vaporizes the mercury to generate light. Recycling mercury containing lamps protects human health and our the environment by recycling universal wastes, contact EH&S at (949) 824-6200 or visit: www.ehs.uci.edu Mercury

George, Steven C.

200

Mechanisms of carbon nanotube-induced toxicity: Focus on oxidative stress  

SciTech Connect

Nanotechnologies are emerging as highly promising technologies in many sectors in the society. However, the increasing use of engineered nanomaterials also raises concerns about inadvertent exposure to these materials and the potential for adverse effects on human health and the environment. Despite several years of intensive investigations, a common paradigm for the understanding of nanoparticle-induced toxicity remains to be firmly established. Here, the so-called oxidative stress paradigm is scrutinized. Does oxidative stress represent a secondary event resulting inevitably from disruption of biochemical processes and the demise of the cell, or a specific, non-random event that plays a role in the induction of cellular damage e.g. apoptosis? The answer to this question will have important ramifications for the development of strategies for mitigation of adverse effects of nanoparticles. Recent examples of global lipidomics studies of nanoparticle-induced tissue damage are discussed along with proteomics and transcriptomics approaches to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the complex and interrelated molecular changes in cells and tissues exposed to nanoparticles. We also discuss instances of non-oxidative stress-mediated cellular damage resulting from direct physical interference of nanomaterials with cellular structures. -- Highlights: ? CNT induced non-random oxidative stress associated with apoptosis. ? Non-oxidative mechanisms for cellular toxicity of carbon nanotubes. ? Biodegradation of CNT by cells of innate immune system. ? “Omics”-based biomarkers of CNT exposures.

Shvedova, Anna A., E-mail: ats1@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome (Italy); Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome (Italy); Pietroiusti, Antonio [Department of Biopathology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome (Italy)] [Department of Biopathology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome (Italy); Fadeel, Bengt [Division of Molecular Toxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden) [Division of Molecular Toxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kagan, Valerian E. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A framework for human microbiome research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of microbial communities and their genes (the microbiome) exist throughout the human body, with fundamental roles in human health and disease. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Human Microbiome Project ...

Friedman, Jonathan

202

Engineered nanomaterials: knowledge gaps in fate, exposure, toxicity, and future directions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to identify current knowledge gaps in fate, exposure, and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), highlight research gaps, and suggest future research directions. Humans and other living organisms are exposed to ENMs during ...

Arun Kumar, Prashant Kumar, Ananthitha Anandan, Teresa F. Fernandes, Godwin A. Ayoko, George Biskos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Understanding the mHealth Needs of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the mHealth Needs of Kelly Caine1 Kay Connelly1 mHealth Needs of Patients in the mHealth space to help those suffering from depression · must consider human factors, perceived f

Connelly, Kay

204

Toxic components in diesel exhaust fumes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To control diesel-engine toxicity, a computation method is proposed for the concentration of toxic components in diesel exhaust fumes, on the basis of external engine...

A. F. Dorokhov; E. V. Klimova

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Health Insurance and Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article reviews the recent literature on the causal effect of health insurance on health outcomes. The focus is mainly on private health insurance in the US. The objective is to illustrate measurement issues for both health insurance and health outcomes, and to discuss the methodological challenges for researchers as they address endogeneity of insurance. Finally, a brief overview of methods and results found in the source studies is provided. Certain patterns emerge: in general, insurance is more pronounced for all-cause mortality and for generic health outcomes as compared with disease-specific outcomes. In addition, vulnerable and medically needy populations are more likely to benefit from health insurance than the general population. Finally, there is some support for the notion that continuous health insurance coverage benefits health more than intermittent insurance, suggesting that sporadic coverage offers limited value.

A. Dor; E. Umapathi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Environmental lead: insidious health problem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental lead: insidious health problem ... Several federal programs aim to reduce human exposure to lead, but which source is most dangerous is subject of growing controversy ...

LOIS R. EMBER; C&EN; WASHINGTON

1980-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

207

Men's Health - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials > Men's Health Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Ergonomics Fitness & Exercise Men's Health Nutrition Women's Health Health & Productivity Health...

208

Health & Productivity - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health & Productivity Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and Screenings...

209

Health Education & Wellness - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wellness Health Education & Wellness Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and...

210

Chapter 30 - Inorganic Arsenic in Rice and Rice Bran: Health Implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Rice is a staple food for people in many countries in all parts of the world. Arsenic in food, including rice, is present in several forms that have different toxicities. Inorganic arsenic species (AsIII and AsV) are the most toxic forms of arsenic present in food. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified inorganic arsenic, but not organic arsenic, in Group 1, as carcinogenic to humans. There has been increasing concern about the health implications regarding exposure to inorganic arsenic through rice consumption. An extensive review of published reports has shown that no epidemiological studies have been conducted indicating the health effects associated with the ingestion of inorganic arsenic through consumption of rice. Several studies suggested that drinking water containing high levels of inorganic arsenic plays a major role in the health risk of cancers among people residing in arsenic-contaminated areas. Two leading research groups in this field have concluded that “At present, it is impossible to fully assess the health risk of arsenic in rice,” and “Even if epidemiological studies were to be initiated, it would take decades to understand how elevated arsenic in rice affects lifetime health outcomes”.

Suthep Ruangwises; Piyawat Saipan; Nongluck Ruangwises

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Community Health Map: A geospatial and multivariate data visualization tool for public health datasets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on health care. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services keeps track of a variety of health care that enables users to visualize health care data in multivariate space as well as geospatially. It is designed a compre- hensible and powerful interface for policy makers to visualize health care quality, public health

Shneiderman, Ben

212

Emissions of airborne toxics from coal-fired boilers: Mercury  

SciTech Connect

Concerns over emissions of hazardous air Pollutants (air toxics) have emerged as a major environmental issue, and the authority of the US Environmental Protection Agency to regulate such pollutants was greatly expanded through the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Mercury has been singled out for particular attention because of concerns over possible effects of emissions on human health. This report evaluates available published information on the mercury content of coals mined in the United States, on mercury emitted in coal combustion, and on the efficacy of various environmental control technologies for controlling airborne emissions. Anthracite and bituminous coals have the highest mean-mercury concentrations, with subbituminous coals having the lowest. However, all coal types show very significant variations in mercury concentrations. Mercury emissions from coal combustion are not well-characterized, particularly with regard to determination of specific mercury compounds. Variations in emission rates of more than an order of magnitude have been reported for some boiler types. Data on the capture of mercury by environmental control technologies are available primarily for systems with electrostatic precipitators, where removals of approximately 20% to over 50% have been reported. Reported removals for wet flue-gas-desulfurization systems range between 35 and 95%, while spray-dryer/fabric-filter systems have given removals of 75 to 99% on municipal incinerators. In all cases, better data are needed before any definitive judgments can be made. This report briefly reviews several areas of research that may lead to improvements in mercury control for existing flue-gas-clean-up technologies and summarizes the status of techniques for measuring mercury emissions from combustion sources.

Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.; Zaromb, S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobic piperidinium and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobic piperidinium and Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobic piperidinium and pyrrolidinium ionic liquids Title Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobic piperidinium and pyrrolidinium ionic liquids Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Salminen, Justin, Nicolas Papaiconomou, Anand R. Kumar, Jong-Min Lee, John B. Kerr, John S. Newman, and John M. Prausnitz Journal Fluid Phase Equilibria Volume 261 Pagination 421-426 Keywords hydrophobic, ionic liquids, piperidinium, properties, pyrrolidinium, safety, toxicity Abstract Some properties are reported for hydrophobic ionic liquids (IL) containing 1-methyl-1-propyl pyrrolidinium [MPPyrro]+, 1-methyl-1-butyl pyrrolidinium [MBPyrro]+, 1-methyl-1-propyl piperidinium [MPPip]+, 1-methyl-1-butyl piperidinium [MBPip]+, 1-methyl-1-octyl pyrrolidinium [MOPyrro]+ and 1-methyl-1-octyl piperidinium [MOPip]+ cations. These liquids provide new alternatives to pyridinium and imidazolium ILs. High thermal stability of an ionic liquid increases safety in applications like rechargeable lithium-ion batteries and other electrochemical devices. Thermal properties, ionic conductivities, viscosities, and mutual solubilities with water are reported. In addition, toxicities of selected ionic liquids have been measured using a human cancer cell line. The ILs studied here are sparingly soluble in water but hygroscopic. We show some structure-property relationships that may help to design green solvents for specific applications. While ionic liquids are claimed to be environmentally benign solvents, as yet few data have been published to support these claims.

214

Mobile health: beyond consumer apps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The explosion of apps for the medical and wellness sectors has been noted by many. Consumer apps, which provide innovative solutions for self management for a range of health problems have flooded the market, due to high consumer demand. More recently ... Keywords: health, human computer interaction, human factors, mobile, wellbeing, wellness

Jill Freyne

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Strategies for assessing the implications of malformed frogs for environmental health.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

whether there are human health implications in the malformedHealth Perspectives Workshop Summary * Implications ofHealth Perspectives Workshop Summary * Implications of

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult health outcomes Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Social support, health outcomes, cardiologycritically ill, qualitative methodology, health care... College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes May 2007...

217

Women's Health - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials > Women's Health Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Ergonomics Fitness & Exercise Men's Health Nutrition Women's Health Health & Productivity...

218

Health effects assessment of exposure to particles from wood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health effects assessment of exposure to particles from wood smoke Elsa Nielsen, Marianne Dybdahl HUMAN EXPOSURE TO PARTICLES FROM WOOD SMOKE 7 HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS 8 Human non-cancer health effects from exposure to particles from wood smoke 8 Human carcinogenic effects from exposure to particles from

219

The photovoltaic industry on the path to a sustainable future — Environmental and occupational health issues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As it supplies solar power, a priori considered harmless for the environment and human health compared with fossil fuels, the photovoltaic (PV) industry seems to contribute optimally to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and, overall, to sustainable development. However, considering the forecast for rapid growth, its use of potentially toxic substances and manufacturing processes presenting health and safety problems may jeopardize its benefits. This paper aims to establish a profile of the PV industry in order to determine current and emerging environmental and health concerns. A review of PV system life cycle assessments, in light of the current state of the industry and its developmental prospects, reveals information deficits concerning some sensitive life cycle indicators and environmental impacts, together with incomplete information on toxicological data and studies of workers' exposure to different chemical and physical hazards. Although solar panel installation is generally considered relatively safe, the occupational health concerns related to the growing number of hazardous materials handled in the PV industry warrants an all-inclusive occupational health and safety approach in order to achieve an optimal equilibrium with sustainability. To prevent eco-health problems from offsetting the benefits currently offered by the PV industry, manufacturers should cooperate actively with workers, researchers and government agencies toward improved and more transparent research, the adoption of specific and stricter regulations, the implementation of preventive risk management of occupational health and safety and, lastly, greater responsibilization toward PV systems from their design until their end of life.

Bouchra Bakhiyi; France Labrčche; Joseph Zayed

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

GIS in Human Health Studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Elucidating the causes of fluorosis in the People’s Republic of China offers another example of how GIS can be used to address the relationship ... to fumes from residential combustion of high-fluorine coal or br...

Joseph E. Bunnell; Alexander W. Karlsen…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Toxic Remediation System And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

Matthews, Stephen M. (Alameda County, CA); Schonberg, Russell G. (Santa Clara County, CA); Fadness, David R. (Santa Clara County, CA)

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

222

Wildlife toxicity extrapolations: Measurement endpoints  

SciTech Connect

Ecotoxicological assessments must rely on the extrapolation of toxicity data from a few indicator species to many species of concern. Data are available from laboratory studies (e.g., quail, mallards, rainbow trout, fathead minnow) and some planned or serendipitous field studies of a broader, but by no means comprehensive, suite of species. Yet all ecological risk assessments begin with an estimate of risk based on information gleaned from the literature. One is then confronted with the necessity of extrapolating toxicity information from a limited number of indicator species to ail organisms of interest. This is a particularly acute problem when trying to estimate hazard to wildlife in terrestrial systems as there is an extreme paucity of data for most chemicals in all but a handful of species. This section continues the debate by six panelists of the ``correct`` approach for determining wildlife toxicity thresholds by examining which are the appropriate measurement endpoints. Should only mortality, growth, or reproductive endpoints be used? Since toxicity threshold values may be used to make management decisions, should values related to each measurement endpoint be presented to allow the risk assessor to choose the measurement endpoint most relevant to the assessment questions being asked, or is a standard approach that uses the lowest value that causes a toxicologic response in any system of the animal a more appropriate, conservative estimate?

Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Berg, M. van den [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands). Research Inst. of Toxicology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

The evolutionary biology of child health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...70 87 The evolutionary biology of child health Bernard Crespi * * crespi@sfu.ca Department...analyse central issues underlying child health, with emphases on the roles of human-specific...and human disorders indicates that child health risks have evolved in the context of evolutionary...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICINE AT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICINE AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE CENTER FOR PATIENT- CENTERED FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICINE AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE CENTER FOR PATIENT-CENTERED OUTCOMES "Our work often seeks to understand human behavior and its interface with pressing health issues. We focus on the human

Engman, David M.

225

Biocides in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids: A Critical Review of Their Usage, Mobility, Degradation, and Toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To enable assessment of the potential environmental and health impacts of the biocides used in hydraulic fracturing fluids, we review their relevant pathways of environmental contamination, environmental mobility, stability and chemical behavior in a variety of natural environments, and toxicity. ... In Fracking’s Wake: New Rules Are Needed to Protect Our Health and Environment From Contaminated Wastewater, NRDC Document D:12-05-A; Natural Resources Defense Council (NDRC): New York, 2012; pp 1– 113. ... Henderson, N. D. Environmental Impact and Toxic Effects of DDAC; Environmental Protection Division, BC Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, 1992. ...

Genevieve A. Kahrilas; Jens Blotevogel; Philip S. Stewart; Thomas Borch

2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

226

CDC 24/7: Saving Lives. Protecting People from Health Threats. Saving Money through Prevention. National Center for Environmental Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. But when your environment exposes you to hazardous substances or dangerous events, your health canCS239266-A CDC 24/7: Saving Lives. Protecting People from Health Threats. Saving Money through Prevention. National Center for Environmental Health Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry CDC

227

International Health Global Health Policy--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

50 International Health Global Health Policy-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www.ghp.m.u-tokyo.ac.jp Our mission is to improve population health by enhancing accountability and improving evidence base of global (both domestic and international) health programmes through the provision

Miyashita, Yasushi

228

Smoke and toxic species analyses from combustion of guayule bagasse modified fiberboards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The determination of particle size distribution. 3. The identification of heavy metals in the smoke and ash phases. 4. The identification of other major smoke components. These tests will also be performed on normal, untreated fiberboard samples so... and untreated fiberboards were less than 10 microns in size and were, therefore, respirable to humans. Toxic species identification through the use of the gas chromatograph/mass spectroscopy identified no unusually toxic chemical species within the smoke...

Paris, Lisa Danielle

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Cd{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Se{sup 2+} toxicity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking YPK9p the orthologue of human ATP13A2  

SciTech Connect

The Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene YPK9 encodes a putative integral membrane protein which is 58% similar and 38% identical in amino acid sequence to the human lysosomal P{sub 5B} ATPase ATP13A2. Mutations in ATP13A2 have been found in patients with Kufor-Rakeb syndrome, a form of juvenile Parkinsonism. We report that Ypk9p localizes to the yeast vacuole and that deletion of YPK9 confers sensitivity for growth for cadmium, manganese, nickel or selenium. These results suggest that Ypk9p may play a role in sequestration of divalent heavy metal ions. Further studies on the function of Ypk9p/ATP13A2 may help to define the molecular basis of Kufor-Rakeb syndrome and provide a potential link to environmental factors such as heavy metals contributing to some forms of Parkinsonism.

Schmidt, Karyn; Wolfe, Devin M. [Center for Neural Development and Disease, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 601 Elmwood Ave., Box 645, Rochester, NY 14620 (United States)] [Center for Neural Development and Disease, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 601 Elmwood Ave., Box 645, Rochester, NY 14620 (United States); Stiller, Barbara [Institute of Human Genetics, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany) [Institute of Human Genetics, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Institute for Genetics, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Pearce, David A., E-mail: David_Pearce@urmc.rochester.edu [Center for Neural Development and Disease, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 601 Elmwood Ave., Box 645, Rochester, NY 14620 (United States); Aab Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Department of Neurology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

230

Domestic Health Studies and Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

energy-policy decision-makers about actual human experience of negligible risk to human health from well-regulated occupational and environmental exposures to plutonium and other...

231

Careers/ Human Resources | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employment Opportunities Environment, Safety & Health Procurement Division Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library Contact Us Lab Leadership Directory Careers Human...

232

Assessing Safety, Health, and Environmental Impact Early during Process Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After identifying SHE problems as dangerous properties, their magnitude is analyzed as potential of danger and can be reduced by technological measures. ... Health effects are subdivided into two dangerous properties:? irritation and chronic toxicity. ...

Guntram Koller; Ulrich Fischer; Konrad Hungerbühler

2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

233

Is thioacetamide a serious health hazard in inorganic chemistry laboratories?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Is thioacetamide a serious health hazard in inorganic chemistry laboratories? ... The dangerous properties of thioacetamide seemingly are not well known by many of those who use it; presented here is a collection of data on its toxic effects. ...

Hannu Elo

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Wildlife toxicity extrapolations: Dose metric  

SciTech Connect

Ecotoxicological assessments must rely on the extrapolation of toxicity data from a few indicator species to many species of concern. Data are available from laboratory studies (e.g., quail, mallards, rainbow trout, fathead minnow) and some planned or serendipitous field studies of a broader, but by no means comprehensive, suite of species. Yet all ecological risk assessments begin with an estimate of risk based on information gleaned from the literature. One is then confronted with the necessity of extrapolating toxicity information from a limited number of indicator species to all organisms of interest. This is a particularly acute problem when trying to estimate hazards to wildlife in terrestrial systems as there is an extreme paucity of data for most chemicals in all but a handful of species. This section continues the debate by six panelists of the ``correct`` approach for determining wildlife toxicity thresholds by examining which dose metric to use for threshold determination and interspecific extrapolation, Since wild animals are exposed to environmental contaminants primarily through ingestion, should threshold values be expressed as amount of chemical in the diet (e.g., ppm) or as a body weight-adjusted dose (mg/kg/day)? Which of these two approaches is most relevant for ecological risk assessment decision making? Which is best for interspecific extrapolations? Converting from one metric to the other can compound uncertainty if the actual consumption rates of a species is unknown. How should this be dealt with? Is it of sufficient magnitude to be of concern?

Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Berg, M. van den [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands). Research Inst. of Toxicology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

Master of Public Health (MPH) and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Human Services 2010 1 Master of Public Health (MPH) and Certificate Program University of New Hampshire) and Public Health Certificate Program (PHC) University of New Hampshire Manchester Campus 286 Commercial StMaster of Public Health (MPH) and Public Health Certificate Program (PHC) University of New

New Hampshire, University of

236

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Environmental Restoration Program (ERP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ERP ERP ESG Home ERP Home Documents Photo Gallery Contact Us Links Environmental Restoration Program Welcome to the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) website dedicated to its Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). The ERP is part of a nationwide effort by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to identify and clean up contaminated areas at its facilities. The mission of the ERP is to protect human health and the environment by investigating and cleaning up soil and groundwater contaminated by past activities at Berkeley Lab. Berkeley Lab operates its Hazardous Waste Handling Facility under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit issued by the California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic Substances

237

Human Genetics Portfolio Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in providing the assessments of the Wellcome Trust's role in supporting human genetics and have informed `our to maximise the health benefits of research into the human genome remains a core component of the WellcomeHuman Genetics 1990­2009 June 2010 Portfolio Review #12;The Wellcome Trust is a charity registered

Rambaut, Andrew

238

Health effects of risk-assessment categories  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and occupational health effects associated with exposures to various chemicals are a subject of increasing concern. One recently developed methodology for assessing the health impacts of various chemical compounds involves the classification of similar chemicals into risk-assessment categories (RACs). This report reviews documented human health effects for a broad range of pollutants, classified by RACs. It complements other studies that have estimated human health effects by RAC based on analysis and extrapolation of data from animal research.

Kramer, C.F.; Rybicka, K.; Knutson, A.; Morris, S.C.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Learning from Lister: antisepsis, safer surgery and global health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Centre for the Humanities and Health, 2 the conference attracted...historians of medicine and health care safety, infectious disease experts, health services researchers and...authority on the side of rational reform. It is indeed so excellent...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

USGS National Wildlife Health Center Diagnostic Case Submission Guidelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USGS National Wildlife Health Center Diagnostic Case Submission Guidelines The following guidelines broadly outline the framework used by the National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC to the submitting agency, its wildlife populations, or domestic animal and human health. Type of Specimens

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Urban health and health inequalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Urban health and health inequalities and the role of urban forestry in Britain: A review Liz O'Brien Kathryn Williams Amy Stewart 2010 #12;Urban health and woodlands Contents Executive Summary 4 1.1.3 Definition of terms 9 3. The policy context: health and forestry policies 11 3.1 Health policies 11 3

242

Wind Turbines and Health A Rapid Review of the Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Wind Turbines and Health A Rapid Review of the Evidence July 2010 #12;2 Wind Turbines and Health of the evidence from current literature on the issue of wind turbines and potential impacts on human health regarding wind turbines and their potential effect on human health. It is important to note that these views

Firestone, Jeremy

243

Humanity’s unsustainable environmental footprint  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biodiversity loss or effects on human health or...billion m 3 /year (average for 1996 to 2005...billion m 3 /year (average for 1996 to...emissions from fossil fuels—part of humanity...products in their price—for example, by...The EF of the average global citizen...so-called rebound effect (44). Profound...

Arjen Y. Hoekstra; Thomas O. Wiedmann

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

244

Air Pollution and Health Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The quality of the air we breathe is still a major concern to human health. Notwithstanding the air pollution mitigation efforts that have been pursued since ... be attributed to the effects of urban outdoor air

Ana Isabel Miranda; Joana Valente…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Human Genome From human genome to other  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

genome to health Structural Genomics initiative #12;What is the Human Genome Project? · U.S. govtThe Human Genome Project From human genome to other genomes and to gene function June 2000 From that arise from genome research #12;The Human Genome Project Project began in 1990 as a $3 billion, 15-year

Linial, Michal

246

NTP-CERHR Expert Panel report on the reproductive and developmental toxicity of 1-bromopropane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The National Toxicology Program (NTP) and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) established the NTP Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (CERHR) in June 1998. The purpose of the CERHR is to provide timely, unbiased, scientifically sound evaluations of human and experimental evidence for adverse effects on reproduction, including development, caused by agents to which humans may be exposed. 1-Bromopropane (1-BP) was nominated by NIOSH and selected for evaluation by the CERHR based primarily on documented evidence of worker exposures and published evidence of reproductive and developmental toxicity in rodents. 1-BP is used in spray adhesives and as a precision cleaner and degreaser. It may also be used as an intermediate in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, insecticides, quaternary ammonium compounds, flavors, and fragrances and as a solvent for fats, waxes, or resins. The evaluation of 1-BP was a 4-month effort by a 10-member panel of academic, private, and government scientists that culminated in a public meeting in December 2001. At that meeting, the Expert Panel reviewed the scientific evidence on 1-BP and reached conclusions regarding its potential effects on human reproduction and development. The background information on 1-BP and findings of the Expert Panel are contained within this report. Expert Panel reports are intended to (1) interpret the strength of scientific evidence that a given exposure or exposure circumstance may pose a hazard to reproduction and the health and welfare of children; (2) provide objective and scientifically thorough assessments of the scientific evidence that adverse reproductive/developmental health effects are associated with exposure to specific chemicals or classes of chemicals, including descriptions of any uncertainties that would diminish confidence in assessment of risks; and (3) identify knowledge gaps to help establish research and testing priorities. Staff scientists from the CERHR and members of the CERHR Core Committee (oversight committee to the CERHR whose members include NTP participating agencies) have reviewed the report and the CERHR will seek public review and comment through a Federal Register notice. Subsequent to this comment period, the NTP will prepare the NTP-CERHR monograph on 1-bromopropane that contains its conclusions regarding the potential for 1-BP to adversely affect human reproduction or development. The NTP will base its conclusions on the Expert Panel report on 1-bromopropane, any public comments received on that report, and any relevant information available since the Expert Panel Meeting. The NTP-CERHR monograph will include the public comments and the Expert Panel report as appendices. The NTP-CERHR report on 1-bromopropane will be made publicly available and transmitted to health and regulatory agencies. The NTP and the CERHR wish to thank the members of the bromopropanes Expert Panel for their contributions to the evaluation of 1-BP. We greatly appreciate their time, effort, and objectivity during this evaluation process. We also wish to thank the contract staff for their support in convening the Expert Panel and preparing the Expert Panel report. The NTP-CERHR is headquartered at NIEHS, Research Triangle Park, NC and is staffed and administered by scientists and support personnel at NIEHS and at Sciences International, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia. Reports can be obtained from the website (http://cerhr.niehs.nih.gov) or from: Michael D. Shelby, Ph.D., NIEHS EC-32, P.O. Box 12233, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA. Tel.: +1-919-541-3455; e-mail: shelby@niehs.nih.gov

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Center for Occupational and Environmental Health School of Public Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for Occupational and Environmental Health School of Public Health University economy" (FTC 1967). 2. It serves to prevent harm by protecting users from dangerous products (FDA 1991). The dangers posed by most products are the risk of human exposure to harmful chemical ingredients

248

Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Title Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2005 Authors Sohn, Michael D., Richard G. Sextro, and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 10th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate - Indoor Air 2005 Volume 2(6) Pagination 1792-1796 Date Published Sept. 4-9, 2005 Publisher Tsinghua University Press Conference Location Beijing, China Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, airflow modeling, comis, countermeasures to chemical and biological threats, emergency response, exposure, indoor environment department, shelter-in-place Abstract An accidental or intentional outdoor release of pollutants can produce a hazardous plume, potentially contaminating large portions of a metropolitan area as it disperses downwind. To minimize health consequences on the populace, government and research organizations often recommend sheltering in place when evacuation is impractical. Some reports also recommend "hardening" an indoor shelter, for example by applying duct tape to prevent leakage into a bathroom. However, few studies have quantified the perceived beneficial effects of sheltering and hardening, or examined the limits of their applicability. In this paper, we examine how sheltering and hardening might reduce exposure levels under different building and meteorological conditions (e.g., wind direction). We predict concentrations and exposure levels for several conditions, and discuss the net benefits from several sheltering and hardening options

249

Toxicity of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Toxicity of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Environment ... While nanoparticles occur naturally in the environment and have been intentionally used for centuries, the production and use of engineered nanoparticles has seen a recent spike, which makes environmental release almost certain. ... Therefore, recent efforts to characterize the toxicity of engineered nanoparticles have focused on the environmental implications, including exploration of toxicity to organisms from wide-ranging parts of the ecosystem food webs. ...

Melissa A. Maurer-Jones; Ian L. Gunsolus; Catherine J. Murphy; Christy L. Haynes

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

250

ONE HEALTH ILLINOIS SUMMIT The purpose of the One Health Illinois Summit was  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ONE HEALTH ILLINOIS SUMMIT The purpose of the One Health Illinois Summit was: o To provide an update on the health of Illinois' human, animal and ecosystem communities o To encourage communication and food producers o To consider policy options designed to improve the health of Illinois communities

Gilbert, Matthew

251

Lidocaine Toxicity Misinterpreted as a Stroke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toxicity Misinterpreted as a Stroke Benjamin Bursell, MDdysfunction, manifested as a stroke, occurred acutely in andeterioration suggesting stroke. We will review the dosing,

Bursell, Benjamin; Smally, Alan J; Ratzan, Richard M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Community-Based Research: Environmental Conditions, Human Health and the Quality of Life Residents of the Homedale neighborhood in west Phoenix are concerned about  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ASU researchers, and in November 2001 audited 170 households or approximately half of all the households in the neighborhood. Results of Community Audit Health Problems (by household) · 50.4% Coughing Diploma Hispanic/Latino White Under Age 18 Tract 1146 Maricopa County The Circle K Truck Stop at 35th

Hall, Sharon J.

253

EAT SMART Sources: Heart Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-1- EAT SMART Sources: Heart Health American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide and Promotion; Home and Garden Bulletin Number 252; August 1992. Heart Attach Signs, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH Publication No. 01

254

International Health Studies and Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of international health studies and activities is to support the health and safety mission of DOE by providing new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation and other industrial exposures encountered in the workplace or within nearby communities; and as a result of nuclear weapons testing, use and accidents.

255

An assessment of health educators' likelihood of adopting genomic competencies for the public health workforce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the completion of the Human Genome Project helps develop efficient treatment/prevention programs, it will raise new and non-trivial public health issues. Many of these issues fall under the professional purview of health educators. Yet...

Chen, Lei-Shih

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Paraquat toxicity. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the toxic effects of the herbicide paraquat on humans and animals. Topics include clinical and pathological findings, biochemical mechanisms, effects of oxygen, pulmonary effects of exposure, and effects on freshwater and marine organisms. The contamination of marijuana plants with paraquat is also considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Uranium: Environmental Pollution and Health Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium is found ubiquitously in nature in low concentrations in soil, rock, and water. Naturally occurring uranium contains three isotopes, namely 238U, 235U, and 234U. All uranium isotopes have the same chemical properties, but they have different radiological properties. The main civilian use of uranium is to fuel nuclear power plants, whereas high enriched (in 235U) uranium is used in the military sector as nuclear explosives and depleted uranium (DU) as penetrators or tank shielding. Exposure to uranium may cause health problems due to its radiological (uranium is predominantly emitting alpha-particles) and chemical actions (heavy metal toxicity). Uranium uptake may occur by ingestion, inhalation, contaminated wounds, and embedded fragments especially for soldiers. Inhalation of dust is considered the major pathway for uranium uptake in workplaces. Soluble uranium compounds tend to quickly pass through the body, whereas insoluble uranium compounds pose a more serious inhalation exposure hazard. The kidney is the most sensitive organ for uranium chemotoxicity. An important indirect radiological effect of uranium is the increased risk of lung cancers from inhalation of the daughter products of radon, a noble gas in the uranium decay chains that transports uranium-derived radioactivity from soil into the indoor environment. No direct evidence about the carcinogenic effect of DU in humans is available yet.

D. Melo; W. Burkart

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Toxic congener-specific analysis of PCBs: assessment of toxicity in equivalents of TCDD  

SciTech Connect

High resolution capillary gas chromatographic analysis of the polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) present in snapping turtle eggs, provided quantitative data on selected toxic congeners. The concentrations of these congeners have been converted into equivalent toxic concentrations of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-p-dibenzodioxin (TCDD). The toxic equivalent factors (TEFs), necessary to effect this transformation were derived from EC/sub 50/ values (half the concentration of the toxic congener required to produce the maximum effect) for aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) induction associated with the corresponding toxic PCB congener or isomer. Summation of the resulting toxic equivalents provided a composite assessment of the toxicity of the PCB mixture in terms of an equivalent concentration of TCDD.

Olafsson, P.G.; Bryan, A.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Instructions for use JICA's Assistance in Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and clinical care eg, strengthen health systems including the development of human resources, facilitiesInstructions for use #12;1 JICA's Assistance in Health Ryuji MATSUNAGA International Cooperation's Assistance in Health Example of JICA Programme/Projects 2 #12;An Overview of Japan's ODA 3 #12;Japan's ODA

Tsunogai, Urumu

260

Mental retardation and prenatal methylmercury toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Methylmercury (MeHg) is a developmental neurotoxicant; exposure results principally from consumption of seafood contaminated by mercury (Hg). In this analysis, the burden of mental retardation (MR) associated with methylmercury exposure in the 2000 U.S. birth cohort is estimated, and the portion of this burden attributable to mercury (Hg) emissions from coal-fired power plants is identified. The aggregate loss in cognition associated with MeHg exposure in the 2000 U.S. birth cohort was estimated using two previously published dose-response models that relate increases in cord blood Hg concentrations with decrements in IQ. MeHg exposure was assumed not to be correlated with native cognitive ability. Previously published estimates were used to estimate economic costs of MR caused by MeHg. Downward shifts in IQ resulting from prenatal exposure to MeHg of anthropogenic origin are associated with 1,566 excess cases of MR annually (range: 376-14,293). This represents 3.2% of MR cases in the US (range: 0.8%-29.2%). The MR costs associated with decreases in IQ in these children amount to $2.0 billion/year (range: $0.5-17.9 billion). Hg from American power plants accounts for 231 of the excess MR cases year (range: 28-2,109), or 0.5% (range: 0.06%-4.3%) of all MR. These cases cost $289 million (range: $35 million-2.6 billion). Toxic injury to the fetal brain caused by Hg emitted from coal-fired power plants exacts a significant human and economic toll on American children.

Trasande, L.; Schechter, C.B.; Haynes, K.A.; Landrigan, P.J. [CUNY Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Community & Preventative Medicine

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Mercury, cadmium, lead and arsenic levels in three pelagic fish species from the Atlantic Ocean: Intra- and inter-specific variability and human health risks for consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three commonly consumed and commercially valuable fish species (sardine, chub and horse mackerel) were collected from the Northeast and Eastern Central Atlantic Ocean in Portuguese waters during one year. Mercury, cadmium, lead and arsenic amounts were determined in muscles using graphite furnace and cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry. Maximum mean levels of mercury (0.1715 ± 0.0857 mg/kg, ww) and arsenic (1.139 ± 0.350 mg/kg, ww) were detected in horse mackerel. The higher mean amounts of cadmium (0.0084 ± 0.0036 mg/kg, ww) and lead (0.0379 ± 0.0303 mg/kg, ww) were determined in chub mackerel and in sardine, respectively. Intra- and inter-specific variability of metals bioaccumulation was statistically assessed and species and length revealed to be the major influencing biometric factors, in particular for mercury and arsenic. Muscles present metal concentrations below the tolerable limits considered by European Commission Regulation and Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO). However, estimation of non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic health risks by the target hazard quotient and target carcinogenic risk, established by the US Environmental Protection Agency, suggests that these species must be eaten in moderation due to possible hazard and carcinogenic risks derived from arsenic (in all analyzed species) and mercury ingestion (in horse and chub mackerel species).

C. Vieira; S. Morais; S. Ramos; C. Delerue-Matos; M.B.P.P. Oliveira

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal health network Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Products Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 3 SAVE THE DATE Saskatchewan Epidemiology Association Summary: health: bridging animal and human health in...

263

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute mental health Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Human Development Faculty Research Themes Summary: and use of long-term care, mental health care, physician services and prescription drugs among older... College of Health...

264

Electrochemical Sensors for the Detection of Lead and Other Toxic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors for the Detection of Lead and Other Toxic Heavy Metals: The Next Generation of Personal Exposure Electrochemical Sensors for the Detection of Lead and Other Toxic Heavy...

265

Comparative Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic Fractioins of Gasoline and Diesel Emissions Comparative Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic Fractioins...

266

MSc in Environmental Health The Place of Useful Learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? Environmental Health is the assessment & management of environmental influences on human health, including study of: · Environmental protection (including control of air, water and land pollution) · Food safety engineering approaches to manage risks to human health from contaminated water, air, and land

Mottram, Nigel

267

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER HUMAN STEM CELL RESEARCH COST.....................................................................................12 #12;University of Connecticut and the University of Connecticut Health Center Human Stem Cell that is ineligible for federal support. The University of Connecticut and the University of Connecticut Health Center

Kim, Duck O.

268

Environmental toxicity of complex chemical mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and wildlife tissues were collected from four National Priority List Superfund sites within the United States. In general, chemical analysis was not always predictive of mixture toxicity. Although biodegradation reduced the concentration of total...

Gillespie, Annika Margaret

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Nanomaterials and nanoparticles: Sources and toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review is presented as a common foundation for scientists interested in nanoparticles, their origin, activity, and biological toxicity. It is written with the goal of rationalizing and informing public he...

Cristina Buzea; Ivan I. Pacheco; Kevin Robbie

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Toxicity Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in people who work in pulp and paper mills, at hazardous waste sites, municipal and hazardous waste incinerators, and those involved in production, use, and disposal of chlorinated pesticides and herbicides. The most toxic of the PCDDs, 2...

Naspinski, Christine S.

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

Residual Toxicities of Insecticides to Cotton Insects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effects of simulated wind and rain on the residues. Tempera- ture and humidity conditions incident to the holding period were sufficient to destroy most of the residual toxicity of this material. Effect of Simulated Wind Among the chlorinated... hydrocarbon insecticides, there was little difference between the effects of simu- lated wind and rain on residual toxicities. However, it is likely that under field conditions the effects of rain would be more noticeable. Simulated wind was less damaging...

Hightower, B. G.; Gaines, J. C.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Human Genetics Portfolio Review Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the past 20 years, from our contribution to the Human Genome Project at the Sanger Institute to our role during this time. The drive to maximise the health benefits of human genome research remains a core to build research capacity and infrastructure to support human genetics and genomics · providing generous

Rambaut, Andrew

273

Health Economics College of Public Health and Health Professions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of health, the demand for health care, health insurance theory, the demand for health insurance, the health insurance market and managed care, the market for physicians' services, production and cost of health care care environment. #12;2 Apply general and health economics concepts and show demonstrated competence

Kane, Andrew S.

274

Health Sciences and Nursing Health Sociology ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

related to health problems and health care systems, through developing and applying theories, concepts44 Health Sciences and Nursing Health Sociology in interdisciplinary academic fields, involving health, medicine and nursing as well as the field of sociology

Miyashita, Yasushi

275

Oxygen Toxicity Calculations by Erik C. Baker, P.E.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Oxygen Toxicity Calculations by Erik C. Baker, P.E. Management of exposure to oxygen toxicity myself using the good ole' FORTRAN programming language, I found that incorporating oxygen toxicity for others. Background Two oxygen toxicity parameters are typically "tracked" in technical diving

Read, Charles

276

Developmental toxicity of diesel exhaust: A review of studies in experimental animals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Diesel exhaust (DE) is a complex mixture of combustion products of diesel fuel, including gases and diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), commonly known as soot, that contains many toxic air contaminants. Studies of pre- and postnatal exposure to DE or \\{DEPs\\} have revealed changes in growth, sexual development, hormone levels, spermatogenesis, weights of the reproductive and accessory organs, behavior, monoaminergic system, expression of immune-related genes, histopathology of the testes and brain, susceptibility to allergies, and inflammatory and genotoxic endpoints in rodent offspring. Changes in gene expression for gonadal development were also observed after exposure to DE. As for the causative agent for the developmental toxicity of DE, \\{DEPs\\} and the gaseous phase, conflicting findings were reported. Although this paper provides initial information on the potential developmental toxicity of DE including the gaseous phase and DEPs, further studies using relevant concentrations closely reflecting expected levels of human exposure are needed.

Makoto Ema; Masato Naya; Masao Horimoto; Haruhisa Kato

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

UNO Student Health Services Patient's Bill of Rights and Responsibilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

health care program. UNO Student Health Services Human Performance Center Rm. 109 (504) 280-6387 wwwUNO Student Health Services Patient's Bill of Rights and Responsibilities Patient's Bill of Rights to the Health Service regarding its operations and the right to change caregivers for any reason. #12;Patient

Kulp, Mark

278

Reference manual for toxicity and exposure assessment and risk characterization. CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 1980) (CERCLA or Superfund) was enacted to provide a program for identifying and responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA, 1986) was enacted to strengthen CERCLA by requiring that site clean-ups be permanent, and that they use treatments that significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous pollutants. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (USEPA, 1985; USEPA, 1990) implements the CERCLA statute, presenting a process for (1) identifying and prioritizing sites requiring remediation and (2) assessing the extent of remedial action required at each site. The process includes performing two studies: a Remedial Investigation (RI) to evaluate the nature, extent, and expected consequences of site contamination, and a Feasibility Study (FS) to select an appropriate remedial alternative adequate to reduce such risks to acceptable levels. An integral part of the RI is the evaluation of human health risks posed by hazardous substance releases. This risk evaluation serves a number of purposes within the overall context of the RI/FS process, the most essential of which is to provide an understanding of ``baseline`` risks posed by a given site. Baseline risks are those risks that would exist if no remediation or institutional controls are applied at a site. This document was written to (1) guide risk assessors through the process of interpreting EPA BRA policy and (2) help risk assessors to discuss EPA policy with regulators, decision makers, and stakeholders as it relates to conditions at a particular DOE site.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Risk assessment of toxic pollutants from fossil fuel power plants: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the development and application of a methodology for assessing the control costs and chronic health risks of toxic pollutant emissions from coal-fired electric power plants. The approach emphasizes surface water discharges and pollution, but incorporates emissions to air, water, soil, and groundwater and transfers of pollutants between these media. The components of the general framework include (1) pollutant emission characterization, (2) environmental transport and fate analysis, (3) population exposure calculation, and (4) quantitative health risk assessment. The report provides a basic overview of the approach, discusses each component in detail, and describes its application to an hypothetical, simplified case study. 234 refs., 32 figs., 32 tabs.

Bolten, J.G.; Morrison, P.F.; Solomon, K.A.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

An empirical analysis of exposure-based regulation to abate toxic air pollution  

SciTech Connect

Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments requires the Environmental Protection Agency to regulate 189 air toxics, including emissions from by-product coke ovens. Economists criticize the inefficiency of uniform standards, but Title III makes no provision for flexible regulatory instruments. Environmental health scientists suggest that population exposure, not necessarily ambient air quality, should motivate environmental air pollution policies. Using an engineering-economic model of the United States steel industry, we estimate that an exposure-based policy can achieve the same level of public health as coke oven emissions standards and can reduce compliance costs by up to 60.0%. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Marakovits, D.M.; Considine, T.J. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Rangeland Drought Management for Texans: Toxic Range Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ly alter grazing behavior. To minimize losses to toxic plants, producers should learn how to identify the toxic plants, use good graz- ing and livestock management practices, and take measures to control the plants when necessary. Know which plants... are toxic The first step in managing for toxic plants is being able to identify them. Ranchers must be able to: Identify plants that are toxic to livestock in their area Understand what makes them poisonous Recognize the symptoms produced when live...

Hart, Charles R.; Carpenter, Bruce B.

2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

282

Human adaptation of avian influenza viruses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human adaptation of avian influenza viruses pose an enormous public health challenge as the human population is predominantly naive to avian influenza antigens. As such, constant surveillance is needed to monitor the ...

Srinivasan, Karunya

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Health Insurance After Graduation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health Insurance After Graduation: Individual Health Insurance in California University of California, Berkeley Student Health Insurance Office Tang Center Fall Semester 2013 #12;Health Care vs. Health Insurance Health Care is... Provision of Medical Services by ­ Private Physicians & Hospitals

Kammen, Daniel M.

284

Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Background Improving health in our nation requires strengthening four major domains of the health care system: personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and health-related research. Many avoidable shortcomings...

Detmer, Don E

2003-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

285

environmental health The Local Board of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environmental health The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer Second Edition #12;The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer Second Edition Author Carrie Hribar, MA Project Director ďż˝ Public Health Policy National Association of Local Boards of Health Editor Mark Schultz, MEd

286

Public health assessment for Petro-Chemical, Inc. (Turtle Bayou) Liberty, Liberty County, Texas, Region 6. CERCLIS No. TXD980873350. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Petro-Chemical Systems, Inc. site, located near Liberty, Texas, is a site where unauthorized disposal of petroleum-based oils has taken place. Although there is evidence of past exposure to site contaminants, the best available evidence does not indicate that humans are currently being exposed to site contaminants at levels that could cause adverse health effects. Contaminated ground water, surface water, soils, and surface water sediments have been found on the site. Although sampling was done for 144 priority pollutants, the primary contaminants of concern are benzene, ethylbenzene, xylene, naphthalene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and lead. Because the greatest threat to public health would be contamination of drinking water, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has recommended that necessary actions are taken to insure that private wells do not become contaminated with site contaminants.

Not Available

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - administration health care Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

health care Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: administration health care Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 College of Health and Human...

288

BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH Assessing the Environmental, Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH Assessing the Environmental, Health and Safety Impact of Nanoparticles- proaching the sensitivity limit for most instruments. #12;BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH A colloidal nanoparticle

Magee, Joseph W.

289

Eighth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Truly healthy communities and their citizen leaders recognize the roles that human health, environmental quality, environmental justice, and economic development play in...

290

Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles  

SciTech Connect

Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals. -- Highlights: ? Intratracheal instillation of W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe induces lung inflammation in rats. ? W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe alter expression of oxidative stress and toxicity genes. ? W–Ni–Co induces a greater oxidative burst response than W–Ni–Fe in lung macrophages.

Roedel, Erik Q., E-mail: Erik.Roedel@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Cafasso, Danielle E., E-mail: Danielle.Cafasso@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Lee, Karen W.M., E-mail: Karen.W.Lee@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Pierce, Lisa M., E-mail: Lisa.Pierce@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Reducing Livestock Losses To Toxic Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,Extension CommunicationsSpecialistTheTexasA&MUniversitySystem. Cover design byRhondaKappler, ExtensionCommercial Artist Reducing Livestock Losses to Toxic Plants Allan McGinty and Rick Machen* More than 100 species of toxic plants in- fest Texas rangelands. These plants... and Sons: New York, N.Y. Lane, M. A., M. H. Ralphs, J. D. Olsen, F. D. Provenza and J. A. Pfister. 1990. ?Conditioned taste aversion: potentialfor reducing cattle loss to larkspur.? Journal ofRangeManagement. 43:127-131. McGinty, Allan and Tommy G. Welch...

McGinty, Allan; Machen, Richard V.

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

292

Lead toxicity, vulnerable subpopulations and emergency preparedness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality-health endpoints for which the elderly...over the past 30 y, potential health risks from environmental Pb...mortality study. Environ. Health Perspect (2006) 114:1538-1541...cadmium, cobalt and lead as more dangerous than hitherto expected. Carcinogenesis......

Norm Healey

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Introducing the journal of compassionate health care  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The inspiration for this new open access journal, Journal of Compassionate Health Care emerged from the apparent need to restore humanity to healthcare, particularly within a period of austerity that has been aff...

Sue Shea; Christos Lionis

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Putting mHealth in Public Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in mobile technologies have the potential to transform public health today and for the future. However, the potential and promise of mHealth in public health initiatives are not guaranteed. ... Health an...

Donna Malvey; Donna J. Slovensky

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

CDC's National Asthma Control Program CDC 24/7: Saving Lives. Protecting People from Health Threats. Saving Money Through Prevention.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health Threats. Saving Money Through Prevention. Environmental Health Your environment is everything, you are more likely to stay healthy. But when your environment exposes you to dangerous events or toxic substances, your health can be negatively affected. CDC is committed to saving lives

296

Toxic effects of excess cloned centromeres.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mitosis. We conclude that an excess of centromeres is toxic and...Yeast transformations. The lithium acetate method (19) was used...modifications. Cells were treated with lithium acetate at a cell concentration...and mixed with a twofold excess of similarly treated strain...

B Futcher; J Carbon

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER DOE FRAP 1997-15 Prepared for in both domestic and industrial wastewater. The release of these compounds during wastewater treatment to predict the mass of the VOCs in the wastewater treated by biotransformation and the mass stripped

298

Health Fairs and Screenings - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wellness > Health Fairs and Screenings Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and...

299

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a variety of topics including substance abuse, worksite health promotion, health care cost containment the importance of health care as well as the promotion, protection and maintenance of health. Without a doubt things in the area of health promotion and health care. As the COHS look to the future, we need to take

Barrash, Warren

300

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle-income countries to carry out health- related research within their own countries. Gl bal Health #12;3 | Global Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated

Rambaut, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

HEALTH ECONOMICS Health Econ. (in press)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

health services/economics; costs and cost analysis; health services/utilization; quality of health careHEALTH ECONOMICS Health Econ. (in press) Published online in Wiley InterScience (www and ROBERT BLACKb a Department of Population and Family Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School

Scharfstein, Daniel

302

Study downplays health concerns  

SciTech Connect

A government-funded study has concluded that reformulated gasoline containing methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) does not increase short-term health risks when compared with gasoline that does not contain the additive. The study, performed by the Health Effects Institute (Cambridge, MA), compared data from dozens of animal, human, and epidemiological studies of health effects linked to oxygenates, including MTBE and ethanol, but did not find enough evidence to warrant an immediate reduction in oxygenate use. However, the study did recommend that additional research be conducted on possible health consequences associated with the gasoline additives, including neurotoxic effects, if oxygenates continue to be used long term. Oxygenates have been used in gasoline since 1992, when EPA mandated that several municipalities use MTBE or other oxygenates in reformulated gasoline to reduce carbon monoxide emissions and meet Clean Air Act requirements. Shortly after the program began, residents in areas where the oxygenates were used complained of nausea, headaches, and dizziness. The institute says the study--funded by EPA and the Centers for Disease Control--will be used for a broader review of gasoline oxygenates by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

Stringer, J.

1996-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

303

Office of Domestic and International Health Studies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Domestic and International Health Studies engages in the conduct of international scientific studies that may provide new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation in the workplace or people exposed in communities as a result of nuclear accidents, including providing health and environmental monitoring services to populations specified by law.

304

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxicity due Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

305

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

306

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxic mode-of-action Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

307

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute testis toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

308

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxicity results Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... not cause overt fetal or maternal toxicity, but not rats...

309

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxic encephalopathy Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

310

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute renal toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

311

E-Print Network 3.0 - acutely toxic hepatitis Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

312

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute urinary toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

313

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute liver toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

314

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxic hepatitis Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

315

Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations San Francisco Bay Regional Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations San Francisco Bay Regional Monitoring Program chemicals of concern that may impact the estuary's ecosystem. Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE identified weak associations between mortality and bulk-phase chlordane and silver concentrations at Redwood

316

Genomic medicine: genetic variation and its impact on the future of health care  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sequence of the human genome. Science. 291...metabolomic assessments of human health and nutrition...for Biotechnology Information. Nucleic Acids Res...care. | Advances in genome technology and other fruits of the Human Genome Project are playing a growing...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emission Samples Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission Samples 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute...

318

Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emissions Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emissions 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Lovelace Respiratory Research...

319

Yahoo! Health News: Rat Whiskers Give Clues to Blinking Disorder Yahoo! My Yahoo! Mail  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yahoo! Health News: Rat Whiskers Give Clues to Blinking Disorder Yahoo! My Yahoo! Mail Search · Encyclopedia A-Z · Health News via RSS · Recipes HealthDay All HealthDay News Rat Whiskers Give Clues, Feb. 2 (HealthDayNews) -- A rat's whiskers may hold vital clues to a debilitating human disorder

Kleinfeld, David

320

Seeing Toxic Algae Before it Blooms By Steve Ress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seeing Toxic Algae Before it Blooms By Steve Ress Researchers at the University of Nebraska of toxic blue-green algae before the bacteria that produce it can grow into a full-scale bloom. Now UNL and monitor in real-time, the water-borne agents that can cause toxic blue- green algae to flourish and become

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Health Effects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers research programs and monitoring activities, both domestic and international, that support the protection and promotion of the health of DOE workers, their families, and residents of neighboring communities near DOE sites, affected by exposure to hazardous materials from DOE sites or a result of nuclear weapons testing, use or accident.

322

Health Primers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE proverb that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing is especially true in regard to matters connected with ... thing is especially true in regard to matters connected with health, and it might therefore be supposed that the issue of a series of ...

T. L. B.

1879-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

323

Human viruses: discovery and emergence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...whether or not it poses a risk to humans, would be...will pose a serious risk to public health but...situation will require both political will and considerable investment in infrastructure...Woolhouse, M. E. J. 2001 Risk factors for human disease...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Can you recognize victims of human trafficking among the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

health provider, you can help liberate victims of human trafficking. Health Problems Common in Victims because they are often forced to live and work in dangerous conditions, putting them at greater risk for, phobias and panic attacks Preventive health care for victims of human trafficking is virtually non

Kay, Mark A.

325

Nanoparticles, human health hazard and regulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...testing is necessary before they enter the market. Whether this situation continues remains...the materials being developed for the market. Both are complex, and some of the issues...241-247. Lucking, A. J. , 2008 Diesel exhaust inhalation increases thrombus...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Communities: Human Health and Community Development Webinar ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

goals of strengthening our economy, creating good jobs now while providing a foundation for lasting prosperity, using energy more efficiently to secure energy independence,...

327

Medi, Human Robot Interaction in Pediatric Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Social Robots. ACM Classification Keywords H.5.m. Information interfaces and presentation (e.g., HCI

Greenberg, Saul

328

Seafood Safety and Human Health Implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current projections for the twenty-first century show that global warming will accelerate, with stronger storms, extreme precipitation, dry spells and rising sea levels as the primary symptoms. Such changes will ...

António Marques; Rui Rosa; Maria Leonor Nunes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Western Human Resources Occupational Health and Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wavelength (nm) Power/Energy Open Enclosed Embedded Note: For each laser/laser system, a Laser Beam. Training/Experience Regarding Lasers/Laser Systems and Western Laser Safety Training Date of the Applicant or Contact Person before operating lasers/laser systems. 3 Western Laser workers who will use an open laser

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

330

From HEALTH TOPICS on the UHS Web site www.rochester.edu/uhs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From HEALTH TOPICS on the UHS Web site www.rochester.edu/uhs Stress University Health Service. Stress causing agents include: Physical Fears · Dangerous machinery · Exposure to toxic chemicals · Dangerous, congested traffic Psychological Fears · Failure · Phobias · Inability to manage debts

Mahon, Bradford Z.

331

Methylmercury-induced toxicity is mediated by enhanced intracellular calcium through activation of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C  

SciTech Connect

Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant to which humans can be exposed by ingestion of contaminated food. MeHg has been suggested to exert its toxicity through its high reactivity to thiols, generation of arachidonic acid and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and elevation of free intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}). However, the precise mechanism has not been fully defined. Here we show that phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) is a critical pathway for MeHg-induced toxicity in MDCK cells. D609, an inhibitor of PC-PLC, significantly reversed the toxicity in a time- and dose-dependent manner with concomitant inhibition of the diacylglycerol (DAG) generation and the phosphatidylcholine (PC)-breakdown. MeHg activated the group IV cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} (cPLA{sub 2}) and acidic form of sphingomyelinase (A-SMase) downstream of PC-PLC, but these enzymes as well as protein kinase C (PKC) were not linked to the toxicity by MeHg. Furthermore, MeHg produced ROS, which did not affect the toxicity. Addition of EGTA to culture media resulted in partial decrease of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and partially blocked the toxicity. In contrast, when the cells were treated with MeHg in the presence of Ca{sup 2+} in the culture media, D609 completely prevented cell death with parallel decrease in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. Our results demonstrated that MeHg-induced toxicity was linked to elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} through activation of PC-PLC, but not attributable to the signaling pathways such as cPLA{sub 2}, A-SMase, and PKC, or to the generation of ROS.

Kang, Mi Sun [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Ju Yeon [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Ji Heui [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hyung Jun [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kwang Mook [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Chin, Mi-Reyoung [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Chang-Kiu [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bonventre, Joseph V. [Renal Unit, Brigham Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Jung, Sung Yun [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Kyong [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: proteinlab@hanmail.net

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Health and Health Care, Macroeconomics of  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Macroeconomics can have a measurable impact on health and health care. The aim of this article is to introduce the macroeconomics of health and health care. The article will outline the core features and terms related to macroeconomics, as distinct from microeconomics, and then give an overview of the relationship between the macroeconomy and health and health care. It will thus consider, for example, the relationship between health care expenditure and national income, and provide an overview of the routes through which greater macroeconomic integration at the global level may impact on health and health care via international trade.

R. Smith

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

today. In politics, in education, in health care, in society in general we are so turned inwardCollege of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection April/May 2010 Volume VIII (8) WOW! Spring semester of 2010 is almost

Barrash, Warren

335

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection April 2011 Volume IX (4) The end of the spring semester is quickly approaching accreditation review. Similarly, the Environmental and Occupational Health program also had a very positive

Barrash, Warren

336

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, College of Health Sciences. · "Innovative Ways to Address Idaho's Healthcare Needs: Long-Term CareCollege of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection February 2011 Volume IX (3) Since the last COHS newsletter, the faculty

Barrash, Warren

337

Students' Health Service Hampton House Health Centre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.bristol.ac.uk/infectious-diseases/meningitis www.bristol.ac.uk/infectious-diseases/mumps www.bristol.ac.uk/infectious-diseases/measles. Health care / Health care Student support Health care Registering with a doctor It is important that you register' Health Service The Students' Health Service (SHS) offers full general practice care, including: ·travel

Bristol, University of

338

Public Health Conferences GENERAL PUBLIC HEALTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Health Conferences GENERAL PUBLIC HEALTH Michigan's Premier Public Health Conference.sph.umich.edu/scr/news_events/event.cfm?ID=2631 American Public Health Association (APHA) 140th Annual Meeting & Exposition: October 27-31, 2012 in San Francisco, CA o http://www.apha.org/meetings/AnnualMeeting/ Global Health & Innovation 2013

Kamat, Vineet R.

339

Health Research National Institute for Health Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Embedding Health Research National Institute for Health Research Annual Report 2009/10 #12;Contents National Institute for Health Research Annual Report 2009/10 1 Foreword 2 The National Institute for Health to the NHS 40 Section 4: Strengthening health policy 54 Section 5: Changing NHS practice 64 Financial summary

Diggle, Peter J.

340

counselling health promotion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

health and counselling services health promotion 10 Ways to get active Most people find that huff and puff stuff a few times a week and make it last for 15 minutes or more each time. students.sfu.ca/health counselling health promotion physiotherapy health clinic #12;health and counselling services health promotion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

BACTOX, a Rapid Bioassay That Uses Protozoa To Assess the Toxicity of Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...well-recognized standard for toxicity testing (, , , ). The purpose of the BACTOX test is the detection of the overall toxicity of surreptitious strains which synthesize toxic secondary metabolites (toxicants) and which may constitute a biohazard. Its purpose is...

Wolfram Schlimme; Marcello Marchiani; Kurt Hanselmann; Bernard Jenni

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

The Health Component of Head Start: Potential Impacts on Childhood Obesity, Immunizations, and Dental Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Head Start, an early intervention program administered by the Administration for Children and Families of the Department of Health and Human Services, offers children of low-income families comprehensive services in an effort to even the playing...

Banda, Tanya Y.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

343

Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O[sub 3], PO, PO[sub 2], etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like. 20 figs.

Chang, S.G.

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

344

Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O.sub.3, PO, PO.sub.2, etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like.

Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

CERTIFICATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDER FOR EMPLOYEE'S PREGNANCY DISABILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CERTIFICATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDER FOR EMPLOYEE'S PREGNANCY DISABILITY HUMAN RESOURCES Employee this form to your medical provider. Section II must be fully completed by the health care provider Department/College name: Campus Phone: I authorize my health care provider to complete this form and provide

Eirinaki, Magdalini

346

Communication and Effectiveness in Primary Health Jean Carletta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Communication and Effectiveness in Primary Health Care Teams Jean Carletta Human Communication.Carletta@edinburgh.ac.uk ABSTRACT Primary health care team members need to communicate effectively with each other in order of cross-disciplinary team meetings, we describe communication in primary health care teams, explore

Carletta, Jean

347

ORISE: Health Literacy Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Literacy Development While health disparities may be attributed to a number of factors, health literacy development and access to health information can help special populations...

348

Evaluation of toxicity and biodegradability of choline chloride based deep eutectic solvents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been dramatically expanding in popularity as a new generation of environmentally friendly solvents with possible applications in various industrial fields, but their ecological footprint has not yet been thoroughly investigated. In the present study, three choline chloride-based \\{DESs\\} with glucose, glycerol and oxalic acid as hydrogen bond donors were evaluated for in vitro toxicity using fish and human cell line, phytotoxicity using wheat and biodegradability using wastewater microorganisms through closed bottle test. Obtained in vitro toxicity data on cell lines indicate that choline chloride: glucose and choline chloride:glycerol possess low cytotoxicity (EC50>10 mM for both cell lines) while choline chloride:oxalic acid possess moderate cytotoxicity (EC50 value 1.64 mM and 4.19 mM for fish and human cell line, respectively). Results on phytotoxicity imply that tested \\{DESs\\} are non-toxic with seed germination EC50 values higher than 5000 mg l?1. All tested \\{DESs\\} were classified as?readily biodegradable? based on their high levels of mineralization (68–96%). These findings indicate that \\{DESs\\} have a green profile and a good prospect for a wider use in the field of green technologies.

Kristina Radoševi?; Marina Cvjetko Bubalo; Višnje Gaurina Sr?ek; Dijana Grgas; Tibela Landeka Dragi?evi?; Ivana Radoj?i? Redovnikovi?

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Mental health in schools and public health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corporation; 1989. Public Health Reports / May–June 2006 /comes in part from the Of?ce of Adolescent Health, Maternaland Child Health Bureau (Title V, Social Security Act),

Adelman, Howard S; Taylor, Linda

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Virtual Health Square: a new Health Promotion Setting?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Health Square is a new health promotion setting in Sweden. Health Squares are meeting places for health; offering activities such as information on health management,… (more)

Mahmud, Amina; Olander, Ewy; Haglund, Bo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Disposition of toxic PCB congeners in snapping turtle eggs: expressed as toxic equivalents of TCDD  

SciTech Connect

Studies of snapping turtles, taken from the region of the Upper Hudson River, in New York State, revealed exceedingly high levels of PCBs in the adipose tissue. There is evidence to suggest that large reserves of fat provide protection against chlorinated hydrocarbon toxicity. Such storage may protect snapping turtle eggs from disposition of toxic PCB congeners and account for the apparent absence of reports regarding detrimental effects on the hatchability of eggs from turtles living in the vicinity of the upper Hudson River. The present study was undertaken to determine if indeed these eggs are protected against disposition of toxic PCB congeners by the presence of large reserves of fat. Although tissue volumes play an important role in determining the initial site of disposition, the major factor controlling the elimination of these compounds involves metabolism. For simple halogenated benzenes as well as for more complex halogenated biphenyls, oxidative metabolism catalyzed by P-448, occurs primarily at the site of two adjacent unsubstituted carbon atoms via arene oxide formation leading to the formation of water soluble metabolites. Toxicological studies have demonstrated that the most toxic PCB congeners, isosteriomers of tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), require no metabolic activation. These compounds have chlorine atoms in the meta and para positions of both rings. It may be concluded that the structures of PCB congeners and isomers which favor induction of cytochrome P-448 are also those which are toxic and resist metabolism. It is the objective of the present study to determine if the heavy fat bodies of the female turtle provide a sufficiently large sink to retain the toxic congeners and prevent their incorporation into the eggs.

Bryan, A.M.; Stone, W.B.; Olafsson, P.G.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

ATHENA, the Desktop Human "Body"  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Creating surrogate human organs, coupled with insights from highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies, a new project is on the brink of revolutionizing the way we screen new drugs and toxic agents. ATHENA, the Advanced Tissue-engineered Human Ectypal Network Analyzer project team, is developing four human organ constructs - liver, heart, lung and kidney - that are based on a significantly miniaturized platform. Each organ component will be about the size of a smartphone screen, and the whole ATHENA "body" of interconnected organs would fit neatly on a desk. "By developing this 'homo minutus,' we are stepping beyond the need for animal or Petri dish testing: There are huge benefits in developing drug and toxicity analysis systems that can mimic the response of actual human organs," said Rashi Iyer, a senior scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the lead laboratory on the five-year, $19 million multi-institutional effort. The project is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). Some 40 percent of pharmaceuticals fail their clinical trials, Iyer noted, and there are thousands of chemicals whose effects on humans are simply unknown. Providing a realistic, cost-effective and rapid screening system such as ATHENA with high-throughput capabilities could provide major benefits to the medical field, screening more accurately and offering a greater chance of clinical trial success.

Iyer, Rashi; Harris, Jennifer

2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

353

ATHENA, the Desktop Human "Body"  

SciTech Connect

Creating surrogate human organs, coupled with insights from highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies, a new project is on the brink of revolutionizing the way we screen new drugs and toxic agents. ATHENA, the Advanced Tissue-engineered Human Ectypal Network Analyzer project team, is developing four human organ constructs - liver, heart, lung and kidney - that are based on a significantly miniaturized platform. Each organ component will be about the size of a smartphone screen, and the whole ATHENA "body" of interconnected organs would fit neatly on a desk. "By developing this 'homo minutus,' we are stepping beyond the need for animal or Petri dish testing: There are huge benefits in developing drug and toxicity analysis systems that can mimic the response of actual human organs," said Rashi Iyer, a senior scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the lead laboratory on the five-year, $19 million multi-institutional effort. The project is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). Some 40 percent of pharmaceuticals fail their clinical trials, Iyer noted, and there are thousands of chemicals whose effects on humans are simply unknown. Providing a realistic, cost-effective and rapid screening system such as ATHENA with high-throughput capabilities could provide major benefits to the medical field, screening more accurately and offering a greater chance of clinical trial success.

Iyer, Rashi; Harris, Jennifer

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

354

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Department of Occupational Health and Safety Revised December 2009 #12;Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Management System 1. Introduction.............................................................................................................. 3 2.2 Management of Health and Safety

355

Fact Sheet HEALTH SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Long Term Care Administrator · Training Coordinator · Clinical Health Education Specialist · Health Media Director · Long Term Care Facilities Manager Fact Sheet HEALTH SCIENCE Highlights · Health Science

Su, Xiao

356

Implications of the toxicity of tetramethyltin, dimethyl tin dichloride, and tin tetrachloride in selecting a suitable tin precursor in the chemical vapor deposition of tin oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Potential health hazards in the chemical vapor deposition of tin oxide films from tetramethylin dimethylin dichloride and tin tetrachloride have to be balanced against the benefits to solar cell fabrication. Concerns regarding the toxicity costs and physical properties of and the quality of the tin oxide films produced with these tin precursors are outlined. (AIP)

Roy G. Gordon; James W. Prescia

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Transforming Health Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transforming Health Research the first two years National Institute for Health Research Progress For Information R OCR R ef: 0 Gateway R ef: 9298 Title Transforming Health Research the first two years. Health Institute for Health Research Progress Report i Transforming Health Research the first two years National

Diggle, Peter J.

358

Global Health Seminar Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in global health: The challenges of investing in health and universal health coverage Although targets can help to focus global health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in global health

Klein, Ophir

359

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL/PUB-3092 LBNL/PUB-3092 Guidelines for Generators to Meet HWHF Acceptance Requirements for Hazardous, Radioactive, and Mixed Wastes at Berkeley Lab Waste Management Group Environment, Health, and Safety Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, California 94720 Revision 7.1 October 2011 1. Hazardous Wastes. 1- 1 Summary of Hazardous Waste Requirements. 1- 2 1.1 How Do I Know If My Waste Is Hazardous?. 1- 3 1.1.1 Characteristic Waste. 1- 4 1.1.1.1 Ignitability. 1- 4 1.1.1.2 Corrosivity. 1- 4 1.1.1.3 Reactivity. 1- 5 1.1.1.4 Toxicity. 1- 5 1.1.2 Listed Waste. 1- 6 1.1.3 Chemical Compatibility. 1- 7 1.1.4 Excess Laboratory Chemicals and Laboratory Cleanouts. 1- 10 1.1.5 Unknowns. 1- 10

360

The Use of Remotely Sensed Bioelectric Action Potentials to Evaluate Episodic Toxicity Events and Ambient Toxicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from storm water runoff is very difficult. The research reported here describes a non-invasive, or minimally invasive, system that measures in real-time or near real-time, clam gape. Clams have been shown to change gape in the presence of toxicants i...

Waller, W. Tom; Acevedo, Miguel F.; Allen, H. J.; Schwalm, F. U.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection December 2009 January 2010 Volume VIII (5) Moving from the Superficial the superficial level so that the result is the formation of deep relationships, caring, compassion, justice, love

Barrash, Warren

362

Center for Health & Counseling Services Health Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College How is West Nile diagnosed? If a health care provider suspects WNV, samples of the patient's bloodCenter for Health & Counseling Services Health Services 505 Ramapo Valley Road, Mahwah, NJ 07430 Nile Virus outbreak is the biggest since the virus was first identified in the United States, health

Rainforth, Emma C.

363

Macroeconomics and Health: Investing in Health for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Macroeconomics and Health: Investing in Health for Economic Development #12;Information concerning be obtained from: World Health Organization Marketing and Dissemination 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland tel: (41 clear and strong on the central task of raising the health of the poor. I can be `realistic

364

UNIVERSITY HEALTH CENTER UGA OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY HEALTH CENTER UGA OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH APPROVAL FOR PHYSICAL EXAMS, EYE EXAMS, LAB WORK No Faculty/Staff: Yes No UGA Employment: Full-Time Part-Time New to Occupational Health Program? Yes No E: Release of Information: I authorize the University Health Center ("UHC") at The University of Georgia

Arnold, Jonathan

365

Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5th Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health Hosted by The Stanford WSDM* Center May 21;3 Welcome to the 5th Annual Women's Health Forum - hosted by the Stanford WSDM Center, also known as the Stanford Center for Health Research on Women and Sex Differences in Medicine. The Stanford WSDM Center

Kay, Mark A.

366

Students' Health Service Hampton House Health Centre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.ac.uk/infectious-diseases. Health care / Student support Other NHS services NHS 111 NHS 111 is a telephone service, giving in an emergency. Student support / Health care Student support Health care Registering with a doctor practice care, including: · travel immunisation and advice · contraceptive advice · sexual health testing

Bristol, University of

367

Health and Health Care, Need for  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this article the authors critically examine what it means to be in need of either health or health care. The authors start by considering different definitions of health and reasons for valuing health. In light of their answers to these questions the authors consider the notion of a baseline of health against which health need should be measured, and suggest that this baseline should be specified in terms of a sufficient rather than a maximally attainable level of health achievement. The authors then look at three different concepts of health care need and how needs would be ranked for the purpose of health care rationing on each of these three conceptions. It is concluded that ‘distribution according to need’ names a general approach to health policy rather than a specific principle of distribution.

G. Wester; J. Wolff

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A review of the toxicity of biomass pyrolysis liquids formed at low temperatures  

SciTech Connect

The scaleup of biomass fast pyrolysis systems to large pilot and commercial scales will expose an increasingly large number of personnel to potential health hazards, especially during the evaluation of the commercial use of the pyrolysis condensates. Although the concept of fast pyrolysis to optimize liquid products is relatively new, low-temperature pyrolysis processes have been used over the aeons to produce charcoal and liquid by-products, e.g., smoky food flavors, food preservatives, and aerosols containing narcotics, e.g., nicotine. There are a number of studies in the historical literature that concern the hazards of acute and long-term exposure to smoke and to the historical pyrolysis liquids formed at low temperatures. The reported toxicity of smoke, smoke food flavors, and fast pyrolysis oils is reviewed. The data found for these complex mixtures suggest that the toxicity may be less than that of the individual components. It is speculated that there may be chemical reactions that take place that serve to reduce the toxicity during aging. 81 refs.

Diebold, J.P. [Thermalchemie, Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Investigations of Sediment Elutriate Toxicity at Three Estuarine Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigations of Sediment Elutriate Toxicity at Three Estuarine Stations in San Francisco Bay.............................................................................................. 8 Sediment-Water Interface Exposures................................................................................. 9 August 1997 Sediment-Water Interface Exposures

370

Salicylate Toxicity from Ingestion and Continued Dermal Absorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of salicylate dermal absorption and toxicity. REFERENCESand Continued Dermal Absorption Rachel L. Chin, MD*, Kent R.bases in the percutaneous absorption of salicylates II. J

Chin, Rachel L; Olson, Kent R; Dempsey, Delia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Assessment of metal content and toxicity of leachates from teapots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metallic teapots traditionally used in Morocco were investigated for release of toxic metals from the teapots and their toxicity, as determined by MetPAD, a bacterial toxicity test that is specific for heavy metal toxicity. Our data show that some teapots were non-toxic while a few others were highly toxic, as shown by MetPAD. Tea addition reduced somewhat heavy metal toxicity due possibly to the complexing ability of tea. Chemical analysis of teapot leachates showed that some contained zinc and copper. Teapot No. 5, which showed the highest toxicity, also displayed the highest Zn concentration (7.39 mg/l), confirming the toxicity data. Based on estimates of tea consumption in Morocco, we showed that the extra daily burden of Zn ranged from 1.75 to 4.2 mg/day, assuming the maximum zinc concentration of 7.4 mg/l, as found in our study. This represents 3.5–8% of the LOAEL for zinc of 50 mg/day and would not be important as compared to other sources of zinc intake.

Ali Boularbah; Gabriel Bitton; J.L Morel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Copper Toxicity in the San Francisco Bay-Delta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reducing the toxicity of copper that continues to leach fromothers to characterize copper bioaccumulation from distinctreview of total dissolved copper and its chemical speciation

Buck, Kristen N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

SURGICAL HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY | UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN Spring 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SURGICAL HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY | UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN Spring 2014 Journal, COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING Department of Surgery University of Saskatchewan COVER PAGE Primal (96" x 60 Humanities Program Department of Surgery University of Saskatchewan Health Sciences Building 107 Wiggins Road

Peak, Derek

374

Human Ecology Human ecology Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human Ecology Impact of Human ecology Research Bonus Issue FROM SCHOLARSHIP TO POLICY MAKING OF HUMAN ECOLOGY APRIL 2005/VOLUME 33, NUMBER 1 #12;Human Ecology Volume 33, Number 1 April 2005 The New York State College of Human Ecology at Cornell University Lisa Staiano-Coico, Ph.D. Rebecca Q

Wang, Z. Jane

375

Increased cellular brevetoxins in the red tide dinoflagellate Karenia ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... limitation of growth rate: Evolutionary implications and potential effects on bloom toxicity ... ABSTRACT: Karenia brevis blooms impair human health, marine

376

Variation in Selective Toxicity: Causes and Consequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pre-invasive lesions such as Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS). This project addresses two fundamental questions in human cancer biology: 1. When does the invasive breast cancer phenotype first emerge? and 2. Do cancer stem cells / cancer progenitor...

J. Frank Henderson

1969-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A high-throughput method for assessing chemical toxicity using a Caenorhabditis elegans reproduction assay  

SciTech Connect

The National Research Council has outlined the need for non-mammalian toxicological models to test the potential health effects of a large number of chemicals while also reducing the use of traditional animal models. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an attractive alternative model because of its well-characterized and evolutionarily conserved biology, low cost, and ability to be used in high-throughput screening. A high-throughput method is described for quantifying the reproductive capacity of C. elegans exposed to chemicals for 48 h from the last larval stage (L4) to adulthood using a COPAS Biosort. Initially, the effects of exposure conditions that could influence reproduction were defined. Concentrations of DMSO vehicle {<=} 1% did not affect reproduction. Previous studies indicated that C. elegans may be influenced by exposure to low pH conditions. At pHs greater than 4.5, C. elegans reproduction was not affected; however below this pH there was a significant decrease in the number of offspring. Cadmium chloride was chosen as a model toxicant to verify that automated measurements were comparable to those of traditional observational studies. EC{sub 50} values for cadmium for automated measurements (176-192 {mu}M) were comparable to those previously reported for a 72-h exposure using manual counting (151 {mu}M). The toxicity of seven test toxicants on C. elegans reproduction was highly correlative with rodent lethality suggesting that this assay may be useful in predicting the potential toxicity of chemicals in other organisms.

Boyd, Windy A. [Biomolecular Screening Branch, National Toxicology Program, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); McBride, Sandra J.; Rice, Julie R.; Snyder, Daniel W. [Biomolecular Screening Branch, National Toxicology Program, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Freedman, Jonathan H., E-mail: freedma1@niehs.nih.go [Biomolecular Screening Branch, National Toxicology Program, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Laboratory of Toxicology and Pharmacology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Assessing interactions between nutrients and toxicity : influences of nitrogen and phosphorus on triclosan toxicity to the aquatic macrophyte "lemna gibba".  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the present study, influences of nutrient availability on triclosan toxicity to a model aquatic macrophyte Lemna gibba were explored. Triclosan effective concentrations varied by… (more)

Fulton, Barry A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research Compliance Order, October 6, 1995  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Compliance Order, October 6, 1.. Page 1 of 11 for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Compliance Order, October 6, 1.. Page 1 of 11 EM Home | Regulatory Compliance | Environmental Compliance Agreements Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Compliance Order, October 6, 1995 STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY DEPARTMENT OF TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL _________________________________ In the Matter of: LABORATORY FOR ENERGY-RELATED HEALTH RESEARCH (LEHR). HWCA U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, Respondent. ) ) ) COMPLIANCE ORDER ) 95/96 -020 ) ) ) ) _________________________________) FEDERAL FACILITY COMPLIANCE ACT ORDER FOR THE LABORATORY FOR ENERGY-RELATED HEALTH RESEARCH (LEHR) This Order is issued by the California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) to require compliance by the United States Department of Energy (DOE)

380

COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR HOSPITAL SYSTEMS SERVING MONROE COUNTY, NEW YORK 2012 Lakeside Health System Rochester General Health System Unity Health System Memorial Hospital Developed Collaboratively with Finger Lakes Health System Agency Monroe County Department

Goldman, Steven A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR HOSPITAL SYSTEMS SERVING MONROE COUNTY, NEW YORK 2013 Lakeside Health System Rochester General Health System Unity Health System Memorial Hospital Developed Collaboratively with Finger Lakes Health System Agency Monroe County Department

Goldman, Steven A.

382

Assessing the potential toxicity of resuspended sediment  

SciTech Connect

Two moderately contaminated freshwater sediments (Sorel Harbour, St. Lawrence River, Canada) were subjected to a suspension event. The objective was to assess the environmental impact of the disposal of dredged material in water, in particular, the short-term effects of dumping on the water column and the long-term effects of dredged sediment deposits. In a series of microcosms, the sediments were left to stand for 25 d under flow-through conditions. In a second series of microcosms, sediments were vigorously suspended for 15 min before being left to settle and were submitted to the same treatment as reference sediments during the following 25 d. Physicochemical and biological parameters (Daphnia magna and Hydra attenuata survival) were measured in overlying water throughout the experiment. Sediment toxicity was assessed with Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca exposed to sediments collected at both the beginning and end of the 25-d period. Pore-water toxicity was evaluated with D. magna. During the suspension process, in the Sorel Harbour mixed sediment overlying water, the authors observed effects on H. attenuata survival and ammonia and metals (chromium, copper, and zinc) releases. Meanwhile, in reference (nonmixed) and mixed sediments as well as in associated pore waters, there were no significant chemical modifications no biological effects after the 25-d experiments. The developed approach, which attempts to simulate a dumping process, aims at allowing the assessment of the short- and long-term hazards resulting from a resuspension process in overlying water and in resettled sediments using both chemical and biological measurements.

Bonnet, C.; Babut, M.; Ferard, J.F.; Martel, L.; Garric, J.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Combustion toxics: Available data and additional needs  

SciTech Connect

With the continuing expansion of air pollution regulations there is an increasing awareness of the potential need to assess the emissions and impact of trace compounds from combustion sources in refineries and chemical plants. It has been found that these trace compounds may be emitted as the result of incomplete fuel combustion, formation of new compounds during combustion, or the presence of inorganics (e.g., metals) in the fuel. Emission factors based on field data from these sources have recently been published by both the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The emission factors indicate that a large number of trace compounds may be emitted from combustion sources including volatiles, semi-volatiles, PAHs, metals, and dioxins/furans. Some of these trace compounds have been classified as hazardous or toxic. A review of the EPA and API published data sets indicates that, while there is some overlap, many gaps exist in specific source and emission types. Where gaps exist, there is a lack of confirmation for the reported emission factor. Comparison of the EPA and API emission factors for gas and fuel oil fired boilers, however, indicates reasonable agreement for several metals and some PAHs where the data overlap. EPA, however, has sampled for many more metals than API and several EPA factors for PAHs are significantly higher than reported by API. Additionally tests may be warranted where there is insufficient overlap. Much additional work needs to be done to provide reliable factors which can be used to estimate trace toxic emissions from combustion. Many gaps and inconsistencies exist in the emission factors database and changes to existing factors are expected as the database is expanded.

Siegell, J.H.

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities January 8, 2013 - 1:55pm Addthis Speaker Dr. Daniel Rahn at the Health Disparaties Conference. Speaker Dr. Daniel Rahn at the Health Disparaties Conference. What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment The Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities, Reducing Health Disparities through Sustaining and Strengthening Healthy Communities, was held in Little Rock, Arkansas, November 28 through December 1, 2012, at The Peabody Little Rock. Like its five predecessors, the 2012 conference focused on policies and programs to reduce health disparities among minority and low-income populations. Presenters emphasized the role of

385

Challenge of the world order and its implications for health personnel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-governmental medical organizations, including amnesty international medical groups, Physicians for Human Rights, and the World Health Organisation (WHO), have for years tried to forge a link between health an...

Siroos Mirzaei; Peter Knoll

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute health problems Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: acute health problems Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes Summary: care, Medicare post-acute...

387

Health sciences at Manchester  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health sciences at Manchester a time of change and growth Institute of Health Sciences January 2010 #12;The Institute of Health Sciences exists to improve health and healthcare practice through high quality health sciences research in Manchester. It is a collaborative endeavour involving schools

Heil, Matthias

388

winter 2015 Health Informatics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UinG anD PrOfeSSiOnal eDUCatiOn HEALTH INFORMATICS ANd ANALYTICS #12;2 Advancing Health Care Through.S. health care prior to commencing study. High-quality, Convenient Online Learning Format All courses, computer science and health care. In this introductory course, gain broad exposure to the field of health

California at Davis, University of

389

Introduction Health Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the originality and creativity to establish total health care, (2advanced healthcare specialists with abundant and researchers who can put total health care into practice. 21 20084 2 3 total health care #1232 Introduction Guide Entrance Life Career Inquiries Health Sciences Health Problems

Banbara, Mutsunori

390

Chemistry 330 / Study Guide 217 Toxic Heavy Metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemistry 330 / Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored for this section. #12;Chemistry 330 / Study Guide 219 Common Features--Toxicity of the Heavy Metals Objectives. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution problem. Heavy metals

Short, Daniel

391

VINYL CHLORIDE ACUTE TOXICITY THRESHOLDS IN THE CONTEXT OF CONTROLLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The "irreversible effects threshold" is the maximum concentration of pollutant in the air for a given exposure timeVINYL CHLORIDE ACUTE TOXICITY THRESHOLDS IN THE CONTEXT OF CONTROLLING URBAN DEVELOPMENT OR LAND of vinyl Chloride , the french procedure to set acute toxicity thresholds in the context of controlling

Boyer, Edmond

392

Chronic toxicity evaluation of simulated DWPF effluent to Ceriodaphnia dubia  

SciTech Connect

A 7-Day Full Series Chronic Toxicity test was conducted April 13--20, 1990, for the Savannah River Site to assess the chronic toxicity of Simulated defense waste processing facility (DWPF) effluent to Ceriodaphnia dubia. The simulated effluented consisted of Sodium Nitrate, Sodium Oxalate, Sodium Formate, and Corros. Inib.

Not Available

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

March 29, 2007 Mobile Source Air Toxics Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 6 were identified as significant contributors to national emissions of hazardous air pollutants EPA Mobile Source Air Toxics Rules March 2001 rule relied on existing control programs (Tier 2March 29, 2007 Mobile Source Air Toxics Analysis for FHWA Projects Jeff Houk FHWA Resource Center

Minnesota, University of

394

Downloads & Patient Materials - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Ergonomics Fitness & Exercise Men's Health Nutrition Women's Health Health & Productivity Health Calculators &...

395

Abstract A2: Region 4 NCI CRCHD BMaP: A team science approach towards a multistate network to reduce cancer health disparities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, NIH Pub No.02-5074...and understanding of advertised tar numbers: health policy implications. Am J Public Health 1996;86:18-24. 15 US. Department of...

Mary A. O'Connell; Leticia O. Vilchis; Mai H. Oushy; Amelie G. Ramirez; Kipling J. Gallion; and Alan Holden

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Ergonomics - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Education & Wellness > Downloads & Patient Materials > Ergonomics Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Ergonomics Fitness & Exercise Men's Health...

397

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY and HEALTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MARYLAND OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY and HEALTH ACT safety and health protection on the job STATE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS, AND OTHER APPLICABLE REGULATIONS MAY BE OBTAINED FROM Complaints about State Program administration may be made to Regional Administrator, Occupational Safety

Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

398

Rural Health Association  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Montana Rural Health Association Phone: 406-994-6004 Fax: 406-994-5653 E-mail: MRHA 170520 Bozeman, Montana 59717-0520 Montana Rural Health Association Membershipdesignation.Membershipisrenewedonan annualbasis.PleasemakecheckspayabletoMontanaRuralHealth

Maxwell, Bruce D.

399

Addressing Genetics Delivering Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Addressing Genetics Delivering Health A strategy for advancing the dissemination and application of genetics knowledge throughout our health professions Funded by Hilary Burton September 2003 Executive education of health workers q providing strategic overview of education programme q collaborating

Rambaut, Andrew

400

DIRECTORY OF HEALTH SERVICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a centralized resource of regional health care services for persons with developmental disabilitiesDIRECTORY OF HEALTH SERVICES FOR BRONX RESIDENTS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES 2012 Compiled Albert Einstein College of Medicine in collaboration with Health Services Committee, Bronx Developmental

Yates, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Health Equity Building High Performance Health Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, recently passed health reform outreach psychiatric care to the homeless legislation will be significantly were problematic, we rode our take health care to the streets to reach those bicycles to visit our education and health care delivery models toMedicine,located in a community struggling create high

Oklahoma, University of

402

University Health Care Health Sciences Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University Health Care Health Sciences Center 30 N. 1900 E. 6DOW /DNH &LW\\ 87 84132-2204 Phone and your child. University Health Care School of Medicine Division of Pediatric Nephrology & Hypertension care physician after each visit. x If you would like a copy of your child's clinic note you must

Feschotte, Cedric

403

Mental Health, Determinants of  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this article, the authors first review differences between mental health and physical health conditions and explicitly consider how the health production function can be applied to mental health. They then review the research on the determinants of mental health, focusing on the contributions of economists to this literature. They focus on three important inputs to mental health production: income, macroeconomic conditions, and employment.

E. Golberstein; S.H. Busch

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

E-Print Network 3.0 - apidae colony health Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 2002 ( 2002) 0001-8244020300-00950 2002 Plenum Publishing Corporation Summary: implications for the fitness of honeybee colonies, for human and animal health, and for...

405

ORISE: Public Health Communication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Communication Public Health Communication The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) assists government agencies and organizations in addressing public health...

406

ORISE: Health physics services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health physics services Nuclear power plant The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers comprehensive health physics services in a number of technical areas...

407

ORISE: Public Health Preparedness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preparedness Public Health Preparedness The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) recognizes that public health events will largely be managed at the local level,...

408

The health effects of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There has been a substantial amount of public discussion on the health effects of the use of depleted uranium (DU) munitions. In response to this concern the Royal Society set up an independent, expert working group to investigate the health effects of DU munitions. The Royal Society has now produced two reports, and this summary covering the key conclusions and recommendations from both reports. The part I report considered the increased risks of radiation-induced cancer from exposures to DU on the battlefield. Part II dealt with the risks from the chemical toxicity of uranium, non-malignant radiation effects from DU intakes, the long-term environmental consequences of the deployment of DU munitions and responses to part I including issues arising at a public meeting to discuss the part I report.

The Royal Society Working Group on the Health Hazards of

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Proteomic analysis of rat cerebral cortex following subchronic acrolein toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Acrolein, a member of reactive ?,?-unsaturated aldehydes, is a major environmental pollutant. Acrolein is also produced endogenously as a toxic by-product of lipid peroxidation. Because of high reactivity, acrolein may mediate oxidative damages to cells and tissues. It has been shown to be involved in a wide variety of pathological states including pulmonary, atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative diseases. In this study we employed proteomics approach to investigate the effects of subchronic oral exposures to 3 mg/kg of acrolein on protein expression profile in the brain of rats. Moreover effects of acrolein on malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and reduced glutathione (GSH) content were investigated. Our results revealed that treatment with acrolein changed levels of several proteins in diverse physiological process including energy metabolism, cell communication and transport, response to stimulus and metabolic process. Interestingly, several differentially over-expressed proteins, including ?-synuclein, enolase and calcineurin, are known to be associated with human neurodegenerative diseases. Changes in the levels of some proteins were confirmed by Western blot. Moreover, acrolein increases the level of MDA, as a lipid peroxidation biomarker and decreased GSH concentrations, as a non-enzyme antioxidant in the brain of acrolein treated rats. These findings suggested that acrolein induces the oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in the brain, and so that may contribute to the pathophysiology of neurological disorders. - Highlights: • Acrolein intoxication increased lipid peroxidation and deplete GSH in rat brain. • Effect of acrolein on protein levels of cerebral cortex was analyzed by 2DE-PAGE. • Levels of a number of proteins with different biological functions were increased.

Rashedinia, Marzieh; Lari, Parisa [Department of Pharmacodynamics and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abnous, Khalil, E-mail: Abnouskh@mums.ac.r [Pharmaceutical Research Center, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseinzadeh, Hossein, E-mail: Hosseinzadehh@mums.ac.ir [Pharmaceutical Research Center, Department of Pharmacodynamics and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Peruvian Gold Rush Threatens Health and the Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Peruvian Gold Rush Threatens Health and the Environment ... Mercury vapor released when the amalgam is heated can be inhaled, the most dangerous exposure route for humans, or precipitates out and settles on streets or in watersheds. ...

Barbara Fraser

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

411

A review on environmental factors regulating arsenic methylation in humans  

SciTech Connect

Subjects exposed to arsenic show significant inter-individual variation in urinary patterns of arsenic metabolites but insignificant day-to-day intra-individual variation. The inter-individual variation in arsenic methylation can be partly responsible for the variation in susceptibility to arsenic toxicity. Wide inter-ethnic variation and family correlation in urinary arsenic profile suggest a genetic effect on arsenic metabolism. In this paper the environmental factors affecting arsenic metabolism are reviewed. Methylation capacity might reduce with increasing dosage of arsenic exposure. Furthermore, women, especially at pregnancy, have better methylation capacity than their men counterparts, probably due to the effect of estrogen. Children might have better methylation capacity than adults and age shows inconsistent relevance in adults. Smoking and alcohol consumption might be associated with a poorer methylation capacity. Nutritional status is important in the methylation capacity and folate may facilitate the methylation and excretion of arsenic. Besides, general health conditions and medications might influence the arsenic methylation capacity; and technical problems can cause biased estimates. The consumption of seafood, seaweed, rice and other food with high arsenic contents and the extent of cooking and arsenic-containing water used in food preparation may also interfere with the presentation of the urinary arsenic profile. Future studies are necessary to clarify the effects of the various arsenic metabolites including the trivalent methylated forms on the development of arsenic-induced human diseases with the consideration of the effects of confounding factors and the interactions with other effect modifiers.

Tseng, C.-H. [National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Development, National Taiwan University Hospital Yun-Lin Branch, Yun-Lin, Taiwan (China); School of Public Health, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine of the National Health Research Institutes, Taipei, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: ccktsh@ms6.hinet.net

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute silver toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Membrane of Rainbow Trout Gills Summary: that are the primary site for acute heavy metal toxicity (Mc- Donald and Wood, 1993). The toxic action of silver... and chloride...

413

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute copper toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with additional metals analyses. Because copper concentrations were within the range toxic to bivalves and sample... -six hour acute toxicity tests were conducted using...

414

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxic regulations Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AQPM air quality program manager ARP accidental release prevention ATCM air toxic control... -volatile organic compound TAC toxic air contaminant TCA trichloroethane TCE...

415

Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...

416

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute cadmium toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cortisol levels were... -113 1. Introduction Cadmium (Cd) is a widely distributed heavy metal, toxic to terrestrial and aquatic... of the toxicant are acutely lethal, the rise in...

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics volume Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

designed to remove the acutely toxic chemicals before the air is discharged into the environment. Acutely... Chemistry Department Standard Operating Procedure Title: Acutely Toxic...

418

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute organ toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

toxicity between chemicals and between organisms... . They are examples of known pollutants, albeit ones listed as having low-to-moderate acute toxicities, purposely... to...

419

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute systemic toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12... that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute ... Source: Kane, Andrew S. -...

420

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute skin toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... skin Reproductive effects of not seen with glycols...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxic potency Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute ... Source: Kane, Andrew S. -...

422

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute methanol toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... ) to acetaldehyde to acetate to acetyl CoA Methanol ...

423

Worker Safety and Health  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Worker Safety and Health Policy establishes Departmental expectations for worker safety and health through the development of rules, directives and guidance. Worker safety and health policy will ensure that workers are adequately protected from hazards associated with DOE sites and operations and reflect national worker safety and health laws, regulations, and standards where applicable.

424

ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH AND SAFETY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAMS SPRING 2012 Including: Free Information Session New Program in Health and Safety CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION #12;2 Our Health and Safety Programs Workplace Health and Safety Certificate Program For every dollar invested in workplace safety, organizations

California at Davis, University of

425

Counselling HEALTH & COUNSELLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Counselling HEALTH & COUNSELLING SERVICES Counselling 778.782.4615 - Burnaby intake@sfu.ca 778.782.5200 - Vancouver 778.782.8022 - Surrey surrey_counsellor@sfu.ca Health Clinic 778.783.4615 - Burnaby 778.782.5200 - Vancouver Health Promotion 778.782.4674 Health & Counselling Services, SFU - 8888 University Drive, MBC 0164

426

HEALTH SCIENCES POSTGRADUATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2013 HEALTH SCIENCES POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES #12;Welcome to the Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute The Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI) aims to facilitate high-quality translational health research in a number of key areas including Ageing and Dementia, Prevention and Management

427

Press Release: Health Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of New Hampshire Student Health Benefit Plan Identified as a Model Plan for Health Care Reform A national study group devoted to considering the impact of health care reform for the college student successful management features such as direct contracting with local health care providers or adoption

New Hampshire, University of

428

POSTGRADUATE Health Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.Sc.Courses Cancer Care 54 Dementia 55 Gerontological Nursing 56 Mental Health 57 Midwifery 59 Nursing 60 Palliative Care 61 Postgraduate Diplomas Clinical Health Sciences Education 62 Nursing (Specialist) 63 HigherPOSTGRADUATE COURSES 2012 Health Sciences TheUniversityofDublinPostgraduateCourses2012Health

O'Mahony, Donal E.

429

IMMUNIZATION HEALTH SERVICES CHECKLIST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. We offer medical care, health promotion and insurance services, including: Alcohol and Drug1 HEALTH AND IMMUNIZATION GUIDE #12;2 HEALTH SERVICES CHECKLIST Immunization Form due (one time ­ September 5, 2014 Spring Semester 2015 ­ January 31, 2015 Summer Semester 2015 ­ June 15, 2015 WWW.CMU.EDU/HEALTH

430

IMMUNIZATION HEALTH SERVICES CHECKLIST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(regardless of insurance coverage), as well as current staff and faculty. We offer medical care, health1 HEALTH AND IMMUNIZATION GUIDE #12;2 HEALTH SERVICES CHECKLIST Immunization Form due (one timeEdu and Haven Courses completed by: August 11, 2014 WWW.CMU.EDU/HEALTH-SERVICES Questions? Contact us at 412

Matsuda, Noboru

431

Oregon Health & Science University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to high-quality health care for all, especially Oregonians. 4. Help meet Oregon's health and science, however, has changed dramatically. National and statewide health care reform alters the ways care, including the changing health care environment, new and disruptive technologies, globalization, changing

Chapman, Michael S.

432

Graduate Assistant Health Insurance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center (formerly NMSU Student Health Center) for all outpatient primary health care services. Campus:30 pm by Appt- Psychiatry & Women's Health · 7:30 am- 4:30 pm Urgent Care Evaluation, Pharmacy, Lab, X ­ prescription medications ­ testing & procedures ­ office visits for part-time students #12;United Health Care

Johnson, Eric E.

433

CHEIBA TRUST Health Insurance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEIBA TRUST Health Insurance Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield www.anthem.com BlueAdvantage Point of Service Plan (HMO/POS) Prime Health Plan (PPO) and Custom Plus Health Plan Phone.................................................................................................................1-800-542-9402 Provider Directories Health and Dental www.anthem.com HMO Chiropractic Landmark

434

Climate Instability and Public Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Instability and Public Health Climate Instability and Public Health Speaker(s): Paul Epstein Date: August 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Evan Mills Climate restricts the range of infectious diseases, while weather affects the timing and intensity of outbreaks. The ranges of several key diseases or their vectors are changing, along with shifts in plant communities and the retreat of alpine glaciers. In addition, extreme weather events associated with warming create conditions conducive to "clusters" of disease outbreaks. The rapid spread of West Nile virus in the Americas is related, paradoxically, to drought and its impact on wildlife (230 species of animals, 138 species of birds) could alter the ratios of predator birds to their prey (including rodents) and thus have implications for human

435

Health Care Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Health Care Health Care Characteristics by Activity... Health Care Health care buildings are those used as diagnostic and treatment facilities for both inpatient and outpatient care. Doctor's and dentist's offices are considered health care if they use any type of diagnostic medical equipment and office if they do not. Skilled nursing or other residential care buildings are categorized as lodging. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Health Care Buildings... Health care buildings in the South tended to be smaller and were more numerous than those in other regions of the country. Buildings on health care complexes tended to be newer than those not on multibuilding facilities. The median age for buildings on health care complexes was 9.5 years, compared to 29.5 years for health care buildings not on a multibuilding facility.

436

Chapter 6 - Family Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The family is a fundamental social organization including people of different or same genders as parents, with children, relatives, and even clans. Members of different ages and genders all go through life stages with differing health issues in maintaining health and preventing disease. Health for women through all phases of life includes equal rights, fertility, pregnancy, and child care. Child nutrition for physical and cognitive development is vital in family and community health. Women's and men's health involves healthy lifestyles and prevention of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and social and mental health problems. Aging can place stress on individuals and the family, who may depend on social and health services to provide help. The health of the family is also the responsibility of society, the health system, and the family itself. Family health is impacted by poverty and social distress, displacement, wars, terrorism, and mass trauma of all kinds.

Theodore H. Tulchinsky; Elena A. Varavikova

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Public Health Surveillance of Toxic Cyanobacteria in Freshwater Systems Using Remote Detection Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vicinity of the Klamath Hydroelectric Project: April, MayReport, Klamath Hydroelectric Project, Water Resources.2010). "Klamath River Hydroelectric Project Overview."

Mackie, Trina Nicole

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Public Health Surveillance of Toxic Cyanobacteria in Freshwater Systems Using Remote Detection Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and soluble reactive phosphorous. All samples were kept coldtheir reported reactive phosphorous values matched withtemperature and reactive phosphorous data reported for the

Mackie, Trina Nicole

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

SUFFOLK COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES TOXIC/HAZARDOUS MATERIAL TRANSFER FACILITY DESIGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or similar installation solely incident to the retail sale or personal consumption of motor fuels for motor be included in the partial plan view: A) dimensions of concrete slab; B) location of oil/water separator

440

Federal Employee Occupational Safety And Health (FEOSH) Program Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Congress established Public Law 91-596, The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSH Act) “to ensure so far as possible every working man and woman in the Nation safe and healthful working conditions and to preserve our human resources.”

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Does Health Insurance and Seeing the Doctor Keep You Out of the Hospital? We obtain estimates of associations between health insurance and hospitalization and between  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

health care reform debate, as illustrated by the quote from Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary of the U at a presentation of this research at the American Enterprise Institute for their comments. #12;1 "Our health care.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Indeed, primary care is central focus of the Patient Protection

Mateo, Jill M.

442

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Management Permits are required to construct, install, or modify any stationary source which has the potential to increase emissions of a listed toxic air contaminant by an amount greater than the minimum quantity for that contaminant. Minimum quantities are specified in Table III of these regulations. Permits will be granted based in part on the impact of the projected emissions of the stationary source on acceptable ambient levels

443

Incomplete Mixing, Intermittency and Fluctuating Toxic Load Measurements in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incomplete Mixing, Intermittency and Fluctuating Toxic Load Measurements in Incomplete Mixing, Intermittency and Fluctuating Toxic Load Measurements in Indoor Plumes Speaker(s): David J. Wilson Date: October 19, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Sextro Why have people been able to get away with ignoring intermittency (periods of zero concentration or zero turbulent temperature difference) in heat and mass transfer for the past century? Why is intermittency crucially important in toxic load estimates for biological exposure? We will explore how a simple back-of-the-envelope model can be constructed for the respiration toxicology of concentration fluctuations at a fixed receptor (for example; your lungs). This simple model will show the origin of the toxic load exponent n=2.0 for concentration C in L=Cnt. An extensive set of

444

Fate of Toxic Potato Glycoalkaloids in a Potato Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The toxic glycoalkaloids, ?-solanine and ?-chaconine, are present in all parts of the potato plant and are possibly transferred to the terrestrial environment. The amounts of glycoalkaloids in plant, soil, and groundwater were followed in a potato field ...

Pia H. Jensen; Bjarne W. Strobel; Hans Christian B. Hansen; Ole Stig Jacobsen

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

445

Bacterial and enzymatic bioassays for toxicity testing in the environment  

SciTech Connect

Microbioassays using bacteria or enzymes are increasingly applied to measure chemical toxicity in the environment. Attractive features of these assays may include low cost, rapid response to toxicants, high sample throughput, modest laboratory equipment and space requirements, low sample volume, portability, and reproducible responses. Enzymatic tests rely on measurement of either enzyme activity or enzyme biosynthesis. Dehydrogenases are the enzymes most used in toxicity testing. Assay of dehydrogenase activity is conveniently carried out using oxidoreduction dyes such as tetrazolium salts. Other enzyme activity tests utilize ATPases, esterases, phosphatases, urease, luciferase, beta-galactosidase, protease, amylase, or beta-glucosidase. Recently, the inhibition of enzyme (beta-galactosidase, tryptophanase, alpha-glucosidase) biosynthesis has been explored as a basis for toxicity testing. Enzyme biosynthesis was found to be generally more sensitive to organic chemicals than enzyme activity.107 references.

Bitton, G.; Koopman, B. (Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Neuro-reproductive toxicities of 1-bromopropane and 2-bromopropane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Male reproductive toxicities of 2-bromopropane are summarized in Table 1. The inhalation study (Ichihara et al. 1996, 1997) using Wistar rats showed exposure to 2-bromopropane decreased epididymal sperm count and...

Gaku Ichihara

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Electrically Heated High Temperature Incineration of Air Toxics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-Process Technology has placed a prototype of its patented, electrically heated, packed-bed air toxics oxidizer at a northern California chemical plant. This thermal oxidizer is capable of handling a wide range of chlorinated and non...

Agardy, F. J.; Wilcox, J. B.

448

Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Thomas L. McCall, Jr. http:www.em.doe.govffaaortsca.html 4252001 Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agree.. Page 12 of 26 Deputy...

449

A toolbox for health risk related decisions  

SciTech Connect

Development efforts since the late 1970s have resulted in a generalized method for ranking health hazards. This method provides the basis for a wide range of applications where decisions are needed for allocating resources on the basis of health risk considerations. It has been used for more than a decade to solve real problems, and it is supported by 23 publications in the open literature. The diversity of this generalized methodology allows us to provide support in a great number of problem areas. we give four examples in this manuscript: the relative toxicities of petroleum mixtures; a method to derive Emergency Response Planning Guides; an estimate of the possible carcinogenic potency of tungsten, an alternative material to depleted uranium for heavy armor penetrators; and an approach to low dose extrapolation. Our experience suggests that many more applications of the original concept and variations on it can be of utility in military situations. Some potentially fruitful areas may be in the: development of a health-risk-ranking system for alternative solutions to manufacturing, waste management, and remediation; provision of a basis for identifying levels of hazardous agents which are below health concerns, or which should be of concern; development of a framework for evaluating chemicals and radioactive materials on the same basis, and in the development of a battery of in vitro bioassays which could take the place of long-term whole animal tests.

Easterly, C.E.; Jones, T.D.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Mineral and Fuel Extraction: Health Consequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Activities associated with mining and fuel extraction may present a range of potential health risks for nearby communities. The environmental legacy of mining and fuel extraction is extensive, with millions of active and abandoned mines globally. Evaluation of community risks from mineral and fuel extraction is often a complex task, given the variety of products produced, multiple potential exposure contexts, routes of contact, and health impacts. Adverse health outcomes that may arise from mineral-related processes include release of toxicants such as metals, metalloids, and mineral dusts, and indirect effects such as the increased potential of vectorborne disease. The ongoing processing and end-use of minerals also produce gas emissions (such as carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide), often on a large scale. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are substances of particular concern arising from conventional crude oil and coal extraction, oil sands/shales wastes, and tailings water, and are classified as either proven or suspected carcinogens. The geotechnical and structural aspects of mine sites must also be considered, including the risk of major hazardous events such as release of tailings dam contents. Indirect or delayed effects of mineral and fuel extraction include those that act to affect community health through contamination or disruption of water supplies and food sources (e.g., crops). As with many industries, the balance between risks and benefits of mining must be carefully calibrated.

A. Cook; R.B. Finkelman; A. Fourie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Master's Degree in Agriculture Plant Health Management Option Option Title: Master of Science (MS) in Agriculture: Plant Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Master's Degree in Agriculture ­ Plant Health Management Option Option Title: Master of Science (MS) in Agriculture: Plant Health Management Department(s) or Program(s): Supported of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences (CAHNRS) Contact Name: Dr. Kim Kidwell, Director MS

Collins, Gary S.

452

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Resources with Additional Information Charles DeLisi As head of DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research, Charles DeLisi played a pivotal role in proposing and initiating the Human Genome Program in 1986. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has historically been active in supporting human genome research. On September 10, 2003, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham presented the Secretary's Gold Award to Aristides Patrinos and Francis Collins for their leadership of the government's Human Genome Project. At DOE's Office of Science, Dr. Patrinos is the Associate Director for Biological and Environmental Research. He has been a researcher at the department's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory.

453

Toxic species emissions from controlled combustion of selected paving asphalts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOXIC SPECIES EMISSIONS FROM CONTROLLED COMBUSTION OF SELECTED PAVING ASPHALTS A Theis CARLOS LUIS MENDEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas Adt, M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Safety Engineering TOXIC SPECIES EMISSIONS FROM CONTROLLED COMBUSTION OF SELECTED PAVING ASPHALTS A Thesis by CARLOS LUIS MENDEZ Submitted to Texas AdtM University in partial fulfillment...

Mendez, Carlos Luis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

454

Veto likely on ocean burning of toxic wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Veto likely on ocean burning of toxic wastes ... Ocean incineration of toxic wastes has been under study for some time, and EPA has authorized test burns as far back as 1974. ... (where more than 6000 people showed up), and Mobile, Ala., where the issues of transporting the waste safely to the burn site and what advantages ocean incineration has over land incineration were hotly debated. ...

1984-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

455

Identification of toxic components in beechwood and petroleum creosotes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIC COMPONENTS IN BEECHWOOD AND PETROLEUM CREOSOTES A Thesis by MEHMET S. OKAYGUN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1989 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIC COMPONENTS IN BEECHWOOD AND PETROLEUM CREOSOTES A Thesis by MEHMET S. OKAYGUN Approved as to style and content by: Ay(hn Akger (Co-Chairman of Committee) T. Rick Irvin (Co...

Okaygun, Mehmet S.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

456

Occupational Health Services - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program Medical Exam Scheduling Medical...

457

Health Maintenance Exam - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program Medical Exam Scheduling Medical...

458

Behavioral Health Services - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program Medical Exam Scheduling Medical...

459

Graduate School of Public Health (Graduate School of Public Health) (Dept. of Public Health)`  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

including environmental health covering concept of contents and meanings. (Health Care Management-3-0 History of Health & Medical Care , , . , , , . This course reviews Graduate School of Public Health #12;#12;(Graduate School of Public Health) (Dept. of Public

Kim, Guebuem

460

Health Sciences Center Department of Internal Medicine Employee Health Promotion Program Health Care Provider Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health Sciences Center Department of Internal Medicine Employee Health Promotion Program Health Care Provider Report Dear Health Care Provider: Your patient, ______________________________, has applied for enrollment in a fitness program sponsored by the University of New Mexico, Employee Health

New Mexico, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

ORISE: Health Literacy Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Literacy Development Literacy Development While health disparities may be attributed to a number of factors, health literacy development and access to health information can help special populations gain a better understanding of wellness and prevention. The Internet and other means of electronic communication have become popular tools that are allowing people to take control of their health. According to Healthy People 2010, nearly half of American adults (90 million people) are deemed "health illiterate"-an increasing problem among special populations that appears to contribute to health disparities. Health literacy refers to the ability to read and understand materials related to personal health, as well as navigate the health system. To assist government agencies and organizations educate populations facing

462

Case Study of Municipal Air Pollution Policies: Houston’s Air Toxic Control Strategy under the White Administration, 2004–2009  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

U.S. EPA has long recognized limitations in its air toxics program and called for state and local agencies to complement the federal program with their own,(10) stating, “[a]lthough EPA will continue to develop national efforts to address the remaining air toxics risk, in many cases these risks can be more appropriately addressed at the [state, local, and tribal] level rather than the federal level.”. ... The communities adjacent to the petrochemical and refining facilities along the Houston Ship Channel in East Houston are among the most vulnerable in the region: they tend to be poor, nonwhite, and lack health insurance. ... In examining the decision-makers’ choices about particular policy forms, we found that they made trade-offs, considering criteria such as legal and bureaucratic constraints, ethical and moral concerns, political considerations, economic issues, and public health benefits. ...

Rebecca J. Bruhl; Stephen H. Linder; Ken Sexton

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

463

An update on environmental, health and safety issues of interest to the photovoltaic industry  

SciTech Connect

There is growing interest in the environmental, health, and safety issues related to new photovoltaic technologies as they approach commercialization. Such issues include potential toxicity of II--VI compounds; the impacts of new environmental regulations on module manufacturers; and, the need for recycling of spent modules and manufacturing wastes. This paper will review these topics. 20 refs.

Moskowitz, P.D.; Viren, J.; Fthenakis, V.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Health Hazards in Indoor Air J.M. Logue, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Keywords: Indoor air quality; hazard analysis; residential; criteria pollutants; VOCs; air toxics Citation Health Hazards in Indoor Air J.M. Logue, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control through

465

Page 4, Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 of 11 4 of 11 Previous Page Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Initial Election Period As a new employee, you have 60 days from your date of appointment to make an election for the health benefits program. Your completed Health Benefits Election Form, SF-2809, must be submitted to your servicing Human Resources Office in a timely manner. If you fail to make an election within the required deadline, you are considered to have declined coverage. You will not have another opportunity to enroll until the annual open season (conducted November/December) or unless you experience a qualifying life event (see http://www.opm.gov/insure/health/planinfo/qle.asp) that would allow you to enroll. Please note that the SF-2809 should be completed and submitted even if you are declining coverage.

466

Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies -Health Sciences Bachelor of Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Six: [14 Credit Hours] NURS 45010 Health Care Policy and Delivery Systems or NURS 46000 Health Care 41581 Health Psychology (3) or SOC 42563 Sociology in Health and Health Care (3) 3 Health Science 45080 Physiology of Exercise 3 PHIL 40005 Health Care Ethics 3 General Elective (lower or upper

Sheridan, Scott

467

Health And Wellness Department Of Health And Wellness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health And Wellness Department Of Health And Wellness Lutchmie Narine, Chair, 315-443-9630 426 The Department of Health and Wellness offers a 123-credit Bachelor of Science degree (B.S.) in public health. Our graduates are prepared to work in community health education and health promotion in public health agencies

McConnell, Terry

468

Principles of Population Health Science Population Health 795  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Principles of Population Health Science Population Health 795 A course in the Program in Population Health Fall 2012 University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health The lecture in medicine and public health, inequities in health persist. Understanding health on a population level

Sheridan, Jennifer

469

ORISE: Public Health Communication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Communication Communication Public Health Communication The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) assists government agencies and organizations in addressing public health challenges by developing evidence-based communication programs and social marketing initiatives that resonate with target populations. Because approximately half of American adults do not understand basic health information, ORISE develops the types of messages that will attract attention and motivate people to address their personal and family health. ORISE also develops and executes evidence-based and culturally-competent public health communication programs that help change behaviors and result in healthier lifestyles. Communication Planning and Products Public health organizations are faced with increasing demands for

470

Global Health: Mental Health and the Global Agenda  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the World Health Organization (WHO) European Ministerial Conference on Mental Health endorsed the statement "No health without mental health" in 2005, it spoke to the intrinsic — and indispensable — role of mental health care in health care writ large. Yet mental health has long been treated... This article reviews the impact of mental health on overall health on a global level. The authors suggest changes that could lead to improved identification and treatment of mental illness in countries with limited resources.

Becker A.E.; Kleinman A.

2013-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

471

Assessment of diurnal systemic dose of agrochemicals in regulatory toxicity testing – An integrated approach without additional animal use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integrated toxicokinetics (TK) data provide information on the rate, extent and duration of systemic exposure across doses, species, strains, gender, and life stages within a toxicology program. While routine for pharmaceuticals, TK assessments of non-pharmaceuticals are still relatively rare, and have never before been included in a full range of guideline studies for a new agrochemical. In order to better understand the relationship between diurnal systemic dose (AUC24h) and toxicity of agrochemicals, TK analyses in the study animals is now included in all short- (excluding acute), medium- and long-term guideline mammalian toxicity studies including reproduction/developmental tests. This paper describes a detailed procedure for the implementation of TK in short-, medium- and long-term regulatory toxicity studies, without the use of satellite animals, conducted on three agrochemicals (X11422208, 2,4-D and X574175). In these studies, kinetically-derived maximum doses (KMD) from short-term studies instead of, or along with, maximum tolerated doses (MTD) were used for the selection of the high dose in subsequent longer-term studies. In addition to leveraging TK data to guide dose level selection, the integrated program was also used to select the most appropriate method of oral administration (i.e., gavage versus dietary) of test materials for rat and rabbit developmental toxicity studies. The integrated TK data obtained across toxicity studies (without the use of additional/satellite animals) provided data critical to understanding differences in response across doses, species, strains, sexes, and life stages. Such data should also be useful in mode of action studies and to improve human risk assessments.

Shakil A. Saghir; Michael J. Bartels; David L. Rick; Alene T. McCoy; Reza J. Rasoulpour; Robert G. Ellis-Hutchings; M. Sue Marty; Claire Terry; Jason P. Bailey; Richard Billington; James S. Bus

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics emission Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

emission Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air toxics emission...

473

QUANTITATIVE HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT RESULTING FROM GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION OF AN ABANDONED OPEN FIELD CHEMICAL WASTE BURNING SITE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantitative human health risk assessment was performed for the evaluation of health threat resulting from the chemical contamination of the soil and groundwater in the area of the former open field pharmaceutica...

GYULA DURA; SANDOR SZOBOSZLAI; BALAZS KRISZT…

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Risk to animal health from pathogens in municipal sludge  

SciTech Connect

Public and legislative concerns directed toward resource and materials recycling have stimulated widespread interest in the use of sewage sludge to improve the fertility and water-holding capacity of soil. The use of sludge on land to grow crops for human or animal consumption has raised concerns over the health hazards from the sludge pathogens. Relatively little attention has been focused on the risks to the health of animals that may graze on sudge-amended pastures or consume feedstuffs grown on these lands. Concern about the animal health risks is justified because economic losses from animal disease that may be associated with the use of sewage sludge could be quite large. In fact, these losses may exceed poential economic losses from human disease associated with sludge use. This review emphasizes the risk to animal health from zoonotic and human pathogens in sludge and from specific animal pathogens that may be found in sludge.

Yeager, J.G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP)  

SciTech Connect

The Environment, Safety and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) models human safety and health risk resulting from waste management and environmental restoration activities. Human safety and health risks include those associated with storing, handling, processing, transporting, and disposing of radionuclides and chemicals. Exposures to these materials, resulting from both accidents and normal, incident-free operation, are modeled. In addition, standard industrial risks (falls, explosions, transportation accidents, etc.) are evaluated. Finally, human safety and health impacts from cleanup of accidental releases of radionuclides and chemicals to the environment are estimated. Unlike environmental impact statements and safety analysis reports, ESHRAP risk predictions are meant to be best estimate, rather than bounding or conservatively high. Typically, ESHRAP studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management or environmental restoration program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, processing, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal. ESHRAP can be used to support complex environmental decision-making processes and to track risk reduction as activities progress.

Eide, Steven Arvid; Thomas Wierman

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) modulates the toxicity of mixed organophosphorus compounds  

SciTech Connect

A transgenic mouse model of the human hPON1{sub Q192R} polymorphism was used to address the role of paraoxonase (PON1) in modulating toxicity associated with exposure to mixtures of organophosphorus (OP) compounds. Chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO), diazoxon (DZO), and paraoxon (PO) are potent inhibitors of carboxylesterases (CaE). We hypothesized that a prior exposure to these OPs would increase sensitivity to malaoxon (MO), a CaE substrate, and the degree of the effect would vary among PON1 genotypes if the OP was a physiologically significant PON1 substrate in vivo. CPO and DZO are detoxified by PON1. For CPO hydrolysis, hPON1{sub R192} has a higher catalytic efficiency than hPON1{sub Q192}. For DZO hydrolysis, the two alloforms have nearly equal catalytic efficiencies. For PO hydrolysis, the catalytic efficiency of PON1 is too low to be physiologically relevant. When wild-type mice were exposed dermally to CPO, DZO, or PO followed 4-h later by increasing doses of MO, toxicity was increased compared to mice receiving MO alone, presumably due to CaE inhibition. Potentiation of MO toxicity by CPO and DZO was greater in PON1{sup -/-} mice, which have greatly reduced capacity to detoxify CPO or DZO. Potentiation by CPO was more pronounced in hPON1{sub Q192} mice than in hPON1{sub R192} mice due to the decreased efficiency of hPON1{sub Q192} for detoxifying CPO. Potentiation by DZO was similar in hPON1{sub Q192} and hPON1{sub R192} mice, which are equally efficient at hydrolyzing DZO. Potentiation by PO was equivalent among all four genotypes. These results indicate that PON1 status can have a major influence on CaE-mediated detoxication of OP compounds.

Jansen, Karen L. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Cole, Toby B.; Park, Sarah S. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Department of Medicine (Div. of Medical Genetics), University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Furlong, Clement E. [Department of Medicine (Div. of Medical Genetics), University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)], E-mail: clem@u.washington.edu; Costa, Lucio G. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

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Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

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E-Print Network (OSTI)

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NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Worker Health Research Worker Health Research Worker Health Research The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides technical assistance to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other government agencies by performing specialized worker health research to assess the health of workers and other populations. Statistical methods, epidemiologic research and hazard assessments are core ORISE worker health research competencies. Because information technology is an integral part of the epidemiologic research process, ORISE also capitalizes on its benefits by organizing worker health research data into manageable databases. By providing DOE and the scientific community with accessible information on the long-term health outcomes of occupational exposures, ORISE is helping improve the

480

E-Print Network 3.0 - asthma serum-sensitized human Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

search results for: asthma serum-sensitized human Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 About the Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program The Air Pollution and Respiratory Health...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health toxicity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

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E-Print Network (OSTI)

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2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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