National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for human health toxicity

  1. Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, Erica Dawn

    2009-05-15

    RAGS Risk Assessment Guidance For Superfund RCRA Resource Conservation and Recovery Act SD Sum of Squared Deviation TCDD 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin TEF Toxic Equivalency Factor TEF B Bioassay Based Toxic Equivalency... Amendments (HSWA) of 1984 further strengthened the EPA?s ability to regulate waste disposal. The HSWA was responsible for the eventual removal of land disposal of hazardous wastes. Cancers, renal disease, circulatory disorders, reproductive disorders...

  2. "Human Health Impact Characterization of Toxic Chemicals for Sustainable Design and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    Sustainable Design and Manufacturing Chris Y. Yuan, Davidsustainable design and manufacturing. Human health impactfor sustainable design and manufacturing, streamlined and

  3. Sustainable Material Selection of Toxic Chemicals in Design and Manufacturing From Human Health Impact Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    within the framework of life cycle assessment of products. ”potentials for life- cycle assessment and toxics releasesubstances in life cycle assessment. Part I: Calculation of

  4. Schematic Characterization of Human Health Impact of Toxic Chemicals for Sustainable Design and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris Y.; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    potentials for life-cycle assessment and toxics releasesubstances in life cycle assessment. Part I: Calculation ofhealth response in life cycle assessment using ED10 and

  5. "Human Health Impact Characterization of Toxic Chemicals for Sustainable Design and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    potentials for life-cycle assessment and toxics releasesubstances in life cycle assessment. Part I: Calculation ofhealth response in life cycle assessment using ED10 and

  6. Development of dioxin toxicity evaluation method in human milk by enzyme-linked immunosorbent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    Development of dioxin toxicity evaluation method in human milk by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay Co. Ltd., Tokyo 105-8528, Japan b Dioxin Research Group, Saitama Institute of Public Health, Saitama, the development of a toxicity evaluation method for dioxins in human milk by enzyme-linked im- munosorbent assay

  7. ENGINEERING AND HUMAN HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    ENGINEERING AND HUMAN HEALTH: FROM THE INSIDE OUT Engineering research on small scales could have huge health implications College of Engineering U N I V E R S I T Y O F S A S K ATC H E WA N CO L L E G 17 Alumni accolades College of Engineering THOROUGHUNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

  8. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Human Health #12;Welcome to our Health issue ­ Please take the time to read the exciting stories about how our faculty, students, and alumni are engineering solutions to health care to tackle large worldwide health problems. A few years ago, the College of Engineering made a strategic

  9. Oceans and Human Health (and climate change)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    Oceans and Human Health (and climate change) Tracy K. Collier Science Dimensions and Ocean Health in a Changing Climate, USC March 12, 2013 1 #12 use Climate change Closes the loop in understanding connections between ocean health and human health

  10. Guidance on health effects of toxic chemicals. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foust, C.B.; Griffin, G.D.; Munro, N.B.; Socolof, M.L.

    1994-02-01

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES), and Martin Marietta Utility Services, Inc. (MMUS), are engaged in phased programs to update the safety documentation for the existing US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facilities. The safety analysis of potential toxic hazards requires a methodology for evaluating human health effects of predicted toxic exposures. This report provides a consistent set of health effects and documents toxicity estimates corresponding to these health effects for some of the more important chemicals found within MMES and MMUS. The estimates are based on published toxicity information and apply to acute exposures for an ``average`` individual. The health effects (toxicological endpoints) used in this report are (1) the detection threshold; (2) the no-observed adverse effect level; (3) the onset of irritation/reversible effects; (4) the onset of irreversible effects; and (5) a lethal exposure, defined to be the 50% lethal level. An irreversible effect is defined as a significant effect on a person`s quality of life, e.g., serious injury. Predicted consequences are evaluated on the basis of concentration and exposure time.

  11. College of Health & Human Services 349 College of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie,Jiang (Linda)

    College of Health & Human Services 349 College of Health and Human Services www.health.uncc.edu Dean: Karen Schmaling Associate Dean: Jane Neese In the College of Health and Human Services at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, students and faculty help chart the course for health care

  12. {~.~ DEPARTMENT Of HEALTH & HUMAN ERVICES Public Health SaMea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    {~.~ DEPARTMENT Of HEALTH & HUMAN ERVICES "~~ Public Health SaMea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) AUanta GA 30341-3724 February 27, 2004 Dear Environmental Health Colleague: The Environmental Health Services Branch is pleased to provide your agency with a copy of the Volusia County Health

  13. College of Health and Human Sciences College of Health and Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    College of Health and Human Sciences College of Health and Human Sciences Office in L.L. Gibbons Sciences Fermentation Science and Technology Health and Exercise Science Human Development and Family Merchandising Nutrition COLLEGE PROGRAMS The College of Health and Human Sciences comprises six academic

  14. Estimated human health risks of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

    1997-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the contaminants` toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks.

  15. Climate Change and Human Health National Center for Environmental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change and Human Health National Center for Environmental Health Division of Environmental Hazardsand Health Effects Paul Schramm,MS,MPH Climate and Health Program Centersfor Disease Control and Prevention October 17, 2012 #12;Coastal flooding Climate change effects: ·Temperature ·Sea level

  16. SCHOOL OF HEALTH & APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES College of Health & Human Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    SCHOOL OF HEALTH & APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES College of Health & Human Services University of North Carolina Wilmington FACT SHEET 2011-2012 About the School of Health and Applied Human Sciences · Founded and Recreation in 1977, and subsequently the Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPER

  17. Predicting human developmental toxicity of pharmaceuticals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Paul R., E-mail: pwest@stemina.co [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., 504 S. Rosa Rd., Suite 150, Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Weir, April M.; Smith, Alan M.; Donley, Elizabeth L.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., 504 S. Rosa Rd., Suite 150, Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Cezar, Gabriela G. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., 504 S. Rosa Rd., Suite 150, Madison, WI 53719 (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Animal Sciences, 1675 Observatory Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Teratogens, substances that may cause fetal abnormalities during development, are responsible for a significant number of birth defects. Animal models used to predict teratogenicity often do not faithfully correlate to human response. Here, we seek to develop a more predictive developmental toxicity model based on an in vitro method that utilizes both human embryonic stem (hES) cells and metabolomics to discover biomarkers of developmental toxicity. We developed a method where hES cells were dosed with several drugs of known teratogenicity then LC-MS analysis was performed to measure changes in abundance levels of small molecules in response to drug dosing. Statistical analysis was employed to select for specific mass features that can provide a prediction of the developmental toxicity of a substance. These molecules can serve as biomarkers of developmental toxicity, leading to better prediction of teratogenicity. In particular, our work shows a correlation between teratogenicity and changes of greater than 10% in the ratio of arginine to asymmetric dimethylarginine levels. In addition, this study resulted in the establishment of a predictive model based on the most informative mass features. This model was subsequently tested for its predictive accuracy in two blinded studies using eight drugs of known teratogenicity, where it correctly predicted the teratogenicity for seven of the eight drugs. Thus, our initial data shows that this platform is a robust alternative to animal and other in vitro models for the prediction of the developmental toxicity of chemicals that may also provide invaluable information about the underlying biochemical pathways.

  18. Enhancing Human and Planetary Health Through Innovation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Ben

    2014-10-17

    Ben Brown mesmerizes the audience on how to enhance human and planetary health through innovation at our '8 Big Ideas' Science at the Theater event on October 8th, 2014, in Oakland, California.

  19. Human Health Risk & Environmental Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Health Risk and Environmental Analysis SHARE Human Health Risk and Environmental Analysis Help decision makers assess emerging technologies and methods for identifying and...

  20. Creating LTS&M Efficiencies While Protecting Human Health and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Creating LTS&M Efficiencies While Protecting Human Health and the Environment Creating LTS&M Efficiencies While Protecting Human Health and the Environment October 13, 2015 -...

  1. COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK "Improving Health and Quality of Life Globally and in NC" Jock Brandis The Full

  2. Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Construct a ground sourced heat pump, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system for the new Oakland University Human Health Sciences Building utilizing variable refrigerant flow (VRF) heat pumps. A pair of dedicated outdoor air supply units will utilize a thermally regenerated desiccant dehumidification section. A large solar thermal system along with a natural gas backup boiler will provide the thermal regeneration energy.

  3. COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK CHHS SUCCESS Spring 2014 The College of Health and Human Services is dedicated to enhancing the health and quality of life of individuals, families and communities in Southeastern North

  4. COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES of Health and Human Services (CHHS) will be nationally recognized for our inter- professional and collaborative approach to enhancing the health and quality of life of individuals, families, and communities

  5. COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF HEALTH/APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF HEALTH/APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK Faculty Scholarly and Research Interests 2012-2014 School of Health/Applied Human Sciences Personnel Physical Activity/exercise levels. Licensure to teach K-12 HPE. K-12 Healthful Living Curriculum

  6. Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations, Committee on Foreign Affairs Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health,...

  7. Multi-parameter in vitro toxicity testing of crizotinib, sunitinib, erlotinib, and nilotinib in human cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, Kimberly R., E-mail: kimberly.doherty@quintiles.com [Quintiles, 777 Oakmont Lane Suite 100, Westmont, IL 60559 (United States); Wappel, Robert L.; Talbert, Dominique R.; Trusk, Patricia B.; Moran, Diarmuid M. [Quintiles, 777 Oakmont Lane Suite 100, Westmont, IL 60559 (United States); Kramer, James W.; Brown, Arthur M. [ChanTest Corporation, 14656 Neo Parkway, Cleveland, OH 44128 (United States); Shell, Scott A.; Bacus, Sarah [Quintiles, 777 Oakmont Lane Suite 100, Westmont, IL 60559 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKi) have greatly improved the treatment and prognosis of multiple cancer types. However, unexpected cardiotoxicity has arisen in a subset of patients treated with these agents that was not wholly predicted by pre-clinical testing, which centers around animal toxicity studies and inhibition of the human Ether-ą-go-go-Related Gene (hERG) channel. Therefore, we sought to determine whether a multi-parameter test panel assessing the effect of drug treatment on cellular, molecular, and electrophysiological endpoints could accurately predict cardiotoxicity. We examined how 4 FDA-approved TKi agents impacted cell viability, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, metabolic status, impedance, and ion channel function in human cardiomyocytes. The 3 drugs clinically associated with severe cardiac adverse events (crizotinib, sunitinib, nilotinib) all proved to be cardiotoxic in our in vitro tests while the relatively cardiac-safe drug erlotinib showed only minor changes in cardiac cell health. Crizotinib, an ALK/MET inhibitor, led to increased ROS production, caspase activation, cholesterol accumulation, disruption in cardiac cell beat rate, and blockage of ion channels. The multi-targeted TKi sunitinib showed decreased cardiomyocyte viability, AMPK inhibition, increased lipid accumulation, disrupted beat pattern, and hERG block. Nilotinib, a second generation Bcr-Abl inhibitor, led to increased ROS generation, caspase activation, hERG block, and an arrhythmic beat pattern. Thus, each drug showed a unique toxicity profile that may reflect the multiple mechanisms leading to cardiotoxicity. This study demonstrates that a multi-parameter approach can provide a robust characterization of drug-induced cardiomyocyte damage that can be leveraged to improve drug safety during early phase development. - Highlights: • TKi with known adverse effects show unique cardiotoxicity profiles in this panel. • Crizotinib increases ROS, apoptosis, and cholesterol as well as alters beat rate. • Sunitinib inhibits AMPK, increases lipids and alters the cardiac beat pattern. • Nilotinib causes ROS and caspase activation, decreased lipids and arrhythmia. • Erlotinib did not impact ROS, caspase, or lipid levels or affect the beat pattern.

  8. Human Reliability Program (HRP) - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EpidemiologyHealth Data Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program...

  9. Scientific contestations over "toxic trespass"¯: health and regulatory implications of chemical biomonitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamasunder, Bhavna; Morello-Frosch, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    health decisions on chemicals released into our environment.JM (2011b) Environmental chemicals in pregnant women in thedata must be connected to chemical’s existing human exposure

  10. Nitrite in feed: From Animal health to human health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cockburn, Andrew; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Fernįndez, Maria-Luisa; Arcella, Davide; Peteghem, Carlos van; Dorne, Jean-Lou

    2013-08-01

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also carried out taking into account all direct and indirect sources of nitrite from the human diet, including carry-over of nitrite in animal-based products such as milk, eggs and meat products. Human exposure was then compared with the acceptable daily intake (ADI) for nitrite of 0-0.07 mg/kg b.w. per day. Overall, the low levels of nitrite in fresh animal products represented only 2.9% of the total daily dietary exposure and thus were not considered to raise concerns for human health. It is concluded that the potential health risk to animals from the consumption of feed or to man from eating fresh animal products containing nitrite, is very low.

  11. school of education, health, and human performance Boundless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    school of education, health, and human performance #12;Boundless: The Campaign for the College the next era of the School of Education, Health, and Human Performance. The magnitude of our goal reflects for meaningful research, service and learning. The School of Education, Health, and Human Performance

  12. COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK CHHS SUCCESS Fall 2013 The College of Health and Human Services is dedicated't think any of us will forget the power of the Alumni Keynote presented by SHAHS alum Chad Porter

  13. COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    Telling: Building Self Efficacy, Optimism and Enhancing School Performance with Middle School StudentsCOLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK CHHS SUCCESS April/May 2013 The College of Health and Human Services is dedicated

  14. COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES-quality health care, ensuring safe and affordable recreational activities, helping parents find quality child care, keeping the food on our shelves safe and infectious diseases in check, advocating for health

  15. COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES and Communication & Cultural Studies. After Glenn completed his PhD, he was Director of Migrant Health for the NSW Department of Health, which in turn led to Glenn writing ethic access policies for the NSW Department

  16. COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF HEALTH/APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF HEALTH/APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK Implementing Cultural Competency Training Throughout an Entire Health System March 26, 2013 3 competency training. He is a fellow of the Health Research and Education Trust Cultural Competency Leadership

  17. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reducing the negative...

  18. HEALTH & HUMANITYHEALTH & HUMANITYHEALTH & HUMANITY This major is intended for students interested in fields that inform the health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    HEALTH & HUMANITYHEALTH & HUMANITYHEALTH & HUMANITY This major is intended for students interested in fields that inform the health profession and in related questions about health and human experience the how health issues relate to different fields. Ethnographics Lab: The Ethnographics Laboratory

  19. A Schematic Method for Sustainable Material Selection of Toxic Chemicals in Design and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris Yingchun; David Dornfeld

    2010-01-01

    the Environmental Impact of Manufacturing and SustainabilityChemicals in Design and Manufacturing From Human HealthChemicals in Design and Manufacturing Toxic chemicals used

  20. Evidence for toxicity differences between inorganic arsenite and thioarsenicals in human bladder cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naranmandura, Hua [Analytical and Environmental Toxicology, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G3 (Canada); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chuo, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Ogra, Yasumitsu; Iwata, Katsuya [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chuo, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Lee, Jane [Department of Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Suzuki, Kazuo T. [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chuo, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Weinfeld, Michael [Department of Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Le, X. Chris [Analytical and Environmental Toxicology, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G3 (Canada)], E-mail: xc.le@ualberta.ca

    2009-07-15

    Arsenic toxicity is dependent on its chemical species. In humans, the bladder is one of the primary target organs for arsenic-induced carcinogenicity. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying arsenic-induced carcinogenicity, and what arsenic species are responsible for this carcinogenicity. The present study aimed at comparing the toxic effect of DMMTA{sup V} with that of inorganic arsenite (iAs{sup III}) on cell viability, uptake efficiency and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) toward human bladder cancer EJ-1 cells. The results were compared with those of a previous study using human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Although iAs{sup III} was known to be toxic to most cells, here we show that iAs{sup III} (LC{sub 50} = 112 {mu}M) was much less cytotoxic than DMMTA{sup V} (LC{sub 50} = 16.7 {mu}M) in human bladder EJ-1 cells. Interestingly, pentavalent sulfur-containing DMMTA{sup V} generated a high level of intracellular ROS in EJ-1 cells. However, this was not observed in the cells exposed to trivalent inorganic iAs{sup III} at their respective LC{sub 50} dose. Furthermore, the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine completely inhibited the cytotoxicity of DMMTA{sup V} but not iAs{sup III}, suggesting that production of ROS was the main cause of cell death from exposure to DMMTA{sup V}, but not iAs{sup III}. Because the cellular uptake of iAs{sup III} is mediated by aquaporin proteins, and because the resistance of cells to arsenite can be influenced by lower arsenic uptake due to lower expression of aquaporin proteins (AQP 3, 7 and 9), the expression of several members of the aquaporin family was also examined. In human bladder EJ-1 cells, mRNA/proteins of AQP3, 7 and 9 were not detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)/western blotting. In A431 cells, only mRNA and protein of AQP3 were detected. The large difference in toxicity between the two cell lines could be related to their differences in uptake of arsenic species.

  1. COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES University of North Carolina Wilmington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES University of North Carolina Wilmington DEVELOPMENTAL MILESTONES administrative unit, the College of Health and Human Services, approved by the University of North Carolina was established by members of the Brewer and Boddie families of eastern North Carolina to enable the SON

  2. Health Policy and Administration University Park, College of Health and Human Development (H P A)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    Health Policy and Administration University Park, College of Health and Human Development (H P A positions or graduate study in the field of health care. Students in the major develop the skills and knowledge needed to understand the complex societal problem of providing access to quality health care

  3. Human Dimensions and Ocean Health in a Changing Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    Human Dimensions and Ocean Health in a Changing Climate When: March 12, 2013, 10:00 am - 5:00 pm@usc.edu) by March 5, 2013 Morning Session: Ocean Health in a Changing Climate 9:30 - 10:00 Registration (coffee Health Index Lunch (Lunch will be provided) 12:30 - 1:45 Steve Lamy, USC The Geopolitics of Climate

  4. US DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    Year - 20% [ ] 3rd Year - 20% [ ] 4th Year - 25% CANCELLED: PRINCIPAL AMOUNT INTEREST AMOUNT SIGNATURE Health Service Act, as amended by Public Law 107-205. The form must be submitted for each complete year of the Public Health Service Act, as amended by Public Law 107-205, for one year of employment as a full

  5. Human and animal health risk assessments of chemicals in the food chain: Comparative aspects and future perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorne, J.L.C.M.; Fink-Gremmels, J.

    2013-08-01

    Chemicals from anthropogenic and natural origins enter animal feed, human food and water either as undesirable contaminants or as part of the components of a diet. Over the last five decades, considerable efforts and progress to develop methodologies to protect humans and animals against potential risks associated with exposure to such potentially toxic chemicals have been made. This special issue presents relevant methodological developments and examples of risk assessments of undesirable substances in the food chain integrating the animal health and the human health perspective and refers to recent Opinions of the Scientific Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM) of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). This introductory review aims to give a comparative account of the risk assessment steps used in human health and animal health risk assessments for chemicals in the food chain and provides a critical view of the data gaps and future perspectives for this cross-disciplinary field. - Highlights: ? Principles of human and animal health risk assessment. ? Data gaps for each step of animal health risk assessment. ? Implications of animal risk assessment on human risk assessment. ? Future perspectives on chemical risk assessment.

  6. Indoor air and human health: major indoor air pollutants and their health implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This publication is a collection of abstracts of papers presented at the Indoor Air and Human Health symposium. Session titles include: Radon, Microorganisms, Passive Cigarette Smoke, Combustion Products, Organics, and Panel and Audience Discussion.

  7. Waste area Grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Human health risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purucker, S.T.; Douthat, D.M.

    1996-06-01

    This report is one of five reports issued in 1996 that provide follow- up information to the Phase 1 Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The five reports address areas of concern that could cause potential human health risk and ecological risk within WAG2 at ORNL. The purpose of this report is to present a summary of the human health risk assessment results based on the data collected for the WAG 2 Phase 1 RI. Estimates of risk are provided based on measured concentrations in the surface water, floodplain soil, and sediment of White Oak Creek, Melton Branch, and their tributaries. The human health risk assessment methodology used in this risk assessment is based on Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS). First, the data for the different media are elevated to determine usability for risk assessment. Second, through the process of selecting chemicals of potential concern (COPCs), contaminants to be considered in the risk assessment are identified for each assessment of exposure potential is performed, and exposure pathways are identified. Subsequently, exposure is estimated quantitatively, and the toxicity of each of the COPCs is determined. The results of these analyses are combined and summarized in a risk characterization.

  8. USEtox - The UNEP-SETAC toxicity model: recommended characterisation factors for human toxicity and freshwater ecotoxicity in Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.

    2010-01-01

    International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 13(7):532-toxic impacts in Life Cycle Assessment. Recommendations andof toxic impacts in Life Cycle Assessment. USEtox therefore

  9. College of Health and Human Sciences Student Services Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Life Emphasis COMM 1110 Or CISM 1120/1110 PSYC 1101 Or SOCI 1101 Child Life Emphasis Courses (21 hrs/1110, CHEM 1145, CHEM 1151, GEOL 1121, PHYS 1111/1113, Or PHYS 2211/1113 CISM 1120/1110 * A grade of "C by the Department . #12;College of Health and Human Sciences Student Services Center Hrs. CISM 1120 2 CISM 1110 1

  10. College of Health and Human Sciences Student Services Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    , or Technology CISM 1120/1110 preferred Two advisor approved electives: ACCT 2030, ANTH 1102, BIOL 2107, BIOL 2108, CHFD 2135, CISM 1120/1110, COMM 2332, CRJU 1100, GEOG 1101, GEOG 1130, HLTH 2130, JOUR 2331, POLS program of study. #12;College of Health and Human Sciences Student Services Center Hrs. CISM 1120 2 CISM

  11. College of Health and Human Sciences Student Services Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    1340, Or PHYS 1149 CISM 1120/1110 preferred Area C Elective (one of the following): ART 1000, COMM 1110 2108, CHFD 2135, CISM 1120/1110, COMM 2332, CRJU 1100, GEOG 1101, GEOG 1130, MMJ 2331, POLS 2101, PSYC;College of Health and Human Sciences Student Services Center Hrs. CISM 1120 2 CISM 1110 1 ENGL 1101 None 3

  12. COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES University of North Carolina Wilmington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    COLLEGE OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES University of North Carolina Wilmington FACT SHEET 2011 by the North Carolina Board of Nursing · Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) The Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) Program Approved by the North Carolina Board of Nursing · Bachelor of Social Work

  13. Physical Therapy Career Options Human Biology Health & Society (HBHS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    65 Physical Therapy Career Options Human Biology Health & Society (HBHS) Nutritional Sciences ­ CHE-CALS) ________________________________________________________________________________________ Many NS-CHE, NS-CALS and HBHS majors consider physical therapy as a career option because, performance and rehabilitation. The pathway to a career in physical therapy for Cornell undergraduates

  14. EUNICE KENNEDY SHRIVER NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (NICHD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    EUNICE KENNEDY SHRIVER NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (NICHD) THE NEXT THE DIRECTOR The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part

  15. Scientific contestations over "toxic trespass"¯: health and regulatory implications of chemical biomonitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamasunder, Bhavna; Morello-Frosch, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    assessment or risk management evaluations, and perhaps as adeveloping BEs. or risk management evaluations. for use as aHealth risks from dioxin and related compounds: evaluation

  16. Scientific contestations over "toxic trespass"¯: health and regulatory implications of chemical biomonitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamasunder, Bhavna; Morello-Frosch, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    ral trends, and comparison with dioxins, dibenzofurans, andtoxic chemicals such as dioxin that took decades to complete2006) Health risks from dioxin and related compounds:

  17. College of Health and Human Sciences Student Services Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    & Family Development Major Core (30 hrs.) CISM 1120/1110 Or COMM 1110 PSYC 1101 Or SOCI 1101 Start Year D1 are preferred by the Department . #12;College of Health and Human Sciences Student Services Center Hrs. CISM 1120 2 CISM 1110 1 ENGL 1101 None 3 2 HIST 2110 3 2 3 CHFD 1131 None 3 D1 Science 4 ENGL 1102 3 FYE

  18. Assessing human health risk in the USDA forest service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, D.R.

    1990-12-31

    This paper identifies the kinds of risk assessments being done by or for the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service. Summaries of data sources currently in use and the pesticide risk assessments completed by the agency or its contractors are discussed. An overview is provided of the agency`s standard operating procedures for the conduct of toxicological, ecological, environmental fate, and human health risk assessments.

  19. Airborne particles in the San Joaquin Valley may affect human health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Department of Mechanical and Aero- nautical Engineering, UCand human health: A review. Aero- sol Sci Technol 38(8):737–

  20. National Center for Environmental Health Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concerns for asthma care. Elevated levels of air pollutants that make up vog have been linked to breathing's National Center for Environmental Health: Hawaii CDC 24/7: Saving Lives. Protecting People from Health--the air you breathe, the water you drink, the community around you, the places where your food is grown

  1. Toxicological and epidemiological aspects of global warming on human health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ando, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Wakamatsu, K.; Kawahara, I.; Asanuma, S.

    1996-12-31

    Since human activities are responsible for anthropogenic greenhouse gases emissions, climate models project an increase in the global surface temperature of 0.9 C to 4.0 C by 2100. For human health, it is projected that global warming may have a critical effect on the increased periods of severe heat stress in summer throughout the world. Global warming may have a critical issue on the increased periods of severe heat stress that have a potential impact on peroxidative damage in humans and animals. Lipid peroxidative damage is markedly related to GSH peroxidase activities, therefore the study was carried out to analyze the relationship between biochemical adaptability and the lipid peroxidative damage especially intracellular structure, such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum depending on the exposure time of heat stress.

  2. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development NATIONAL;DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE EUNICE KENNEDY SHRIVER NATIONAL INSTITUTE Guttmacher, Chair, NACHHD Council, and Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health

  3. Human intake fraction of toxic pollutants: a model comparison between caltox and uses-lca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; Geelen, Loes M.J.; Hertwich, Edgar G.; McKone, Thomas E.; van de Meent, Dik

    2004-01-01

    of toxic substances in LCA. II: Assessing parameter06 iF fw- ingestion-USES-LCA (-) 1,0E-04 1,0E-02 Figure 5b04 iF fw-inhalation-USES-LCA (-) Figure 6a 1,0E-04 iF fw-

  4. National Center for Environmental Health Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are caused by environmental exposures. Some of these diseases--such as cancer, asthma, and cardiovascular of Americans by promoting a healthy environment and preventing premature death and avoidable illness caused and local health programs to investigate root causes of foodborne illness outbreaks. · Responds rapidly

  5. Approaches to advancing quantitative human health risk assessment of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Euling, Susan Y.; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Subramaniam, Ravi P.

    2013-09-15

    The contribution of genomics and associated technologies to human health risk assessment for environmental chemicals has focused largely on elucidating mechanisms of toxicity, as discussed in other articles in this issue. However, there is interest in moving beyond hazard characterization to making more direct impacts on quantitative risk assessment (QRA) — i.e., the determination of toxicity values for setting exposure standards and cleanup values. We propose that the evolution of QRA of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era will involve three, somewhat overlapping phases in which different types of approaches begin to mature. The initial focus (in Phase I) has been and continues to be on “augmentation” of weight of evidence — using genomic and related technologies qualitatively to increase the confidence in and scientific basis of the results of QRA. Efforts aimed towards “integration” of these data with traditional animal-based approaches, in particular quantitative predictors, or surrogates, for the in vivo toxicity data to which they have been anchored are just beginning to be explored now (in Phase II). In parallel, there is a recognized need for “expansion” of the use of established biomarkers of susceptibility or risk of human diseases and disorders for QRA, particularly for addressing the issues of cumulative assessment and population risk. Ultimately (in Phase III), substantial further advances could be realized by the development of novel molecular and pathway-based biomarkers and statistical and in silico models that build on anticipated progress in understanding the pathways of human diseases and disorders. Such efforts would facilitate a gradual “reorientation” of QRA towards approaches that more directly link environmental exposures to human outcomes.

  6. Depleted uranium human health risk assessment, Jefferson Proving Ground, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

    1994-04-29

    The risk to human health from fragments of depleted uranium (DU) at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG) was estimated using two types of ecosystem pathway models. A steady-state, model of the JPG area was developed to examine the effects of DU in soils, water, and vegetation on deer that were hunted and consumed by humans. The RESRAD code was also used to estimate the effects of farming the impact area and consuming the products derived from the farm. The steady-state model showed that minimal doses to humans are expected from consumption of deer that inhabit the impact area. Median values for doses to humans range from about 1 mrem ({plus_minus}2.4) to 0.04 mrem ({plus_minus}0.13) and translate to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments (excess cancers) in the population. Monte Carlo simulation of the steady-state model was used to derive the probability distributions from which the median values were drawn. Sensitivity analyses of the steady-state model showed that the amount of DU in airborne dust and, therefore, the amount of DU on the vegetation surface, controlled the amount of DU ingested by deer and by humans. Human doses from the RESRAD estimates ranged from less than 1 mrem/y to about 6.5 mrem/y in a hunting scenario and subsistence fanning scenario, respectively. The human doses exceeded the 100 mrem/y dose limit when drinking water for the farming scenario was obtained from the on-site aquifer that was presumably contaminated with DU. The two farming scenarios were unrealistic land uses because the additional risk to humans due to unexploded ordnance in the impact area was not figured into the risk estimate. The doses estimated with RESRAD translated to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments to about 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} detriments. The higher risks were associated only with the farming scenario in which drinking water was obtained on-site.

  7. Evaluation of the Hazard of Microcystis Blooms for Human Health through Fish Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will be harmful to human health. #12;Proposed Work Microcystin Toxicokinetics Experiments Past experimentationEvaluation of the Hazard of Microcystis Blooms for Human Health through Fish Consumption Primary-Investigator: Duane Gossiaux - NOAA GLERL Overview Human exposure to the cyanobacterial toxin Microcystin occurs

  8. Graduate Program in Scholarship and Research Integrity College of Health and Human Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    in eight programs: Biobehavioral Health; Communication Sciences and Disorders; Health Policy and Administration; Hospitality Management; Human Development and Family Studies; Kinesiology; Nutritional Sciences designed for Penn State by the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI: www

  9. Human exposure to mercury: A critical assessment of the evidence of adverse health effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratcliffe, H.E.; Swanson, G.M.; Fischer, L.J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1996-10-25

    The ubiquitous nature of mercury in the environment, its global atmospheric cycling, and its toxicity to humans at levels that are uncomfortably close to exposures experienced by a proportion of the population are some of the current concerns associated with this pollutant. The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate the scientific quality of published reports involving human exposures to mercury and associated health outcomes as an aid in the risk evaluation of this chemical. A comprehensive review of the scientific literature involving human exposures to mercury was performed and each publication evaluated using a defined set of criteria that are considered standards in epidemiologic and toxicologic research. Severe, sometimes fatal, effects of mercury exposure at high levels were primarily reported as case studies. The disasters in Minamata, Japan, in the 1950s and in Iraq in 1971-1972 clearly demonstrated neurologic effects associated with ingestion of methylmercury both in adults and in infants exposed in utero. The effects were convincingly Associated with methylmercury ingestion, despite limitations of the study design. Several well-conducted studies have investigated the effects of methylmercury at levels below those in the Iraq incident but have not provided clear evidence of an effect. The lower end of the dose-response curve constructed from the Iraq data therefore still needs to be confirmed. The studies of mercury exposure in the workplace were mainly of elemental or inorganic mercury, and effects that were observed at relatively low exposure levels were primarily neurologic and renal. Several studies have investigated effects associated with dental amalgam but have been rated as inconclusive because of methodologic deficiencies. In our overall evaluation, 29 of 110 occupational studies and 20 of 54 studies where exposure occurred in the natural environment provided at least suggestive evidence of an exposure-related effect. 259 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. The bipyridyl herbicide paraquat-induced toxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells: relevance to dopaminergic pathogenesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Wonsuk

    2006-10-30

    brain. However, it is unclear how paraquat triggers toxicity in dopaminergic neurons. Based on the previous reports, it was hypothesized that paraquat may induce oxidative stress and proteasomal dysfunction-mediated toxicity in dopaminergic neurons...

  11. "Human Health Impact Characterization of Toxic Chemicals for Sustainable Design and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    screening. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 20(4),persistence. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 17, pp.analysis. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 19, pp.

  12. Schematic Characterization of Human Health Impact of Toxic Chemicals for Sustainable Design and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris Y.; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    screening. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 20(4),persistence. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 17, pp.analysis. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 19, pp.

  13. Sustainable Material Selection of Toxic Chemicals in Design and Manufacturing From Human Health Impact Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    screening. ” Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 20(4),persistence. ” Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 17,analysis. ” Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 19, pp.

  14. The coastal environment and human health: microbial indicators, pathogens, sentinels and reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin F.

    Innovative research relating oceans and human health is advancing our understanding of disease-causing organisms in coastal ecosystems. Novel techniques are elucidating the loading, transport and fate of pathogens in coastal ...

  15. Environmental and health management in small and medium size enterprises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arredondo, Juan C. (Juan Carlos Arredondo Brun), 1974-

    2004-01-01

    Workers and employees are increasingly exposed in the workplace to chemical compounds and substances that are potentially toxic; for most of these compounds, no information exist regarding effects on human health. As one ...

  16. Exposure information in environmental health research: Current opportunities and future directions for particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    and Hodis, H.N. Ambient air pollution and atherosclerosis inP.B. Health effects of air pollution. Journal of Allergy andof health-related air pollution standards. Annual Review of

  17. M.S. in Health and Human Development Sustainable Food Systems Emphasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    , consumer issues, and waste recycling. While sustainable food systems encompass activities from productionM.S. in Health and Human Development Sustainable Food Systems Emphasis Information for Prospective degree with an option in food, family, and community health sciences with two programs of study: 1

  18. Exposure information in environmental health research: Current opportunities and future directions for particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    sectional or intra-urban analysis of air pollution healthan epidemiologic analysis of air pollution health effects,

  19. Job Title: Occupational Health Nurse Department: Human Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    and/or evaluation of a variety of wellness programs and injury, illness, and disease prevention program, medical surveillance and immunization, ergonomics, and occupational health and safety initiatives. Continuously evaluate the early intervention and case management strategies, ensuring resources

  20. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    M (1999). Compilation of EU dioxin exposure and health data.Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in fish from the Great

  1. Oceans and Human Health: Harmful Algal Blooms and Acute Health Symptoms Among Surfers and Lifeguards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Halloran, Christina Lee

    2011-01-01

    measure for eye irritation, cough, and nasal congestion.nasal congestion, and cough were the health outcomes ofnasal congestion, and cough. In the two Backer et al.

  2. College of Health and Human Sciences Student Services Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    HLTH 1520 Healthful Living 2 Physical Activity Course 1 Physical Activity Course 1 Rev. 5/15 CISM 1120 Sciences Student Services Center Hrs. CISM 1120 2 CISM 1110 1 ENGL 1101 None 3 2 HIST 2110 3 2 3 CHFD 1131 Or CISM None "C" in ENGL 1102ENGL 2111/12 CHFD 3135 Semester Four Spring "C" in CHFD 1131 & 2135 "C

  3. Energy and Human Health Kirk R. Smith,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved Keywords coal, air pollution, biomass fuel, petroleum, nuclear energy accrue to the harvesting and burning of solid fuels, coal and biomass, mainly in the form of occupational health risks and household and general ambient air pollution. Lack of access to clean fuels

  4. Nanomaterials and nanoparticles : Sources and toxicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzea, Cristina; Robbie, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    This review is written with the goal of informing public health concerns related to nanoscience, while raising awareness of nanomaterials toxicity among scientists and manufacturers handling them. We show that humans have always been exposed to nanoparticles and dust from natural sources and human activities, the recent development of industry and combustion-based engine transportation profoundly increasing anthropogenic nanoparticulate pollution. The key to understanding the toxicity of nanoparticles is that their minute size, smaller than cells and cellular organelles, allows them to penetrate these basic biological structures, disrupting their normal function. Among diseases associated with nanoparticles are asthma, bronchitis, lung cancer, neurodegenerative diseases (such as Parkinson`s and Alzheimer`s diseases), Crohn`s disease, colon cancer. Nanoparticles that enter the circulatory system are related to occurrence of arteriosclerosis, and blood clots, arrhythmia, heart diseases, and ultimately cardiac d...

  5. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyu, Mei-Ling

    Announcement Type: New Announcement Number: HRSA-15-042 Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) No. 93 Service Act (42 U.S.C. 293c) (Educational Assistance in the Health Professions Regarding Individuals from or allied health professions programs; 2) improve retention rates by implementing tailored enrichment

  6. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Services Centers for Disease Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , is functioning as a public health authority as defined by the Rule (45 CFR 164. 501). HUD, CDC, and EPA childhood lead poisoning. Enforcement is best targeted to high-risk properties www.hud.gov espanol.hud. To date, the U.S. Department ofJustice, HUD, EPA, and local health programs have completed 34 enforcement

  7. Do Housing Prices Reflect Environmental Health Risks? Evidence from More than 1600 Toxic Plant Openings and Closings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Currie, Janet

    2012-12-21

    A ubiquitous and largely unquestioned assumption in studies of housing markets is that there is perfect information about local amenities. This paper measures the housing market and health impacts of 1,600 openings and ...

  8. Do Housing Prices Reflect Environmental Health Risks? Evidence from More than 1600 Toxic Plant Openings and Closings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Currie, Janet

    A ubiquitous and largely unquestioned assumption in studies of housing markets is that there is perfect information about local amenities. This paper measures the housing market and health impacts of 1,600 openings and ...

  9. Quantifying the health and economic impacts of mercury : an integrated assessment approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giang, Amanda (Amanda Chi Wen)

    2013-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic pollutant that endangers human and ecosystem health. Especially potent in the form of methyl mercury, exposure is known to lead to adverse neurological effects, and, a growing body of evidence suggests, ...

  10. Department of Environmental Toxicology The Institute of Environmental and Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Department of Environmental Toxicology The Institute of Environmental and Human Health Texas Tech.gradprogram@ttu.edu Environmental Toxicology Reference Form Part I: To be filled out by the applicant before giving at the above address. In addition to an assessment of the ability to complete graduate-level work, we invite

  11. Essays on econometric modeling of subjective perceptions of risks in environment and human health 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, To Ngoc

    2009-05-15

    A large body of literature studies the issues of the option price and other ex-ante welfare measures under the microeconomic theory to valuate reductions of risks inherent in environment and human health. However, it does not offer a careful...

  12. Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety, therefore generating high

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety and a thumb-drive sized prototype system. I. INTRODUCTION xposure to air pollution consistently ranks among to occupational safety as energy demands rise. Airborne pollutants and explosive gases vary in both time and space

  13. Assessing the ecological and human health status of Baltimore's Inner Harbor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    Assessing the ecological and human health status of Baltimore's Inner Harbor Caroline Wicks1, Heath Partnership of Baltimore, 3Center for Watershed Protection, 4Integration and Application Network Mid-Atlantic Volunteer Monitoring Conference August 10-11, 2011 #12;Outline of this talk · Introduction to Baltimore

  14. EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK OF AERIAL ULTRA-LOW VOLUME APPLICATIONS OF PYRETHRINS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK OF AERIAL ULTRA-LOW VOLUME APPLICATIONS OF PYRETHRINS). A human health risk assessment conducted by Peterson et al. (2006) for truck-mounted ultra-low volume (ULV to epidemic levels and dispersed to all 58 counties in the state, and was associated with low

  15. Human health impacts for Renewable Energy scenarios from the EnerGEO Platform of Integrated Assessment (PIA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Human health impacts for Renewable Energy scenarios from the EnerGEO Platform of Integrated of renewable energy, affect concentrations of air pollutants and as a consequence affect human health. PM2 as a reference and the Maximum renewable power scenario. 1. Introduction People exposure to fine particulate

  16. Testing for Toxic Algae By Tadd Barrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Testing for Toxic Algae By Tadd Barrow UNL Extension Educator, Water Quality Algae is a microscopic plant that occurs in all water. However, only certain conditions bring algae to the surface, making it toxic to animals, especially humans and dogs. Toxic algae often are naturally occurring from high

  17. Treating chronic arsenic toxicity with high selenium lentil diets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sah, Shweta [Department of Ecosystem and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6 (Canada); Vandenberg, Albert [Department of Plant Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8 (Canada); Smits, Judit, E-mail: judit.smits@ucalgary.ca [Department of Ecosystem and Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6 (Canada)

    2013-10-01

    Arsenic (As) toxicity causes serious health problems in humans, especially in the Indo-Gangetic plains and mountainous areas of China. Selenium (Se), an essential micronutrient is a potential mitigator of As toxicity due to its antioxidant and antagonistic properties. Selenium is seriously deficient in soils world-wide but is present at high, yet non-toxic levels in the great plains of North America. We evaluate the potential of dietary Se in counteracting chronic As toxicity in rats through serum biochemistry, blood glutathione levels, immunotoxicity (antibody response), liver peroxidative stress, thyroid response and As levels in tissues and excreta. To achieve this, we compare diets based on high-Se Saskatchewan (SK) lentils versus low-Se lentils from United States. Rats drank control (0 ppm As) or As (40 ppm As) water while consuming SK lentils (0.3 ppm Se) or northwestern USA lentils (< 0.01 ppm Se) diets for 14 weeks. Rats on high Se diets had higher glutathione levels regardless of As exposure, recovered antibody responses in As-exposed group, higher fecal and urinary As excretion and lower renal As residues. Selenium deficiency caused greater hepatic peroxidative damage in the As exposed animals. Thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), were not different. After 14 weeks of As exposure, health indicators in rats improved in response to the high Se lentil diets. Our results indicate that high Se lentils have a potential to mitigate As toxicity in laboratory mammals, which we hope will translate into benefits for As exposed humans. - Highlights: • We reduce chronic arsenic toxicity in rats with a whole food solution. • High selenium lentils decrease liver damage and increase blood glutathione levels. • High selenium lentil diets increase urinary and fecal arsenic excretion. • High selenium lentil diets decrease arsenic levels in kidney, the storage organ. • High selenium lentil diets reverse arsenic suppression of the B cell response.

  18. IEEE JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH INFORMATICS, VOL. 19, NO. 3, MAY 2015 883 Human Core Temperature Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEEE JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH INFORMATICS, VOL. 19, NO. 3, MAY 2015 883 Human Core versions of one or more of the figures in this paper are available online at http://ieeexplore.ieee

  19. LCIA OF IMPACTS ON HUMAN HEALTH AND ECOSYSTEMS METHODOLOGY USEtox--the UNEP-SETAC toxicity model: recommended

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Lois Swirsky

    was initiated by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP)­Society for Environmental Toxicology.O. Box 6079, Montréal, QC, Canada H3C 3A7 e-mail: ralph.rosenbaum@polymtl.ca T. M. Bachmann European Institute for Energy Research (EIFER), University of Karlsruhe, Emmy-Noether-Strasse 11, 76131 Karlsruhe

  20. Toxic remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matthews, Stephen M. (Alamed County, CA); Schonberg, Russell G. (Santa Clara County, CA); Fadness, David R. (Santa Clara County, CA)

    1994-01-01

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  1. Examining the Links between Biodiversity and Human Health: An Interdisciplinary Research Initiative at the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    can profoundly impact the ability of ecosystems to provide clean water, energy, food, recreation INTRODUCTION Humans depend on natural ecosystems and the services they provide, including food, energy, cleanExamining the Links between Biodiversity and Human Health: An Interdisciplinary Research Initiative

  2. Increased European biofuel cultivation could harm human health1 by James Morgan for www.scienceomega.com2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Bohemia, University of

    Increased European biofuel cultivation could harm human health1 by James Morgan for www that the large-scale production of biofuels in4 Europe could result in increased human mortality and crop losses that many biofuel plant species, including poplar and willow, release more isoprene ­ an6 ozone precursor

  3. A risk assessment software tool for evaluating potential risks to human health and the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drendel, G.; Allen, B.; Gentry, R.; Shipp, A.; Van Landingham, C.

    1994-12-31

    The Ecology and National Environmental Policy Act Division (END), is providing a sitewide evaluation of alternative strategies for the final disposition of the Rocky Flats Plant material inventory. This analysis is known as the Systems Engineering Analysis (SEA) for the Rocky Flats Plant. The primary intent of the SEA is to support the Rocky Flats Plant decision-making. As part of the SEA project, a risk assessment software tool has been developed which will assist in the analysis by providing an evaluation of potential risks to human health and the environment for the purpose of augmenting future decisions at the site.

  4. Green tea polyphenol, (?)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, induces toxicity in human skin cancer cells by targeting ?-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Tripti; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2013-12-01

    The green tea polyphenol, (?)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), has been shown to have anti-carcinogenic effects in several skin tumor models, and efforts are continued to investigate the molecular targets responsible for its cytotoxic effects to cancer cells. Our recent observation that ?-catenin is upregulated in skin tumors suggested the possibility that the anti-skin carcinogenic effects of EGCG are mediated, at least in part, through its effects on ?-catenin signaling. We have found that treatment of the A431 and SCC13 human skin cancer cell lines with EGCG resulted in reduced cell viability and increased cell death and that these cytotoxic effects were associated with inactivation of ?-catenin signaling. Evidence of EGCG-induced inactivation of ?-catenin included: (i) reduced accumulation of nuclear ?-catenin; (ii) enhanced levels of casein kinase1?, reduced phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3?, and increased phosphorylation of ?-catenin on critical serine{sup 45,33/37} residues; and (iii) reduced levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, which are down-stream targets of ?-catenin. Treatment of cells with prostaglandin E2 (PGE{sub 2}) enhanced the accumulation of ?-catenin and enhanced ?-catenin signaling. Treatment with either EGCG or an EP2 antagonist (AH6809) reduced the PGE{sub 2}-enhanced levels of cAMP, an upstream regulator of ?-catenin. Inactivation of ?-catenin by EGCG resulted in suppression of cell survival signaling proteins. siRNA knockdown of ?-catenin in A431 and SCC13 cells reduced cell viability. Collectively, these data suggest that induction of cytotoxicity in skin cancer cells by EGCG is mediated by targeting of ?-catenin signaling and that the ?-catenin signaling is upregulated by inflammatory mediators. - Highlights: • EGCG inhibits cancer cell viability through inactivation of ?-catenin signaling. • Inactivation of ?-catenin involves the downregulation of inflammatory mediators. • EGCG inactivates ?-catenin in skin cancer cells by inhibition of cAMP and PGE{sub 2}. • siRNA knockdown of ?-catenin or COX-2 reduces the viability of cancer cells.

  5. USDOE study: Human health and ecological risk assessment for produced water discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; DePhillips, M.; Hamilton, L.D.

    1994-12-31

    Produced water generated during the production of oil and gas can contain high concentrations of radionuclides, organics and heavy metals. There are concerns about potential human health and ecological impacts from the discharge of these contaminants to the Gulf of Mexico. Data collected in the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) field study are being used in a series of human health and ecological risk assessments. These assessments will support scientifically-based regulation and risk management. This presentation: summarizes risk assessments performed for produced water discharges; describes how uncertainties in these assessments are guiding data collection efforts in the USDOE field study; and outlines ongoing risk assessment studies. In these studies, risk assessment is treated as an iterative process. An initial screening-level assessment is performed to identify important contaminants, transport and exposure pathways, and parameters. These intermediate results are used to guide data collection efforts and refinements to the analysis. At this stage in the analysis, risk is described in terms of probabilities; the uncertainties in each measured or modeled parameter are considered explicitly.

  6. Comparative Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine Emissions Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles...

  7. Abstract--Accurate recognition of air pollutants and estimation of their concentrations are critical for human health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    Abstract--Accurate recognition of air pollutants and estimation of their concentrations Exposure to air pollutions has a serious effect on the health of humans and has become the leading cause of relevant gases. However, because there are several air pollutants that need to be monitored simultaneously

  8. Programs director`s report for the Office of Health and Environmental Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Since its establishment, the Department of Energy`s Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has had responsibility for conducting biological research to develop the knowledge needed to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy use and development, including the potential health impacts of radiation. The Health Effects Research Program has established the basis for understanding the health consequences of radiation for humans, developed radiation dosimetry methodology, characterized and evaluated the health impacts of fossil fuels, and developed and conducted research to determine the health impacts of inhaled toxicants. The results of this research have provided input for setting genetic standards for radiation and chemical exposure.

  9. Old, the new, the states, the evolution of the regulation of air toxics. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vecera, D.R.

    1993-02-14

    The activism associated with America in the 1960s spilled over into many areas, one of which was a new environmental movement. A product of that movement was the Clean Air Act passed in 1970. The new law included a selection aimed specifically at controlling emissions of hazardous or toxic air pollutants. However, over the next 20 years there was very little government regulation of air toxics, and this section of the Clean Air Act was considered to be a resounding failure. What went wrong. How did this lofty goal to protect human health and the environment end up on the back burner. The article will address the idealism that led to the Clean Air Act legislation, in particular the air toxics program, and explore the realities that scuttled those ideals when it came time to implement the law.

  10. A macro environmental risk assessment methodology for establishing priorities among risks to human health and the environment in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gernhofer, S.; Oliver, T.J.; Vasquez, R.

    1994-12-31

    A macro environmental risk assessment (ERA) methodology was developed for the Philippine Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) as part of the US Agency for International Development Industrial Environmental Management Project. The DENR allocates its limited resources to mitigate those environmental problems that pose the greatest threat to human health and the environment. The National Regional Industry Prioritization Strategy (NRIPS) methodology was developed as a risk assessment tool to establish a national ranking of industrial facilities. The ranking establishes regional and national priorities, based on risk factors, that DENR can use to determine the most effective allocation of its limited resources. NRIPS is a systematic framework that examines the potential risk to human health and the environment from hazardous substances released from a facility, and, in doing so, generates a relative numerical score that represents that risk. More than 3,300 facilities throughout the Philippines were evaluated successfully with the NRIPS.

  11. Hazardous waste transportation risk assessment for the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement -- human health endpoints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartmann, H.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Lazaro, M.A.

    1994-03-01

    In this presentation, a quantitative methodology for assessing the risk associated with the transportation of hazardous waste (HW) is proposed. The focus is on identifying air concentrations of HW that correspond to specific human health endpoints.

  12. Tropical Medicine and International Health voLUME 2 NO rr SUPPLEMENT PP Ar-A54 NOVEMBER 1997 Human behaviour and cultural context in disease control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tropical Medicine and International Health voLUME 2 NO rr SUPPLEMENT PP Ar-A54 NOVEMBER 1997 Human, Department of Tropical Medicine, Twlane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, N ew Orleans, USA medicine and medical anthropology researchers contributed to a successful community- based cost recovery

  13. PA-40-201 1 Department of Health and Human Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    Library of Medicine (NLM) Fogarty International Center (FIC) National Center for Complementary Organization(s) National Institutes of Health (NIH) Components of Participating Organizations National Cancer Institute (NCI) National Eye Institute (NEI) National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) National

  14. Human health benefits of ambient sulfate aerosol reductions under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chestnut, L.G. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Watkins, A.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Acid Rain Provisions (Title IV) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 call for about a 10 million ton reduction in annual SO{sub 2} emissions in the United States by the year 2010. Although the provisions apply nationwide, most of the reduction will take place in the eastern half of the United States, where use of high sulfur coal for electricity generation is most common. One potentially large benefit of Title IV is the expected reduction in adverse human health effects associated with exposure to ambient sulfate aerosols, a secondary pollutant formed in the atmosphere when SO{sub 2} is present. Sulfate aerosols are a significant constituent of fine particulate (PM{sub 2.5}). This paper combines available epidemiologic evidence of health effects associated with sulfate aerosols and economic estimates of willingness to pay for reductions in risks or incidence of health effects with available estimates of the difference between expected ambient sulfate concentrations in the eastern United States and southeastern Canada with and without Title IV to estimate the expected health benefits of Title IV. The results suggest a mean annual benefit in the eastern United States of $10.6 billion (in 1994 dollars) in 1997 and $40.0 billion in 2010, with an additional $1 billion benefit each year in Ontario and Quebec provinces.

  15. Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

    2012-01-01

    The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

  16. Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSCGrid-based29HaiWhy Is ItHarry1-1642Health

  17. Model of medical supply demand and astronaut health for long-duration human space flight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assad, Albert

    2009-01-01

    The medical care of space crews is the primary limiting factor in the achievement of long-duration space missions. (Nicogossian 2003) The goal of this thesis was to develop a model of long-duration human space flight ...

  18. The Nuremberg Code subverts human health and safety by requiring animal modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greek, Ray; Pippus, Annalea; Hansen, Lawrence A

    2012-01-01

    the Human Genome Project ( HGP) [54,55] and other spin-offprojects. Prior to the HGP, scientists thought the number ofscientists involved in the HGP were looking for an estimated

  19. Role of domestic dogs in diseases of significance to humans and wildlife health in central Chile 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acosta-Jamett, Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    The higher proximity among humans, domestic animals and wildlife favours disease spill-over both from wildlife to domestic animals and vice versa, which is a potential risk for the extinction of wildlife populations and ...

  20. Climate change and human health: Spatial modeling of water availability, malnutrition, and livelihoods in Mali, Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    , and livelihoods in Mali, Africa Marta M. Jankowskaa,*,1 , David Lopez-Carrb,1 , Chris Funkc , Gregory J. Husakd Malnutrition Mali-Africa Livelihoods a b s t r a c t This study develops a novel approach for projecting climate trends in the Sahel in relation to shifting livelihood zones and health outcomes. Focusing on Mali

  1. DOE contractor's meeting on chemical toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) is required to determine the potential health and environmental effects associated with energy production and use. To ensure appropriate communication among investigators and scientific disciplines that these research studies represent, OHER has sponsored workshops. This document provides a compilation of activities at the Third Annual DOE/OHER Workshop. This year's workshop was broadened to include all OHER activities identified as within the chemical effects area. The workshop consisted of eight sessions entitled Isolation and Detection of Toxic chemicals; Adduct Formation and Repair; Chemical Toxicity (Posters); Metabolism and Genotoxicity; Inhalation Toxicology; Gene Regulation; Metals Toxicity; and Biological Mechanisms. This document contains abstracts of the information presented by session.

  2. Mary Hopkins-Best, Ed.D. Dean, College of Education, Health and Human Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    officer and academic leader of the College, including fiscal management, personnel, policy and program completion programs were approved and implemented during my tenure as dean: B.S. Human Development Family monthly research colloquia. o Developed a CEHHS Collaborative Research Award which provided funding to two

  3. Human health safety evaluation of cosmetics in the EU: A legally imposed challenge to science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauwels, M.; Rogiers, V.

    2010-03-01

    As stated in the European legislation, cosmetic products present on the European market must be safe for the consumer. Safety evaluation of the products is carried out by a qualified safety assessor who needs to consider potential exposure scenarios next to the physicochemical and toxicological profiles of all composing ingredients. Whereas, until recently, the tools to determine the toxicological profile of cosmetic ingredients mainly consisted of animal experiments, they have now been narrowed down substantially by the legally imposed animal testing ban on cosmetic ingredients, taken up in the Cosmetic Products Directive (76/768/EEC). This Directive, however, is not a stand-alone piece of European legislation, since as well directly as indirectly it is influenced by a complex web of related legislations. Vertical legislations deal with different categories of chemicals, including dangerous substances, biocides, plant protection products, food additives, medicinal products, and of course also cosmetics. Horizontal legislative texts, on the contrary, cover more general fields such as protection of experimental animals, consumer product safety, misleading of consumers, specific provisions for aerosols, and others. Experience has learnt that having a general overview of these related legislations is necessary to understand their impact on the cosmetic world in general terms and on cosmetic safety evaluation in particular. This goes for a variety of concerned parties, including national and European regulators/agencies, contract laboratories, raw material suppliers, cosmetic companies, research and educational centers. They all deal with a number of aspects important for the quality and toxicity of cosmetics and their ingredients. This review summarises the most relevant points of the legislative texts of different types of product categories and emphasises their impact on the safety evaluation of cosmetics.

  4. Chapter 10 Health and Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    however, these same facilities could pose risks to humans-including electrocution, fire, collision with aircraft and watercraft, and exposure to toxic and hazardous...

  5. Appendix F Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB10081278MaywoodWayne AnalyticalSurfaceHuman

  6. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Porter, William C.; Rosenstiel, Todd N.; Guenther, Alex; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Barsanti, Kelley

    2015-05-06

    An expected global increase in bioenergy-crop cultivation as an alternative to fossil fuels will have consequences on both global climate and local air quality through changes in biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). While greenhouse gas emissions may be reduced through the substitution of next-generation bioenergy crops such as eucalyptus, giant reed, and switchgrass for fossil fuels, the choice of species has important ramifications for human health, potentially reducing the benefits of conversion due to increases in ozone (O?) and fine particulate matter (PM???) levels as a result of large changes in biogenic emissions. Using the Community Earth Systemmore »Model we simulate the conversion of marginal and underutilized croplands worldwide to bioenergy crops under varying future anthropogenic emissions scenarios. A conservative global replacement using high VOC-emitting crop profiles leads to modeled population-weighted O? increases of 5–27 ppb in India, 1–9 ppb in China, and 1–6 ppb in the United States, with peak PM??? increases of up to 2 ?gm?³. We present a metric for the regional evaluation of candidate bioenergy crops, as well as results for the application of this metric to four representative emissions profiles using four replacement scales (10–100% maximum estimated available land). Finally, we assess the total health and climate impacts of biogenic emissions, finding that the negative consequences of using high-emitting crops could exceed 50% of the positive benefits of reduced fossil fuel emissions in value.« less

  7. Human-health effects of radium: an epidemiolgic perspective of research at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stebbings, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The topic of health effects of radium has recently been considerably broadened by the identification of multiple myeloma as a specific outcome of bone-seeking radionuclides, and by evidence that the incidence of breast cancer may be significantly increased by radium exposure. All soft-tissue tumors are now suspect, especially leukemias. Concepts of dose-response need to be broadened to include the concept of risk factors, or, if one prefers, of susceptible subgroups. Biological factors relating to radium uptake and retention require study, as do risk factors modifying risk of both the clasical tumors, osteosarcoma and nasal sinus/mastoid, and the more recently suspect soft-tissue tumors. The history, organization, and current research activities in epidemiology at Argonne National Laboratory are described, and findings of the last decade and a half reviewed. Plans for future research are briefly discussed.

  8. Health Maintenance Exam - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EpidemiologyHealth Data Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program...

  9. Neurodevelopmental toxicity of prenatal polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by chemical structure and activity: a birth cohort study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Hye-Youn; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Sovcikova, Eva; Kocan, Anton; Drobna, Beata; Trnovec, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    polychlorinated biphenyl, dioxin, and furan signals. Environof human and Mammalian toxic equivalency factors for dioxinsand dioxin-like compounds. Toxicol Sci 2006, 93:223-241. 18.

  10. Addressing Genetics Delivering Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    century in the Human Genome Project (HGP) underlined recognition throughout research and clinical the HGP, however, are challenging these boundaries and health professionals throughout the health service

  11. MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS LOCAL IMPACTS ON HUMAN HEALTH RISK.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN, T.M.; BOWERMAN, B.; ADAMS, J.; LIPFERT, F.; MORRIS, S.M.; BANDO, A.; PENA, R.; BLAKE, R.

    2005-12-01

    A thorough quantitative understanding of the processes of mercury emissions, deposition, and translocation through the food chain is currently not available. Complex atmospheric chemistry and dispersion models are required to predict concentration and deposition contributions, and aquatic process models are required to predict effects on fish. However, there are uncertainties in all of these predictions. Therefore, the most reliable method of understanding impacts of coal-fired power plants on Hg deposition is from empirical data. A review of the literature on mercury deposition around sources including coal-fired power plants found studies covering local mercury concentrations in soil, vegetation, and animals (fish and cows). There is strong evidence of enhanced local deposition within 3 km of the chlor-alkali plants, with elevated soil concentrations and estimated deposition rates of 10 times background. For coal-fired power plants, the data show that atmospheric deposition of Hg may be slightly enhanced. On the scale of a few km, modeling suggests that wet deposition may be increased by a factor of two or three over background. The measured data suggest lower increases of 15% or less. The effects of coal-fired plants seem to be less than 10% of total deposition on a national scale, based on emissions and global modeling. The following summarizes our findings from published reports on the impacts of local deposition. In terms of excesses over background the following increments have been observed within a few km of the plant: (1) local soil concentration Hg increments of 30%-60%, (2) sediment increments of 18-30%, (3) wet deposition increments of 11-12%, and (4) fish Hg increments of about 5-6%, based on an empirical finding that fish concentrations are proportional to the square root of deposition. Important uncertainties include possible reductions of RGM to Hg{sub 0} in power plant plumes and the role of water chemistry in the relationship between Hg deposition and fish content. Soil and vegetation sampling programs were performed around two mid-size coal fired power plants. The objectives were to determine if local mercury hot-spots exist, to determine if they could be attributed to deposition of coal-fired power plant emissions, and to determine if they correlated with model predictions. These programs found the following: (1) At both sites, there was no correlation between modeled mercury deposition and either soil concentrations or vegetation concentrations. At the Kincaid plant, there was excess soil Hg along heavily traveled roads. The spatial pattern of soil mercury concentrations did not match the pattern of vegetation Hg concentrations at either plant. (2) At both sites, the subsurface (5-10 cm) samples the Hg concentration correlated strongly with the surface samples (0-5 cm). Average subsurface sample concentrations were slightly less than the surface samples; however, the difference was not statistically significant. (3) An unequivocal definition of background Hg was not possible at either site. Using various assumed background soil mercury concentrations, the percentage of mercury deposited within 10 km of the plant ranged between 1.4 and 8.5% of the RGM emissions. Based on computer modeling, Hg deposition was primarily RGM with much lower deposition from elemental mercury. Estimates of the percentage of total Hg deposition ranged between 0.3 and 1.7%. These small percentages of deposition are consistent with the empirical findings of only minor perturbations in environmental levels, as opposed to ''hot spots'', near the plants. The major objective of this study was to determine if there was evidence for ''hot-spots'' of mercury deposition around coal-fired power plants. Although the term has been used extensively, it has never been defined. From a public health perspective, such a ''hot spot'' must be large enough to insure that it did not occur by chance, and it must affect water bodies large enough to support a population of subsistence fishers. The results of this study support the hypothesis that n

  12. Toxic chemical hazard classification and risk acceptance guidelines for use in DOE facilities. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, D.K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Davis, J.S. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Prowse, J. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hoffman, P.W. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

    1995-03-24

    The concentration-limit guidelines presented in this document apply to airborne releases of chemicals evaluated with respect to human health effects for the purposes of hazard classification and categorization, risk assessment and safety analysis. They apply to all DOE facilities and operations involving the use of potentially hazardous chemicals. The guidelines do not address other nonradiological hazards such as fire, pressure releases (including explosions), and chemical reactivity, but the guidelines are applicable to hazardous chemical releases resulting from these events. This report presents the subcommittee`s evaluation and recommendations regarding analyses of accidentally released toxic chemicals. The premise upon which these recommendations are based is that the mechanism of action of toxic chemicals is fundamentally different from that associated with radionuclides, with the exception of carcinogens. The recommendations reported herein are restricted to the airborne pathway because in an accident scenario this typically represents the most immediately significant route of public exposure. However, the subcommittee recognizes that exposure to chemicals through other pathways, in particular waterborne, can have significant impacts on human health and the environment. Although there are a number of chemicals for which absorption through the skin can contribute measurably to the total dose in chronic (e.g., occupational) exposure situations, this pathway has not been considered for the acute exposure scenarios considered in this report. Later studies. will address these issues if it appears desirable.

  13. Health assessment for Northwest Transformer (South Harkness), Everson, Whatcom County, Washington, Region 10. CERCLIS No. WAD027315621. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-21

    In compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has prepared Health Assessment reports for sites currently on, or proposed for, the National Priorities List. In the report, the presence and nature of health hazards at this site are assessed, and the public health implications specific to this site are evaluated. The Health Assessment is based on such factors as the nature, concentration, toxicity, and extent of contamination at the site; the existence of potential pathways for the human exposure; the size and nature of the community likely to be exposed; and any other information available to ATSDR that is relevant to a determination of potential risks to public health.

  14. Food packaging chemicals may be harmful to human health over long term1 BMJ-British Medical Journal2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Bohemia, University of

    for several reasons." These include the fact that known toxicants, such as formaldehyde, a cancer13 causing substance, are legally used in these materials. Formaldehyde is widely present, albeit at low levels to disrupt hormone production also crop up in FCMs, including bisphenol A, tributyltin,17 triclosan

  15. CHEMISTRY AND TOXICITY OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) primary treated domestic sewage from greater Vancouver (Annacis Island Wastewater Treatment Plant); (2#12;CHEMISTRY AND TOXICITY OF THREE WASTEWATERS DOE FRAP 1993-08 Prepared for Environment Canada wastewater characterization study in April and May 1992. Three representative effluent types were sampled: (1

  16. A tiered approach for the human health risk assessment for consumption of vegetables from with cadmium-contaminated land in urban areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swartjes, Frank A. Versluijs, Kees W.; Otte, Piet F.

    2013-10-15

    Consumption of vegetables that are grown in urban areas takes place worldwide. In developing countries, vegetables are traditionally grown in urban areas for cheap food supply. In developing and developed countries, urban gardening is gaining momentum. A problem that arises with urban gardening is the presence of contaminants in soil, which can be taken up by vegetables. In this study, a scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables from cadmium-contaminated land. Starting from a contaminated site, the procedure follows a tiered approach which is laid out as follows. In Tier 0, the plausibility of growing vegetables is investigated. In Tier 1 soil concentrations are compared with the human health-based Critical soil concentration. Tier 2 offers the possibility for a detailed site-specific human health risk assessment in which calculated exposure is compared to the toxicological reference dose. In Tier 3, vegetable concentrations are measured and tested following a standardized measurement protocol. To underpin the derivation of the Critical soil concentrations and to develop a tool for site-specific assessment the determination of the representative concentration in vegetables has been evaluated for a range of vegetables. The core of the procedure is based on Freundlich-type plant–soil relations, with the total soil concentration and the soil properties as variables. When a significant plant–soil relation is lacking for a specific vegetable a geometric mean of BioConcentrationFactors (BCF) is used, which is normalized according to soil properties. Subsequently, a ‘conservative’ vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor is calculated as basis for the Critical soil concentration (Tier 1). The tool to perform site-specific human health risk assessment (Tier 2) includes the calculation of a ‘realistic worst case’ site-specific vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. -- Highlights: • A scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables. • Uptake characteristics of cadmium in a series of vegetables is represented by a vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. • Calculations and measurement steps are combined.

  17. Toxic Substances Control Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  18. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, WC; Rosenstiel, TN; Guenther, A; Lamarque, J-F; Barsanti, K

    2015-01-01

    bioenergy crops such as eucalyptus, giant reed, anduse of crops such as poplar, eucalyptus, and switchgrass asemitters such as eucalyptus. The com- bined health bene?ts

  19. Health assessment for Cedartown Municipal Landfill NPL Site, Cedartown, Polk County, Georgia, Region 4. CERCLIS No. GAD980495402. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-08

    In compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has prepared Health Assessment reports for sites currently on, or proposed for, the National Priorities List. In the report, the presence and nature of health hazards at this site are assessed, and the public health implications specific to this site are evaluated. The Health Assessment is based on such factors as the nature, concentration, toxicity, and extent of contamination at the site; the existence of potential pathways for the human exposure; the size and nature of the community likely to be exposed; and any other information available.

  20. HELLE: Health Effects of Low Level Exposures/ Gezondheidseffecten van lage blootstellingniveaus [International workshop: Influence of low level exposures to chemicals and radiation on human and ecological health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoten, Eert

    1998-11-26

    The Health Council is closely involved in establishing the scientific foundation of exposure limits for substances and radiation in order to protect public health. Through the years, the Council has contributed to the formulation of principles and procedures, both for carcinogenic and for noncarcinogenic agents. As a rule, the discussion with regard to the derivation of health-based recommended exposure limits centers around the appropriateness of extrapolation methods (What can be inferred from data on high exposure levels and on experimental animals?). Generally speaking, there is a lack of direct information on the health effects of low levels of exposure. Effects at these levels cannot usually be detected by means of traditional animal experiments or epidemiological research. The capacity of these analytical instruments to distinguish between ''signal'' and ''noise'' is inadequate in most cases. Annex B of this report contains a brief outline of the difficulties and the established methods for tackling this problem. In spite of this, the hope exists that the posited weak signals, if they are indeed present, can be detected by other means. The search will have to take place on a deeper level. In other words, effort must be made to discover what occurs at underlying levels of biological organization when organisms are exposed to low doses of radiation or substances. Molecular and cell biology provide various methods and techniques which give an insight into the processes within the cell. This results in an increase in the knowledge about the molecular and cellular effects of exposure to agents, or stated differently, the working mechanisms which form the basis of the health effects. Last year, the Health Council considered that the time was ripe to take stock of the state of knowledge in this field. To this end, an international working conference was held from 19 to 21 October 1997, entitled ''Health Effects of Low Level Exposures: Scientific Developments and Perspectives for Risk Assessment''. The central question was the extent to which the sometimes fast-growing knowledge about molecular and cellular effects offers the desired basis for extrapolation. Against this setting, a number of more specific questions which have been hotly debated for some time were also addressed. One of the primary questions concerned the traditional but increasingly questioned division between stochastic and non-stochastic working agents, and the corresponding division between exposure-effect relations without a threshold and with a threshold. Thoughts were also exchanged on what is often referred to as hormesis: the notion that low levels of exposure could actually improve health. For the purpose of illuminating the many aspects of these issues, experts from a number of areas were invited. In addition to this, three agents were selected to serve as points of crystallization for the general debate: ionizing radiation, ultraviolet (UV) radiation and dioxins. The present report calls attention to a selection of issues which emerged during the discussions on the above-mentioned central topic. Various more detailed questions and the wider context of the points considered are described at greater length in the enclosed conference report and in the background documents attached to the report. What follows is a series of considerations regarding the scientific basis for the derivation of recommended exposure levels, viewed in the light of current procedures and against the background of the work of the Health Council. In the preparation of the following comments and recommendations, various Dutch experts have been consulted.

  1. Genetic Databases: Assessing the Benefits and the Impact on Human and Patient Rights – A World Health Organisation Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurie, Graeme

    2004-01-01

    This article summarises the underlying rational and provisions of a report on genetic databases prepared for the European Partnership on Patients’ Rights and Citizens’ Empowerment, a network of the World Health Organisation ...

  2. Epidemiology/Health Data Analysis - HPMC Occupational Health...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EpidemiologyHealth Data Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program...

  3. Environmental Public Health Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Public Health Tracking Network VISION Version 1.0 10/20/2004 This document has been for Disease Control and Prevention ­ Department of Health and Human Services #12;Environmental Public Health the features that will be proposed to stakeholders to support environmental public health tracking nationwide

  4. A preclinical cognitive test battery to parallel the National Institute of Health Toolbox in humans: bridging the translational gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortin, Norbert J.

    Review A preclinical cognitive test battery to parallel the National Institute of Health Toolbox that there are several paradigms available to define a preclinical battery that parallels the NIH Toolbox. We also suggest areas in which new tests may benefit the development of a comprehensive preclinical test battery

  5. The Use of Remotely Sensed Bioelectric Action Potentials to Evaluate Episodic Toxicity Events and Ambient Toxicity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waller, W. Tom; Acevedo, Miguel F.; Allen, H. J.; Schwalm, F. U.

    1996-01-01

    The exposure of an organism to a toxicant is defined by the magnitude, duration, and frequency with which the organism(s) interact with the toxicant(s). Predicting the exposure of organisms to toxicants during episodic ...

  6. Overview of ozone human exposure and health risk analyses used in the U.S. EPA's review of the ozone air quality standard.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, R. G.

    1999-03-04

    This paper presents an overview of the ozone human exposure and health risk analyses developed under sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These analyses are being used in the current review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The analyses consist of three principal steps: (1) estimating short-term ozone exposure for particular populations (exposure model); (2) estimating population response to exposures or concentrations (exposure-response or concentration-response models); and (3) integrating concentrations or exposure with concentration-response or exposure-response models to produce overall risk estimates (risk model). The exposure model, called the probabilistic NAAQS exposure model for ozone (pNEM/03), incorporates the following factors: hourly ambient ozone concentrations; spatial distribution of concentrations; ventilation state of individuals at time of exposure; and movement of people through various microenvironments (e.g., outdoors, indoors, inside a vehicle) of varying air quality. Exposure estimates are represented by probability distributions. Exposure-response relationships have been developed for several respiratory symptom and lung function health effects, based on the results of controlled human exposure studies. These relationships also are probabilistic and reflect uncertainties associated with sample size and variability of response among subjects. The analyses also provide estimates of excess hospital admissions in the New York City area based on results from an epidemiology study. Overall risk results for selected health endpoints and recently analyzed air quality scenarios associated with alternative 8-hour NAAQS and the current 1-hour standard for outdoor children are used to illustrate application of the methodology.

  7. Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel...

  8. Combustion & Health 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, W.

    2012-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-KT-12-10-18.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 4107 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-KT-12-10-18.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH... Winifred J. Hamilton, PhD, SM Clear Air Through Energy Efficiency (CATEE) Galveston, TX October 9?11, 2012 FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH FFCOMBUSTION: THE THREAT ? Biggest threat to world ecosystems (and to human health) ? Combustion of fossil fuels...

  9. California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic Substances Control Jump to: navigation, search Name: California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic...

  10. TOXNET and Beyond-Using the National Library of Medicine's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templin-Branner, Wilma

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this training is to familiarize participants with reliable online environmental health and toxicology information, from the National Library of Medicine and other reliable sources. Skills and knowledge acquired in this training class will enable participants to access, utilize, and refer others to environmental health and toxicology information. After completing this course, participants will be able to: (1) Identify quality, accurate, and authoritative online resources pertaining to environmental health, toxicology, and related medical information; (2) Demonstrate the ability to perform strategic search techniques to find relevant online information; and (3) Apply the skills and knowledge obtained in this class to their organization's health information needs. NLMs TOXNET (Toxicology Data Network) is a free, Web-based system of databases on toxicology, environmental health, hazardous chemicals, toxic releases, chemical nomenclatures, and specialty areas such as occupational health and consumer products. Types of information in the TOXNET databases include: (1) Specific chemicals, mixtures, and products; (2) Unknown chemicals; and (3) Special toxic effects of chemicals in humans and/or animals.

  11. Health Behavior Health Promotion -Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    Health Behavior Health Promotion - Prevention Modification of Health Attitudes and Health Behavior #12;Health Promotion: An Overview Basic philosophy Good health = individual and collective goal interventions Public Health Strategies #12;Introduction to Health Behaviors: Role of Behavioral Factors

  12. Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense in the Gulf of Maine : investigations using physical-biological model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Charles A. (Charles Andrew), 1975-

    2005-01-01

    Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense are annually recurrent in the western Gulf of Maine (WGOM) and pose a serious economic and public health threat. Transitions between and vital rates within the life ...

  13. HEALTH & COUNSELLING Health Clinic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HEALTH & COUNSELLING SERVICES Health Clinic 778.783.4615 - Burnaby 778.782.5200 - Vancouver_counsellor@sfu.ca Health Promotion 778.782.4674 Health & Counselling Services, SFU - 8888 University Drive, MBC 0164 health can suffer if you're under stress for a long time, especially if you are not eating well. You may

  14. Health effects associated with energy conservation measures in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, R.D.; Baechler, M.C.

    1990-09-01

    Indoor air quality can be impacted by hundreds of different chemicals. More than 900 different organic compounds alone have been identified in indoor air. Health effects that could arise from exposure to individual pollutants or mixtures of pollutants cover the full range of acute and chronic effects, including largely reversible responses, such as rashes and irritations, to the irreversible toxic and carcinogenic effects. These indoor contaminants are emitted from a large variety of materials and substances that are widespread components of everyday life. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a search of the peer-reviewed literature on health effects associated with indoor air contaminants for the Bonneville Power Administration to aid the agency in the preparation of environmental documents. Results are reported in two volumes. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the search of the peer-reviewed literature on health effects associated with a selected list of indoor air contaminants. In addition, the report discusses potential health effects of polychlorinated biphenyls and chlorofluorocarbons. All references to the literature reviewed are found in this document Volume 2. Volume 2 provides detailed information from the literature reviewed, summarizes potential health effects, reports health hazard ratings, and discusses quantitative estimates of carcinogenic risk in humans and animals. Contaminants discussed in this report are those that; have been measured in the indoor air of a public building; have been measured (significant concentrations) in test situations simulating indoor air quality (as presented in the referenced literature); and have a significant hazard rating. 38 refs., 7 figs., 23 tabs.

  15. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crespi, C.L.; Thilly, W.G.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics. 3 figs.

  16. Toxic Remediation System And Method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matthews, Stephen M. (Alameda County, CA); Schonberg, Russell G. (Santa Clara County, CA); Fadness, David R. (Santa Clara County, CA)

    1996-07-23

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  17. Public Health in Public Housing: Improving Health, Changing Lives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jun

    Public Health in Public Housing: Improving Health, Changing Lives National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Education Strategy Development Workshop S U M M A R Y R E P O R T U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute #12;#12;U

  18. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Toxic...

  19. June 2005 Page 1 of 7 Environmental Public Health Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for assessing people's exposure to toxic substances and for responding to serious environmental public healthJune 2005 Page 1 of 7 Environmental Public Health Tracking and Biomonitoring What is environmental public health tracking? · Environmental public health tracking (EPHT) is the ongoing collection

  20. SEASONAL VARIATIONS in TOXICITY of BUTTER CLAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    'iations in the toxicity of the clams from the different areas and the variation in tcxicity between the siphon

  1. Toxicity evaluation and hazard review Cold Smoke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archuleta, M.M.; Stocum, W.E.

    1993-12-01

    Cold Smoke is a dense white smoke produced by the reaction of titanium tetrachloride and aqueous ammonia aerosols. Early studies on the toxicity of this nonpyrotechnically generated smoke indicated that the smoke itself is essentially non-toxic (i.e. exhibits to systemic toxicity or organ damage due to exposure) under normal deployment conditions. The purpose of this evaluation was to review and summarize the recent literature data available on the toxicity of Cold Smoke, its chemical constituents, and its starting materials.

  2. Risk Communication - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EpidemiologyHealth Data Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program...

  3. Qualification Exam - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EpidemiologyHealth Data Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program...

  4. Emergency Preparedness - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EpidemiologyHealth Data Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program...

  5. Medical Monitoring Exam - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EpidemiologyHealth Data Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program...

  6. Infection Control & Immunizations - HPMC Occupational Health...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EpidemiologyHealth Data Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program...

  7. Medical Exam Scheduling - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EpidemiologyHealth Data Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program...

  8. Influenza Immunization Program - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EpidemiologyHealth Data Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program...

  9. Worksite Visits - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EpidemiologyHealth Data Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program...

  10. Medical Exams - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EpidemiologyHealth Data Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program...

  11. Differential toxicity of heterocyclic aromatic amines and their mixture in metabolically competent HepaRG cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumont, Julie, E-mail: Julie.Dumont@pasteur-lille.f [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Josse, Rozenn, E-mail: Rozenn.Josse@univ-rennes1.f [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Lambert, Carine, E-mail: Carine.Lambert45@gmail.co [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Antherieu, Sebastien, E-mail: Sebastien.Antherieu@univ-rennes1.f [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Le Hegarat, Ludovic, E-mail: l.lehegarat@afssa.f [Agence Francaise de Securite Sanitaire des Aliments, F-35300 Fougeres (France); Aninat, Caroline, E-mail: Caroline.Aninat@univ-rennes1.f [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Robin, Marie-Anne, E-mail: Marie-Anne.Robin@inserm.f [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane, E-mail: Christiane.Guillouzo@univ-rennes1.f [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France)

    2010-06-01

    Human exposure to heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) usually occurs through mixtures rather than individual compounds. However, the toxic effects and related mechanisms of co-exposure to HAA in humans remain unknown. We compared the effects of two of the most common HAA, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), individually or in combination, in the metabolically competent human hepatoma HepaRG cells. Various endpoints were measured including cytotoxicity, apoptosis, oxidative stress and DNA damage by the comet assay. Moreover, the effects of PhIP and/or MeIQx on mRNA expression and activities of enzymes involved in their activation and detoxification pathways were evaluated. After a 24 h treatment, PhIP and MeIQx, individually and in combination, exerted differential effects on apoptosis, oxidative stress, DNA damage and cytochrome P450 (CYP) activities. Only PhIP induced DNA damage. It was also a stronger inducer of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression and activity than MeIQx. In contrast, only MeIQx exposure resulted in a significant induction of CYP1A2 activity. The combination of PhIP with MeIQx induced an oxidative stress and showed synergistic effects on apoptosis. However, PhIP-induced genotoxicity was abolished by a co-exposure with MeIQx. Such an inhibitory effect could be explained by a significant decrease in CYP1A2 activity which is responsible for PhIP genotoxicity. Our findings highlight the need to investigate interactions between HAA when assessing risks for human health and provide new insights in the mechanisms of interaction between PhIP and MeIQx.

  12. Impacts of Climate Change on Tribal Health

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Climate change, together with other natural and human-made health stressors, threatens our health and well-being in many ways. This webinar will provide an overview of climate-related health...

  13. Global Warming and Human Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful LinksGlass StrongerGlobalOn1

  14. Health Education & Wellness - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wellness Health Education & Wellness Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and...

  15. Health & Productivity - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health & Productivity Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and Screenings...

  16. Is Roundup the Toxic Chemical that's Destroying Our Health?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seneff, Stephanie

    of Roundup #12;3/11/14 6 Glyphosate vs. Other Pes3cides* *hGp://sustainablepulse.com/wp-content/uploads/GMO aroma/c amino acids) Ā· Huge expansion of GMO corn, soy, coGon, sugar beet

  17. Health Insurance Privacy Policy 2.15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Health Insurance Privacy Policy 2.15 Office of Human Resources Applies to: Faculty, staff protected health information about members in its health benefit plans. Federal Health Insurance Portability by the health benefit programs and grant members certain rights with respect to their information. To protect

  18. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolker, A.; Sarofim, A.F.; Palmer, C.A.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Lighty, J.; Veranth, J.; Helble, J.J.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Ames, M.R.; Finkelman, R.; Mamani-Paco, M.; Sterling, R.; Mroczkowsky, S.J.; Panagiotou, T.; Seames, W.

    1999-05-10

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environ-mental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). This report covers the reporting period from 1 January 1999 to 31 March 1999. During this period, a full Program Review Meeting was held at the University of Arizona. At this meeting, the progress of each group was reviewed, plans for the following 9 month period were discussed, and action items (principally associated with the transfer of samples and reports among the various investigators) were identified.

  19. Mobile Source Air Toxics Rule (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    On February 9, 2007, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its MSAT2 rule, which will establish controls on gasoline, passenger vehicles, and portable fuel containers. The controls are designed to reduce emissions of benzene and other hazardous air pollutants. Benzene is a known carcinogen, and the EPA estimates that mobile sources produced more than 70% of all benzene emissions in 1999. Other mobile source air toxics, including 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and naphthalene, also are thought to increase cancer rates or contribute to other serious health problems.

  20. A System for the Rapid Identification of Toxic Chemicals in HazMat Response Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhavnani, Suresh K.

    Medicine & Biology, Medical School, 2 Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research, 3 Elect. Eng Response Team, Ann Arbor, MI; 5 Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. Introduction The rapid identification of toxic, we collaborated with an experienced first responder from a local county HazMat response team

  1. Public Health Assessment Gopher State Ethanol, City of St. Paul

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Public Health Assessment Gopher State Ethanol, City of St. Paul Ramsey County, Minnesota September 19, 2003 Prepared by The Minnesota Department of Health Under Cooperative Agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry #12;Foreword This document summarizes health concerns associated

  2. The Human Genome From human genome to other

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linial, Michal

    The Human Genome Project From human genome to other genomes and to gene function June 2000 From genome to health Structural Genomics initiative #12;What is the Human Genome Project? · U.S. govt that arise from genome research #12;The Human Genome Project Project began in 1990 as a $3 billion, 15-year

  3. Nutrient Interactions and Toxicity The Amino Bisphosphonate Ibandronate Prevents Vitamin D Toxicity and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Paul A.

    Nutrient Interactions and Toxicity The Amino Bisphosphonate Ibandronate Prevents Vitamin D Toxicity and Inhibits Vitamin D-Induced Calcification of Arteries, Cartilage, Lungs and Kidneys in Rats1 Paul A. Price,2 treated with a toxic dose of vitamin D. These studies were prompted by the recent discovery

  4. Toxic hazards of underground excavation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.; Chitnis, V.; Damasian, M.; Lemm, M.; Popplesdorf, N.; Ryan, T.; Saban, C.; Cohen, J.; Smith, C.; Ciminesi, F.

    1982-09-01

    Inadvertent intrusion into natural or man-made toxic or hazardous material deposits as a consequence of activities such as mining, excavation or tunnelling has resulted in numerous deaths and injuries in this country. This study is a preliminary investigation to identify and document instances of such fatal or injurious intrusion. An objective is to provide useful insights and information related to potential hazards due to future intrusion into underground radioactive-waste-disposal facilities. The methodology used in this study includes literature review and correspondence with appropriate government agencies and organizations. Key categories of intrusion hazards are asphyxiation, methane, hydrogen sulfide, silica and asbestos, naturally occurring radionuclides, and various mine or waste dump related hazards.

  5. Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Toxic Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.

    2000-11-01

    Toxic plants can cause serious losses to livestock, but with the information in this leaflet producers will know how to manage grazing to minimize the danger of toxic plants. It is important to recognize problems early and know how to deal with them....

  6. Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Toxic Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Toxic Contamination *Preliminary draft, please refer in the program implementation section a requirement to implement actions to reduce toxic contaminants and types of known contaminants in the Columbia Basin be mapped, and a means of identifying contaminants

  7. Residual Toxicities of Insecticides to Cotton Insects. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hightower, B. G.; Gaines, J. C.

    1960-01-01

    -ITHION. The residual toxicity of para- rliioti to the tumid spider mite was not affected by ~i1nul;ttetl rain when the spray was applied at a dosage c.cluiv;~lcnt to 0.3 pound of toxicant per acre. Kill5 or the cotton aphid on spray residues of 1),11;1thion were...

  8. Health Coaching - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coaching Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and Screenings Interactive Exercises...

  9. Toxicities of selected substances to freshwater biota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohreiter, D.W.

    1980-05-01

    The amount of data available concerning the toxicity of various substances to freshwater biota is so large that it is difficult to use in a practical situation, such as environmental impact assessment. In this document, summary tables are presented showing acute and/or chronic toxicity of selected substances for various groups of aquatic biota. Each entry is referenced to its original source so that details concerning experimental conditions may be consulted. In addition, general information concerning factors modifying toxicity, synergisms, evidence of bioaccumulation, and water quality standards and criteria for the selected substances is given. The final table is a general toxicity table designed to provide an easily accessible and general indication of toxicity of selected substances in aquatic systems.

  10. 1ASU Environmental Health and Safety. Compiled by David Gillum. TITLE 42 --PUBLIC HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1ASU Environmental Health and Safety. Compiled by David Gillum. TITLE 42 -- PUBLIC HEALTH CHAPTER I -- PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES SUBCHAPTER F -- QUARANTINE, INSPECTION of this part: Administrator means the Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, or any person

  11. Health & Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health & Safety Health & Safety1354608000000Health & SafetySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access.NoQuestions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov Health &...

  12. Enhanced toxic cloud knockdown spray system for decontamination applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Betty, Rita G. (Rio Rancho, NM); Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM); Brockmann, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lucero, Daniel A. (Albuquerque, NM); Levin, Bruce L. (Tijeras, NM); Leonard, Jonathan (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-09-06

    Methods and systems for knockdown and neutralization of toxic clouds of aerosolized chemical or biological warfare (CBW) agents and toxic industrial chemicals using a non-toxic, non-corrosive aqueous decontamination formulation.

  13. Rangeland Drought Management for Texans: Toxic Range Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.; Carpenter, Bruce B.

    2001-05-03

    Toxic plants can pose a major threat to livestock during a drought. This publication explains the importance of knowing which plants are toxic, keeping the range healthy, and preventing toxic plant problems....

  14. Review: Poisoned for Pennies: The Economics of Toxics and Precaution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Review: Poisoned for Pennies: The Economics of Toxics andFrank. Poisoned for Pennies: The Economics of Toxics ands new book Poisoned for Pennies: The Economics of Toxics and

  15. International Health Global Health Policy--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    50 International Health Global Health Policy-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www.ghp.m.u-tokyo.ac.jp Our mission is to improve population health by enhancing accountability and improving evidence base of global (both domestic and international) health programmes through the provision

  16. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 5: Appendix F -- Baseline human health risk assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix F documents potential risks and provides information necessary for making remediation decisions. A quantitative analysis of the inorganic, organic, and radiological site-related contaminants found in various media is used to characterize the potential risks to human health associated with exposure to these contaminants.

  17. Renewable, Non-Toxic and Cost Competitive Solvents and Plasticizers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable, Non-Toxic and Cost Competitive Solvents and Plasticizers Renewable, Non-Toxic and Cost Competitive Solvents and Plasticizers Breakout Session 1-D: The Pitch Renewable,...

  18. University Health Service Health Educator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    University Health Service Health Educator A full-time, 12 month Health Educator position is available at the University Health Service, University of Rochester. The Health Educator plans, implements, and evaluates theory- and evidence-based health promotion strategies, programs, and services for University

  19. At A Glance Environmental Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    At A Glance Environmental Public Health Tracking Program: Closing America's Environmental Public Health Gap 2004 Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention SAFER · HEALTHIER · PEOPLETM "CDC's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program is building a national

  20. The Dance Exchange Tools for Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    The Dance Exchange Tools for Health Arts Integration Workshop Part of the MetLife Healthy Living Initiative Sponsored by UNCW's College of Health & Human Services PARTICIPANT CALL UNCW's College of Health provided) for students, faculty, artists, educators and health care professionals. Conducted

  1. Beryllium-Associated Worker Registry - HPMC Occupational Health...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EpidemiologyHealth Data Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program...

  2. Employee Job Task Analysis (EJTA) - HPMC Occupational Health...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EpidemiologyHealth Data Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program...

  3. Walk-In Medical Services - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EpidemiologyHealth Data Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program...

  4. Audio visual information fusion for human activity analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thagadur Shivappa, Shankar

    2010-01-01

    recorded in a health smart home,” in LREC 2010 workshop onto the system. Health smart homes and assisted living forintelligent vehicles, smart homes and natural human-computer

  5. Acute aquatic toxicity of biodiesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, B.; Haws, R.; Little, D.; Reese, D.; Peterson, C.; Moeller, G.

    1995-12-31

    This study develops data on the acute aquatic toxicity of selected biodiesel fuels which may become subject to environmental effects test regulations under the US Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). The test substances are Rape Methyl Ester (RME), Rape Ethyl Ester (REE), Methyl Soyate (MS), a biodiesel mixture of 20% REE and 80% Diesel, a biodiesel mixture of 50% REE and diesel, and a reference substance of Phillips D-2 Reference Diesel. The test procedure follows the Daphnid Acute Toxicity Test outlined in 40 CFR {section} 797.1300 of the TSCA regulations. Daphnia Magna are exposed to the test substance in a flow-through system consisting of a mixing chamber, a proportional diluter, and duplicate test chambers. Novel system modifications are described that accommodate the testing of oil-based test substances with Daphnia. The acute aquatic toxicity is estimated by an EC50, an effective concentration producing immobility in 50% of the test specimen.

  6. Differences in growth and toxicity of Karenia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neely, Tatum Elizabeth

    2006-08-16

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) in the Gulf of Mexico are primarily caused by dense aggregations of the dinoflagellate species, Karenia brevis. Karenia brevis produces a highly toxic neurotoxin, brevetoxin which has been shown ...

  7. Resources for global risk assessment: The International Toxicity Estimates for Risk (ITER) and Risk Information Exchange (RiskIE) databases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wullenweber, Andrea Kroner, Oliver; Kohrman, Melissa; Maier, Andrew; Dourson, Michael; Rak, Andrew; Wexler, Philip; Tomljanovic, Chuck

    2008-11-15

    The rate of chemical synthesis and use has outpaced the development of risk values and the resolution of risk assessment methodology questions. In addition, available risk values derived by different organizations may vary due to scientific judgments, mission of the organization, or use of more recently published data. Further, each organization derives values for a unique chemical list so it can be challenging to locate data on a given chemical. Two Internet resources are available to address these issues. First, the International Toxicity Estimates for Risk (ITER) database ( (www.tera.org/iter)) provides chronic human health risk assessment data from a variety of organizations worldwide in a side-by-side format, explains differences in risk values derived by different organizations, and links directly to each organization's website for more detailed information. It is also the only database that includes risk information from independent parties whose risk values have undergone independent peer review. Second, the Risk Information Exchange (RiskIE) is a database of in progress chemical risk assessment work, and includes non-chemical information related to human health risk assessment, such as training modules, white papers and risk documents. RiskIE is available at (http://www.allianceforrisk.org/RiskIE.htm), and will join ITER on National Library of Medicine's TOXNET ( (http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/)). Together, ITER and RiskIE provide risk assessors essential tools for easily identifying and comparing available risk data, for sharing in progress assessments, and for enhancing interaction among risk assessment groups to decrease duplication of effort and to harmonize risk assessment procedures across organizations.

  8. Toxicity of Bitterweed (Actinea odorata) for Sheep. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boughton, I. B (Ivan Bertrand); Hardy, W. T. (William Tyree)

    1937-01-01

    TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, RFCAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 552 AUGUST, 1937 DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE TOXICITY OF BI'FTERWEED" FOR SHEEP (*Actinea odorata) AGRICULTURAL... AND MECHANICMIJ COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President Previous feeding tests and field observations* have established the toxicity of bitterweed (Actinea odorata) for sheep. The experi- ments reported herein prove that the minimum lethal dose of the fresh...

  9. Integrating mechanistic and polymorphism data to characterize human genetic susceptibility for environmental chemical risk assessment in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Holly M.; Euling, Susan Y.

    2013-09-15

    Response to environmental chemicals can vary widely among individuals and between population groups. In human health risk assessment, data on susceptibility can be utilized by deriving risk levels based on a study of a susceptible population and/or an uncertainty factor may be applied to account for the lack of information about susceptibility. Defining genetic susceptibility in response to environmental chemicals across human populations is an area of interest in the NAS' new paradigm of toxicity pathway-based risk assessment. Data from high-throughput/high content (HT/HC), including -omics (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) technologies, have been integral to the identification and characterization of drug target and disease loci, and have been successfully utilized to inform the mechanism of action for numerous environmental chemicals. Large-scale population genotyping studies may help to characterize levels of variability across human populations at identified target loci implicated in response to environmental chemicals. By combining mechanistic data for a given environmental chemical with next generation sequencing data that provides human population variation information, one can begin to characterize differential susceptibility due to genetic variability to environmental chemicals within and across genetically heterogeneous human populations. The integration of such data sources will be informative to human health risk assessment.

  10. Health effects of risk-assessment categories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, C.F.; Rybicka, K.; Knutson, A.; Morris, S.C.

    1983-10-01

    Environmental and occupational health effects associated with exposures to various chemicals are a subject of increasing concern. One recently developed methodology for assessing the health impacts of various chemical compounds involves the classification of similar chemicals into risk-assessment categories (RACs). This report reviews documented human health effects for a broad range of pollutants, classified by RACs. It complements other studies that have estimated human health effects by RAC based on analysis and extrapolation of data from animal research.

  11. Emissions Trading and Air Toxics Emissions: RECLAIM and Toxics Regulation in the South Coast Air Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Nancy J.

    1993-01-01

    Emissions Trading and Air Toxics Emissions: RECLAIM anda mar- ket-based emissions trading program called theimpacts cre- ated by emissions trading programs that affect

  12. Tobacco Cessation - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    currently available: "Quit It" 10-week Program: The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services suggests that the combination of education, support, and the proper...

  13. Wind Turbines and Health A Rapid Review of the Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    1 Wind Turbines and Health A Rapid Review of the Evidence July 2010 #12;2 Wind Turbines and Health of the evidence from current literature on the issue of wind turbines and potential impacts on human health regarding wind turbines and their potential effect on human health. It is important to note that these views

  14. Men's Health - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Education & Wellness > Downloads & Patient Materials > Men's Health Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Ergonomics Fitness & Exercise Men's Health...

  15. Urban health and health inequalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urban health and health inequalities and the role of urban forestry in Britain: A review Liz O'Brien Kathryn Williams Amy Stewart 2010 #12;Urban health and woodlands Contents Executive Summary 4 1.1.3 Definition of terms 9 3. The policy context: health and forestry policies 11 3.1 Health policies 11 3

  16. Memorandum of Understanding Between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof EnergyPresentation:Dais AnalyticDepartmentHEALTH AND

  17. ONE HEALTH ILLINOIS SUMMIT The purpose of the One Health Illinois Summit was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    ONE HEALTH ILLINOIS SUMMIT The purpose of the One Health Illinois Summit was: o To provide an update on the health of Illinois' human, animal and ecosystem communities o To encourage communication and food producers o To consider policy options designed to improve the health of Illinois communities

  18. Health Calculators & Logs - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calculators & Logs Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Body Mass Index Health Coaching Health Fairs and...

  19. Reference manual for toxicity and exposure assessment and risk characterization. CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 1980) (CERCLA or Superfund) was enacted to provide a program for identifying and responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA, 1986) was enacted to strengthen CERCLA by requiring that site clean-ups be permanent, and that they use treatments that significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous pollutants. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (USEPA, 1985; USEPA, 1990) implements the CERCLA statute, presenting a process for (1) identifying and prioritizing sites requiring remediation and (2) assessing the extent of remedial action required at each site. The process includes performing two studies: a Remedial Investigation (RI) to evaluate the nature, extent, and expected consequences of site contamination, and a Feasibility Study (FS) to select an appropriate remedial alternative adequate to reduce such risks to acceptable levels. An integral part of the RI is the evaluation of human health risks posed by hazardous substance releases. This risk evaluation serves a number of purposes within the overall context of the RI/FS process, the most essential of which is to provide an understanding of ``baseline`` risks posed by a given site. Baseline risks are those risks that would exist if no remediation or institutional controls are applied at a site. This document was written to (1) guide risk assessors through the process of interpreting EPA BRA policy and (2) help risk assessors to discuss EPA policy with regulators, decision makers, and stakeholders as it relates to conditions at a particular DOE site.

  20. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  1. Genomic mosaicism in the human brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westra, Jurjen Willem

    2008-01-01

    Zlokovic BV (2008) The blood-brain barrier in health andmosaicism in the human brain ………………………………………. Chapter Threethe Alzheimer’s disease brain ………………………………. Chapter Five DNA

  2. Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roedel, Erik Q., E-mail: Erik.Roedel@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Cafasso, Danielle E., E-mail: Danielle.Cafasso@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Lee, Karen W.M., E-mail: Karen.W.Lee@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Pierce, Lisa M., E-mail: Lisa.Pierce@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals. -- Highlights: ? Intratracheal instillation of W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe induces lung inflammation in rats. ? W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe alter expression of oxidative stress and toxicity genes. ? W–Ni–Co induces a greater oxidative burst response than W–Ni–Fe in lung macrophages.

  3. Bioinformatics for the human microbiome project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gevers, Dirk

    Microbes inhabit virtually all sites of the human body, yet we know very little about the role they play in our health. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in studying human-associated microbial communities, ...

  4. Human adaptation of avian influenza viruses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Karunya

    2012-01-01

    Human adaptation of avian influenza viruses pose an enormous public health challenge as the human population is predominantly naive to avian influenza antigens. As such, constant surveillance is needed to monitor the ...

  5. Fact Sheet HEALTH SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    contributions to the campus, community, and professions of public health and health Concentration · Health Services Administration Concentration · Health Professions

  6. Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emission Samples Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission Samples 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute...

  7. Seeing Toxic Algae Before it Blooms By Steve Ress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Seeing Toxic Algae Before it Blooms By Steve Ress Researchers at the University of Nebraska of toxic blue-green algae before the bacteria that produce it can grow into a full-scale bloom. Now UNL and monitor in real-time, the water-borne agents that can cause toxic blue- green algae to flourish and become

  8. REVIEW Open Access Toxic marine microalgae and shellfish poisoning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Graeme

    REVIEW Open Access Toxic marine microalgae and shellfish poisoning in the British isles: history The relationship between toxic marine microalgae species and climate change has become a high profile and well examine the current state of toxic microalgae species around the UK, in two ways: first we describe

  9. The toxicity of certain new chlorinated hydrocarbons to cotton pests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merkl, Marvin Eugene

    1953-01-01

    THE TOXICITY OF CERTAIN NEW CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS TO COTTON PESTS A Dissertation 5y MARVIN EUGENE MERKL Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of CouBlttee Head of Departnent May 19*3 THE TOXICITY OF CERTAIN NEW CHLORINATED... .....................................................78 CONCLUSIONS............................................... ..81 BIBLIOGRAPHI .............................................. ..82 Pag? FIGURES 1* Dosage-?ortality curve for the toxicity of endrin to aphids...

  10. Wind Turbines and Health A Rapid Review of the Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    1 Wind Turbines and Health A Rapid Review of the Evidence July 2010 #12;2 Wind Turbines and Health of the evidence from current literature on the issue of wind turbines and potential impacts on human health: There are no direct pathological effects from wind farms and that any potential impact on humans can be minimised

  11. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER HUMAN STEM CELL RESEARCH COST.....................................................................................12 #12;University of Connecticut and the University of Connecticut Health Center Human Stem Cell that is ineligible for federal support. The University of Connecticut and the University of Connecticut Health Center

  12. Toxicity Data to Determine Refrigerant Concentration Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calm, James M.

    2000-09-30

    This report reviews toxicity data, identifies sources for them, and presents resulting exposure limits for refrigerants for consideration by qualified parties in developing safety guides, standards, codes, and regulations. It outlines a method to calculate an acute toxicity exposure limit (ATEL) and from it a recommended refrigerant concentration limit (RCL) for emergency exposures. The report focuses on acute toxicity with particular attention to lethality, cardiac sensitization, anesthetic and central nervous system effects, and other escape-impairing effects. It addresses R-11, R-12, R-22, R-23, R-113, R-114, R-116, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-E134, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-218, R-227ea, R-236fa, R-245ca, R-245fa, R-290, R-500, R-502, R-600a, R-717, and R-744. It summarizes additional data for R-14, R-115, R-170 (ethane), R-C318, R-600 (n-butane), and R-1270 (propylene) to enable calculation of limits for blends incorporating them. The report summarizes the data a nd related safety information, including classifications and flammability data. It also presents a series of tables with proposed ATEL and RCL concentrations-in dimensionless form and the latter also in both metric (SI) and inch-pound (IP) units of measure-for both the cited refrigerants and 66 zerotropic and azeotropic blends. They include common refrigerants, such as R-404A, R-407C, R-410A, and R-507A, as well as others in commercial or developmental status. Appendices provide profiles for the cited single-compound refrigerants and for R-500 and R-502 as well as narrative toxicity summaries for common refrigerants. The report includes an extensive set of references.

  13. Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

  14. Methylmercury-induced toxicity is mediated by enhanced intracellular calcium through activation of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Mi Sun [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Ju Yeon [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Ji Heui [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hyung Jun [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kwang Mook [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Chin, Mi-Reyoung [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Chang-Kiu [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bonventre, Joseph V. [Renal Unit, Brigham Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Jung, Sung Yun [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Kyong [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: proteinlab@hanmail.net

    2006-10-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant to which humans can be exposed by ingestion of contaminated food. MeHg has been suggested to exert its toxicity through its high reactivity to thiols, generation of arachidonic acid and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and elevation of free intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}). However, the precise mechanism has not been fully defined. Here we show that phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) is a critical pathway for MeHg-induced toxicity in MDCK cells. D609, an inhibitor of PC-PLC, significantly reversed the toxicity in a time- and dose-dependent manner with concomitant inhibition of the diacylglycerol (DAG) generation and the phosphatidylcholine (PC)-breakdown. MeHg activated the group IV cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} (cPLA{sub 2}) and acidic form of sphingomyelinase (A-SMase) downstream of PC-PLC, but these enzymes as well as protein kinase C (PKC) were not linked to the toxicity by MeHg. Furthermore, MeHg produced ROS, which did not affect the toxicity. Addition of EGTA to culture media resulted in partial decrease of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and partially blocked the toxicity. In contrast, when the cells were treated with MeHg in the presence of Ca{sup 2+} in the culture media, D609 completely prevented cell death with parallel decrease in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. Our results demonstrated that MeHg-induced toxicity was linked to elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} through activation of PC-PLC, but not attributable to the signaling pathways such as cPLA{sub 2}, A-SMase, and PKC, or to the generation of ROS.

  15. Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O.sub.3, PO, PO.sub.2, etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like.

  16. Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, S.G.

    1994-07-26

    The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O[sub 3], PO, PO[sub 2], etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like. 20 figs.

  17. ATHENA, the Desktop Human "Body"

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Iyer, Rashi; Harris, Jennifer

    2015-01-05

    Creating surrogate human organs, coupled with insights from highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies, a new project is on the brink of revolutionizing the way we screen new drugs and toxic agents. ATHENA, the Advanced Tissue-engineered Human Ectypal Network Analyzer project team, is developing four human organ constructs - liver, heart, lung and kidney - that are based on a significantly miniaturized platform. Each organ component will be about the size of a smartphone screen, and the whole ATHENA "body" of interconnected organs would fit neatly on a desk. "By developing this 'homo minutus,' we are stepping beyond the need for animal or Petri dish testing: There are huge benefits in developing drug and toxicity analysis systems that can mimic the response of actual human organs," said Rashi Iyer, a senior scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the lead laboratory on the five-year, $19 million multi-institutional effort. The project is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). Some 40 percent of pharmaceuticals fail their clinical trials, Iyer noted, and there are thousands of chemicals whose effects on humans are simply unknown. Providing a realistic, cost-effective and rapid screening system such as ATHENA with high-throughput capabilities could provide major benefits to the medical field, screening more accurately and offering a greater chance of clinical trial success.

  18. ATHENA, the Desktop Human "Body"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iyer, Rashi; Harris, Jennifer

    2014-09-29

    Creating surrogate human organs, coupled with insights from highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies, a new project is on the brink of revolutionizing the way we screen new drugs and toxic agents. ATHENA, the Advanced Tissue-engineered Human Ectypal Network Analyzer project team, is developing four human organ constructs - liver, heart, lung and kidney - that are based on a significantly miniaturized platform. Each organ component will be about the size of a smartphone screen, and the whole ATHENA "body" of interconnected organs would fit neatly on a desk. "By developing this 'homo minutus,' we are stepping beyond the need for animal or Petri dish testing: There are huge benefits in developing drug and toxicity analysis systems that can mimic the response of actual human organs," said Rashi Iyer, a senior scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the lead laboratory on the five-year, $19 million multi-institutional effort. The project is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). Some 40 percent of pharmaceuticals fail their clinical trials, Iyer noted, and there are thousands of chemicals whose effects on humans are simply unknown. Providing a realistic, cost-effective and rapid screening system such as ATHENA with high-throughput capabilities could provide major benefits to the medical field, screening more accurately and offering a greater chance of clinical trial success.

  19. Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy...

  20. Health assessment for Cedartown Industries, Cedartown, Polk County, Georgia, Region 4. CERCLIS No. GAD95840674. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-29

    The Cedartown Industries, Inc. site has been proposed for the National Priorities List (NPL) by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The 7-acre site is located in Cedartown, Polk County, Georgia, in the northwest part of the State. In 1986, one sediment sample from an on-site impoundment and two soil samples (one background) were collected on-site and analyzed by EPD. Only Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity testing was performed on these samples. The test which measures the concentration of leachate generated from the soil showed leachate with lead concentrations up to 720 parts per million (ppm) and cadmium concentrations up to 1.4 ppm. Based on the information reviewed, ATSDR has concluded that the site is of potential public health concern because humans may be exposed to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. As noted in the Human Exposure Pathways Section above, human exposure to lead may occur via ingestion of, inhalation of, and dermal contact with surface water, sediments, soils, ground water, air, and food-chain entities.

  1. US DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    Year - 20% 3rd Year - 20% 4th Year - 25% SIGNATURE OF AUTHORIZING OFFICIAL ­ LENDING SCHOOL TITLE Service Act, as amended by Public Law 107-205. The form must be submitted for each complete year of full, as amended by Public Law 107-205, for one year of employment as a full-time nurse faculty. PERIOD

  2. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Roadmap Initiative has the potential to have a profound and positive impact on how American medical. Because the Roadmap recognizes that one of the most powerful and unifying concepts of 21st century biology central to the research enterprise. Second is the Roadmap's requirement to "re-engineer the national

  3. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    -named in the NIH Reform Act of 2006, the Common Fund supports research in areas of emerging scientific disciplines by supporting the development of catalytic tools, technologies, databases, models of research the next decade. Catalytic: Must achieve a defined set of high impact goals within a 5- to 10- year time

  4. Bachelor of Science, Health Science Studies, Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis, 2014-2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Health Science Studies, Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis and Humanities 3-4 DLS Social Sciences course in a first field 3 DLS Social Sciences course in a second field 3 3 Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis ACCT 205 Introduction to Financial

  5. Bachelor of Science, Health Science Studies, Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis, 2013-2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Health Science Studies, Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis and Humanities 3-4 DLS Social Sciences course in a first field 3 DLS Social Sciences course in a second field 3 3 Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis ACCT 205 Introduction to Financial

  6. An assessment of health educators' likelihood of adopting genomic competencies for the public health workforce 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Lei-Shih

    2009-05-15

    , the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced the completion of the Human Genome Project (HGP). The project represents a milestone in human history, as advanced genomic technologies/information can offer insight into specific diseases and may help.... Certainly, genomics is going to have a profound impact on the public health practice of the future?? 10 Yet in the wake of its completion, the HGP also raised new and non-trivial public health issues. These include, but are not restricted to...

  7. Global Health and Economic Impacts of Future Ozone Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Mort D.

    We assess the human health and economic impacts of projected 2000-2050 changes in ozone pollution using the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis-Health Effects (EPPA-HE) model, in combination with results from the ...

  8. Reducing Livestock Losses To Toxic Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; Machen, Richard V.

    2000-04-25

    AgriculturalExtensionService The Texas A&M University System Reducing Livestock Losses to Toxic Plants B-1499 Sand Shinnery L Perennial Broomweed Texas Agricultural Extension Service a71 Zerle L. Carpenter, Director a71 The Texas A&M University System a71 College Station, Texas Tableof... in diagnosis is to determine *Extension range specialist and Extension livestock- specialist, The Texas A&M University System. whether the cause is plant poisoning or in- fectious disease. To do so it is necessary to carefully observe symptoms exhibited by af...

  9. Linking coral reef health and human welfare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Sheila Marie

    2009-01-01

    these results to ecosystem- based management, information isEcosystem-based management, however, requires information on

  10. Human health impacts of high altitude emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eastham, Sebastian D. (Sebastian David)

    2015-01-01

    Millions of deaths worldwide are attributed annually to exposure degraded surface air quality and UV-induced skin cancer. However, the focus has been on surface emissions, and the contribution of high altitude emissions ...

  11. Linking coral reef health and human welfare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Sheila Marie

    2009-01-01

    Kiribati subsidized copra, coconut agriculture, in order tobuying price of copra, a coconut product, with the aim offishing, own some land with coconut trees, and both fishing

  12. Linking coral reef health and human welfare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Sheila Marie

    2009-01-01

    energy storage (condition) because lower predation risk mayrisk increases the value of current reproduction over energy allocation to storage

  13. Human energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawyer, Suzana

    2010-01-01

    This is the power of human energy that Chevron neverExperience the power of ‘‘Human Energy’’: S. Sawyer (&)s voice returns: ‘‘This is the power of human energy. ’’ In

  14. WHAT CAN I DO WITH MY HEALTH ADMINISTRATION & POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suri, Manil

    CARE SERVICES Nursing Homes, Retirement Centers, Adult Day Care Centers, Home Health Care Agencies Admissions Representative Marketing Specialist Adult Day Care Coordinator Public Relations Specialist Human

  15. environmental health The Local Board of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental health The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer Second Edition #12;The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer Second Edition Author Carrie Hribar, MA Project Director ­ Public Health Policy National Association of Local Boards of Health Editor Mark Schultz, MEd

  16. The toxicity of different emulsions of toxaphene to cotton insects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selby, James Winford

    1952-01-01

    . Summary of the cotton boll weevil toxicity tests ~ . LS 5. Analysis of cotton bolL weevil control data ob- tained in the laboratory and field teste ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 20 4 ~ Summary of the cotton boll weevil toxicity test in the Laboratorye ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e... ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 21 6 Summary of the saltish caterpillar toxicity tests ~ ~ ~ eo ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e( ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ee ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ a ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 22 6 ~ Vedian lethal dosage {KID) of the test materials as obtained fran the Laboratory...

  17. Health Insurance After Graduation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Health Insurance After Graduation: Individual Health Insurance in California University of California, Berkeley Student Health Insurance Office Tang Center Fall Semester 2013 #12;Health Care vs. Health Insurance Health Care is... Provision of Medical Services by ­ Private Physicians & Hospitals

  18. Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobicpiperidinium and pyrrolidinium ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salminen, Justin; Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Kumar, R. Anand; Lee,Jong-Min; Kerr, John; Newman, John; Prausnitz, John M.

    2007-06-25

    Some properties are reported for hydrophobic ionic liquids (IL) containing 1-methyl-1-propyl pyrrolidinium [MPPyrro]{sup +}, 1-methyl-1-butyl pyrrolidinium [MBPyrro]{sup +}, 1-methyl-1-propyl piperidinium [MPPip]{sup +}, 1-methyl-1-butyl piperidinium [MBPip]{sup +}, 1-methyl-1-octylpyrrolidinium [MOPyrro]{sup +} and 1-methyl-1-octylpiperidinium [MOPip]{sup +} cations. These liquids provide new alternatives to pyridinium and imidazolium ILs. High thermal stability of an ionic liquid increases safety in applications like rechargeable lithium-ion batteries and other electrochemical devices. Thermal properties, ionic conductivities, viscosities, and mutual solubilities with water are reported. In addition, toxicities of selected ionic liquids have been measured using a human cancer cell-line. The ILs studied here are sparingly soluble in water but hygroscopic. We show some structure-property relationships that may help to design green solvents for specific applications. While ionic liquids are claimed to be environmentally-benign solvents, as yet few data have been published to support these claims.

  19. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    any stationary source which has the potential to increase emissions of a listed toxic air contaminant by an amount greater than the minimum quantity for that contaminant....

  20. Early Proctoscopy is a Surrogate Endpoint of Late Rectal Toxicity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS). Late toxicity data were analyzed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison between prognosis groups was performed by log-rank analysis....

  1. Renewable, Non-Toxic and Cost Competitive Solvents and Plasticizers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1-D: The Pitch Renewable, Non-Toxic and Cost Competitive Solvents and Plasticizers Len Rand, Chief Executive Officer, Chairman, xF Technologies

  2. Plant–herbivore interactions mediated by plant toxicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-03-25

    Dec 17, 2007 ... O. Box 249118, Coral Gables, FL 33124, United States. .... Per capital death rate of herbivore unrelated to plant toxicity. 2. Analysis of the ...

  3. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Toxic Substance Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (TSCA-UE- FFCA), February 20, 1992 State Kentucky Agreement Type Compliance Agreement Legal...

  4. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Toxic Substance Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (TSCA-UE- FFCA), February 20, 1992 State Ohio Agreement Type Compliance Agreement Legal...

  5. Air quality resolution for health impact assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air quality resolution for health impact assessment: influence of regional characterstics* T to: discover new interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess future; and improve methods to model, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts

  6. Doug Brutlag 2015 Your Genes and Your Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    © Doug Brutlag 2015 Your Genes and Your Health http://bio84.stanford.edu/ The Human Genome Project;© Doug Brutlag 2015 The Human Genome Project: Should we do it? · Service, R. F. (2001). The human genome Human Genome Project Strategy http://www.nhgri.nih.gov/ Courtesy Eric Green #12;© Doug Brutlag 2015

  7. FINE PARTICAL AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Wayne S. Seames; Art Fernandez

    2003-09-21

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and pulverized coal. The objective was to determine potential tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} mitigation through using a CO{sub 2} neutral fuel, such as municipal sewage sludge, and the emergence of other potential problems such as the emission of toxic fly ash particles. The work led to new insight into mechanisms governing the partitioning of major and trace metals from the combustion of sewage sludge, and mixtures of coal and sewage sludge. The research also showed that the co-combustion of coal and sewage sludge emitted fine particulate matter that might potentially cause greater lung injury than that from the combustion of either coal alone or municipal sewage sludge alone. The reason appeared to be that the toxicity measured required the presence of large amounts of both zinc and sulfur in particles that were inhaled. MSS provided the zinc while coal provided the sulfur. Additional research showed that the toxic effects could most likely be engineered out of the process, through the introduction of kaolinite sorbent downstream of the combustion zone, or removing the sulfur from the fuel. These results are consequences of applying ''Health Effects Engineering'' to this issue. Health Effects Engineering is a new discipline arising out of this work, and is derived from using a collaboration of combustion engineers and toxicologists to mitigate the potentially bad health effects from combustion of this biomass fuel.

  8. Toxic material measurement, monitoring, and control in the metal joining and finishing industries. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the measurement, monitoring, and control of toxic exposure to hazardous substances by workers in the metal joining and finishing industries. Topics include measurement methods and monitoring studies of workplace solvents and electroplating baths used in degreasing and painting metal surfaces. Coverage includes accepted exposure control procedures that meet health guidelines and regulations. Welding safety and health guidelines from several sources are detailed, including air contamination and welding fumes standards. References to recovery and recycling of waste metals are covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 122 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8, 2828-2853; doi:10.3390/ijerph8072828 International Journal of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the production of a conceptual model. The data analysis phase contains the effect and exposure assessment steps species, reservoirs of plant disease, animal and insect use, animal toxicity, human toxicity and allergenicity, erosion, and wildfire. Effect and exposure uncertainties for potential impacts of toadflax

  10. Direct from CDC Environmental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct from CDC Environmental Health Services Branch Mary Jean Brown, Sc.D., R that affects practically all systems in the human body (National Research Council, 1993). In children children in the United States decreased from 8.6 percent in 1988­1991 to 1.6 percent in 1999­2002, an 81

  11. Toxicity assessments of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in isolated mitochondria, rat hepatocytes, and zebrafish show good concordance across chemical classes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadanaciva, Sashi [Compound Safety Prediction, Worldwide Medicinal Chemistry, Pfizer, Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Aleo, Michael D. [Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Strock, Christopher J. [Cyprotex US, Watertown, MA 02472 (United States); Stedman, Donald B. [Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Wang, Huijun [Computational Sciences, Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Will, Yvonne, E-mail: yvonne.will@pfizer.com [Compound Safety Prediction, Worldwide Medicinal Chemistry, Pfizer, Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    To reduce costly late-stage compound attrition, there has been an increased focus on assessing compounds in in vitro assays that predict attributes of human safety liabilities, before preclinical in vivo studies are done. Relevant questions when choosing a panel of assays for predicting toxicity are (a) whether there is general concordance in the data among the assays, and (b) whether, in a retrospective analysis, the rank order of toxicity of compounds in the assays correlates with the known safety profile of the drugs in humans. The aim of our study was to answer these questions using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a test set since NSAIDs are generally associated with gastrointestinal injury, hepatotoxicity, and/or cardiovascular risk, with mitochondrial impairment and endoplasmic reticulum stress being possible contributing factors. Eleven NSAIDs, flufenamic acid, tolfenamic acid, mefenamic acid, diclofenac, meloxicam, sudoxicam, piroxicam, diflunisal, acetylsalicylic acid, nimesulide, and sulindac (and its two metabolites, sulindac sulfide and sulindac sulfone), were tested for their effects on (a) the respiration of rat liver mitochondria, (b) a panel of mechanistic endpoints in rat hepatocytes, and (c) the viability and organ morphology of zebrafish. We show good concordance for distinguishing among/between NSAID chemical classes in the observations among the three approaches. Furthermore, the assays were complementary and able to correctly identify “toxic” and “non-toxic” drugs in accordance with their human safety profile, with emphasis on hepatic and gastrointestinal safety. We recommend implementing our multi-assay approach in the drug discovery process to reduce compound attrition. - Highlights: • NSAIDS cause liver and GI toxicity. • Mitochondrial uncoupling contributes to NSAID liver toxicity. • ER stress is a mechanism that contributes to liver toxicity. • Zebrafish and cell based assays are complimentary.

  12. Assessing the potential toxicity of resuspended sediment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnet, C.; Babut, M.; Ferard, J.F.; Martel, L.; Garric, J.

    2000-05-01

    Two moderately contaminated freshwater sediments (Sorel Harbour, St. Lawrence River, Canada) were subjected to a suspension event. The objective was to assess the environmental impact of the disposal of dredged material in water, in particular, the short-term effects of dumping on the water column and the long-term effects of dredged sediment deposits. In a series of microcosms, the sediments were left to stand for 25 d under flow-through conditions. In a second series of microcosms, sediments were vigorously suspended for 15 min before being left to settle and were submitted to the same treatment as reference sediments during the following 25 d. Physicochemical and biological parameters (Daphnia magna and Hydra attenuata survival) were measured in overlying water throughout the experiment. Sediment toxicity was assessed with Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca exposed to sediments collected at both the beginning and end of the 25-d period. Pore-water toxicity was evaluated with D. magna. During the suspension process, in the Sorel Harbour mixed sediment overlying water, the authors observed effects on H. attenuata survival and ammonia and metals (chromium, copper, and zinc) releases. Meanwhile, in reference (nonmixed) and mixed sediments as well as in associated pore waters, there were no significant chemical modifications no biological effects after the 25-d experiments. The developed approach, which attempts to simulate a dumping process, aims at allowing the assessment of the short- and long-term hazards resulting from a resuspension process in overlying water and in resettled sediments using both chemical and biological measurements.

  13. THE UNIVERSITY Of TENNESSEE Health Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    THE UNIVERSITY Of TENNESSEE Health Science Center Human Resources 910 Madison Ave, Suite 722 Memphis, TN 38163 Tel: (901) 448-5600 Fax: (901) 448-5170 THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE HEALTH SCIENCE the Personnel Records of UT public domain. This gives any citizen of the State of Tennessee the right to view

  14. Office of Domestic and International Health Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Domestic and International Health Studies engages in the conduct of international scientific studies that may provide new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation in the workplace or people exposed in communities as a result of nuclear accidents, including providing health and environmental monitoring services to populations specified by law.

  15. Evaluation of Sediment Toxicity Using a Suite of Assessment Tools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Matthew A

    2010-01-15

    of sediment toxicity. The goal of this research was to provide information which could help increase the accuracy with which predictions of toxicity could be made at hazardous sites. A calibration study was conducted using model PAHs, PCBs, a binary PAH...

  16. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection February 2011 Volume IX (3) Since the last COHS newsletter, the faculty Dr. Tim Dunnagan, Dean #12;Health Sciences Connection 2 College News College of Health Sciences

  17. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection November 2010 Volume IX (2) Rationale The faculty, staff and students within the sweeping changes associated with health care reform. Health care reform represents the most significant

  18. 1-on-1 Health Coaching - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1-on-1 Health Coaching Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and Screenings...

  19. Advances in exposure and toxicity assessment of particulate matter: An overview of presentations at the 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunasekar, Palur G.; Stanek, Lindsay W.

    2011-07-15

    The 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference (TRAC) session on 'Advances in Exposure and Toxicity Assessment of Particulate Matter' was held in April 2009 in West Chester, OH. The goal of this session was to bring together toxicology, geology and risk assessment experts from the Department of Defense and academia to examine issues in exposure assessment and report on recent epidemiological findings of health effects associated with particulate matter (PM) exposure. Important aspects of PM exposure research are to detect and monitor low levels of PM with various chemical compositions and to assess the health risks associated with these exposures. As part of the overall theme, some presenters discussed collection methods for sand and dust from Iraqi and Afghanistan regions, health issues among deployed personnel, and future directions for risk assessment research among these populations. The remaining speakers focused on the toxicity of ultrafine PM and the characterization of aerosols generated during ballistic impacts of tungsten heavy alloys.

  20. Comparative Developmental Toxicity of Environmentally Relevant Oxygenated PAHs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knecht, Andrea; Goodale, Britton; Truong, Lisa; Simonich, Michael; Swanson, Annika; Matzke, Melissa M.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert

    2013-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous pollutants in urban air, dust and in the soil of most industrial coal gassification, coal burning, coke production and wood preservation sites (Howsam and Jones 1998). It is widely recognized that PAHs pose risks to human health,having been associated with increased risks of systemic inflammation (Delfino et al. 2010), cardiopulmonary mortality (Lee et al. 2011; Lewtas 2007) and lung cancer mortality (Grant 2009; Hoshuyama et al. 2006). The potential risks may be especially acute for the developing fetus and infant where PAH exposures have been linked to low birth weight, intrauterine growth retardation, in-utero mortality and lower intelligence (Dejmek et al. 1999; Dejmek et al. 2000; Perera et al. 1999; Perera et al. 2009; Perera et al. 2006; Perera et al. 1998; Wu et al. 2010). Despite the more than two decades of intensive study devoted to parent PAHs, they are only part of the hazard spectrum from PAH contamination.

  1. The Health Component of Head Start: Potential Impacts on Childhood Obesity, Immunizations, and Dental Health 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banda, Tanya Y.

    2010-01-14

    Head Start, an early intervention program administered by the Administration for Children and Families of the Department of Health and Human Services, offers children of low-income families comprehensive services in an ...

  2. Acute aquatic toxicity and biodegradation potential of biodiesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haws, R.A.; Zhang, X.; Marshall, E.A.; Reese, D.L.; Peterson, C.L.; Moeller, G.

    1995-12-31

    Recent studies on the biodegradation potential and aquatic toxicity of biodiesel fuels are reviewed. Biodegradation data were obtained using the shaker flask method observing the appearance of CO{sub 2} and by observing the disappearance of test substance with gas chromatography. Additional BOD{sub 5} and COD data were obtained. The results indicate the ready biodegradability of biodiesel fuels as well as the enhanced co-metabolic biodegradation of biodiesel and petroleum diesel fuel mixtures. The study examined reference diesel, neat soy oil, neat rape oil, and the methyl and ethyl esters of these vegetable oils as well as various fuel blends. Acute toxicity tests on biodiesel fuels and blends were performed using Oncorhynchus mykiss (Rainbow Trout) in a static non-renewal system and in a proportional dilution flow replacement system. The study is intended to develop data on the acute aquatic toxicity of biodiesel fuels and blends under US EPA Good Laboratory Practice Standards. The test procedure is designed from the guidelines outlined in Methods for Measuring the Acute Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater and Marine Organisms and the Fish Acute Aquatic Toxicity Test guideline used to develop aquatic toxicity data for substances subject to environmental effects test regulations under TSCA. The acute aquatic toxicity is estimated by an LC50, a lethal concentration effecting mortality in 50% of the test population.

  3. Proteomic analysis of rat cerebral cortex following subchronic acrolein toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rashedinia, Marzieh; Lari, Parisa; Abnous, Khalil; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Acrolein, a member of reactive ?,?-unsaturated aldehydes, is a major environmental pollutant. Acrolein is also produced endogenously as a toxic by-product of lipid peroxidation. Because of high reactivity, acrolein may mediate oxidative damages to cells and tissues. It has been shown to be involved in a wide variety of pathological states including pulmonary, atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative diseases. In this study we employed proteomics approach to investigate the effects of subchronic oral exposures to 3 mg/kg of acrolein on protein expression profile in the brain of rats. Moreover effects of acrolein on malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and reduced glutathione (GSH) content were investigated. Our results revealed that treatment with acrolein changed levels of several proteins in diverse physiological process including energy metabolism, cell communication and transport, response to stimulus and metabolic process. Interestingly, several differentially over-expressed proteins, including ?-synuclein, enolase and calcineurin, are known to be associated with human neurodegenerative diseases. Changes in the levels of some proteins were confirmed by Western blot. Moreover, acrolein increases the level of MDA, as a lipid peroxidation biomarker and decreased GSH concentrations, as a non-enzyme antioxidant in the brain of acrolein treated rats. These findings suggested that acrolein induces the oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in the brain, and so that may contribute to the pathophysiology of neurological disorders. - Highlights: • Acrolein intoxication increased lipid peroxidation and deplete GSH in rat brain. • Effect of acrolein on protein levels of cerebral cortex was analyzed by 2DE-PAGE. • Levels of a number of proteins with different biological functions were increased.

  4. Chronomodulation of topotecan or X-radiation treatment increases treatment efficacy without enhancing acute toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullins, Dana; Proulx, Denise; Saoudi, A.; Ng, Cheng E. . E-mail: cng@ohri.ca

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: Topotecan (TPT), a camptothecin analog, is currently used to treat human ovarian and small-cell lung cancer and is in clinical trials for other tumor sites. However, it is unknown whether chronomodulation of TPT treatment is beneficial. We examined the effects of administering TPT or X-radiation (XR) alone at different times of the day or night. Methods: We treated mice bearing human colorectal tumor xenografts at four different times representing the early rest period (9 AM or 3 HALO [hours after light onset]), late rest period (3 PM or 9 HALO), early active period (9 PM or 15 HALO), and late active period (3 AM or 21 HALO) of the mice. We gave either TPT (12 mg/kg, injected i.p.) or XR (4 Gy, directed to the tumor) twice weekly on Days 0, 4, 7, 10 within 2 weeks. Results: Treatment with either TPT or XR at 3 AM demonstrated the greatest efficacy (measured by a tumor regrowth assay) without significantly increasing acute toxicity (assessed by a decrease in leukocyte counts or body weight). Conversely, treatment at 3 PM, in particular, showed increased toxicity without any enhanced efficacy. Conclusions: Our study provided the first evidence that chronomodulation of TPT treatments, consistent with the findings of other camptothecin analogs, is potentially clinically beneficial. Additionally, our findings suggest that chronomodulation of fractionated XR treatments is also potentially clinically beneficial.

  5. Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...

  6. Introduction to Health Bachelor of Health Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Health. 2016 Introduction to Health Bachelor of Health Sciences Bachelor of Social Work Bachelor Hurunui promoting physical wellbeing and Mori and Indigenous Health in Hagley Park. Published April 2015 are available online at www.canterbury.ac.nz/regulations 18 The UC Health Graduate 20 Frequently asked questions

  7. Public Health Conferences GENERAL PUBLIC HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Public Health Conferences GENERAL PUBLIC HEALTH Michigan's Premier Public Health Conference.sph.umich.edu/scr/news_events/event.cfm?ID=2631 American Public Health Association (APHA) 140th Annual Meeting & Exposition: October 27-31, 2012 in San Francisco, CA o http://www.apha.org/meetings/AnnualMeeting/ Global Health & Innovation 2013

  8. Health Research National Institute for Health Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diggle, Peter J.

    Embedding Health Research National Institute for Health Research Annual Report 2009/10 #12;Contents National Institute for Health Research Annual Report 2009/10 1 Foreword 2 The National Institute for Health to the NHS 40 Section 4: Strengthening health policy 54 Section 5: Changing NHS practice 64 Financial summary

  9. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection Back to School edition September 2010 Volume IX (1) Dr. Tim Dunnagan, Dean of the College of Health Sciences (COHS) at Boise State University (BSU). It is truly an honor to have

  10. counselling health promotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    health and counselling services health promotion 10 Ways to get active Most people find that huff and puff stuff a few times a week and make it last for 15 minutes or more each time. students.sfu.ca/health counselling health promotion physiotherapy health clinic #12;health and counselling services health promotion

  11. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Health Monitoring Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring Structural Health Monitoring is the process of implementing a damage detection strategy for...

  12. Electrically Heated High Temperature Incineration of Air Toxics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agardy, F. J.; Wilcox, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    In-Process Technology has placed a prototype of its patented, electrically heated, packed-bed air toxics oxidizer at a northern California chemical plant. This thermal oxidizer is capable of handling a wide range of chlorinated and non...

  13. Sensitivity or artifact? -- IQ Toxicity Test -- effluent values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, K.R.; Novotny, A.N.; Batista, N.

    1995-12-31

    Several complex effluents were DAPHNIA MAGNA IQ TOXICITY TESTED -- (1.25 hours) and conventionally tested with Daphnia magna (48 hours). In many samples the IQ Technology yielded low EC50 values while the 48 hour exposures yielded no acute toxicity. Possible explanations have been suggested for this occurrence such as: genotoxicity, mutagenicity, substrate interference, and enzyme satiation. To identify the causative agent(s) of this response a Toxicity Identification Evaluation was performed on one of the samples. To define the nature of the response, THE SOS-CHROMOTEST KIT and THE MUTA-CHROMOPLATE KIT were utilized to characterize genotoxicity and mutagenicity respectively. The sample did not test positive for genotoxicity but tested positive for mutagenicity only after activation with S9 enzymes, suggesting the presence of promutagens. Additional work needs to be performed to correlate IQ TOXICITY TEST sensitivity with positive MUTA-CHROMOPLATE response.

  14. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Thomas L. McCall, Jr. http:www.em.doe.govffaaortsca.html 4252001 Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agree.. Page 12 of 26 Deputy...

  15. Adsorbed Polymer and NOM Limits Adhesion and Toxicity of Nano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Adsorbed Polymer and NOM Limits Adhesion and Toxicity of Nano Scale Zerovalent Iron to E. coli Z H. Here we assess the effect that adsorbed synthetic polymers and natural organic matter

  16. Mental health in schools and public health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelman, Howard S; Taylor, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Corporation; 1989. Public Health Reports / May–June 2006 /comes in part from the Of?ce of Adolescent Health, Maternaland Child Health Bureau (Title V, Social Security Act),

  17. The recognition of toxic contaminants in sea water by bioassay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duke, Thomas Wade

    1960-01-01

    THE RECOGNITION OF TOXIC CONTAMINANTS IN SEA WATER BY BIOASSAY A Thesis By THOMAS WADE DUKE Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1960 Major Subject: Biological Oceanography THE RECOGNITION OF TOXIC CONTAMINANTS IN SEA li'ATER BY BIOASSAY A Thesis THOMAS O'ADE DUKE Approved as to style and content by: ( airman o emmy ee wi, ( ea of Depar me...

  18. Isolation and identification of a toxic metabolite of Phomopsis sp. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samples, Daniel Robert

    1982-01-01

    ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF A TOXIC MEl'ABOLITE OF PHOMOPSIS SP. A Thesis by DANIEL ROBERT SAMPLES Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A&B University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... MAY 1982 Major Subject~ Veterinary Toxicology ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF A TOXIC METABOLITE OF PHOMOPSIS SP. A Thesis by DANIEL ROBERT SAMPLES Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Membe (Mem ) (Head of Departme t...

  19. Ionizing radiation predisposes non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells to undergo TGF beta-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Health Effects; the Low Dose Radiation Program of the DOElong-term, low-dose ionizing radiation exposure in humans.

  20. Division of Human Resources Termination Of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Division of Human Resources Termination Of Domestic Partnership Health Stipend Questions (813) 974 Insurance Stipend will terminate as of the Effective Date on this Termination of Domestic Partnership Health. ______ The Domestic Partnership Declaration attested to and filed by me with USF shall be and is terminated

  1. Gene expression analysis of precision-cut human liver slices indicates stable expression of ADME-Tox related genes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elferink, M.G.L., E-mail: m.g.l.elferink@rug.nl [Department of Pharmacokinetics, Toxicology and Targeting, Groningen Research Institute for Pharmacy, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Olinga, P. [Department of Pharmacokinetics, Toxicology and Targeting, Groningen Research Institute for Pharmacy, University of Groningen (Netherlands); van Leeuwen, E.M.; Bauerschmidt, S.; Polman, J. [Molecular Design and Informatics, MSD, Oss (Netherlands); Schoonen, W.G. [Toxicology and Drug Disposition, MSD, Oss (Netherlands); Heisterkamp, S.H. [Biostatistics and Research Decision Sciences MSD, Oss (Netherlands); Bioinformatics Centre, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Groothuis, G.M.M. [Department of Pharmacokinetics, Toxicology and Targeting, Groningen Research Institute for Pharmacy, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-05-15

    In the process of drug development it is of high importance to test the safety of new drugs with predictive value for human toxicity. A promising approach of toxicity testing is based on shifts in gene expression profiling of the liver. Toxicity screening based on animal liver cells cannot be directly extrapolated to humans due to species differences. The aim of this study was to evaluate precision-cut human liver slices as in vitro method for the prediction of human specific toxicity by toxicogenomics. The liver slices contain all cell types of the liver in their natural architecture. This is important since drug-induced toxicity often is a multi-cellular process. Previously we showed that toxicogenomic analysis of rat liver slices is highly predictive for rat in vivo toxicity. In this study we investigated the levels of gene expression during incubation up to 24 h with Affymetrix microarray technology. The analysis was focused on a broad spectrum of genes related to stress and toxicity, and on genes encoding for phase-I, -II and -III metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Observed changes in gene expression were associated with cytoskeleton remodeling, extracellular matrix and cell adhesion, but for the ADME-Tox related genes only minor changes were observed. PCA analysis showed that changes in gene expression were not associated with age, sex or source of the human livers. Slices treated with acetaminophen showed patterns of gene expression related to its toxicity. These results indicate that precision-cut human liver slices are relatively stable during 24 h of incubation and represent a valuable model for human in vitro hepatotoxicity testing despite the human inter-individual variability.

  2. Introduction Health Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    32 Introduction Guide Entrance Life Career Inquiries Health Sciences Health Problems population, changing lifestyle habit, and the coming of globalization age. The role health sciences play, the former Department of Health Sciences of the Graduate School of Medicine, was reorganized

  3. OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Department of Occupational Health and Safety Revised December 2009 #12;Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Management System 1. Introduction.............................................................................................................. 3 2.2 Management of Health and Safety

  4. Health Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSCGrid-based29HaiWhy IsHealth Benefits

  5. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Collaborations Past Collaborations NSEC Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring- Test Structures &...

  6. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Collaborations Past Collaborations NSEC Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring- Statistical Pattern...

  7. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Collaborations Past Collaborations NSEC Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring- Methodology Contact...

  8. Global Health Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in global health: The challenges of investing in health and universal health coverage Although targets can help to focus global health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in global health

  9. According to the Centre for Health Protection (CHP), the Government has ordered a total of three million doses of H1N1 Human Swine Influenza (HSI) vaccine from French

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    According to the Centre for Health Protection (CHP), the Government has ordered a total of three by CHP on 30 Nov 2009 at this link: http://www.chp.gov.hk/files/pdf/info_public_hsivp_eng.pdf According to the CHP, the remaining quantity of H1N1 HSI vaccine will be provided to private doctors participating

  10. UNIVERSITY HEALTH CENTER UGA OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    UNIVERSITY HEALTH CENTER UGA OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH APPROVAL FOR PHYSICAL EXAMS, EYE EXAMS, LAB WORK No Faculty/Staff: Yes No UGA Employment: Full-Time Part-Time New to Occupational Health Program? Yes No E: Release of Information: I authorize the University Health Center ("UHC") at The University of Georgia

  11. Health and Counselling Services SFU Health Promotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Health and Counselling Services SFU Health Promotion A division of Student Services HEALTHY CAMPUS COMMUNITY 2 0 1 3 R E P O R T #12;Dr. Tim Rahilly Dr. Nancy Johnston FOREWORD The health and well Campus Community 2013 Report. This report highlights the work that SFU Health Promotion is undertaking

  12. Macroeconomics and Health: Investing in Health for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macroeconomics and Health: Investing in Health for Economic Development #12;Information concerning be obtained from: World Health Organization Marketing and Dissemination 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland tel: (41 clear and strong on the central task of raising the health of the poor. I can be `realistic

  13. Duke Health Enterprise Organized Health Care Arrangement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duke Health Enterprise Organized Health Care Arrangement NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES WE ARE COMMITTED TO PROTECTING THE PRIVACY OF YOUR PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION. THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL IT CAREFULLY. This notice of our privacy practices explains: 1. How we may use and disclose your health

  14. Transforming health and humanitarian Health Disaster Humanitarian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Transforming health and humanitarian Health Disaster Humanitarian Systems Management Operations.humanitarian.scl.gatech.edu@HHSGATech · · · · · · · · · systems through education, outreach, and applied research 6-day Professional Certificate program in Health & Humanitarian Supply Chain Management HHS@isye.gatech.edu HHSGATech HHS Georgia Tech Annual Health

  15. Public Health Surveillance of Toxic Cyanobacteria in Freshwater Systems Using Remote Detection Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackie, Trina Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Adequate characterization of the entire reservoir wouldCharacterization 2.1 Introduction This research involved field data collection in two field sites: the Iron Gate and Copco reservoirs

  16. JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND HEALTH Part A--Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockne, Karl J.

    be promising for in situ bioremediation following NAPL extraction. Key Words: Reductive dechlorination; Bioremediation; Ethyl lactate; Perchloroethene; Tetrachloroethene; Chloroethene; Green chemistry; Solvent- water aquifers and may exist as dense nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) due to their higher density

  17. Scientific contestations over "toxic trespass"¯: health and regulatory implications of chemical biomonitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamasunder, Bhavna; Morello-Frosch, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    U.S. popula- tion to bisphenol a and 4-tertiary-octylphenol:Vińas R, Watson CS (2013) Bisphenol S disrupts estradiol-the making and unmaking of bisphenol a ‘safety’. Am J Publ

  18. National Center for Environmental Health Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in California had asthma in 2008. Asthma was the underlying cause of death for 402 adults and 17 children of Americans by promoting a healthy environment and preventing premature death and avoidable illness caused of every dollar entrusted to the agency. Funded Activities National Asthma Control Program (FY 2013 funding

  19. National Center for Environmental Health Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are caused by environmental exposures. Some of these diseases--such as cancer, asthma, and cardiovascular of Americans by promoting a healthy environment and preventing premature death and avoidable illness caused of every dollar entrusted to the agency. Funded Activities National Asthma Control Program (FY 2013 funding

  20. Public Health Surveillance of Toxic Cyanobacteria in Freshwater Systems Using Remote Detection Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackie, Trina Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Vicinity of the Klamath Hydroelectric Project: April, MayReport, Klamath Hydroelectric Project, Water Resources.2010). "Klamath River Hydroelectric Project Overview."

  1. Ranking* Category Aspect Normal Abnormal Emergency Impact Description Impact Comment High Water & energy Water consumption 7 (Neg) 7 (Neg) 7 (Neg) Water resource depletion. Use of chlorine / ozone in treatment and potential risk of damage to human health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    2 saving vis-ą-vis national grid supplied electricity (20% electricity generation from CHP and global warming resulting in sea level rise, changing weather patterns, increased incidence of pest electrical & electronic equipment (WEEE) 7 (Neg) 7 (Neg) 7 (Neg) Breaches of environmental legislation. Human

  2. Mass-transport models to predict toxicity of inhaled gases in the upper respiratory tract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubal, E.A.C.; Fedkiw, P.S.; Kimbell, J.S. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Mass-transport (the movement of a chemical species) plays an important role in determining toxic responses of the upper respiratory tract (URT) to inhaled chemicals. Mathematical dosimetry models incorporate physical characteristics of mass transport and are used to predict quantitative uptake (absorption rate) and distribution of inhaled gases and vapors in the respiratory tract. Because knowledge of dose is an essential component of quantitative risk assessment, dosimetry modeling plays an important role in extrapolation of animal study results to humans. A survey of existing mathematical dosimetry models for the URT is presented, limitations of current models are discussed, and adaptations of existing models to produce a generally applicable model are suggested. Reviewed URT dosimetry models are categorized as early, lumped-parameter, and distributed-parameter models. Specific examples of other relevant modeling work are also presented. 35 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  3. 1New Students Orientation Campus Health & Wellbeing Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    1New Students Orientation ­ Campus Health & Wellbeing University Health Services Campus Health & Wellbeing 2New Students Orientation ­ Campus Health & Wellbeing University Health Services (UHS) UMass (HPV, MMR, etc...) Sports Medicine 9New Students Orientation ­ Campus Health & Wellbeing UHS also

  4. COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR HOSPITAL SYSTEMS SERVING MONROE COUNTY, NEW YORK 2012 Lakeside Health System Rochester General Health System Unity Health System Memorial Hospital Developed Collaboratively with Finger Lakes Health System Agency Monroe County Department

  5. COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR HOSPITAL SYSTEMS SERVING MONROE COUNTY, NEW YORK 2013 Lakeside Health System Rochester General Health System Unity Health System Memorial Hospital Developed Collaboratively with Finger Lakes Health System Agency Monroe County Department

  6. Comparative Analysis of Korean Human Gut Microbiota by Barcoded Pyrosequencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    @khu.ac.kr Introduction After the completion of the Human Genome Project (HGP), many scientists were disappointed of human health and disease. Therefore, after the HGP, Human Microbiome Project (HMP) was initiated to fill a gap between our current understanding derived from HGP and actual physiological phenomenon

  7. International Compilation of Human Research Standards 2015 Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    1 International Compilation of Human Research Standards 2015 Edition Compiled By: Office for Human Research Protections U.S. Department of Health and Human Services PURPOSE The International Compilation organizations. This Compilation was developed for use by researchers, IRBs/Research Ethics Committees, sponsors

  8. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01

    2004). "Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts onfor human health and climate change." J Toxicol Environet al. (2001). Climate change 2001: impacts, adaptation, and

  9. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01

    for human health and climate change." J Toxicol Environet al. (2001). Climate change 2001: impacts, adaptation, andin France: dangerous climate change here and now." Risk Anal

  10. USHIPUndergraduate Student Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    USHIPUndergraduate Student Health Insurance Plan WHAT IS HEALTH CARE REFORM? Health Care Reform,includingcoveragestandards,pricingstandards,andanindividualmandate.Theindividual mandate is a requirement that every U.S. citizen have qualifying health insurance coverage or pay a monetary penalty (beginning in 2014). Please note that student health insurance plans are considered

  11. Health sciences at Manchester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higham, Nicholas J.

    Health sciences at Manchester a time of change and growth Institute of Health Sciences January 2010 #12;The Institute of Health Sciences exists to improve health and healthcare practice through high quality health sciences research in Manchester. It is a collaborative endeavour involving schools

  12. The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer Risk Assessment Factsheet environmental health Background · Localpublichealthprotectionrequiresidentifyingandprioritizingneedsthroughrisk.Environmentalandhealthdepartmentofficialsshould developcommunity-specificcriteriaforconductingtheriskmanagementphaseof hazardandriskreduction. Board of Health

  13. Weight Management Program - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and Screenings Interactive Exercises...

  14. Body Mass Index - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Education & Wellness > Health Calculators & Logs > Body Mass Index Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs...

  15. Rural Health Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Montana Rural Health Association Phone: 406-994-6004 Fax: 406-994-5653 E-mail: MRHA 170520 Bozeman, Montana 59717-0520 Montana Rural Health Association Membershipdesignation.Membershipisrenewedonan annualbasis.PleasemakecheckspayabletoMontanaRuralHealth

  16. Health and justice: the capability to be healthy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkatapuram, Sridhar

    2009-08-18

    central human capabilities SR sophisticated resourcist 3 Statement of Length Sridhar Venkatapuram King’s College December 2007 Thesis Title: Health and justice: The capability to be healthy The dissertation does not exceed 80...

  17. Medicine and public health in a multiethnic world 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhopal, Raj

    2009-01-01

    Achievement of medical and public health goals requires mutual understanding between professionals and the public, a challenge in diverse societies. Despite their massive diversity humans belong to one species, with race ...

  18. Ergonomics - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Education & Wellness > Downloads & Patient Materials > Ergonomics Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Ergonomics Fitness & Exercise Men's Health...

  19. National Institutes of Health Public Health Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    of Acquisition and Logistics Management Subject: OAMP Policy Letter 2011-1, Announcement of Contract AwardsNational Institutes of Health Public Health Service Bethesda, Maryland 20892 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH: Acquisition Management Committee GS-1102-ListServe From: Head of the Contracting Activity and Director, Office

  20. Induction of apoptotic death and retardation of neuronal differentiation of human neural stem cells by sodium arsenite treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Vladimir N., E-mail: vni3@columbia.edu [Center for Radiological Research, Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, NY 10032 (United States); Hei, Tom K. [Center for Radiological Research, Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, NY 10032 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Chronic arsenic toxicity is a global health problem that affects more than 100 million people worldwide. Long-term health effects of inorganic sodium arsenite in drinking water may result in skin, lung and liver cancers and in severe neurological abnormalities. We investigated in the present study whether sodium arsenite affects signaling pathways that control cell survival, proliferation and neuronal differentiation of human neural stem cells (NSC). We demonstrated that the critical signaling pathway, which was suppressed by sodium arsenite in NSC, was the protective PI3K–AKT pathway. Sodium arsenite (2–4 ?M) also caused down-regulation of Nanog, one of the key transcription factors that control pluripotency and self-renewal of stem cells. Mitochondrial damage and cytochrome-c release induced by sodium arsenite exposure was followed by initiation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in NSC. Beside caspase-9 and caspase-3 inhibitors, suppression of JNK activity decreased levels of arsenite-induced apoptosis in NSC. Neuronal differentiation of NSC was substantially inhibited by sodium arsenite exposure. Overactivation of JNK1 and ERK1/2 and down-regulation of PI3K–AKT activity induced by sodium arsenite were critical factors that strongly affected neuronal differentiation. In conclusion, sodium arsenite exposure of human NSC induces the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which is substantially accelerated due to the simultaneous suppression of PI3K–AKT. Sodium arsenite also negatively affects neuronal differentiation of NSC through overactivation of MEK–ERK and suppression of PI3K–AKT. - Highlights: ? Arsenite induces the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in human neural stem cells. ? Arsenite-induced apoptosis is strongly upregulated by suppression of PI3K–AKT. ? Arsenite-induced apoptosis is strongly down-regulated by inhibition of JNK–cJun. ? Arsenite negatively affects neuronal differentiation by inhibition of PI3K–AKT.

  1. Relative Leaching and Aquatic Toxicity of Pressure-Treated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Relative Leaching and Aquatic Toxicity of Pressure-Treated Wood Products Using Batch Leaching Tests leaching tests. The wood preservatives included chromated copper arsenate (CCA), alkaline copper quaternary, copper boron azole, copper citrate, and copper dimeth- yldithiocarbamate. An unpreserved wood sample

  2. Survey of toxicity and carcinogenity of mineral deposits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furst, A.; Harding-Barlow, I.

    1981-11-03

    The toxicities and biogeochemical cycles of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead and nickel are reviewed in some detail, and other trace elements briefly mentioned. These heavy metals are used as a framework within which the problem of low-level radioactive waste disposal can be compared. (ACR)

  3. Transition Metal Nutrition: A Balance Between Deficiency and Toxicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamel, Patrice

    333 Transition Metal Nutrition: A Balance Between Deficiency and Toxicity CHAPTER 10 CHAPTER CONTENTS I. Introduction 334 II. Components of the metal homeostasis network 335 A. Metal transporters 335 B. Metal chelation 349 C. Differences with other photosynthetic organisms 352 III. Metal tolerance

  4. Tolerance of nitrobacter to toxicity of some Nigerian crude oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okpokwasili, G.C.; Odokuma, L.O. (Univ. of Port Harcourt (Nigeria))

    1994-03-01

    Crude oil spillage in aquatic systems affects thousands of aquatic species including bacteria. Some of the crude oil components are rapidly evaporated or biologically degraded. Other components continue to remain for several months and perhaps several years. Some of these components may be toxic to microorganisms, while some may stimulate microbial activity especially at low concentrations. The use of bacteria as bioassay organisms is now gaining wide acceptance. It offers a number of advantages such as ease of handling, economy of space, short life cycles and low cost. Their uses in bioassays are based on cell lysis, mutagenic properties and the inhibition of physiological processes such as respiration. Recently, a number of workers have proposed the use of Nitrobacter as a test organism. The organism has a number of advantages in toxicity testing: obligate autotrophy, its sensitivity to various toxicants and its predominance in wastewater environments are some of them . Of recent, the inhibition of bacterial enzyme biosynthesis have been suggested in bacterial assays. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of six Nigerian crude oils on the cell reproduction rate (LC, lethal concentration), cellular respiration (EC, effective concentration) and biosynthesis of enzyme responsible for nitrite oxidation (IC, inhibition concentration) in Nitrobacter. In addition, the goal was to identify which of these was the most sensitive to crude oil and which may thus be used for detecting the toxicity of these chemicals. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. EVALUATION OF THE PEEP INDEX AND RECOMMENDED TOXICITY TESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a Vancouver storm sewer. A flow-weighte~ composite sample from each site was tested for acute toxicity the mathematicalformula used to derive the index. A battery of bioassays is recommended for use in the FraserRiver Basin tliatthe SOS-Chromotest The test battery is identical to that used for the PEEP index, is replaced

  6. Biosecurity and Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biosecurity and Health Biosecurity and Health Los Alamos scientists are developing science and technology designed to battle pathogens responsible for causing disease epidemics,...

  7. ORISE: Public Health Communication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Communication Public Health Communication The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) assists government agencies and organizations in addressing public health...

  8. ORISE: Health physics services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health physics services Nuclear power plant The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers comprehensive health physics services in a number of technical areas...

  9. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Health Monitoring Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring- The Los Alamos Approach Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI...

  10. ORISE: Public Health Preparedness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preparedness Public Health Preparedness The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) recognizes that public health events will largely be managed at the local level,...

  11. ORISE: Health Disparity Interventions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disparity Interventions Public health theory and practice suggests that risky health behaviors can be altered through interventions that organize and educate communities, screen...

  12. ORISE: Health Physics Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Physics Training Student performs an analysis during an ORAU health physics training course Training and educating a highly skilled workforce that can meet operational...

  13. An update on environmental, health and safety issues of interest to the photovoltaic industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Viren, J.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-08-01

    There is growing interest in the environmental, health, and safety issues related to new photovoltaic technologies as they approach commercialization. Such issues include potential toxicity of II--VI compounds; the impacts of new environmental regulations on module manufacturers; and, the need for recycling of spent modules and manufacturing wastes. This paper will review these topics. 20 refs.

  14. Mitochondrial bioenergetics and drug-induced toxicity in a panel of mouse embryonic fibroblasts with mitochondrial DNA single nucleotide polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, Claudia V.; Oliveira, Paulo J. [CNC—Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra (Portugal)] [CNC—Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra (Portugal); Will, Yvonne [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States)] [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States); Nadanaciva, Sashi, E-mail: sashi.nadanaciva@pfizer.com [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States)] [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been proposed to be involved in idiosyncratic drug reactions. However, current in vitro and in vivo models lack the genetic diversity seen in the human population. Our hypothesis is that different cell strains with distinct mtDNA SNPs may have different mitochondrial bioenergetic profiles and may therefore vary in their response to drug-induced toxicity. Therefore, we used an in vitro system composed of four strains of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with mtDNA polymorphisms. We sequenced mtDNA from embryonic fibroblasts isolated from four mouse strains, C57BL/6J, MOLF/EiJ, CZECHII/EiJ and PERA/EiJ, with the latter two being sequenced for the first time. The bioenergetic profile of the four strains of MEFs was investigated at both passages 3 and 10. Our results showed that there were clear differences among the four strains of MEFs at both passages, with CZECHII/EiJ having a lower mitochondrial robustness when compared to C57BL/6J, followed by MOLF/EiJ and PERA/EiJ. Seven drugs known to impair mitochondrial function were tested for their effect on the ATP content of the four strains of MEFs in both glucose- and galactose-containing media. Our results showed that there were strain-dependent differences in the response to some of the drugs. We propose that this model is a useful starting point to study compounds that may cause mitochondrial off-target toxicity in early stages of drug development, thus decreasing the number of experimental animals used. -- Highlights: ? mtDNA SNPs may be linked to individual predisposition to drug-induced toxicity. ? CZECHII/EiJ and PERA/EiJ mtDNA was sequenced for the first time in this study. ? Strain-dependent mitochondrial capacity differences were measured. ? Strain-dependent differences in response to mitochondrial toxicants were observed.

  15. Research discoveries can improve people's health.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyu, Mei-Ling

    Research discoveries can improve people's health. Before you decide to become a research volunteer the pros and cons. It's Your Decision For more information call: Office for Human Research Protections Toll-0527 E-mail: ohrp@osophs.dhhs.gov BECOMING A RESEARCH VOLUNTEER: IT'S YOUR DECISION This space reserved

  16. A mechanism for diversity in warning signals: Conspicuousness versus toxicity in poison frogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Molly E.

    A mechanism for diversity in warning signals: Conspicuousness versus toxicity in poison frogs natural variation among poison frog species measured with spectral reflectance and toxicity assays, we components using natural variation among poison frog species. Poison frogs (Dendrobatidae) display some

  17. (Low frequency electromagnetic fields and public health)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, T.E.

    1988-05-23

    The traveler participated in the IARC-sponsored workshop entitled Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) and Public Health'' where he delivered the keynote address. This address set the stage for deliberations among the EMF public health professionals regarding strategies for international collaborative work on this topic. Strong emphasis was placed in explicit exposure monitoring. The traveler also participated in the Tenth Yves Biraud Seminar on rare-event surveillance as a sentinel system for detection potential environmental hazards. He presented an invited paper describing a means for making rapid, preliminary decisions regarding potential health impacts due to contamination of the environment around point sources of toxic substances. He served as the symposium's expert on numerical techniques on the use of spatial and temporal aggregation of rare health events. There is considerable variation among countries in emphasis on application of sentinel systems and application of sentinel systems and data gathering. France has a highly automated, statistically-sophisticated system involving individual physician reporting of specific reportable infectious diseases to a central location. The European Common Market nations are sold on this concept and are supporting the development of an internationally coordinated system.

  18. The WIPP Bulletin -1996 "Protecting Public Health and the Environment"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    program with over 10 years experience in the federal government working on radiation issues. BeginningThe WIPP Bulletin - 1996 "Protecting Public Health and the Environment" Office of Radiation have guided EPA's WIPP Program since its inception: 1) to protect human health and the environment from

  19. Captain Planet Takes on Hazard Transfer: Combining the Forces of Market, Legal and Ethical Decisionmaking to Reduce Toxic Exports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giampetro-Meyer, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    infra Part II; see generally Toxic EXPORTS, supra note 5.82. Toxic EXPORTS, supra note 5. See infra Part II. 83.of California). 31. Toxic EXPORTS, supra note 5, at 9. Clapp

  20. Reliability of Quantitative Ultrasonic Assessment of Normal-Tissue Toxicity in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Emi J.; Chen Hao; Torres, Mylin; Andic, Fundagul; Liu Haoyang; Chen Zhengjia; Sun, Xiaoyan; Curran, Walter J.; Liu Tian

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study's purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials: Our ultrasound technique analyzes radiofrequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semiautomatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months postradiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity ({>=}6 months postradiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intraobserver reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess interobserver reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and interobserver reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results: Intraobserver ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular tissue toxicity. Interobserver ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p = 0.0027), and glandular tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scores of patients in the late toxicity group. Patients with RTOG Grade 1 or 2 had greater ultrasound-assessed toxicity percentage changes than patients with RTOG Grade 0. Conclusion: Early and late radiation-induced effects on normal tissue can be reliably assessed using quantitative ultrasound.

  1. Modeling hepatitis C virus infection using human induced pluripotent stem cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Robert E.

    Human pathogens impact patient health through a complex interplay with the host, but models to study the role of host genetics in this process are limited. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer the ability to ...

  2. environmental health Understanding Concentrated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental health Understanding Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations and Their Impact of Health Editor Mark Schultz, MEd Grants Administrator/Technical Writer National Association of Local Boards of Health ©2010 National Association of Local Boards of Health 1840 East Gypsy Lane Road Bowling

  3. HEALTH SCIENCES POSTGRADUATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013 HEALTH SCIENCES POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES #12;Welcome to the Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute The Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI) aims to facilitate high-quality translational health research in a number of key areas including Ageing and Dementia, Prevention and Management

  4. Counselling HEALTH & COUNSELLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Counselling HEALTH & COUNSELLING SERVICES Counselling 778.782.4615 - Burnaby intake@sfu.ca 778.782.5200 - Vancouver 778.782.8022 - Surrey surrey_counsellor@sfu.ca Health Clinic 778.783.4615 - Burnaby 778.782.5200 - Vancouver Health Promotion 778.782.4674 Health & Counselling Services, SFU - 8888 University Drive, MBC 0164

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH AND SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAMS SPRING 2012 Including: Free Information Session New Program in Health and Safety CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION #12;2 Our Health and Safety Programs Workplace Health and Safety Certificate Program For every dollar invested in workplace safety, organizations

  6. STUDENT HEALTH MEDICAL SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiying

    Ver 2.0 09/2012 ANNEX H STUDENT HEALTH & MEDICAL SERVICES #12;Ver 2.0 09/2012 H-i APPROVAL & IMPLEMENTATION Annex H Student Health & Medical Services This emergency management plan is hereby approved. ______________________________ ________________________ Robert Blum Date Director of Health Services Marie Bannister Date Director of Mental Health Services

  7. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY and HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARYLAND OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY and HEALTH ACT safety and health protection on the job STATE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS, AND OTHER APPLICABLE REGULATIONS MAY BE OBTAINED FROM and Health Administration, The Curtis Center, Suite 740 West, 170 S. Independence Mall West, Philadelphia, PA

  8. One-Two-Three Punch Clobbers Toxic Algae, Restores Fremont Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    One-Two-Three Punch Clobbers Toxic Algae, Restores Fremont Lake Final Report Fremont Lake #20 Water-two-three punch to knockout toxic algae and restore water quality in Nebraska's numerous sandpit lakes. "It seems to help rid the too-often toxic algae prone Fremont State Lakes of the oily green scum that can close them

  9. The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer Vector Control Factsheet environmental health,bioterroristactivitiessupportedby hostilegovernmentsandindividuals,andadecreaseinvectorcontrolprograms becauseofbudgetshortages. Board of Health ActionsIntegratedPestManagementisbeingusedforvectorcontrol. · Communicateriskstothecommunityintheeventofavector-relatedemergency. Resources for Continuing Education · AssociationofStateandTerritorialHealth

  10. Fluoride-elicited developmental testicular toxicity in rats: Roles of endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shun; Jiang, Chunyang; Liu, Hongliang; Guan, Zhizhong; Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Cheng; Lei, Rongrong; Xia, Tao; Gao, Hui; Yang, Lu; Chen, Yihu; Wu, Xue; Zhang, Xiaofei; Cui, Yushan; Yu, Linyu; Wang, Zhenglun; Wang, Aiguo

    2013-09-01

    Long-term excessive fluoride intake is known to be toxic and can damage a variety of organs and tissues in the human body. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying fluoride-induced male reproductive toxicity are not well understood. In this study, we used a rat model to simulate the situations of human exposure and aimed to evaluate the roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammatory response in fluoride-induced testicular injury. Sprague–Dawley rats were administered with sodium fluoride (NaF) at 25, 50 and 100 mg/L via drinking water from pre-pregnancy to gestation, birth and finally to post-puberty. And then the testes of male offspring were studied at 8 weeks of age. Our results demonstrated that fluoride treatment increased MDA accumulation, decreased SOD activity, and enhanced germ cell apoptosis. In addition, fluoride elevated mRNA and protein levels of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), inositol requiring ER-to-nucleus signal kinase 1 (IRE1), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), indicating activation of ER stress signaling. Furthermore, fluoride also induced testicular inflammation, as manifested by gene up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), interleukin-1? (IL-1?), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), in a nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B)-dependent manner. These were associated with marked histopathological lesions including injury of spermatogonia, decrease of spermatocytes and absence of elongated spermatids, as well as severe ultrastructural abnormalities in testes. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence that ER stress and inflammation would be novel and significant mechanisms responsible for fluoride-induced disturbance of spermatogenesis and germ cell loss in addition to oxidative stress. - Highlights: • We used a rat model to simulate the situations of human fluoride (F) exposure. • Developmental F exposure induces testicular damage related with oxidative stress. • Endoplasmic reticulum stress is involved in testis disorder and germ cell apoptosis. • Inflammatory response is implicated in impaired spermatogenesis and germ cell loss.

  11. Energy Systems and Population Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ezzati, Majid; Bailis, Rob; Kammen, Daniel M.; Holloway, Tracey; Price, Lynn; Cifuentes, Luis A.; Barnes, Brendon; Chaurey, Akanksha; Dhanapala, Kiran N.

    2004-04-12

    It is well-documented that energy and energy systems have a central role in social and economic development and human welfare at all scales, from household and community to regional and national (41). Among its various welfare effects, energy is closely linked with people s health. Some of the effects of energy on health and welfare are direct. With abundant energy, more food or more frequent meals can be prepared; food can be refrigerated, increasing the types of food items that are consumed and reducing food contamination; water pumps can provide more water and eliminate the need for water storage leading to contamination or increased exposure to disease vectors such as mosquitoes or snails; water can be disinfected by boiling or using other technologies such as radiation. Other effects of energy on public health are mediated through more proximal determinants of health and disease. Abundant energy can lead to increased irrigation, agricultural productivity, and access to food and nutrition; access to energy can also increase small-scale income generation such as processing of agricultural commodities (e.g., producing refined oil from oil seeds, roasting coffee, drying and preserving fruits and meats) and production of crafts; ability to control lighting and heating allows education or economic activities to be shielded from daily or seasonal environmental constraints such as light, temperature, rainfall, or wind; time and other economic resources spent on collecting and/or transporting fuels can be used for other household needs if access to energy is facilitated; energy availability for transportation increases access to health and education facilities and allow increased economic activity by facilitating the transportation of goods and services to and from markets; energy for telecommunication technology (radio, television, telephone, or internet) provides increased access to information useful for health, education, or economic purposes; provision of energy to rural and urban health facilities allows increased delivery and coverage of 3 various health services and interventions such as tests and treatments, better storage of medicine and vaccines, disinfection of medical equipment by boiling or radiation, and more frequent and efficient health system encounters through mobile clinics or longer working hours; and so on. In fact, while the dominant view of development-energy-health linkages has been that improvements in energy and health are outcomes of the socioeconomic development process (e.g., the ''energy ladder'' framework discussed below), it has even been argued that access to higher quality energy sources and technologies can initiate a chain of demographic, health, and development outcomes by changing the household structure and socioeconomic relationships. For example, in addition to increased opportunities for food and income production, reduced infant mortality as a result of transition to cleaner fuels or increased coverage of vaccination with availability of refrigerators in rural clinics may initiate a process of ''demographic transition'' to low-mortality and low-fertility populations (14). Such a transition has historically been followed with further improvements in maternal and child health and increased female participation in the labor markets and other economic activities.

  12. IN SICKNESS AND IN HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    IN SICKNESS AND IN HEALTH #12;The UHC Cares for YOU! #12;#12;ABOUTUS Location;HERE'S ONLY SOME OF WHAT WE CAN DO FORYOU! Health Clinic Health Health Health

  13. Reactive formulations for a neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Mark D. (Albuqueruqe, NM); Betty, Rita G. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2006-10-24

    Decontamination formulations for neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals, and methods of making and using same. The formulations are effective for neutralizing malathion, hydrogen cyanide, sodium cyanide, butyl isocyanate, carbon disulfide, phosgene gas, capsaicin in commercial pepper spray, chlorine gas, anhydrous ammonia gas; and may be effective at neutralizing hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, ethylene oxide, methyl bromide, boron trichloride, fluorine, tetraethyl pyrophosphate, phosphorous trichloride, arsine, and tungsten hexafluoride.

  14. The subchronic toxicity of Roridin A in sheep 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thormahlen, Keller Andrew

    1988-01-01

    synclranms (5, 6) . However, in 1967 a toxic outbreak occurred in Russia on rye straw infected with ecium verrucaria, which is frequently seen to occur in the same colonies as Nyrothecium roridum (9) . Unfortunately, these isolates have yet to reproduce... aminotransferase (AST) . 'Ihe disease is characterized by a fatty cirrhosis of the liver starting first as a fatty infiltration organizing itself within the ~yma su~ing the portal vein, the hepatic ~, and the bile duct. This fatty degeneration ~ a fibrogenic...

  15. Occupational Health Services - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exercise physiology and work conditioning, monitored care and case management, fitness for duty evaluations, health education and wellness promotion, infection control,...

  16. Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivan Diaz-Loya, E.; Allouche, Erez N.; Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R.; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5.00 mg/L, respectively.

  17. Graduate Certificate in Global Health Fact Sheet College of Public Health GRADUATE EDUCATION IN GLOBAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Graduate Certificate in Global Health Fact Sheet · College of Public Health GRADUATE EDUCATION IN GLOBAL HEALTH Graduate Certificate in Global Health A UGA Graduate Program What is Global Health? Global health applies public health principles to solutions of health problems that transcend national

  18. Air toxics evaluation of ABB Combustion Engineering Low-Emission Boiler Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesnor, J.D.

    1993-10-26

    The specific goals of the program are to identify air toxic compounds that might be emmitted from the new boiler with its various Air Pollution Control device for APCD alternatives in levels of regulatory concern. For the compounds thought to be of concern, potential air toxic control methodologies will be suggested and a Test Protocol will be written to be used in the Proof of Concept and full scale tests. The following task was defined: Define Replations and Standards; Identify Air Toxic Pollutants of Interest to Interest to Utility Boilers; Assesment of Air Toxic By-Products; State of the Art Assessment of Toxic By-Product Control Technologies; and Test Protocol Definition.

  19. Open Defecation and the Human Waste Crisis in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mozaffar, Parveen

    2014-05-31

    This thesis analyzes the human waste crisis in India. The lack of sanitation facilities as well as open defecation seriously impacts India's ability to achieve its sanitation goals by 2015. More importantly, if the World Health Organization...

  20. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Human Fungal Pathogens Causing Paracoccidioidomycosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holder, Jason W.

    Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, ...

  1. Health Sciences Center Department of Internal Medicine Employee Health Promotion Program Health Care Provider Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Health Sciences Center Department of Internal Medicine Employee Health Promotion Program Health Care Provider Report Dear Health Care Provider: Your patient, ______________________________, has applied for enrollment in a fitness program sponsored by the University of New Mexico, Employee Health

  2. The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer Air Quality Factsheet environmental health. · Indoorairqualityatspecializedplaces,suchasschoolsorindoorpools,shouldbe monitoredaswell. Board of Health ActionsProtectionAgency.IndoorAirQuality.Availableatwww.epa.gov/iaq/ · NationalAssociationofLocalBoardsofHealth.(2011).AirQuality.InThe Local Board of Health Environmental Health

  3. Principles of Population Health Science Population Health 795

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    1 Principles of Population Health Science Population Health 795 A course in the Program in Population Health Fall 2012 University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health The lecture in medicine and public health, inequities in health persist. Understanding health on a population level

  4. Health And Wellness Department Of Health And Wellness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Terry

    Health And Wellness Department Of Health And Wellness Lutchmie Narine, Chair, 315-443-9630 426 The Department of Health and Wellness offers a 123-credit Bachelor of Science degree (B.S.) in public health. Our graduates are prepared to work in community health education and health promotion in public health agencies

  5. Evaluation of Chemical Warfare Agent Percutaneous Vapor Toxicity: Derivation of Toxicity Guidelines for Assessing Chemical Protective Ensembles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, A.P.

    2003-07-24

    Percutaneous vapor toxicity guidelines are provided for assessment and selection of chemical protective ensembles (CPEs) to be used by civilian and military first responders operating in a chemical warfare agent vapor environment. The agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents, the vesicant sulfur mustard (agent HD) and, to a lesser extent, the vesicant Lewisite (agent L). The focus of this evaluation is percutaneous vapor permeation of CPEs and the resulting skin absorption, as inhalation and ocular exposures are assumed to be largely eliminated through use of SCBA and full-face protective masks. Selection of appropriately protective CPE designs and materials incorporates a variety of test parameters to ensure operability, practicality, and adequacy. One aspect of adequacy assessment should be based on systems tests, which focus on effective protection of the most vulnerable body regions (e.g., the groin area), as identified in this analysis. The toxicity range of agent-specific cumulative exposures (Cts) derived in this analysis can be used as decision guidelines for CPE acceptance, in conjunction with weighting consideration towards more susceptible body regions. This toxicity range is bounded by the percutaneous vapor estimated minimal effect (EME{sub pv}) Ct (as the lower end) and the 1% population threshold effect (ECt{sub 01}) estimate. Assumptions of exposure duration used in CPE certification should consider that each agent-specific percutaneous vapor cumulative exposure Ct for a given endpoint is a constant for exposure durations between 30 min and 2 hours.

  6. Health and safety guide for inorganic compounds and metals used in the fabrication of superconductive alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, S.D.; Talley, G.M.

    1990-04-25

    This health and safety guide was written to satisfy two objectives: to summarize the toxicity of metals and alloys used in superconductivity for the benefit of those who work with these materials, and to summarize and describes the basic principles of a highly technical field from a health and safety point-of-view for the benefit of health professionals. The guide begins with a profile of the superconductivity industry, including a list of current and potential applications, a literature review of the market potential, and summary of the current industry status. The body of the paper provides a toxicity and hazard summary for 50 metals, alloys and metal oxides used in superconductivity. The toxicity and hazard summary for all 50 compounds includes: occupational exposure limits, explosiveness and flammability potential, LD{sub 50}'s, chemical and physical properties, incompatibilities and reactivities, recommended personal protective equipment, symptoms of acute and chronic exposure, target organs and toxic effects, and steps for emergency first aid. Finally, a discussion of general occupational hygiene principles is provided, with emphasis on how these principles apply to the unique field of superconductivity. 41 refs.

  7. A Conversational Model for Health Promotion on the World Wide Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grasso, Floriana

    assessment. Users typically enter information about their current diet (selecting from meal options, in health pro- motion, and conversational modelling. We describe our initial study of human health promotionA Conversational Model for Health Promotion on the World Wide Web Alison Cawsey 1 , Floriana Grasso

  8. 2007-No54-BoilingPoint Health and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biomass and Fossil Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2007-No54-BoilingPoint Theme Health and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biomass and Fossil Fuel Energy, but both the human health and envi- ronmental impacts associated with reliance on this fuel structure of fossil-fuel energy systems. These scenarios are analysed for various environmental and health impacts

  9. Space, light, and time : prospective analysis of Circadian illumination for health-based daylighting with applications to healthcare architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pechacek, Christopher S. (Christopher Scott)

    2008-01-01

    Light in architecture can be studied for its objective or perceptual effects. This thesis describes an objective link between human health and architectural design. Specifically, the link between daylight and human circadian ...

  10. Health Insurance Marketplace Notice New Health Insurance Marketplace...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Insurance Marketplace Notice New Health Insurance Marketplace Coverage Options and Your Health Coverage PART A: General Information When key parts of the health care law take...

  11. Keeping Track, Promoting Health... CDC NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH TRACKING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and chronic disease. The most common environmental health hazards are air and water pollution; asthma, cancer a tracking program, environmental causes of chronic diseases are hard to identify. Systematically measuring up in human tissues, and understanding how they may cause illness would seem a wise precaution

  12. Health Center - 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2009-01-01

    The United States is the only technologically advanced, industrialized country that fails to provide all of its citizenry with health care coverage.1 In 2010, an estimated 16.3% of Americans (approximately 50 million people) did not possess health...

  13. Downloads & Patient Materials - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Education & Wellness > Downloads & Patient Materials Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Ergonomics Fitness & Exercise Men's Health Nutrition Health &...

  14. About HPMC OMS - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    safety and health, risk communication, health data analysis and trending, health education and promotion, industrial rehabilitation and ergonomics, behavioral health...

  15. Human Subjects Section 6. Protection of Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Human Subjects Section 6. Protection of Human Subjects This section is required for applicants answering "yes" to the question "Are human subjects involved?" on the R&R Other Project Information form subjects applicants must provide a justification in this section for the claim that no human subjects

  16. HEALTH SCIENCES Division of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Hokwon

    HEALTH SCIENCES Division of University of nevada, Las vegas IMPACT How we serve our students, our community, and our state #12;academic impact UNLV's Division of Health Sciences is a vital force in the Las Vegas metropolitan area, educating desperately needed health care professionals and taking on some

  17. Health, Safety & Wellbeing Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Health, Safety & Wellbeing Policy Statement The University of Glasgow is one of the four oldest our very best to minimise the risk to the health, safety and wellbeing of staff, students, researchers resource and our students as our valued customers and partners. We acknowledge health and safety as a core

  18. HEALTH ALERT Meningococcal Meningitis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford, Kyle

    HEALTH ALERT Prevention Meningococcal Meningitis What is Meningococcal Meningitis? Meningococcal with someone confirmed to have this disease, immediately contact the Student Health Center or go to the nearest. Students: Check past medical records and contact Student Health Center if you did not receive your last

  19. Health Insurance Marketplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    About the Health Insurance Marketplace 8 things you can do to get ready now 1. Explore current options. You may be able to get coverage now through existing programs. Visit HealthCare.gov to learn more about health insurance for adults up to age 26 and programs for people and children in families

  20. Developing the Environmental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing the Environmental Health Workforce Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch CAPT Michael E. Herring, R.E.H.S., M.P.H. Editor's note: NEHA strives to provide up-to-date and relevant information on environmental health and to build part- nerships

  1. THE UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN ONTARIO Human Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Ian

    Radiation Safety Coordinator on matters of all radiation safety including nuclear substances and radiationTHE UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN ONTARIO Human Resources Occupational Health and Safety SAFETY MANUAL FOR NON-MEDICAL X-RAY EQUIPMENT Prepared by Mr. H. Ly Radiation Safety Coordinator Approved

  2. Health Effects | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Worker Health & Safety Health Effects Health Effects The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers research programs and monitoring activities, both domestic and...

  3. Occupational Health and Safety Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occupational Health and Safety Manual #12;1 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 York University Occupational Health and Safety Policy and Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Occupational Health and Safety Legislation

  4. An evaluation of the whole effluent toxicity test method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osteen, D.V.

    1999-12-17

    Whole effluent toxicity (WET) testing has become increasingly more important to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the States in the permitting of wastewater discharges from industry and municipalities. The primary purpose of the WET test is to protect aquatic life by predicting the effect of an effluent on the receiving stream. However, there are both scientific and regulatory concerns that using WET tests to regulate industrial effluents may result in either false positives and/or false negatives. In order to realistically predict the effect of an effluent on the receiving stream, the test should be as representative as possible of the conditions in the receiving stream. Studies (Rand and Petrocelli 1985) suggested several criteria for an ideal aquatic toxicity test organism, one of which is that the organism be indigenous to, or representative of, the ecosystem receiving the effluent. The other component needed in the development of a predictive test is the use of the receiving stream water or similar synthetic water as the control and dilution water in the test method. Use of an indigenous species and receiving water in the test should help reduce the variability in the method and allow the test to predict the effect of the effluent on the receiving stream. The experience with toxicity testing at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has yielded inconclusive data because of the inconsistency and unreliability of the results. The SRS contention is that the WET method in its present form does not adequately mimic actual biological/chemical conditions of the receiving streams and is neither reasonable nor accurate. This paper discusses the rationale for such a position by SRS on toxicity testing in terms of historical permitting requirements, outfall effluent test results, standard test method evaluation, scientific review of alternate test species, and concerns over the test method expressed by other organizations. This paper presents the Savannah River Site position that the EPA test is neither reasonable nor accurate and thus cannot adequately establish the impact of NPDES outfall discharges on receiving streams.

  5. The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tools: EnvironmentalPolicy,Law,andAdministration.InThe Local Board of Health Environmental H Working to strengthen.). Management Tools: Environmental Policy, Law, and Administration Factsheet #12;The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer environmental health Background

  6. The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer Injury Prevention Factsheet environmental health Background · Unintentionalinjuryandviolenceaccountsforapproximately30%ofallyearsof-relatedinjuries. · Recreationalwaterillnessesareillnessesthatarespreadbycontactwithcontaminated waterfromswimmingpools,spas,lakes,rivers,oroceans. Board of Health Actions

  7. Health Assessment Requirements Candidate Waiver Request Health Assessment Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    Health Assessment Requirements Candidate Waiver Request Health Assessment Management System Please: To Position #: Position Title: Environmental Health & Safety Use Only Reviewer Name: ___________________ Effective Date: _______________ Comments: Revised: May 14, 2012 #12;Health Assessment Requirements Candidate

  8. USEtox - The UNEP-SETAC toxicity model: recommended characterisation factors for human toxicity and freshwater ecotoxicity in Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.

    2010-01-01

    characterisation factors (CFs) is within a factor of 100-variation between the CFs of each model respectively. Thebeen used to calculate CFs for several thousand substances

  9. Application of powder metallurgy techniques for the development of non-toxic ammunition. Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowden, R.; Kelly, R.

    1997-05-30

    The purpose of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and Delta Frangible Ammunition (DFA), was to identify and evaluate composite materials for the development of small arms ammunition. Currently available small arms ammunition utilizes lead as the major component of the projectile. The introduction of lead into the environment by these projectiles when they are expended is a rapidly increasing environmental problem. At certain levels, lead is a toxic metal to the environment and a continual health and safety concern for firearm users as well as those who must conduct lead recovery operations from the environment. DFA is a leading supplier of high-density mixtures, which will be used to replace lead-based ammunition in specific applications. Current non-lead ammunition has several limitations that prevent it from replacing lead-based ammunition in many applications (such as applications that require ballistics, weapon recoil, and weapon function identical to that of lead-based ammunition). The purpose of the CRADA was to perform the research and development to identify cost-effective materials to be used in small arms ammunition that eventually will be used in commercially viable, environmentally conscious, non-lead, frangible and/or non-frangible, ammunition.

  10. Environmental contamination is an unfortunate side effect of the conveniences humans are accustomed to. Perflourinated compounds,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    Environmental contamination is an unfortunate side effect of the conveniences humans are accustomed. By assessing the predatory cues researchers can measure the degree of contamination. Dr. Anderson TOXICITY and Mosquitofish, the team focuses on the exposure pathway of PFC's. "The sites where PFC contamination exists

  11. Using urinary biomarkers to elucidate dose-related patterns of human benzene metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Using urinary biomarkers to elucidate dose-related patterns of human benzene metabolism Sungkyoon; Fax: ž1 919 966 0521; Email: stephen_rappaport@unc.edu Although the toxicity of benzene has been, particularly at low levels of exposure. We investigated unmetabolized benzene in urine (UBz) and all major

  12. Women's Health - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    other materials pertaining to women's health that you can download. Related Links: Women: Stay Healthy at Any Age Women and Heart Disease Prevention Last Updated 09022014 2:44 PM...

  13. The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer Epidemiology Factsheet environmental health,case-control,andcohortstudiesandare designedtotesthypothesesregardingthefactorsthatcauseadisease. Board of Health Actions · EncourageenvironmentalhealthpersonneltobecomefamiliarwiththesystemsDefenseScorecards.Availableatwww.scorecard.org · Friis,R.(2007).EnvironmentalEpidemiology.InEssentials of Environmental Health. · NationalAssociationofLocalBoardsofHealth

  14. Introduction to Health Services Research Population Health 796

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    1 Introduction to Health Services Research Population Health 796 University of Wisconsin used in the field of health service research. What is health services research? Health services researchers focus on some of the most complex and challenging issues currently affecting health care

  15. Principles of Population Health Science Population Health 795

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    1 Principles of Population Health Science Population Health 795 A course in the Program in Population Health Fall 2011 University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health OVERVIEW Despite significant advances in medicine and public health, inequities in health persist. Understanding

  16. Health Insurance after Graduation Individual Health Insurance in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    1 April 2010 Health Insurance after Graduation Individual Health Insurance in California Kathy Gage University of California, Berkeley Student Health Insurance Office Berkeley Law Presentation Spring Semester 2010 Health Care vs. Health Insurance Health Care is... Provision of Medical Services by · Private

  17. Organic ligands reduce copper toxicity in Pseudomonas syringae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azenha, M.; Vasconcelos, M.T.; Cabral, J.P.S.

    1995-03-01

    Pseudomonas syringae cells were exposed to 100 {mu}M copper alone, or to previously equilibrated copper sulfate-ligand solutions. Ligand concentrations were determined experimentally as those that reduced the free copper concentration to 5 {mu}M (determined with a Cu{sup 2+}-selective electrode). These values were in agreement with those calculated by computational equilibrium simulation based on published stability constants. Exposure of P. syringae cells to copper sulfate, chloride, or nitrate resulted in similar high mortality, suggesting that copper was responsible for cell death. Acetate, succinate, proline, lysine, cysteine, and EDTA significantly reduced both the amount of copper bound to the cells and cell death, indicating that not only strong chelating agents but also weak and moderate copper ligands can effectively antagonize copper toxicity. However, cysteine and EDTA were considerably more effective than acetate, succinate, proline, and lysine, indicating that copper toxicity is not simply a function of free copper concentration but depends on the nature of the ligand. The results suggested that a significant fraction of copper bound to acetate, succinate, proline, or lysine was displaced to the bacteria or, alternatively, mixed copper-ligand-cell complexes could be formed. On the contrary, none of these phenomena occurred for the copper complexes with cysteine or EDTA.

  18. Microbial stabilization and mass reduction of wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Gillow, J.B.

    1991-09-10

    A process is provided to treat wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals with Clostridium sp. BFGl to release a large fraction of the waste solids into solution and convert the radionuclides and toxic metals to a more concentrated and stable form with concurrent volume and mass reduction. The radionuclides and toxic metals being in a more stable form are available for recovery, recycling and disposal. 18 figures.

  19. Toxicity of polychlorinated diphenyl ethers in Hydra attenuata and in rat whole embryo culture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Marion Carol

    1991-01-01

    TOXICITY OF CHLORINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS IN HYDRA . . 34 Materials and Methods Results Discussion 36 37 43 IV EXPERIMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF CHLORINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS IN THE RAT, 46 Materials and Methods Results Discussion... and little is known about their potential for causing developmental defects. Because the PCDEs are closely related to the chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and the PCBs, it is of interest to review studies conducted to determine the developmental toxicity...

  20. Is lead toxicity still a risk to U.S. children?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heneman, Karrie M.; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

    2006-01-01

    in children with blood lead concentrations below 10 microgchocolate pieces monitoring of lead levels Milk chocolatethe risk Candy-coated of lead toxicity from these chocolate

  1. Bacterial chemotaxis towards the extracellular products of the toxic phytoplankton Heterosigma akashiwo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Roman

    Marine bacteria exhibit positive chemotactic responses to the extracellular exudates of the toxic phytoplankton Heterosigma akashiwo. In the environment, this will support bacteria–algae associations with potential ...

  2. Pentose fermentation of normally toxic lignocellulose prehydrolysate with strain of Pichia stipitis yeast using air

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keller, Jr., Fred A. (Lakewood, CO); Nguyen, Quang A. (Golden, CO)

    2002-01-01

    Strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis NPw9 (ATCC PTA-3717) useful for the production of ethanol using oxygen for growth while fermenting normally toxic lignocellulosic prehydrolysates.

  3. Health YorkU? Kinesiology & Health Science | Psychology | Nursing | Global Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Why choose Health YorkU? Kinesiology & Health Science | Psychology | Nursing | Global Health Health Studies (Management, Policy, Informatics, Health Studies) @ #12;State-of-the-Art Labs and Facilities #12;Real World Experience #12;Great Student Experience #12;Here's Why More course selections in Health than

  4. KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prohaska, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    in the generation of human power, where energy is gained byparticipant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "by muscle-power and chemical processes of human bodies. For

  5. Structural Health Monitoring Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SHMTools SHMTools is a MATLAB package that facilitates the construction of structural health monitoring (SHM) processes. The package provides a set of functions or- ganized into...

  6. Structural Health Monitoring Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Figueiredo, E., Park, G., Figueiras, J., Farrar, C., & Worden, K. (2009). Structural Health Monitoring Algorithm Comparisons using Standard Data Sets. Los Alamos National...

  7. Structural Health Monitoring Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Figueiredo, E., Park, G., Figueiras, J., Farrar, C., and Worden, K. (2009). Structural Health Monitoring Algorithm Comparisons Using Standard Datasets, Los Alamos National...

  8. Mechanisms of toxicity and carcinogenicity of three alkylanilines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Hsiao-Lan Patty

    2006-01-01

    Alkyl-substituted anilines have been implicated as important etiological agents in human carcinogenesis. Specifically, 2,6-dimethylaniline (2,6-DMA), 3,5-dimethylaniline (3,5-DMA), and 3-ethylaniline (3EA) have been ...

  9. Functional genomics of a non-toxic Alexandrium lusitanicum culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martins, Claudia A

    2007-01-01

    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) is a human intoxication associated with the consumption of shellfish contaminated with a family of neurotoxins called saxitoxins. Many species in the dinoflagellate genus Alexandrium ...

  10. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy for Cervical and Endometrial Cancer: A Prospective Report on Toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandecasteele, Katrien, E-mail: Katrien.Vandecasteele@uzgent.be [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Tummers, Philippe; Makar, Amin [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Eijkeren, Marc van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Delrue, Louke [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Denys, Hannelore [Department of Medical Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Lambert, Bieke [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Beerens, Anne-Sophie [Department of Pathology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Pathology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Van den Broecke, Rudy [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Lambein, Kathleen [Department of Pathology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Pathology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Fonteyne, Valerie; De Meerleer, Gert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To report on toxicity after postoperative intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) for cervical (CC) and endometrial cancer (EC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-four CC and 41 EC patients were treated with postoperative IMAT. If indicated, para-aortic lymph node irradiation (preventive or when affected, PALN) and/or concomitant cisplatin (40 mg/m Superscript-Two , weekly) was administered. The prescribed dose for IMAT was 45 Gy (CC, 25 fractions) and 46 Gy (EC, 23 fractions), followed by a brachytherapeutic boost if possible. Radiation-related toxicity was assessed prospectively. The effect of concomitant cisplatin and PALN irradiation was evaluated. Results: Regarding acute toxicity (n = 65), Grade 3 and 2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity was observed in zero and 63% of patients (79% CC, 54% EC), respectively. Grade 3 and 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was observed in 1% and 18% of patients, respectively. Grade 2 (21%) and 3 (12%) hematologic toxicity (n = 41) occurred only in CC patients. Seventeen percent of CC patients and 2% of EC patients experienced Grade 2 fatigue and skin toxicity, respectively. Adding cisplatin led to an increase in Grade >2 nausea (57% vs. 9%; p = 0.01), Grade 2 nocturia (24% vs. 4%; p = 0.03), Grade {>=}2 hematologic toxicity (38% vs. nil, p = 0.003), Grade {>=}2 leukopenia (33% vs. nil, p = 0.009), and a strong trend toward more fatigue (14% vs. 2%; p = 0.05). Para-aortic lymph node irradiation led to an increase of Grade 2 nocturia (31% vs. 4%, p = 0.008) and a strong trend toward more Grade >2 nausea (44% vs. 18%; p = 0.052). Regarding late toxicity (n = 45), no Grade 3 or 4 late toxicity occurred. Grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity, genitourinary toxicity, and fatigue occurred in 4%, 9%, and 1% of patients. Neither concomitant cisplatin nor PALN irradiation increased late toxicity rates. Conclusions: Postoperative IMAT for EC or CC is associated with low acute and late toxicity. Concomitant chemotherapy and PALN irradiation influences acute but not late toxicity.

  11. Identification of toxic components in beechwood and petroleum creosotes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okaygun, Mehmet S.

    1988-01-01

    of potential human mutagens. Bacteria have different absorption and metabolism mechanisms than ~s and these factors may alter mutagenic response in a mammal compared to bacteria. CHAPTER II LITERATURE REVIEW A. Properties of Petroleum Creosote Petroleum... tests could be also used for screening the potential mu- tagens but these are generaUy microbial assays which indicate bacterial mutagenicity rather than human mutagenicity. Bacteria are procaryotes and differ from mammals in many ways, like...

  12. Human-machine interactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM); Abbott, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Brannon, Nathan G. (Albuquerque, NM); Bernard, Michael L. (Tijeras, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  13. Method and apparatus for diagnosis of lead toxicity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosen, John F. (Riverside, CT); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Bayside, NY); Wielopolski, Lucian (Shirley, NY)

    1989-01-01

    Improved methods and apparatus for in vivo measurement of the skeletal lead burden of a patient and for diagnosis of lead toxicity are disclosed. The apparatus comprises an x-ray tube emitting soft low energy x-rays from a silver anode, a polarizer for polarizing the emitted x-rays, and a detector for detecting photons fluoresced from atoms in the patient's tibia upon irradiation by the polarized x-rays. The fluoresced photons are spectrally analyzed to determine their energy distribution. Peaks indicating the presence of lead are identified if the patient has relatively high bone lead content. The data may be compared to data recorded with respect to a similar test performed on patients having also had the conventional EDTA chelation tests performed thereon in order to correlate the test results with respect to a particular patient to the conventionally accepted EDTA chelation test.

  14. Catalytic oxidation of VOC`s and air toxics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lassen, M.A.; Chu, W. [Johnson Matthey, Wayne, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Catalytic oxidation for VOC control of stationary sources has been in use since the 1940`s for energy recovery and odor control. Widespread use of catalytic oxidation, as a means for controlling emissions began in earnest in the early 1970`s with the passage of the Clean Air Act of 1970. Since that time, catalytic technology has undergone many improvements and advancements. Some of these include higher destruction efficiencies at lower temperatures, poison resistance, enhanced durability and the ability to effectively control halogenated hydrocarbon compounds. This is particularly important for meeting the Title III requirements, since many of the air toxics regulated under Title III are halogenated VOC`s. This paper will describe catalytic oxidation, how it works, its benefits and limitations, its cost relative to thermal, and describe recent technology advances.

  15. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Resources The Human Resources team is fully integrated with Jefferson Lab's mission, committed to providing quality customer service based on expertise, innovation and...

  16. Building Toxic Metal Characterization and Decontamination Report: Area 6, Building 914

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Industrial Hygiene

    2011-08-15

    The purpose of this report is to outline the toxic metal characterization and decontamination efforts in Area 6, Building 914. This includes the initial building inspection, the hotspot sampling, results/findings, building cleanup, and the verification sampling. Building 914 is a steel light frame building that was constructed in 1992. It is about 16,454 square feet, and five employees are assigned to this building. According to the building's floor plan blueprints, it could be inferred that this building was once a Wiremen/Lineman shop. In 2002-2004, the National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office embarked on a broad characterization of beryllium (Be) surface concentrations throughout the North Las Vegas Facility, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), and ancillary facilities like the Special Technologies Laboratory, Remote Sensing Laboratory, etc. Building 914 was part of this characterization. The results of the 2002 study illustrated that the metal housekeeping limits were within acceptable limits and from a Be standpoint, the building was determined to be fit for occupancy. On March 2, 2011, based on a request from Building 914 users, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) Industrial Hygiene (IH) collected bulk samples from the southwest corner of Building 914 at heights above 6 feet where black dust had been noticed on this particular wall. IH conducted surface swipe sampling of the area and analyzed the samples for toxic metals, namely, beryllium (Be), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), and manganese (Mn). The sample results indicated values two to four times above the housekeeping threshold for Be, Cd, Cr, Pb, and Mn. Subsequently, the facility was closed and posted; the necessary personnel were notified; and controls were instituted for ingress and egress of the building. On March 17, 2011, IH performed an extensive sampling event involving the entire warehouse in accordance with NSTec Organization Procedure OP-P250.004, Sampling Procedures. Analysis of the results from this exercise illustrated that toxic metal contamination was ubiquitous throughout the warehouse section of this building but did not extend into the office, restroom, and break room areas. On March 22, 2011, a planning meeting was held with Environment, Safety, Health & Quality management; Operations & Infrastructure (O&I) mangement; Facility Management; Occupational Medicine; O&I Operations; and IH. After a brief discussion concerning the salient facts of the surface sample results, it was agreed that the facility and its contents required cleaning. The facility would then be re-sampled to verify cleanliness and suitability for re-occupancy. On April 18, 2011, warehouse cleanup activites began. On July 5, 2011, upon receipt of the results from the last cleaned section, the cleanup operations were concluded. The building was statistically determined to be clean; thus, it could be reoccupied and the warehouse operations could resume immediately.

  17. College of Health and Human Sciences Student Services Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    , GEOL 1340, Or PHYS 1149 COMM 1110 Or CISM 1120/1110 PSYC 1101 Or SOCI 1101 Child Development Emphasis Services Center Hrs. CISM 1120 2 CISM 1110 1 ENGL 1101 None 3 2 HIST 2110 3 2 3 Area E Elective None 3 CHFD

  18. College of Health and Human Sciences Student Services Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    , ANTH 1102, BIOL 2107, BIOL 2108, CHFD 2135, CISM 1120/1110, COMM 2332, CRJU 1100, GEOG 1101, GEOG 1130

  19. College of Health and Human Sciences Student Services Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    (3 hrs.) Family Services Emphasis COMM 1110 Or CISM 1120/1110 PSYC 1101 Or SOCI 1101 Family Services Student Services Center Hrs. CISM 1120 2 CISM 1110 1 ENGL 1101 None 3 2 HIST 2110 3 2 3 Area E Elective Five Fall CHFD 2130 Department approval See list on CHHS website CHFD 3135 None FACS 4132 Or CISM None

  20. College of Health and Human Sciences Student Services Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    , CISM 1120/1110, COMM 2332, CRJU 1100, GEOG 1101, GEOG 1130, MMJ 2331, POLS 2101, PSYC 1101, PUBH 2130

  1. College of Health and Human Sciences Student Services Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    2030, ANTH 1102, BIOL 2107, BIOL 2108, CHFD 2135, CISM 1120/1110, COMM 2332, CRJU 1100, GEOG 1101, GEOG

  2. College of Health and Human Sciences Student Services Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    2108, CHFD 2135, CISM 1120/1110, COMM 2332, CRJU 1100, GEOG 1101, GEOG 1130, MMJ 2331, POLS 2101, PSYC Sciences Student Services Center Hrs. CISM 1120 2 CISM 1110 1 ENGL 1101 None 3 2 HLTH 1520 None 2 3 POLS

  3. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    USA. Frischknecht R (2005). Ecoinvent data v1.1: From626-630. Frischknecht R (2005). Ecoinvent data v1.1: Fromchapter Frischknecht R (2005). Ecoinvent data v1.1: From

  4. Development of human brain connectivity in health and disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colby, John Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    LInsC LFrntlOpC LIFGpt LMFG LHG(HaH LSTGad LPlP LPOC LCOCLInsC LFrntlOpC LIFGpt LMFG LHG(HaH LSTGad LPlP LPOC LCOCRTFCpd q LMTGtp q q LLOCid LHG(HaH q LOcP q LPlP q LHpp LTmP

  5. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    coal) Electricity (natural gas) Electricity (California mix ) Electricity (UCTE mix ) Electricity (Mex ico mix ) Electricity (Canada

  6. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    Technology change and environmental management for cement manufacturing:Technology change and environmental management for cement manufacturing.

  7. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    schemes adopted in life-cycle assessment, such as archetypeshealth response in life-cycle assessment using ED10s andglobal warming in life-cycle assessment based on damages to

  8. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride 1,3-Butadiene Methomyl Acephate5.3E-04 5.2E-04 2.8E-04 1,3-Butadiene 3.9E-12 9.7E-12 3.5E-Chemical CHLOROETHANE HEXACHLORO-1,3- BUTADIENE ACETONITRILE

  9. Human mouth microbes provide insight into health, disease | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SR1 and other bacteria because they use a different genetic alphabet. "In the big pool of bacteria, genes can be exchanged between species and can contribute to increased...

  10. Bioanalysis of Pteroyl Derivatives in Various Aspects of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Haandel, Leon

    2010-11-29

    This dissertation describes the development of bioanalytical strategies for a group of experimental and known therapeutic agents and chemically related essential substances. The array of analytes include the antifolate ...

  11. U.S. Department of Health and Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, asthma, low self-esteem, isolation, eating disorders, and more Helping children helps our families. #12;4 Why the increase? Multiple causes Lifestyle

  12. Development of human brain connectivity in health and disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colby, John Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    decreases in cortical thick- ness (discussed later) may beand total z slab thick- ness, subject positioning issues

  13. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    Proctor D (2001). How much fly ash. Concrete Constructionash material: A novel fly ash-based cement. Environ Sci2007. TFHRC (2005). Coal fly ash. Turner Fairbank Highway

  14. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    seen as a co-product of coal-fired power plants, using flyet al. 1998), 70% to 95% (coal fired power station with flueof electricity in a coal-fired power plant This process

  15. Development of human brain connectivity in health and disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colby, John Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    153 Automatically-generated HTML QC report for along-tract461(7266), 983–6. [doi] [html] 32. Casey B. J. , Cohen J.of America 96(18), 10422–7. [html] 48. Cooke B. M. (2006).

  16. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    mainly by coughing, sneezing, and close contact. Anyone can get flu. Flu strikes suddenly and can last · cough · headache · runny or stuffy nose Flu can also lead to pneumonia and blood infections, and cause: · soreness, redness, or swelling where the shot was given · hoarseness · sore, red or itchy eyes · cough

  17. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    be extrapolated (e.g. , coal power-plants generally involve89% (United States coal power plant average - Frischknechtelectricity from a coal power plant (Electricity), crude oil

  18. SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK College of Health & Human Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    . Organizational Policy change processes 3. Vulnerable Populations a. African American teens and families b exchange trip brings students to the Lakota Reservation in collaboration with Sinte Gleska University Lakota Studies Department. #12;· A member of the North Carolina Child Welfare Collaborative, which offers

  19. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    schemes adopted in life-cycle assessment, such as archetypeshealth response in life-cycle assessment using ED10s andmanagement: Life-cycle assessment: Principles and framework.

  20. Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I DueBETO Quiz - InteractiveDepartment ofand

  1. Re-Visiting Health Informatics What is Health Informatics?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    Re-Visiting Health Informatics HINF1100 Fall 2008 #12;What is Health Informatics? · Health the effective organization, analysis, management and use of health information to improve the delivery and practice of healthcare · Health Informatics is the study of applying information and technology to improve

  2. GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN PUBLIC HEALTH Master of Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN PUBLIC HEALTH Master of Public Health Graduate Certificate of Public Health and Public Health Sciences Wayne State University School of Medicine September 2011 Accredited by: #12;_____________________________Graduate Programs in Public Health 2011-2012___________________________ Page 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS

  3. Health Information Systems for Primary Health Care: Thinking About Participation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahay, Sundeep

    Health Information Systems for Primary Health Care: Thinking About Participation Elaine Byrne in supporting primary health care functioning, the design, development and implementation of these systems of complexity in the primary health system make the task of design, development and use of IS for primary health

  4. Health Sciences Allied health professionals change lives every day.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    Committed To A Brighter Tomorrow College of Health Sciences #12;Allied health professionals change, hospital or clinic, chances are your life will be impacted by a health sciences professional. Health sciences, or allied health, professionals come from many diverse disciplines. There are more than 200

  5. Public Health Principles and Practice Population Health Sciences 780

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Public Health Principles and Practice Population Health Sciences 780 Fall 2011 This course examines population-based approaches to improve the health of the public. The focus will be on learning methods for community health improvement--from assessment to finding and implementing evidence based public health

  6. Public Health Genomics Population Health Sciences 650 Section 023

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Public Health Genomics Population Health Sciences 650 Section 023 Summer 2009, 07/20/09 ­ 07: Public health genomics is a new discipline that uses knowledge gained from genetic and molecular research and improve the health of the population often by enacting health services, programs, and policies

  7. Health and Safety Policy Statement4 Health and Safety Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    Health and Safety Policy Statement4 Health and Safety Policy Statement UnIVERSITY OF LEEDS-based health and safety management system and workplace health framework, and by allocating the resources as a minimum l the development of a health and safety management framework based upon the University protocols

  8. New Health Insurance Marketplace Coverage Options and Your Health Coverage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yi

    New Health Insurance Marketplace Coverage Options and Your Health Coverage PART A: General Information When key parts of the health care law take effect in 2014, there will be a new way to buy health insurance: the Health Insurance Marketplace. To assist you as you evaluate options for you and your family

  9. www.btny.purdue.edu/weedscience/ Poison Hemlock The Toxic Parsnip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    www.btny.purdue.edu/weedscience/ Poison Hemlock ­ The Toxic Parsnip We often get questions about wild carrot (Daucus carota L.) only to find out that the question is actually about poison hemlock (Conium maculatum L.). Although these two plants may look similar, poison hemlock is toxic to cattle

  10. Screening Methods to Develop Alfalfa Germplasms Tolerant of Acid, Aluminum Toxic Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    Screening Methods to Develop Alfalfa Germplasms Tolerant of Acid, Aluminum Toxic Soils M. Dall'Agnol, J. H. Bouton,* and W. A. Parrott ABSTRACT Soil acidity and aluminum (Al)toxicity are major problems different screening methods for selection of acid soil tolerant alfalfa germplasms in the greenhouse during

  11. ACCELERATED COMMUNICATION Aspects of Dioxin Toxicity Are Mediated by Interleukin 1-Like

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradfield, Christopher A.

    ACCELERATED COMMUNICATION Aspects of Dioxin Toxicity Are Mediated by Interleukin 1-Like Cytokines, 2005 ABSTRACT Exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin) re- sults in a broad spectrum of toxic effects. Most, if not all, of these responses are dependent upon the binding of dioxin to the aryl

  12. Modulation of the Toxicity and Macromolecular Binding of Benzene Metabolites by NAD(P)H:Quinone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Articles Modulation of the Toxicity and Macromolecular Binding of Benzene Metabolites by NAD, San Francisco, California 94143-0560 Received April 17, 1998 Benzene is oxidized in the liver of benzene metabolite toxicity. NQO1 expression reduced a class of hydroquinone- and benzenetriol-induced DNA

  13. HEALTH CARE ASSOCIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    to meet the specific needs of your organization and to better inform your board members, senior management.g., Health Systems CFG, Home Health CFG, Pharmaceutical CFG, etc. The CFG's will provide an appropriate Chair, Drafting Committee Chairman, HCCA Pharmaceutical Compliance Focus Group HCCA Board Member HCCA

  14. Generic report on health effects for the US Gaseous Diffusion Plants. Sect. 8, Pt. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Just, R.A.; Emler, V.S.

    1984-06-01

    Toxic substances present in uranium enrichment plants include uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/), hydrogen fluoride (HF), uranyl fluoride (UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/), chlorine (Cl/sub 2/), chlorine trifluoride (ClF/sub 3/), fluorine (F/sub 2/), uranium tetrafluoride (UF/sub 4/), and technetium (Tc). The current knowledge of the expected health effects of acute exposures to these substances is described. 10 references, 2 figures, 6 tables. (ACR)

  15. Field Validation of Toxicity Tests to Evaluate the Potential for Beneficial Use of Produced Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Bidwell; Jonathan Fisher; Naomi Cooper

    2008-03-31

    This study investigated potential biological effects of produced water contamination derived from occasional surface overflow and possible subsurface intrusion at an oil production site along the shore of Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. We monitored basic chemistry and acute toxicity to a suite of standard aquatic test species (fathead minnow-Pimephales promelas, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia) in produced water and in samples taken from shallow groundwater wells on the site. Toxicity identification evaluations and ion toxicity modeling were used to identify toxic constituents in the samples. Lake sediment at the oil production site and at a reference site were also analyzed for brine intrusion chemically and by testing sediment toxicity using the benthic invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus, and Hyallela azteca. Sediment quality was also assessed with in situ survival and growth studies with H. azteca and the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, and by benthic macroinvertebrate community sampling. The produced water was acutely toxic to the aquatic test organisms at concentrations ranging from 1% to 10% of the whole produced water sample. Toxicity identification evaluation and ion toxicity modeling indicated major ion salts and hydrocarbons were the primary mixture toxicants. The standardized test species used in the laboratory bioassays exhibited differences in sensitivity to these two general classes of contaminants, which underscores the importance of using multiple species when evaluating produced water toxicity. Toxicity of groundwater was greater in samples from wells near a produced water injection well and an evaporation pond. Principle component analyses (PCA) of chemical data derived from the groundwater wells indicated dilution by lake water and possible biogeochemical reactions as factors that ameliorated groundwater toxicity. Elevated concentrations of major ions were found in pore water from lake sediments, but toxicity from these ions was limited to sediment depths of 10 cm or greater, which is outside of the primary zone of biological activity. Further, exposure to site sediments did not have any effects on test organisms, and macroinvertebrate communities did not indicate impairment at the oil production site as compared to a reference site. In situ experiments with H. azteca and C. fluminea, indicated a sublethal site effect (on growth of both species), but these could not be definitively linked with produced water infiltration. Severe weather conditions (drought followed by flooding) negatively influenced the intensity of lake sampling aimed at delineating produced water infiltration. Due to the lack of clear evidence of produced water infiltration into the sub-littoral zone of the lake, it was not possible to assess whether the laboratory bioassays of produced water effectively indicate risk in the receiving system. However, the acutely toxic nature of the produced water and general lack of biological effects in the lake at the oil production site suggest minimal to no produced water infiltration into surficial lake sediments and the near-shore water column. This study was able to demonstrate the utility of ion toxicity modeling to support data from toxicity identification evaluations aimed at identifying key toxic constituents in produced water. This information could be used to prioritize options for treating produced water in order to reduce toxic constituents and enhance options for reuse. The study also demonstrated how geographic information systems, toxicity modeling, and toxicity assessment could be used to facilitate future site assessments.

  16. Electronic Health Information Literacy: An Investigation of the Electronic Health Information Knowledge and Skills of Health Education Majors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanik, Bruce Walter

    2012-07-16

    Health educators are expected to serve as resource of health knowledge and being e-health literate enable health educators to perform that function. However, the e-health literacy level of health education undergraduate students is rarely explored...

  17. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP while demonstrating the ICCT CT-121 FGD Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-16

    The US Department of Energy is performing comprehensive assessments of toxic emissions from eight selected coal-fired electric utility units. This program responds to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which require the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to evaluate emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from electric utility power plants for Potential health risks. The resulting data will be furnished to EPA utility power plants and health risk determinations. The assessment of emissions involves the collection and analysis of samples from the major input, process, and output streams of each of the eight power plants for selected hazardous Pollutants identified in Title III of the Clean Air Act. Additional goals are to determine the removal efficiencies of pollution control subsystems for these selected pollutants and the Concentrations associated with the particulate fraction of the flue gas stream as a function of particle size. Material balances are being performed for selected pollutants around the entire power plant and several subsystems to identify the fate of hazardous substances in each utility system. Radian Corporation was selected to perform a toxics assessment at a plant demonstrating an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project. The site selected is Plant Yates Unit No. 1 of Georgia Power Company, which includes a Chiyoda Thoroughbred-121 demonstration project.

  18. A Heart Health Alaska Natives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jun

    Honoring the Gift of Heart Health A Heart Health Educator's Manual for Alaska Natives U . S . D E Health Service Office of Prevention, Education, and Control #12;Honoring the Gift of Heart Health A Heart National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Indian Health Service NIH Publication No. 06-5218 Revised

  19. A Heart Health American Indians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jun

    Honoring the Gift of Heart Health A Heart Health Educator's Manual for American Indians U . S . D E Health Service Office of Prevention, Education, and Control #12;Honoring the Gift of Heart Health A Heart National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Indian Health Service NIH Publication No. 06-5218 Revised

  20. Environmental Public Health Performance Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Public Health Performance Standards (Version 2.0) Updated May 2014 National Center for Environmental Health Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services #12;#12;Environmental Public Health Performance Standards (Version 2.0) Updated May 2014 #12;Environmental Public Health Performance Standards

  1. Health risk from earthquake caused releases of UF{sub 6} at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, N.W; Lu, S.; Chen, J.C.; Roehnelt, R.; Lombardi, D.

    1998-05-01

    The health risk to the public and workers from potential exposure to the toxic materials from earthquake caused releases of uranium hexafluoride from the Paducah gaseous Diffusion Plant are evaluated. The results of the study show that the health risk from earthquake caused releases is small, and probably less than risks associated with the transportation of hydrogen fluoride and other similar chemicals used by industry. The probability of more than 30 people experiencing health consequences (injuries) from earthquake damage is less than 4xlO{sup 4}/yr.

  2. Health Status and Health Literacy in Older Adults 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulton, Daphne Saxon

    2014-08-04

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between health literacy and the health status of older adults. The first section of the study consisted of a comprehensive literature review of prior research regarding cognitive, health, and behavioral...

  3. Health Fairs and Screenings - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    health fair schedule(s) on the right regarding health fairs in your area. Contact Health Education Services at 376-3939 or OMCHEW@rl.gov for questionscomment Related Links: Sept...

  4. Evaluation of Mental Health Emergency Preparedness Among Health Professionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ablah, Elizabeth; Hawley, Suzanne; Konda, Kurt M.; Wolfe, Deborah; Cook, David J.

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify if health professionals report an increase in mental health preparedness abilities with having only two mental health components as part of a 2-day preparedness training conference. ...

  5. Center for Energy and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    environmental sciences major #12;Human Health Mercury, lead, air pollutants, pes- ticides, plastics, copper- ogy program; to promote studies on the effects of environmental pollutants and toxicants

  6. human spaceflight and operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anand, Mahesh

    1 human spaceflight and operations Lunar Lander human spaceflight and operations #12;2 human cooperation in exploration prim ary objective opportunity for investigations #12;3 human spaceflight No RHUs LANDING SITE South Polar Reliant on Solar Power generation + conventional thermal control LAUNCHER

  7. Bioactivation of myelotoxic xenobiotics by human neutrophil myeloperoxidase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    Many environmental pollutants and drugs are toxic to the bone marrow. Some of these xenobiotics may initiate toxicity after undergoing bioactivation to free radicals and/or other reactive electrophiles. Peroxidases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the one-electron oxidative bioactivation of a variety of xenobiotics in vitro. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a peroxidative enzyme found in very high concentration in the neutrophils of human bone marrow. In this study, human MPO was evaluated to determine its ability to catalyze the in vitro bioactivation of known bone marrow toxicants that contain the aromatic hydroxyl (Ar-OH), aromatic amine (Ar-N-R{sub 2}), or heterocyclic tertiary amine ({double bond}N-R) moieties. The formation of free radical metabolites during the MPO-catalyzed bioactivation of hydroquinone and catechol (benzene metabolites), mitoxantrone and ametantrone (antitumor drugs), and chlorpromazine and promazine (antipsychotic drugs) was demonstrated by EPR spectroscopy. The reactivity of the products formed during the MPO catalyzed bioactivation of ({sup 14}C)hydroquinone and ({sup 14}C)catechol was shown by their covalent binding to protein and DNA in vitro. The covalently binding metabolite in each case is postulated to be the quinone form of the xenobiotic. In addition, both GSH and NADH were oxidized by the reactive intermediate(s) formed during the MPO-catalyzed bioactivation of many of the bone marrow toxicants tested. It was also shown that p,p-biphenol stimulated the MPO catalyzed bioactivation of both hydroquinone and catechol, while p-cresol stimulated the MPO-catalyzed bioactivation of catechol.

  8. Board of Health Recommendations for Hiring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    seek to assess their community's environmental health needs, develop policies and programs to meetBoard of Health Recommendations for Hiring Qualified Environmental Health Practitioners environmental health #12;Board of Health Recommendations for Hiring Qualified Environmental Health

  9. West Virginia University 1 Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 Public Health Degrees Offered: Master of Public Health · Biostatistics · Epidemiology · Health Policy, Management and Leadership · Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences · Social and Behavioral Sciences Master of Public Health (Online) Master of Science · School Health

  10. Evaluation and Interconversion of Various Indicator PCB Schemes for PCB and Dioxin-Like PCB Toxic Equivalent Levels in Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arhonditsis, George B.

    Evaluation and Interconversion of Various Indicator PCB Schemes for PCB and Dioxin-Like PCB ToxicPCB schemes in estimating total of PCB congeners (PCB) and dioxin-like PCB toxic equivalent (dl

  11. Health Care at the Crossroads: Health Experiences and Perceived Health Access Among Emancipated Foster Youth in Alameda County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Anika A

    2007-01-01

    different and their special health care needs. " PrimPediatrics (2002). "Health of Young Children in Foster2005). Fostering Health: Health Care for Children and

  12. Health News & InsideOut Newsletter - HPMC Occupational Health...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Newsletter Newsletter & Updates Health News & InsideOut Newsletter Emerging Infectious Diseases Pandemic Preparedness Progress on Childhood Obesity in Washington State Health News...

  13. Roadmap: Public Health Health Services Administration Bachelor of Science in Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Public Health ­ Health Services Administration ­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-HSVA] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 10-Apr-12/LNHD This roadmap One: [16 Credit Hours] PH 10001 Introduction to Public Health 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State

  14. Roadmap: Public Health Global Health Bachelor of Science in Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Public Health ­ Global Health­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-GLHL] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 24-Apr-2013/LNHD This roadmap One: [14 Credit Hours] PH 10001 Introduction to Public Health 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State

  15. Roadmap: Public Health Health Services Administration Bachelor of Science in Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Public Health ­ Health Services Administration ­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-HSVA] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 29-May-13/LNHD This roadmap One: [16 Credit Hours] PH 10001 Introduction to Public Health 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State

  16. Woods for Health Strategy Woods for Health Strategy | 32 | Woods for Health Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategy Woods for Health #12;Woods for Health Strategy Woods for Health Strategy | 32 | Woods for Health Strategy Foreword Like the rest of the western world, Scotland experiences growing rates a key role in helping to promote better physical and mental health for all by providing greenspace

  17. HEALTH SCIENCES www.wits.ac.za/health The Faculty of Health Sciences has

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Stephan

    41 HEALTH SCIENCES www.wits.ac.za/health #12;42 The Faculty of Health Sciences has an outstanding Lorna Jacklin, winner of the Checkers-Shoprite Woman of the Year in 2008 in the category of Health) · Bachelor of Health Sciences - BHSc: (3 years) (there are two plans - Biomedical Sciences and Biokinetics

  18. UNITED STATES ARMY HEALTH PROFESSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    UNITED STATES ARMY HEALTH PROFESSIONS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM IN MEDICINE, DENTISTRY, VETERINARY MEDICINE, OPTOMETRY, CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY AND NURSE ANESTHESIA WHAT IS THE ARMY'S HEALTH PROFESSIONS care field. It's called the F. Edward Hebert Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship Program (HPSP

  19. CAPACITY BUILDING ACTIVITIES Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    CAPACITY BUILDING ACTIVITIES School of Public Health Dean Principal Investigator Community Advisory System Faculty & Students School of Public Health Faculty & Students Prince George's County Washington, D.C. Community Members Practitioners, Residents and Public Health Professionals Research Projects Forum (CAC

  20. Graduate Schools of the Health Professions that Use the Multiple Mini Interview (MMI), 9/14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Graduate Schools of the Health Professions that Use the Multiple Mini Interview (MMI), 9/14 MD of Medicine · Michigan State College of Human Medicine · New York Medical College · New York University