Sample records for human health risk

  1. Human Health Risk & Environmental Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the interplay between human health and environmental risks associated with energy production, hazardous waste, national security and natural disasters. Research findings...

  2. Assessing human health risk in the USDA forest service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, D.R. [Department of Agriculture-Forest Service, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper identifies the kinds of risk assessments being done by or for the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service. Summaries of data sources currently in use and the pesticide risk assessments completed by the agency or its contractors are discussed. An overview is provided of the agency`s standard operating procedures for the conduct of toxicological, ecological, environmental fate, and human health risk assessments.

  3. Estimated human health risks of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the contaminants` toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks.

  4. Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, Erica Dawn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk assessment procedures for mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present a problem due to the lack of available potency and toxicity data on mixtures and individual compounds. This study examines the toxicity of parent compound...

  5. EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK OF AERIAL ULTRA-LOW VOLUME APPLICATIONS OF PYRETHRINS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK OF AERIAL ULTRA-LOW VOLUME APPLICATIONS OF PYRETHRINS). A human health risk assessment conducted by Peterson et al. (2006) for truck-mounted ultra-low volume (ULV to epidemic levels and dispersed to all 58 counties in the state, and was associated with low

  6. Waste management programmatic environmental impact statement methodology for estimating human health risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergenback, B. [Midwest Technical, Inc. (United States); Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has produced large quantities of radioactive and hazardous waste during years of nuclear weapons production. As a result, a large number of sites across the DOE Complex have become chemically and/or radiologically contaminated. In 1990, the Secretary of Energy charged the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM) with the task of preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS should identify and assess the potential environmental impacts of implementing several integrated Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) alternatives. The determination and integration of appropriate remediation activities and sound waste management practices is vital for ensuring the diminution of adverse human health impacts during site cleanup and waste management programs. This report documents the PEIS risk assessment methodology used to evaluate human health risks posed by WM activities. The methodology presents a programmatic cradle to grave risk assessment for EM program activities. A unit dose approach is used to estimate risks posed by WM activities and is the subject of this document.

  7. assessing health risks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: SYLLABUS Introduction to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 SWES 418518 Time: Tuesday...

  8. assess health risks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: SYLLABUS Introduction to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 SWES 418518 Time: Tuesday...

  9. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

  10. assessing human risks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: SYLLABUS Introduction to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 SWES 418518 Time: Tuesday...

  11. Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

  12. The Health Risks: Seafood Contamination, Harmful Algal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    health products from the sea. What is the central issue? Why should I care? How will OHH researchThe Health Risks: Seafood Contamination, Harmful Algal Blooms and Polluted Beaches Seafood associated public health costs. Announcing a New Interagency Report on Oceans and Human Health Research

  13. Appendix F Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN RCD _WOMPOC:Human Health

  14. Approaches to advancing quantitative human health risk assessment of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Weihsueh A., E-mail: chiu.weihsueh@epa.gov [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC, 20460 (United States); Euling, Susan Y.; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Subramaniam, Ravi P. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC, 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The contribution of genomics and associated technologies to human health risk assessment for environmental chemicals has focused largely on elucidating mechanisms of toxicity, as discussed in other articles in this issue. However, there is interest in moving beyond hazard characterization to making more direct impacts on quantitative risk assessment (QRA) — i.e., the determination of toxicity values for setting exposure standards and cleanup values. We propose that the evolution of QRA of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era will involve three, somewhat overlapping phases in which different types of approaches begin to mature. The initial focus (in Phase I) has been and continues to be on “augmentation” of weight of evidence — using genomic and related technologies qualitatively to increase the confidence in and scientific basis of the results of QRA. Efforts aimed towards “integration” of these data with traditional animal-based approaches, in particular quantitative predictors, or surrogates, for the in vivo toxicity data to which they have been anchored are just beginning to be explored now (in Phase II). In parallel, there is a recognized need for “expansion” of the use of established biomarkers of susceptibility or risk of human diseases and disorders for QRA, particularly for addressing the issues of cumulative assessment and population risk. Ultimately (in Phase III), substantial further advances could be realized by the development of novel molecular and pathway-based biomarkers and statistical and in silico models that build on anticipated progress in understanding the pathways of human diseases and disorders. Such efforts would facilitate a gradual “reorientation” of QRA towards approaches that more directly link environmental exposures to human outcomes.

  15. Health effects of risk-assessment categories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, C.F.; Rybicka, K.; Knutson, A.; Morris, S.C.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and occupational health effects associated with exposures to various chemicals are a subject of increasing concern. One recently developed methodology for assessing the health impacts of various chemical compounds involves the classification of similar chemicals into risk-assessment categories (RACs). This report reviews documented human health effects for a broad range of pollutants, classified by RACs. It complements other studies that have estimated human health effects by RAC based on analysis and extrapolation of data from animal research.

  16. Essays on econometric modeling of subjective perceptions of risks in environment and human health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, To Ngoc

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    the estimator asymptotically unbiased and efficient. The third essay addresses the problem of modeling perceived mortality risks from arsenic concentrations in drinking water. I estimated a formal model that allows for ambiguity about risk. The empirical...

  17. Long-term fate of depleted uranium at Aberdeen and Yuma Proving Grounds: Human health and ecological risk assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebinger, M.H.; Beckman, R.J.; Myers, O.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kennedy, P.L.; Clements, W.; Bestgen, H.T. [Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate and long-term consequences of depleted uranium (DU) in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) and Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) for the Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) of the US Army. Specifically, we examined the potential for adverse radiological and toxicological effects to humans and ecosystems caused by exposure to DU at both installations. We developed contaminant transport models of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at APG and terrestrial ecosystems at YPG to assess potential adverse effects from DU exposure. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of the initial models showed the portions of the models that most influenced predicted DU concentrations, and the results of the sensitivity analyses were fundamental tools in designing field sampling campaigns at both installations. Results of uranium (U) isotope analyses of field samples provided data to evaluate the source of U in the environment and the toxicological and radiological doses to different ecosystem components and to humans. Probabilistic doses were estimated from the field data, and DU was identified in several components of the food chain at APG and YPG. Dose estimates from APG data indicated that U or DU uptake was insufficient to cause adverse toxicological or radiological effects. Dose estimates from YPG data indicated that U or DU uptake is insufficient to cause radiological effects in ecosystem components or in humans, but toxicological effects in small mammals (e.g., kangaroo rats and pocket mice) may occur from U or DU ingestion. The results of this study were used to modify environmental radiation monitoring plans at APG and YPG to ensure collection of adequate data for ongoing ecological and human health risk assessments.

  18. MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS LOCAL IMPACTS ON HUMAN HEALTH RISK.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN, T.M.; BOWERMAN, B.; ADAMS, J.; LIPFERT, F.; MORRIS, S.M.; BANDO, A.; PENA, R.; BLAKE, R.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thorough quantitative understanding of the processes of mercury emissions, deposition, and translocation through the food chain is currently not available. Complex atmospheric chemistry and dispersion models are required to predict concentration and deposition contributions, and aquatic process models are required to predict effects on fish. However, there are uncertainties in all of these predictions. Therefore, the most reliable method of understanding impacts of coal-fired power plants on Hg deposition is from empirical data. A review of the literature on mercury deposition around sources including coal-fired power plants found studies covering local mercury concentrations in soil, vegetation, and animals (fish and cows). There is strong evidence of enhanced local deposition within 3 km of the chlor-alkali plants, with elevated soil concentrations and estimated deposition rates of 10 times background. For coal-fired power plants, the data show that atmospheric deposition of Hg may be slightly enhanced. On the scale of a few km, modeling suggests that wet deposition may be increased by a factor of two or three over background. The measured data suggest lower increases of 15% or less. The effects of coal-fired plants seem to be less than 10% of total deposition on a national scale, based on emissions and global modeling. The following summarizes our findings from published reports on the impacts of local deposition. In terms of excesses over background the following increments have been observed within a few km of the plant: (1) local soil concentration Hg increments of 30%-60%, (2) sediment increments of 18-30%, (3) wet deposition increments of 11-12%, and (4) fish Hg increments of about 5-6%, based on an empirical finding that fish concentrations are proportional to the square root of deposition. Important uncertainties include possible reductions of RGM to Hg{sub 0} in power plant plumes and the role of water chemistry in the relationship between Hg deposition and fish content. Soil and vegetation sampling programs were performed around two mid-size coal fired power plants. The objectives were to determine if local mercury hot-spots exist, to determine if they could be attributed to deposition of coal-fired power plant emissions, and to determine if they correlated with model predictions. These programs found the following: (1) At both sites, there was no correlation between modeled mercury deposition and either soil concentrations or vegetation concentrations. At the Kincaid plant, there was excess soil Hg along heavily traveled roads. The spatial pattern of soil mercury concentrations did not match the pattern of vegetation Hg concentrations at either plant. (2) At both sites, the subsurface (5-10 cm) samples the Hg concentration correlated strongly with the surface samples (0-5 cm). Average subsurface sample concentrations were slightly less than the surface samples; however, the difference was not statistically significant. (3) An unequivocal definition of background Hg was not possible at either site. Using various assumed background soil mercury concentrations, the percentage of mercury deposited within 10 km of the plant ranged between 1.4 and 8.5% of the RGM emissions. Based on computer modeling, Hg deposition was primarily RGM with much lower deposition from elemental mercury. Estimates of the percentage of total Hg deposition ranged between 0.3 and 1.7%. These small percentages of deposition are consistent with the empirical findings of only minor perturbations in environmental levels, as opposed to ''hot spots'', near the plants. The major objective of this study was to determine if there was evidence for ''hot-spots'' of mercury deposition around coal-fired power plants. Although the term has been used extensively, it has never been defined. From a public health perspective, such a ''hot spot'' must be large enough to insure that it did not occur by chance, and it must affect water bodies large enough to support a population of subsistence fishers. The results of this study support the hypothesis that n

  19. Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.D.

    1992-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Almost daily, Americans receive reports from the mass news media about some new and frightening risk to health and welfare. Most such reports emphasize the newsworthiness of the risks -- the possibility of a crisis, disagreements among experts, how things happened, who is responsible for fixing them, how much will it cost, conflict among parties involved, etc. As a rule, the magnitudes of the risks, or the difficulty of estimating those magnitudes, have limited newsworthiness, and so they are not mentioned. Because of this emphasis in the news media, most people outside the risk assessment community must judge the relative significance of the various risks to which we all are exposed with only that information deemed newsworthy by reporters. This information is biased and shows risks in isolation. There is no basis for understanding and comparing the relative importance of risks among themselves, or for comparing one risk, perhaps a new or newly-discovered one, in the field of all risks. The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which we are routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies.

  20. Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eide, Steven Arvid; Thomas Wierman

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environment, Safety and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) models human safety and health risk resulting from waste management and environmental restoration activities. Human safety and health risks include those associated with storing, handling, processing, transporting, and disposing of radionuclides and chemicals. Exposures to these materials, resulting from both accidents and normal, incident-free operation, are modeled. In addition, standard industrial risks (falls, explosions, transportation accidents, etc.) are evaluated. Finally, human safety and health impacts from cleanup of accidental releases of radionuclides and chemicals to the environment are estimated. Unlike environmental impact statements and safety analysis reports, ESHRAP risk predictions are meant to be best estimate, rather than bounding or conservatively high. Typically, ESHRAP studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management or environmental restoration program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, processing, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal. ESHRAP can be used to support complex environmental decision-making processes and to track risk reduction as activities progress.

  1. Overview of ozone human exposure and health risk analyses used in the U.S. EPA's review of the ozone air quality standard.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, R. G.

    1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of the ozone human exposure and health risk analyses developed under sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These analyses are being used in the current review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The analyses consist of three principal steps: (1) estimating short-term ozone exposure for particular populations (exposure model); (2) estimating population response to exposures or concentrations (exposure-response or concentration-response models); and (3) integrating concentrations or exposure with concentration-response or exposure-response models to produce overall risk estimates (risk model). The exposure model, called the probabilistic NAAQS exposure model for ozone (pNEM/03), incorporates the following factors: hourly ambient ozone concentrations; spatial distribution of concentrations; ventilation state of individuals at time of exposure; and movement of people through various microenvironments (e.g., outdoors, indoors, inside a vehicle) of varying air quality. Exposure estimates are represented by probability distributions. Exposure-response relationships have been developed for several respiratory symptom and lung function health effects, based on the results of controlled human exposure studies. These relationships also are probabilistic and reflect uncertainties associated with sample size and variability of response among subjects. The analyses also provide estimates of excess hospital admissions in the New York City area based on results from an epidemiology study. Overall risk results for selected health endpoints and recently analyzed air quality scenarios associated with alternative 8-hour NAAQS and the current 1-hour standard for outdoor children are used to illustrate application of the methodology.

  2. THE LOCAL IMPACTS OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS ON HUMAN HEALTH RISK. PROGRESS REPORT FOR THE PERIOD OF MARCH 2003 - MARCH 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN,T.M.LIPFERT,F.D.MORRIS,S.M.

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a follow-up to previous assessments of the health risks of mercury that BNL performed for the Department of Energy. Methylmercury is an organic form of mercury that has been implicated as the form of mercury that impacts human health. A comprehensive risk assessment report was prepared (Lipfert et al., 1994) that led to several journal articles and conference presentations (Lipfert et al. 1994, 1995, 1996). In 2001, a risk assessment of mercury exposure from fish consumption was performed for 3 regions of the U.S (Northeast, Southeast, and Midwest) identified by the EPA as regions of higher impact from coal emissions (Sullivan, 2001). The risk assessment addressed the effects of in utero exposure to children through consumption of fish by their mothers. Two population groups (general population and subsistence fishers) were considered. Three mercury levels were considered in the analysis, current conditions based on measured data, and hypothetical reductions in Hg levels due to a 50% and 90% reduction in mercury emissions from coal fired power plants. The findings of the analysis suggested that a 90% reduction in coal-fired emissions would lead to a small reduction in risk to the general population (population risk reduction on the order of 10{sup -5}) and that the population risk is born by less than 1% of the population (i.e. high end fish consumers). The study conducted in 2001 focused on the health impacts arising from regional deposition patterns as determined by measured data and modeling. Health impacts were assessed on a regional scale accounting for potential percent reductions in mercury emissions from coal. However, quantitative assessment of local deposition near actual power plants has not been attempted. Generic assessments have been performed, but these are not representative of any single power plant. In this study, general background information on the mercury cycle, mercury emissions from coal plants, and risk assessment are provided to provide the basis for examining the impacts of local deposition. A section that covers modeling of local deposition of mercury emitted from coal power plants follows. The code ISCST3 was used with mercury emissions data from two power plants and local meteorological conditions to assess local deposition. The deposition modeling results were used to estimate the potential increase in mercury deposition that could occur in the vicinity of the plant. Increased deposition was assumed to lead to a linearly proportional increase in mercury concentrations in fish in local water bodies. Fish are the major pathway for human health impacts and the potential for increased mercury exposure was evaluated and the risks of such exposure estimated. Based on the findings recommendations for future work and conclusions are provided. Mercury is receiving substantial attention in a number of areas including: understanding of mercury deposition, bioaccumulation, and transport through the atmosphere, and improvements to the understanding of health impacts created by exposure to mercury. A literature review of key articles is presented as Appendix A.

  3. Human Resources, Safety & Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Human Resources, Safety & Risk Management 1600 Holloway Avenue, ADM 252 San Francisco, California OF RISK AND AGREEMENT TO PAY CLAIMS Activity: San Francisco State University Campus Recreation Department participating in this Activity. I am aware of the risks associated with traveling to/from and participating

  4. Health risks of energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travis, C.C.; Etnier, E.L. (eds.)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume examines occupational, public health, and environmental risks of the coal fuel cycle, the nuclear fuel cycle, and unconventional energy technologies. The 6 chapters explore in detail the relationship between energy economics and risk analysis, assess the problems of applying traditional cost-benefit analysis to long-term environmental problems (such as global carbon dioxide levels), and consider questions about the public's perception and acceptance of risk. Also included is an examination of the global risks associated with current and proposed levels of energy production and comsumption from all major sources. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 6 chapters; all are included in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA) and four in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

  5. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the exciting stories about how our faculty, students, and alumni are engineering solutions to health careCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Human Health #12;Welcome to our Health issue ­ Please take the time to read to tackle large worldwide health problems. A few years ago, the College of Engineering made a strategic

  6. Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrys, Mark

    Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE Teaching Fellowship in Athletic of Science and Health, the School of Health and Human Performance at DCU is developing an international reputation in health and exercise science. As such, the School of Health and Human Performance is committed

  7. Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G; Daniels, J; Wegrecki, A

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the human health and ecological risk assessment for the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF). Volume 1 is the text of the risk assessment, and Volume 2 (provided on a compact disc) is the supporting modeling data. The EWTF is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Site 300, which is located in the foothills between the cities of Livermore and Tracy, approximately 17 miles east of Livermore and 8 miles southwest of Tracy. Figure 1 is a map of the San Francisco Bay Area, showing the location of Site 300 and other points of reference. One of the principal activities of Site 300 is to test what are known as 'high explosives' for nuclear weapons. These are the highly energetic materials that provide the force to drive fissionable material to criticality. LLNL scientists develop and test the explosives and the integrated non-nuclear components in support of the United States nuclear stockpile stewardship program as well as in support of conventional weapons and the aircraft, mining, oil exploration, and construction industries. Many Site 300 facilities are used in support of high explosives research. Some facilities are used in the chemical formulation of explosives; others are locations where explosive charges are mechanically pressed; others are locations where the materials are inspected radiographically for such defects as cracks and voids. Finally, some facilities are locations where the machined charges are assembled before they are sent to the onsite test firing facilities, and additional facilities are locations where materials are stored. Wastes generated from high-explosives research are treated by open burning (OB) and open detonation (OD). OB and OD treatments are necessary because they are the safest methods for treating explosives wastes generated at these facilities, and they eliminate the requirement for further handling and transportation that would be required if the wastes were treated off site.

  8. Health risk assessment of environmental exposure to trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.P.; Farrar, D.G.; de Rooij, C.G. (Epidemiology Unit, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (England))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the animal data showed trichloroethylene (TRI) to be of low acute toxicity. Repeated exposure showed that the target organs were the liver, and to a lesser extent, the kidney. TRI is not mutagenic or only marginally mutagenic. There is no evidence of fetotoxicity or teratogenicity. TRI is judged not to exhibit chronic neurotoxicity. Lifetime bioassays resulted in tumors in both the mouse and the rat. However, because of qualitative and quantitative metabolic differences between rodent and human, no one suitable tumor site can be chosen for human health risk assessment. In addition, of the several epidemiology studies, none has demonstrated a positive association for increased tumor incidence. A review of the health effects in humans shows TRI to be of low acute toxicity and, following chronic high doses, to be hepatotoxic. Environmental exposure to TRI is mainly via the atmosphere, while the contribution from exposure to drinking water and foodstuffs is negligible. The total body burden was calculated as 22 micrograms/day. The safety margin approach based on human health effects showed that TRI levels are well within the safety margin for the human no-observable-effect level (10,000 times lower). The total body burden represents a risk of 1.4 X 10(-5) by linearized multistage modeling. Therefore, by either methodological approach to risk assessment, the environmental occurrence of TRI does not represent a significant health risk to the general population or to the population in areas close to industrial activities. 66 references.

  9. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Judith G.

    ; and translating and disseminating research findings to health care providers, researchers, policymakersDCP - 1 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH Drug Control Programs ..................................................................................................................................2 #12;DCP - 2 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Resource Summary

  10. Health and environmental risks of energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives four examples of health risk assessments of energy systems: (1) Comparative risk assessment of the health effects of the coal and nuclear fuel cycles. Estimates differ from previous values chiefly by inclusion of ranges of uncertainty, but some coal-cycle numbers were re-estimated. Upper-boundary public disease risks of air pollution from coal-fired plants dominate. Reactors probably account for most of the potential effect of major nuclear accidents. Accidental death rates in electricity generation are low for reactors and higher for coal. (2) Upper boundary air pollution health risks of existing fossil-based energy technologies in the United States. Preliminary mortality estimates were obtained combining potential impacts of three index pollutants - SO/sub 4/, NO/sub 2/, and CO - as independent measures of risk. Four fuel cycle trajectories leading to three end-uses were analyzed. Example results: domestic wood burning has substantial potential impact, with an upper boundary exceeding that of coal; upper-boundary air pollution impacts of gas can exceed those of oil, because of NO/sub 2/. (3) Health risks of acid deposition and other transported air pollutants, carried out as part of an assessment of the US Congress Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) Acid Rain and Transported Air Pollutants - Implications for Public Policy. Three scenarios were examined, leading to estimates of 40,000 to 50,000 annual premature deaths, depending on year (1978 vs 2000) and scenario (holding total emissions constant vs 30% reduction). (4) health effects of uranium mill tailings piles. Mortality risk is estimated to be minuscule (8.7 x 10/sup -9/ average individual lifetime cancer risk from a model mill, compared with 9.5 x 10/sup -4/ for background radiation). Methods that sum risks over the indefinite future are shown to be to be unrealistic. 39 references, 7 figures, 15 tables.

  11. Communities: Human Health and Community Development Webinar ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Communities: Human Health and Community Development Webinar Communities: Human Health and Community Development Webinar May 1, 2014 5:00PM to 6:30PM EDT The multi-agency...

  12. Risk Management Department of Human Resource Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Risk Management Department of Human Resource Services Workers' Compensation Update INJURY to identify and address potential safety hazards. It also assists Risk Management staff determine in a timely manager or supervisor will contact Risk Management to arrange transportation. An employee who needs

  13. Risk Management Department of Human Resource Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Risk Management Department of Human Resource Services Workers' Compensation Update RETURN TO WORK or supervisor upon returning to work. The manager or supervisor should fax a copy of the release to Risk, the University's Workers' Compensation Program Manager, at extension 2824 or visit the Risk Management Website

  14. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment; evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provide estimates of: (1) individual risks based on central tendency exposure; (2) individual risks based on maximum environmental concentrations; (3) risks to highly exposed or susceptible subgroups of the population (e.g., subsistence farmers and school children); (4) risks associated with specific activities that may result in elevated exposures (e.g., subsistence fishermen and deer hunters); and (5) population risk. This approach allows for the estimation of risks to specific segments of the population taking into consideration activity patterns, number of individuals, and actual locations of individuals in these subgroups with respect to the facility. The fate and transport modeling of emissions from the facility to estimate exposures to identified subgroups is described.

  15. Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies. Revision 5/94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.D.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which man is routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies. This report is not a risk assessment; nor does it contain instructions on how to do a risk assessment. Rather, it provides background information on how most of us think about risks and why it is difficult to do it rationally, it provides a philosophy and data with which to do a better job of judging risks more rationally, and it provides an overview of where risks of energy technologies fit within the spectrum of all risks. Much of the quantitative information provided here is on relative risk of dying of various causes. This is not because risk of dying is seen as the most important kind of risk, but because the statistics on mortality rates by cause are the highest quality data available on health risks in the general population.

  16. Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrys, Mark

    Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE Teaching Fellowship in Athletic Therapy (half time, 3 year contract) The School of Health and Human Performance invites applications from and assessment, have relevant qualifications and be experienced in emergency care training and be competent

  17. Optimization Online - Robust risk adjustment in health insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tengjiao Xiao

    2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 8, 2014 ... Abstract: Risk adjustment is used to calibrate payments to health plans based on the relative health status of insured populations and helps ...

  18. Risk Management Department of Human Resource Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Risk Management Department of Human Resource Services Workers' Compensation Update WORKERS and are available by contacting the Risk Management department. Please do not add this form to any packets kept' COMPENSATION PHARMACY BENEFIT MANAGEMENT PROGRAM The California State University system has partnered

  19. Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    HUMAN HEALTH SCIENCE BLDG GEO HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Principal Investigator Source Heat Pumps Demo Projects May 20, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential,...

  20. U.S. Department of Energy worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with environmental restoration and waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.; Travis, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Risk Management; Simek, M.A.; Sutherland, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Scofield, P.A. [Office of Environmental Compliance and Documentation (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM). The methodology is appropriate for estimating worker risks across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex at both programmatic and site-specific levels. This document supports the worker health risk methodology used to perform the human health risk assessment portion of the DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) although it has applications beyond the PEIS, such as installation-wide worker risk assessments, screening-level assessments, and site-specific assessments.

  1. Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Services Review Group Type Activity Grant the obligation to comply with Public Health Services terms and conditions if a grant is awarded as a result/PI SUBTOTALS CONSULTANT COSTS EQUIPMENT (Itemize) SUPPLIES (Itemize by category) TRAVEL INPATIENT CARE COSTS

  2. Climate Change and Human Health National Center for Environmental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change and Human Health National Center for Environmental Health Division of Environmental and Prevention October 17, 2012 #12;Coastal flooding Climate change effects: ·Temperature ·Sea level,civil conflict Anxiety,despair,depression Civil conflict Climate Change Health Effects Food & water Malnutrition

  3. LAND AND WATER USE CHARACTERISTICS AND HUMAN HEALTH INPUT PARAMETERS FOR USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DOSIMETRY AND RISK ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T.; Karapatakis, D.; Lee, P.; Farfan, E.

    2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters but the use of site-specific values by the applicant is encouraged. A detailed survey of land and water use parameters was conducted in 1991 and is being updated here. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk and vegetable consumption rates as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS are documented. Based on comparisons to the 2009 SRS environmental compliance doses, the following effects are expected in future SRS compliance dose calculations: (1) Aquatic all-pathway maximally exposed individual doses may go up about 10 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors; (2) Aquatic all-pathway collective doses may go up about 5 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors that offset the reduction in average individual water consumption rates; (3) Irrigation pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go up about 40 percent due to increases in the element-specific transfer factors; (4) Irrigation pathway collective doses may go down about 50 percent due to changes in food productivity and production within the 50-mile radius of SRS; (5) Air pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go down about 10 percent due to the changes in food productivity in the SRS area and to the changes in element-specific transfer factors; and (6) Air pathway collective doses may go down about 30 percent mainly due to the decrease in the inhalation rate assumed for the average individual.

  4. PEOPLE OF CALIFORNIA HEALTH AND HUMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chair AIR RESOURCES BOARD Mary Nichols Chair DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH CARE SERVICES Toby Douglas DirectorPEOPLE OF CALIFORNIA HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES AGENCY Diana Dooley Secretary Michael Wilkening Deborah Raphael Director OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH HAZARD ASSESSMENT George Alexeeff Director

  5. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    , M.D. Technology Richard Nakamura., Ph.D. Andrea T. Norris #12;ES-3 FY 2015 Budget Request National 2015 Budget Page No. Organization ChartES-1 Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Executive Summary FY

  6. College of Human and Health Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    8988 College of Human and Health Sciences All research is delivered through discipline-focused research centres, which examine fields such as child research, ageing, psychology and social care, as well as midwifery, nursing and allied health professions. External funding from a number of prestigious bodies has

  7. A new approach to criteria for health risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickett, Jeffery, E-mail: J.Spickett@curtin.edu.au [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Katscherian, Dianne [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia); Western Australian Department of Health WA, PO Box 8172, Perth Business Centre WA 6849 (Australia); Goh, Yang Miang [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is a developing component of the overall impact assessment process and as such needs access to procedures that can enable more consistent approaches to the stepwise process that is now generally accepted in both EIA and HIA. The guidelines developed during this project provide a structured process, based on risk assessment procedures which use consequences and likelihood, as a way of ranking risks to adverse health outcomes from activities subjected to HIA or HIA as part of EIA. The aim is to assess the potential for both acute and chronic health outcomes. The consequences component also identifies a series of consequences for the health care system, depicted as expressions of financial expenditure and the capacity of the health system. These more specific health risk assessment characteristics should provide for a broader consideration of health consequences and a more consistent estimation of the adverse health risks of a proposed development at both the scoping and risk assessment stages of the HIA process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A more objective approach to health risk assessment is provided. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An objective set of criteria for the consequences for chronic and acute impacts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An objective set of criteria for the consequences on the health care system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An objective set of criteria for event frequency that could impact on health. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The approach presented is currently being trialled in Australia.

  8. Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk Management Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk Management Services 3-107 Research Transition of Insurance Policy Standards Department of Management Services Protective Services Management & Risk Management & Risk Assessment Office Resource Planning Tel: 780.248.1147 Tel: 780.492.5050 Tel: 780

  9. Understanding Risk Management through an Environmental Health and Safety Template

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    URMIA Understanding Risk Management through an Environmental Health and Safety Template 2008 URMIA Journal Reprint Howard N. Apsan, Ph.D. The City University of New York University Risk Management CUNY and other universities to upgrade their risk management efforts? It is easy to suggest

  10. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH &. HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH &. HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health of Intramural Research, OD Dr. James F. Taylor, Director Office ofAnimal Care and Use, OIR, OD Director, Division ofOccupational Health and Safety (DOHS) Scientific Resources, ORS Subject: Medical Surveillance of

  11. Assessing the health risk of solar development on contaminated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 11, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint A recently published report from Argonne's Environmental Science (EVS) division presents a methodology for assessing potential human health...

  12. Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J.J.; Wood, R.A.; Haszeldine, R.S. [Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage, School of GeoSciences, Grant Institute, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JW, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrialized societies which continue to use fossil fuel energy sources are considering adoption of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology to meet carbon emission reduction targets. Deep geological storage of CO2 onshore faces opposition regarding potential health effects of CO2 leakage from storage sites. There is no experience of commercial scale CCS with which to verify predicted risks of engineered storage failure. Studying risk from natural CO2 seeps can guide assessment of potential health risks from leaking onshore CO2 stores. Italy and Sicily are regions of intense natural CO2 degassing from surface seeps. These seeps exhibit a variety of expressions, characteristics (e.g., temperature/ flux), and location environments. Here we quantify historical fatalities from CO2 poisoning using a database of 286 natural CO2 seeps in Italy and Sicily. We find that risk of human death is strongly influenced by seep surface expression, local conditions (e.g., topography and wind speed), CO2 flux, and human behavior. Risk of accidental human death from these CO2 seeps is calculated to be 10-8 year-1 to the exposed population. This value is significantly lower than that of many socially accepted risks. Seepage from future storage sites is modeled to be less than Italian natural flux rates. With appropriate hazard management, health risks from unplanned seepage at onshore storage sites can be adequately minimized.

  13. Global Warming and Human Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey(SC) GettingGit GitGlobal Warming and Human

  14. Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Construct a ground sourced heat pump, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system for the new Oakland University Human Health Sciences Building utilizing variable refrigerant flow (VRF) heat pumps. A pair of dedicated outdoor air supply units will utilize a thermally regenerated desiccant dehumidification section. A large solar thermal system along with a natural gas backup boiler will provide the thermal regeneration energy.

  15. Robust Risk Adjustment in Health Insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 7, 2014 ... Moody's estimates the preliminary median operating margins for ..... [1] Staff, ORYX risk adjustment guide, Tech. rep., Joint Commission (2014).

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, SAFETY, AND RISK MANAGEMENT COMPREHENSIVE MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    and healthy environment, to develop and facilitate emergency management best practices, to assist and educateENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, SAFETY, AND RISK MANAGEMENT COMPREHENSIVE MANUAL Table of Contents Mission Manual Chapter VIII - Radiation Safety Technical Manual Chapter IX - Risk Management Technical Manual

  17. Risk adjusted control charts for health care Willem Albers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    )) strongly suggest to apply SPC methods, in particular control charts, and we shall follow that line hereRisk adjusted control charts for health care monitoring Willem Albers Department of Applied membership can be used to adjust the basic negative binomial charts to the actual risk incurred. Attention

  18. aeromonas human health: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of North Carolina at Charlotte, students and faculty help chart the course for health care Xie,Jiang (Linda) 10 Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  19. Risk Communication - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15 to March 15A MegawattElectricity:Risk

  20. Lead Screening for NH Soils: Minimizing Health Risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    family. On your soil test report, if the lead screening levels are elevated, you will receive in populated areas include the use of lead paint around homes (pre- 1970s), the use of lead-arsenate for pest does a "lead screening" test that indicates whether or not lead could pose a health risk for your

  1. Modeling human risk: Cell & molecular biology in context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is anticipated that early in the next century manned missions into outer space will occur, with a mission to Mars scheduled between 2015 and 2020. However, before such missions can be undertaken, a realistic estimation of the potential risks to the flight crews is required. One of the uncertainties remaining in this risk estimation is that posed by the effects of exposure to the radiation environment of outer space. Although the composition of this environment is fairly well understood, the biological effects arising from exposure to it are not. The reasons for this are three-fold: (1) A small but highly significant component of the radiation spectrum in outer space consists of highly charged, high energy (HZE) particles which are not routinely experienced on earth, and for which there are insufficient data on biological effects; (2) Most studies on the biological effects of radiation to date have been high-dose, high dose-rate, whereas in space, with the exception of solar particle events, radiation exposures will be low-dose, low dose-rate; (3) Although it has been established that the virtual absence of gravity in space has a profound effect on human physiology, it is not clear whether these effects will act synergistically with those of radiation exposure. A select panel will evaluate the utilizing experiments and models to accurately predict the risks associated with exposure to HZE particles. Topics of research include cellular and tissue response, health effects associated with radiation damage, model animal systems, and critical markers of Radiation response.

  2. Evaluation of Human Performance Issues for Fire Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bley, Dennis C.; Cooper, Susan E.; Forester, John A.; Kolaczkowski, Alan M.; Ramey-Smith, Ann; Thompson, Catherine M.; Whitehead, Donnie W.; Wreathall, John

    1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the current status of the treatment of human reliability in fire risk analyses for nuclear power plants and identifies areas that need to be addressed. A new approach is suggested to improve the modeling.

  3. Diagnostic health risk assessment of electronic waste on the general population in developing countries' scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazzoli, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.frazzoli@iss.i [Food and Veterinary Toxicology Unit and WHO/FAO Collaborating Centre for Veterinary Public Health - Department of Veterinary Public Health and Food Safety, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Noodles Onlus, Nutrition and food safety and wholesomeness (Italy); Orisakwe, Orish Ebere [Toxicology Unit, Department of Pharmacology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, College of Health Sciences Nnewi Campus, Nnewi, Anambra State (Nigeria); Noodles Onlus, Nutrition and food safety and wholesomeness (Italy); Dragone, Roberto [Institute of Nanostructured Materials (ISMN), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, at the Department of Chemistry of the 'Sapienza' University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Noodles Onlus, Nutrition and food safety and wholesomeness (Italy); Mantovani, Alberto [Food and Veterinary Toxicology Unit and WHO/FAO Collaborating Centre for Veterinary Public Health - Department of Veterinary Public Health and Food Safety, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Noodles Onlus, Nutrition and food safety and wholesomeness (Italy)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    E-waste is the generic name for technological waste. Even though aspects related to e-waste environmental pollution and human exposure are known, scientific assessments are missing so far on the actual risks for health sustainability of the general population exposed to e-waste scenarios, such as illicit dumping, crude recycling and improper treatment and disposal. In fact, further to occupational and direct local exposure, e-waste scenarios may impact on the environment-to-food chain, thus eliciting a widespread and repeated exposure of the general population to mixtures of toxicants, mainly toxic chemical elements, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and persistent organic pollutants. In the absence of any clear policy on e-waste flow management, the situation in the e-waste receiver countries may become quite scary; accordingly, here we address a diagnostic risk assessment of health issues potentially elicited by e-waste related mixtures of toxicants. Scientific evidence available so far (mainly from China) is discussed with special attention to the concept of health sustainability, i.e. the poor health burden heritage perpetuated through the mother-to-child dyad. Endocrine disruption and neurotoxicity are specifically considered as examples of main health burden issues relevant to perpetuation through life cycle and across generations; toxicological information are considered along with available data on environmental and food contamination and human internal exposure. The risk from exposure to e-waste related mixtures of toxicants of vulnerable subpopulation like breast-fed infants is given special attention. The diagnostic risk assessment demonstrates how e-waste exposure poses an actual public health emergency, as it may entrain significant health risks also for generations to come. Exposure scenarios as well as specific chemicals of major concern may vary in different contexts; for instance, only limited information is available on e-waste related exposures in a major site of e-waste dumping such as West Africa. Therefore, considerations are also given on data gaps possibly fitting a systematic risk assessment of the e-waste health impacts in different subscenarios as well as possible protective factors for exposed subpopulations.

  4. Application of the bioecological model and health belief model to self-reported health risk behaviors of adolescents in the united states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleary, Sasha A.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    incorporates these three sources of risk-taking, however it lacks explanatory power. For this reason, this thesis focused on explaining risk perception of health risk behaviors (smoking cigarette, alcohol and marijuana use), and health risk behaviors...

  5. Adjunct Faculty Data Request College of Health and Human Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Adjunct Faculty Data Request College of Health and Human Services Bowling Green State University at Bowling Green State University are required to provide the following information. Appointments

  6. Risk assessment for improved treatment of health considerations in EIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demidova, Olga [Ecoline Environmental Assessment Center, PO Box 7 125047, Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: odemidova@eac-ecoline.ru; Cherp, Aleg [Department of Environmental Sciences and Policy, Central European University (CEU), Nador u. 9, 1051, Budapest (Hungary)]. E-mail: cherpa@ceu.hu

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and Risk Assessment (RA) processes are rarely used to complement each other despite potential benefits of such integration. This paper proposes a model for procedural and methodological integration of EIA and RA based on reported best practice approaches. The proposed model stipulates 'embedding' RA into EIA and is organized in accordance with the generic stages of the EIA process. The model forms the basis for the proposed Evaluation Package which can be used as a benchmarking tool for evaluating the effectiveness of integration of RA within particular EIAs. The current paper uses the package for evaluating seven Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) of waste incineration facilities in the UK produced between 1990 and 2000. Though RA was found to be an element of these EIAs, its prominence varied considerably from case to case. Systematic application of RA in accordance with the best practice was not observed. Particular omissions were demonstrated in assessing health impacts not directly associated with air emissions, identifying the receptors of health impacts (affected population), interpreting health impacts as health risks, dealing with uncertainties, and risk communications.

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse health risks Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Sample search results for: adverse health risks Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Health Care through the Lens of Risk Call for Papers for a four part special issue of...

  8. A comparison between integrated risk assessment and classical health/environmental assessment: Emerging beneficial properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekizawa, Jun [Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, University of Tokushima, Japan, 1-1 Minamijosanjimacho, Tokushima 770-8502 (Japan)]. E-mail: sekizawa@ias.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Tanabe, Shinsuke [Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyocho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both humans and wildlife are exposed to various types of halogenated organic compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), typically old chemicals, and tris(4-chlorophenyl) methane (TCPM) and brominated flame retardants, some new chemicals, simultaneously. Classical risk assessment has evaluated health and ecological risks independently by experts from different disciplines. Taking into considerations the recent concerns about endocrine disrupting chemicals and the progress of research in related areas, we integrated and assessed data on exposure and potential effects in humans and wildlife. Comparisons were made for organ concentrations, body burdens of several organochlorine compounds (OCs), metabolic capacities between humans and various wildlife. When we integrate the knowledge on effects and exposure in humans and in wildlife, new insights were suggested about similarities and/or differences in potential effects among various human populations living on different foods and having different body burdens. Combining existing information with emerging knowledge of mechanisms of actions on endocrine disrupting chemicals after exposure to above chemicals during early developmental stages will further elucidate potential risks from exposure to those chemicals.

  9. College of Health and Human Sciences School of Health Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    : Environmental health and toxicology program formed 1970s: Industrial hygiene added 1979-Present: Era of School components of the School: Environmental Health Sciences, Radiological Health, and Industrial Hygiene (1963 with Tom Miya) Occupational health (industrial hygiene) (1979 with Dennis Paustenbach) Medical

  10. 05.09 1 Risk Management and Environmental Health & Safety REGENTS' POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    05.09 1 Risk Management and Environmental Health & Safety REGENTS' POLICY PART V ­ FINANCE AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Chapter 05.09 - Risk Management and Environmental Health and Safety P05 effectively and efficiently establish and maintain a risk management and environmental health and safety

  11. Human Resource Services Health Insurance Informational Session

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karonis, Nicholas T.

    will be defaulted to the Quality Care Health Plan Enrollment forms were mailed by Central Management Services February 1, 2013 Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) Quality Care Health Plan (D3) Open Access Plan (OAP) ­ Managed Care Coventry OAP (CH) HealthLink OAP (CF) Health Maintenance Organization (HMO

  12. Defining Human Failure Events for Petroleum Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring; Knut Øien

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, an identification and description of barriers and human failure events (HFEs) for human reliability analysis (HRA) is performed. The barriers, called target systems, are identified from risk significant accident scenarios represented as defined situations of hazard and accident (DSHAs). This report serves as the foundation for further work to develop petroleum HFEs compatible with the SPAR-H method and intended for reuse in future HRAs.

  13. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    FY 2015 Budget Page No. Appropriation Language ...............................................................................................40 #12;OA-2 National Institutes of Health FY 2015 Congressional Justification FY 2015 Appropriations

  14. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    ) Director, Research and Development Global Health, Population and Nutrition Contraceptive Technology and Gynecology Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine University of Iowa Health Care Iowa City, IA of Veterans Affairs Washington, DC 20420 LU, Michael C., M.D., M.P.H. Associate Administrator Maternal

  15. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    ,133.828 Drug Resources by Decision Unit National Institute on Drug Abuse 1 National Institute on Alcohol Abuse MISSION National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) The societal impact of substance abuse (alcohol, tobacco a year in health care, crime-related, and productivity losses. To provide a comprehensive public health

  16. Information resources used in health risk assessment by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, G.B.; Baratta, M.; Wolfson, S.; McGeorge, L. [New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Trenton (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection`s responsibilities related to health-based risk assessment are described, including its research projects and its development of health based compound specific standards and guidance levels. The resources used by the agency to support health risk assessment work are outlined.

  17. Method of assessing a lipid-related health risk based on ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA); Krauss, Ronald M. (Berkeley, CA); Blanche, Patricia J. (Berkeley, CA)

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  18. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    Resources by Decision Unit National Institute on Drug Abuse 1 National Institute on Alcohol Abuse Program Summary MISSION National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) The societal impact of substance abuse $600 billion a year in health care, crime-related, and productivity losses. Knowledge is the foundation

  19. Risk assessment and toxicology databases for health effects assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, P.Y.; Wassom, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific and technological developments bring unprecedented stress to our environment. Society has to predict the results of potential health risks from technologically based actions that may have serious, far-reaching consequences. The potential for error in making such predictions or assessment is great and multiplies with the increasing size and complexity of the problem being studied. Because of this, the availability and use of reliable data is the key to any successful forecasting effort. Scientific research and development generate new data and information. Much of the scientific data being produced daily is stored in computers for subsequent analysis. This situation provides both an invaluable resource and an enormous challenge. With large amounts of government funds being devoted to health and environmental research programs and with maintenance of our living environment at stake, we must make maximum use of the resulting data to forecast and avert catastrophic effects. Along with the readily available. The most efficient means of obtaining the data necessary for assessing the health effects of chemicals is to utilize applications include the toxicology databases and information files developed at ORNL. To make most efficient use of the data/information that has already been prepared, attention and resources should be directed toward projects that meticulously evaluate the available data/information and create specialized peer-reviewed value-added databases. Such projects include the National Library of Medicine`s Hazardous Substances Data Bank, and the U.S. Air Force Installation Restoration Toxicology Guide. These and similar value-added toxicology databases were developed at ORNL and are being maintained and updated. These databases and supporting information files, as well as some data evaluation techniques are discussed in this paper with special focus on how they are used to assess potential health effects of environmental agents. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  20. Preventing Disability Among Working Participants in Kansas’ High-risk Insurance Pool: Implications for Health Reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.; Moore, Janice M.; Welch, Greg W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Health conditions that prevent individuals from working full time can restrict their access to health insurance. For people living in the 35 states that offer high-risk pools, coverage is available but premiums are 125–200% ...

  1. Integrating mechanistic and polymorphism data to characterize human genetic susceptibility for environmental chemical risk assessment in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Holly M., E-mail: mortensen.holly@epa.gov [Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA, 109 TW Alexander Dr., Mailcode B205-01, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Euling, Susan Y. [Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Environmental Assessment, US EPA, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Mail Code 8623P, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Response to environmental chemicals can vary widely among individuals and between population groups. In human health risk assessment, data on susceptibility can be utilized by deriving risk levels based on a study of a susceptible population and/or an uncertainty factor may be applied to account for the lack of information about susceptibility. Defining genetic susceptibility in response to environmental chemicals across human populations is an area of interest in the NAS' new paradigm of toxicity pathway-based risk assessment. Data from high-throughput/high content (HT/HC), including -omics (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) technologies, have been integral to the identification and characterization of drug target and disease loci, and have been successfully utilized to inform the mechanism of action for numerous environmental chemicals. Large-scale population genotyping studies may help to characterize levels of variability across human populations at identified target loci implicated in response to environmental chemicals. By combining mechanistic data for a given environmental chemical with next generation sequencing data that provides human population variation information, one can begin to characterize differential susceptibility due to genetic variability to environmental chemicals within and across genetically heterogeneous human populations. The integration of such data sources will be informative to human health risk assessment.

  2. Health Risk Assessment: scale-dependent effects of urban air pollution on mortality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Health Risk Assessment: scale-dependent effects of urban air pollution on mortality M. Valari(1), L;-Pollutants concentrations [c] ·Average outdoors pollution ·Indoors air quality ·Other sources of intoxication (food, water etc.) -Population exposure: [c] x dt -Health data & air pollution health effects Health

  3. Assessment of OEP health's risk in nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santacruz-Gomez, K.; Manzano, C.; Melendrez, R.; Castaneda, B.; Barboza-Flores, M.; Pedroza-Montero, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico and Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados CIMAV, A.C. Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico); Centro de Diagnostico Integral del Noroeste, Luis Donaldo Colosio 23 83000 Centro Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of ionizing radiation has been increased in recent years within medical applications. Nuclear Medicine Department offers both treatment and diagnosis of diseases using radioisotopes to controlled doses. Despite the great benefits to the patient, there is an inherent risk to workers which remains in contact with radiation sources for long periods. These personnel must be monitored to avoid deterministic effects. In this work, we retrospectively evaluated occupationally exposed personnel (OEP) to ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine during the last five years. We assessed both area and personal dosimetry of this department in a known Clinic in Sonora. Our results show an annual equivalent dose average of 4.49 {+-} 0.70 mSv in OEP without showing alarming changes in clinical parameters analyzed. These results allow us to conclude that health of OEP in nuclear medicine of this clinic has not been at risk during the evaluated period. However, we may suggest the use of individual profiles based on specific radiosensitivity markers.

  4. Energy and Human Health Kirk R. Smith,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved Keywords coal, air pollution, biomass fuel, petroleum, nuclear energy accrue to the harvesting and burning of solid fuels, coal and biomass, mainly in the form of occupational health risks and household and general ambient air pollution. Lack of access to clean fuels

  5. The virtual absence of refereed information on potential risks of GM crops has been documented by Domingo (2000) for human health and by Wolfenbarger and Phifer (2000) for the environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, E. Ann

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 The virtual absence of refereed information on potential risks of GM crops has been documented) is a technology which has been released prematurely into the marketplace. As a result, GM crops are vulnerable and longevity of ag biotech have been fatally compromised by a) misrepresenting GM crops as solutions to real

  6. Safety & Risk Services Environmental Health and Safety Last Revised: 2010/10/20 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safety & Risk Services Environmental Health and Safety Last Revised: 2010/10/20 1 EXPOSURE CONTROL the presence or the reasonably anticipated presence of blood or OPIMs on an item or surface. RISK AND RESPONSIBILITIES The purpose of this exposure control plan is to eliminate or minimize the risk of occupational

  7. Health risk assessment of environmental exposure to 1,1,1-trichloroethane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verschuuren, H.G.; de Rooij, C.G. (Dow Europe, Horgen (Switzerland))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1986 a survey was published by CEFIC on the occurrence of chlorinated solvents in ambient air, in surface water, and in ground water. The present article concentrates on 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-T), and puts into perspective the environmental occurrence and the toxicity. Critical toxicological data are briefly discussed. As no evidence of a carcinogenic effect of 1,1,1-T is apparent, the no-adverse-effect levels in chronic inhalation exposure in rats (875 ppm) and mice (1500 ppm) form the basis for the estimation of potential risk to human health. Environmental exposure to 1,1,1-T is mainly via the atmosphere (120 micrograms/day); the contributions of drinking water (2 micrograms/day) and food (3 micrograms/kg) are negligible. Safety margins are calculated by comparing the no-adverse-effect levels in rat and mouse studies with the total body burden. Safety margins are also calculated after converting no-adverse-effect levels into estimated internal dose levels by physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling. Safety margins vary with the starting point, but are of the order of 10(5) for the general population and more than 10(4) for the population close to industrial activities. It may be concluded that the risk of a potential health effect resulting from environmental exposure to 1,1,1-trichloroethane is negligible. 43 references.

  8. The current use of studies on promoters and cocarcinogens in quantitative risk assessment. Environ. Health Perspect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Stara; D. Mukerjee; R. Mcgaughy; T P. Durkint; M. L. Dourson

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several of the priority pollutants discussed in EPA's Ambient Water Quality Criteria documents have been reported to have promotion or cocarcinogenic activity. For example, phenol appears to have tumor-promoting activity in mice when repeatedly applied after initiation with either 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA) or benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Similarly, it has been reported that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a potent promoter of liver tumors as well as a cocarcinogen. However, in developing guidelines to derive ambient water quality criteria, it became apparent that satisfactory approaches had not been developed for using promotion/cocarcinogen data in human health risk estimation, nor were available promotion and/or cocarcinogen data on individual chemicals strong enough to permit a defensible quantitative risk estimation, if such approaches had existed. For this reason, the criteria derived for pollutants with reported promotion/cocarcinogenic activities were based on approaches for carcinogenic (e.g., TCDD), toxic (e.g., fluoranthene) or organoleptic effects (e.g., 2,4-dichlorophenol). Nonetheless, with advances in studies on both the biological mechanisms and dose/response patterns of promoters and cocarcinogens, it may be possible to develop a scientifically valid quantitative approach to use this type of data for derivation of ambient water quality criteria or other risk assessments. Some progress toward this goal and the problems associated with this effort are discussed.

  9. Assessment Plans College of Education, Health and Human Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Program Plan Update LO Data Sched Education UG BS Early Childhood Education & Child Services Y 2014 Y Y YAssessment Plans 9/18/2014 College of Education, Health and Human Development Dept Level Degree Education UG BS Elementary Education K-8 Y 2014 Y Y N Education UG BS Secondary Education Y 2014 Y Y N

  10. Soil and human health: an epidemiological review R. L. HOUGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Soil and human health: an epidemiological review R. L. HOUGH The Macaulay Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH, UK Summary Two different approaches have been used to study relationships between soil in the geosciences and broadly relates spatial soil characteristics to geographic incidence of disease. However

  11. Human-robot interactions: model-based risk analysis and safety case construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiochet, Jérémie

    Human-robot interactions: model-based risk analysis and safety case construction Quynh Anh DO HOANG potential threats related to physical human-robot interactions and to assess the associated risks that might affect safety and dependability. Because of the complexity of human-robot interactions, rigorous

  12. ('~ DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    and communicate research findings to patients and their families, health care providers, and the general public care professionals access to important health and science information from taxpayer to reach patients, health care providers, and our other audiences. While these communication efforts

  13. The Influence of Friendship Networks on Adolescents' Health-Risk Behaviors: A Social Network Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeon, Kwon Chan

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Friendships among adolescents can exert significant influence on behaviors that pose risk to their health. However, empirical evidence for friendships’ influence is mixed due to various factors. Among these factors, are the complex mechanisms...

  14. SCHIFFERT HEALTH CENTER TUBERCULOSIS RISK ASSESSMENT FORM (REQUIRED)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    symptoms? ___ NO If YES, check all that apply. Persistent cough for more than 3 weeks ___ Yes Unexplained weight loss ___ Yes Productive cough with bloody sputum ___ Yes Exposure Risks

  15. Indoor air and human health revisited: A recent IAQ symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gammage, R.B.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Indoor Air and Human Health Revisited was a speciality symposium examining the scientific underpinnings of sensory and sensitivity effects, allergy and respiratory disease, neurotoxicity and cancer. An organizing committee selected four persons to chain the sessions and invite experts to give state-of-the-art presentations that will be published as a book. A summary of the presentations is made and some critical issues identified.

  16. Updated 2011-12 HEALTH AND BEHAVIORAL RISKS OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, David

    Updated 2011-12 HEALTH AND BEHAVIORAL RISKS OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE The negative physical and mental effects of the use of alcohol and other drugs are well documented. Use of these drugs may cause including depression, psychosis, and severe anxiety. Risks associated with specific drugs are described

  17. adult health risk: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A&M University - TxSpace Summary: Knowledge concerning the current utilization of mental health care by the nation's geriatric population is greatly lacking. Research conducted...

  18. Radionuclides in the Arctic seas from the former Soviet Union: Potential health and ecological risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layton, D W; Edson, R; Varela, M; Napier, B

    1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the assessment reported here is to evaluate the health and environmental threat to coastal Alaska posed by radioactive-waste dumping in the Arctic and Northwest Pacific Oceans by the FSU. In particular, the FSU discarded 16 nuclear reactors from submarines and an icebreaker in the Kara Sea near the island of Novaya Zemlya, of which 6 contained spent nuclear fuel (SNF); disposed of liquid and solid wastes in the Sea of Japan; lost a {sup 90}Sr-powered radioisotope thermoelectric generator at sea in the Sea of Okhotsk; and disposed of liquid wastes at several sites in the Pacific Ocean, east of the Kamchatka Peninsula. In addition to these known sources in the oceans, the RAIG evaluated FSU waste-disposal practices at inland weapons-development sites that have contaminated major rivers flowing into the Arctic Ocean. The RAIG evaluated these sources for the potential for release to the environment, transport, and impact to Alaskan ecosystems and peoples through a variety of scenarios, including a worst-case total instantaneous and simultaneous release of the sources under investigation. The risk-assessment process described in this report is applicable to and can be used by other circumpolar countries, with the addition of information about specific ecosystems and human life-styles. They can use the ANWAP risk-assessment framework and approach used by ONR to establish potential doses for Alaska, but add their own specific data sets about human and ecological factors. The ANWAP risk assessment addresses the following Russian wastes, media, and receptors: dumped nuclear submarines and icebreaker in Kara Sea--marine pathways; solid reactor parts in Sea of Japan and Pacific Ocean--marine pathways; thermoelectric generator in Sea of Okhotsk--marine pathways; current known aqueous wastes in Mayak reservoirs and Asanov Marshes--riverine to marine pathways; and Alaska as receptor. For these waste and source terms addressed, other pathways, such as atmospheric transport, could be considered under future-funded research efforts for impacts to Alaska. The ANWAP risk assessment does not address the following wastes, media, and receptors: radioactive sources in Alaska (except to add perspective for Russian source term); radioactive wastes associated with Russian naval military operations and decommissioning; Russian production reactor and spent-fuel reprocessing facilities nonaqueous source terms; atmospheric, terrestrial and nonaqueous pathways; and dose calculations for any circumpolar locality other than Alaska. These other, potentially serious sources of radioactivity to the Arctic environment, while outside the scope of the current ANWAP mandate, should be considered for future funding research efforts.

  19. Task 3 Report - PCBs in the Environment Near the Oak Ridge Reservation - A Reconstruction of Historical Doses and Health Risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Paul S; Widner, Thomas; Bonnevie, Nancy; Schmidt, Charlie; McCrodden-Hamblen, Jane; Vantaggio, Joanne; Gwinn, Patrick

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an in-depth assessment of historical releases of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and risks of adverse health effects in local populations. The study was conducted by ChemRisk, a service of McLaren/Hart, Inc., for the Tennessee Department of Health. The project team (1) investigated releases of PCBs from the government sites, (2) evaluated PCB levels in environmental media in the area, (3) described releases of PCBs from other sources in the area, and (4) evaluated potential human exposures and health impacts associated with the historical presence of these contaminants in the environment. Beginning in the 1940s, PCBs were used extensively on the ORR and throughout the U.S. as a fire retardant in electrical components. PCBs were also used as cutting fluids for lubrication and cooling during metal working operations. Using information specific to the ORR, the project team estimated health risks for five off-site populations: (1) farm families that raised beef, dairy cattle, and vegetables on the flood plain of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC); (2) individuals who may have purchased beef and milk from cattle raised in the EFPC flood plain; (3) commercial and recreational fish consumers; (4) individuals that may have consumed turtles; and (5) users of surface water for recreation. Noteworthy features of the study include a two-dimensional analysis of uncertainty and variability in the non-cancer risk estimates and an assessment of the uncertainty in PCB toxicology thresholds. Conservative estimates of cancer risks from the ORR releases of PCBs to consumers of fish from Watts Bar Reservoir and the Clinch River range from less than 1 in a 1,000,000 to 2 in 10,000. Three or less excess cases of cancer would be expected to occur among individuals who consumed fish from these local waters since the 1940's. Persons who consumed large amounts of fish from the Clinch R. and Watts Bar were also at risk from non -cancer effects of PCBs. However, for Watts Bar, these risks were mainly due to sources of PCBs other than the ORR; the releases from the ORR appear to have placed an additional one to two percent of the total number of fish consumers potentially at risk. This percentage corresponds to approximately 1,000-2,000 fish consumers over the last 50 years. This report is one in a set of eight technical reports on the Oak Ridge Offsite Dose Reconstruction.

  20. Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Rangeland Health and Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    favorable condi- tions. Unfortunately, they do not provide dependable, continuous protection to the soil surface, nor do they provide sufficient forage for livestock and wildlife. Rangeland Health and Sustainability Allan McGinty Professor and Extension...

  1. Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, Erica Dawn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has delineated a set of rules for naming PAH compounds. There are only a select number of compounds that are given trivial names such as fluorene, chrysene, and pyrene (Figure 1). The numbering system is determined... 154.2 3.98 (3.66) NC Fluorene 166.2 800 4.18 (3.86) NC Anthracene 178.2 59 2.4x 10 -4 4.5 (4.15) NC Phenanthrene 178.2 435 6.8x 10 -4 4.46 (4.15) NC 2-Methylanthracene 192.3 21.3 4.77 NC 9-Methylphenanthrene 192.3 261 4.77 NC 1...

  2. Human Health Risk & Environmental Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault SignInstituteDOE Origins Resources

  3. Infrastructure, human resources, international cooperation, research and development, environment and health, societal issues, industrial innovation, Infrastructure, human resources, international cooperation, research and development, environment and hea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zürich, Universität

    Infrastructure, human resources, international cooperation, research and development, environment and health, societal issues, industrial innovation, Infrastructure, human resources, international Infrastructure, human resources, international cooperation, research and development, environment and health

  4. Sensitivity of health risk estimates to air quality adjustment procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, R.G.

    1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter is a summary of risk results associated with exposure estimates using two-parameter Weibull and quadratic air quality adjustment procedures (AQAPs). New exposure estimates were developed for children and child-occurrences, six urban areas, and five alternative air quality scenarios. In all cases, the Weibull and quadratic results are compared to previous results, which are based on a proportional AQAP.

  5. RESEARCH ARTICLE Source, distribution, and health risk assessment of polycyclic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    polycyclic aro- matic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 87 urban street dust samples from Tianjin as a Chinese megacity that has undergone rapid urbanization were investigated. In the meantime, potential sources of PAHs were identified using the principal compo- nent analysis (PCA), and the risk of residents' exposure to PAHs via

  6. Simulations of long-term health risk from shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, C.A.; Fields, D.E.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRESTO (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) is a computer code developed under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funding to evaluate possible health effects from shallow land burial of low-level radioactive wastes. The model is intended to assess radionuclide transport, ensuing exposure, and health impact to a static local population for up to 1000 years following the end of burial operations. Human exposure scenarios that may be considered by model include normal releases (including leaching and operational spillage), human intrusion, and near site farming. Pathways and processes of transit from the trench to an individual or population include:groundwater transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, resuspension, atmospheric transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, resuspension, atmospheric transport, deposition, inhalation, and ingestion of contaminated beef, milk, crops, and water. Off-site population and individual doses and cancer risks may be calculated as well as doses and risks to the intruder and farmer. Data have been compiled for three extant shallow land burial sites: Barnwell, South Carolina; Beatty, Nevada; and West Valley, New York. Some simulation results for the Barnwell site are presented. 13 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  7. A strategic analysis study-based approach to integrated risk assessment: Occupational health risks from environmental restoration and waste management activities at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahaffey, J.A.; Doctor, P.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Glantz, C.S.; Daling, P.M.; Sever, L.E.; Vargo, G.J. Jr.; Strachan, D.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Pajunen, A.L.; Hoyt, R.C.; Ludowise, J.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of environmental restoration and waste management activities is to reduce public health risks or to delay risks to the future when new technology will be available for improved cleanup solutions. Actions to remediate the wastes on the Hanford Site will entail risks to workers, the public, and the environment that do not currently exist. In some circumstances, remediation activities will create new exposure pathways that are not present without cleanup activities. In addition, cleanup actions will redistribute existing health risks over time and space, and will likely shift health risks to cleanup workers in the short term. This report describes an approach to occupational risk assessment based on the Hanford Strategic Analysis Study and illustrates the approach by comparing worker risks for two options for remediation of N/K fuels, a subcategory of unprocessed irradiated fuels at Hanford.

  8. Evaluation of the Hazard of Microcystis Blooms for Human Health through Fish Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will be harmful to human health. #12;Proposed Work Microcystin Toxicokinetics Experiments Past experimentationEvaluation of the Hazard of Microcystis Blooms for Human Health through Fish Consumption Primary-Investigator: Duane Gossiaux - NOAA GLERL Overview Human exposure to the cyanobacterial toxin Microcystin occurs

  9. assessing human health: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Assessments Engineering Websites Summary: a next exam date recorded by the Student Health Care Center. Use this instruction guide to keep yourInstruction Guide Health...

  10. Health Safety & Environmental Protection Committee Site Risks:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartment of Energy Health Physics

  11. An Evaluation of some Health Risks of the Pollution from Fossil Fuel Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Workshop Economic Evaluation of Damage Caused by Acidifying Pollutants London, May 9 - 11,version1-3Apr2014 Author manuscript, published in "UN/ECE Workshop Economic Evaluation of Damage Caused94-27 An Evaluation of some Health Risks of the Pollution from Fossil Fuel Combustion Guy Landrieu

  12. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health NIH Division of Loan Repayment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Center The Year in Review 1 The Five Extramural Loan Repayment Programs 2 Applications, Awards of the NRSA Payback Service Center 18 The Year in Review 19 #12;U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

  13. Instrumentation in Health Education and the Adolescent Health Risk Behavior Survey (AHRBS) Instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Matthew L.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , characteristics of the peer group. The author concluded the following: (1) published articles in the four health education journals inconsistently reported survey instrument characteristics or results of psychometric property testing for the data collected...

  14. Novel Threat-risk Index Using Probabilistic Risk Assessment and Human Reliability Analysis - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George A. Beitel

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of a national need to improve the current state-of-the-art in alerting decision makers to the risk of terrorist attack, a quantitative approach employing scientific and engineering concepts to develop a threat-risk index was undertaken at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). As a result of this effort, a set of models has been successfully integrated into a single comprehensive model known as Quantitative Threat-Risk Index Model (QTRIM), with the capability of computing a quantitative threat-risk index on a system level, as well as for the major components of the system. Such a threat-risk index could provide a quantitative variant or basis for either prioritizing security upgrades or updating the current qualitative national color-coded terrorist threat alert.

  15. Clay minerals and their beneficial effects upon human health. M. Isabel Carretero*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Clay minerals and their beneficial effects upon human health. A review M. Isabel Carretero* Dpto examines the beneficial effects for human health of clay minerals, describing their use in pharmaceutical process and in its possible degradation effect. Among their uses in spas, clay minerals therapeutic

  16. aerosols human health: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health and Safety, was established, and is dedicated to providing outstanding clinical care to improve the health and safety of University employees 4 Adjoint model...

  17. ancillary human health: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health and Safety, was established, and is dedicated to providing outstanding clinical care to improve the health and safety of University employees 4 Faculty of Science &...

  18. Hanford Site Environmental Safety and Health Fiscal Year 2001 Budget-Risk management summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REEP, I.E.

    1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Budget-Risk Management Summary report is prepared to support the annual request to sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex by DOE, Headquarters. The request requires sites to provide supplementary crosscutting information related to ES&H activities and the ES&H resources that support these activities. The report includes the following: (1) A summary status of fiscal year (FY) 1999 ES&H performance and ES&H execution commitments; (2)Status and plans of Hanford Site Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup activities; (3) Safety and health (S&H) risk management issues and compliance vulnerabilities of FY 2001 Target Case and Below Target Case funding of EM cleanup activities; (4) S&H resource planning and crosscutting information for FY 1999 to 2001; and (5) Description of indirect-funded S&H activities.

  19. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    indicators in life-cycle assessment (LCA). Human Ecologicalindicators in life-cycle assessment (LCA). Human EcologicalI explore how life-cycle assessment (LCA) results can

  20. Health risk from earthquake caused releases of UF{sub 6} at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, N.W; Lu, S.; Chen, J.C.; Roehnelt, R.; Lombardi, D.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The health risk to the public and workers from potential exposure to the toxic materials from earthquake caused releases of uranium hexafluoride from the Paducah gaseous Diffusion Plant are evaluated. The results of the study show that the health risk from earthquake caused releases is small, and probably less than risks associated with the transportation of hydrogen fluoride and other similar chemicals used by industry. The probability of more than 30 people experiencing health consequences (injuries) from earthquake damage is less than 4xlO{sup 4}/yr.

  1. Communications Assistant The College of Health and Human Sciences Dean's Office is seeking a dynamic individual to help us get

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Communications College of Health and Human Sciences 226 L. L. Gibbons Building (970) 491-5182 | gretchen

  2. Risk Level Based Management System: a control banding model for occupational health and safety risk management in a highly regulated environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Kamerzell, R; Paik, S; Kapp, J; Harrington, D; Swuste, P

    2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Risk Level Based Management System (RLBMS) is an occupational risk management (ORM) model that focuses occupational safety, hygeiene, and health (OSHH) resources on the highest risk procedures at work. This article demonstrates the model's simplicity through an implementation within a heavily regulated research institution. The model utilizes control banding strategies with a stratification of four risk levels (RLs) for many commonly performed maintenance and support activities, characterizing risk consistently for comparable tasks. RLBMS creates an auditable tracking of activities, maximizes OSHH professional field time, and standardizes documentation and control commensurate to a given task's RL. Validation of RLs and their exposure control effectiveness is collected in a traditional quantitative collection regime for regulatory auditing. However, qualitative risk assessment methods are also used within this validation process. Participatory approaches are used throughout the RLBMS process. Workers are involved in all phases of building, maintaining, and improving this model. This work participation also improves the implementation of established controls.

  3. River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment (RCBRA) Human Health Risk Assessment (Volume 2)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15 to March 15ARiskSands Jim Hansen U.S.

  4. The coastal environment and human health: microbial indicators, pathogens, sentinels and reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin F.

    Innovative research relating oceans and human health is advancing our understanding of disease-causing organisms in coastal ecosystems. Novel techniques are elucidating the loading, transport and fate of pathogens in coastal ...

  5. SUSTAINABILITY PRINCIPLES Harvard University is committed to developing and maintaining an environment that enhances human health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulsson, Johan

    #12;#12;SUSTAINABILITY PRINCIPLES Harvard University is committed to developing and maintaining species. · · · Developing planning tools to enable comparative analysis of sustainability implications an environment that enhances human health and fosters a transition toward sustainability. Sustainability should

  6. An overview of the evolution of human reliability analysis in the context of probabilistic risk assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bley, Dennis C. (Buttonwood Consulting Inc., Oakton, VA); Lois, Erasmia (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Kolaczkowski, Alan M. (Science Applications International Corporation, Eugene, OR); Forester, John Alan; Wreathall, John (John Wreathall and Co., Dublin, OH); Cooper, Susan E. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the Reactor Safety Study in the early 1970's, human reliability analysis (HRA) has been evolving towards a better ability to account for the factors and conditions that can lead humans to take unsafe actions and thereby provide better estimates of the likelihood of human error for probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs). The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of recent reviews of operational events and advances in the behavioral sciences that have impacted the evolution of HRA methods and contributed to improvements. The paper discusses the importance of human errors in complex human-technical systems, examines why humans contribute to accidents and unsafe conditions, and discusses how lessons learned over the years have changed the perspective and approach for modeling human behavior in PRAs of complicated domains such as nuclear power plants. It is argued that it has become increasingly more important to understand and model the more cognitive aspects of human performance and to address the broader range of factors that have been shown to influence human performance in complex domains. The paper concludes by addressing the current ability of HRA to adequately predict human failure events and their likelihood.

  7. Blood Pressure U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Your Blood Pressure Lowering Guide to U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute #12;Your Guide to Lowering Blood Pressure 2 What Are High Blood Pressure and Prehypertension? Blood pressure is the force of blood against

  8. Access and use of information resources in assessing health risks from chemical exposure: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Health risk assessment is based on access to comprehensive information about potentially hazardous agents in question. Relevant information is scattered throughout the literature, and often is not readily accessible. To be useful in assessment efforts, emerging scientific findings, risk assess parameters, and associated data must be compiled and evaluated systemically. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are among the federal agencies heavily involved in this effort. This symposium was a direct response by EPA and ORNL to the expressed needs of individuals involved in assessing risks from chemical exposure. In an effort to examine the state of the risk assessment process, the availability of toxicological information, and the future development and transfer of this information, the symposium provided an excellent cadre of speakers and participants from state and federal agencies, academia and research laboratories to address these topics. This stimulating and productive gathering discussed concerns associated with (1) environmental contamination by chemicals; (2) laws regulating chemicals; (3) information needs and resources; (4) applications; (5) challenges and priorities; and (6)future issues. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  9. Comparative pathophysiology, toxicology, and human cancer risk assessment of pharmaceutical-induced hibernoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radi, Zaher, E-mail: zaher.radi@pfizer.com [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Drug Safety R and D, 1 Burtt Rd., Andover, MA 01810 (United States); Bartholomew, Phillip, E-mail: phillip.m.bartholomew@pfizer.com [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Drug Safety R and D, Eastern Point Road, Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Elwell, Michael, E-mail: michael.elwell@covance.com [Covance Laboratories, Chantilly, VA 20151 (United States); Vogel, W. Mark, E-mail: w.mark.vogel@pfizer.com [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Drug Safety R and D, 1 Burtt Rd., Andover, MA 01810 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In humans, hibernoma is a very rare, benign neoplasm of brown adipose tissue (BAT) that typically occurs at subcutaneous locations and is successfully treated by surgical excision. No single cause has been accepted to explain these very rare human tumors. In contrast, spontaneous hibernoma in rats is rare, often malignant, usually occurs in the thoracic or abdominal cavity, and metastases are common. In recent years, there has been an increased incidence of spontaneous hibernomas in rat carcinogenicity studies, but overall the occurrence remains relatively low and highly variable across studies. There have only been four reported examples of pharmaceutical-induced hibernoma in rat carcinogenicity studies. These include phentolamine, an alpha-adrenergic antagonist; varenicline, a nicotine partial agonist; tofacitinib, a Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor; and hydromorphone, an opiod analgesic. Potential non-genotoxic mechanisms that may contribute to the pathogenesis of BAT activation/proliferation and/or subsequent hibernoma development in rats include: (1) physiological stimuli, (2) sympathetic stimulation, (3) peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonism, and/or (4) interference or inhibition of JAK/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling. The evaluation of an apparent increase of hibernoma in rats from 2-year carcinogenicity studies of novel pharmaceutical therapeutics and its relevance to human safety risk assessment is complex. One should consider: the genotoxicity of the test article, dose/exposure and safety margins, and pathophysiologic and morphologic differences and similarities of hibernoma between rats and humans. Hibernomas observed to date in carcinogenicity studies of pharmaceutical agents do not appear to be relevant for human risk at therapeutic dosages. - Highlights: • Highly variable incidence of spontaneous hibernoma in carcinogenicity studies • Recent increase in the spontaneous incidence of hibernomas in Sprague–Dawley rats • Pharmaceutical-related hibernoma has been observed in rats, but not in humans. • Pathophysiologic and morphologic differences of hibernoma between rats and 7 humans. • Hibernomas are unlikely to be relevant to human risk assessment.

  10. Development of human brain connectivity in health and disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colby, John Benjamin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CT) often imposed some modest risk of harm to the subject (brain size have shown a modest but reproducible correlationects were isolated to only modest regions of the brainstem,

  11. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    cells James McBride, Stephen Pennycook #12;Disease... Pollution... Hunger... Global warming... Did you on important health issues, including what causes certain diseases and how to treat them safely and effectively

  12. Geomatic techniques for assessing ecological and health risk at U.S. Department of Energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regens, J.L.; White, L. [Tulane Univ. Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States); Albers, B.J. [BMD Federal, Germantown, MD (United States); Purdy, C.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hazardous substances, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and chlorinated hydrocarbons, pose unique challenges in terms of environmental restoration and waste management, especially in aquatic environments. When stored, used or disposed of improperly, hazardous materials including transuranic wastes, high level wastes, low level wastes, greater than class C wastes, mixed wastes or chemical wastes can contaminate an array of environmental receptors ranging from soils, sediments, groundwater to surface water. Depending on the specific hazardous substance and site attributes, assessing ecological and health risk as a basis for environmental restoration and waste management can be a complex, problematic activity. This is basis for environmental restoration and waste management can be a complex, problematic activity. This is particularly true for the major Defense Programs facilities managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Environmental Restoration (ER) program of DOE was initiated in 1987 to consolidate and coordinate those regulatory activities designed to identify and remediate sites at installations contaminated with radioactive, chemical or mixed wastes. To supply the tools necessary for defining, describing, and characterizing the nature of contaminants within the DOE complex and identifying alternative post-remediation land use options, DOE has implemented a program for the research and development of spatial data technologies to aid in assessing ecological and health risk.

  13. Human health benefits of ambient sulfate aerosol reductions under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chestnut, L.G. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Watkins, A.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Acid Rain Provisions (Title IV) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 call for about a 10 million ton reduction in annual SO{sub 2} emissions in the United States by the year 2010. Although the provisions apply nationwide, most of the reduction will take place in the eastern half of the United States, where use of high sulfur coal for electricity generation is most common. One potentially large benefit of Title IV is the expected reduction in adverse human health effects associated with exposure to ambient sulfate aerosols, a secondary pollutant formed in the atmosphere when SO{sub 2} is present. Sulfate aerosols are a significant constituent of fine particulate (PM{sub 2.5}). This paper combines available epidemiologic evidence of health effects associated with sulfate aerosols and economic estimates of willingness to pay for reductions in risks or incidence of health effects with available estimates of the difference between expected ambient sulfate concentrations in the eastern United States and southeastern Canada with and without Title IV to estimate the expected health benefits of Title IV. The results suggest a mean annual benefit in the eastern United States of $10.6 billion (in 1994 dollars) in 1997 and $40.0 billion in 2010, with an additional $1 billion benefit each year in Ontario and Quebec provinces.

  14. An assessment of mercury emissions and health risks from a coal-fired power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fthenakis, V.M.; Lipfert, F.; Moskowitz, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Analytical Sciences Div.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title 3 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) mandated that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) evaluate the need to regulate mercury emissions from electric utilities. In support of this forthcoming regulatory analysis the U.S. DOE, sponsored a risk assessment project at Brookhaven (BNL) to evaluate methylmercury (MeHg) hazards independently. In the US MeHg is the predominant way of exposure to mercury originated in the atmosphere. In the BNL study, health risks to adults resulting from Hg emissions from a hypothetical 1,000 MW coal-fired power plant were estimated using probabilistic risk assessment techniques. This study showed that the effects of emissions of a single power plant may double the background exposures to MeHg resulting from consuming fish obtained from a localized area near the power plant. Even at these more elevated exposure levels, the attributable incidence in mild neurological symptoms was estimated to be quite small, especially when compared with the estimated background incidence in the population. The current paper summarizes the basic conclusions of this assessment and highlights issues dealing with emissions control and environmental transport.

  15. Health, safety, and environmental risks from energy production: A year-long reality check

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and environmental risks from energy production: A year-longaddition to the risks of the existing energy infrastructureto minimize HSE risk related to the world's existing energy

  16. Modeling and Quantification of Team Performance in Human Reliability Analysis for Probabilistic Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey C. JOe; Ronald L. Boring

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and Human Reliability Assessment (HRA) are important technical contributors to the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) risk-informed and performance based approach to regulating U.S. commercial nuclear activities. Furthermore, all currently operating commercial NPPs in the U.S. are required by federal regulation to be staffed with crews of operators. Yet, aspects of team performance are underspecified in most HRA methods that are widely used in the nuclear industry. There are a variety of "emergent" team cognition and teamwork errors (e.g., communication errors) that are 1) distinct from individual human errors, and 2) important to understand from a PRA perspective. The lack of robust models or quantification of team performance is an issue that affects the accuracy and validity of HRA methods and models, leading to significant uncertainty in estimating HEPs. This paper describes research that has the objective to model and quantify team dynamics and teamwork within NPP control room crews for risk informed applications, thereby improving the technical basis of HRA, which improves the risk-informed approach the NRC uses to regulate the U.S. commercial nuclear industry.

  17. Prognostic Health Monitoring System: Component Selection Based on Risk Criteria and Economic Benefit Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binh T. Pham; Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J Lybeck; Magdy S Tawfik

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prognostic health monitoring (PHM) is a proactive approach to monitor the ability of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) to withstand structural, thermal, and chemical loadings over the SSCs planned service lifespans. The current efforts to extend the operational license lifetime of the aging fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants from 40 to 60 years and beyond can benefit from a systematic application of PHM technology. Implementing a PHM system would strengthen the safety of nuclear power plants, reduce plant outage time, and reduce operation and maintenance costs. However, a nuclear power plant has thousands of SSCs, so implementing a PHM system that covers all SSCs requires careful planning and prioritization. This paper therefore focuses on a component selection that is based on the analysis of a component's failure probability, risk, and cost. Ultimately, the decision on component selection depend on the overall economical benefits arising from safety and operational considerations associated with implementing the PHM system.

  18. Human Factors Process Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) Application in the Evaluation of Management Risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soguilon, Nenita M.

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    .3.1. Mechanisms of Prevention ............................................................................................... 11 2.4. Human Factors Process Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) ....................... 11 2.5. FMEA Components... ........................................................................................... 15 2.5.5. Risk Priority Number ....................................................................................................... 17 2.6. FMEA Model...

  19. Human Reliability Program (HRP) - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault SignInstituteDOE Origins ResourcesHuman

  20. M.S. in Health and Human Development Sustainable Food Systems Emphasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    to promote health, human development, and well-being. The sustainable food systems program focuses://sites.google.com/site/friendsoflocalfood/ Sustainable Food and Bioenergy Systems Undergraduate Program: www.sfbs.montana.edu Accredited Dietetics completed a bachelor's degree in food and nutrition, agricultural science, environmental or food studies

  1. Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety, therefore generating high

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety and a thumb-drive sized prototype system. I. INTRODUCTION xposure to air pollution consistently ranks among to occupational safety as energy demands rise. Airborne pollutants and explosive gases vary in both time and space

  2. el equilibrio: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    National Cancer Institute Publicación de NIH, No. 05-5274 Junio 2005 Cómo las familias encuentran el Health and Human Development (Instituto Nacional de Salud Infantil y Desarrollo Humano, NICHD) y el National Cancer Institute (Instituto Nacional del Cáncer, NCI). ¡Podemos! es un programa único, puesto que

  3. Human health impacts for Renewable Energy scenarios from the EnerGEO Platform of Integrated Assessment (PIA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Energy Agency with the use of the World En- ergy Model for the World Energy Outlook 2009, OrganizationHuman health impacts for Renewable Energy scenarios from the EnerGEO Platform of Integrated of renewable energy, affect concentrations of air pollutants and as a consequence affect human health. PM2

  4. Challenges for In vitro to in Vivo Extrapolation of Nanomaterial Dosimetry for Human Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Jordan N.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proliferation in types and uses of nanomaterials in consumer products has led to rapid application of conventional in vitro approaches for hazard identification. Unfortunately, assumptions pertaining to experimental design and interpretation for studies with chemicals are not generally appropriate for nanomaterials. The fate of nanomaterials in cell culture media, cellular dose to nanomaterials, cellular dose to nanomaterial byproducts, and intracellular fate of nanomaterials at the target site of toxicity all must be considered in order to accurately extrapolate in vitro results to reliable predictions of human risk.

  5. Health, safety, and environmental risks from energy production: A year-long reality check

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) offers the benefit of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions and thereby mitigating climate change risk, but it will also bring its own health, safety, and environmental risks. Curtis M. Oldenburg, Editor-in-Chief, considers these risks in the context of the broader picture of energy production. Over the last year, there have been major acute health, safety, and environmental (HSE) consequences related to accidents involving energy production from every major primary energy source. These are, in chronological order: (i) the Upper Big Branch (coal) Mine disaster, (ii) the Gulf of Mexico Macondo (oil) well blowout, (iii) the San Bruno (natural gas) pipeline leak and explosion, and (iv) the Fukushima (nuclear) reactor radioactivity releases. Briefly, the Upper Big Branch Mine disaster occurred in West Virginia on April 5, 2010, when natural methane in the mine ignited, causing the deaths of 29 miners, the worst coal mine disaster in the USA since 1970. Fifteen days later, the Macondo oil well in the Gulf of Mexico suffered a blowout, with a gas explosion and fire on the floating drilling platform that killed 11 people. The oil and gas continued to flow out of the well at the seafloor until July 15, 2010, spilling a total of approximately 5 million barrels of oil into the sea. On September 9, 2010, a 30-inch (76-cm) buried, steel, natural gas pipeline in San Bruno, California, leaked gas and exploded in a residential neighborhood, killing 8 people in their homes and burning a total of 38 homes. Flames were up to 1000 ft (300 m) high, and the initial explosion itself reportedly measured 1.1 on the Richter scale. Finally, on March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake off the coast of Japan's main island, Honshu, caused a tsunami that crippled the backup power and associated cooling systems for six reactor cores and their spent fuel storage tanks at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. At time of writing, workers trying to bring the crisis under control have been exposed to dangerous levels of radiation, and radioactive water and particulates have been released to the sea and atmosphere. These four disasters, all of which occurred within the past 12 months, were not unprecedented; similar events differing only in detail have happened around the world before, and such events will occur again. Today, developed nations primarily use fossil fuels to create affordable energy for comforts such as lighting, heating and air-conditioning, refrigeration, transportation, education, and entertainment, as well as for powering manufacturing, which creates jobs and a wealth of material goods. In addition to the risks of the existing energy infrastructure that have become obvious through these recent disasters, there is also the ongoing risk of climate change that comes from the vast emissions of greenhouse gases, primarily CO{sub 2}, from the burning of fossil fuels. The implementation of CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) will help mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel energy, but it also carries with it HSE risks. In my personal interactions with the public and with students, the main concern voiced is whether CO{sub 2} could leak out of the deep reservoirs into which it is injected and rise up out of the ground, smothering people and animals at the ground surface. Another concern expressed is that CO{sub 2} pipelines could fail and cause similar gaseous plumes of CO{sub 2}. The widespread concerns about CO{sub 2} leaking out over the ground surface may be inspired by events that have happened within natural systems in equatorial Africa, in Indonesia, and in Italy. Researchers have been investigating a wide variety of HSE risks of geologic CO{sub 2} storage for some time and have determined that wells are the main potential pathways for significant leakage from the deep subsurface. I discuss the acute HSE risks of CO{sub 2} leakage through wells and from pipelines, and compare the behavior of failures in CO{sub 2} wells and pipelines with oil and gas analogues from which most of our experien

  6. Methodology and a preliminary data base for examining the health risks of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Bassioni, A.A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical model was developed to assess and examine the health effects associated with the production of electricity from uranium and coal fuels. The model is based on a systematic methodology that is both simple and easy to check, and provides details about the various components of health risk. A preliminary set of data that is needed to calculate the health risks was gathered, normalized to the model facilities, and presented in a concise manner. Additional data will become available as a result of other evaluations of both fuel cycles, and they should be included in the data base. An iterative approach involving only a few steps is recommended for validating the model. After each validation step, the model is improved in the areas where new information or increased interest justifies such upgrading. Sensitivity analysis is proposed as the best method of using the model to its full potential. Detailed quantification of the risks associated with the two fuel cycles is not presented in this report. The evaluation of risks from producing electricity by these two methods can be completed only after several steps that address difficult social and technical questions. Preliminary quantitative assessment showed that several factors not considered in detail in previous studies are potentially important. 255 refs., 21 figs., 179 tabs.

  7. Call me 'at-risk' : maternal health in Sao Paulo's public health clinics and the desire for cesarean technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denyer, Laurie Michelle

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is based on ethnographic field research undertaken in a public health clinic in the periphery of São Paulo, as well as an examination of the "Humanisation of Childbirth Campaign". The Humanisation Campaign is a ...

  8. Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    risk from surface CO2 seeps. Data were elicited from Googas (17), a web-based catalogue of degassing

  9. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents: Introduction and Summary of Results; Facility Background; Facility Emissions; Atmospheric Dispersion and Deposition Modeling of Emissions; Human Health Risk Assessment; Screening Ecological Risk Assessment; Accident Analysis; Additional Analysis in Response to Peer Review Recommendations; References.

  10. Low- and high-risk human papillomavirus E7 proteins regulate p130 differently

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrow-Laing, Lisa; Chen Wei [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Roman, Ann, E-mail: aroman@iupui.ed [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

    2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The E7 protein of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR HPVs) targets pRb family members (pRb, p107 and p130) for degradation; low-risk (LR) HPV E7 only targets p130 for degradation. The effect of HR HPV 16 E7 and LR HPV 6 E7 on p130 intracellular localization and half-life was examined. Nuclear/cytoplasmic fractionation and immunofluorescence showed that, in contrast to control and HPV 6 E7-expressing cells, a greater amount of p130 was present in the cytoplasm in the presence of HPV 16 E7. The half-life of p130, relative to control cells, was decreased in the cytoplasm in the presence of HPV 6 E7 or HPV 16 E7, but only decreased by HPV 6 E7 in the nucleus. Inhibition of proteasomal degradation extended the half-life of p130, regardless of intracellular localization. These results suggest that there may be divergent mechanisms by which LR and HR HPV E7 target p130 for degradation.

  11. Health, safety, and environmental risks from energy production: A year-long reality check

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and environmental risks from energy production: A year-longbroader picture of energy production. Over the last year,to accidents involving energy production from every major

  12. HumanWildlife Interactions 5(2):198203, Fall 2011 Wildlife risk to aviation: a multi-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1973, Blokpoel 1976). Since the inception of the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) NationalHuman­Wildlife Interactions 5(2):198­203, Fall 2011 Commentary Wildlife risk to aviation: a multi concerns to the aviation industry worldwide. Recent events such as the ditching of US Airways Flight 1549

  13. Increased European biofuel cultivation could harm human health1 by James Morgan for www.scienceomega.com2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Bohemia, University of

    Increased European biofuel cultivation could harm human health1 by James Morgan for www that the large-scale production of biofuels in4 Europe could result in increased human mortality and crop losses that many biofuel plant species, including poplar and willow, release more isoprene ­ an6 ozone precursor

  14. VQ5. Ecosystem and Human Health How do changes in ecosystem composi9on and func9on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    VQ5. Ecosystem and Human Health How do changes in ecosystem composi9on Issue: ·Ecosystem condition affects the humans dependent on those ecosystems for life and livelihood. How do changes in ecosystem composition and function correlate with famine, exposure to harmful biotic

  15. The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer Risk Assessment Factsheet environmental,M.,andToscano,W.(Eds).(2007).Risk Assessment for Environmental Health. · NationalAssociationofLocalBoardsofHealth.(2011).RiskAssessment assessment

  16. Waste management health risk assessment: A case study of a solid waste landfill in South Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davoli, E., E-mail: enrico.davoli@marionegri.i [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Fattore, E.; Paiano, V.; Colombo, A.; Palmiotto, M. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Rossi, A.N.; Il Grande, M. [Progress S.r.l., Via Nicola A. Porpora 147, 20131 Milano (Italy); Fanelli, R. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated risk assessment study has been performed in an area within 5 km from a landfill that accepts non hazardous waste. The risk assessment was based on measured emissions and maximum chronic population exposure, for both children and adults, to contaminated air, some foods and soil. The toxic effects assessed were limited to the main known carcinogenic compounds emitted from landfills coming both from landfill gas torch combustion (e.g., dioxins, furans and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) and from diffusive emissions (vinyl chloride monomer, VCM). Risk assessment has been performed both for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects. Results indicate that cancer and non-cancer effects risk (hazard index, HI) are largely below the values accepted from the main international agencies (e.g., WHO, US EPA) and national legislation ( and ).

  17. Is California Different? State-Specific Risk Adjustment Needs under Health Reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulton, Brent D.; Dow, William H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relative Risk Score Percentile Range for U.S. and CaliforniaScore U.S. Members California Members Difference PercentileRange Percentile Upper Mean SE Mean SE Mean z-statistic

  18. Health literacy in Korean immigrants at risk for type2 diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Sarah E.; Rush, Elizabeth; Henry, Shayna

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of health literacy with diabetes outcomes. JAMA. 24-31.in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. J Adv Nurs. 2008;prevalence of type 2 diabetes among California Asian adults?

  19. RIS-M-2351 FORMALIZED SEARCH STRATEGIES FOR HUMAN RISK CONTRIBUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    outside this category are outlined. INIS Descriptors: FAILURE MODE ANALYSIS; HUMAN FACTORS; INDUS- TRIAL

  20. Krypton-85 health risk assessment for a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Tanner, J.E.; Gilbert, E.S.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The risks involved in the routine release of /sup 85/Kr from nuclear fuel reprocessing operations to the environment were compared to those resulting from the capture and storage of /sup 85/Kr. Instead of releasing the /sup 85/Kr to the environment when fuel is reprocessed, it can be captured, immobilized and stored. Two alternative methods of capturing /sup 85/Kr (cryogenic distillation and fluorocarbon absorption) and one method of immobilizing the captured gas (ion implantation/sputtering) were theoretically incorporated into a representative fuel reprocessing plant, the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, even though there are no known plans to start up this facility. Given the uncertainties in the models used to generate lifetime risk numbers (0.02 to 0.027 radiation induced fatal cancers expected in the occupational workforce and 0.017 fatal cancers in the general population), the differences in total risks for the three situations, (i.e., no-capture and two-capture alternatives) cannot be considered meaningful. It is possible that no risks would occur from any of the three situations. There is certainly no reason to conclude that risks from /sup 85/Kr routinely released to the environment are greater than those that would result from the other two situations considered. Present regulations mandate recovery and disposal of /sup 85/Kr from the off gases of a facility reprocessing spent fuel from commercial sources. Because of the lack of a clear-cut indication that recovery woud be beneficial, it does not seem prudent to burden the facilities with a requirement for /sup 85/Kr recovery, at least until operating experience demonstrates the incentive. The probable high aging of the early fuel to be processed and the higher dose resulting from the release of the unregulated /sup 3/H and /sup 14/C also encourage delaying implementation of the /sup 85/Kr recovery in the early plants.

  1. THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR RADIOECOLOGY: A NETWORK OF EXCELLENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND HUMAN RADIATION RISK REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T.

    2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioecology in the United States can be traced back to the early 1950s when small research programs were established to address the fate and effects of radionuclides released in the environment from activities at nuclear facilities. These programs focused primarily on local environmental effects, but global radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons testing and the potential for larger scale local releases of radioisotopes resulted in major concerns about the threat, not only to humans, but to other species and to ecosystems that support all life. These concerns were shared by other countries and it was quickly recognized that a multi-disciplinary approach would be required to address and understand the implications of anthropogenic radioactivity in the environment. The management, clean-up and long-term monitoring of legacy wastes at Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-regulated facilities continues to be of concern as long as nuclear operations continue. Research conducted through radioecology programs provides the credible scientific data needed for decision-making purposes. The current status of radioecology programs in the United States are: fragmented with little coordination to identify national strategies and direct programs; suffering from a steadily decreasing funding base; soon to be hampered by closure of key infrastructure; hampered by aging and retiring workforce (loss of technical expertise); and in need of training of young scientists to ensure continuation of the science (no formal graduate education program in radioecology remaining in the U.S.). With these concerns in mind, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) took the lead to establish the National Center for Radioecology (NCoRE) as a network of excellence of the remaining radioecology expertise in the United States. As part of the NCoRE mission, scientists at SRNL are working with six key partner universities to re-establish a graduate education training program for radioecology. Recently, NCoRE hosted a workshop to identify the immediate needs for science-driven discoveries, tool development and the generation of scientific data to support the legislative decision-making process for remediation strategies, long-term monitoring of radiologically-contaminated sites and protection of human health and the environment. Some of the immediate strategic research needs were identified in the fields of functional genomics for determining low-dose effects, improved low-level dosimetry, and mixed (radiological and chemical) contaminant studies. Longer term strategic research and tool development areas included development of radioecology case study sites, comprehensive decision-making tools, consequence response actions, and optimized scenario based ecosystem modeling. A summary of the NCoRE workshop findings related to waste management needs and priority areas will be presented in this paper.

  2. D & D screening risk evaluation guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robers, S.K.; Golden, K.M.; Wollert, D.A.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Screening Risk Evaluation (SRE) guidance document is a set of guidelines provided for the uniform implementation of SREs performed on decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) facilities. Although this method has been developed for D&D facilities, it can be used for transition (EM-60) facilities as well. The SRE guidance produces screening risk scores reflecting levels of risk through the use of risk ranking indices. Five types of possible risk are calculated from the SRE: current releases, worker exposures, future releases, physical hazards, and criticality. The Current Release Index (CRI) calculates the current risk to human health and the environment, exterior to the building, from ongoing or probable releases within a one-year time period. The Worker Exposure Index (WEI) calculates the current risk to workers, occupants and visitors inside contaminated D&D facilities due to contaminant exposure. The Future Release Index (FRI) calculates the hypothetical risk of future releases of contaminants, after one year, to human health and the environment. The Physical Hazards Index (PHI) calculates the risks to human health due to factors other than that of contaminants. Criticality is approached as a modifying factor to the entire SRE, due to the fact that criticality issues are strictly regulated under DOE. Screening risk results will be tabulated in matrix form, and Total Risk will be calculated (weighted equation) to produce a score on which to base early action recommendations. Other recommendations from the screening risk scores will be made based either on individual index scores or from reweighted Total Risk calculations. All recommendations based on the SRE will be made based on a combination of screening risk scores, decision drivers, and other considerations, as determined on a project-by-project basis.

  3. UCRL-JC-1197l5 PREPRINT HUMAN HEALTH RISKS FROM TNT, RDX, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Regulat. Toxicol. Pharmacol. 13,3641. Layton, D., B. Mallon, W. Mitchell, L. Hall, R. Fish, L. Perry, G. Snyder, K. Bogen, W. Malloch, C. Ham, and P. Dowd (1987), Conventional...

  4. UCRL-JC-1197l5 PREPRINT HUMAN HEALTH RISKS FROM TNT, RDX, and HMX

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The item youThe DiscoveryFuels and Power5727

  5. Using remote sensing to map the risk of human monkeypox virus in the Congo basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 2. Rodent Reservoir Data Used to Predict Humanpopulation density data and reservoir models. Data Reductionof 25% of the data for each reservoir Mapping the Risk of

  6. Prepared by Gallagher Student Health & Special Risk -4/23/2014 This document is provided as a resource intended for clients of Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. It is not intended for distribution without consent. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    , Emergency Services, Hospitalization, Maternity & Newborn Care, Mental Health / Substance Abuse DisorderPrepared by Gallagher Student Health & Special Risk - 4/23/2014 This document is provided consent. 1 Healthcare Reform Frequently Asked Questions For Students & Campus Administrators This updated

  7. Sustainable Material Selection of Toxic Chemicals in Design and Manufacturing From Human Health Impact Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human Toxicity Potential (HTP) method. Keywords: SustainableHuman Toxicity Potential (HTP) is used for the human healthassessment of toxic chemicals. HTP is a computed weighting

  8. Trends in the Health of Older Californians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Steven P.; Lee, Jennifer H.; Jawad, May Aydin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Status, Health Risks and Use of Health Services by SelectedPreventive Care and Use of Health Services Changes in HealthHealth Risks and Use of Health Services by County, Age 65

  9. Multimedia assessment of health risks for the Weldon Spring site remedial action project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haroun, L.A.; MacDonell, M.M.; Peterson, J.M.; Fingleton, D.J.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), under its Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), is responsible for cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, Weldon Spring, Missouri. The site consists of two noncontiguous areas: the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits, and the quarry. The Weldon Spring site became radioactively and chemically contaminated as a result of processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through the 1960s. The US Department of the Army used the Weldon Spring site to produce dinitrotoluene (DNT) and trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosives from 1941 to 1946. The US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC, predecessor of the DOE) used the site to process uranium and thorium ore concentrates from 1957 to 1966. The quarry was used by the Army and the AEC for waste disposal beginning in the early 1940s; it was last used for disposal in 1969. Wastes placed in the quarry include TNT and DNT residues and radioactively contaminated materials. A summary of disposal activities at the quarry is presented. As part of the environmental compliance process at the Weldon Spring site, a baseline risk evaluation (BRE) was prepared to assess the potential risks associated with contamination present at the quarry. 13 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. What stands STORM for? Prioritization of decision are related to human health,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    ): Quantitative regional risk assessment and aggregation for groundwater well catchments following stakeholder matrices?, Risk Analysis 28(2), p. 497-512.. Motivation Literature Conclusion Support of the German of subjectivity and facts Semi-quantitative Risk Assessment (Fig. 3) Problem of translation (risk mitigation

  11. FY 2008FY 2008FY 2012 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Table of Contents The Year in Review 1 The Four Intramural Loan Repayment Programs 2 Applications Institutes of Health The Year in Review In Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, 92 individuals applied to the Intramural

  12. FY 2008FY 2008FY 2010 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    ­ National Institutes of Health NIH Intramural Loan Repayment Programs Table of Contents The Year in Review 1 Repayment Programs The Year in Review In Fiscal Year (FY) 2010, 96 individuals applied to the Intramural

  13. Schematic Characterization of Human Health Impact of Toxic Chemicals for Sustainable Design and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris Y.; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human Toxicity Potential (HTP) method. With an explicitHuman toxicity potential (HTP), proposed by Guinée andassessment of toxic chemicals. HTP is a computed weighting

  14. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):186198, Fall 2009 Developing bird-strike risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , YO41 1LZ Abstract: Mineral extraction sites that are restored to open water can increase bird that attract wildlife are planned for mineral extraction sites near airports. These conflicts arises primarily-strike risk if they are planned near airports. This can generate conflict between the minerals industry

  15. Human and Ecological Risk Assessment, 12: 856870, 2006 Copyright C Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    ,1 Kan Wang,2 and Robert K. D. Peterson3 1 Biosafety Institute for Genetically Modified Agricultural to Jeff Wolt, Biosafety Institute for Genetically Modified Agricultural Products, Iowa State University Risk of Unintended Antigen Occurrence in Food: A Case Instance for Maize-Expressed LT-B Jeffrey D. Wolt

  16. Risk analyses for disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed of in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing the contaminants` toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks. Potential human health risks associated with hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) in NOW were assessed under four postclosure cavern release scenarios: inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks or leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. To estimate potential human health risks for these scenarios, contaminant concentrations at the receptor were calculated using a one-dimensional solution to an advection/dispersion equation that included first order degradation. Even under worst-case conditions, the risks have been found to be within the US EPA target range for acceptable exposure levels. From a human health risk perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for NOW.

  17. Contact the College of Human and Health Sciences for more information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    , doctors and other health and social care practitioners. This part-time provision extends to postgraduate be applied retrospectively to existing modules and programmes u Work closely with health and social care providers and professional bodies u Engage with employers across the health and social care, social policy

  18. To advance and share knowledge, discover solutions and promote opportunities in food and agriculture, bioenergy, health, the environment and human well-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    and agriculture, bioenergy, health, the environment and human well- being. Vision: To lead in science, innovationMission: To advance and share knowledge, discover solutions and promote opportunities in food

  19. Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecoveryG -Hazmat work opensHealth

  20. Cigarettes Health Risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    include hydrogen cyanide (used in chemical weapons), carbon monoxide (found in car exhaust), formaldehyde on tobacco products! Think of something nice to buy with the extra cash you will save. You'll look better

  1. A Multidisciplinary Paradigm and Approach to Protecting Human Health and the Environment, Society, and Stakeholders at Nuclear Facilities - 12244

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Joanna [Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Gochfeld, Michael [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Rutgers University, Piscataway NY, USA and Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Clarke, James; Powers, Charles W.; Kosson, David [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Rutgers University, Piscataway NY, USA and Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Civil and Environmental Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Department of Energy (DOE) continues to remediate its lands, and to consider moving toward long-term stewardship and the development of energy parks on its industrial, remediated land, it is essential to adequately characterize the environment around such facilities to protect society, human health, and the environment. While DOE sites re considering several different land-use scenarios, all of them require adequate protection of the environment. Even if DOE lands are developed for energy parks that are mainly for industrializes sections of DOE lands that will not be remediated to residential standards, there is still the need to consider the protection of human health and the environment. We present an approach to characterization and establishment of teams that will gather the information, and integrate that information for a full range of stakeholders from technical personnel, to public policy makers, and that public. Such information is needed to establish baselines, site new energy facilities in energy parks, protect existing nuclear facilities and nuclear wastes, improve the basis for emergency planning, devise suitable monitoring schemes to ensure continued protection, provide data to track local and regional response changes, and for mitigation, remediation and decommissioning planning. We suggest that there are five categories of information or data needs, including 1) geophysical, sources, fate and transport, 2) biological systems, 3) human health, 4) stakeholder and environmental justice, and 5) societal, economic, and political. These informational needs are more expansive than the traditional site characterization, but encompass a suite of physical, biological, and societal needs to protect all aspects of human health and the environment, not just physical health. We suggest a Site Committee be established that oversees technical teams for each of the major informational categories, with appropriate representation among teams and with a broad involvement of a range of governmental personnel, natural and social scientists, Native Americans, environmental justice communities, and other stakeholders. Such informational teams (and Oversight Committee) would report to a DOE-designated authority or Citizen's Advisory Board. Although designed for nuclear facilities and energy parks on DOE lands, the templates and information teams can be adapted for other hazardous facilities, such as a mercury storage facility at Oak Ridge. (authors)

  2. The importance of human performance and procedures in limiting severe accident risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higgins, J.C.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the defense in depth concept and redundancy in safety systems utilized, complex industrial plants, such as nuclear power plants (NPPs) can be operated safely. This capability has been demonstrated by many years of safe operation by numerous NPPs in the US and abroad. However, the occurrence of severe accidents has also demonstrated that constant vigilance in a number of areas is necessary to ensure continued safe operation. The areas noted as particularly important are Design, Organization and Management, Maintenance, and Operations (Human Performance). 18 refs.

  3. "Human Health Impact Characterization of Toxic Chemicals for Sustainable Design and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human toxicity potential (HTP), proposed by Guinée andassessment of toxic chemicals. HTP is a computed weightingmodel environment [5]. The HTP values of toxic chemicals are

  4. Health risks associated with exposure to gasoline additives-methyl tertiary butyl ether [MTBE]. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, Special Hearing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This hearing focuses on an Alaskan study by the Centers for Disease Control which examines possible health risks associated with exposure to gasoline additive know as MTBE. Testimony is given by Dr. William Roper, Director, CDC.

  5. AMERIND Risk Annual Conference and Trade Fair

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the AMERIND Risk, this three-day conference includes risk management training, workers' safety, human resources, and more.

  6. Risk Taking and Gender in Hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scotchmer, Suzanne

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Investors’ Attitudes toward Risk. ” forthcoming (2003)in attitudes toward ?nancial risk. ” Evolution and HumanGrossman. 2005a. “Sex and Risk: Experimen- tal Evidence. ” (

  7. E7 properties of mucosal human papillomavirus types 26, 53 and 66 correlate with their intermediate risk for cervical cancer development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansour, Mariam; Touka, Majid; Hasan, Uzma; Bellopede, Angelica; Smet, Anouk; Accardi, Rosita; Gabet, Anne-Sophie; Sylla, Bakary S. [Infections and Cancer Biology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 cours Albert-Thomas, 69008 Lyon (France); Tommasino, Massimo [Infections and Cancer Biology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 cours Albert-Thomas, 69008 Lyon (France)], E-mail: tommasino@iarc.fr

    2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that 15 different mucosal human papillomavirus (HPV) types of the genus alpha of the HPV phylogetic tree are classified as high risk for cervical cancer development. Three additional HPV types of the same genus, HPV26, 53 and 66, are classified as probable high-risk types. In this study, we have characterized the biological properties of the E7 oncoproteins from these three HPV types. All of the corresponding E7 proteins were able to associate with retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and up-regulated the expression of several positive cell cycle regulators, i.e. CDK2, cyclin A and cylin E. However, HPV26 E7 appears to be more efficient than HPV53 and 66 E7 in up-regulating the transcription of cyclin A. Unlike E7 from the high-risk type HPV16 protein, HPV26, 53 and 66 did not efficiently promote pRb degradation. In addition, E7 from these viruses was able to promote proliferation of primary human keratinocytes and circumvent G1 arrest imposed by overexpression of p16{sup INK4a}, but with less efficiency than the high-risk HPV16 E7. Together, our data show that in vitro properties of these E7 proteins correlate with the epidemiological classification of HPV26, 53 and 66 as HPV types with an intermediate risk for cervical cancer development.

  8. PA-40-201 1 Department of Health and Human Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    (s), Year(s), by 5:00 PM local time of applicant organization. AIDS Application Due Date(s) Standard AIDS Organization(s) National Institutes of Health (NIH) Components of Participating Organizations National Cancer Library of Medicine (NLM) Fogarty International Center (FIC) National Center for Complementary

  9. Do Housing Prices Reflect Environmental Health Risks? Evidence from More than 1600 Toxic Plant Openings and Closings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Currie, Janet

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A ubiquitous and largely unquestioned assumption in studies of housing markets is that there is perfect information about local amenities. This paper measures the housing market and health impacts of 1,600 openings and ...

  10. Do Housing Prices Reflect Environmental Health Risks? Evidence from More than 1600 Toxic Plant Openings and Closings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Currie, Janet

    A ubiquitous and largely unquestioned assumption in studies of housing markets is that there is perfect information about local amenities. This paper measures the housing market and health impacts of 1,600 openings and ...

  11. Patterns of health and disease have undergone dramatic transitions during human history, reflecting social and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    of infectious disease and infant mortality decreased, lengthening life expectancy.At the same time,noninfectious chronic disease rose, accounting for a greater share of over- all mortality. Greater water and air dispersed into new habitats by phoresy (i.e.,one organism transporting another), flight, or wind, but human

  12. Understanding the nature of nuclear power plant risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denning, R. S. [Ohio State Univ., 201 West 19th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1142 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the evolution of understanding of severe accident consequences from the non-mechanistic assumptions of WASH-740 to WASH-1400, NUREG-1150, SOARCA and today in the interpretation of the consequences of the accident at Fukushima. As opposed to the general perception, the radiological human health consequences to members of the Japanese public from the Fukushima accident will be small despite meltdowns at three reactors and loss of containment integrity. In contrast, the radiation-related societal impacts present a substantial additional economic burden on top of the monumental task of economic recovery from the nonnuclear aspects of the earthquake and tsunami damage. The Fukushima accident provides additional evidence that we have mis-characterized the risk of nuclear power plant accidents to ourselves and to the public. The human health risks are extremely small even to people living next door to a nuclear power plant. The principal risk associated with a nuclear power plant accident involves societal impacts: relocation of people, loss of land use, loss of contaminated products, decontamination costs and the need for replacement power. Although two of the three probabilistic safety goals of the NRC address societal risk, the associated quantitative health objectives in reality only address individual human health risk. This paper describes the types of analysis that would address compliance with the societal goals. (authors)

  13. The National Center for Radioecology (NCoRE): A Network of Excellence for Environmental and Human Radiation Risk Reduction - 13365

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhne, W.W.; Jannik, G.T.; Farfan, E.B.; Knox, A.S.; Mayer, J.J.; Murray, A.M. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioecology in the United States can be traced back to the early 1950's when small research programs were established to address the fate and effects of radionuclides released in the environment from activities at nuclear facilities. These programs focused primarily on local environmental effects, but global radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons testing and the potential for larger scale local releases of radioisotopes resulted in major concerns about the threat, not only to humans, but to other species and to ecosystems that support all life. These concerns were shared by other countries and it was quickly recognized that a multi-disciplinary approach would be required to address and understand the implications of anthropogenic radioactivity in the environment. The management, clean-up and long-term monitoring of legacy wastes at Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-regulated facilities continues to be of concern as long as nuclear operations continue. Research conducted through radioecology programs provides the credible scientific data needed for decision-making purposes. The current status of radioecology programs in the United States are: fragmented with little coordination to identify national strategies and direct programs; suffering from a steadily decreasing funding base; soon to be hampered by closure of key infrastructure; hampered by aging and retiring workforce (loss of technical expertise); and in need of training of young scientists to ensure continuation of the science (no formal graduate education program in radioecology remaining in the U.S.). With these concerns in mind, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) took the lead to establish the National Center for Radioecology (NCoRE) as a network of excellence of the remaining radioecology expertise in the United States. As part of the NCoRE mission, scientists at SRNL are working with six key partner universities to re-establish a graduate education training program for radioecology. Recently, NCoRE hosted a workshop to identify the immediate needs for science-driven discoveries, tool development and the generation of scientific data to support the legislative decision-making process for remediation strategies, long-term monitoring of radiologically- contaminated sites and protection of human health and the environment. Some of the immediate strategic research needs were identified in the fields of functional genomics for determining low-dose effects, improved low-level dosimetry, and mixed (radiological and chemical) contaminant studies. Longer term strategic research and tool development areas included development of radioecology case study sites, comprehensive decision-making tools, consequence response actions, and optimized scenario based ecosystem modeling. A summary of the NCoRE workshop findings related to waste management needs and priority areas will be presented in this paper. (authors)

  14. Human mouth microbes provide insight into health, disease | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault SignInstituteDOEMaterialsHuman

  15. Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences School of Health & Social Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    management competencies Risk assessment, risk analysis and risk assessment tools Decision making conditions Public health and epidemiology Policy and organisational analysis Medicines management Case

  16. Evaluation of health risks associated with proposed ground water standards at selected inactive uranium mill-tailings sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Nagy, J.; Lackey, K.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed ground water standards applicable to all inactive uranium mill-tailings sites. The proposed standards include maximum concentration limits (MCL) for currently regulated drinking water contaminants, as well as the addition of standards for molybdenum, uranium, nitrate, and radium-226 plus radium-228. The proposed standards define the point of compliance to be everywhere downgradient of the tailings pile, and require ground water remediation to drinking water standards if MCLs are exceeded. This document presents a preliminary description of the Phase 2 efforts. The potential risks and hazards at Gunnison, Colorado and Lakeview, Oregon were estimated to demonstrate the need for a risk assessment and the usefulness of a cost-benefit approach in setting supplemental standards and determining the need for and level of restoration at UMTRA sites. 8 refs., 12 tabs.

  17. Human health and wellbeing in environmental impact assessment in New South Wales, Australia: Auditing health impacts within environmental assessments of major projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Patrick J., E-mail: patrick.harris@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia); Harris, Elizabeth, E-mail: e.harris@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia); Thompson, Susan, E-mail: s.thompson@unsw.edu.a [Faculty of the Built Environment, UNSW, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Harris-Roxas, Ben, E-mail: b.harris-roxas@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia); Kemp, Lynn, E-mail: l.kemp@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Internationally the inclusion of health within environmental impact assessment (EIA) has been shown to be limited. While Australian EIA documentation has not been studied empirically to date, deficiencies in practice have been documented. This research developed an audit tool to undertake a qualitative descriptive analysis of 22 Major Project EAs in New South Wales, Australia. Results showed that health and wellbeing impacts were not considered explicitly. They were, however, included indirectly in the identification of traditional public health exposures associated with the physical environment and to a lesser extent the inclusion of social and economic impacts. However, no health data was used to inform any of the assessments, there was no reference to causal pathways between exposures or determinants and physical or mental health effects, and there was no inclusion of the differential distribution of exposures or health impacts on different populations. The results add conceptually and practically to the long standing integration debate, showing that health is in a position to add value to the EIA process as an explicit part of standard environmental, social and economic considerations. However, to overcome the consistently documented barriers to integrating health in EIA, capacity must be developed amongst EIA professionals, led by the health sector, to progress health related knowledge and tools.

  18. COM: A Method for Mining and Monitoring Human Activity Patterns in Home-based Health Monitoring Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    for the health care system due to the shortage of health care professionals and health care facilities. To remedy population in the coming decades will result in many complications for families, society and the government, such as the shortage of health care professionals and care facilities, an increase in age related diseases and rising

  19. Exposure to risk and its impact on human capital : essays on combat exposure, military labor, and conflict duration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yankovich, Michael F

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the impact of contemporaneous American participation in war on military labor and conflict duration. Chapter one uses variation in occupation-specific retention bonuses and mortality risks observed ...

  20. Estimates of health risks associated with radionuclide emissions from fossil-fueled steam-electric generating plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, C.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Title III, Section 112 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment, Congress directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to perform a study of the hazards to public resulting from pollutants emitted by electric utility system generating units. Radionuclides are among the groups of pollutants listed in the amendment. This report updates previously published data and estimates with more recently available information regarding the radionuclide contents of fossil fuels, associated emissions by steam-electric power plants, and potential health effects to exposed population groups.

  1. Risk Estimation Methodology for Launch Accidents.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Daniel James; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bechtel, Ryan D.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As compact and light weight power sources with reliable, long lives, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) have made space missions to explore the solar system possible. Due to the hazardous material that can be released during a launch accident, the potential health risk of an accident must be quantified, so that appropriate launch approval decisions can be made. One part of the risk estimation involves modeling the response of the RPS to potential accident environments. Due to the complexity of modeling the full RPS response deterministically on dynamic variables, the evaluation is performed in a stochastic manner with a Monte Carlo simulation. The potential consequences can be determined by modeling the transport of the hazardous material in the environment and in human biological pathways. The consequence analysis results are summed and weighted by appropriate likelihood values to give a collection of probabilistic results for the estimation of the potential health risk. This information is used to guide RPS designs, spacecraft designs, mission architecture, or launch procedures to potentially reduce the risk, as well as to inform decision makers of the potential health risks resulting from the use of RPSs for space missions.

  2. Distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in human breast milk from various locations in Tunisia: Levels of contamination, influencing factors, and infant risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ennaceur, S. [Laboratory of Environmental Analytical Chemistry (05/UR/12-03), Faculty of Sciences, Bizerte, 7021 Zarzouna (Tunisia)], E-mail: ennaceurs@yahoo.fr; Gandoura, N. [Service of Pediatrics, Regional Hospital of Bizerte, Bizerte (Tunisia); Driss, M.R. [Laboratory of Environmental Analytical Chemistry (05/UR/12-03), Faculty of Sciences, Bizerte, 7021 Zarzouna (Tunisia)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The concentrations of dichlorodiphenytrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), dieldrin, and 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were determined in 237 human breast milk samples collected from 12 locations in Tunisia. Gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) was used to identify and quantify residue levels on a lipid basis of organochlorine compounds (OCs). The predominant OCs in human breast milk were PCBs, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, HCHs, and HCB. Concentrations of DDTs in human breast milk from rural areas were significantly higher than those from urban locations (p<0.05). With regard to PCBs, we observed the predominance of mid-chlorinated congeners due to the presence of PCBs with high K{sub ow} such as PCB 153, 138, and 180. Positive correlations were found between concentrations of OCs in human breast milk and age of mothers and number of parities, suggesting the influence of such factors on OC burdens in lactating mothers. The comparison of daily intakes of PCBs, DDTs, HCHs, and HCB to infants through human breast milk with guidelines proposed by WHO and Health Canada shows that some individuals accumulated OCs in breast milk close to or higher than these guidelines.

  3. THE INVESTIGATION OF CORROSION PROBLEMS, PRECAUTIONS AND THE NEW SYSTEMS REGARDING TO THE HUMAN HEALTH IN AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Evren Sar?yerli; Mercedes-benz Turk; Gökçe S. Sar?yerli

    In every part of our life and in every division of the industry, the corrosion is one of vital problems. It becomes a subject for research and progress in the automotive sector. Based on the knowledge that the lifetime is the most important insurance that is given to the customers by the firms in a though competition, the prevention of corrosion occurs depending on the environmental protection factors and the utilization of new technology. Necessary importance should be given to the human health and the production of vehicle according to the climate changes. On this study, primarily the types of corrosion in the automotive industry has been investigated and then the data of corrosion process and the protection concepts of corrosion have been given. Mostly the dynamic corrosion program and tests that have been applied to the test vehicle took place. And then the process of surface cathodic deep dying and the development of establishment have been mentioned. Lastly, the systems for the prevention of the corrosion with the environmental protection factor determined. The usage of test vehicle met with all the corrosion problems that normally do not happen, the region of corrosion can be easily determined and all the preventive precautions can be taken before corrosion occurs. Nowadays the advanced isolation techniques such as the phosphatising, the surface process, the cathodic deep dying, the coating of surface and the other protection concepts that realize the techniques to continue by the constructive application, the successful results on the surfaces of the vehicles have been taken.

  4. BASELINE PARAMETER UPDATE FOR HUMAN HEALTH INPUT AND TRANSFER FACTORS FOR RADIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coffield, T; Patricia Lee, P

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to update parameters utilized in Human Health Exposure calculations and Bioaccumulation Transfer Factors utilized at SRS for Performance Assessment modeling. The reason for the update is to utilize more recent information issued, validate information currently used and correct minor inconsistencies between modeling efforts performed in SRS contiguous areas of the heavy industrialized central site usage areas called the General Separations Area (GSA). SRS parameters utilized were compared to a number of other DOE facilities and generic national/global references to establish relevance of the parameters selected and/or verify the regional differences of the southeast USA. The parameters selected were specifically chosen to be expected values along with identifying a range for these values versus the overly conservative specification of parameters for estimating an annual dose to the maximum exposed individual (MEI). The end uses are to establish a standardized source for these parameters that is up to date with existing data and maintain it via review of any future issued national references to evaluate the need for changes as new information is released. These reviews are to be added to this document by revision.

  5. National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health Department of Health and HumanNational Institute of Mental Health Division of Intramural Research Programs http://intramural.nimh.nih.gov/ [NIMH of Fellowship Training] National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health Department of Health

  6. University of Connecticut Health Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    ; not working in the health care field; > 15mm induration. b. High Risk: Health Care workers or those with risk or other congregate settings, health care workers, children younger than 4 years of age, and highUniversity of Connecticut Health Center John Dempsey Hospital Department of Nursing (Patient

  7. 3150 Federal Register/Vol. 76, No. 12/Wednesday, January 19, 2011/Notices DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be housed under BLl conditions. Thus these breeding experiments do not pose an appreciable risk to human AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA. SUMMARY: The NIH Guidelines currently require that recombinant DNA experiments designed to create new

  8. of Health Care National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    of Health Care National Institutes of Health Expanding Horizons Strategic Plan 2005-2009 UR nesmohsirh retir,ztnelinaoJ #12;of Health Care Expanding Horizons Strategic Plan 2005-2009 National Center.S Department of Health and Human Services National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine #12;A M mo

  9. Depleted uranium risk assessment for Jefferson Proving Ground using data from environmental monitoring and site characterization. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the third risk assessment completed for the depleted uranium (DU) munitions testing range at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG), Indiana, for the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation command. Jefferson Proving Ground was closed in 1995 under the Base Realignment and Closure Act and the testing mission was moved to Yuma Proving Ground. As part of the closure of JPG, assessments of potential adverse health effects to humans and the ecosystem were conducted. This report integrates recent information obtained from site characterization surveys at JPG with environmental monitoring data collected from 1983 through 1994 during DU testing. Three exposure scenarios were evaluated for potential adverse effects to human health: an occasional use scenario and two farming scenarios. Human exposure was minimal from occasional use, but significant risk were predicted from the farming scenarios when contaminated groundwater was used by site occupants. The human health risk assessments do not consider the significant risk posed by accidents with unexploded ordnance. Exposures of white-tailed deer to DU were also estimated in this study, and exposure rates result in no significant increase in either toxicological or radiological risks. The results of this study indicate that remediation of the DU impact area would not substantially reduce already low risks to humans and the ecosystem, and that managed access to JPG is a reasonable model for future land use options.

  10. transforming human health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenny, Paraic

    are in clinical trials: forodesine for treating leukemia and lymphoma, and BCX4208 for gout. Drugs to treat

  11. human health | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of strong brown carbon chromophores. Citation: Laskin J, A Laskin, S Nizkorodov, PJ Roach, PA Eckert, MK Gilles, B Wang, HJ Lee, and Q Hu.2014."Molecular Selectivity of Brown...

  12. EMSL - human health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MS) with high mass resolution (m&61636;m100,000). Solvent mixtures of acetonitrilewater and acetonitriletoluene were used to extract and ionize polar and non-polar...

  13. Study downplays health concerns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stringer, J.

    1996-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A government-funded study has concluded that reformulated gasoline containing methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) does not increase short-term health risks when compared with gasoline that does not contain the additive. The study, performed by the Health Effects Institute (Cambridge, MA), compared data from dozens of animal, human, and epidemiological studies of health effects linked to oxygenates, including MTBE and ethanol, but did not find enough evidence to warrant an immediate reduction in oxygenate use. However, the study did recommend that additional research be conducted on possible health consequences associated with the gasoline additives, including neurotoxic effects, if oxygenates continue to be used long term. Oxygenates have been used in gasoline since 1992, when EPA mandated that several municipalities use MTBE or other oxygenates in reformulated gasoline to reduce carbon monoxide emissions and meet Clean Air Act requirements. Shortly after the program began, residents in areas where the oxygenates were used complained of nausea, headaches, and dizziness. The institute says the study--funded by EPA and the Centers for Disease Control--will be used for a broader review of gasoline oxygenates by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

  14. Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies Health Services Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Six: [15 Credit Hours] NURS 45010 Health Care Policy and Delivery Systems or NURS 46000 Health CareRoadmap: Integrated Health Studies ­ Health Services ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-IHS-HLSV] College of Education, Health, and Human Services School of Health Sciences Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last

  15. How information resources are used by federal agencies in risk assessment application: Rapporteur summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenner-Crisp, P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of information available for risk assessment from the federal perspective is described. Different federal agencies conduct varying degrees of hazard evaluation, and some also generate empirical data. The role of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry in hazard assessments of potential public health impacts of Superfund sites includes identification of the 275 most significant substances. ATSDR is responsible for preparing toxicological profiles. ATSDR also identifies data gaps and needs critical to adequately assessing human health impacts.

  16. Development and Health The impact of health on development in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, University of

    · breakdown of health care delivery systems · inadequate application of TB control measures · increasing drug's population are at risk - increasing due to: · breakdown of health care delivery systems · growing drugDevelopment and Health The impact of health on development in Africa #12;Health challenges

  17. Qualitative risk assessment for the 100-HR-3 groundwater operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vukelich, S.E. [Golder Associates, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the qualitative risk assessment for the 100-HR-3 operable unit on the Hanford Reservation. 100-HR-3 is a ground water unit. The purpose of the QRA at the 100-HR-3 operable unit is to focus on a predefined set of human and environmental exposure scenarios in order to provides sufficient information that will assist the Tri-Party signatories (Washington State Department of Ecology, EPA and US DOE) in making defensible decisions on the necessity of Interim Remedial Measures. Frequent- and occasional-use exposure scenarios are evaluated in the human health risk assessment to provide bounding estimates of risk. The ecological risk assessment consists of an evaluation of the risks to riparian and aquatic receptors which live in or near the Columbia River.

  18. National Center for Environmental Health Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Services wastewater system. Protocol for Assessing Community Excellence in Environmental Health: Tool for Community Environmental Health Assessment Many communities face disproportionate health risks. Environmental for Assessing Community Excellence in Environmental Health PACE EH is a community involvement tool. The National

  19. Estimate of the risks of disposing nonhazardous oil field wastes into salt caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed in domal salt caverns. Potential human health risks associated with hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) in NOW were assessed under four postclosure cavern release scenarios: inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks or leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. To estimate potential human health risks for these scenarios, contaminant concentrations at the receptor were calculated using a one-dimensional solution to an advection/dispersion equation that included first order degradation. Assuming a single, generic salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, the best-estimate excess cancer risks ranged from 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} to 1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} and hazard indices (referring to noncancer health effects) ranged from 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} to 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. Under worse-case conditions in which the probability of cavern failure is 1.0, excess cancer risks ranged from 4.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} to 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and hazard indices ranged from 7.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} to 0.07. Even under worst-case conditions, the risks are within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure levels. From a human health risk perspective, salt caverns can, therefore, provide an acceptable disposal method for NOW.

  20. MSU Safety & Risk Management Page 1 of 2 SAFETY & RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    MSU Safety & Risk Management Page 1 of 2 SAFETY & RISK MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY Safety & Risk Management (SRM) of new hires. Completion of a baseline occupational health evaluation Protection Program.) #12;MSU Safety & Risk Management Page 2 of 2 MSU provides additional medical evaluations

  1. Mountain Health Choices Beneficiary Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    ................................................................................................................ 42 I. Access to Health Care Mountain Health Choices Beneficiary Report A Report to the West Virginia Bureau for Medical of Health and Human Resources, Bureau for Medical Services. #12; 1 Table of Contents I. EXECUTIVE

  2. 'Sifting the significance from the data' - the impact of high-throughput genomic technologies on human genetics and health care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Angus J; Cooper, David N; Krawczak, Michael; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Wallace, Helen M; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Raymond, Frances L; Chadwick, Ruth; Craddock, Nick; John, Ros; Gallacher, John; Chiano, Mathias

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    the system of governance also serves other, more institutional purposes. The prospect of internet-based marketing corporations using access to research data and to electronic health records as an op- portunity to market more products seems both manipu- lative...

  3. Gasbuggy Site Assessment and Risk Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the geologic and hydrologic conditions and evaluates potential health risks to workers in the natural gas industry in the vicinity of the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site, where the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission detonated an underground nuclear device in 1967. The 29-kiloton detonation took place 4,240 feet below ground surface and was designed to evaluate the use of a nuclear detonation to enhance natural gas production from the Pictured Cliffs Formation in the San Juan Basin, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, on land administered by Carson National Forest. A site-specific conceptual model was developed based on current understanding of the hydrologic and geologic environment. This conceptual model was used for establishing plausible contaminant exposure scenarios, which were then evaluated for human health risk potential. The most mobile and, therefore, the most probable contaminant that could result in human exposure is tritium. Natural gas production wells were identified as having the greatest potential for bringing detonation-derived contaminants (tritium) to the ground surface in the form of tritiated produced water. Three exposure scenarios addressing potential contamination from gas wells were considered in the risk evaluation: a gas well worker during gas-well-drilling operations, a gas well worker performing routine maintenance, and a residential exposure. The residential exposure scenario was evaluated only for comparison; permanent residences on national forest lands at the Gasbuggy site are prohibited

  4. Occupational Health Nurse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Occupational Health Nurse position is located in the Talent Sustainment group within the Human Capital Management (HCM) organization. The Talent Sustainment organization ensures that effective...

  5. THE COMPETITION BETWEEN METHYLMERCURY RISKS AND OMEGA-3 POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACID BENEFITS: A REVIEW OF CONFLICTING EVIDENCE ON FISH CONSUMPTION AND CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The health concerns of methylmercury (MeHg) contamination of seafood have recently been extended to include cardiovascular effects, especially premature mortality. Although the fatty acids (fish oils) found in most species are thought to confer a wide range of health benefits, especially to the cardiovascular system, some epidemiological studies have suggested that such benefits may be offset by adverse effects of MeHg. This comprehensive review is based on searches of the NIH MEDLINE database and compares and contrasts 145 published studies involving cardiovascular effects and exposures to mercury and other fish contaminants, intake of fatty acids including dietary supplements of fish oils, and rates of seafood consumption. Since few of these studies include adequate simultaneous measurements of all of these potential predictor variables, we summarized their effects separately, across the available studies of each, and then drew conclusions based on the aggregated findings. It is important to realize that studies of seafood consumption encompass the net effects of all of these predictor variables, but that seafood intake studies are rarely supported by human biomarker measurements that reflect the actual uptake of harmful as well as beneficial fish ingredients. As a result, exposure measurement error is an issue when comparing studies and predictor variables. It is also possible that the observed benefits of eating fish may relate more to the characteristics of the consumers than to those of the fish. We found the evidence for adverse cardiovascular effects of MeHg to be sparse and unconvincing. Studies of cardiovascular mortality show net benefits, and the findings of adverse effects are mainly limited to studies Finland at high mercury exposure levels. By contrast, a very consistent picture of beneficial effects is seen for fatty acids, after recognizing the effects of exposure uncertainties and the presence of threshold effects. Studies based on measured biomarker levels are seen to be the most reliable and present a convincing picture of strong beneficial effects, especially for those causes of death involving cardiac arrhythmia. This conclusion also extends to studies of fish-oil supplementation. Studies based on fish consumption show mainly benefits from increased consumption. This finding is supported by an ecological study at the national population level, for which the lifestyle effects that might be correlated with fish consumption within a given population would be expected to ''average out'' across nations. Finally, the net survival benefits resulting from eating fish are consistent with studies involving complete diets, although benefits are also seen to accrue from reduced consumption of red meat and saturated fats.

  6. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uriniferous lignite ashing site near Belfield, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Inactive Uraniferous Lignite Ashing Site Near Belfield, North Dakota, evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the site where coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. The US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is evaluating plans to remedy soil and ground water contamination at the site. Phase I of the UMTRA Project consists of determining the extent of soil contamination. Phase II of the UMTRA Project consists of evaluating ground water contamination. Under Phase II, results of this risk assessment will help determine what remedial actions may be necessary for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health and the environment resulting from exposure to contaminated ground water as it relates to historic processing activities at the site. Potential risk is quantified for constituents introduced from the processing activities, and not for those constituents naturally occurring in water quality in the site vicinity. Background ground water quality has the potential to cause adverse health effects from exposure through drinking. Any risks associated with contaminants attributable to site activities are incremental to these risks from background ground water quality. This incremental risk from site-related contaminants is quantified in this risk assessment. The baseline risk from background water quality is incorporated only into the assessment of potential chemical interactions and the definition of the overall site condition.

  7. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & INSTRUCTIONAL SAFETY 2009 ANNUAL REPORTS #12;2009 Annual Report Page 2 RISK MANAGEMENT I. Program Cost One method to assess the effectiveness of the University's risk management program is to compare the annual cost

  8. Adsorption of Human Papillomavirus 16 to live human sperm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribbeck, Katharina

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a diverse group of viruses that infect the skin and mucosal tissues of humans. A high-risk subgroup of HPVs is associated with virtually all cases of cervical cancer [1]–[3]. High-risk ...

  9. Health Information Systems for Primary Health Care: Thinking About Participation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahay, Sundeep

    Health Information Systems for Primary Health Care: Thinking About Participation Elaine Byrne in supporting primary health care functioning, the design, development and implementation of these systems information systems, human rights 1. Introduction: Primary health care is a crucial element of national health

  10. Multiple Criteria Analysis and Water Resources Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    risk Quality of life Health Noncancer risk Costs Cost Technology availability Health risk Testing Management factors Environmental quality Treatment Chemical performance Fairness Cost of technology & Management 48:6, 2005 · Evaluation of drinking water treatment technology: An entropy-based fuzzy application

  11. BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH Assessing the Environmental, Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH Assessing the Environmental, Health and Safety Impact of Nanoparticles are urgently needed to support risk assessments and regulatory policy decisions regarding materials containing · Environmental Protection Agency · DuPont · BASF · Evonik · Cabot · General Electric Approach The quartz crystal

  12. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ``produced water.`` Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  13. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  14. Human Pathogen Importation Importing "Human" Pathogens from Outside Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human Pathogen Importation Importing "Human" Pathogens from Outside Canada 1) Permits be obtained from the Public Health Agency Canada (PHAC) to facilitate customs clearance. 2) If a permit

  15. Tropical Medicine and International Health voLUME 2 NO rr SUPPLEMENT PP Ar-A54 NOVEMBER 1997 Human behaviour and cultural context in disease control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /faith in rural health care. Utilization rates are often low in rural clinics because health care wor

  16. Parental involvement in mental health services for diverse youth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, June

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. (2002). Mental health services for Latino adolescentsfamilies to mental health services: The role of the familyoutpatient mental health services. New York: Human Sciences

  17. Realizing Health Reform’s Potential: Why a National High-Risk Insurance Pool Is Not a Workable Alternative to the Marketplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and register to receive email alerts. Commonwealth Fund pub. 1792 Vol. 31 Why a National High-Risk Insurance Pool Is Not a Workable Alternative to the Marketplace Jean P. Hall Abstract The Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP) was a national high-risk... to outline why national high-risk pools, which continue to be proposed as policy alternatives to ACA coverage expan- sions, are expensive to enrollees as well as their administrators and ultimately unsustainable. The key lesson—and the principle on which...

  18. Utilizing toxicogenomic data to understand chemical mechanism of action in risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Vickie S., E-mail: wilson.vickie@epa.gov [National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Keshava, Nagalakshmi [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Hester, Susan [National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Segal, Deborah; Chiu, Weihsueh [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Thompson, Chad M. [ToxStrategies, Inc., 23501 Cinco Ranch Blvd., Suite G265, Katy, TX 77494 (United States); Euling, Susan Y. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The predominant role of toxicogenomic data in risk assessment, thus far, has been one of augmentation of more traditional in vitro and in vivo toxicology data. This article focuses on the current available examples of instances where toxicogenomic data has been evaluated in human health risk assessment (e.g., acetochlor and arsenicals) which have been limited to the application of toxicogenomic data to inform mechanism of action. This article reviews the regulatory policy backdrop and highlights important efforts to ultimately achieve regulatory acceptance. A number of research efforts on specific chemicals that were designed for risk assessment purposes have employed mechanism or mode of action hypothesis testing and generating strategies. The strides made by large scale efforts to utilize toxicogenomic data in screening, testing, and risk assessment are also discussed. These efforts include both the refinement of methodologies for performing toxicogenomics studies and analysis of the resultant data sets. The current issues limiting the application of toxicogenomics to define mode or mechanism of action in risk assessment are discussed together with interrelated research needs. In summary, as chemical risk assessment moves away from a single mechanism of action approach toward a toxicity pathway-based paradigm, we envision that toxicogenomic data from multiple technologies (e.g., proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, supportive RT-PCR studies) can be used in conjunction with one another to understand the complexities of multiple, and possibly interacting, pathways affected by chemicals which will impact human health risk assessment.

  19. Business Affairs Environmental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Dapeng Oliver

    Business Affairs Environmental Health & Safety Dive Safety Facility/Fire Safety/ Building Codes Radiation Control & Radiological Services Occupational Safety/ Industrial Hygiene Risk Management IFAS Facility Safety Indoor Air Quality Industrial Hygiene Hearing Conservation OSHA Safety Underground

  20. Possibilities for health-conscious assisted housing mobility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arcaya, Mariana Clair

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many poor, segregated, urban neighborhoods are rife with risks to health, which contributes to stark racial and geographic disparities in health. Fighting health disparities requires buy-in from non-health professionals ...

  1. Fair return for risk? An examination of structure, competition and profitability in the market for private finance in the National Health Service 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellowell, Mark Stephen

    2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1993, the Private Finance Initiative (PFI) has been the dominant form of large-scale infrastructure procurement used by National Health Service (NHS) organisations in the United Kingdom. As of April 2011, 123 PFI ...

  2. Health Effects Support Document for Hexachlorobutadiene Health Effects Support Document

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    For Hexachlorobutadiene

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), as amended in 1996, requires the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to establish a list of contaminants to aid the agency in regulatory priority setting for the drinking water program. In addition, SDWA requires EPA to make regulatory determinations for no fewer than five contaminants by August 2001. The criteria used to determine whether or not to regulate a chemical on the CCL are the following: The contaminant may have an adverse effect on the health of persons. The contaminant is known to occur or there is a substantial likelihood that the contaminant will occur in public water systems with a frequency and at levels of public health concern. In the sole judgment of the administrator, regulation of such contaminant presents a meaningful opportunity for health risk reduction for persons served by public water systems. The Agency’s findings for the three criteria are used in making a determination to regulate a contaminant. The Agency may determine that there is no need for regulation when a contaminant fails to meet one of the criteria. This document provides the health effects basis for the regulatory determination for hexachlorobutadiene. In arriving at the regulatory determination, data on toxicokinetics, human

  3. A framework for human microbiome research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Jonathan

    A variety of microbial communities and their genes (the microbiome) exist throughout the human body, with fundamental roles in human health and disease. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Human Microbiome Project ...

  4. The Evolution of Medical Spending Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruber, Jonathan

    How has the economic risk of health spending changed over time for U.S. households? We describe trends in aggregate health spending in the United States and how private insurance markets and public insurance programs have ...

  5. Syllabus: PHS 650 Principles of Environmental Health for Public Health Practice Spring, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    following exposure to environmental hazards. Explain current environmental risk assessment methods environmental health issues. Describe approaches for assessing, preventing, and managing environmental hazards1 Syllabus: PHS 650 Principles of Environmental Health for Public Health Practice Spring, 2012

  6. National energy strategy: Recent studies comparing the health impacts of energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.D.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The human health impacts of energy technologies arise mostly from routine emissions of pollutants and from traumatic accidents, which may also release pollutants. The natures and magnitudes of the risks differ among technologies -- they are a lot different for some -- and so the differences must be included in any evaluation of their relative merits. Based on the characteristics of their health risks, energy technologies can be classified into three groups: The fuel group, the renewable resources group, and the nuclear group. Within these technology groups, health risks are similar in form and magnitude. But among the groups they are quite different. They occur in different parts of the fuel cycle, to different people, and their characteristics are different with respect to public perceptions of their relative importance in decision making. These groups are compared in this study.

  7. Reference manual for toxicity and exposure assessment and risk characterization. CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 1980) (CERCLA or Superfund) was enacted to provide a program for identifying and responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA, 1986) was enacted to strengthen CERCLA by requiring that site clean-ups be permanent, and that they use treatments that significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous pollutants. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (USEPA, 1985; USEPA, 1990) implements the CERCLA statute, presenting a process for (1) identifying and prioritizing sites requiring remediation and (2) assessing the extent of remedial action required at each site. The process includes performing two studies: a Remedial Investigation (RI) to evaluate the nature, extent, and expected consequences of site contamination, and a Feasibility Study (FS) to select an appropriate remedial alternative adequate to reduce such risks to acceptable levels. An integral part of the RI is the evaluation of human health risks posed by hazardous substance releases. This risk evaluation serves a number of purposes within the overall context of the RI/FS process, the most essential of which is to provide an understanding of ``baseline`` risks posed by a given site. Baseline risks are those risks that would exist if no remediation or institutional controls are applied at a site. This document was written to (1) guide risk assessors through the process of interpreting EPA BRA policy and (2) help risk assessors to discuss EPA policy with regulators, decision makers, and stakeholders as it relates to conditions at a particular DOE site.

  8. All mercury lamps contain small amounts of mercury. An electric current passes through the lamp and vaporizes the mercury to generate light. Recycling mercury containing lamps protects human health and our environment from heavy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    and vaporizes the mercury to generate light. Recycling mercury containing lamps protects human health and our the environment by recycling universal wastes, contact EH&S at (949) 824-6200 or visit: www.ehs.uci.edu Mercury lamp recycling separates a number of materials for further use in new products. · The mercury is reused

  9. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaye, S.V.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) is to provide a sound scientific basis for the measurement and assessment of human health impacts of radiological and chemical substances. Our approach to fulfilling this mission is to conduct a broad program of experimental, theoretical, and field research based on a strong foundation of fundamental physical studies that blend into well-established programs in life sciences. Topics include biomedical screening techniques, biological and chemical sensors, risk assessment, health hazards, dosimetry, nuclear medicine, environmental pollution monitoring, electron-molecule interactions, interphase physics, surface physics, data base management, environmental mutagens, carcinogens, and tetratogens.

  10. DEPARTMENTOFHEALTHANDHUMANSERVICES National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    DEPARTMENTOFHEALTHANDHUMANSERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Extramural Research 9000 Institutes of Health (NIH), part of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), is the principal health research agency of the U.S. Federal Government. The Office of Extramural Research (OER) provides

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SYSTEMS, MAN, AND CYBERNETICS--PART A: SYSTEMS AND HUMANS 1 A Socio-Physical Approach to Systemic Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulieru, Mihaela

    -Physical Approach to Systemic Risk Reduction in Emergency Response and Preparedness William Ross, Student Member and preparedness, systemic risk, situational awareness. I. INTRODUCTION Emergency-response efforts in major recent of a system to improve emergency response and preparedness. Using network analysis, it is shown

  12. Health Behavior Health Promotion -Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    chronic disease complications Improve quality of life Reduce health care costs #12;ImpactHealth Behavior Health Promotion - Prevention Modification of Health Attitudes and Health Behavior #12;Health Promotion: An Overview Basic philosophy Good health = individual and collective goal

  13. Awareness and knowledge of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection among high-risk men of Hispanic origin attending a Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) clinic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colón-López, Vivian; Ortiz, Ana P; Del Toro-Mejías, Lizbeth M; García, Hermes; Clatts, Michael C; Palefsky, Joel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transmitted infections clinics as strategic venues forrisk men attending an STI clinic in Puerto Rico. P R HealthTransmitted Infection (STI) clinic. BMC Infectious Diseases

  14. Influence of egocentrism, future time perspective, and health locus of control on risk-takeing in adolescents diagosed with cancer and their siblings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Nancy Ann

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    & Hobbie, 1996). Adolescents treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and brain tumors may be at greater risk foz pooz- quality decision making leading to risky behaviors. Cognitive impairment, including attentional problems and difficulties.... 9 years, SD = 1. 7), with mean age at diagnosis being 6. 5 years (SD = 4. 1). Although 47'-, of the sample had been diagnosed with leukemia, other disease types were also represented (i. e. , Wilm's tumoz, neuroblastoma, osteo/Swing's sarcoma...

  15. Risk analyses for disposing nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.; Caudle, D.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Salt caverns have been used for several decades to store various hydrocarbon products. In the past few years, four facilities in the US have been permitted to dispose nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns. Several other disposal caverns have been permitted in Canada and Europe. This report evaluates the possibility that adverse human health effects could result from exposure to contaminants released from the caverns in domal salt formations used for nonhazardous oil field waste disposal. The evaluation assumes normal operations but considers the possibility of leaks in cavern seals and cavern walls during the post-closure phase of operation. In this assessment, several steps were followed to identify possible human health risks. At the broadest level, these steps include identifying a reasonable set of contaminants of possible concern, identifying how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the toxicities of these contaminants, estimating their intakes, and characterizing their associated human health risks. The contaminants of concern for the assessment are benzene, cadmium, arsenic, and chromium. These were selected as being components of oil field waste and having a likelihood to remain in solution for a long enough time to reach a human receptor.

  16. Center for Occupational and Environmental Health School of Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center for Occupational and Environmental Health School of Public Health University and mixtures, and the risk of ecological damage due to their use or release. 3. It facilitates informed ingredient, actions to prevent health and environmental harm depend on accurate knowledge of product

  17. Developing Human Performance Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Joe; Bruce Hallbert; Larry Blackwood; Donald Dudehoeffer; Kent Hansen

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the reactor oversight process (ROP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors the performance of utilities licensed to operate nuclear power plants. The process is designed to assure public health and safety by providing reasonable assurance that licensees are meeting the cornerstones of safety and designated crosscutting elements. The reactor inspection program, together with performance indicators (PIs), and enforcement activities form the basis for the NRC’s risk-informed, performance based regulatory framework. While human performance is a key component in the safe operation of nuclear power plants and is a designated cross-cutting element of the ROP, there is currently no direct inspection or performance indicator for assessing human performance. Rather, when human performance is identified as a substantive cross cutting element in any 1 of 3 categories (resources, organizational or personnel), it is then evaluated for common themes to determine if follow-up actions are warranted. However, variability in human performance occurs from day to day, across activities that vary in complexity, and workgroups, contributing to the uncertainty in the outcomes of performance. While some variability in human performance may be random, much of the variability may be attributed to factors that are not currently assessed. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assure licensee performance and indicate when additional investigation may be required. This paper presents research that establishes a technical basis for developing human performance measures. In particular, we discuss: 1) how historical data already gives some indication of connection between human performance and overall plant performance, 2) how industry led efforts to measure and model human performance and organizational factors could serve as a data source and basis for a framework, 3) how our use of modeling and simulation techniques could be used to develop and validate measures of human performance, and 4) what the possible outcomes are from this research as the modeling and simulation efforts generate results.

  18. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 and type 2 seroprevalence, incidence, and residual transfusion risk among blood donors in Brazil during 2007-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in HIV/AIDS patients from Brazil: Comparative performances30220-090 Brazil E-mail: anna.proietti@hemominas.mg.gov.brRisk Among Blood Donors in Brazil During 2007–2009 Anna Ba´

  19. Community Health Map: A geospatial and multivariate data visualization tool for public health datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shneiderman, Ben

    on health care. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services keeps track of a variety of health care that enables users to visualize health care data in multivariate space as well as geospatially. It is designed a compre- hensible and powerful interface for policy makers to visualize health care quality, public health

  20. Applied Health Sciences May 6, 2010 Class of 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Applied Health Sciences May 6, 2010 Class of 2010 PRESIDING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charlotte A. Tate PRESENTATION OF DEGREE CANDIDATES (see list on page 12) Biomedical and Health Information in · Biomedical Visualization · Health Informatics · Health Information Management Disability and Human

  1. Emerging contaminants: Presentations at the 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murnyak, George, E-mail: George.murnyak@us.army.mil [U.S. Army, Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, MD (United States); Vandenberg, John, E-mail: Vandenberg.John@epamail.epa.gov [U.S. EPA, Office of Research and Development, National Center for Environmental Assessment-Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Yaroschak, Paul J., E-mail: Paul.Yaroschak@osd.mil [Chemical Material and Risk Management, Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense, VA (United States); Williams, Larry, E-mail: Larry.williams45@us.army.mil [U.S. Army, Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, MD (United States); Prabhakaran, Krishnan, E-mail: Krishnan.Prabhakaran.ctr@wpafb.af.mil [Navy Health Research Center Detachment, Environmental Health Effects Laboratory, OH (United States); Hinz, John, E-mail: John.Hinz@brooks.af.mil [Air Force Research Laboratory, TX (United States)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A session entitled 'Emerging Contaminants' was held in April 2009 in Cincinnati, OH at the 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference. The purpose of the session was to share information on both programmatic and technical aspects associated with emerging contaminants. Emerging contaminants are chemicals or materials that are characterized by a perceived or real threat to human health or environment, a lack of published health standards or an evolving standard. A contaminant may also be 'emerging' because of the discovery of a new source, a new pathway to humans, or a new detection method or technology. The session included five speakers representing the Department of Defense (DoD), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and each of the military services. The DoD created the Emerging Contaminant Directorate to proactively address environmental, health, and safety concerns associated with emerging contaminants. This session described the scan-watch-action list process, impact assessment methodology, and integrated risk management concept that DoD has implemented to manage emerging contaminants. EPA presented emerging trends in health risk assessment. Researchers made technical presentations on the status of some emerging contaminates in the assessment process (i.e. manganese, RDX, and naphthalene).

  2. Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Qualitative risk evaluation for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a risk evaluation of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities on the Hanford Site. Also included are the related data that were compiled by the risk evaluation team during investigations performed on the facilities. Results are the product of a major effort performed in fiscal year 1993 to produce qualitative information that characterizes certain risks associated with these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km{sup 2} (570-mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30-km (20 mi) southeast of the 200 Area. During walkdown investigations of these facilities, data on real and potential hazards that threatened human health or safety or created potential environmental release issues were identified by the risk evaluation team. Using these findings, the team categorized the identified hazards by facility and evaluated the risk associated with each hazard. The factors contributing to each risk, and the consequence and likelihood of harm associated with each hazard also are included in this evaluation.

  3. Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.

    1998-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. Argonne determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, Argonne subsequently conducted a preliminary evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in domal salt caverns. Steps used in this evaluation included the following: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing contaminant toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and calculating human cancer and noncancer risk estimates. Five postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (referring to noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results led to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

  4. Gasbuggy Site Assessment and Risk Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gasbuggy site is in northern New Mexico in the San Juan Basin, Rio Arriba County (Figure 1-1). The Gasbuggy experiment was designed to evaluate the use of a nuclear detonation to enhance natural gas production from the Pictured Cliffs Formation, a tight, gas-bearing sandstone formation. The 29-kiloton-yield nuclear device was placed in a 17.5-inch wellbore at 4,240 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs), approximately 40 ft below the Pictured Cliffs/Lewis shale contact, in an attempt to force the cavity/chimney formed by the detonation up into the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone. The test was conducted below the southwest quarter of Section 36, Township 29 North, Range 4 West, New Mexico Principal Meridian. The device was detonated on December 10, 1967, creating a 335-ft-high chimney above the detonation point and a cavity 160 ft in diameter. The gas produced from GB-ER (the emplacement and reentry well) during the post-detonation production tests was radioactive and diluted, primarily by carbon dioxide. After 2 years, the energy content of the gas had recovered to 80 percent of the value of gas in conventionally developed wells in the area. There is currently no technology capable of remediating deep underground nuclear detonation cavities and chimneys. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must continue to manage the Gasbuggy site to ensure that no inadvertent intrusion into the residual contamination occurs. DOE has complete control over the 1/4 section (160 acres) containing the shot cavity, and no drilling is permitted on that property. However, oil and gas leases are on the surrounding land. Therefore, the most likely route of intrusion and potential exposure would be through contaminated natural gas or contaminated water migrating into a producing natural gas well outside the immediate vicinity of ground zero. The purpose of this report is to describe the current site conditions and evaluate the potential health risks posed by the most plausible contaminant exposure scenario, drilling of natural gas wells near the site. The results of this risk evaluation will guide DOE's future surveillance and monitoring activities in the area to ensure that site conditions are adequately protective of human health. This evaluation is not a comprehensive risk assessment for the site; it is intended to provide assurance that DOE's monitoring approach can detect the presence of site-related contamination at levels well below those that would pose an unacceptable risk to human health.

  5. A socio-technical account of risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, Wesley Raymond

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to determining risk. Roger E. and Jeanne X. Kasperson propose a conception of risk that is nevertheless still a species of the positivist concept. Unlike Starr and Whipple, the Kaspersons conception of risk focuses heavily on the influence of the human... Roger and Jeanne Kasperson. Not only does she question the manner in which risks are chosen for analysis, she also challenges the legitimacy of the methodologies associated with quantitative risk analysis. Jasanoff does this by performing a cross...

  6. Risk D&D Rapid Prototype: Scenario Documentation and Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Seiple, Timothy E.

    2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Report describes process and methodology associated with a rapid prototype tool for integrating project risk analysis and health & safety risk analysis for decontamination and decommissioning projects.

  7. Community Health & Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Community Health & Public Health Preparedness in the Marcellus Shale Era 2011 Pennsylvania Public Photo credit: Pittsburgh Tribune- Review, Keith Hodan #12;Safety by the Numbers PA Marcellus Citations. Conference presentation, Spain. · County Commissioners Association of Pennsylvania (CCAP). (2010). Marcellus

  8. Potential health impacts from range fires at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willians, G.P.; Hermes, A.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Hartmann, H.M.; Tomasko, D.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study uses atmospheric dispersion computer models to evaluate the potential for human health impacts from exposure to contaminants that could be dispersed by fires on the testing ranges at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. It was designed as a screening study and does not estimate actual human health risks. Considered are five contaminants possibly present in the soil and vegetation from past human activities at APG--lead, arsenic, trichloroethylene (TCE), depleted uranium (DU), and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT); and two chemical warfare agents that could be released from unexploded ordnance rounds heated in a range fire--mustard and phosgene. For comparison, dispersion of two naturally occurring compounds that could be released by burning of uncontaminated vegetation--vinyl acetate and 2-furaldehyde--is also examined. Data from previous studies on soil contamination at APG are used in conjunction with conservative estimates about plant uptake of contaminants, atmospheric conditions, and size and frequency of range fires at APG to estimate dispersion and possible human exposure. The results are compared with US Environmental Protection Agency action levels. The comparisons indicate that for all of the anthropogenic contaminants except arsenic and mustard, exposure levels would be at least an order of magnitude lower than the corresponding action levels. Because of the compoundingly conservative nature of the assumptions made, they conclude that the potential for significant human health risks from range fires is low. The authors recommend that future efforts be directed at fire management and control, rather than at conducting additional studies to more accurately estimate actual human health risk from range fires.

  9. Historical Relationship Between Performance Assessment for Radioactive Waste Disposal and Other Types of Risk Assessment in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RECHARD,ROBERT P.

    2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the evolution of the process for assessing the hazards of a geologic disposal system for radioactive waste and, similarly, nuclear power reactors, and the relationship of this process with other assessments of risk, particularly assessments of hazards from manufactured carcinogenic chemicals during use and disposal. This perspective reviews the common history of scientific concepts for risk assessment developed to the 1950s. Computational tools and techniques developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s to analyze the reliability of nuclear weapon delivery systems were adopted in the early 1970s for probabilistic risk assessment of nuclear power reactors, a technology for which behavior was unknown. In turn, these analyses became an important foundation for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal in the late 1970s. The evaluation of risk to human health and the environment from chemical hazards is built upon methods for assessing the dose response of radionuclides in the 1950s. Despite a shared background, however, societal events, often in the form of legislation, have affected the development path for risk assessment for human health, producing dissimilarities between these risk assessments and those for nuclear facilities. An important difference is the regulator's interest in accounting for uncertainty and the tools used to evaluate it.

  10. Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

  11. 5.0 POTENTIAL ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM URANIUM MINES This document has focused on the potential risks to humans from exposures to unreclaimed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5.0 POTENTIAL ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM URANIUM MINES This document has focused on the potential of potential effects due to uranium mining difficult. There is, however, a general framework for ecological constituents that may be associated with uranium mine sites. Efforts are underway to extend the ecological risk

  12. Disposal of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns -- Legality, technical feasibility, economics, and risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G.P.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, there are no fatal flaws that would prevent a state regulatory agency from approaching cavern disposal of NORM. On the basis of the costs charged by caverns currently used for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal caverns could be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

  13. Space Science Technology Health General Sci-fi & Gaming Oddities International Business Politics Education Entertainment Sports Better Than The Human Eye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Education Entertainment Sports Better Than The Human Eye Posted on: Monday, 17 January 2011, 22:22 CST Tiny a curvilinear camera, much like the human eye, with the significant feature of a zoom capability, unlike the human eye. The "eyeball camera" has a 3.5x optical zoom, takes sharp images, is inexpensive to make

  14. Home National World Business Sports Cricket Entertainment Health Science Bollywood Celebs Geekwerks New curvilinear camera adds a zoom to the `human eye'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Geekwerks New curvilinear camera adds a zoom to the `human eye' From ANI Washington, Jan 18: Researchers have developed a curvilinear camera that mimics the human eye, but has the added feature of zooming-vision surveillance, robotic vision, endoscopic imaging and consumer electronics. "We were inspired by the human eye

  15. addressing complex health: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    work is properly cited. This article considers some of the effects of health sector reform on human resources for health (HRH) in developing countries and countries in...

  16. Risk Management Steering Committee Terms of Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Risk Management Steering Committee Terms of Reference October 2009 1.0 Purpose The purposes Facilities Management Risk and Insurance Analyst Associate Vice-President Human Resources Administrative of the Steering Committee are: a) to follow a continuous process to understand and communicate risk from

  17. Environmental Occupational Health Protection Laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The manufacturing, processing, and use of chemicals and materials in industrial, workplaces are often accompanied by environmental, health, and safety hazards and risks. Occupational and environmental factors cause or ...

  18. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site, near Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the second site-specific risk assessment document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Gunnison site. A preliminary risk assessment was conducted in 1990 to determine whether long-term use of ground water from private wells near the Gunnison site had the potential for adverse health effects. Due to the results of that preliminary risk assessment, the residents were provided bottled water on an interim basis. In July 1994, the residents and the nearby Valco cement/concrete plant were given the option to connect to anew alternate water supply system, eliminating the bottled water option. This document evaluates current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether more action is needed to protect human health and the environment and to comply with the EPA standards.

  19. Employment as a Health Determinant for Working-age, Dually-eligible People with Disabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.; Kurth, Noelle K.; Hunt, Suzanne L.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Individuals with disabilities are a health disparity population with high rates of risk factors, lower overall health status, and greater health care costs. The interacting effect of employment, health and disability has not been...

  20. INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICINE AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engman, David M.

    INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICINE AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE CENTER FOR PATIENT- CENTERED FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICINE AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE CENTER FOR PATIENT-CENTERED OUTCOMES "Our work often seeks to understand human behavior and its interface with pressing health issues. We focus on the human

  1. Integrated risk information system (IRIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuxen, L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) is an electronic information system developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) containing information related to health risk assessment. IRIS is the Agency`s primary vehicle for communication of chronic health hazard information that represents Agency consensus following comprehensive review by intra-Agency work groups. The original purpose for developing IRIS was to provide guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This original purpose for developing IRIS was to guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This role has expanded and evolved with wider access and use of the system. IRIS contains chemical-specific information in summary format for approximately 500 chemicals. IRIS is available to the general public on the National Library of Medicine`s Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET) and on diskettes through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS).

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface cleanup at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Lakeview, Oregon was completed in 1989. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Ecological risks to plants or animals may result from exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the ecological environment.

  3. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaye, S.V.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a brief progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology including Measurement Applications and Development, Pollutant Assessments, Measurement Systems Research, Dosimetry Applications Research, Metabolism and Dosimetry Research and Nuclear Medicine. Biological and Radiation Physics including Atomic, Molecular, and High Voltage Physics, Physics of Solids and Macromolecules, Liquid and Submicron Physics, Analytic Dosimetry and Surface Physics and Health Effects. Chemical Physics including Molecular Physics, Photophysics and Advanced Monitoring Development. Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis including Human Genome and Toxicology, Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication, Environmental Regulations and Remediation and Information Management Technology. Risk Analysis including Hazardous Waste.

  4. Air Risk Information Support Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoaf, C.R.; Guth, D.J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Air Risk Information Support Center (Air RISC) was initiated in early 1988 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Health and Environmental Assessment (OHEA) and the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) as a technology transfer effort that would focus on providing information to state and local environmental agencies and to EPA Regional Offices in the areas of health, risk, and exposure assessment for toxic air pollutants. Technical information is fostered and disseminated by Air RISCs three primary activities: (1) a {open_quotes}hotline{close_quotes}, (2) quick turn-around technical assistance projects, and (3) general technical guidance projects. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  5. Health and Safety Policy Statement4 Health and Safety Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    To achieve this, the University will ensure effective management of risk by setting and reviewing a quality-based health and safety management system and workplace health framework, and by allocating the resources necessary to attain these. It will also define clear management systems and ensure the involvement of all

  6. Screening Level Risk Assessment for the New Waste Calcining Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. L. Abbott; K. N. Keck; R. E. Schindler; R. L. VanHorn; N. L. Hampton; M. B. Heiser

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This screening level risk assessment evaluates potential adverse human health and ecological impacts resulting from continued operations of the calciner at the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The assessment was conducted in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) report, Guidance for Performing Screening Level Risk Analyses at Combustion Facilities Burning Hazardous Waste. This screening guidance is intended to give a conservative estimate of the potential risks to determine whether a more refined assessment is warranted. The NWCF uses a fluidized-bed combustor to solidify (calcine) liquid radioactive mixed waste from the INTEC Tank Farm facility. Calciner off volatilized metal species, trace organic compounds, and low-levels of radionuclides. Conservative stack emission rates were calculated based on maximum waste solution feed samples, conservative assumptions for off gas partitioning of metals and organics, stack gas sampling for mercury, and conservative measurements of contaminant removal (decontamination factors) in the off gas treatment system. Stack emissions were modeled using the ISC3 air dispersion model to predict maximum particulate and vapor air concentrations and ground deposition rates. Results demonstrate that NWCF emissions calculated from best-available process knowledge would result in maximum onsite and offsite health and ecological impacts that are less then EPA-established criteria for operation of a combustion facility.

  7. University of Connecticut Health Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    University of Connecticut Health Center John Dempsey Hospital (Patient Identification, platelets) is and/or potentially may become medically indicated as a part of my care. 2. My doctor* has told about the known risks involved in receiving a transfusion. I know that blood used at the Health Center

  8. Privacy and identifiability in clinical research, personalized medicine, and public health surveillance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cassa, Christopher A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic transmission of protected health information has become pervasive in research, clinical, and public health investigations, posing substantial risk to patient privacy. From clinical genetic screenings to publication ...

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  10. Health effects associated with energy conservation measures in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, R.D.; Baechler, M.C.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indoor air quality can be impacted by hundreds of different chemicals. More than 900 different organic compounds alone have been identified in indoor air. Health effects that could arise from exposure to individual pollutants or mixtures of pollutants cover the full range of acute and chronic effects, including largely reversible responses, such as rashes and irritations, to the irreversible toxic and carcinogenic effects. These indoor contaminants are emitted from a large variety of materials and substances that are widespread components of everyday life. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a search of the peer-reviewed literature on health effects associated with indoor air contaminants for the Bonneville Power Administration to aid the agency in the preparation of environmental documents. Results are reported in two volumes. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the search of the peer-reviewed literature on health effects associated with a selected list of indoor air contaminants. In addition, the report discusses potential health effects of polychlorinated biphenyls and chlorofluorocarbons. All references to the literature reviewed are found in this document Volume 2. Volume 2 provides detailed information from the literature reviewed, summarizes potential health effects, reports health hazard ratings, and discusses quantitative estimates of carcinogenic risk in humans and animals. Contaminants discussed in this report are those that; have been measured in the indoor air of a public building; have been measured (significant concentrations) in test situations simulating indoor air quality (as presented in the referenced literature); and have a significant hazard rating. 38 refs., 7 figs., 23 tabs.

  11. University Services University Health and Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Management Storm and Waste Water Compliance Promote Environmental Health Drinking Water Quality Human with environmental, health and safety standards, rules and best practices. Through partnerships with units with Capital Planning and Project Management, Facilities Management and academic departments throughout

  12. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT Introduction to Enterprise Risk Management at UVM 1 #12;Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT What is Enterprise Risk Management? Enterprise risk management governance, and accountability · Facilitates effective management of the uncertainty and associated risks

  13. Risk Assessment Risk communication 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Shih-Hao

    · 1 1997 2003 WHO #12;6060 NTU Alumni Bimonthly No.87 Fault tree Event tree [2] Nuclear reactor of nuclear power plants. Reliability Engineering and Safety System, 52:297-314. [4] Jonas Hagmann. 2012. Fukushima: probing the analytical and epistemological limits of risk analysis. Journal of Risk Research. 15

  14. Innovative . Flexible . RegionalInnovative . Flexible . Regional Health Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    Executive Master in Innovative . Flexible . RegionalInnovative . Flexible . Regional Health Care Learning Outcomes Health Systems, Policy and Reform - Communicating with Policy Makers - Evidence - Human Resources Management - Data and Decision Making Executive Master in Health Care Leadership (EMHCL

  15. USGS National Wildlife Health Center Diagnostic Case Submission Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USGS National Wildlife Health Center Diagnostic Case Submission Guidelines The following guidelines broadly outline the framework used by the National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC to the submitting agency, its wildlife populations, or domestic animal and human health. Type of Specimens

  16. Exploring the factors associated with preconception health behaviors among women of childbearing age: a naturalistic inquiry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delissaint, Dieula

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Poor maternal health is one of the major risk factors related to adverse birth outcomes. Women entering pregnancy with poor health status are at higher risk of these outcomes. Prenatal care has been established as the standard prevention paradigm...

  17. Market Based Risk Mitigation: Risk Management vs. Risk Avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Market Based Risk Mitigation: Risk Management vs. Risk Avoidance Shmuel Oren University of the critical infrastructures in our society. Risk assessment and systematic consideration of risk in the design knowledge for engineers, like physics for instance, consideration of risk has penetrated all engineering

  18. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells to determine the potential for immediate human health and environmental impacts. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated groundwater that flows beneath the processing site towards the Gunnison River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentration of most contaminants are used in this risk assessment. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium.

  19. Audio visual information fusion for human activity analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thagadur Shivappa, Shankar

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recorded in a health smart home,” in LREC 2010 workshop onto the system. Health smart homes and assisted living forintelligent vehicles, smart homes and natural human-computer

  20. Schiffert Health Center TUBERCULOSIS RISK ASSESSMENT FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    · Persistent cough of unknown etiology for more than 3 weeks · Productive cough with bloody sputum Section 2

  1. ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT 2009 Annual Report Letter to President Emmert . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    0 ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT 2009 Annual Report #12;1 Letter to President Emmert Analysis Employment Liability Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Human Resources ­ Managing Key Risks: President Mark Emmert From: President's Advisory Committee on Enterprise Risk Management Re: UW Enterprise

  2. Analysis of Senate Bill 576: Health Care Coverage for Tobacco Cessation Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dependence: A US public health service report. The tobaccoHuman Services. Public Health Service. Javitz HS, Swan GE,Health. U.S. Public Health Service (PHS). (2000). Treating

  3. Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 110 | NUMBER 12 | December 2002 1239 DDT and Its Metabolites Alter Gene Expression in Human Uterine Cell Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLachlan, John

    Environmental Health Perspectives · VOLUME 110 | NUMBER 12 | December 2002 1239 DDT and Its- trichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites, have been shown to mimic estrogen, binding to and activating the ERs, thereby often pro- ducing estrogen-like effects (2,16­21). DDT and its metabolites have displayed harmful

  4. Guidance Note 052 RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance Note 052 RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS as required under the CONTROL OF SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH REGULATIONS (COSHH) and the DANGEROUS SUBSTANCES AND EXPLOSIVE ATMOSPHERES Involving the Use of Hazardous Chemicals. COSHH requires health risks to be assessed and controlled

  5. Public health assessment for New Bedford Site, New Bedford, Bristol County, Massachusetts, Region 1. Cerclis No. MAD980731335. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    New Bedford Harbor drains the Acushnet River into Buzzards Bay in southeastern Massachusetts. Extensive polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and heavy metal contamination have been detected in the estuary that drains the river, a portion of which is exposed as a mudflat at low tide. This contamination has also been detected in sediment sampled from the remainder of the harbor. Based on the information reviewed, ATSDR has concluded that this site is of public health hazard because of the risk to human health resulting from ongoing exposure to PCBs via ingestion of contaminated fish within harbor waters and dermal contact with PCB-contaminated sediments.

  6. Roadmap: School Health Education -Health and Physical Education -Bachelor of Science in Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: School Health Education - Health and Physical Education - Bachelor of Science in Education [EH-BSE-SHED-HPE] College of Education, Health and Human Services School of Health Sciences Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 22-May-12/JS This roadmap is a recommended semester

  7. Roadmap: School Health Education -Health and Physical Education -Bachelor of Science in Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: School Health Education - Health and Physical Education - Bachelor of Science in Education [EH-BSE-SHED-HPE] College of Education, Health and Human Services School of Health Sciences Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 4-June-13/JS This roadmap is a recommended semester

  8. Risk Group and Biosafety Level Definitions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cause severe human disease and present a serious hazard to workers; it may present a risk of spreading to the community, but there is usually effective prophylaxis or treatment...

  9. EAT SMART Sources: Heart Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -1- EAT SMART Sources: Heart Health American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide and Promotion; Home and Garden Bulletin Number 252; August 1992. Heart Attach Signs, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH Publication No. 01

  10. Risk assessment activities at NIOSH: Information resources and needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stayner, L.T.; Meinhardt, T.; Hardin, B. [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Occupational Safety and Health, and Mine Safety and Health Acts, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is charged with development of recommended occupational safety and health standards, and with conducting research to support the development of these standards. Thus, NIOSH has been actively involved in the analysis of risk associated with occupational exposures, and in the development of research information that is critical for the risk assessment process. NIOSH research programs and other information resources relevant to the risk assessment process are described in this paper. Future needs for information resources are also discussed.

  11. ORISE: Health physics services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE ProjectCrisis and RiskEnvironmentLiteracyHealthHealth

  12. Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk (most common ­ personal hygiene very important); d) storage ­ leaks; and e) waste ­ storage and disposal

  13. adult health evidence: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nor promoted for this at-risk population. Given financial restrictions facing many health care systems, guidance is needed to direct limited available resources toward the...

  14. Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk all connections and fittings prior to start of anesthesia. Carefully pour Isoflurane from Environmental Health & Safety before re-entering the laboratory. REFERENCES 1. Procedure

  15. Prediction of risk-based screening levels for infiltration of volatile subsurface contaminants into buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hers, I.; Zapf-Gilje, R.; Petrovic, S. [Golder Associates Ltd., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada); Macfarlane, M.; McLenehan, R. [British Columbia Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Risk-Based Corrective Action (RBCA) approach is increasingly being used for the management of contaminated sites. Fundamental to this approach is the prediction of risk-based screening levels (RBSL) for operable exposure pathways. Screening level models currently used indicate that RBSLs for the indoor inhalation pathway can be significantly lower than other pathways typically considered. This paper presents the results of a screening level spreadsheet model used to predict human health risks resulting from infiltration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings. The model was developed to derive RBSLs for soil and groundwater for possible future incorporation into the regulation of contaminated sites in British Columbia. Key features of the semi-analytical VOC infiltration model are steady-state diffusive mass transfer through soil coupled with advective and diffusive mass transfer through a cracked building floor slab or wall, source mass depletion of soil contaminants present using a mass balance approach, and the capability to incorporate multi-component chemical partitioning for soils containing non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL). The critical factors affecting VOC infiltration and resulting health risks are presented.

  16. Center for Community Health At the Center for Community Health (CCH),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Center for Community Health At the Center for Community Health (CCH), the community is our patient. Our focus is on disease prevention and improving access to care, especially for at-risk populations, to prevent health problems before they start. Partnering with the URMC, our research- based interventions

  17. Risk perspectives for TOPAZ II flight mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, A.C. Jr. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Haskin, F.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to present a preliminary estimate of the nuclear-related public health risk presented by launching and operating the Russian TOPAZ II space reactor as part of the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP). This risk is then compared to the risks from the operation of commercial nuclear power reactors and previously planned and/or launched space nuclear power missions. For the current mission profile, the initial estimate of the risk posed by launching and operating TOPAZ II is significantly less (at least two orders of magnitude) than that estimated for prior space nuclear missions. Even allowing for the large uncertainties in this estimate, it does not appear that the NEPSTP mission will present a significant health risk to the public.

  18. ENVIRONMENTALENVIRONMENTALENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & HEALTHSCIENCE & HEALTHSCIENCE & HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    development, fisheries management, protected-area planning and assessment, and human health issues. Notable related to energy, water, transportation, etc., and help develop strategies for protecting human Courses ENST 387: Economics for Natural Resources and the Environment -- An introduction to the economic

  19. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project, and the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado, phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado. The surface cleanup will reduce radon and other radiation emissions from the former uranium processing site and prevent further site-related contamination of ground water. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health and the environment, and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment was conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  20. WORKING PAPER N 2007 -40 The distortionary effect of health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , health care, public/private, compulsory/voluntary insurance PARIS-JOURDAN SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES for modeling the impact of insurance on health- care demand extending some of the results of the two-risk model and still consume healthcare. Keywords: Health insurance, Adverse selection, Health care, Public

  1. Combustion & Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, W.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) ? Combustion of fossil fuels for ? Electricity ? Industrial processes ? Vehicle propulsion ? Cooking and heat ? Other ? Munitions ? Fireworks ? Light ? Cigarettes, hookahs? FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH FFCOMBUSTION: THE THREAT ? SCALE (think health... for public health and strategies to reduce GHG ? Reduce CO2 emissions by 50% by 2030 ? Reduction in PM2.5 deaths greatly offset costs in all models FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH FFCOMBUSTION: PM EXPOSURE ? Combustion is source of most concern ? Health...

  2. Eielson Air Force Base OU-1 baseline risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvis, M.T.; Jarvis, T.T.; Van Houten, N.C.; Lewis, R.E.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment report is the second volume in a set of three volumes for operable Unit 1 (OU-1). The companion documents contain the Remedial Investigation and the Feasibility Study. Operable Unit 1 (OU-1) is one of several groups of hazardous waste sites located at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) near Fairbanks, Alaska. The operable units at Eielson are typically characterized by petroleum, oil, lubricant/solvent contamination, and by the presence of organics floating at the water table. In 1989 and 1990, firms under contract to the Air Force conducted field studies to gather information about the extent of chemical contamination in soil, groundwater, and soil air pore space (soil gas) at the site. This report documents the results of a baseline risk assessment, which uses the 1989 and 1991 site characterization database to quantify the potential human health risk associated with past Base industrial activities in the vicinity of OU-1. Background data collected in 1992 were also used in the preparation of this report.

  3. Process of Integrating Screening and Detailed Risk-based Modeling Analyses to Ensure Consistent and Scientifically Defensible Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, John W.; McDonald, John P.; Taira, Randal Y.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To support cleanup and closure of these tanks, modeling is performed to understand and predict potential impacts to human health and the environment. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a screening tool for the United States Department of Energy, Office of River Protection that estimates the long-term human health risk, from a strategic planning perspective, posed by potential tank releases to the environment. This tool is being conditioned to more detailed model analyses to ensure consistency between studies and to provide scientific defensibility. Once the conditioning is complete, the system will be used to screen alternative cleanup and closure strategies. The integration of screening and detailed models provides consistent analyses, efficiencies in resources, and positive feedback between the various modeling groups. This approach of conditioning a screening methodology to more detailed analyses provides decision-makers with timely and defensible information and increases confidence in the results on the part of clients, regulators, and stakeholders.

  4. Instructions for use JICA's Assistance in Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsunogai, Urumu

    and clinical care eg, strengthen health systems including the development of human resources, facilitiesInstructions for use #12;1 JICA's Assistance in Health Ryuji MATSUNAGA International Cooperation's Assistance in Health Example of JICA Programme/Projects 2 #12;An Overview of Japan's ODA 3 #12;Japan's ODA

  5. Ecological Risk Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological risk assessment is the appraisal of potential adverse effects of exposure to contaminants on plants and animals....

  6. Risk Without Return

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Lisa R.; Mahmoud, Ola

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Mitra, I. (2010). Extreme risk analysis. The Journal offrom the fact that the risk parity strategy was diversifiedboth in capital and in risk weights. Further research into

  7. Risks of Untrustworthiness Peter G. Neumann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumann, Peter G.

    - erties such as security, reliability, human safety, and sur- vivability in the presence of a wide range to what had been ex- pected of them. The risks relate to security, reliability, survivability, human safety, and other attributes, and span a variety of applications and critical infrastructures

  8. [Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Selected topics in risk analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voit, E.O. [ed.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is becoming increasingly clear that human health is intricately related to our chemical and physical surroundings. Recognizing the interdependence between health and environment, the Medical University of South Carolina has begun to implement a graduate program in Environmental Risk Assessment. While the infrastructure for such a program had been in place for quite a while, providing education in biostatistics, epidemiology, and mathematical modeling, specific courses in risk assessment were not available. To expedite the educational process in this area, the Department of Biometry and Epidemiology offered the course Special Topics in Risk Analysis in the Spring semester of 1993. This course was intended as an introduction for graduate students, but one faculty and one postdoctoral fellow also enrolled. The course was organized in the form of a seminar, with students or faculty presenting selected materials from the literature that covered some of the central issues in risk analysis. The presentations were subsequently written up as reports and revised according to suggestions by the instructor. This technical report comprises the presentations and reflects what has been learned in the course Special Topics in Risk Analysis. It also may serve as an easy to read introduction to the complex area of risk analysis. By the very nature of the course and this report, most of the presented material is not original. It does not necessarily reflect the authors` or the editor`s opinion and is not intended for citation. Nonetheless, the students and the instructor have paid attention to citing relevant literature in order to enable the reader to trace ideas back to the original sources. As an Appendix, this volume contains the course syllabus as well as hand-out material that the students prepared independently and that has not been edited or revised.

  9. Risk Dynamics?An Analysis for the Risk of Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Tailin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Is Quantitative Risk Assessment?" Risk Analysis, Aubrey,quantitative methods of how people do science, engineering and risk analysisthe Quantitative Definition of Risk." Risk Analysis, 1(1),

  10. IMPROVING ACCESS TO CARDIOVASCULAR PREVENTIVE HEALTH CARE FOR THE UNINSURED POLISH POPULATION IN THE GREATER CHICAGO AREA-EXPERIENCE FROM THE POLISH AMERICAN ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK FACTOR MODIFICATION (POLAARIS) PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhimaraj, Arvind

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    more than 40% underwent percutaneous coronary intervention. Also, the lipid profiles indicated high triglycerides, low HDL and normal LDL levels. In fact, an institutional learning has been that being ?Polish? is a risk factor for coronary artery...

  11. Behavioral/Cognitive Neuroanatomy Predicts Individual Risk Attitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kable, Joe

    preferences of human choosers. To that end, we quantified the risk attitudes of human decision-makers using neurobiological tools. Our whole-brain analysis revealed that the gray matter volume of a region in the right,andcouldpotentiallyprovideacharacteristicdistributionoftheseattitudesforpolicymakers. Key words: decision making; parietal cortex; risk aversion; structural MRI; subjective value

  12. Genomic mosaicism in the human brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westra, Jurjen Willem

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zlokovic BV (2008) The blood-brain barrier in health andmosaicism in the human brain ………………………………………. Chapter Threethe Alzheimer’s disease brain ………………………………. Chapter Five DNA

  13. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Baxter, S.L.; Holtzman, S.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Rowe, M.D.; Sun, C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Anspaugh, L.; Layton, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two important environmental problems at the USDOE Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) facility in Fernald, Ohio were studied in this human health risk assessment. The problems studied were radon emissions from the K-65 waste silos, and offsite contamination of ground water with uranium. Waste from the processing of pitchblende ore is stored in the K-65 silos at the FEMP. Radium-226 in the waste decays to radon gas which escapes to the outside atmosphere. The concern is for an increase in lung cancer risk for nearby residents associated with radon exposure. Monitoring data and a gaussian plume transport model were used to develop a source term and predict exposure and risk to fenceline residents, residents within 1 and 5 miles of the silos, and residents of Hamilton and Cincinnati, Ohio. Two release scenarios were studied: the routine release of radon from the silos and an accidental loss of one silo dome integrity. Exposure parameters and risk factors were described as distributions. Risks associated with natural background radon concentrations were also estimated.

  14. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program Guide to Risk Assessment & Response August 16, 2012 #12; i ...........26 List of Figures Figure 1: The Risk Management Process.......................................................................................................12 #12; 1 Overview The risk management process--of identifying, analyzing, evaluating

  15. Credit Risk Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The incumbent in this position will serve as a Credit Risk Analyst in the Transacting and Credit Risk Management department of the Office of Risk Management. The Transacting and Credit Risk...

  16. Bioinformatics for the human microbiome project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gevers, Dirk

    Microbes inhabit virtually all sites of the human body, yet we know very little about the role they play in our health. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in studying human-associated microbial communities, ...

  17. Determining the risk of cardiovascular disease using ion mobility of lipoproteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W. Henry; Krauss, Ronald M.; Blanche, Patricia J.

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  18. Recent advances in the risk assessment of melamine and cyanuric acid in animal feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorne, Jean Lou, E-mail: jean-lou.dorne@efsa.europa.eu [Unit on Contaminants, European Food Safety Authority, Largo N. Palli 5/A, 43121 Parma (Italy); Doerge, Daniel R. [NCTR, Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Vandenbroeck, Marc [Unit on Contaminants, European Food Safety Authority, Largo N. Palli 5/A, 43121 Parma (Italy); Fink-Gremmels, Johanna [University of Utrecht (Netherlands); Mennes, Wim [RIVM, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Knutsen, Helle K. [Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo (Norway); Vernazza, Francesco [Dietary and Chemical Monitoring, European Food Safety Authority, Largo N. Palli 5/A, 43121 Parma (Italy); Castle, Laurence [FERA, York (United Kingdom); Edler, Lutz [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Benford, Diane [Food Standard Agency, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Melamine can be present at low levels in food and feed mostly from its legal use as a food contact material in laminates and plastics, as a trace contaminant in nitrogen supplements used in animal feeds, and as a metabolite of the pesticide cyromazine. The mechanism of toxicity of melamine involves dose-dependent formation of crystals with either endogenous uric acid or a structural analogue of melamine, cyanuric acid, in renal tubules resulting in potential acute kidney failure. Co-exposure to melamine and cyanuric acid in livestock, fish, pets and laboratory animals shows higher toxicity compared with melamine or cyanuric acid alone. Evidence for crystal formation between melamine and other structural analogs i.e. ammelide and ammeline is limited. Illegal pet food adulterations with melamine and cyanuric acid and adulteration of milk with melamine resulted in melamine–cyanuric acid crystals, kidney damage and deaths of cats and dogs and melamine–uric acid stones, hospitalisation and deaths of children in China respectively. Following these incidents, the tolerable daily intake for melamine was re-evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the World Health Organisation, and the Scientific Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). This review provides an overview of toxicology, the adulteration incidents and risk assessments for melamine and its structural analogues. Particular focus is given to the recent EFSA risk assessment addressing impacts on animal and human health of background levels of melamine and structural analogues in animal feed. Recent research and future directions are discussed. - Highlights: ? Melamine in food and feed. ? Forms crystals in kidney with uric acid or cyanuric acid. ? Toxicity higher with cyanuric acid. ? Recent EFSA risk assessment. ? Animal and human health.

  19. Wind Turbines and Health A Rapid Review of the Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    of the evidence from current literature on the issue of wind turbines and potential impacts on human health: There are no direct pathological effects from wind farms and that any potential impact on humans can be minimised regarding wind turbines and their potential effect on human health. It is important to note that these views

  20. Risk Management, Mar 2012 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Management, Mar 2012 Risk Management Conditions of Volunteer Service (Please send completed form to the Office of Risk Management) riskmanagement@uoregon.edu Fax: 541-346-7008 As a volunteer Tort Claims Act, ORS 30.260-300, and Oregon Department of Administrative Services Risk Management

  1. CANCER RISKS AM I AT RISK?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    CANCER RISKS AM I AT RISK? It is often hard to explain why one person develops cancer and another does not. There are risk factors that could increase a person's likelihood of developing cancer, however, some people may have many of these risk factors and never get cancer. When thinking about your

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (phase 2). For the UMTRA Project site located near Green River, Utah, the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1989. The tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were removed from their original locations and placed into a disposal cell on the site. The disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and minimize further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Green River site, the risk assessment helps determine whether human health risks result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Green River site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

  3. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the UMTRA Project site near Lakeview, Oregon, was completed in 1989. The mill operated from February 1958 to November 1960. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Ecological risks to plants or animals may result from exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the ecological environment.

  4. Status of health and environmental research relative to direct coal liquefaction: 1976 to the present

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, R.H.; Cowser, K.E. (eds.)

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the status of health and environmental research efforts, supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to assist in the development of environmentally acceptable coal liquefaction processes. Four major direct coal liquefaction processes are currently in (or have been investigated at) the pilot plant stage of development. Two solvent refined coal processes (SRC-I and -II), H-coal (a catalytic liquefaction process) and Exxon donor solvent (EDS). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was assigned responsibility for evaluating SRC process materials and prepared comprehensive health and environmental effects research program plans for SRC-I and -II. A similar program plan was prepared for H-coal process materials by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A program has been developed for EDS process materials by Exxon Research and Engineering Co. The program includes short-term screening of coal-derived materials for potential health and ecological effects. Longer-term assays are used to evaluate materials considered most representative of potential commercial practice and with greatest potential for human exposure or release to the environment. Effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential health and ecological effects are also being evaluated. These assessments are being conducted to assist in formulating cost-effective environmental research programs and to estimate health and environmental risks associated with a large-scale coal liquefaction industry. Significant results of DOE's health and environmental research efforts relative to coal liquefaction include the following: chemical characterization, health effects, ecological fate and effects, amelioration and risk assessment.

  5. Scaling up Primary Health Services in Rural Tamil Nadu: Public Investment Requirements and Health Sector Reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scaling up Primary Health Services in Rural Tamil Nadu: Public Investment Requirements and Health two key questions in this paper: 1) In terms of state-wide scaling up of rural services in the area of primary health, what will it cost financially and in terms of human resources to scale-up these services

  6. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination from past activities at the former uranium processing site in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. The US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has placed contaminated material from this site in an on-site disposal cell. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the UMTRA Ground Water Project. Currently, no domestic or drinking water well tap into contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the unconsolidated materials and the bedrock. Because there is no access, no current health or environmental risks are associated with the direct use of the contaminated ground water. However, humans and ecological organisms could be exposed to contaminated ground water if a domestic well were to be installed in the unconsolidated materials in that part of the site being considered for public use (Area C). The first step is evaluating ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. For the Canonsburg site, this evaluation showed the contaminants in ground water exceeding background in the unconsolidated materials in Area C are ammonia, boron, calcium, manganese, molybdenum, potassium, strontium, and uranium.

  7. UNO Student Health Services Patient's Bill of Rights and Responsibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulp, Mark

    health care program. UNO Student Health Services Human Performance Center Rm. 109 (504) 280-6387 wwwUNO Student Health Services Patient's Bill of Rights and Responsibilities Patient's Bill of Rights to the Health Service regarding its operations and the right to change caregivers for any reason. #12;Patient

  8. MSc in Environmental Health The Place of Useful Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    ? Environmental Health is the assessment & management of environmental influences on human health, including study and the corresponding breadth of the degree reflect rapid technological progress. Environmental impact assessmentMSc in Environmental Health The Place of Useful Learning #12;What is Environmental Health

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Shiprock, New Mexico. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment at the former uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico, evaluates the potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an on-site disposal cell in 1986 through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. There are no domestic or drinking water wells in the contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the contaminated ground water in the San Juan River floodplain alluvium below the site and the contaminated ground water in the terrace alluvium area where the disposal cell is located. Because no one is drinking the affected ground water, there are currently no health or environmental risks directly associated with the contaminated ground water. However, there is a potential for humans, domestic animals, and wildlife to the exposed to surface expressions of ground water in the seeps and pools in the area of the San Juan River floodplain below the site. For these reasons, this risk assessment evaluates potential exposure to contaminated surface water and seeps as well as potential future use of contaminated ground water.

  10. Global Health and Economic Impacts of Future Ozone Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Mort D.

    We assess the human health and economic impacts of projected 2000-2050 changes in ozone pollution using the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis-Health Effects (EPPA-HE) model, in combination with results from the ...

  11. Office of Student Services Health Science Campus MS 1026

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Avenue Toledo, OH 43614-2598 419-383-5810 BSN Consortium Planning Guide Bowling Green State University College of Health & Human Services Nursing Advisor - Health Center Rm. 102 Bowling Green, OH 43403 419

  12. Environmental Health Policy Decisions: The Role of Uncertainty in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    are informed by the link between economic and quantitative risk analysis on the one hand, and the critical role in quantitative risk assessments and associated regulatory outcomes. In representing a broad spec- trum implications for those health professionals, particu- larly in the area of quantitative risk assessment, whose

  13. Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.

    1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Salt caverns can be formed in underground salt formations incidentally as a result of mining or intentionally to create underground chambers for product storage or waste disposal. For more than 50 years, salt caverns have been used to store hydrocarbon products. Recently, concerns over the costs and environmental effects of land disposal and incineration have sparked interest in using salt caverns for waste disposal. Countries using or considering using salt caverns for waste disposal include Canada (oil-production wastes), Mexico (purged sulfates from salt evaporators), Germany (contaminated soils and ashes), the United Kingdom (organic residues), and the Netherlands (brine purification wastes). In the US, industry and the regulatory community are pursuing the use of salt caverns for disposal of oil-field wastes. In 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a regulatory determination exempting wastes generated during oil and gas exploration and production (oil-field wastes) from federal hazardous waste regulations--even though such wastes may contain hazardous constituents. At the same time, EPA urged states to tighten their oil-field waste management regulations. The resulting restrictions have generated industry interest in the use of salt caverns for potentially economical and environmentally safe oil-field waste disposal. Before the practice can be implemented commercially, however, regulators need assurance that disposing of oil-field wastes in salt caverns is technically and legally feasible and that potential health effects associated with the practice are acceptable. In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. It investigated regulatory issues; the types of oil-field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location considerations; and disposal operations, closure and remediation issues. It determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could, from technical and legal perspectives, be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, ANL subsequently conducted a preliminary risk assessment on the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in salt caverns. The methodology for the risk assessment included the following steps: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing contaminant toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and estimating human cancer and noncancer risks. To estimate exposure routes and pathways, four postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (for noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the EPA target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results lead to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

  14. Unanticipated potential cancer risk near metal recycling facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raun, Loren, E-mail: raun@rice.edu [Department of Statistics, MS 138, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States)] [Department of Statistics, MS 138, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States); Pepple, Karl, E-mail: pepple.karl@epa.gov [State and Local Programs Group, Air Quality Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Policy, Analysis, and Communications Staff, Mail Drop C404-03, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [State and Local Programs Group, Air Quality Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Policy, Analysis, and Communications Staff, Mail Drop C404-03, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Hoyt, Daniel, E-mail: hoyt.daniel@epa.gov [Air Surveillance Section, US EPA, Region 6, 6EN-AS, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX 75202-2733 (United States)] [Air Surveillance Section, US EPA, Region 6, 6EN-AS, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX 75202-2733 (United States); Richner, Donald, E-mail: Donald.Richner@houstontx.gov [Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Pollution Control and Prevention, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States)] [Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Pollution Control and Prevention, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States); Blanco, Arturo, E-mail: arturo.blanco@houstontx.gov [Pollution Control and Prevention, Environmental Health Division, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States)] [Pollution Control and Prevention, Environmental Health Division, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States); Li, Jiao, E-mail: jiao.li@rice.edu [Wiess School of Natural Science, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005 (United States)] [Wiess School of Natural Science, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal recycling is an important growing industry. Prior to this study, area sources consisting of metal recycling facilities fell in a category of limited regulatory scrutiny because of assumed low levels of annual emissions. Initiating with community complaints of nuisance from smoke, dust and odor, the Houston Department of Health and Human Services (HDHHS) began a monitoring program outside metal recycler facilities and found metal particulates in outdoor ambient air at levels which could pose a carcinogenic human health risk. In a study of five similar metal recycler facilities which used a torch cutting process, air downwind and outside the facility was sampled for eight hours between 6 and 10 times each over 18 months using a mobile laboratory. Ten background locations were also sampled. Iron, manganese, copper, chromium, nickel, lead, cobalt, cadmium and mercury were detected downwind of the metal recyclers at frequencies ranging from 100% of the time for iron to 2% of the time for mercury. Of these metals, chromium, nickel, lead, cobalt, cadmium and mercury were not detected in any sample in the background. Two pairs of samples were analyzed for total chromium and hexavalent chromium to establish a ratio of the fraction of hexavalent chromium in total chromium. This fraction was used to estimate hexavalent chromium at all locations. The carcinogenic risk posed to a residential receptor from metal particulate matter concentrations in the ambient air attributed to the metal recyclers was estimated from each of the five facilities in an effort to rank the importance of this source and inform the need for further investigation. The total risk from these area sources ranged from an increased cancer risk of 1 in 1,000,000 to 6 in 10,000 using the 95th upper confidence limit of the mean of the carcinogenic metal particulate matter concentration, assuming the point of the exposure is the sample location for a residential receptor after accounting for wind direction and the number of shifts that could operate a year. Further study is warranted to better understand the metal air pollution levels in the community and if necessary, to evaluate the feasibility of emission controls and identify operational improvements and best management practices for this industry. This research adds two new aspects to the literature: identification of types and magnitude of metal particulate matter air pollutants associated with a previously unrecognized area source, metal recyclers and their potential risk to health. -- Highlights: • Air monitoring study in response to community complaints found metal contamination. • Metal recyclers found to potentially pose cancer from metal particulates • Chromium, nickel, cobalt and cadmium samples were detected in five metal recyclers. • These metals were not detected in background air samples. • Estimated increased cancer risk ranges from 1 in 1,000,000 to 8 in 10,000.

  15. Health Sciences and Nursing Health Sociology ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    related to health problems and health care systems, through developing and applying theories, concepts44 Health Sciences and Nursing Health Sociology in interdisciplinary academic fields, involving health, medicine and nursing as well as the field of sociology

  16. Health Economics College of Public Health and Health Professions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    of health, the demand for health care, health insurance theory, the demand for health insurance, the health insurance market and managed care, the market for physicians' services, production and cost of health care care environment. #12;2 Apply general and health economics concepts and show demonstrated competence

  17. Approach and strategy for performing ecological risk assessments for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation: 1994 revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, G.W. II; Sample, B.E.; Jones, D.S.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides guidance for planning and performing ecological risk assessments on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The tiered approach to ecological risk assessment has been implemented, generic conceptual models have been developed, and a general approach for developing ecological assessment endpoints and measurement endpoints has been agreed upon. The document also includes changes in terminology to agree with the terminology in the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) framework for ecological risk assessment. Although ecological risks are equal in regulatory importance to human health risks, formal procedures for ecological risk assessment are poorly developed. This report will provide specific guidance and promote the use of consistent approaches for ecological risk assessments at individual sites on the ORR. The strategy discussed in this report is consistent with the overall strategy for site management and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) compliance and with relevant EPA guidance. The general approach and strategy presented herein was developed for the ORR, but it should be applicable to other complex CERCLA sites that possess significant ecological resources.

  18. Oilfield property development: Risk assessment, management and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, M.; Robles, H.; Manweiler, D. [Environmental Science & Engineering, Inc., Fountain Valley, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several regulatory authorities in California have developed new regulations/guidelines for oilfield remediation and subsequent development. The sole intent of the new regulations/guidelines is to protect public health; however, these efforts are often misdirected. In fact, many of the regulations/guidelines impose remediation or construction standards that, in effect, render the development of such properties impractical. These standards include or require stringent contaminant cleanup standards, minimum development setbacks from active and abandoned wells, natural-gas venting provisions for abandoned wells, and the widespread use of soil-gas barriers. Clearly, these regulatory changes have been made without due consideration of risk. Because, in actuality, the risks posed by former oilfield properties are insignificant when compared to other non- oilfield properties. The history of oilfield development in Southern California has shown that although some physical and chemical hazards do exist, oilfield development, properly managed, can usually be accomplished with acceptable residual risk. Rigid control measures, based on inaccurate assumptions, merely inhibit the useful development of valuable property and misdirect resources that could be more effectively applied where the risks are real and significant. To protect public health and allow for efficient resource allocation, risk control measures must be both adequate and proportional to the actual health risks and hazards posed. This paper reviews the history of oil production in Southern California, explains the known health risks associated with oilfield property development, and describes a risk management approach that will address these risks at an acceptable cost.

  19. Regional groundwater flow and tritium transport modeling and risk assessment of the underground test area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The groundwater flow system of the Nevada Test Site and surrounding region was evaluated to estimate the highest potential current and near-term risk to the public and the environment from groundwater contamination downgradient of the underground nuclear testing areas. The highest, or greatest, potential risk is estimated by assuming that several unusually rapid transport pathways as well as public and environmental exposures all occur simultaneously. These conservative assumptions may cause risks to be significantly overestimated. However, such a deliberate, conservative approach ensures that public health and environmental risks are not underestimated and allows prioritization of future work to minimize potential risks. Historical underground nuclear testing activities, particularly detonations near or below the water table, have contaminated groundwater near testing locations with radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Tritium was selected as the contaminant of primary concern for this phase of the project because it is abundant, highly mobile, and represents the most significant contributor to the potential radiation dose to humans for the short term. It was also assumed that the predicted risk to human health and the environment from tritium exposure would reasonably represent the risk from other, less mobile radionuclides within the same time frame. Other contaminants will be investigated at a later date. Existing and newly collected hydrogeologic data were compiled for a large area of southern Nevada and California, encompassing the Nevada Test Site regional groundwater flow system. These data were used to develop numerical groundwater flow and tritium transport models for use in the prediction of tritium concentrations at hypothetical human and ecological receptor locations for a 200-year time frame. A numerical, steady-state regional groundwater flow model was developed to serve as the basis for the prediction of the movement of tritium from the underground testing areas on a regional scale. The groundwater flow model was used in conjunction with a particle-tracking code to define the pathlines followed by groundwater particles originating from 415 points associated with 253 nuclear test locations. Three of the most rapid pathlines were selected for transport simulations. These pathlines are associated with three nuclear test locations, each representing one of the three largest testing areas. These testing locations are: BOURBON on Yucca Flat, HOUSTON on Central Pahute Mesa, and TYBO on Western Pahute Mesa. One-dimensional stochastic tritium transport simulations were performed for the three pathlines using the Monte Carlo method with Latin hypercube sampling. For the BOURBON and TYBO pathlines, sources of tritium from other tests located along the same pathline were included in the simulations. Sensitivity analyses were also performed on the transport model to evaluate the uncertainties associated with the geologic model, the rates of groundwater flow, the tritium source, and the transport parameters. Tritium concentration predictions were found to be mostly sensitive to the regional geology in controlling the horizontal and vertical position of transport pathways. The simulated concentrations are also sensitive to matrix diffusion, an important mechanism governing the migration of tritium in fractured carbonate and volcanic rocks. Source term concentration uncertainty is most important near the test locations and decreases in importance as the travel distance increases. The uncertainty on groundwater flow rates is as important as that on matrix diffusion at downgradient locations. The risk assessment was performed to provide conservative and bounding estimates of the potential risks to human health and the environment from tritium in groundwater. Risk models were designed by coupling scenario-specific tritium intake with tritium dose models and cancer and genetic risk estimates using the Monte Carlo method. Estimated radiation doses received by individuals from chronic exposure to tritium, and the corre

  20. Risk Management Strategy Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Risk Management Strategy Introduction 1. The risk of adverse consequences is inherent in all activity. Dynamic enterprise will inevitably create new risks. Risk management is about ensuring that all significant relevant risks are understood and prioritised as part of normal management

  1. Overview of the Capstone Depleted Uranium Study of Aerosols from Impact with Armored Vehicles: Test Setup and Aerosol Generation, Characterization, and Application in Assessing Dose and Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Guilmette, Raymond A.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Characterization and Risk Assessment Study was conducted to generate data about DU aerosols generated during the perforation of armored combat vehicles with large-caliber DU penetrators, and to apply the data in assessments of human health risks to personnel exposed to these aerosols, primarily through inhalation, during the 1991 Gulf War or in future military operations. The Capstone study consisted of two components: 1) generating, sampling and characterizing DU aerosols by firing at and perforating combat vehicles and 2) applying the source-term quantities and characteristics of the aerosols to the evaluation of doses and risks. This paper reviews the background of the study including the bases for the study, previous reviews of DU particles and health assessments from DU used by the U.S. military, the objectives of the study components, the participants and oversight teams, and the types of exposures it was intended to evaluate. It then discusses exposure scenarios used in the dose and risk assessment and provides an overview of how the field tests and dose and risk assessments were conducted.

  2. Risk-adjusted monitoring of survival times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sego, Landon H.; Reynolds, Marion R.; Woodall, William H.

    2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the monitoring of clinical outcomes, where each patient has a di®erent risk of death prior to undergoing a health care procedure.We propose a risk-adjusted survival time CUSUM chart (RAST CUSUM) for monitoring clinical outcomes where the primary endpoint is a continuous, time-to-event variable that may be right censored. Risk adjustment is accomplished using accelerated failure time regression models. We compare the average run length performance of the RAST CUSUM chart to the risk-adjusted Bernoulli CUSUM chart, using data from cardiac surgeries to motivate the details of the comparison. The comparisons show that the RAST CUSUM chart is more efficient at detecting a sudden decrease in the odds of death than the risk-adjusted Bernoulli CUSUM chart, especially when the fraction of censored observations is not too high. We also discuss the implementation of a prospective monitoring scheme using the RAST CUSUM chart.

  3. assessing health worker: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Human health impacts for Renewable Energy scenarios from the EnerGEO Platform of Integrated running the EnerGEO...

  4. Emergency Response Health Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mena, RaJah [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis; Pemberton, Wendy [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis; Beal, William [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Andrews

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health; however, there are major differences between health physics for research or occupational safety and health physics during a large-scale radiological emergency. The deployment of a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) monitoring and assessment team to Japan in the wake of the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant yielded a wealth of lessons on these difference. Critical teams (CMOC (Consequence Management Outside the Continental U.S.) and CMHT (Consequence Management Home Team) ) worked together to collect, compile, review, and analyze radiological data from Japan to support the response needs of and answer questions from the Government of Japan, the U.S. military in Japan, the U.S. Embassy and U.S. citizens in Japan, and U.S. citizens in America. This paper addresses the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. A key lesson learned was that public perception and the availability of technology with social media requires a diligent effort to keep the public informed of the science behind the decisions in a manner that is meaningful to them.

  5. Asbestos exposure--quantitative assessment of risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, J.M.; Weill, H.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for deriving quantitative estimates of asbestos-associated health risks are reviewed and their numerous assumptions and uncertainties described. These methods involve extrapolation of risks observed at past relatively high asbestos concentration levels down to usually much lower concentration levels of interest today--in some cases, orders of magnitude lower. These models are used to calculate estimates of the potential risk to workers manufacturing asbestos products and to students enrolled in schools containing asbestos products. The potential risk to workers exposed for 40 yr to 0.5 fibers per milliliter (f/ml) of mixed asbestos fiber type (a permissible workplace exposure limit under consideration by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ) are estimated as 82 lifetime excess cancers per 10,000 exposed. The risk to students exposed to an average asbestos concentration of 0.001 f/ml of mixed asbestos fiber types for an average enrollment period of 6 school years is estimated as 5 lifetime excess cancers per one million exposed. If the school exposure is to chrysotile asbestos only, then the estimated risk is 1.5 lifetime excess cancers per million. Risks from other causes are presented for comparison; e.g., annual rates (per million) of 10 deaths from high school football, 14 from bicycling (10-14 yr of age), 5 to 20 for whooping cough vaccination. Decisions concerning asbestos products require participation of all parties involved and should only be made after a scientifically defensible estimate of the associated risk has been obtained. In many cases to date, such decisions have been made without adequate consideration of the level of risk or the cost-effectiveness of attempts to lower the potential risk. 73 references.

  6. Overview of Navy marine ecological risk assessment projects in Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tracey, G.A. [Science Applications International Corp., Narragansett, RI (United States); King, J.; Quinn, J. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI (United States); Hahn, S. [Navy, Lester, PA (United States). Northern Div.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Navy has had a long and prominent role in shaping the shoreline of Narragansett Bay, R.I. During times of war, Navy bases in this area, as well as elsewhere, commonly used seaside landfill and/or conduits to the sea to dispose of wastes, including construction materials, solvents, spent fuels, and electrical components. Recognizing that the disposal areas may pose risks to the environment and human health, the Navy has been actively pursuing remediation options based on input from Ecological Risk Assessments (ERAs). In Narragansett Bay, four sites have been targeted for ecological risk assessments; one at the Naval Construction Battalion Center in western Narragansett Bay and three sites at the Naval Education and Training Center (NETC) in the Lower East Passage of Narragansett Bay. To streamline the process of ERA scoping, OA/QC and reporting procedures, a Master Plan was developed to encompass all general aspects of these projects, and were augmented by site-specific study plans for each ERA. This approach has dramatically reduced the time and cost which would have been required had each study been developed separately. This presentation will include an overview of each project, including conceptual approach, problem formulation, exposure and effects characterization and risk assessment summary.

  7. Risk management for buildings -- Has the time come?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, D.L.; Hunter, R.L.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are both incentives and challenges for applying formal risk management processes to buildings and other structures, including bridges, highways, dams, stadiums, shopping centers, and private dwellings. Based on an assessment of several issues, the authors conclude that for certain types of buildings and structures the time has come for the use of a formal risk-management approach, including probabilistic risk assessment methods, to help identify dominant risks to public health, safety, and security and to help manage these risks in a cost-effective manner.

  8. BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A R RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDIN T PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEM

  9. Enterprise Risk Management Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Framework The Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) framework includes four steps: identify the risks, determine the probability and impact of each one, identify controls that are...

  10. Commentary Biodiesel Exhaust: The Need for Health Effects Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimberly J. Swanson; Michael C. Madden; Andrew J. Ghio

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BACKGROUND: Biodiesel is a diesel fuel alternative that has shown potential of becoming a commercially accepted part of the United States ’ energy infrastructure. In November 2004, the signing of the Jobs Creation Bill HR 4520 marked an important turning point for the future production of biodiesel in the United States because it offers a federal excise tax credit. By the end of 2005, industry production was 75 million gallons, a 300 % increase in 1 year. Current industry capacity, however, stands at just over 300 million gallons/year, and current expansion and new plant construction could double the industry’s capacity within a few years. Biodiesel exhaust emission has been extensively characterized under field and laboratory conditions, but there have been limited cytotoxicity and mutagenicity studies on the effects of biodiesel exhaust in biologic systems. OBJECTIVES: We reviewed pertinent medical literature and addressed recommendations on testing specific research needs in the field of biodiesel toxicity. DISCUSSION: Employment of biodiesel fuel is favorably viewed, and there are suggestions that its exhaust emissions are less likely to present any risk to human health relative to petroleum diesel emissions. CONCLUSION: The speculative nature of a reduction in health effects based on chemical composition of biodiesel exhaust needs to be followed up with investigations in biologic systems. KEY WORDS: air pollution, biodiesel, diesel exhaust, diesel fuels, lung diseases, vehicle emissions. Environ Health Perspect 115:496–499 (2007). doi:10.1289/ehp.9631 available via

  11. Fact Sheet HEALTH SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    · Long Term Care Administrator · Training Coordinator · Clinical Health Education Specialist · Health Media Director · Long Term Care Facilities Manager Fact Sheet HEALTH SCIENCE Highlights · Health Science

  12. Confronting Nuclear Risks: Counter-Expertise as Politics Within

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutkin, Boris

    Confronting Nuclear Risks: Counter-Expertise as Politics Within the French Nuclear Energy Debate of knowledge and expertise on the environ- mental and health risks of nuclear energy in France. From disaster (26 April 1986). Since then, the biggest nuclear accident ever has added par- ticular significance

  13. air pollution risk: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    air pollution risk First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Health Risk Assessment:...

  14. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    consequences through its longstanding support for the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Unit and the Neonatal Research and improving the care and treatment of preterm and low birth weight infants, to work with the Office of the NIH-fetal gestations, due in a large part to the increased use of assisted reproductive technologies. Between 1980

  15. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    Budget FY 2015 Budget Page No. Organization Chart #12;OAR-3 Institute / Center FY 2013 Actual FY 2014 Enacted FY 2015 President's Budget FY 2015 +/- FY...........................................................................................................................2 Budget Authority by Institute and Center

  16. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Roadmap Initiative has the potential to have a profound and positive impact on how American medical. Because the Roadmap recognizes that one of the most powerful and unifying concepts of 21st century biology central to the research enterprise. Second is the Roadmap's requirement to "re-engineer the national

  17. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    Videocast Website: http://videocast.nih.gov/ Contact Number: 301-594-7232 AGENDA OPEN PORTION - Thursday

  18. Department of Health and Human Services PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Committee for Responsible Medicine Jonathan Balcombe, Ph.D., Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine

  19. Reduction in Work Force Unclassified Staff Office of Human Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Reduction in Work Force ­ Unclassified Staff 9.15 Office of Human Resources Applies to: Regular by the Health System. Health System employees should contact their human resource department for further information. The Ohio State University ­ Office of Human Resources Page 1 of 1 Policy 9.15 Reduction in Work

  20. Health Physicist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as a Health Physicist in the Facility Operations Division, Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OREM). The selectee will be regarded as a...

  1. Health and environmental effects document for direct coal liquefaction - 1981.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Wilson, B.W.; Mahlum, D.D.; Sever, L.E.; Olsen, A.R.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents initial estimates of potential human health effects from inhalation of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) that may be released from a future hypothetical industry producing about 600,000 bb1/day of synthetic fuel by direct liquefaction of coal. The assessment approach starts wth general assumptions that are then refined in a tiered sequence that considers available epidemiological, environmental and chemical data. The uncertainties involved in such an evaluation have been quantified where possible at this early stage of health risk analysis. Many surrogate data bases were considered for application to coal liquefaction including coke oven, British gas retort, roofing tar and asphalts, and cigarette smoke. The coke oven data base was selected for this assessment because the chemical and physical nature of coke oven emissions are judged to more closely approximate potential coal liquefaction emissions. Utilizing the extensive epidemiological data base for coke oven workers as a surrogate model, health effects from release of coal liquefaction NMHC may be quantified. This method results in estimates of about 1 x 10/sup -3/ excess cancer deaths/yr to an industrial work force of 7800 persons and 5 x 10/sup -2/ excess cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole from NMHC that boil above 600/sup 0/F. Sources of uncertainty in the estimates are listed. Using these uncertainties, it is estimated that from 2 x 10/sup -4/ to 5 x 10/sup -3/ lung cancer deaths/yr may occur in the industrial work force and from 1 x 10/sup -2/ to 2.5 x 10/sup -1/ lung cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole. On an individual basis, the excess lifetime risk to occupationally exposed workers is estimated to be 500 times greater than to members of the U.S. public.

  2. THE UNIVERSITY Of TENNESSEE Health Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    THE UNIVERSITY Of TENNESSEE Health Science Center Human Resources 910 Madison Ave, Suite 722 Memphis, TN 38163 Tel: (901) 448-5600 Fax: (901) 448-5170 THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE HEALTH SCIENCE the Personnel Records of UT public domain. This gives any citizen of the State of Tennessee the right to view

  3. Office of Domestic and International Health Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Domestic and International Health Studies engages in the conduct of international scientific studies that may provide new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation in the workplace or people exposed in communities as a result of nuclear accidents, including providing health and environmental monitoring services to populations specified by law.

  4. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Human health risk may result from exposure to ground water contaminated from uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur from drinking water obtained from a well placed in the areas of contamination. Furthermore, environmental risk may result from plant or animal exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water.

  5. Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk Forum 2012 A Joint Program with LA RIMS Education Day Rethinking Catastrophic Risk in Risk Management: Earthquake-Related Challenges Featuring: Keynote Speaker Dr. Frank Beuthin, Willis Group Holdings Plc. Yohei Miyamoto, Aon Risk Solutions Curtis deVera, Marsh

  6. alcohol-related injury risk: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    activity in the ADRIA project concerns the performance of numerical simulations of the brain response to human head loading during car Verhoeve Bovendeerd Wismans 23 Risk...

  7. assessing human immunodeficiency: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and risk assessment of many species are affected by the presence of humans Blumstein, Daniel T. 202 Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1 PR) is an essential...

  8. Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle-income countries to carry out health- related research within their own countries. Gl bal Health #12;3 | Global Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated

  9. HEALTH ECONOMICS Health Econ. (in press)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharfstein, Daniel

    health services/economics; costs and cost analysis; health services/utilization; quality of health careHEALTH ECONOMICS Health Econ. (in press) Published online in Wiley InterScience (www and ROBERT BLACKb a Department of Population and Family Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School

  10. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    "--today we hear that word bantered about more than ever. Whether the context is national (health care reformCollege of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection March 2010 Volume VIII (7) Greetings health sciences' colleagues, community

  11. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    with a variety of topics including substance abuse, worksite health promotion, health care cost containment the importance of health care as well as the promotion, protection and maintenance of health. Without a doubt things in the area of health promotion and health care. As the COHS look to the future, we need to take

  12. Actuarial science is the quantitative analysis of risk. In addition to mathematics and statistics courses, students in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Actuarial science is the quantitative analysis of risk. In addition to mathematics and statistics. Actuaries help individuals, businesses and society manage risk by evaluating the likelihood of future events's risk tolerance with various risk parameters such as age of the insured, health status, place

  13. Linking coral reef health and human welfare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Sheila Marie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Baselines and degradation of coral reefs in the northernBaselines and degradation of coral reefs in the northern2006) Fisheries Resources: Coral ReefFishes. Solomon Islands

  14. Linking coral reef health and human welfare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Sheila Marie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    create a balanced factorial design. An additional 13 sitesa balanced natural factorial experimental design to test theusing a natural factorial experimental design (Fig. 1-1),

  15. air risk information: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technologies to protect the bank from the increased risk of technology. This cycle will lead to bank examiners and regulators to focus on human behavior, not on the ever changing...

  16. Risk assessment of soil-based exposures to plutonium at experimental sites located on the Nevada Test Site and adjoining areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Bogen, K.T.; Straume, T.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1950s and early 1960s, a series of tests was conducted at or near the Nevada Test Site to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of {sup 239,240}Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Access to the sites is strictly controlled; therefore, it does not constitute a threat to human health at the present time. However, because the residual {sup 239} Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), the sites could indeed represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, we defined three basic exposure scenarios that could bring individuals in contact with {sup 239,240}Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision located at a test site, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility. Our screening analyses indicated that doses to organs are dominated by the intemal deposition of Pu via the inhalation pathway, and thus our risk assessment focused on those factors that affect inhalation exposures and associated doses, including inhalation rates, activity patterns, tenure at a residence or occupation, indoor/outdoor air relationships, and resuspension outdoors. Cancer risks were calculated as a function of lifetime cumulative doses to the key target organs (i.e., bone surface, liver, and lungs) and risk factors for those organs. Uncertainties in the predicted cancer risks were analyzed using Monte-Carlo simulations of the probability distributions used to represent assessment parameters. The principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

  17. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Riverton, Wyoming. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of two phases: the Surface Project and the Ground Water Project. At the UMTRA Project site near Riverton, Wyoming, Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1990. Tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were taken from the Riverton site to a disposal cell in the Gas Hills area, about 60 road miles (100 kilometers) to the east. The surface cleanup reduces radon and other radiation emissions and minimizes further ground water contamination. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination at the Riverton site that has resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. Such evaluations are used at each site to determine a strategy for complying with UMTRA ground water standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and if human health risks could result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could hypothetically occur if drinking water were pumped from a well drilled in an area where ground water contamination might have occurred. Human health and environmental risks may also result if people, plants, or animals are exposed to surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water.

  18. Operational health physics training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial four sections treat basic information concerning atomic structure and other useful physical quantities, natural radioactivity, the properties of {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, x rays and neutrons, and the concepts and units of radiation dosimetry (including SI units). Section 5 deals with biological effects and the risks associated with radiation exposure. Background radiation and man-made sources are discussed next. The basic recommendations of the ICRP concerning dose limitations: justification, optimization (ALARA concepts and applications) and dose limits are covered in Section seven. Section eight is an expanded version of shielding, and the internal dosimetry discussion has been extensively revised to reflect the concepts contained in the MIRD methodology and ICRP 30. The remaining sections discuss the operational health physics approach to monitoring radiation. Individual sections include radiation detection principles, instrument operation and counting statistics, health physics instruments and personnel monitoring devices. The last five sections deal with the nature of, operation principles of, health physics aspects of, and monitoring approaches to air sampling, reactors, nuclear safety, gloveboxes and hot cells, accelerators and x ray sources. Decontamination, waste disposal and transportation of radionuclides are added topics. Several appendices containing constants, symbols, selected mathematical topics, and the Chart of the Nuclides, and an index have been included.

  19. Protecting Patients, Preserving Integrity, Advancing Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    values of protecting the integrity of their research, the well being of the human subjects whoProtecting Patients, Preserving Integrity, Advancing Health: Accelerating the Implementation of COI of Interest in Human Subjects Research February 2008 #12;Protecting Patients, Preserving Integrity, Advancing

  20. Model-based Security Analysis of the German Health Card Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurjens, Jan

    information systems, security, German Health Card. 1 #12;1 Introduction The use of health-care information information security that are particularly significant for health-care systems, due both to the inherent these risks and enable secure health-care information systems, the security analysis has to be embedded

  1. Maternal Vitamin D Status Related to Triacylglycerol in Early Pregnancy and Subsequent Risk for Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Ka Ian

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Research has suggested roles of vitamin D in health beyond its action on calcium homeostasis and bone health. Recent studies revealed a high proportion of pregnant women having low vitamin D status. This may lead to increased risks for preeclampsia...

  2. Risk assessment of landfill disposal sites - State of the art

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butt, Talib E. [Sustainability Centre in Glasgow (SCG), George Moore Building, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow G4 0BA, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: t_e_butt@hotmail.com; Lockley, Elaine [Be Environmental Ltd. Suite 213, Lomeshaye Business Village, Turner Road, Nelson, Lancashire, BB9 7DR, England (United Kingdom); Oduyemi, Kehinde O.K. [Built and Natural Environment, Baxter Building, University of Abertay Dundee, Bell Street, Dundee DD1 1HG, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.oduyemi@abertay.ac.uk

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A risk assessment process can assist in drawing a cost-effective compromise between economic and environmental costs, thereby assuring that the philosophy of 'sustainable development' is adhered to. Nowadays risk analysis is in wide use to effectively manage environmental issues. Risk assessment is also applied to other subjects including health and safety, food, finance, ecology and epidemiology. The literature review of environmental risk assessments in general and risk assessment approaches particularly regarding landfill disposal sites undertaken by the authors, reveals that an integrated risk assessment methodology for landfill gas, leachate or degraded waste does not exist. A range of knowledge gaps is discovered in the literature reviewed to date. From the perspective of landfill leachate, this paper identifies the extent to which various risk analysis aspects are absent in the existing approaches.

  3. Risk Management Steering Committee Membership 2014/15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Risk Management Steering Committee Membership 2014/15 NAME TITLE / DEPARTMENT Gayle Gorrill (Chair, Facilities Management Kane Kilbey Associate Vice-President, Human Resources and EOC Coordinator Kristi Emergency Planner Andrew Coward Assistant Treasurer Ben McAllister Risk and Insurance Analyst Adrian Round

  4. Risk management at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, D.J.; Hislop, R.D.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The only facility at Argonne National Laboratory which is classified as high hazard is EBR-II. A Level I Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), including external events, has been completed for EBR-II. There were several objectives for this project; to provide a quantitative estimate of the risk associated with the operation of EBR-II, to provide a framework for managerial decision-making for the management of risk at the facility, and to provide insights into the nature of the risk of EBR-II that can be applied in the design of future LMRS. Other ANL facilities do not have complete probabilistic assessments. Despite this fact, Risk Management is an essential part of ANL`s approach to safety and operations. Risk management at Argonne National Laboratory is not limited to accelerator or nuclear facilities. It is also an integral part of construction activities. The Advanced Photon Source, a major construction project at the Laboratory, utilizes a variety of risk assessment techniques to identify potential construction loss exposures and to develop measures to eliminate them. Over the past 15 years, in excess of 15,000 pages of regulatory requirements pertaining to environment safety and health have been printed in the Federal Register. Not all of these are applicable to Argonne National Laboratory all of the time, but as a highly-visible, nationally-funded facility, compliance with those that are applicable must be above reproach. Therefore, risk management is also a very important part of construction activities at ANL. This paper will give examples of these activities, such as, the EBR-II PRA, risk-based analyses of Fuel Cycle Facility Safety Systems, reliability studies of the Access Control Interlock System for the Advanced Photon Source and management approaches for controlling risk during the construction activities at APS.

  5. WHAT WE KNOW: THE REALITY, RISKS AND RESPONSE TO CLIMATE CHANGE WHAT WE KNOW: THE REALITY, RISKS AND RESPONSE TO CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    WHAT WE KNOW: THE REALITY, RISKS AND RESPONSE TO CLIMATE CHANGE 1 #12;WHAT WE KNOW: THE REALITY, RISKS AND RESPONSE TO CLIMATE CHANGE 2 The AAAS Climate Science Panel Mario Molina WE KNOW: THE REALITY, RISKS AND RESPONSE TO CLIMATE CHANGE 3 The overwhelming evidence of human

  6. Risk and Performance Analyses Supporting Closure of WMA C at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberlein, Susan J. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Bergeron, Marcel P. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Kemp, Christopher J. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Hildebrand, R. Douglas [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Aly, Alaa [INTERA, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Kozak, Matthew [INTERA, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Mehta, Sunil [INTERA, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Connelly, Michael [Freestone Environmental Services, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of River Protection under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is pursuing closure of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) C as stipulated by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO) under federal requirements and work tasks will be done under the State-approved closure plans and permits. An initial step in meeting the regulatory requirements is to develop a baseline risk assessment representing current conditions based on available characterization data and information collected at the WMA C location. The baseline risk assessment will be supporting a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Field Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS) for WMA closure and RCRA corrective action. Complying with the HFFACO conditions also involves developing a long-term closure Performance Assessment (PA) that evaluates human health and environmental impacts resulting from radionuclide inventories in residual wastes remaining in WMA C tanks and ancillary equipment. This PA is being developed to meet the requirements necessary for closure authorization under DOE Order 435.1 and Washington State Hazardous Waste Management Act. To meet the HFFACO conditions, the long-term closure risk analysis will include an evaluation of human health and environmental impacts from hazardous chemical inventories along with other performance Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Appropriate and Applicable Requirements (CERCLA ARARs) in residual wastes left in WMA C facilities after retrieval and removal. This closure risk analysis is needed to needed to comply with the requirements for permitted closure. Progress to date in developing a baseline risk assessment of WMA C has involved aspects of an evaluation of soil characterization and groundwater monitoring data collected as a part of the RFI/CMS and RCRA monitoring. Developing the long-term performance assessment aspects has involved the construction of detailed numerical models of WMA C using the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP©) computer code, the development of a technical approach for abstraction of a range of representative STOMP© simulations into a system-level model based on the GoldSim© system-level model software.The STOMP©-based models will be used to evaluate local-scale impacts and closed facility performance over a sufficient range of simulations to allow for development of the system-level model of the WMA C. The GoldSim©-based system-level model will be used to evaluate overall sensitivity of modeled parameters and the estimate the uncertainty in potential future impacts from a closed WMA C facility.

  7. OccupationalSafety andHealthResearchCenter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    Disorders, Safety, Slips/Trips/Falls, Work Organization w w w.oshrc.ic tas.vt.edu Separating humans from the safety and health of workers. OSHRC, formally known as the Center for Innova- tion in Construction Safety for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to innova- tively improve health and safety in the construction sector

  8. Communication and Effectiveness in Primary Health Jean Carletta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carletta, Jean

    Communication and Effectiveness in Primary Health Care Teams Jean Carletta Human Communication.Carletta@edinburgh.ac.uk ABSTRACT Primary health care team members need to communicate effectively with each other in order of cross-disciplinary team meetings, we describe communication in primary health care teams, explore

  9. CERTIFICATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDER FOR EMPLOYEE'S PREGNANCY DISABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eirinaki, Magdalini

    CERTIFICATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDER FOR EMPLOYEE'S PREGNANCY DISABILITY HUMAN RESOURCES Employee this form to your medical provider. Section II must be fully completed by the health care provider Department/College name: Campus Phone: I authorize my health care provider to complete this form and provide

  10. Poor Nutrition and Health Concerns in Low Income Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and foodborne illness, reduced indigent health care costs and improved quality of life. Contact: Dean McPoor Nutrition and Health Concerns in Low Income Population An estimated one out of every six in 1995 as a cooperative endeavor among the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, Texas Health and Human

  11. ADVANCED BUSINESS CERTIFICATE (ABC) HEALTH CARE FINANCE AND INSURANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Management (HSMG 5686) Global Healthcare Systems (HSMG 5687) Risk Management and Quality Across Borders (HSMG Management & Insurance Studies offers an Advanced Business Certificate for business professionals who, hospitals, health plans, pharmaceutical companies, long-term care facilities, physician practice management

  12. Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Types of Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Larry D.; Hanselka, C. Wayne

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Types of risk associated with range ecosystems include climatic, biological, financial and political risks. These risks are explained so that managers can know how to handle them....

  13. Risk Dynamics?An Analysis for the Risk of Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Tailin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bookstaber, R. (1999). "Risk Management in ComplexG. E. (2004). "How Useful Is Quantitative Risk Assessment?"Risk Analysis, Aubrey, A. (2010). "Preventing Diabetes:

  14. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    , College of Health Sciences. · "Innovative Ways to Address Idaho's Healthcare Needs: Long-Term CareCollege of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection February 2011 Volume IX (3) Since the last COHS newsletter, the faculty

  15. Students' Health Service Hampton House Health Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    .bristol.ac.uk/infectious-diseases/meningitis www.bristol.ac.uk/infectious-diseases/mumps www.bristol.ac.uk/infectious-diseases/measles. Health care / Health care Student support Health care Registering with a doctor It is important that you register' Health Service The Students' Health Service (SHS) offers full general practice care, including: ·travel

  16. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    today. In politics, in education, in health care, in society in general we are so turned inwardCollege of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection April/May 2010 Volume VIII (8) WOW! Spring semester of 2010 is almost

  17. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection April 2011 Volume IX (4) The end of the spring semester is quickly approaching accreditation review. Similarly, the Environmental and Occupational Health program also had a very positive

  18. Methods of Risk Analysis: Traditional and Ecological Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the fields of toxicology, industrial hygiene, environmental impact assessment, engineering, and epidemiol exposure as a result of an industrial accident, impact of hazardous material on human health, impact

  19. Finance and Risk & ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronov, Boris

    Finance and Risk & ENGINEERING Charles S. Tapiero Department Head and Morton and Angela Topfer · Corporate Finance and Financial Markets · Computational Finance · Risk Finance · Technology and Algorithmic Finance A Collective Leadership Students participation #12;RESEARCH STRENGTHS · Black Swans and Fragility

  20. Assessing corporate project impacts in changeable contexts: A human rights perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salcito, Kendyl, E-mail: kendyl.salcito@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); NomoGaia, 1900 Wazee Street, Suite 303, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Singer, Burton H., E-mail: bhsinger@epi.ufl.edu [Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Krieger, Gary R., E-mail: gkrieger@newfields.com [NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Weiss, Mitchell G., E-mail: mitchell-g.weiss@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); Wielga, Mark, E-mail: wielga@nomogaia.org [NomoGaia, 1900 Wazee Street, Suite 303, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Utzinger, Jürg, E-mail: juerg.utzinger@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project-level impact assessment was originally conceived as a snapshot taken in advance of project implementation, contrasting current conditions with a likely future scenario involving a variety of predicted impacts. Current best practice guidance has encouraged a shift towards longitudinal assessments from the pre-project stage through the implementation and operating phases. Experience and study show, however, that assessment of infrastructure-intensive projects rarely endures past the project's construction phase. Negative consequences for environmental, social and health outcomes have been documented. Such consequences clarify the pressing need for longitudinal assessment in each of these domains, with human rights impact assessment (HRIA) as an umbrella over, and critical augmentation of, environmental, social and health assessments. Project impacts on human rights are more closely linked to political, economic and other factors beyond immediate effects of a company's policy and action throughout the project lifecycle. Delineating these processes requires an adequate framework, with strategies for collecting longitudinal data, protocols that provide core information for impact assessment and guidance for adaptive mitigation strategies as project-related effects change over time. This article presents general principles for the design and implementation of sustained, longitudinal HRIA, based on experience assessing and responding to human rights impact in a uranium mining project in Malawi. The case study demonstrates the value of longitudinal assessment both for limiting corporate risk and improving human welfare. - Graphical abstract: Assessing changes in human rights condition as affected by both project and context, over time. - Highlights: • Corporate capital projects affect human rights in myriad ways. • Ongoing, longitudinal impact assessment techniques are needed. • We present an approach for conducting longitudinal human rights impact assessment. • Our methodology allows distinguishing corporate impacts from contextual changes. • Promptly observing context changes and impacts enables companies to react nimbly.

  1. Sandia Energy - Security Risk Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Risk Assessment Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology Security Risk Assessment Security Risk Assessmentcwdd2015-05-04T21:...

  2. Subjective Risk, Confidence, and Ambiguity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traeger, Christian P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper 1103) Subjective Risk, Confidence, and Ambiguityby author(s). Subjective Risk, Con?dence, and Ambiguity ?567. Ellsberg, D. (1961), ‘Risk, ambiguity and the savage

  3. Essays in time and risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprenger, Charles

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4.4.1 Risk Attitudes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.3.1 Additional Risk Preference Measures . . . . . . . .An Endowment Effect for Risk: Experimental Tests of

  4. Learning and risk aversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyarzun, Carlos

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation contains three essays on learning and risk aversion. In the first essay we consider how learning may lead to risk averse behavior. A learning rule is said to be risk averse if it is expected to add more probability to an action...

  5. Livestock Risk Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Bill; Bennett, Blake; Jones, Diana

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    risk insurance with an ending date of coverage that meets their risk management objectives. Feeder cattle producers may want the end date of coverage to match the William Thompson, Blake Bennett and DeDe Jones* Figure 1: Livestock Risk Protection...

  6. Risk assessment in the DOE Assurance Program for Remedial Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, S.; Cross, F.T.; Denham, D.H.; Kennedy, W.E.; Stenner, R.D.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides information obtained during the performance of risk assessment tasks in support of the Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA) sponsored by the Office of Operational Safety of the Department of Energy. We have presented a method for the estimation of projected health effects at properties in the vicinity of uranium mill tailing piles due to transported tailings or emissions from the piles. Because radon and radon daughter exposure is identified as the principal factor contributing to health effects at such properties, the basis for estimating lung cancer risk as a result of such exposure is discussed in detail. Modeling of health risk due to a secondary pathway, ingestion of contaminated, home-grown food products, is also discussed since it is a potentially important additional source of exposure in certain geographic locations. Risk assessment methods used in various mill tailings reports are reviewed. The protocols for radiological surveys conducted in DOE-sponsored remedial action programs are critically reviewed with respect to their relevance to the needs of health risk estimation. The relevance of risk assessment to the APRA program is discussed briefly.

  7. Health assessment for Shpack Landfill, Attleboro/North, Massachusetts, Region 1. CERCLIS No. MAD980503973. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shpack Landfill site is on the National Priorities List (NPL). The landfill received both domestic and industrial waste, including inorganic and organic chemicals as well as radioactive waste. Ground water contains vinyl chloride, trichloroethylene, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chromium, barium, copper, nickel, manganese, arsenic, cadmium, lead, polychlorinated biphenyl-1260 (Aroclor-1260), radium-226, alpha particles and beta particles. Surface and subsurface soil samples contained radium-226, uranium-238, uranium-235, uranium-234, and visual evidence of metal plating waste sludges. The site is considered to be of potential health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the potential for exposure to hazardous substances via ingestion of contaminated soils at the site and future ingestion of contaminated domestic well water.

  8. Risk & QualityRisk & Quality ManagementManagement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    liability."" [Balsaono RR, Brown[Balsaono RR, Brown MK, Risk ManagementMK, Risk Management inin Legal

  9. Checklist of Successful Health Plan Approaches to Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Checklist of Successful Health Plan Approaches to Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Yes at risk for heart disease, stroke, and related conditions and risk factors (e.g., routine screenings the health plan offer specialized disease management programs for members who have been diagnosed with heart

  10. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, April 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research progress for the reporting period is briefly summarized for the following sections: (1) health studies, (2) technology assessments, (3) biological and radiation physics, (4) chemical physics, (5) Office of Risk Analysis, and (6) health and environmental risk and analysis. (ACR)

  11. Baseline risk assessment for exposure to contaminants at the St. Louis Site, St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The St. Louis Site comprises three noncontiguous areas in and near St. Louis, Missouri: the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS), the St. Louis Airport Storage Site (SLAPS), and the Latty Avenue Properties. The main site of the Latty Avenue Properties includes the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) and the Futura Coatings property, which are located at 9200 Latty Avenue. Contamination at the St. Louis Site is the result of uranium processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through the 1970s. Uranium processing took place at the SLDS from 1942 through 1957. From the 1940s through the 1960s, SLAPS was used as a storage area for residues from the manufacturing operations at SLDS. The materials stored at SLAPS were bought by Continental Mining and Milling Company of Chicago, Illinois, in 1966, and moved to the HISS/Futura Coatings property at 9200 Latty Avenue. Vicinity properties became contaminated as a result of transport and movement of the contaminated material among SLDS, SLAPS, and the 9200 Latty Avenue property. This contamination led to the SLAPS, HISS, and Futura Coatings properties being placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for cleanup activities at the St. Louis Site under its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The primary goal of FUSRAP is the elimination of potential hazards to human health and the environment at former Manhattan Engineer District/Atomic Energy Commission (MED/AEC) sites so that, to the extent possible, these properties can be released for use without restrictions. To determine and establish cleanup goals for the St. Louis Site, DOE is currently preparing a remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental impact statement (RI/FS-EIS). This baseline risk assessment (BRA) is a component of the process; it addresses potential risk to human health and the environment associated wi

  12. Design Optimization of Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, Eric B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensor networks drive decisions. Approach: Design networks to minimize the expected total cost (in a statistical sense, i.e. Bayes Risk) associated with making wrong decisions and with installing maintaining and running the sensor network itself. Search for optimal solutions using Monte-Carlo-Sampling-Adapted Genetic Algorithm. Applications include structural health monitoring and surveillance.

  13. FIELD ACTION REPORTS mmunity Environmental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , water is abundant; however, wells may be affected by unsanitary dis posal of sewage and solid waste. Project collaborators used the Protocol for Assessing Commu nity Excellence in Environmental Health (PACE; · Identify populations at risk of exposure to environmental hazards; · Identify and collect mean ingful

  14. PARALLELS OF RADIATION- AND FINANCIAL-RISK MANAGEMENT ON PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogue, M.

    2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The financial collapse of 2007 provides an opportunity for a cross-discipline comparison of risk assessments. Flaws in financial risk assessments bear part of the blame for the financial collapse. There may be a potential for similar flaws to be made in radiological risk assessments. Risk assessments in finance and health physics are discussed in the context of a broader view of the risk management environment. Flawed risk assessments can adversely influence public acceptance of radiological technologies, so the importance of quality is magnified.

  15. RADTRAN3. Radioactive Material Transport Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madsen, M.M.; Taylor, J.M.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Reardon, P.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RADTRAN3 is a flexible analytical tool for calculating both the incident-free and accident impacts of transporting radioactive materials. The consequences from incident-free shipments are apportioned among eight population subgroups and can be calculated for several transport modes. The radiological accident risk (probability times consequence summed over all postulated accidents) is calculated in terms of early fatalities, early morbidities, latent cancer fatalities, genetic effects, and economic impacts. Groundshine, ingestion, inhalation, direct exposure, resuspension, and cloudshine dose pathways are modeled to calculate the radiological health risks from accidents. Economic impacts are evaluated based on costs for emergency response, cleanup, evacuation, income loss, and land use. RADTRAN3 can be applied to specific scenario evaluations (individual transport modes or specified combinations), to compare alternative modes or to evaluate generic radioactive material shipments. Unit-risk factors can easily be evaluated to aid in performing generic analyses when several options must be compared with the amount of travel as the only variable.

  16. Global Health Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in global health: The challenges of investing in health and universal health coverage Although targets can help to focus global health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in global health

  17. Risk Policy and Risk Management Procedures The University's Risk Policy sets out The University's approach to risk and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Risk Policy and Risk Management Procedures Preface The University's Risk Policy sets out The University's approach to risk and its management together with the means for identifying, analysing and managing risk in order to minimise its frequency and impact. The risks considered significant

  18. Professional Certificate in Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton University

    Professional Certificate in Risk Management 2010 Program 3 Part-time Courses CRM01: Essentials of Risk Management ­ Next Session Fall 2010 CRM02: Risk Control ­ Jan. 12 - April 26, 2010 CRM03: Risk to apply for the Canadian Risk Management (CRM) designation. #12;Professional Certificate in Risk

  19. Students' Health Service Hampton House Health Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    .ac.uk/infectious-diseases. Health care / Student support Other NHS services NHS 111 NHS 111 is a telephone service, giving in an emergency. Student support / Health care Student support Health care Registering with a doctor practice care, including: · travel immunisation and advice · contraceptive advice · sexual health testing

  20. Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    5th Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health Hosted by The Stanford WSDM* Center May 21;3 Welcome to the 5th Annual Women's Health Forum - hosted by the Stanford WSDM Center, also known as the Stanford Center for Health Research on Women and Sex Differences in Medicine. The Stanford WSDM Center

  1. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection December 2009 January 2010 Volume VIII (5) Moving from the Superficial the superficial level so that the result is the formation of deep relationships, caring, compassion, justice, love

  2. Center for Health & Counseling Services Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    College How is West Nile diagnosed? If a health care provider suspects WNV, samples of the patient's bloodCenter for Health & Counseling Services Health Services 505 Ramapo Valley Road, Mahwah, NJ 07430 Nile Virus outbreak is the biggest since the virus was first identified in the United States, health

  3. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    the sweeping changes associated with health care reform. Health care reform represents the most significant health care legislation since the development of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965. It has tremendous potential ramification for the future of our college. Health care reform will dramatically increase

  4. Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date General Degree and Humanities 3-4 DLS ENGL 202 Technical Communication 3 DLS ENVHLTH 102 Global Environmental Health 3 BIOL 192 320 Community Environmental Health Management ENVHLTH 415 Occupational Safety and Health ENVHLTH 416

  5. Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date General Degree and Humanities 3-4 DLS ENGL 202 Technical Communication 3 DLS ENVHLTH 102 Global Environmental Health 3 BIOL 192 320 Community Environmental Health Management ENVHLTH 415 Occupational Safety and Health ENVHLTH 416

  6. Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date General Degree and Humanities 3-4 DLS ENGL 202 Technical Communication 3 DLS ENVHLTH 102 Global Environmental Health 3 BIOL 192 Management ENVHLTH 320 Community Environmental Health Management ENVHLTH 415 Occupational Safety and Health

  7. The emerging role and benefits of boundary analysis in spatio-temporal epidemiology and public health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to study human health outcomes, correlates and determinants. Epidemiology has a strong clinical tradition-time change; health outcomes; environmental exposures; health-environment association 1. Introduction of the ingredients of living that are determinants of individual health status and outcomes. From this perspective

  8. Division of Human Resources Termination Of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Division of Human Resources Termination Of Domestic Partnership Health Stipend Questions (813) 974 Insurance Stipend will terminate as of the Effective Date on this Termination of Domestic Partnership Health. ______ The Domestic Partnership Declaration attested to and filed by me with USF shall be and is terminated

  9. Estimating radiogenic cancer risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a revised methodology for EPA`s estimation of cancer risks due to low-LET radiation exposures in light of information that has become available since the publication of BIER III, especially new information on the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. For most cancer sites, the risk model is one in which the age-specific relative risk coefficients are obtained by taking the geometric mean of coefficients derived from the atomic bomb survivor data employing two different methods for transporting risks from Japan to the U.S. (multiplicative and NIH projection methods). Using 1980 U.S. vital statistics, the risk models are applied to estimate organ-specific risks, per unit dose, for a stationary population.

  10. Risk prediction models for melanoma: A systematic review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usher-Smith, Juliet A.; Emery, Jon; Kassianos, Angelos P.; Walter, Fiona M.

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. 2 General Practice and Primary Care Academic Centre, University of Melbourne, Australia. 3 School of Primary, Aboriginal and Rural Health Care, University of Western Australia, Australia. Running title: Risk prediction models... :1000129. 35. English, DR, Armstrong, BK. Identifying people at high risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma: Results from a case-control study in Western Australia. Br. Med. J. (Clin. Res. Ed). 1988; 296: 1285–1288. 36. Amir, E, Freedman, OC, Seruga...

  11. Technical Needs for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Equipment Condition Assessment for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Coles, Garill A.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Berglin, Eric J.; Wootan, David W.; Mitchell, Mark R.

    2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced small modular reactors (aSMRs) can provide the United States with a safe, sustainable, and carbon-neutral energy source. The controllable day-to-day costs of aSMRs are expected to be dominated by operation and maintenance costs. Health and condition assessment coupled with online risk monitors can potentially enhance affordability of aSMRs through optimized operational planning and maintenance scheduling. Currently deployed risk monitors are an extension of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). For complex engineered systems like nuclear power plants, PRA systematically combines event likelihoods and the probability of failure (POF) of key components, so that when combined with the magnitude of possible adverse consequences to determine risk. Traditional PRA uses population-based POF information to estimate the average plant risk over time. Currently, most nuclear power plants have a PRA that reflects the as-operated, as-modified plant; this model is updated periodically, typically once a year. Risk monitors expand on living PRA by incorporating changes in the day-by-day plant operation and configuration (e.g., changes in equipment availability, operating regime, environmental conditions). However, population-based POF (or population- and time-based POF) is still used to populate fault trees. Health monitoring techniques can be used to establish condition indicators and monitoring capabilities that indicate the component-specific POF at a desired point in time (or over a desired period), which can then be incorporated in the risk monitor to provide a more accurate estimate of the plant risk in different configurations. This is particularly important for active systems, structures, and components (SSCs) proposed for use in aSMR designs. These SSCs may differ significantly from those used in the operating fleet of light-water reactors (or even in LWR-based SMR designs). Additionally, the operating characteristics of aSMRs can present significantly different requirements, including the need to operate in different coolant environments, higher operating temperatures, and longer operating cycles between planned refueling and maintenance outages. These features, along with the relative lack of operating experience for some of the proposed advanced designs, may limit the ability to estimate event probability and component POF with a high degree of certainty. Incorporating real-time estimates of component POF may compensate for a relative lack of established knowledge about the long-term component behavior and improve operational and maintenance planning and optimization. The particular eccentricities of advanced reactors and small modular reactors provide unique challenges and needs for advanced instrumentation, control, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) techniques such as enhanced risk monitors (ERM) in aSMRs. Several features of aSMR designs increase the need for accurate characterization of the real-time risk during operation and maintenance activities. A number of technical gaps in realizing ERM exist, and these gaps are largely independent of the specific reactor technology. As a result, the development of a framework for ERM would enable greater situational awareness regardless of the specific class of reactor technology. A set of research tasks are identified in a preliminary research plan to enable the development, testing, and demonstration of such a framework. Although some aspects of aSMRs, such as specific operational characteristics, will vary and are not now completely defined, the proposed framework is expected to be relevant regardless of such uncertainty. The development of an ERM framework will provide one of the key technical developments necessary to ensure the economic viability of aSMRs.

  12. Conditional Risk Mappings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Megiddo

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Key words: Risk; Conjugate Duality; Stochastic Optimization; Dynamic ... MSC2000 Subject Classification: Primary: 90C15,90C48; Secondary: 91B30,

  13. Health assessment for Oronogo-Duenweg Mining Belt, Jasper County, Missouri, Region 7. CERCLIS No. MDD980686281. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oronogo-Duenweg Mining Belt site, Jasper County, Missouri, has been proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for inclusion on the National Priorities List (NPL). Referred to as the Missouri portion of the Tri-State (Missouri, Kansas, and Oklahoma) Mining District, the site comprises approximately 20 square miles and was the location of the most concentrated mining effort in the Tri-State District. As a result of commercial zinc and lead mining operations that occurred from about 1850 until the late 1960s, shallow groundwater, surface water, sediment, and surface soil are contaminated with heavy metals (zinc, lead, cadmium, and nickel). Municipalities in the area use both surface water and a deep aquifer for water supplies; individual households outside these centers rely on a shallow aquifer for water. Based upon information reviewed, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has concluded that this site is of public health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from probable exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse human health effects.

  14. ORISE: Health Promotion and Outreach

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE ProjectCrisis and RiskEnvironmentLiteracyHealth

  15. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of two phases: the first is the Surface Project, and the second is the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site known as the Vitro site, near Salt Lake City, Utah, Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1985 to 1987. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. A risk assessment is the process of describing a source of contamination and showing how that contamination may reach people and the environment. The amount of contamination people or the environment may be exposed to is calculated and used to characterize the possible health or environmental effects that may result from this exposure. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Vitro site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Vitro site will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

  16. Lung Health Dissertation Grant (LH) Program Description Page 1 of 6 5/25/2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Lung Health Dissertation Grant (LH) Program Description Page 1 of 6 5/25/2011 IMPORTANT NOTES REFERENCE. The objective of the Lung Health Research Dissertation Grant is to support pre-doctoral dissertation research in the various disciplines of social science examining risk factors affecting lung health

  17. Essays on risk aversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jindapon, Paan

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    the preferred distribution by a simple mean-preserving spread and the cost is a utility cost. Higher-order increases in risk lead to higher-order generalizations, and the com- parative statics method yields a unified approach to the problem of comparative risk...

  18. EPA`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Quantification issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dourson, M.L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantitative procedures associated with noncancer risk assessment include reference dose (RfD), benchmark dose, and severity modeling. The RfD, which is part of the EPA risk assessment guidelines, is an estimation of a level that is likely to be without any health risk to sensitive individuals. The RfD requires two major judgments: the first is choice of a critical effect(s) and its No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL); the second judgment is choice of an uncertainty factor. This paper discusses major assumptions and limitations of the RfD model.

  19. Introduction Health Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    with the originality and creativity to establish total health care, (2advanced healthcare specialists with abundant and researchers who can put total health care into practice. 21 20084 2 3 total health care #1232 Introduction Guide Entrance Life Career Inquiries Health Sciences Health Problems

  20. winter 2015 Health Informatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    UinG anD PrOfeSSiOnal eDUCatiOn HEALTH INFORMATICS ANd ANALYTICS #12;2 Advancing Health Care Through.S. health care prior to commencing study. High-quality, Convenient Online Learning Format All courses, computer science and health care. In this introductory course, gain broad exposure to the field of health

  1. HIV/AIDS risk behaviors and correlates of injection drug use among drug users in Pakistan.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transfusion risks in Karachi, Pakistan. Int J Infect Dis.dis- orders in Pakistan. AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 1988;4:threat: HIV/AIDS policy in Pakistan. Health Policy Plann.

  2. Maternal Blood Lead Levels and the Risk of Pregnancy Induced Hypertension. The "EDEN" Cohort Study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Maternal Blood Lead Levels and the Risk of Pregnancy Induced Hypertension. The "EDEN" Cohort title: Lead and Gestational Hypertension Key words: cadmium; environmental health; epidemiology; gestation; hypertension; lead; manganese. Acknowledgments: We are indebted to the participating families

  3. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lakeview, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lake view, Oregon evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site.

  4. Sandia Energy - Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Health Monitoring Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Materials, Reliability, & Standards Structural Health Monitoring Structural Health...

  5. CDC's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network MAINE Keeping Track, Promoting Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    analysis systems. These systems provide health planners, policymakers, and other decision makers critical risk factors. For example, the new analysis revealed that 40% of all childhood lead poisonings (Tracking Network). The Tracking Network is a dynamic Web-based tool that, for the first time, provides

  6. Environmental and health management in small and medium size enterprises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arredondo, Juan C. (Juan Carlos Arredondo Brun), 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Workers and employees are increasingly exposed in the workplace to chemical compounds and substances that are potentially toxic; for most of these compounds, no information exist regarding effects on human health. As one ...

  7. Medicine and public health in a multiethnic world 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhopal, Raj

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Achievement of medical and public health goals requires mutual understanding between professionals and the public, a challenge in diverse societies. Despite their massive diversity humans belong to one species, with race ...

  8. Integration of site-specific health information: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry health assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry is required to conduct a health assessment of any site that is listed on or proposed for the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List. Sixteen US Department of Energy (DOE) sites currently fall into this category. Health assessments contain a qualitative description of impacts to public health and the environment from hazardous waste sites, as well as recommendations for actions to mitigate or eliminate risk. Because these recommendations may have major impacts on compliance activities at DOE facilities, the health assessments are an important source of information for the monitoring activities of DOE's Office of Environmental Compliance (OEC). This report provides an overview of the activities involved in preparing the health assessment, its role in environmental management, and its key elements.

  9. Addressing Genetics Delivering Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Addressing Genetics Delivering Health A strategy for advancing the dissemination and application of genetics knowledge throughout our health professions Funded by Hilary Burton September 2003 Executive education of health workers q providing strategic overview of education programme q collaborating

  10. DIRECTORY OF HEALTH SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Andrew

    a centralized resource of regional health care services for persons with developmental disabilitiesDIRECTORY OF HEALTH SERVICES FOR BRONX RESIDENTS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES 2012 Compiled Albert Einstein College of Medicine in collaboration with Health Services Committee, Bronx Developmental

  11. University Health Care Health Sciences Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feschotte, Cedric

    University Health Care Health Sciences Center 30 N. 1900 E. 6DOW /DNH &LW\\ 87 84132-2204 Phone and your child. University Health Care School of Medicine Division of Pediatric Nephrology & Hypertension care physician after each visit. x If you would like a copy of your child's clinic note you must

  12. Health and Counselling Services SFU Health Promotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Health and Counselling Services SFU Health Promotion A division of Student Services HEALTHY CAMPUS COMMUNITY 2 0 1 3 R E P O R T #12;Dr. Tim Rahilly Dr. Nancy Johnston FOREWORD The health and well. We have a responsibility as a caring community to create a setting that not only supports students

  13. Risk Management in Biopharmaceutical Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Yao

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supply Chain Risk Managementof Recent Work on Supply Chain Risk Management . . . . .M. , Supply chain risk management: Outlining an agenda for

  14. ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH & SAFETY Risk Management Services, University of Alberta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Provide technical expertise and service to departments in aspects of hazardous waste management, re-cycle and disposal and the environment Collect and transport hazardous waste from the campus to the waste facility of research proposals for funding applications Approval of work protocols involving biohazards Regulate

  15. Possible Health Risks Damage to brain and nervous system.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    blood pressure. Protecting Your Family If the building structure was built before1978 or you suspect to entering your home. Provide low fat nutritious meals high in calcium and iron to children. How does Lead exposure occur? Inhalation Ingestion How do I get screened for Lead Poisoning? Ask your doctor to do

  16. Examining the Communication of Environmental Health Risks among

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    with Incineration as Trash Disposal Method 75.5% 92.6% 0.015 *P Value More Active P Value Ever Attended a Community Meeting 44.0% 81.0% 0.000 Familiar with Incineration.24% 0.010 Familiar with Incineration as Trash Disposal Method 66.67% 89.16% 0.008 *P Value

  17. Communicating Health Risks Working Safely With Beryllium | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.Space Data CorporationPast

  18. Systemic risk in consumer finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poon, Martha

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systemic risk in consumer finance Uncertain about risk HowComplexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-History of ResilienceSystemic risk in consumer finance Martha Poon, NYU At the

  19. (Energy Risk Professional, ERP), (GARP),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexander

    · ­ Dragana Pilipovic. Energy Risk: Valuing and Managing Energy Derivatives,2nd Edition (New York: Mc). 9: Risk Management of Energy Derivatives · ­ Alexander Triantis. Handbook of Modern Finance (New 1 ( ) : . (Energy Risk Professional, ERP

  20. Risk in the Weapons Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noone, Bailey C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    When it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile, risk must be as low as possible. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk.

  1. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 6: Appendix G -- Baseline ecological risk assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix G contains ecological risks for fish, benthic invertebrates, soil invertebrates, plants, small mammals, deer, and predator/scavengers (hawks and fox). This risk assessment identified significant ecological risks from chemicals in water, sediment, soil, and shallow ground water. Metals and PCBs are the primary contaminants of concern.

  2. Health assessment for Woodland Route 532 Dump, Woodland Township, Burlington County, New Jersey, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NJD980505887. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Woodland Route 532 Dump site is on the National Priorities List. The 35-acre facility was used by several chemical manufacturers in the 1950s and early 1960s for open burning, dumping, and burial of drummed chemical wastes. On-site contamination consists of pentachlorophenol (182 ppb) in ground water. Although air sampling has not been conducted, it was reported that levels of chemicals in the air were judged by investigators to pose a respiratory hazard during site-invasive sampling procedures. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via contact with surface materials on-site.

  3. ORISE: Health Physics Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Physics Training Student performs an analysis during an ORAU health physics training course Training and educating a highly skilled workforce that can meet operational...

  4. ORISE: Public Health Communication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Communication Public Health Communication The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) assists government agencies and organizations in addressing public health...

  5. ORISE: Public Health Preparedness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by convening community-based workshops and key stakeholder meetings aimed at managing a health care surge during a public health emergency. By identifying and involving key...

  6. DOE-EM privatization and the 2006 Plan: Principles for procurement policies and risk management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjornstad, D.J.; Jones, D.W.; Duemmer, C.L.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Remediation and Waste Management (EM) has recently set in place programs to restructure the strategic planning mechanism that will drive its clean-up schedule, The 2006 Plan, and to create a new set of business relationships with private contractors that will reduce costs--privatization. Taken together, the 2006 Plan and privatization will challenge EM to create new business practices to recast its risk management policies to support these initiatives while ensuring that its responsibilities toward the environment, human health, and worker safety (ES and H) are maintained. This paper argues that the 2006 Plan has transformed EM`s traditional, bottoms-up approach based on technical dictates to a top-down approach based on management goals--a transformation from an engineering problem to an economic problem. The 2006 Plan evolved from EM`s Ten-Year Plan, and seeks to convert the largely open-ended planning approach previously undertaken by EM to a plan bounded by time and dollars. The plan emphasizes making tradeoffs and choosing activities that deliver the most clean-up for the dollar. It also recognizes that each major player--stakeholders, DOE, OMB and Congress--has distinct interests that must be resolved if the process is to succeed. This, in turn, has created the need for a corresponding transformation in risk management practices from compliance-driven to benefit/cost-driven.

  7. Psychosocial risks: acting upon the organisation by ergonomic intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Psychosocial risks: acting upon the organisation by ergonomic intervention Johann Petita , Bernard Duguéa a Department Of Ergonomics, ENSC, Bordeaux Institute of Technology, 146 rue Léo-Saignat, 33076. On the basis of an ergonomic intervention in an insurance company, we were able to show that the health

  8. ORISE: Crisis and Risk Communication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crisis and Risk Communication Crisis and Risk Communication Because a natural disaster, act of terrorism or other public emergency can happen without notice, having a planned,...

  9. Risk Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides non-mandatory risk management approaches for implementing the requirements of DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. Cancels DOE G 413.3-7.

  10. RISK ASSESSMENT CLOUD COMPUTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    SECURITY RESEARCH PRIVACY RISK ASSESSMENT AMC DATA FISMA CLOUD COMPUTING MOBILE DEVICES OPERATIONS application hosted in the cloud · Alaska DHHS fined $1.7M ­ Portable device stolen from vehicle · Mass Eye

  11. Suffolk County Department of Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . heavy metal sludges, mixtures and solutions in excess of the allowable concentrations listed in Title 6 ground or finished floor elevation. #12;Page #2 2.2 Commissioner - Commissioner of Suffolk County present, an actual or potential hazard to human health, or to the drinking water supply, if such substance

  12. Does Health Insurance and Seeing the Doctor Keep You Out of the Hospital? We obtain estimates of associations between health insurance and hospitalization and between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Jill M.

    health care reform debate, as illustrated by the quote from Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary of the U at a presentation of this research at the American Enterprise Institute for their comments. #12;1 "Our health care.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Indeed, primary care is central focus of the Patient Protection

  13. Assessing and Managing the Risks of Fuel Compounds: Ethanol Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layton, D.W.; Rice, D.W.

    2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have implemented a suite of chemical transport and fate models that provide diagnostic information about the behavior of ethanol (denoted EtOH) and other fuel-related chemicals released to the environment. Our principal focus is on the impacts to water resources, as this has been one of the key issues facing the introduction of new fuels and additives. We present analyses comparing the transport and fate of EtOH, methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), and 2,2,4 trimethyl pentane (TMP) for the following cases (1) discharges to stratified lakes, subsurface release in a surficial soil, (3) cross-media transfer from air to ground water, and (4) fate in a regional landscape. These compounds have significantly different properties that directly influence their behavior in the environment. EtOH, for example, has a low Henry's law constant, which means that it preferentially partitions to the water phase instead of air. An advantageous characteristic of EtOH is its rapid biodegradation rate in water; unlike MTBE or TMP, which degrade slowly. As a consequence, EtOH does not pose a significant risk to water resources. Preliminary health-protective limits for EtOH in drinking water suggest that routine releases to the environment will not result in levels that threaten human health.

  14. Environmental Factors and Breast Cancer Risk For millions of women whose lives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    their health history, past environmental exposures, and lifestyle. The participants will be given yearly follow Gene The impact of family history on breast cancer risk suggests that genetic factors play an importantEnvironmental Factors and Breast Cancer Risk For millions of women whose lives have been affected

  15. Guidance for Controlling Potential Risks to Workers Exposed to Class B Biosolids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance for Controlling Potential Risks to Workers Exposed to Class B Biosolids This guidance is intended only for controlling health risks to workers from Class B biosolids during handling and land;1 Introduction Biosolids are the organic residues resulting from the treatment of commercial, industrial

  16. Levels of organochlorine insecticides in human blood from Ahmedabad (rural), India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatnagar, V.K.; Patel, J.S.; Variya, M.R.; Venkaiah, K.; Shah, M.P.; Kashyap, S.K. (National Inst. of Occupational Health, Gujarat (India))

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments of human exposure to persistent organochlorine insecticides (OCI) through biological monitoring offers a profound criteria to evaluate the magnitude of potential health risk, if any, due to use of these chemicals. Residues of these chemicals especially DDT and HCH have been identified and reviewed in man and his environment from different parts of the world however, by comparison very high levels of DDT and its metabolites have been reported in human body fat, blood and milk samples in India. Since there is a definite relationship between the amount of DDT and its residues in blood and those present in human fat depot, blood can be easily be used for assessing the total body burden of persistent OCI in various populations. In view of fragmentary reports on the levels of DDT and HCH in human blood samples from India which categorically pertain to the general population of urban areas like Delhi and Lucknow. The authors attempted to provide a database on residues of DDT and HCH including other cyclodiene compounds, e.g. heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, aldrin, oxygchlordane, HCB and dieldrin in blood samples collected from general population of Ahmedabad (rural) area.

  17. Being Aboriginal and Taiwanese in the Pursuit of Community Well-Being: Examining the Janus-Face of Public Health Among Bunun Peoples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Shyh-Wei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    local Bunun claim that gout problems (tongfong, literally “distributing risk factors (for gout, hypertension, or highand accompanying health issues like gout or high cholesterol

  18. A surety engineering framework to reduce cognitive systems risks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, Thomas P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Peercy, David Eugene; Caldera, Eva O. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Shaneyfelt, Wendy L.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cognitive science research investigates the advancement of human cognition and neuroscience capabilities. Addressing risks associated with these advancements can counter potential program failures, legal and ethical issues, constraints to scientific research, and product vulnerabilities. Survey results, focus group discussions, cognitive science experts, and surety researchers concur technical risks exist that could impact cognitive science research in areas such as medicine, privacy, human enhancement, law and policy, military applications, and national security (SAND2006-6895). This SAND report documents a surety engineering framework and a process for identifying cognitive system technical, ethical, legal and societal risks and applying appropriate surety methods to reduce such risks. The framework consists of several models: Specification, Design, Evaluation, Risk, and Maturity. Two detailed case studies are included to illustrate the use of the process and framework. Several Appendices provide detailed information on existing cognitive system architectures; ethical, legal, and societal risk research; surety methods and technologies; and educing information research with a case study vignette. The process and framework provide a model for how cognitive systems research and full-scale product development can apply surety engineering to reduce perceived and actual risks.

  19. TOXNET and Beyond: Using the National Library of Medicine's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templin-Branner, W.

    2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Library of Medicine's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal provides access to numerous databases that can help you explore environmental chemicals and risks. TOXNET and Beyond: Using NLM's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal conveys the fundamentals of searching the NLM's TOXNET system of databases in chemistry, toxicology, environmental health, and related fields. In addition to TOXNET, the course will highlight various resources available through the Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal.

  20. Master's Degree in Agriculture Plant Health Management Option Option Title: Master of Science (MS) in Agriculture: Plant Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Master's Degree in Agriculture ­ Plant Health Management Option Option Title: Master of Science (MS) in Agriculture: Plant Health Management Department(s) or Program(s): Supported of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences (CAHNRS) Contact Name: Dr. Kim Kidwell, Director MS