National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for human health impacts

  1. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ...man-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reducing the negative human-health impacts of ...

  2. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    through region-specific crop selection (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection An expected global increase in bioenergy-crop cultivation as an alternative to fossil fuels will have consequences on both global climate and local air

  3. Global Warming and Human Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    American Geophysical Union Global Warming and Human Health WHEN: Jul 27, 2015 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM WHERE: Eldorado Hotel 309 W San Francisco Street, Santa Fe SPEAKER: Robert Davis, University of Virginia CONTACT: Shermonta Grant (202) 777-7329 CATEGORY: Community Science TYPE: Lecture INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description The main reason we are concerned about human-induced climate change is that climate shifts might impact the health of Earth's populace. These impacts can be direct, such as

  4. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    lopscience iopscience.iop.org Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My lOPscience Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region- specific crop selection This content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Download details: IP Address: 192.107.175.131 This content was downloaded on 30/07/2015 at 20:46 Please note that terms

  5. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Porter, William C.; Rosenstiel, Todd N.; Guenther, Alex; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Barsanti, Kelley

    2015-05-06

    An expected global increase in bioenergy-crop cultivation as an alternative to fossil fuels will have consequences on both global climate and local air quality through changes in biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). While greenhouse gas emissions may be reduced through the substitution of next-generation bioenergy crops such as eucalyptus, giant reed, and switchgrass for fossil fuels, the choice of species has important ramifications for human health, potentially reducing the benefits of conversion due to increases in ozone (O₃) and fine particulate matter (PM₂̣₅) levels as a result of large changes in biogenic emissions. Using the Community Earth Systemmore » Model we simulate the conversion of marginal and underutilized croplands worldwide to bioenergy crops under varying future anthropogenic emissions scenarios. A conservative global replacement using high VOC-emitting crop profiles leads to modeled population-weighted O₃ increases of 5–27 ppb in India, 1–9 ppb in China, and 1–6 ppb in the United States, with peak PM₂̣₅ increases of up to 2 μgm⁻³. We present a metric for the regional evaluation of candidate bioenergy crops, as well as results for the application of this metric to four representative emissions profiles using four replacement scales (10–100% maximum estimated available land). Finally, we assess the total health and climate impacts of biogenic emissions, finding that the negative consequences of using high-emitting crops could exceed 50% of the positive benefits of reduced fossil fuel emissions in value.« less

  6. Health impact assessment in Korea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Eunjeong; Lee, Youngsoo; Harris, Patrick; Koh, Kwangwook; Kim, Keonyeop

    2011-07-15

    Recently, Health Impact Assessment has gained great attention in Korea. First, the Ministry of Environment introduced HIA within existing Environment Impact Assessment. Second, the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs began an HIA program in 2008 in alliance with Healthy Cities. In this short report, these two different efforts are introduced and their opportunities and challenges discussed. We believe these two approaches complement each other and both need to be strengthened. We also believe that both can contribute to the development of health in policy and project development and ultimately to improvements in the Korean population's health.

  7. Impacts of Climate Change on Tribal Health

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Climate change, together with other natural and human-made health stressors, threatens our health and well-being in many ways. This webinar will provide an overview of climate-related health...

  8. Connecticut's Health Impact Study Rapidly Increasing Weatherization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efforts | Department of Energy Connecticut's Health Impact Study Rapidly Increasing Weatherization Efforts Connecticut's Health Impact Study Rapidly Increasing Weatherization Efforts June 18, 2014 - 10:49am Addthis Weatherization workers are trained in the house as a system approach. The Energy Department's Weatherization Assistance Program funded technical assistance as part of Connecticut's Health Impact Assessment project. | Photo courtesy of Weatherization Assistance Program Technical

  9. Potential Health and Environmental Impact from Emerging Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health and Environmental Impact from Emerging Technologies and Fuels: A report from the Health Effects Insitute Potential Health and Environmental Impact from Emerging Technologies ...

  10. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Safety Health Occupational

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Occupational Safety & Health - Occupational Injury & Illness System PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1 J Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be

  11. Enhancing Human and Planetary Health Through Innovation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Ben

    2014-10-17

    Ben Brown mesmerizes the audience on how to enhance human and planetary health through innovation at our '8 Big Ideas' Science at the Theater event on October 8th, 2014, in Oakland, California.

  12. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Human Resources Personal Information

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetext/neword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This

  13. Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Construct a ground sourced heat pump, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system for the new Oakland University Human Health Sciences Building utilizing variable refrigerant flow (VRF) heat pumps. A pair of dedicated outdoor air supply units will utilize a thermally regenerated desiccant dehumidification section. A large solar thermal system along with a natural gas backup boiler will provide the thermal regeneration energy.

  14. Gross national happiness as a framework for health impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennock, Michael; Ura, Karma

    2011-01-15

    The incorporation of population health concepts and health determinants into Health Impact Assessments has created a number of challenges. The need for intersectoral collaboration has increased; the meaning of 'health' has become less clear; and the distinctions between health impacts, environmental impacts, social impacts and economic impacts have become increasingly blurred. The Bhutanese concept of Gross National Happiness may address these issues by providing an over-arching evidence-based framework which incorporates health, social, environmental and economic contributors as well as a number of other key contributors to wellbeing such as culture and governance. It has the potential to foster intersectoral collaboration by incorporating a more limited definition of health which places the health sector as one of a number of contributors to wellbeing. It also allows for the examination of the opportunity costs of health investments on wellbeing, is consistent with whole-of-government approaches to public policy and emerging models of social progress.

  15. Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations, Committee on Foreign Affairs Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global ...

  16. Nitrite in feed: From Animal health to human health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cockburn, Andrew; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Fernndez, Maria-Luisa; Arcella, Davide; Peteghem, Carlos van; Dorne, Jean-Lou

    2013-08-01

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also carried out taking into account all direct and indirect sources of nitrite from the human diet, including carry-over of nitrite in animal-based products such as milk, eggs and meat products. Human exposure was then compared with the acceptable daily intake (ADI) for nitrite of 0-0.07 mg/kg b.w. per day. Overall, the low levels of nitrite in fresh animal products represented only 2.9% of the total daily dietary exposure and thus were not considered to raise concerns for human health. It is concluded that the potential health risk to animals from the consumption of feed or to man from eating fresh animal products containing nitrite, is very low.

  17. Toxicological and epidemiological aspects of global warming on human health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ando, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Wakamatsu, K.; Kawahara, I.; Asanuma, S.

    1996-12-31

    Since human activities are responsible for anthropogenic greenhouse gases emissions, climate models project an increase in the global surface temperature of 0.9 C to 4.0 C by 2100. For human health, it is projected that global warming may have a critical effect on the increased periods of severe heat stress in summer throughout the world. Global warming may have a critical issue on the increased periods of severe heat stress that have a potential impact on peroxidative damage in humans and animals. Lipid peroxidative damage is markedly related to GSH peroxidase activities, therefore the study was carried out to analyze the relationship between biochemical adaptability and the lipid peroxidative damage especially intracellular structure, such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum depending on the exposure time of heat stress.

  18. Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and International Organizations, Committee on Foreign Affairs | Department of Energy Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations, Committee on Foreign Affairs Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations, Committee on Foreign Affairs Testimony of Jonathan Elkind, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of International Affairs Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human

  19. Adaptation strategies for health impacts of climate change in Western Australia: Application of a Health Impact Assessment framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickett, Jeffery T.; Brown, Helen L.; Katscherian, Dianne

    2011-04-15

    Climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing the globe and there is substantial evidence that this will result in a number of health impacts, regardless of the level of greenhouse gas mitigation. It is therefore apparent that a combined approach of mitigation and adaptation will be required to protect public health. While the importance of mitigation is recognised, this project focused on the role of adaptation strategies in addressing the potential health impacts of climate change. The nature and magnitude of these health impacts will be determined by a number of parameters that are dependent upon the location. Firstly, climate change will vary between regions. Secondly, the characteristics of each region in terms of population and the ability to adapt to changes will greatly influence the extent of the health impacts that are experienced now and into the future. Effective adaptation measures therefore need to be developed with these differences in mind. A Health Impact Assessment (HIA) framework was used to consider the implications of climate change on the health of the population of Western Australia (WA) and to develop a range of adaptive responses suited to WA. A broad range of stakeholders participated in the HIA process, providing informed input into developing an understanding of the potential health impacts and potential adaptation strategies from a diverse sector perspective. Potential health impacts were identified in relation to climate change predictions in WA in the year 2030. The risk associated with each of these impacts was assessed using a qualitative process that considered the consequences and the likelihood of the health impact occurring. Adaptations were then developed which could be used to mitigate the identified health impacts and provide responses which could be used by Government for future decision making. The periodic application of a HIA framework is seen as an ideal tool to develop appropriate adaptation strategies to address the potential health impacts of climate change.

  20. Testing three health impact assessment tools in planning: A process evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schively Slotterback, Carissa; Forsyth, Ann; Krizek, Kevin J.; Johnson, Amanda; Pennucci, Aly

    2011-03-15

    There is increasing interest in Health Impact Assessment in planning. This paper describes the results of different approaches to health impact assessment (HIA) conducted in 10 municipalities and one county in Minnesota. The paper outlines the HIA processes, outputs, and short-term outcomes concluding that it is important to engage a diverse group of stakeholders. Overall, HIA is potentially an important new tool in the planning toolkit. Strategic use of HIA to evaluate draft plans and inform plan updates and project redesigns can help raise awareness about health issues and focus planning on important human problems.

  1. Connecticut's Health Impact Study Rapidly Increasing Weatherization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The projects will study the impact of asthma-related and fall-prevention measures on the process of delivering weatherization services. Recognizing the potential success of the ...

  2. Depleted uranium human health risk assessment, Jefferson Proving Ground, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

    1994-04-29

    The risk to human health from fragments of depleted uranium (DU) at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG) was estimated using two types of ecosystem pathway models. A steady-state, model of the JPG area was developed to examine the effects of DU in soils, water, and vegetation on deer that were hunted and consumed by humans. The RESRAD code was also used to estimate the effects of farming the impact area and consuming the products derived from the farm. The steady-state model showed that minimal doses to humans are expected from consumption of deer that inhabit the impact area. Median values for doses to humans range from about 1 mrem ({plus_minus}2.4) to 0.04 mrem ({plus_minus}0.13) and translate to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments (excess cancers) in the population. Monte Carlo simulation of the steady-state model was used to derive the probability distributions from which the median values were drawn. Sensitivity analyses of the steady-state model showed that the amount of DU in airborne dust and, therefore, the amount of DU on the vegetation surface, controlled the amount of DU ingested by deer and by humans. Human doses from the RESRAD estimates ranged from less than 1 mrem/y to about 6.5 mrem/y in a hunting scenario and subsistence fanning scenario, respectively. The human doses exceeded the 100 mrem/y dose limit when drinking water for the farming scenario was obtained from the on-site aquifer that was presumably contaminated with DU. The two farming scenarios were unrealistic land uses because the additional risk to humans due to unexploded ordnance in the impact area was not figured into the risk estimate. The doses estimated with RESRAD translated to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments to about 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} detriments. The higher risks were associated only with the farming scenario in which drinking water was obtained on-site.

  3. 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 13. Health Impacts | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 3. Health Impacts 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 13. Health Impacts DOE Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review PDF icon 2008_merit_review_13.pdf More Documents & Publications 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 14. Vehicle Systems and Simulation 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 10. Fuels Technologies 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 8. High Efficiency Clean Combustion and Enabling

  4. Assessing corporate project impacts in changeable contexts: A human rights perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salcito, Kendyl; Singer, Burton H.; Krieger, Gary R.; Weiss, Mitchell G.; Wielga, Mark; Utzinger, Jrg

    2014-07-01

    Project-level impact assessment was originally conceived as a snapshot taken in advance of project implementation, contrasting current conditions with a likely future scenario involving a variety of predicted impacts. Current best practice guidance has encouraged a shift towards longitudinal assessments from the pre-project stage through the implementation and operating phases. Experience and study show, however, that assessment of infrastructure-intensive projects rarely endures past the project's construction phase. Negative consequences for environmental, social and health outcomes have been documented. Such consequences clarify the pressing need for longitudinal assessment in each of these domains, with human rights impact assessment (HRIA) as an umbrella over, and critical augmentation of, environmental, social and health assessments. Project impacts on human rights are more closely linked to political, economic and other factors beyond immediate effects of a company's policy and action throughout the project lifecycle. Delineating these processes requires an adequate framework, with strategies for collecting longitudinal data, protocols that provide core information for impact assessment and guidance for adaptive mitigation strategies as project-related effects change over time. This article presents general principles for the design and implementation of sustained, longitudinal HRIA, based on experience assessing and responding to human rights impact in a uranium mining project in Malawi. The case study demonstrates the value of longitudinal assessment both for limiting corporate risk and improving human welfare. - Graphical abstract: Assessing changes in human rights condition as affected by both project and context, over time. - Highlights: Corporate capital projects affect human rights in myriad ways. Ongoing, longitudinal impact assessment techniques are needed. We present an approach for conducting longitudinal human rights impact assessment. Our methodology allows distinguishing corporate impacts from contextual changes. Promptly observing context changes and impacts enables companies to react nimbly.

  5. History of the FreedomCAR Environmental Science and Health Impacts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    History of the FreedomCAR Environmental Science and Health Impacts Activity History of the FreedomCAR Environmental Science and Health Impacts Activity 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  6. The need for health impact assessment in China: Potential benefits for public health and steps forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Liming; Rutherford, Shannon; Chu, Cordia

    2011-07-15

    Health impact assessment (HIA) is a useful tool to predict and estimate the potential health impact associated with programs, projects, and policies by comprehensively identifying relevant health determinants and their consequences. China is undergoing massive and rapid socio-economic changes leading to environment and population health challenges such as a large increase in non-communicable diseases, the emergence and re-emergence of infectious diseases, new health risks associated with environmental pollutants and escalating health inequality. These health issues are affected by multiple determinants which can be influenced by planned policies, programs, and projects. This paper discusses the needs for health impact assessment in China in order to minimize the negative health consequences from projects, programs and policies associated with rapid social and economic development. It first describes the scope of China's current impact assessment system and points out its inadequacy in meeting the requirements of population health protection and promotion. It then analyses the potential use of HIA and why China needs to develop and apply HIA as a tool to identify potential health impacts of proposed programs, projects and policies so as to influence decision-making early in the planning process. Thus, the paper recommends the development of HIA as a useful tool in China to enhance decision-making for the protection and promotion of population health. For this to happen, the paper outlines steps necessary for the establishment and successful implementation of HIA in China: beginning with the establishment of a HIA framework, followed by workforce capacity building, methodology design, and intersectoral collaboration and stakeholder engagement.

  7. Health impact assessment in planning: Development of the design for health HIA tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsyth, Ann; Slotterback, Carissa Schively; Krizek, Kevin J.

    2010-01-15

    How can planners more systematically incorporate health concerns into practical planning processes? This paper describes a suite of health impact assessment tools (HIAs) developed specifically for planning practice. Taking an evidence-based approach the tools are designed to fit into existing planning activities. The tools include: a short audit tool, the Preliminary Checklist; a structured participatory workshop, the Rapid HIA; an intermediate health impact assessment, the Threshold Analysis; and a set of Plan Review Checklists. This description provides a basis for future work including assessing tool validity, refining specific tools, and creating alternatives.

  8. Assessing human rights impacts in corporate development projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salcito, Kendyl; University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel; NomoGaia, 1900 Wazee Street, Suite 303, Denver, CO 80202; NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 ; Utzinger, Jrg; University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel ; Weiss, Mitchell G.; Mnch, Anna K.; Singer, Burton H.; Krieger, Gary R.; Wielga, Mark; NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202

    2013-09-15

    Human rights impact assessment (HRIA) is a process for systematically identifying, predicting and responding to the potential impact on human rights of a business operation, capital project, government policy or trade agreement. Traditionally, it has been conducted as a desktop exercise to predict the effects of trade agreements and government policies on individuals and communities. In line with a growing call for multinational corporations to ensure they do not violate human rights in their activities, HRIA is increasingly incorporated into the standard suite of corporate development project impact assessments. In this context, the policy world's non-structured, desk-based approaches to HRIA are insufficient. Although a number of corporations have commissioned and conducted HRIA, no broadly accepted and validated assessment tool is currently available. The lack of standardisation has complicated efforts to evaluate the effectiveness of HRIA as a risk mitigation tool, and has caused confusion in the corporate world regarding company duties. Hence, clarification is needed. The objectives of this paper are (i) to describe an HRIA methodology, (ii) to provide a rationale for its components and design, and (iii) to illustrate implementation of HRIA using the methodology in two selected corporate development projectsa uranium mine in Malawi and a tree farm in Tanzania. We found that as a prognostic tool, HRIA could examine potential positive and negative human rights impacts and provide effective recommendations for mitigation. However, longer-term monitoring revealed that recommendations were unevenly implemented, dependent on market conditions and personnel movements. This instability in the approach to human rights suggests a need for on-going monitoring and surveillance. -- Highlights: We developed a novel methodology for corporate human rights impact assessment. We piloted the methodology on two corporate projectsa mine and a plantation. Human rights impact assessment exposed impacts not foreseen in ESIA. Corporations adopted the majority of findings, but not necessarily immediately. Methodological advancements are expected for monitoring processes.

  9. Sick of Soot: The Public Health and Economic Impacts of Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sick of Soot: The Public Health and Economic Impacts of Diesel Pollution in California Sick of Soot: The Public Health and Economic Impacts of Diesel Pollution in California 2004 ...

  10. Health impacts of garage workers: A preliminary study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muttamara, S. . Division of Environmental Engineering); Alwis, K.U.

    1994-05-01

    This research study was carried out in two automobile repair garages situated in the Bangkok metropolitan area, employing 47 and 12 workers respectively. Air sampling, biological monitoring (blood, urine), noise monitoring, and audiometry of workers were done to assess the occupational environment and its impact on the workers. The occupational hygiene survey was carried out to observe the working conditions of both garages. It was found that conditions at both sites have a strong negative impact on the health of workers. The lead in air of Garage 1 was 0.20 mg/m[sup 3] which is the same as the threshold limit value (TLV) for lead in air for a working environment. The level of lead in blood of four workers of each garage was above the exposed level. According to the occupational hygiene survey carried out at both garages, 79% of workers of Garage 1 and 70% of workers of Gage 2 suffered from redness of the eyes (eye pain, gritty feeling), and 5% and 2% of workers of Garage 1 and Garage 2 respectively, complained about breathing difficulties. Control measures should be taken to minimize pollution due to dust, fumes, and noise which would reduce the health impacts and lead to a healthier workforce.

  11. National energy strategy: Recent studies comparing the health impacts of energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.D.

    1990-08-01

    The human health impacts of energy technologies arise mostly from routine emissions of pollutants and from traumatic accidents, which may also release pollutants. The natures and magnitudes of the risks differ among technologies -- they are a lot different for some -- and so the differences must be included in any evaluation of their relative merits. Based on the characteristics of their health risks, energy technologies can be classified into three groups: The fuel group, the renewable resources group, and the nuclear group. Within these technology groups, health risks are similar in form and magnitude. But among the groups they are quite different. They occur in different parts of the fuel cycle, to different people, and their characteristics are different with respect to public perceptions of their relative importance in decision making. These groups are compared in this study.

  12. Stakeholder participation in health impact assessment: A multicultural approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negev, Maya; Davidovitch, Nadav; Garb, Yaakov; Tal, Alon

    2013-11-15

    The literature on impact assessment (HIA) registers the importance of stakeholder participation in the assessment process, but still lacks a model for engaging stakeholders of diverse ethnic, professional and sectorial backgrounds. This paper suggests that the multicultural approach can contribute to HIA through a revision of the generic 5-step HIA model, and its implementation in a metropolitan plan in Southern Israel. The health issue scoped by the stakeholders in the HIA is related to land uses in the vicinity of the national hazardous industry and hazardous waste site. The stakeholders were representatives of the diverse populations at stake, including rural Bedouins and Jewish city dwellers, as well as representatives from the public sector, private sector, non-governmental organizations and academia. The case study revealed that a multicultural stakeholder participation process helps to uncover health issues known to the community which were not addressed in the original plan, and provides local knowledge regarding health conditions that is especially valuable when scientific data is uncertain or absent. It enables diverse stakeholders to prioritize the health issues that will be assessed. The case study also reveals ways in which the model needs revisions and improvements such as in recruitment of diverse participants. This paper presents a multicultural model of HIA and discusses some of the challenges that are faced when HIA is implemented in the context of current decision-making culture. -- Highlights: We revised the generic HIA model in light of the multicultural approach. We tested the model in a case study of zoning a hazardous industry site. Multicultural stakeholder participation uncovers health issues known to communities. It enables community prioritization of health issues. We present a model for multicultural stakeholder participation in HIA.

  13. Public health and economic impact of dampness and mold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudarri, David; Fisk, William J.

    2007-06-01

    The public health risk and economic impact of dampness and mold exposures was assessed using current asthma as a health endpoint. Individual risk of current asthma from exposure to dampness and mold in homes from Fisk et al. (2007), and asthma risks calculated from additional studies that reported the prevalence of dampness and mold in homes were used to estimate the proportion of U.S. current asthma cases that are attributable to dampness and mold exposure at 21% (95% confidence internal 12-29%). An examination of the literature covering dampness and mold in schools, offices, and institutional buildings, which is summarized in the appendix, suggests that risks from exposure in these buildings are similar to risks from exposures in homes. Of the 21.8 million people reported to have asthma in the U.S., approximately 4.6 (2.7-6.3) million cases are estimated to be attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home. Estimates of the national cost of asthma from two prior studies were updated to 2004 and used to estimate the economic impact of dampness and mold exposures. By applying the attributable fraction to the updated national annual cost of asthma, the national annual cost of asthma that is attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home is estimated to be $3.5 billion ($2.1-4.8 billion). Analysis indicates that exposure to dampness and mold in buildings poses significant public health and economic risks in the U.S. These findings are compatible with public policies and programs that help control moisture and mold in buildings.

  14. An equity tool for health impact assessments: Reflections from Mongolia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Jeremy; Wagler, Meghan; Lkhagvasuren, Oyun; Laing, Lory; Davison, Colleen; Janes, Craig

    2012-04-15

    A health impact assessment (HIA) is a tool for assessing the potential effects of a project or policy on a population's health. In this paper, we discuss a tool for successfully integrating equity concerns into HIAs. This discussion is the product of collaboration by Mongolian and Canadian experts, and it incorporates comments and suggestions of participants of a workshop on equity focused HIAs that took place in Mongolia in October, 2010. Our motivation for discussing this tool is based on the observation that existing HIAs tend either to fail to define equity or use problematic accounts of this concept. In this paper we give an overview of socio-demographic and health indicators in Mongolia and briefly discuss its mining industry. We then review three accounts of equity and argue for the importance of developing a consensus understanding of this concept when integrating considerations of equity into an HIA. Finally, we present findings from the workshop in Mongolia and outline a tool, derived from lessons from this workshop, for critically considering and integrating the concept of equity into an HIA.

  15. Virtual impact: visualizing the potential effects of cosmic impact in human history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masse, W Bruce; Janecky, David R; Forte, Maurizio; Barrientos, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    Current models indicate that catastrophic impacts by asteroids and comets capable of killing more than one quarter of Earth's human population have occurred on average once every million years; smaller impacts, such the 1908 Tunguska impact that leveled more than 2,000 square km of Siberian forest, occur every 200-300 years. Therefore, cosmic impact likely significantly affected hominine evolution and conceivably played a role in Holocene period human culture history. Regrettably, few archaeologists are trained to appreciate the nature and potential effects of cosmic impact. We have developed a conceptual model for an extensible set of educational and research tools based on virtual reality collaborative environments to engage archaeologists and the general public on the topic of the role of cosmic impact in human history. Our initial focus is on two documented asteroid impacts in Argentina during the period of 4000 to 1000 B.C. Campo del Cicio resulted in an energy release of around 2-3 megatons (100-150 times the Hiroshima atomic weapon), and left several craters and a strewn field covering 493 km{sup 2} in northeastern Argentina. Rio Cuarto was likely more than 1000 megatons and may have devastated an area greater than 50,000 km{sup 2} in central Argentina. We are focusing on reconstructions of these events and their potential effects on contemporary hunter and gatherers. Our vinual reality tools also introduce interactive variables (e.g., impactor physical properties, climate, vegetation, topography, and social complexity) to allow researchers and students to better investigate and evaluate the factors that significantly influence cosmic impact effects.

  16. Assessing human health risk in the USDA forest service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, D.R.

    1990-12-31

    This paper identifies the kinds of risk assessments being done by or for the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service. Summaries of data sources currently in use and the pesticide risk assessments completed by the agency or its contractors are discussed. An overview is provided of the agency`s standard operating procedures for the conduct of toxicological, ecological, environmental fate, and human health risk assessments.

  17. COLLOQUIUM: Human Impacts on the Earth's Geologic Carbon Cycle |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab January 15, 2014, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Human Impacts on the Earth's Geologic Carbon Cycle Professor David Archer University of Chicago Abstract: PDF icon COLL.01.15.14.pdf When fossil fuel CO2 is released to the atmosphere, it essentially accumulates in the relatively rapidly cycling atmosphere / ocean / land biosphere carbon cycle. The atmospheric concentration of CO2 spikes through a time period of CO2 emissions, then is

  18. Assessing health impacts in complex eco-epidemiological settings in the humid tropics: Modular baseline health surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkler, Mirko S.; Divall, Mark J.; Krieger, Gary R.; Schmidlin, Sandro; Magassouba, Mohamed L.; Knoblauch, Astrid M.; Singer, Burton H.; Utzinger, Juerg

    2012-02-15

    The quantitative assessment of health impacts has been identified as a crucial feature for realising the full potential of health impact assessment (HIA). In settings where demographic and health data are notoriously scarce, but there is a broad range of ascertainable ecological, environmental, epidemiological and socioeconomic information, a diverse toolkit of data collection strategies becomes relevant for the mainly small-area impacts of interest. We present a modular, cross-sectional baseline health survey study design, which has been developed for HIA of industrial development projects in the humid tropics. The modular nature of our toolkit allows our methodology to be readily adapted to the prevailing eco-epidemiological characteristics of a given project setting. Central to our design is a broad set of key performance indicators, covering a multiplicity of health outcomes and determinants at different levels and scales. We present experience and key findings from our modular baseline health survey methodology employed in 14 selected sentinel sites within an iron ore mining project in the Republic of Guinea. We argue that our methodology is a generic example of rapid evidence assembly in difficult-to-reach localities, where improvement of the predictive validity of the assessment and establishment of a benchmark for longitudinal monitoring of project impacts and mitigation efforts is needed.

  19. Facilitating communities in designing and using their own community health impact assessment tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, Colleen; Ghosh, Sebanti; Eaton, Susan L.

    2011-07-15

    Reducing health inequities and improving the health of communities require an informed public that is aware of the social determinants of health and how policies and programs have an impact on the health of their communities. People Assessing Their Health (PATH) is a process that uses community-driven health impact assessment to build the capacity of people to become active participants in the decisions that affect the well-being of their community. The PATH process is both a health promotion and a community development approach that builds people's ability to bring critical analysis to a situation and to engage in effective social action to bring about desired change. Because it increases analytical skills and provides communities with their own unique tool to assess the potential impact of projects, programs or policies on the health and well-being of their community it is an empowering process. PATH was originally used in three communities in northeastern Nova Scotia, Canada in 1996 when the Canadian health care system was being restructured to a more decentralized system. Since then it has been used in other communities in Nova Scotia and India. This paper will describe the PATH process and the use of the community health impact assessment as well as the methodology used in the PATH process. The lessons learned from PATH's experiences of building capacity among the community in Canada and India will be presented.

  20. River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment (RCBRA) Human Health Risk Assessment (Volume 2)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sands Jim Hansen U.S. Department of Energy - Richland Operations Office October 12, 2011 River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment (RCBRA) Human Health Risk Assessment (Volume 2) * RCBRA Human Health Risk Assessment is final - Response provided to HAB advice #246 * RCBRA Ecological Risk Assessment (Draft C) was transmitted to regulators September 27 * Columbia River Component - Draft Ecological Screening Level Risk Assessment ready for regulator review - Draft Human health risk assessment will be

  1. Creating LTS&M Efficiencies While Protecting Human Health and the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environment | Department of Energy Creating LTS&M Efficiencies While Protecting Human Health and the Environment Creating LTS&M Efficiencies While Protecting Human Health and the Environment October 13, 2015 - 2:28pm Addthis What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment New agreements with regulators allow for reductions in the frequency and number of reports and sampled constituents. The Fernald Preserve environmental monitoring team implemented work

  2. Estimated human health risks of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

    1997-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the contaminants` toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks.

  3. History of the FreedomCAR Environmental Science and Health Impacts Activity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy History of the FreedomCAR Environmental Science and Health Impacts Activity History of the FreedomCAR Environmental Science and Health Impacts Activity 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: U.S. Department of Energy PDF icon 2004_deer_eberhardt.pdf More Documents & Publications Diesel Injection Shear-Stress Advanced Nozzle (DISSAN) Weekend/Weekday Ozone Study in the South Coast Air Basin The FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies

  4. Diesel Health Impacts & Recent Comparisons to Other Fuels | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Health Impacts & Recent Comparisons to Other Fuels Diesel Health Impacts & Recent Comparisons to Other Fuels 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Natural Resources Defense Council PDF icon 2002_deer_bailey.pdf More Documents & Publications Summary of Swedish Experiences on CNG and "Clean" Diesel Buses CNG and Diesel Transite Bus Emissions in Review ARB's Study of Emissions from Diesel and CNG Heavy-duty Transit Buses

  5. The FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Health Impacts Program - The

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) Project | Department of Energy The FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Health Impacts Program - The Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) Project The FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Health Impacts Program - The Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) Project Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit,

  6. ITEP Webinar: Impacts of Climate Change on Tribal Health

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The presentation will focus on climate-related health indicators and how the report highlights the far-reaching significance of these changes and their possible consequences for people, the environment, and society.

  7. Structural Health Monitoring for Impact Damage in Composite Structures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Dennis P.; Raymond Bond; Doug Adams

    2014-08-01

    Composite structures are increasing in prevalence throughout the aerospace, wind, defense, and transportation industries, but the many advantages of these materials come with unique challenges, particularly in inspecting and repairing these structures. Because composites of- ten undergo sub-surface damage mechanisms which compromise the structure without a clear visual indication, inspection of these components is critical to safely deploying composite re- placements to traditionally metallic structures. Impact damage to composites presents one of the most signi fi cant challenges because the area which is vulnerable to impact damage is generally large and sometimes very dif fi cult to access. This work seeks to further evolve iden- ti fi cation technology by developing a system which can detect the impact load location and magnitude in real time, while giving an assessment of the con fi dence in that estimate. Fur- thermore, we identify ways by which impact damage could be more effectively identi fi ed by leveraging impact load identi fi cation information to better characterize damage. The impact load identi fi cation algorithm was applied to a commercial scale wind turbine blade, and results show the capability to detect impact magnitude and location using a single accelerometer, re- gardless of sensor location. A technique for better evaluating the uncertainty of the impact estimates was developed by quantifying how well the impact force estimate meets the assump- tions underlying the force estimation technique. This uncertainty quanti fi cation technique was found to reduce the 95% con fi dence interval by more than a factor of two for impact force estimates showing the least uncertainty, and widening the 95% con fi dence interval by a fac- tor of two for the most uncertain force estimates, avoiding the possibility of understating the uncertainty associated with these estimates. Linear vibration based damage detection tech- niques were investigated in the context of structural stiffness reductions and impact damage. A method by which the sensitivity to damage could be increased for simple structures was presented, and the challenges of applying that technique to a more complex structure were identi fi ed. The structural dynamic changes in a weak adhesive bond were investigated, and the results showed promise for identifying weak bonds that show little or no static reduction in stiffness. To address these challenges in identifying highly localized impact damage, the possi- bility of detecting damage through nonlinear dynamic characteristics was also identi fi ed, with a proposed technique which would leverage impact location estimates to enable the detection of impact damage. This nonlinear damage identi fi cation concept was evaluated on a composite panel with a substructure disbond, and the results showed that the nonlinear dynamics at the damage site could be observed without a baseline healthy reference. By further developing impact load identi fi cation technology and combining load and damage estimation techniques into an integrated solution, the challenges associated with impact detection in composite struc- tures can be effectively solved, thereby reducing costs, improving safety, and enhancing the operational readiness and availability of high value assets.

  8. USDOE study: Human health and ecological risk assessment for produced water discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; DePhillips, M.; Hamilton, L.D.

    1994-12-31

    Produced water generated during the production of oil and gas can contain high concentrations of radionuclides, organics and heavy metals. There are concerns about potential human health and ecological impacts from the discharge of these contaminants to the Gulf of Mexico. Data collected in the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) field study are being used in a series of human health and ecological risk assessments. These assessments will support scientifically-based regulation and risk management. This presentation: summarizes risk assessments performed for produced water discharges; describes how uncertainties in these assessments are guiding data collection efforts in the USDOE field study; and outlines ongoing risk assessment studies. In these studies, risk assessment is treated as an iterative process. An initial screening-level assessment is performed to identify important contaminants, transport and exposure pathways, and parameters. These intermediate results are used to guide data collection efforts and refinements to the analysis. At this stage in the analysis, risk is described in terms of probabilities; the uncertainties in each measured or modeled parameter are considered explicitly.

  9. Participatory health impact assessment for the development of local government regulation on hazard control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inmuong, Uraiwan; Rithmak, Panee; Srisookwatana, Soomol; Traithin, Nathathai; Maisuporn, Pornpun

    2011-07-15

    The Thai Public Health Act 1992 required the Thai local governments to issue respective regulations to take control of any possible health-hazard related activities, both from commercial and noncommercial sources. Since 1999, there has been centrally decentralized of power to a new form of local government establishment, namely Sub-district Administrative Organization (SAO). The SAO is asmall-scale local governing structure while its legitimate function is for community services, including control of health impact related activities. Most elected SAO administrators and officers are new and less experience with any of public health code of practice, particularly on health-hazard control. This action research attempted to introduce and apply a participatory health impact assessment (HIA) tool for the development of SAO health-hazard control regulation. The study sites were at Ban Meang and Kok See SAOs, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand, while all intervention activities conducted during May 2005-April 2006. A set of cooperative activities between researchers and community representatives were planned and organized by; surveying and identifying place and service base locally causing local environmental health problems, organizing community participatory workshops for drafting and proposing the health-hazard control regulation, and appropriate practices for health-hazard controlling measures. This action research eventually could successfully enable the SAO administrators and officers understanding of local environmental-related health problem, as well as development of imposed health-hazard control regulation for local community.

  10. Non-Targeted Effects Induced by Ionizing Radiation: Mechanisms and Potential Impact on Radiation Induced Health Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2015-01-01

    Not-targeted effects represent a paradigm shift from the "DNA centric" view that ionizing radiation only elicits biological effects and subsequent health consequences as a result of an energy deposition event in the cell nucleus. While this is likely true at higher radiation doses (> 1Gy), at low doses (< 100mGy) non-targeted effects associated with radiation exposure might play a significant role. Here definitions of non-targeted effects are presented, the potential mechanisms for the communication of signals and signaling networks from irradiated cells/tissues are proposed, and the various effects of this intra- and intercellular signaling are described. We conclude with speculation on how these observations might lead to and impact long-term human health outcomes.

  11. Assessing the health equity impacts of regional land-use plan making: An equity focussed health impact assessment of alternative patterns of development of the Whitsunday Hinterland and Mackay Regional Plan, Australia (Short report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunning, Colleen; Harris, Patrick; Mallett, John

    2011-07-15

    Health service and partners completed an equity focussed health impact assessment to influence the consideration of health and equity within regional land-use planning in Queensland, Australia. This project demonstrated how an equity oriented assessment matrix can assist in testing regional planning scenarios. It is hoped that this HIA will contribute to the emerging interest in ensuring that potential differential health impacts continue to be considered as part of land-use planning processes.

  12. FIA-13-0049- In the Matter of UNROW Human Rights Impact Litigation Clinic

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On July 25, 2013, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) denied a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Appeal filed by UNROW Human Rights Impact Litigation Clinic ...

  13. Public Health-Related Impacts of Climate Change inCalifornia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drechsler, D.M.; Motallebi, N.; Kleeman, M.; Cayan, D.; Hayhoe,K.; Kalkstein, L.S.; Miller, N.L.; Jin, J.; VanCuren, R.A.

    2005-12-01

    In June 2005 Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger issued Executive Order S-3-05 that set greenhouse gas emission reduction targets for California, and directed the Secretary of the California Environmental Protection Agency to report to the governor and the State legislature by January 2006 and biannually thereafter on the impacts to California of global warming, including impacts to water supply, public health, agriculture, the coastline, and forestry, and to prepare and report on mitigation and adaptation plans to combat these impacts. This report is a part of the report to the governor and legislature, and focuses on public health impacts that have been associated with climate change. Considerable evidence suggests that average ambient temperature is increasing worldwide, that temperatures will continue to increase into the future, and that global warming will result in changes to many aspects of climate, including temperature, humidity, and precipitation (McMichael and Githeko, 2001). It is expected that California will experience changes in both temperature and precipitation under current trends. Many of the changes in climate projected for California could have ramifications for public health (McMichael and Githeko, 2001), and this document summarizes the impacts judged most likely to occur in California, based on a review of available peer-reviewed scientific literature and new modeling and statistical analyses. The impacts identified as most significant to public health in California include mortality and morbidity related to temperature, air pollution, vector and water-borne diseases, and wildfires. There is considerable complexity underlying the health of a population with many contributing factors including biological, ecological, social, political, and geographical. In addition, the relationship between climate change and changes in public health is difficult to predict for the most part, although more detailed information is available on temperature-related mortality and air pollution effects than the other endpoints discussed in this document. Consequently, these two topics are discussed in greater detail. Where possible, estimates of the magnitude and significance of these impacts are also discussed, along with possible adaptations that could reduce climate-related health impacts. In the context of this review, weather refers to meteorological conditions at a specific place and time over a relatively short time frame, such as up to a year or two. Climate, on the other hand, refers to the same meteorological conditions, but over a longer time frame, such as decades or centuries.

  14. Appendix F Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F This appendix presents the detailed calculations used to estimate risks to human health. It includes the exposure factors, equations, abbreviations, assumptions, and references. Separate spreadsheets for ground water ingestion for the near-term and 20-year assumptio~ls have also been provided. The following spreadsheets are included in this appendix: Overview (Exposure Factors, Equations, Abbreviations, and COPCs)

  15. Advanced combustion, emission control, health impacts, and fuels merit review and peer evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2006-10-01

    This report is a summary and analysis of comments from the Advisory Panel at the FY 2006 DOE National Laboratory Advanced Combustion, Emission Control, Health Impacts, and Fuels Merit Review and Peer Evaluation, held May 15-18, 2006 at Argonne National Laboratory. The work evaluated in this document supports the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. The results of this merit review and peer evaluation are major inputs used by DOE in making its funding decisions for the upcoming fiscal year.

  16. Health impact assessment in the United States: Has practice followed standards?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuchter, Joseph; Bhatia, Rajiv; Corburn, Jason; Seto, Edmund

    2014-07-01

    As an emerging practice, Health Impact Assessment is heterogeneous in purpose, form, and scope and applied in a wide range of decision contexts. This heterogeneity challenges efforts to evaluate the quality and impact of practice. We examined whether information in completed HIA reports reflected objectively-evaluable criteria proposed by the North American HIA Practice Standards Working Group in 2009. From publically-available reports of HIAs conducted in the U.S. and published from 2009 to 2011, we excluded those that were components of, or comment letters on, Environmental Impact Assessments (5) or were demonstration projects or student exercises (8). For the remaining 23 reports, we used practice standards as a template to abstract data on the steps of HIA, including details on the rationale, authorship, funding, decision and decision-makers, participation, pathways and methods, quality of evidence, and recommendations. Most reports described screening, scoping, and assessment processes, but there was substantial variation in the extent of these processes and the degree of stakeholder participation. Community stakeholders participated in screening or scoping in just two-thirds of the HIAs (16). On average, these HIAs analyzed 5.5 determinants related to 10.6 health impacts. Most HIA reports did not include evaluation or monitoring plans. This study identifies issues for field development and improvement. The standards might be adapted to better account for variability in resources, produce fit-for-purpose HIAs, and facilitate innovation guided by the principles. - Highlights: Our study examined reported HIAs in the U.S. against published practice standards. Most HIAs used some screening, scoping and assessment elements from the standards. The extent of these processes and stakeholder participation varied widely. The average HIA considered multiple health determinants and impacts. Evaluation or monitoring plans were generally not included in reports.

  17. Review of Department of Energy research on human health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The Department of Energy research program on the human health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation consists of 16 projects conducted under the sponsorship of the Human Health and Assessments Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. Each of these projects was reviewed by the Committee with the project's principal investigators and associated scientific personnel and with the DOE staff and the associate directors of the national laboratories where appropriate. The principal objectives of this research program include the determination of the risks from exposure to external radiation and from internally deposited radionuclides and the use of this information in the development of standards to protect the health of nuclear workers at DOE and related facilities and of the population at large. 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Services and the U.S. Department of Energy | Department of Energy Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy August 28, 2010 August 2010 Memorandum of Understanding between HHS and DOE regarding the authorities, responsibilities and procedures to conduc mandated activities relating to the Energy

  19. EIS-0280: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    potential environmental and human health impacts of a proposed project under the Clean Coal Technology Program that would integrate the production of molten iron for steelmaking...

  20. EIS-0383: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    social and economic resources, waste management, human health and safety, and noise. The EIS also evaluates potential impacts on these resource areas for a scenario...

  1. The role of Health Impact Assessment in the setting of air quality standards: An Australian perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickett, Jeffery; Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia ; Katscherian, Dianne; Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia ; Harris, Patrick

    2013-11-15

    The approaches used for setting or reviewing air quality standards vary from country to country. The purpose of this research was to consider the potential to improve decision-making through integration of HIA into the processes to review and set air quality standards used in Australia. To assess the value of HIA in this policy process, its strengths and weaknesses were evaluated aligned with review of international processes for setting air quality standards. Air quality standard setting programmes elsewhere have either used HIA or have amalgamated and incorporated factors normally found within HIA frameworks. They clearly demonstrate the value of a formalised HIA process for setting air quality standards in Australia. The following elements should be taken into consideration when using HIA in standard setting. (a) The adequacy of a mainly technical approach in current standard setting procedures to consider social determinants of health. (b) The importance of risk assessment criteria and information within the HIA process. The assessment of risk should consider equity, the distribution of variations in air quality in different locations and the potential impacts on health. (c) The uncertainties in extrapolating evidence from one population to another or to subpopulations, especially the more vulnerable, due to differing environmental factors and population variables. (d) The significance of communication with all potential stakeholders on issues associated with the management of air quality. In Australia there is also an opportunity for HIA to be used in conjunction with the NEPM to develop local air quality standard measures. The outcomes of this research indicated that the use of HIA for air quality standard setting at the national and local levels would prove advantageous. -- Highlights: Health Impact Assessment framework has been applied to a policy development process. HIA process was evaluated for application in air quality standard setting. Advantages of HIA in the air quality standard setting process are demonstrated.

  2. Approaches to advancing quantitative human health risk assessment of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Euling, Susan Y.; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Subramaniam, Ravi P.

    2013-09-15

    The contribution of genomics and associated technologies to human health risk assessment for environmental chemicals has focused largely on elucidating mechanisms of toxicity, as discussed in other articles in this issue. However, there is interest in moving beyond hazard characterization to making more direct impacts on quantitative risk assessment (QRA) i.e., the determination of toxicity values for setting exposure standards and cleanup values. We propose that the evolution of QRA of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era will involve three, somewhat overlapping phases in which different types of approaches begin to mature. The initial focus (in Phase I) has been and continues to be on augmentation of weight of evidence using genomic and related technologies qualitatively to increase the confidence in and scientific basis of the results of QRA. Efforts aimed towards integration of these data with traditional animal-based approaches, in particular quantitative predictors, or surrogates, for the in vivo toxicity data to which they have been anchored are just beginning to be explored now (in Phase II). In parallel, there is a recognized need for expansion of the use of established biomarkers of susceptibility or risk of human diseases and disorders for QRA, particularly for addressing the issues of cumulative assessment and population risk. Ultimately (in Phase III), substantial further advances could be realized by the development of novel molecular and pathway-based biomarkers and statistical and in silico models that build on anticipated progress in understanding the pathways of human diseases and disorders. Such efforts would facilitate a gradual reorientation of QRA towards approaches that more directly link environmental exposures to human outcomes.

  3. Environmental Impacts, Health and Safety Impacts, and Financial Costs of the Front End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett W Carlsen; Urairisa Phathanapirom; Eric Schneider; John S. Collins; Roderick G. Eggert; Brett Jordan; Bethany L. Smith; Timothy M. Ault; Alan G. Croff; Steven L. Krahn; William G. Halsey; Mark Sutton; Clay E. Easterly; Ryan P. Manger; C. Wilson McGinn; Stephen E. Fisher; Brent W. Dixon; Latif Yacout

    2013-07-01

    FEFC processes, unlike many of the proposed fuel cycles and technologies under consideration, involve mature operational processes presently in use at a number of facilities worldwide. This report identifies significant impacts resulting from these current FEFC processes and activities. Impacts considered to be significant are those that may be helpful in differentiating between fuel cycle performance and for which the FEFC impact is not negligible relative to those from the remainder of the full fuel cycle. This report: • Defines ‘representative’ processes that typify impacts associated with each step of the FEFC, • Establishes a framework and architecture for rolling up impacts into normalized measures that can be scaled to quantify their contribution to the total impacts associated with various fuel cycles, and • Develops and documents the bases for estimates of the impacts and costs associated with each of the representative FEFC processes.

  4. Integration of health into urban spatial planning through impact assessment: Identifying governance and policy barriers and facilitators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, Laurence; Barton, Hugh; Gray, Selena; Lease, Helen; Pilkington, Paul

    2012-01-15

    This article presents the results of a review of literature examining the barriers and facilitators in integrating health in spatial planning at the local, mainly urban level, through appraisals. Our literature review covered the UK and non UK experiences of appraisals used to consider health issues in the planning process. We were able to identify four main categories of obstacles and facilitators including first the different knowledge and conceptual understanding of health by different actors/stakeholders, second the types of governance arrangements, in particular partnerships, in place and the political context, third the way institutions work, the responsibilities they have and their capacity and resources and fourth the timeliness, comprehensiveness and inclusiveness of the appraisal process. The findings allowed us to draw some lessons on the governance and policy framework regarding the integration of health impact into spatial planning, in particular considering the pros and cons of integrating health impact assessment (HIA) into other forms of impact assessment of spatial planning decisions such as environmental impact assessment (EIA) and strategic environment assessment (SEA). In addition, the research uncovered a gap in the literature that tends to focus on the mainly voluntary HIA to assess health outcomes of planning decisions and neglect the analysis of regulatory mechanisms such as EIA and SEA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Governance and policy barriers and facilitators to the integration of health into urban planning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Review of literature on impact assessment methods used across the world. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knowledge, partnerships, management/resources and processes can impede integration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HIA evaluations prevail uncovering research opportunities for evaluating other techniques.

  5. Human and animal health risk assessments of chemicals in the food chain: Comparative aspects and future perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorne, J.L.C.M.; Fink-Gremmels, J.

    2013-08-01

    Chemicals from anthropogenic and natural origins enter animal feed, human food and water either as undesirable contaminants or as part of the components of a diet. Over the last five decades, considerable efforts and progress to develop methodologies to protect humans and animals against potential risks associated with exposure to such potentially toxic chemicals have been made. This special issue presents relevant methodological developments and examples of risk assessments of undesirable substances in the food chain integrating the animal health and the human health perspective and refers to recent Opinions of the Scientific Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM) of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). This introductory review aims to give a comparative account of the risk assessment steps used in human health and animal health risk assessments for chemicals in the food chain and provides a critical view of the data gaps and future perspectives for this cross-disciplinary field. - Highlights: ? Principles of human and animal health risk assessment. ? Data gaps for each step of animal health risk assessment. ? Implications of animal risk assessment on human risk assessment. ? Future perspectives on chemical risk assessment.

  6. A risk assessment software tool for evaluating potential risks to human health and the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drendel, G.; Allen, B.; Gentry, R.; Shipp, A.; Van Landingham, C.

    1994-12-31

    The Ecology and National Environmental Policy Act Division (END), is providing a sitewide evaluation of alternative strategies for the final disposition of the Rocky Flats Plant material inventory. This analysis is known as the Systems Engineering Analysis (SEA) for the Rocky Flats Plant. The primary intent of the SEA is to support the Rocky Flats Plant decision-making. As part of the SEA project, a risk assessment software tool has been developed which will assist in the analysis by providing an evaluation of potential risks to human health and the environment for the purpose of augmenting future decisions at the site.

  7. Health effects of risk-assessment categories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, C.F.; Rybicka, K.; Knutson, A.; Morris, S.C.

    1983-10-01

    Environmental and occupational health effects associated with exposures to various chemicals are a subject of increasing concern. One recently developed methodology for assessing the health impacts of various chemical compounds involves the classification of similar chemicals into risk-assessment categories (RACs). This report reviews documented human health effects for a broad range of pollutants, classified by RACs. It complements other studies that have estimated human health effects by RAC based on analysis and extrapolation of data from animal research.

  8. Variation in Estimated Ozone-Related Health Impacts of Climate Change due to Modeling Choices and Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, Ellen S.; Grambsch, A.; Weaver, C. P.; Morefield, Philip; Huang, Jin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Nolte, Christopher G.; Adams, P. J.; Liang, Xin-Zhong; Zhu, J.; Mahoney, Hardee

    2012-11-01

    Future climate change may cause air quality degradation via climate-induced changes in meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and emissions into the air. Few studies have explicitly modeled the potential relationships between climate change, air quality, and human health, and fewer still have investigated the sensitivity of estimates to the underlying modeling choices.

  9. A vibro-haptic human-machine interface for structural health monitoring

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mascarenas, David; Plont, Crystal; Brown, Christina; Cowell, Martin; Jameson, N. Jordan; Block, Jessica; Djidjev, Stephanie; Hahn, Heidi A.; Farrar, Charles

    2014-11-01

    The structural health monitoring (SHM) community’s goal has been to endow physical systems with a nervous system not unlike those commonly found in living organisms. Typically the SHM community has attempted to do this by instrumenting structures with a variety of sensors, and then applying various signal processing and classification procedures to the data in order to detect the presence of damage, the location of damage, the severity of damage, and to estimate the remaining useful life of the structure. This procedure has had some success, but we are still a long way from achieving the performance of nervous systemsmore » found in biology. This is primarily because contemporary classification algorithms do not have the performance required. In many cases expert judgment is superior to automated classification. This work introduces a new paradigm. We propose interfacing the human nervous system to the distributed sensor network located on the structure and developing new techniques to enable human-machine cooperation. Results from the field of sensory substitution suggest this should be possible. This study investigates a vibro-haptic human-machine interface for SHM. The investigation was performed using a surrogate three-story structure. The structure features three nonlinearity-inducing bumpers to simulate damage. Accelerometers are placed on each floor to measure the response of the structure to a harmonic base excitation. The accelerometer measurements are preprocessed. As a result, the preprocessed data is then encoded encoded as a vibro-tactile stimulus. Human subjects were then subjected to the vibro-tactile stimulus and asked to characterize the damage in the structure.« less

  10. Co-benefits of mitigating global greenhouse gas emissions for future air quality and human health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Jason; Smith, Steven J.; Silva, Raquel; Naik, Vaishali; Zhang, Yuqiang; Adelman, Zacariah; Fry, Meridith M.; Anenberg, Susan C.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

    2013-10-01

    Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions also influences air quality. We simulate the co-benefits of global GHG reductions on air quality and human health via two mechanisms: a) reducing co-emitted air pollutants, and b) slowing climate change and its effect on air quality. Relative to a reference scenario, global GHG mitigation in the RCP4.5 scenario avoids 0.50.2, 1.30.6, and 2.21.6 million premature deaths in 2030, 2050, and 2100, from changes in fine particulate matter and ozone. Global average marginal co-benefits of avoided mortality are $40-400 (ton CO2)-1, exceeding marginal abatement costs in 2030 and 2050, and within the low range of costs in 2100. East Asian co-benefits are 10-80 times the marginal cost in 2030. These results indicate that transitioning to a low-carbon future might be justified by air quality and health co-benefits.

  11. Environmental Assessment for Conducting Astrophysics and Other Basic Science Experiments - Chapter 4 Environmental Impacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4-1 CHAPTER 4 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS The following sections describe the environmental impacts that could occur as a result of the proposed activities at the WIPP site. 4.1 HUMAN HEALTH The human health impacts of the proposed astrophysics experiments are quantified in this section to the extent possible given the uncertainties in the actual experiments to be performed at WIPP. For the most part, the health hazards associated with each experiment are discussed individually, although specific

  12. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Q-1 APPENDIX Q LONG-TERM HUMAN HEALTH DOSE AND RISK ANALYSIS This appendix presents methods and results for assessment of potential human health impacts due to releases of radionuclides and chemicals from the high-level radioactive waste tanks, Fast Flux Test Facility decommissioning, and waste management activities over long periods of time following stabilization or closure. Q.1 INTRODUCTION Adverse impacts on human health and the environment may occur over long periods of time following

  13. The development and application of the chemical mixture methodology in analysis of potential health impacts from airborne release in emergencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Petrocchi, Achille J.; Craig, Douglas K.; Glantz, Clifford S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ciolek, John T.; Lu, Po-Yung; Bond, Jayne-Anne; Tuccinardi, Thomas E.; Bouslaugh, Philip R.

    2010-07-15

    The Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM) is used for emergency response and safety planning by the U.S. Department of Energy, its contractors, and other private and public sector organizations. The CMM estimates potential health impacts on individuals and their ability to take protective actions as a result of exposure to airborne chemical mixtures. They are based on the concentration of each chemical in the mixture at a designated receptor location, the protective action criteria (PAC) providing chemical-specific exposure limit values, and the health code numbers (HCNs) that identify the target organ groupings that may be impacted by exposure to each chemical in a mixture. The CMM has been significantly improved since its introduction more than 10 years ago. Major enhancements involve the expansion of the number of HCNs from 44 to 60 and inclusion of updated PAC values based on an improved development methodology and updates in the data used to derive the PAC values. Comparisons between the 1999 and 2009 versions of the CMM show potentially substantial changes in the assessment results for selected sets of chemical mixtures. In particular, the toxic mode hazard indices (HIs) and target organ HIs are based on more refined acute HCNs, thereby improving the quality of chemical consequence assessment, emergency planning, and emergency response decision making. Seven hypothetical chemical storage and processing scenarios are used to demonstrate how the CMM is applied in emergency planning and hazard assessment.

  14. A macro environmental risk assessment methodology for establishing priorities among risks to human health and the environment in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gernhofer, S.; Oliver, T.J.; Vasquez, R.

    1994-12-31

    A macro environmental risk assessment (ERA) methodology was developed for the Philippine Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) as part of the US Agency for International Development Industrial Environmental Management Project. The DENR allocates its limited resources to mitigate those environmental problems that pose the greatest threat to human health and the environment. The National Regional Industry Prioritization Strategy (NRIPS) methodology was developed as a risk assessment tool to establish a national ranking of industrial facilities. The ranking establishes regional and national priorities, based on risk factors, that DENR can use to determine the most effective allocation of its limited resources. NRIPS is a systematic framework that examines the potential risk to human health and the environment from hazardous substances released from a facility, and, in doing so, generates a relative numerical score that represents that risk. More than 3,300 facilities throughout the Philippines were evaluated successfully with the NRIPS.

  15. Introduction of a method for presenting health-based impacts of the emission from products, based on emission measurements of materials used in manufacturing of the products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jrgensen, Rikke Bramming

    2013-11-15

    A method for presenting the health impact of emissions from furniture is introduced, which could be used in the context of environmental product declarations. The health impact is described by the negative indoor air quality potential, the carcinogenic potential, the mutagenic and reprotoxic potential, the allergenic potential, and the toxicological potential. An experimental study of emissions from four pieces of furniture is performed by testing both the materials used for production of the furniture and the complete piece of furniture, in order to compare the results gained by adding emissions of material with results gained from testing the finished piece of furniture. Calculating the emission from a product based on the emission from materials used in the manufacture of the product is a new idea. The relation between calculated results and measured results from the same products differ between the four pieces of furniture tested. Large differences between measured and calculated values are seen for leather products. More knowledge is needed to understand why these differences arise. Testing materials allows us to compare different suppliers of the same material. Four different foams and three different timber materials are tested, and the results vary between materials of the same type. If the manufacturer possesses this type of knowledge of the materials from the subcontractors it could be used as a selection criterion according to production of low emission products. -- Highlights: A method for presenting health impact of emissions is introduced. An experimental study of emissions from four pieces of furniture is performed. Health impact is calculated based on sum of contribution from the materials used. Calculated health impact is compared to health impact of the manufactured product. The results show that health impact could be useful in product development and for presentation in EPDs.

  16. DOE Issues Final Mercury Storage Environmental Impact Statement: Texas Site Is Preferred for Long-Term Mercury Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON – The Department of Energy has prepared a Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement to analyze the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven locations

  17. Programs director`s report for the Office of Health and Environmental Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    Since its establishment, the Department of Energy`s Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has had responsibility for conducting biological research to develop the knowledge needed to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy use and development, including the potential health impacts of radiation. The Health Effects Research Program has established the basis for understanding the health consequences of radiation for humans, developed radiation dosimetry methodology, characterized and evaluated the health impacts of fossil fuels, and developed and conducted research to determine the health impacts of inhaled toxicants. The results of this research have provided input for setting genetic standards for radiation and chemical exposure.

  18. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH IMPACTS OF SEDIMENT DECONTAMINATION FACILITIES FOR NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROWE,M.D.; KLEIN,R.C.; JONES,K.W.

    1999-07-31

    Sediment is accumulating in New York/New Jersey Harbor, and shipping channels are rapidly becoming too shallow for large ships. The Port Authority of New York/New Jersey has determined that dredging of the ship channels is essential to keep them navigable. About five million cubic yards of sediment must be removed per year to keep the channels open. Without dredging, the channels will soon become unusable, and the shoreside shipping and warehousing businesses that depend on them will fade away. The economic loss to the area would be devastating. But the deeper layers of sediment in the Harbor contain a broad range of pollutants that are hazardous to humans and the environment-a legacy of past discharges that are no longer permitted. These include heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins. As a result, there are several million cubic yards of sediments to be dredged per year that do not meet applicable criteria for ocean disposal and must be dealt with in some other way. A possible solution to the problem is to treat the dredged material to immobilize or destroy the contaminants and make the treated sediments suitable for disposal in the ocean or on land at acceptable cost. A variety of technologies can be used to achieve this goal. The simplest approach is to make manufactured soil from untreated sediment. The most complex approaches involve high-temperature destruction of organic contaminants and immobilization of inorganic contaminants. When any of these technologies are used, there is potential for risks to human health from process wastes and from the treated materials themselves. Also, disposal or beneficial use of treated materials may generate other risks to human health or the environment. A description of some of the technologies considered is given in Table 1. Success in removing or immobilizing the contaminants, which varies significantly among technologies, is reported elsewhere. This report provides a preliminary evaluation, or ``screening assessment,'' of potential occupational, public, and environmental health risks from dredging, transporting, and treating contaminated harbor sediments with thermal treatment methods to render them suitable for disposal or beneficial use. The assessment was done in stages as the project advanced and data became available from other tasks on characteristics of sediments and treatment processes.

  19. Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

    2012-01-01

    The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

  20. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for Department of Health and Human Services – ASPR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schey, Steve; Francfort, Jim

    2015-06-01

    This report focuses on the Department of Health and Human Services, Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of PEVs into the agency’s fleet. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (collectively referred to as PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements.

  1. National inventory of abandoned mine land problems: an emphasis on health, safety, and general welfare impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honea, R.B.; Baxter, F.P.

    1984-07-01

    In 1977 Congress passed the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, which provided for the abatement of abandoned mine land (AML) problems through a reclamation program funded by a severance tax on current mining. AML was defined as any land, including associated buildings, equipment, and affected areas, that was no longer being used for coal mining by August 1977. This act also created the Office of Surface Mining (OSM) in the Department of the Interior to administer the AML program and to assume other regulatory and research responsibilities. This report documents the design, implementation, and results of a National inventory of the most serious problems associated with past mining practices. One of the objectives of the Inventory was to help OSM and the participating states locate, identify, and rank AML problems and estimate their reclamation costs. Other objectives were to encourage states and Indian tribes to collect such data and to provide OSM with the information necessary to guide its decision-making processes and to quantify the progress of the reclamation program. Because only limited funds were available to design and implement the National inventory and because the reclamation fund established by the Act may never be sufficient to correct all AML problems, OSM has focused on only the top-priority problems. It is stressed that this is not an inventory of AML features but rather an inventory of AML impacts. It should be noted that the data and analysis contained in this report are based on a data collection effort conducted by the states, Indian tribes, and OSM contractors between 1979 and mid-1982.

  2. Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Research may clarify the effectiveness of regional pollution controls May 28, 2013 Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, (510) 495-2404 LosAngelesSmogv1.jpg Smog over downtown Los Angeles. Aerosols are microscopic particles-like dust, pollen and soot-that ubiquitously float around in our atmosphere. Despite their tiny stature, these particles can have a huge impact on human health, climate and the

  3. Report on the Human Genome Initiative for the Office of Health and Environmental Research

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Tinoco, I.; Cahill, G.; Cantor, C.; Caskey, T.; Dulbecco, R.; Engelhardt, D. L.; Hood, L.; Lerman, L. S.; Mendelsohn, M. L.; Sinsheimer, R. L.; Smith, T.; Soll, D.; Stormo, G.; White, R. L.

    1987-04-01

    The report urges DOE and the Nation to commit to a large, multi-year, multidisciplinary, technological undertaking to order and sequence the human genome. This effort will first require significant innovation in general capability to manipulate DNA, major new analytical methods for ordering and sequencing, theoretical developments in computer science and mathematical biology, and great expansions in our ability to store and manipulate the information and to interface it with other large and diverse genetic databases. The actual ordering and sequencing involves the coordinated processing of some 3 billion bases from a reference human genome. Science is poised on the rudimentary edge of being able to read and understand human genes. A concerted, broadly based, scientific effort to provide new methods of sufficient power and scale should transform this activity from an inefficient one-gene-at-a-time, single laboratory effort into a coordinated, worldwide, comprehensive reading of "the book of man". The effort will be extraordinary in scope and magnitude, but so will be the benefit to biological understanding, new technology and the diagnosis and treatment of human disease.

  4. A clean-burning biofuel as a response to adverse impacts of woodsmoke and coalsmoke on Navajo health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shultz, E.B. Jr.; Bragg, W.G.; Whittier, J.

    1994-12-31

    Because over 60% of Navajo households are heated with woodfuel and coal, and indoor air pollution from woodsmoke and coalsmoke is problematic, most Navajos are probably at risk of respiratory and other smoke-induced illnesses. A previous study has shown that Navajo children living in homes heated by a wood/coal stove are nearly five times more likely to contract acute lower respiratory tract infections than children from homes that do not use those fuels. Stove and flue improvements to reduce leakage of smoke into the home would help. So would clean-burning solid fuels in replacement of woodfuel and coal. The authors describe a clean-burning fast-growing carbohydrate biofuel, prepared by sun-drying the roots of a wild southwestern gourd plant, Cucurbita foetidissima. They call it {open_quotes}rootfuel.{close_quotes} A test plot is growing during the 1994 season at the NMSU Agricultural Science Center on the Navajo Nation, near Farmington, New Mexico. Irrigation requirements are being measured. In the Fall, a preliminary needs assessment will be conducted to learn more about how fuel usage impacts Navajo health. The acceptability of rootfuel in selected homes will be tested during the upcoming heating season.

  5. Impact of Preoperative Radiotherapy on General and Disease-Specific Health Status of Rectal Cancer Survivors: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thong, Melissa S.Y., E-mail: M.Thong@uvt.nl [Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University (Netherlands); Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mols, Floortje [Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University (Netherlands); Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lemmens, Valery E.P.P. [Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rutten, Harm J.T. [Department of Surgery, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Roukema, Jan A. [Department of Surgery, St. Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands); Martijn, Hendrik [Department of Radiotherapy, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de [Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University (Netherlands); Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To date, few studies have evaluated the impact of preoperative radiotherapy (pRT) on long-term health status of rectal cancer survivors. Using a population-based sample, we assessed the impact of pRT on general and disease-specific health status of rectal cancer survivors up to 10 years postdiagnosis. The health status of older ({>=}75 years old at diagnosis) pRT survivors was also compared with that of younger survivors. Methods and Materials: Survivors identified from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry treated with surgery only (SU) or with pRT between 1998 and 2007 were included. Survivors completed the Short Form-36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Colorectal 38 (EORTC QLQ-CR38) questionnaire. The SF-36 and EORTC QLQ-CR38 (sexuality subscale) scores of the survivors were compared to an age- and sex-matched Dutch normal population. Results: A total of 340 survivors (response, 85%; pRT survivors, 71%) were analyzed. Overall, survivors had similar general health status. Both short-term (<5 years) and long-term ({>=}5 years) pRT survivors had significantly poorer body image and more problems with gastrointestinal function, male sexual dysfunction, and defecation than SU survivors. Survivors had comparable general health status but greater sexual dysfunction than the normal population. Older pRT survivors had general and disease-specific health status comparable to that of younger pRT survivors. Conclusions: For better survivorship care, rectal cancer survivors could benefit from increased clinical and psychological focus on the possible long-term morbidity of treatment and its effects on health status.

  6. Human health safety evaluation of cosmetics in the EU: A legally imposed challenge to science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauwels, M.; Rogiers, V.

    2010-03-01

    As stated in the European legislation, cosmetic products present on the European market must be safe for the consumer. Safety evaluation of the products is carried out by a qualified safety assessor who needs to consider potential exposure scenarios next to the physicochemical and toxicological profiles of all composing ingredients. Whereas, until recently, the tools to determine the toxicological profile of cosmetic ingredients mainly consisted of animal experiments, they have now been narrowed down substantially by the legally imposed animal testing ban on cosmetic ingredients, taken up in the Cosmetic Products Directive (76/768/EEC). This Directive, however, is not a stand-alone piece of European legislation, since as well directly as indirectly it is influenced by a complex web of related legislations. Vertical legislations deal with different categories of chemicals, including dangerous substances, biocides, plant protection products, food additives, medicinal products, and of course also cosmetics. Horizontal legislative texts, on the contrary, cover more general fields such as protection of experimental animals, consumer product safety, misleading of consumers, specific provisions for aerosols, and others. Experience has learnt that having a general overview of these related legislations is necessary to understand their impact on the cosmetic world in general terms and on cosmetic safety evaluation in particular. This goes for a variety of concerned parties, including national and European regulators/agencies, contract laboratories, raw material suppliers, cosmetic companies, research and educational centers. They all deal with a number of aspects important for the quality and toxicity of cosmetics and their ingredients. This review summarises the most relevant points of the legislative texts of different types of product categories and emphasises their impact on the safety evaluation of cosmetics.

  7. Dynamic modeling of injection-induced fault reactivation and ground motion and impact on surface structures and human perception

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Cappa, Frederic; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Godano, Maxime

    2014-12-31

    We summarize recent modeling studies of injection-induced fault reactivation, seismicity, and its potential impact on surface structures and nuisance to the local human population. We used coupled multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical numerical modeling, dynamic wave propagation modeling, seismology theories, and empirical vibration criteria from mining and construction industries. We first simulated injection-induced fault reactivation, including dynamic fault slip, seismic source, wave propagation, and ground vibrations. From co-seismic average shear displacement and rupture area, we determined the moment magnitude to about Mw = 3 for an injection-induced fault reactivation at a depth of about 1000 m. We then analyzed the ground vibration results in terms of peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak ground velocity (PGV), and frequency content, with comparison to the U.S. Bureau of Mines vibration criteria for cosmetic damage to buildings, as well as human-perception vibration limits. For the considered synthetic Mw = 3 event, our analysis showed that the short duration, high frequency ground motion may not cause any significant damage to surface structures, and would not cause, in this particular case, upward CO2 leakage, but would certainly be felt by the local population.

  8. Dynamic modeling of injection-induced fault reactivation and ground motion and impact on surface structures and human perception

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Cappa, Frederic; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Godano, Maxime

    2014-12-31

    We summarize recent modeling studies of injection-induced fault reactivation, seismicity, and its potential impact on surface structures and nuisance to the local human population. We used coupled multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical numerical modeling, dynamic wave propagation modeling, seismology theories, and empirical vibration criteria from mining and construction industries. We first simulated injection-induced fault reactivation, including dynamic fault slip, seismic source, wave propagation, and ground vibrations. From co-seismic average shear displacement and rupture area, we determined the moment magnitude to about Mw = 3 for an injection-induced fault reactivation at a depth of about 1000 m. We then analyzed themore » ground vibration results in terms of peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak ground velocity (PGV), and frequency content, with comparison to the U.S. Bureau of Mines’ vibration criteria for cosmetic damage to buildings, as well as human-perception vibration limits. For the considered synthetic Mw = 3 event, our analysis showed that the short duration, high frequency ground motion may not cause any significant damage to surface structures, and would not cause, in this particular case, upward CO2 leakage, but would certainly be felt by the local population.« less

  9. EA-0921: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    21: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0921: Finding of No Significant Impact Ambulatory Research and Education Center, Oregon Health Sciences University Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed construction and operation of the Ambulatory Research and Education Center at Oregon Health Sciences University does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, an environmental

  10. EIS-0120: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0120: Final Environmental Impact Statement Waste Management Activities for Groundwater Protection Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this environmental impact statement (EIS) to assess the environmental consequences of the implementation of modified waste management activities for hazardous, low-level radioactive, and mixed wastes for the protection of groundwater, human health, and the

  11. Human health risk assessment and remediation activities at White Oak Creek Embayment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaylock, B.G.

    1994-12-31

    Cesium-137 concentrations of >10{sup 6} Bq/kg dry wt (10{sup 4} pCi/g dry wt) were found in the surface sediments of White Oak Creek Embayment (WOCE) during 1990. A review of past data indicated Cesium-137, among other contaminants, was released from White Oak dam in the mid 1950s and had accumulated in the sediment of WOCE. The sediments from WOCE were being eroded and transported downstream primarily during winter low-water levels by flood events and by a combination of normal downstream flow and water turbulence. Sampling was conducted to determine the extent of radiological and nonradiological contamination. A contaminant screening analysis was conducted to determine which contaminants pose a problem from a human health standpoint. All noncarcinogens had screening indices of <1.0, indicating that concentrations of noncarcinogens were below the levels of concern for a realistic maximum exposure situation. An illegal intruder or an individual using the embayment for fishing purposes could be exposed to >10{sup 4} risk of excess lifetime cancer incidence from external exposure to Cesium-137 in sediment and from ingestion of polychlorinated biphenyls in fish. As a result of these analyses and the fact that >10{sup 6} Bq/kg dry wt (10{sup 4} pCi/g dry wt) of Cesium-137 could be transported from the Oak Ridge Reservation, a coffer-cell dam was constructed at the mouth of White Oak Creek in 1992 to: (1) reduce sediment erosion and the transport of radioactive sediments from the WOCE into the Clinch River, (2) maintain year-round inundation of the embayment sediments to reduce external radiation exposure, and (3) impede the movement of fish into and out of the embayment. The effectiveness of this remediation is being evaluated.

  12. A tiered approach for the human health risk assessment for consumption of vegetables from with cadmium-contaminated land in urban areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swartjes, Frank A. Versluijs, Kees W.; Otte, Piet F.

    2013-10-15

    Consumption of vegetables that are grown in urban areas takes place worldwide. In developing countries, vegetables are traditionally grown in urban areas for cheap food supply. In developing and developed countries, urban gardening is gaining momentum. A problem that arises with urban gardening is the presence of contaminants in soil, which can be taken up by vegetables. In this study, a scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables from cadmium-contaminated land. Starting from a contaminated site, the procedure follows a tiered approach which is laid out as follows. In Tier 0, the plausibility of growing vegetables is investigated. In Tier 1 soil concentrations are compared with the human health-based Critical soil concentration. Tier 2 offers the possibility for a detailed site-specific human health risk assessment in which calculated exposure is compared to the toxicological reference dose. In Tier 3, vegetable concentrations are measured and tested following a standardized measurement protocol. To underpin the derivation of the Critical soil concentrations and to develop a tool for site-specific assessment the determination of the representative concentration in vegetables has been evaluated for a range of vegetables. The core of the procedure is based on Freundlich-type plantsoil relations, with the total soil concentration and the soil properties as variables. When a significant plantsoil relation is lacking for a specific vegetable a geometric mean of BioConcentrationFactors (BCF) is used, which is normalized according to soil properties. Subsequently, a conservative vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor is calculated as basis for the Critical soil concentration (Tier 1). The tool to perform site-specific human health risk assessment (Tier 2) includes the calculation of a realistic worst case site-specific vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. -- Highlights: A scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables. Uptake characteristics of cadmium in a series of vegetables is represented by a vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. Calculations and measurement steps are combined.

  13. Overview of ozone human exposure and health risk analyses used in the U.S. EPA's review of the ozone air quality standard.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, R. G.

    1999-03-04

    This paper presents an overview of the ozone human exposure and health risk analyses developed under sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These analyses are being used in the current review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The analyses consist of three principal steps: (1) estimating short-term ozone exposure for particular populations (exposure model); (2) estimating population response to exposures or concentrations (exposure-response or concentration-response models); and (3) integrating concentrations or exposure with concentration-response or exposure-response models to produce overall risk estimates (risk model). The exposure model, called the probabilistic NAAQS exposure model for ozone (pNEM/03), incorporates the following factors: hourly ambient ozone concentrations; spatial distribution of concentrations; ventilation state of individuals at time of exposure; and movement of people through various microenvironments (e.g., outdoors, indoors, inside a vehicle) of varying air quality. Exposure estimates are represented by probability distributions. Exposure-response relationships have been developed for several respiratory symptom and lung function health effects, based on the results of controlled human exposure studies. These relationships also are probabilistic and reflect uncertainties associated with sample size and variability of response among subjects. The analyses also provide estimates of excess hospital admissions in the New York City area based on results from an epidemiology study. Overall risk results for selected health endpoints and recently analyzed air quality scenarios associated with alternative 8-hour NAAQS and the current 1-hour standard for outdoor children are used to illustrate application of the methodology.

  14. Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

  15. Development Impact Assessment (DIA) Case Study: South Africa

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Social impacts may include health (mortality and morbidity), poverty reduction, education, ... impacts and certain development impacts including GDP, employment, and povertywelfare. ...

  16. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1979 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health, and safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baalman, R.W.; Dotson, C.W.

    1980-02-01

    Part 5 of the 1979 Annual Report to the Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for the Environment presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Technology Impacts, the Office of Environmental Compliance and Overview, and the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The report is in four sections, corresponding to the program elements: technology impacts, environmental control engineering, operational and environmental compliance, and human health studies. In each section, articles describe progress made during FY 1979 on individual projects.

  17. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K-1 APPENDIX K SHORT-TERM HUMAN HEALTH RISK ANALYSIS This appendix presents the methodologies and assumptions used for estimating potential impacts on, and risks to, individuals and the general public from exposure to releases of radioactive and hazardous chemical materials during normal operations and as a result of hypothetical accidents. It also presents the methodology that was used to assess industrial safety. This information is intended to support the public and occupational health and

  18. Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G; Daniels, J; Wegrecki, A

    2007-10-01

    This document contains the human health and ecological risk assessment for the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF). Volume 1 is the text of the risk assessment, and Volume 2 (provided on a compact disc) is the supporting modeling data. The EWTF is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Site 300, which is located in the foothills between the cities of Livermore and Tracy, approximately 17 miles east of Livermore and 8 miles southwest of Tracy. Figure 1 is a map of the San Francisco Bay Area, showing the location of Site 300 and other points of reference. One of the principal activities of Site 300 is to test what are known as 'high explosives' for nuclear weapons. These are the highly energetic materials that provide the force to drive fissionable material to criticality. LLNL scientists develop and test the explosives and the integrated non-nuclear components in support of the United States nuclear stockpile stewardship program as well as in support of conventional weapons and the aircraft, mining, oil exploration, and construction industries. Many Site 300 facilities are used in support of high explosives research. Some facilities are used in the chemical formulation of explosives; others are locations where explosive charges are mechanically pressed; others are locations where the materials are inspected radiographically for such defects as cracks and voids. Finally, some facilities are locations where the machined charges are assembled before they are sent to the onsite test firing facilities, and additional facilities are locations where materials are stored. Wastes generated from high-explosives research are treated by open burning (OB) and open detonation (OD). OB and OD treatments are necessary because they are the safest methods for treating explosives wastes generated at these facilities, and they eliminate the requirement for further handling and transportation that would be required if the wastes were treated off site.

  19. Life cycle air quality impacts of conventional and alternative light-duty transportation in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tessum, Christopher W.; Hill, Jason D.; Marshall, Julian D.

    2014-12-30

    Commonly considered strategies for reducing the environmental impact of light-duty transportation include using alternative fuels and improving vehicle fuel economy. We evaluate the air quality-related human health impacts of 10 such options, including the use of liquid biofuels, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG) in internal combustion engines; the use of electricity from a range of conventional and renewable sources to power electric vehicles (EVs); and the use of hybrid EV technology. Our approach combines spatially, temporally, and chemically detailed life cycle emission inventories; comprehensive, fine-scale state-of-the-science chemical transport modeling; and exposure, concentration–response, and economic health impact modeling for ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). We find that powering vehicles with corn ethanol or with coal-based or “grid average” electricity increases monetized environmental health impacts by 80% or more relative to using conventional gasoline. Conversely, EVs powered by low-emitting electricity from natural gas, wind, water, or solar power reduce environmental health impacts by 50% or more. Consideration of potential climate change impacts alongside the human health outcomes described here further reinforces the environmental preferability of EVs powered by low-emitting electricity relative to gasoline vehicles.

  20. Life cycle air quality impacts of conventional and alternative light-duty transportation in the United States

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tessum, Christopher W.; Hill, Jason D.; Marshall, Julian D.

    2014-12-30

    Commonly considered strategies for reducing the environmental impact of light-duty transportation include using alternative fuels and improving vehicle fuel economy. We evaluate the air quality-related human health impacts of 10 such options, including the use of liquid biofuels, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG) in internal combustion engines; the use of electricity from a range of conventional and renewable sources to power electric vehicles (EVs); and the use of hybrid EV technology. Our approach combines spatially, temporally, and chemically detailed life cycle emission inventories; comprehensive, fine-scale state-of-the-science chemical transport modeling; and exposure, concentration–response, and economic health impact modeling for ozonemore » (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). We find that powering vehicles with corn ethanol or with coal-based or “grid average” electricity increases monetized environmental health impacts by 80% or more relative to using conventional gasoline. Conversely, EVs powered by low-emitting electricity from natural gas, wind, water, or solar power reduce environmental health impacts by 50% or more. Consideration of potential climate change impacts alongside the human health outcomes described here further reinforces the environmental preferability of EVs powered by low-emitting electricity relative to gasoline vehicles.« less

  1. GIS applications to evaluate public health effects of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regens, J.L.; Hodges, D.G.

    1996-12-31

    Modeling projections of future climatic conditions suggest changes in temperature and precipitation patterns that might induce direct adverse effects on human health by altering the extent and severity of infectious and vector-borne diseases. The incidence of mosquito-borne diseases, for example, could increase substantially in areas where temperature and relative humidity rise. The application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) offers new methodologies to evaluate the impact of global warming on changes in the incidence of infectious and vector-borne diseases. This research illustrates the potential analytical and communication uses of GIS for monitoring historical patterns of climate and human health variables and for projecting changes in these health variables with global warming.

  2. Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Fukushima

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dai-ichi Incident | Department of Energy Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Fukushima Dai-ichi Incident Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Fukushima Dai-ichi Incident April 12, 2013 - 3:09pm Addthis An LM scientist points to star reindeer lichen on Adak Island, Alaska. An LM scientist points to star reindeer lichen on Adak Island, Alaska. What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment The U.S. Department of

  3. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaye, S.V.

    1989-03-01

    The mission of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) is to provide a sound scientific basis for the measurement and assessment of human health impacts of radiological and chemical substances. Our approach to fulfilling this mission is to conduct a broad program of experimental, theoretical, and field research based on a strong foundation of fundamental physical studies that blend into well-established programs in life sciences. Topics include biomedical screening techniques, biological and chemical sensors, risk assessment, health hazards, dosimetry, nuclear medicine, environmental pollution monitoring, electron-molecule interactions, interphase physics, surface physics, data base management, environmental mutagens, carcinogens, and tetratogens.

  4. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Health, Safety and Security...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health, Safety and Security (HSS) 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Health, Safety and Security (HSS) The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact ...

  5. Health & Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health & Safety Health & Safety1354608000000Health & SafetySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access.NoQuestions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov Health &...

  6. Quantum physics and human values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1989-09-01

    This report discusses the following concepts: the quantum conception of nature; the quantum conception of man; and the impact upon human values. (LSP).

  7. 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Health, Safety and Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within Health, Safety and Security.

  8. LEDSGP/analysis/impacts | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    impacts of LEDS measures on country development goals. These goals include reducing poverty, improving health and local environmental quality, improving energy and water access,...

  9. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Resources Human Resources Forms Benefits 2011 Anthem Information Anthem General Mail Order Form (For KeyCare, BlueCare & HealthKeepers) Anthem Customer Claim Form Anthem Enrollment Form Anthem HealthKeepers Vision Claim Form Anthem Member Change Form Anthem Vision Services Claim Form (For KeyCare & BlueCare) 2011 Optima Information Optima Enrollment Form Prescription Home Delivery Order Form (For Optima) 2011 Delta Dental Information Delta Dental Change Form Delta Dental

  10. Social impact assessment - new dimensions in project planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.G.; Hartog, J.J.; Sykes, R.M.

    1996-11-01

    The Objective of the presentation is to provide understanding of how to improve attention to the social dimensions of EP projects. Social Impacts are the consequences to human populations, communities or individuals resulting from a project or activity. Such impacts may change the way in which people live, relate to one another, organize and cope as members of society. There is an increasing demand and expectation that Exploration and Production activities will both understand their impacts and define benefits for the local communities. Social Impact Assessment can be considered a branch of Environmental Impact Assessment. It has become a tool in its own fight due to the focus that was paid to the natural and physical issues within the EIA process. However there are still strong alignments and the wise project planner will integrate social and environmental issues within their project planning process. This can be done through a combination of studies but can result in a single report. The benefits of SIA will be demonstrated to include: (1) obtaining approvals (2) forward planning and design (3) increased project success-benefits to local community (4) economic benefits (5) decision making by management The types of impacts including demographic, socioeconomic, health, social infrastructure, resources, psychological and community, cultural and social equity will be reviewed. Methods and techniques to identify and assess impacts will be addressed. One of the main challenges in SIA is to reach the right audience. Methods to scope studies and implement consultation will be addressed.

  11. Health Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Videos Health Videos Our videos speak more than a thousand words about our science and technology, community outreach, collaborations, careers, and much more. News Releases...

  12. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington 5-394 5.2 FFTF DECOMMISSIONING ALTERNATIVES This section describes the potential long-term environmental and human health impacts associated with implementation of alternatives considered to decommission FFTF and auxiliary facilities at Hanford; to manage waste from the decommissioning process, including waste designated as remote-handled special components (RH-SCs); and to manage the disposition of the Hanford inventory of radioactively contaminated

  13. Impact of the [delta]F508 Mutation in First Nucleotide-binding Domain of Human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator on Domain Folding and Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Hal A.; Zhao, Xun; Wang, Chi; Sauder, J. Michael; Rooney, Isabelle; Noland, Brian W.; Lorimer, Don; Kearins, Margaret C.; Conners, Kris; Condon, Brad; Maloney, Peter C.; Guggino, William B.; Hunt, John F.; Emtage, Spencer (SG); (Columbia); (JHU)

    2010-07-19

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), commonly the deletion of residue Phe-508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), which results in a severe reduction in the population of functional channels at the epithelial cell surface. Previous studies employing incomplete NBD1 domains have attributed this to aberrant folding of DeltaF508 NBD1. We report structural and biophysical studies on complete human NBD1 domains, which fail to demonstrate significant changes of in vitro stability or folding kinetics in the presence or absence of the DeltaF508 mutation. Crystal structures show minimal changes in protein conformation but substantial changes in local surface topography at the site of the mutation, which is located in the region of NBD1 believed to interact with the first membrane spanning domain of CFTR. These results raise the possibility that the primary effect of DeltaF508 is a disruption of proper interdomain interactions at this site in CFTR rather than interference with the folding of NBD1. Interestingly, increases in the stability of NBD1 constructs are observed upon introduction of second-site mutations that suppress the trafficking defect caused by the DeltaF508 mutation, suggesting that these suppressors might function indirectly by improving the folding efficiency of NBD1 in the context of the full-length protein. The human NBD1 structures also solidify the understanding of CFTR regulation by showing that its two protein segments that can be phosphorylated both adopt multiple conformations that modulate access to the ATPase active site and functional interdomain interfaces.

  14. Health effects associated with energy conservation measures in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, R.D.; Baechler, M.C.

    1990-09-01

    Indoor air quality can be impacted by hundreds of different chemicals. More than 900 different organic compounds alone have been identified in indoor air. Health effects that could arise from exposure to individual pollutants or mixtures of pollutants cover the full range of acute and chronic effects, including largely reversible responses, such as rashes and irritations, to the irreversible toxic and carcinogenic effects. These indoor contaminants are emitted from a large variety of materials and substances that are widespread components of everyday life. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a search of the peer-reviewed literature on health effects associated with indoor air contaminants for the Bonneville Power Administration to aid the agency in the preparation of environmental documents. Results are reported in two volumes. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the search of the peer-reviewed literature on health effects associated with a selected list of indoor air contaminants. In addition, the report discusses potential health effects of polychlorinated biphenyls and chlorofluorocarbons. All references to the literature reviewed are found in this document Volume 2. Volume 2 provides detailed information from the literature reviewed, summarizes potential health effects, reports health hazard ratings, and discusses quantitative estimates of carcinogenic risk in humans and animals. Contaminants discussed in this report are those that; have been measured in the indoor air of a public building; have been measured (significant concentrations) in test situations simulating indoor air quality (as presented in the referenced literature); and have a significant hazard rating. 38 refs., 7 figs., 23 tabs.

  15. Overview of the DOE Health Impacts Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  16. Overview of the DOE Health Impacts Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  17. OMB 1910-5122, Human Reliability Program- Description of Collections

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security: OMB 1910-5122, Human Reliability Program - Description of Collections

  18. Emergency Response Health Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mena, R., Pemberton, W., Beal, W.

    2012-05-01

    Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health. Topics of discussion included in this manuscript are related to responding to a radiation emergency, and the necessary balance between desired high accuracy laboratory results and rapid turnaround requirements. Considerations are addressed for methodology with which to provide the most competent solutions despite challenges presented from incomplete datasets and, at times, limited methodology. An emphasis is placed on error and uncertainty of sample analysis results, how error affects products, and what is communicated in the final product.

  19. A wedge-based approach to estimating health co-benefits of climate change mitigation activities in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balbus, John M.; Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Chari, Ramya; Millstein, Dev; Ebi, Kristie L.

    2015-02-01

    While it has been recognized that actions reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions can have significant positive and negative impacts on human health through reductions in ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations, these impacts are rarely taken into account when analyzing specific policies. This study presents a new framework for estimating the change in health outcomes resulting from implementation of specific carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction activities, allowing comparison of different sectors and options for climate mitigation activities. Our estimates suggest that in the year 2020, the reductions in adverse health outcomes from lessened exposure to PM2.5 would yield economic benefits in the range of $6 to $14 billion (in 2008 USD), depending on the specific activity. This equates to between $40 and $93 per metric ton of CO2 in health benefits. Specific climate interventions will vary in the health co-benefits they provide as well as in potential harms that may result from their implementation. Rigorous assessment of these health impacts is essential for guiding policy decisions as efforts to reduce GHG emissions increase in scope and intensity.

  20. Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities January 8, 2013 - 1:55pm Addthis Speaker Dr. Daniel Rahn at the Health Disparaties Conference. Speaker Dr. Daniel Rahn at the Health Disparaties Conference. What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment The Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities, Reducing Health Disparities through Sustaining and Strengthening Healthy Communities,

  1. Trace-element geochemistry of coal resource development related to environmental quality and health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This report assesses for decision makers and those involved in coal resource development the environmental and health impacts of trace-element effects arising from significant increases in the use of coal, unless unusual precautions are invoked. Increasing demands for energy and the pressing need for decreased dependence of the United States on imported oil require greater use of coal to meet the nation's energy needs during the next decade. If coal production and consumption are increased at a greatly accelerated rate, concern arises over the release, mobilization, transportation, distribution, and assimilation of certain trace elements, with possible adverse effects on the environment and human health. It is, therefore, important to understand their geochemical pathways from coal and rocks via air, water, and soil to plants, animals, and ultimately humans, and their relation to health and disease. To address this problem, the Panel on Trace Element Geochemistry of Coal Resource Development Related to Health (PECH) was established. Certain assumptions were made by the Panel to highlight the central issues of trace elements and health and to avoid unwarranted duplication of other studies. Based on the charge to the Panel and these assumptions, this report describes the amounts and distribution of trace elements related to the coal source; the various methods of coal extraction, preparation, transportation, and use; and the disposal or recycling of the remaining residues or wastes. The known or projected health effects are discussed at the end of each section.

  2. Data Compendium for the Columbia River comprehensive impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, P.W.; Huesties, L.R.; Maughan, A.D.; Miley, T.B.; Walters, W.H.

    1994-04-01

    The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA). The CRCIA is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The purpose of the CRCIA is to evaluate the current human and ecological risk from the Columbia River attributable to past and present activities on the Hanford Site. Human risk will be addressed for radioactive and hazardous materials over a range of river use options. Ecological risk will be evaluated relative to the health of the current river ecosystem. The initial effort for the CRCIA is the development of a compendium of existing data on Columbia River contamination. This document provides the data compendium. It also includes a discussion of data sources, descriptions of the physical format of the data, and descriptions of the search process used to identify data.

  3. Impact Statements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reading Room / Final Environment Impact Statements Record of Decision on Bonneville Power Administrations Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project (DOE/EIS-3790, November 2008). February 2009.

  4. Predicting Individual Affect of Health Interventions to Reduce HPV Prevalence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corley, Courtney D.; Mihalcea, Rada; Mikler, Armin R.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

    2011-04-01

    Recently, human papilloma virus has been implicated to cause several throat and oral cancers and hpv is established to cause most cervical cancers. A human papilloma virus vaccine has been proven successful to reduce infection incidence in FDA clinical trials and it is currently available in the United States. Current intervention policy targets adolescent females for vaccination; however, the expansion of suggested guidelines may extend to other age groups and males as well. This research takes a first step towards automatically predicting personal beliefs, regarding health intervention, on the spread of disease. Using linguistic or statistical approaches, sentiment analysis determines a texts affective content. Self-reported HPV vaccination beliefs published in web and social media are analyzed for affect polarity and leveraged as knowledge inputs to epidemic models. With this in mind, we have developed a discrete-time model to facilitate predicting impact on the reduction of HPV prevalence due to arbitrary age and gender targeted vaccination schemes.

  5. Health and safety.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avery, Rosemary Penelope; Johns, William

    2010-08-01

    This document provides information on the possible human exposure to environmental media potentially contaminated with radiological materials and chemical constituents from operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This report is based on the best available information for Calendar Year (CY) 2008, and was prepared in support of future analyses, including those that may be performed as part of the SNL/NM Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement.

  6. Human Capital Organization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Human Capital Organization Human Capital Organization HC Organizational Chart HC Organizational Chart Printable Version The Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer provides leadership to the Department of Energy (DOE) on the impact and use of policies, proposals, programs, and partnerships related to all aspects of Human Capital Management (HCM).

  7. Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Environmental Impact Statements are detailed written statements that are required by section 102(2)(C) of NEPA for a proposed major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If you have any trouble finding a specific document, please contact AskNEPA@hq.doe.gov for assistance. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 18, 2015 EIS-0393: Final Environmental Impact Statement Montanore

  8. DEISCODES. For Environmental Impact Statements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widmayer, D.A. [U.S. NRC, Office of Material Safety and Safegaurds, Washington, D.C., (United States)

    1983-01-01

    DEISCODES, the Draft Environmental Impact Statement CODES are five separate FORTRAN codes used to perform the analysis in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement written to support 10 CFR 61, Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste. The five codes are named OPTIONS, GRWATER, INTRUDE, INVERSW, and INVERSI. These codes calculate impact measures associated with the management of Low-Level radioactive Waste (LLW). Three phases of waste management are considered: waste processing, transportation, and disposal, utilizing (1) information on waste characteristics, (2) data and assumptions on disposal technologies and (3) impact calculational methodologies presented in NUREG/CR-1759 and NUREG-0782. The INTRUDE code determines the radiological impacts resulting from potential inadvertent human intrusion into a selected disposal facility containing processed waste as a function of time after disposal. GRWATER calculates the individual exposures resulting from use of contaminated water drawn from various human access locations such as a well that may become contaminated as a result of potential groundwater migration or radionuclides. The OPTIONS code calculates the waste volume-averaged inadvertent intruder impacts, impacts resulting from exposed waste scenarios, as well as those resulting from operational accidents, and those associated with short term consideration such as waste processing and transportation impacts, disposal costs, energy use, land use, etc. INVERSI, calculates the limiting concentrations in waste to meet a specific dose criterion for a disposal facility. INVERSW, calculates disposal facility radionuclide concentrations and inventories to meet specific allowable dose criteria for groundwater migration for the facility design and regionally representative environmental characteristics.

  9. Emergency Response Health Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mena, RaJah; Pemberton, Wendy; Beal, William

    2012-05-01

    Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health; however, there are major differences between health physics for research or occupational safety and health physics during a large-scale radiological emergency. The deployment of a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) monitoring and assessment team to Japan in the wake of the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant yielded a wealth of lessons on these difference. Critical teams (CMOC (Consequence Management Outside the Continental U.S.) and CMHT (Consequence Management Home Team) ) worked together to collect, compile, review, and analyze radiological data from Japan to support the response needs of and answer questions from the Government of Japan, the U.S. military in Japan, the U.S. Embassy and U.S. citizens in Japan, and U.S. citizens in America. This paper addresses the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. A key lesson learned was that public perception and the availability of technology with social media requires a diligent effort to keep the public informed of the science behind the decisions in a manner that is meaningful to them.

  10. Careers/ Human Resources | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Employment Opportunities Directory Environment, Safety & Health Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Contact Us Business Operations Careers/ Human Resources Employment Opportunities Directory Environment, Safety & Health Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Careers/ Human Resources Join Princeton's TALENT NETWORK to enhance your job search and the application process for Princeton University and

  11. Employee Job Task Analysis (EJTA) - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Occupational Health Services > Employee Job Task Analysis (EJTA) Occupational Health Services Behavioral Health Services Beryllium Beryllium-Associated Worker Registry Emergency Preparedness Employee Job Task Analysis (EJTA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Epidemiology/Health Data Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program Medical Exam Scheduling Medical Exams Return to Work

  12. EIS-0394: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    resources; cultural resources; land use; aesthetics; transportation and traffic; noise and vibration; utility systems; materials and waste management; human health, safety,...

  13. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... human health and welfare. air quality control region - Geographic subdivisions of the United States that were established to deal with pollution on a regional or local level. ...

  14. High-Impact, Low-Frequency Event Risk Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Region Operations for American Electric Power, and Robert ... DHS, DOE, Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), ... formulating an effective publicprivate partnership to more ...

  15. Assessing the health risk of solar development on contaminated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    published report from Argonne's Environmental Science (EVS) division presents a methodology for assessing potential human health risks of developing utility-scale solar...

  16. EA-1917: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the context of NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not...

  17. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    through groundwater. This TC & WM EIS quantifies impacts on the human and natural environment to the extent practicable, consistent with DOE's sliding-scale approach, taking...

  18. Engineered nanoparticles in wastewater and wastewater sludge - Evidence and impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brar, Satinder K.; Verma, Mausam; Tyagi, R.D.; Surampalli, R.Y.

    2010-03-15

    Nanotechnology has widespread application in agricultural, environmental and industrial sectors ranging from fabrication of molecular assemblies to microbial array chips. Despite the booming application of nanotechnology, there have been serious implications which are coming into light in the recent years within different environmental compartments, namely air, water and soil and its likely impact on the human health. Health and environmental effects of common metals and materials are well-known, however, when the metals and materials take the form of nanoparticles - consequential hazards based on shape and size are yet to be explored. The nanoparticles released from different nanomaterials used in our household and industrial commodities find their way through waste disposal routes into the wastewater treatment facilities and end up in wastewater sludge. Further escape of these nanoparticles into the effluent will contaminate the aquatic and soil environment. Hence, an understanding of the presence, behavior and impact of these nanoparticles in wastewater and wastewater sludge is necessary and timely. Despite the lack of sufficient literature, the present review attempts to link various compartmentalization aspects of the nanoparticles, their physical properties and toxicity in wastewater and wastewater sludge through simile drawn from other environmental streams.

  19. Human Genome: DOE Origins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Origins Resources with Additional Information Charles DeLisi Charles DeLisi The genesis of the Department of Energy (DOE) human genome project took place when "Charles DeLisi ... conceived of a concerted effort to sequence the human genome under the aegis of the ... DOE. ... In 1985, DeLisi took the reins of DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research [OHER], the program that supported most Biology in the Department. The origins of DOE's biology program traced to the Manhattan

  20. Analysis of long-term impacts of TRU waste remaining at generator/storage sites for No Action Alternative 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, J.W.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Bergeron, M.P.; Streile, G.P.

    1997-09-01

    This report is a supplement to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal-Phase Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS-II). Described herein are the underlying information, data, and assumptions used to estimate the long-term human-health impacts from exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in transuranic (TRU) waste remaining at major generator/storage sites after loss of institutional control under No Action Alternative 2. Under No Action Alternative 2, TRU wastes would not be emplaced at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) but would remain at generator/storage sites in surface or near-surface storage. Waste generated at smaller sites would be consolidated at the major generator/storage sites. Current TRU waste management practices would continue, but newly generated waste would be treated to meet the WIPP waste acceptance criteria. For this alternative, institutional control was assumed to be lost 100 years after the end of the waste generation period, with exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in the TRU waste possible from direct intrusion and release to the surrounding environment. The potential human-health impacts from exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in TRU waste were analyzed for two different types of scenarios. Both analyses estimated site-specific, human-health impacts at seven major generator/storage sites: the Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The analysis focused on these seven sites because 99 % of the estimated TRU waste volume and inventory would remain there under the assumptions of No Action Alternative 2.

  1. Office of Domestic and International Health Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Domestic and International Health Studies engages in the conduct of international scientific studies that may provide new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation in the workplace or people exposed in communities as a result of nuclear accidents, including providing health and environmental monitoring services to populations specified by law.

  2. Page 4, Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 of 11 Previous Page Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Initial Election Period As a new employee, you have 60 days from your date of appointment to make an election for the health benefits program. Your completed Health Benefits Election Form, SF-2809, must be submitted to your servicing Human Resources Office in a timely manner. If you fail to make an election within the required deadline, you are considered to have declined coverage. You will not have another opportunity to enroll

  3. Technology's Impact on Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Amann; Ellis Deweese; Deborah Shipman

    2009-06-30

    As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) - entitled Technology's Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level - the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: (1) Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. (2) Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. (3) Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies - Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

  4. ECONOMIC IMPACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ECONOMIC IMPACT 2015 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES National Security Sandia's primary mission is ensuring the U.S. nuclear arsenal is safe, secure, and reliable, and can fully support our nation's deterrence policy. NUCLEAR WEAPONS DEFENSE SYSTEMS & ASSESSMENTS We provide technical solutions for global security by engineering and integrating advanced science and technology to help defend and protect the United States. Jill Hruby President and Laboratories Director "Qualified, diverse

  5. Lab Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impact - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  6. Scientific Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Impact Since its inception over twenty years ago, CAMS has achieved noteworthy scientific progress by developing new capabilities and by combining state-of-the-art tools and expertise to address important scientific challenges. Scientific Leadership CAMS scientists are recognized as scientific leaders in the field of AMS and the disciplines that it supports. Many CAMS staff participate on federal agency (NIH, NSF, NOAA and DOE) scientific review panels as well as giving a multitude

  7. Federal Employee Occupational Safety And Health (FEOSH) Program Overview |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Federal Employee Occupational Safety And Health (FEOSH) Program Overview Federal Employee Occupational Safety And Health (FEOSH) Program Overview Congress established Public Law 91-596, The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSH Act) "to ensure so far as possible every working man and woman in the Nation safe and healthful working conditions and to preserve our human resources." PDF icon Federal Employee Occupational Safety And Health (FEOSH) Program

  8. Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2002 | Department of Energy Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 July 3, 2002 Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 The Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness Response Act was signed into effect on 12 June 2002, by the President, the Department of Health and Human Services DHHS and the U.S. Department of Agriculture USDA.

  9. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Health Monitoring Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring Structural Health Monitoring is the process of implementing a damage detection strategy for...

  10. ORISE: Worker Health Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    worker health research to assess the health of workers and other populations. Statistical methods, epidemiologic research and hazard assessments are core ORISE worker health...

  11. A new approach to criteria for health risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickett, Jeffery; Katscherian, Dianne; Goh, Yang Miang

    2012-01-15

    Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is a developing component of the overall impact assessment process and as such needs access to procedures that can enable more consistent approaches to the stepwise process that is now generally accepted in both EIA and HIA. The guidelines developed during this project provide a structured process, based on risk assessment procedures which use consequences and likelihood, as a way of ranking risks to adverse health outcomes from activities subjected to HIA or HIA as part of EIA. The aim is to assess the potential for both acute and chronic health outcomes. The consequences component also identifies a series of consequences for the health care system, depicted as expressions of financial expenditure and the capacity of the health system. These more specific health risk assessment characteristics should provide for a broader consideration of health consequences and a more consistent estimation of the adverse health risks of a proposed development at both the scoping and risk assessment stages of the HIA process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A more objective approach to health risk assessment is provided. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An objective set of criteria for the consequences for chronic and acute impacts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An objective set of criteria for the consequences on the health care system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An objective set of criteria for event frequency that could impact on health. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The approach presented is currently being trialled in Australia.

  12. Valuation of selected environmental impacts associated with Bonneville Power Administration Resource Program alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Englin, J E; Gygi, K F

    1992-03-01

    This report documents work undertaken by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and its contractors to assist the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) in assessing the potential environmental consequences of new power resources. A major purpose of this effort is to describe and evaluate the techniques available for economic valuation of environmental costs. Another is to provide estimates of the environmental costs associated with specific power resources called for under Bonneville's Resource Programs. Bonneville's efforts to extend valuation techniques to as many impacts as can be reliably assessed represents a substantial advance in the application of state-of-the-art economic techniques to environmental assessments. This economic analysis evaluates effects on human health, wildlife, crops, and visibility impacts associated with air pollution. This report also discusses river recreation (primarily fishing) which may be affected by fluctuations in water levels. 70 refs.

  13. Update of Part 61 Impacts Analysis Methodology. Methodology report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oztunali, O.I.; Roles, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Envirosphere Company has expanded and updated the impacts analysis methodology used during the development of the 10 CFR Part 61 rule to allow improved consideration of the costs and impacts of treatment and disposal of low-level waste that is close to or exceeds Class C concentrations. The modifications described in this report principally include: (1) an update of the low-level radioactive waste source term, (2) consideration of additional alternative disposal technologies, (3) expansion of the methodology used to calculate disposal costs, (4) consideration of an additional exposure pathway involving direct human contact with disposed waste due to a hypothetical drilling scenario, and (5) use of updated health physics analysis procedures (ICRP-30). Volume 1 of this report describes the calculational algorithms of the updated analysis methodology.

  14. Health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N.; Cipriano, D.J. Jr.; Uziel, M.S.; Kleinhans, K.R.; Tiner, P.F.

    1994-08-01

    This Programmatic Health and Safety plan (PHASP) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. This plan follows the format recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for remedial investigations and feasibility studies and that recommended by the EM40 Health and Safety Plan (HASP) Guidelines (DOE February 1994). This plan complies with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements found in 29 CFR 1910.120 and EM-40 guidelines for any activities dealing with hazardous waste operations and emergency response efforts and with OSHA requirements found in 29 CFR 1926.65. The policies and procedures in this plan apply to all Environmental Restoration sites and activities including employees of Energy Systems, subcontractors, and prime contractors performing work for the DOE ORNL ER Program. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health and safety and to the environment from event such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water.

  15. Behavioral Health Insurance Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Behavioral Health Behavioral Health Preauthorization from BCBSNM is required for all behavioral health services. Contact Behavioral Health Unit Mental health services for retirees BlueCross BlueShield of New Mexico (BCBSNM) helps LANL employees identify and benefit from the mental health and substance abuse services they may need through a network of providers, programs and facilities. Use the BCBSNM Provider Finder to select an independently contracted and licensed behavioral health

  16. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) continues to maintain an outstanding program of basic and applied research displaying a high level of creativity and achievement as documented by awards, publications, professional service, and successful completion of variety of projects. Our focus is on human health and the scientific basis for measurement and assessment of health-related impacts of energy technologies. It is our custom to publish a division progress report every 18 months that summarizes our programmatic progress and other measures of achievement over the reporting period. Since it is not feasible to summarize in detail all of our work over the period covered by this report (October 1, 1988, to March 30, 1990), we intend this document to point the way to the expensive open literature that documents our findings. During the reporting period the Division continued to maintain strong programs in its traditional areas of R D, but also achieved noteworthy progress in other areas. Much of the Division's work on site characterization, development of new field instruments, compilation of data bases, and methodology development fits into this initiative. Other new work in tunneling microscopy in support of DOE's Human Genome Program and the comprehensive R D work related to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy have attained new and exciting results. These examples of our progress and numerous other activities are highlighted in this report.

  17. Developing a Consumer Health Resource Information Service Program:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Communities Reviewed June 2011 DEVELOPING A CONSUMER HEALTH RESOURCE INFORMATION SERVICE PROGRAM: A GUIDE FOR FAITH-BASED ORGANIZATIONS AND COMMUNITIES Reviewed June 2011 Sponsored by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services This document was prepared for the Specialized Information Services Division, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) through an

  18. International Health Studies and Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    International Health Studies and Activities International Health Studies and Activities Purpose The purpose of international health studies and activities is to support the health and safety mission of DOE by providing new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation and other industrial exposures encountered in the workplace or within nearby communities; and as a result of nuclear weapons testing, use and accidents. The activities mandated by congress or required by

  19. Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Findings of No Significant Impact are public documents issued by a Federal agency briefly presenting the reasons why an action for which the agency has prepared an environmental assessment will not have a significant effect on the human environment and, therefore, will not require preparation of an environmental impact statement. If you have any trouble finding a specific document, please contact

  20. Whitehead Policy Symposium. The Human Genome Project: Science, law, and social change in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, E.K.

    2000-02-17

    Advances in the biomedical sciences, especially in human genomics, will dramatically influence law, medicine, public health, and many other sectors of our society in the decades ahead. The public already senses the revolutionary nature of genomic knowledge. In the US and Europe, we have seen widespread discussions about genetic discrimination in health insurance; privacy issues raised by the proliferation of DNA data banks; the challenge of interpreting new DNA diagnostic tests; changing definitions of what it means to be healthy; and the science and ethics of cloning animals and human beings. The primary goal of the Whitehead/ASLME Policy Symposium was to provide a bridge between the research community and professionals, who were just beginning to grasp the potential impact of new genetic technologies on their fields. The ''Human Genome Project: Science, Law, and Social Change in the 21st Century'' initially was designed as a forum for 300-500 physicians, lawyers, consumers, ethicists, and scientists to explore the impact of new genetic technologies and prepare for the challenges ahead.

  1. ORISE: Health Physics Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Physics Training Student performs an analysis during an ORAU health physics training course Training and educating a highly skilled workforce that can meet operational ...

  2. ORISE: Health physics services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health physics services Nuclear power plant The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers comprehensive health physics services in a number of technical areas ...

  3. Who plans for health improvement? SEA, HIA and the separation of spatial planning and health planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Alan; Cave, Ben; Ballantyne, Rob

    2013-09-15

    This study examines whether there is active planning for health improvement in the English spatial planning system and how this varies across two regions using a combination of telephone surveys and focus group interviews in 2005 and 2010. The spatial planning profession was found to be ill-equipped to consider the health and well-being implications of its actions, whilst health professionals are rarely engaged and have limited understanding and aspirations when it comes to influencing spatial planning. Strategic Environmental Assessment was not considered to be successful in integrating health into spatial plans, given it was the responsibility of planners lacking the capacity to do so. For their part, health professionals have insufficient knowledge and understanding of planning and how to engage with it to be able to plan for health gains rather than simply respond to health impacts. HIA practice is patchy and generally undertaken by health professionals outside the statutory planning framework. Thus, whilst appropriate assessment tools exist, they currently lack a coherent context within which they can function effectively and the implementation of the Kiev protocol requiring the engagement of health professionals in SEA is not to likely improve the consideration of health in planning while there continues to be separation of functions between professions and lack of understanding of the other profession. -- Highlights: ? Health professionals have limited aspirations for health improvement through the planning system. ? Spatial planners are ill-equipped to understand the health and well-being implications of their activities. ? SEA and HIA currently do not embed health consideration in planning decisions. ? The separation of health and planning functions is problematic for the effective conduct of SEA and/or HIA.

  4. Evaluation of the Potential Environmental Impacts from Large-Scale Use and Production of Hydrogen in Energy and Transportation Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Dubey, M.K., Edmonds, J.; Layzell, D.; Olsen, S.; Rahn, T.; Rocket, A.; Wang, D.; Jia, W.

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this project is to systematically identify and examine possible near and long-term ecological and environmental effects from the production of hydrogen from various energy sources based on the DOE hydrogen production strategy and the use of that hydrogen in transportation applications. This project uses state-of-the-art numerical modeling tools of the environment and energy system emissions in combination with relevant new and prior measurements and other analyses to assess the understanding of the potential ecological and environmental impacts from hydrogen market penetration. H2 technology options and market penetration scenarios will be evaluated using energy-technology-economics models as well as atmospheric trace gas projections based on the IPCC SRES scenarios including the decline in halocarbons due to the Montreal Protocol. Specifically we investigate the impact of hydrogen releases on the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, the long-term stability of the ozone layer due to changes in hydrogen emissions, the impact of hydrogen emissions and resulting concentrations on climate, the impact on microbial ecosystems involved in hydrogen uptake, and criteria pollutants emitted from distributed and centralized hydrogen production pathways and their impacts on human health, air quality, ecosystems, and structures under different penetration scenarios

  5. EIS-0277: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0277: Final Environmental Impact Statement Management of Certain Plutonium Residues and Scrub Alloy Stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site This EIS evaluates the potential alternatives and impacts associated with a proposal to process certain plutonium residues and all of the scrub alloy currently stored at Rocky Flats. While ongoing stabilization activities at Rocky Flats are addressing immediate health and safety concerns associated

  6. EIS-0303: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0303: Draft Environmental Impact Statement High-Level Waste Tank Closure, Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, SC This EIS evalutes the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to close the high-level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in accordance with applicable laws and regulations, DOE Orders, and the Industrial Wastewater Closure Plan for F- and H-Area High-Level Waste Tank Systems (approved by the South Carolina Department of Health

  7. A screening approach for identifying environmental justice issues in environmental impact statements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schexnayder, S.S.

    1995-12-01

    Executive Order 12898 and the accompanying memorandum addressed to Federal agency heads, both issued on February 11, 1994, require NEPA processes to incorporate environmental justice. The NEPA processes affected are: (1) public involvement formats, (2) analyses of potential impacts. The Executive Order clearly indicates that research strategies and mitigation measure should be developed with the input of the populations mentioned in the Executive Order, i.e., minority and low-income populations. However, an enhanced public involvement process may not occur because the NEPA activity may have been underway before the Executive Order was issued or because the agency chooses not to change traditional public participation mechanisms. It is also possible that enhanced mechanisms may not effectively elicit involvement. In either case, analysis that considers environmental justice must proceed. These analyses could be highly data-intensive--requiring new or modified methodological approaches-- and time-intensive, particularly if the process elements of the executive order are interpreted broadly, Federal agencies and NEPA project managers already have expressed concern about the potential cost of conducting exhaustive environmental justice related analyses where they may not be warranted. Also, the time and resources required to conduct a full environmental justice analysis is counter to recent trends to streamline the NEPA process. In light of this, a process to screen for indicators of the potential for environmental justice issues has been developed. The method incorporates separate screens for human health impacts, socioeconomic impacts, and social structural impacts. Positive results of any screen indicates the need for full-scale, environmental-justice-related analysis of that category of impact. The screen is intended as a useful tool in implementing environmental justice in environmental impact statements.

  8. Original Impact Calculations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Original Impact Calculations, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  9. Preliminary Impact Evaluation BBNP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Preliminary Impact Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, 2013.

  10. Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis Background: Humans live in constant and vital symbiosis with a closely linked bacterial ecosystem called the microbiome, which influences many aspects of human health. When this microbial ecosystem becomes disrupted, the health of the human host can suffer; a condition called dysbiosis. The

  11. The effect of low dose ionizing radiation on homeostasis and functional integrity in an organotypic human skin model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    von Neubeck, Claere; Geniza, Matthew; Kauer, Paula M.; Robinson, Joseph E.; Chrisler, William B.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2015-05-01

    Outside the protection of earths atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Future NASA plans for deep space missions or a permanent settlement on the moon are limited by the health risks associated with space radiation exposures. There is a paucity of direct epidemiological data for low dose exposures to space radiation-relevant high LET ions. Health risk models are used to estimate the risk for such exposures, though these models are based on high dose experiments. There is increasing evidence, however, that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events at the molecular level, and may involve different response mechanisms. Further, despite their low abundance, high LET particles have been identified as the major contributor to health risk during manned space flight. The human skin is exposed in every external radiation scenario, making it an ideal epithelial tissue model in which to study radiation induced effects. Here, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional (3-D) human organotypic skin tissue model to low doses of high LET oxygen (O), silicon (Si) and iron (Fe) ions. We measured proliferation and differentiation profiles in the skin tissue and examined the integrity of the skins barrier function. We discuss the role of secondary particles in changing the proportion of cells receiving a radiation dose, emphasizing the possible impact on radiation-induced health issues in astronauts.

  12. Notice of Availability (NOA) for the Draft Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    It also addresses the potential human and environmental impacts of the project, and ... Engineers (USACE), and the Twin Cities Ecology Field Office of the U.S. Fish and ...

  13. DOE Publishes Fact Sheet on LED Lighting and Health

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy has published a fact sheet that looks at what's known—and not known—about the effects of lighting on human health, with specific reference to LEDs. Entitled Lighting...

  14. Global Livestock Production and Health Atlas (GLiPHA) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    decision making and to increase awareness of socio-economic, human and animal demographic and health related issues. GLiPHA draws on sub-national data managed within the...

  15. Wind Energy Impacts: Slides

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    help to alleviate common misconceptions about wind energy. Wind Energy Impacts Photo from Invenergy LLC, NREL 14371 Wildlife impacts vary by location,* and new developments have helped to reduce these effects. Photo from LuRay Parker, NREL 17429 Wind Energy Impacts Pre- and post-development studies, educated siting, and curtailment during high-activity periods have decreased wildlife impacts.** Additional strategies are being researched to better understand and further decrease impacts.

  16. ORISE: Health Literacy Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Literacy Development While health disparities may be attributed to a number of factors, health literacy development and access to health information can help special populations gain a better understanding of wellness and prevention. The Internet and other means of electronic communication have become popular tools that are allowing people to take control of their health. According to Healthy People 2010, nearly half of American adults (90 million people) are deemed "health

  17. Occupational Health Services - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exercise physiology and work conditioning, monitored care and case management, fitness for duty evaluations, health education and wellness promotion, infection control,...

  18. History of the DOE Human Genome Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the DOE Human Genome Program The following history is taken from the U.S. Department of Energy 1991-91 Human Genome Program Report (June 1992). This is an archived item. A brief history of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Human Genome Program will be useful in a discussion of the objectives of the DOE program as well as those of the collaborative U.S. Human Genome Project. The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of DOE and its predecessor agencies--the Atomic Energy

  19. Energy Systems and Population Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ezzati, Majid; Bailis, Rob; Kammen, Daniel M.; Holloway, Tracey; Price, Lynn; Cifuentes, Luis A.; Barnes, Brendon; Chaurey, Akanksha; Dhanapala, Kiran N.

    2004-04-12

    It is well-documented that energy and energy systems have a central role in social and economic development and human welfare at all scales, from household and community to regional and national (41). Among its various welfare effects, energy is closely linked with people s health. Some of the effects of energy on health and welfare are direct. With abundant energy, more food or more frequent meals can be prepared; food can be refrigerated, increasing the types of food items that are consumed and reducing food contamination; water pumps can provide more water and eliminate the need for water storage leading to contamination or increased exposure to disease vectors such as mosquitoes or snails; water can be disinfected by boiling or using other technologies such as radiation. Other effects of energy on public health are mediated through more proximal determinants of health and disease. Abundant energy can lead to increased irrigation, agricultural productivity, and access to food and nutrition; access to energy can also increase small-scale income generation such as processing of agricultural commodities (e.g., producing refined oil from oil seeds, roasting coffee, drying and preserving fruits and meats) and production of crafts; ability to control lighting and heating allows education or economic activities to be shielded from daily or seasonal environmental constraints such as light, temperature, rainfall, or wind; time and other economic resources spent on collecting and/or transporting fuels can be used for other household needs if access to energy is facilitated; energy availability for transportation increases access to health and education facilities and allow increased economic activity by facilitating the transportation of goods and services to and from markets; energy for telecommunication technology (radio, television, telephone, or internet) provides increased access to information useful for health, education, or economic purposes; provision of energy to rural and urban health facilities allows increased delivery and coverage of 3 various health services and interventions such as tests and treatments, better storage of medicine and vaccines, disinfection of medical equipment by boiling or radiation, and more frequent and efficient health system encounters through mobile clinics or longer working hours; and so on. In fact, while the dominant view of development-energy-health linkages has been that improvements in energy and health are outcomes of the socioeconomic development process (e.g., the ''energy ladder'' framework discussed below), it has even been argued that access to higher quality energy sources and technologies can initiate a chain of demographic, health, and development outcomes by changing the household structure and socioeconomic relationships. For example, in addition to increased opportunities for food and income production, reduced infant mortality as a result of transition to cleaner fuels or increased coverage of vaccination with availability of refrigerators in rural clinics may initiate a process of ''demographic transition'' to low-mortality and low-fertility populations (14). Such a transition has historically been followed with further improvements in maternal and child health and increased female participation in the labor markets and other economic activities.

  20. Apparatus and methods for a human extender

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jansen, John F. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A human extender controller for interface between a human operator and a physical object through a physical plant. The human extender controller uses an inner-feedback loop to increase the equivalent damping of the operating system to stabilize the system when it contacts with the environment and reduces the impact of the environment variation by utilizing a high feedback gain, determined by a root locus sketch. Because the stability of the human extender controller of the present invention is greatly enhanced over that of the prior art, the present invention is able to achieve a force reflection ratio 500 to 1 and capable of handling loads above the two (2) ton range.

  1. Environment, Safety, Health, & Security | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Management System Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Contact Us Business Operations Careers/ Human Resources Directory Environment, Safety & Health Environmental Management System Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Environment, Safety, Health, & Security About PPPL ESH&S The Environment, Safety,

  2. A Method for Quantifying the Acute Health Impacts of Residential...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File...

  3. Advanced Combustion, Emission Control, Health Impacts, and Fuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... - Definition of goals is perhaps a bit fuzzy; perhaps inevitable as program is getting ... One commented that the benefit and logic of the PDF methods versus other techniques should ...

  4. The FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Health Impacts Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) Project Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 ...

  5. Water chlorination: environmental impact and health effects. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jolley, R.L.; Brungs, W.A.; Cumming, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    The papers dealt with the major facets of chlorination and its associated effects. Each has been abstracted and indexed individually for ERA/EDB. (JGB)

  6. A Method for Quantifying the Acute Health Impacts of Residential...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (US) Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office...

  7. EA-0970: Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory Project No. 94-AA-01 Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to construct and operate an Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory and subsequent demolition of the existing Analytical...

  8. EA-1611: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    finding of no significant impact (FONSI) for the proposed Colorado Highlands Wind Project.The FONSI describes the information Western used to determine that Western's proposal to allow interconnection of the Project will not have a significant impact on the human environment. PDF icon EA-1611-FONSI-2014.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1611-S1: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1611: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1611: Mitigation Action Plan

  9. EA-1903: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1903: Finding of No Significant Impact Kansas State University Zond Wind Energy Project, Manhattan, Kansas Based on the analysis in the EA and other considerations, DOE has decided to provide federal funding for the Proposed Project and further finds that the Proposed Project is not a major federal action that constitutes a significant effect on the human environment. The Propoesed Project will not require the preparation of an environmental impact statement.

  10. EA-1562: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1562: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Operation of a Physical Sciences Facility at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington Based on the analyses of the environmental impacts in the Fina EA and consideration of public comments received on the draft EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA.

  11. EA-1606: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1606: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military Training, SC DOE prepared an environmental assessment to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed use of Savannah River Site lands and facilities for military training. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the

  12. EA-1934: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1934: Finding of No Significant Impact Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Based on the information presented in the Final EA and the commitment in the MAP to mitigate impacts to less-than-significant levels, DOE has determined that the proposed action to expand eleven active borrow areas on the Hanford Site will not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the

  13. Russian Health Studies Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Russian Health Studies Program assesses worker and public health risks from radiation exposure resulting from nuclear weapons production activities in the former Soviet Union.

  14. The Impact of Weatherization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weatherization Assistance Program under the Recovery Act is making a serious impact in savings this summer.

  15. ORISE: Health Disparity Interventions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disparity Interventions Public health theory and practice suggests that risky health behaviors can be altered through interventions that organize and educate communities, screen for risk factors and change environments. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) helps communities increase the quality of life and reduce health disparities by developing interventions that address the complex causes and numerous barriers related to gaps in health status. Groups most commonly affected

  16. ORISE: Health Physics Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Physics Training Student performs an analysis during an ORAU health physics training course Training and educating a highly skilled workforce that can meet operational commitments in the areas of radiation and health physics is an essential part of protecting your workers, the public and the environment. ORAU, the managing contractor of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, offers hands-on, laboratory-based training courses in a variety of health physics areas. Training

  17. Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch From Open Energy Information Address: 591...

  18. Integrated Human Futures Modeling in Egypt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Passell, Howard D.; Aamir, Munaf Syed; Bernard, Michael Lewis; Beyeler, Walter E.; Fellner, Karen Marie; Hayden, Nancy Kay; Jeffers, Robert Fredric; Keller, Elizabeth James Kistin; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Mitchell, Michael David; Silver, Emily; Tidwell, Vincent C.; Villa, Daniel; Vugrin, Eric D.; Engelke, Peter; Burrow, Mat; Keith, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    The Integrated Human Futures Project provides a set of analytical and quantitative modeling and simulation tools that help explore the links among human social, economic, and ecological conditions, human resilience, conflict, and peace, and allows users to simulate tradeoffs and consequences associated with different future development and mitigation scenarios. In the current study, we integrate five distinct modeling platforms to simulate the potential risk of social unrest in Egypt resulting from the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) on the Blue Nile in Ethiopia. The five platforms simulate hydrology, agriculture, economy, human ecology, and human psychology/behavior, and show how impacts derived from development initiatives in one sector (e.g., hydrology) might ripple through to affect other sectors and how development and security concerns may be triggered across the region. This approach evaluates potential consequences, intended and unintended, associated with strategic policy actions that span the development-security nexus at the national, regional, and international levels. Model results are not intended to provide explicit predictions, but rather to provide system-level insight for policy makers into the dynamics among these interacting sectors, and to demonstrate an approach to evaluating short- and long-term policy trade-offs across different policy domains and stakeholders. The GERD project is critical to government-planned development efforts in Ethiopia but is expected to reduce downstream freshwater availability in the Nile Basin, fueling fears of negative social and economic impacts that could threaten stability and security in Egypt. We tested these hypotheses and came to the following preliminary conclusions. First, the GERD will have an important short-term impact on water availability, food production, and hydropower production in Egypt, depending on the short- term reservoir fill rate. Second, the GERD will have a very small impact on water availability in the Nile Basin over the longer term. Depending on the GERD fill rate, short-term (e.g., within its first 5 years of operation) annual losses in Egyptian food production may peak briefly at 25 percent. Long-term (e.g., 15 to 30 year) cumulative losses in Egypt's food production may be less than 3 percent regardless of the fill rate, with the GERD having essentially no impact on projected annual food production in Egypt about 25 years after opening. For the quick fill rates, the short-term losses may be sufficient to create an important decrease in overall household health among the general population, which, along with other economic stressors and different strategies employed by the government, could lead to social unrest. Third, and perhaps most importantly, our modeling suggests that the GERD's effect on Egypt's food and water resources is small when compared to the effect of projected Egyptian population and economic growth (and the concomitant increase in water consumption). The latter dominating factors are exacerbated in the modeling by natural climate variability and may be further exacerbated by climate change. Our modeling suggests that these growth dynamics combine to create long-term water scarcity in Egypt, regardless of the Ethiopian project. All else being equal, filling strategies that employ slow fill rates for the GERD (e.g., 8 to 13 years) may mitigate the risks in future scenarios for Egypt somewhat, but no policy or action regarding the GERD is likely to significantly alleviate the projected water scarcity in Egypt's Nile Basin. However, general beliefs among the Egyptian populace regarding the GERD as a major contributing factor for scarcities in Egypt could make Ethiopia a scapegoat for Egyptian grievances -- contributing to social unrest in Egypt and generating undesirable (and unnecessary) tension between these two countries. Such tension could threaten the constructive relationships between Egypt and Ethiopia that are vital to maintaining stability and security within and between their respective regional spheres of influence, Middle East and North Africa, and the Horn of Africa.

  19. Lead-based paint and lead-containing materials: The impact of recent EPA and OSHA regulations on maintenance and construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staker, R.D.; Scheffius, F.R.

    1998-07-01

    Over the past several years a number of new federal environmental, health, and safety regulations have been established which address various types of lead containing materials such as lead used in solder and lead-based paint. The regulations pertain to the use, removal, disposal, and handling of lead-containing materials during maintenance activities, renovation activities, and new construction. This paper will present a review of these new regulations, the impact on and applicability to maintenance and construction activities, and the risks to human health and environment. Examples will be used to illustrate the concepts discussed. This paper should be of particular interest to electric power senior managers, plant managers, environmental managers, and environmental staff.

  20. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 1, Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public.

  1. Draft environmental impact statement siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 4, Appendices D-R

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-04-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains 15 appendices.

  2. Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Larsen, Peter E.; Dai, Yang

    2015-09-14

    Background: Humans live in constant and vital symbiosis with a closely linked bacterial ecosystem called the microbiome, which influences many aspects of human health. When this microbial ecosystem becomes disrupted, the health of the human host can suffer; a condition called dysbiosis. The community compositions of human microbiomes also vary dramatically from individual to individual, and over time, making it difficult to uncover the underlying mechanisms linking the microbiome to human health. We propose that a microbiome’s interaction with its human host is not necessarily dependent upon the presence or absence of particular bacterial species, but instead is dependent onmore » its community metabolome; an emergent property of the microbiome. Results: Using data from a previously published, longitudinal study of microbiome populations of the human gut, we extrapolated information about microbiome community enzyme profiles and metabolome models. Using machine learning techniques, we demonstrated that the aggregate predicted community enzyme function profiles and modeled metabolomes of a microbiome are more predictive of dysbiosis than either observed microbiome community composition or predicted enzyme function profiles. Conclusions: Specific enzyme functions and metabolites predictive of dysbiosis provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of microbiome–host interactions. The ability to use machine learning to predict dysbiosis from microbiome community interaction data provides a potentially powerful tool for understanding the links between the human microbiome and human health, pointing to potential microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutic interventions.« less

  3. Community impact documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community impact documents Community impact documents Fact sheets, program summaries, and other documents provide insight into the Laboratory's community efforts and impact in Northern New Mexico. Contacts Kathy Keith Community Relations & Partnerships (505) 665-4400 Email Making a difference in Northern New Mexico Fact sheets by county Los Alamos (pdf) Rio Arriba (pdf) San Miguel and Mora (pdf) Santa Fe (pdf) Taos (pdf) General Community Commitment Plan (pdf) | Archive Community Leaders

  4. Infrastructure Impacts | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACInfrastructure Impacts content top National Population, Economic, and Infrastructure Impacts of Pandemic Influenza with Strategic Recommendations Posted by Admin on Mar 2, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments Results of NISAC's two-year study on the potential impacts of pandemic influenza in the United States were published in October 2007 and released to the public in 2008. The summary report and supplemental analysis reports can be downloaded from the column to the right. Pandemic Influenza

  5. Economic Impact of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on the State of Washington in Fiscal Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2014-12-18

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a large economic entity, with $1.06 billion in annual funding, $936 million in total spending, and 4,344 employees in fiscal year (FY) 2013. Four thousand, one hundred and one (4,101) employees live in Washington State. The Laboratory directly and indirectly supports almost $1.31 billion in economic output, 6,802 jobs, and $514 million in Washington State wage income from current operations. The state also gains more than $1.21 billion in output, more than 6,400 jobs, and $459 million in income through closely related economic activities, such as visitors, health care spending, spending by resident retirees, and spinoff companies. PNNL affects Washington’s economy through commonly recognized economic channels, including spending on payrolls and other goods and services that support Laboratory operations. Less-commonly recognized channels also have their own impacts and include company-supported spending on health care for its staff members and retirees, spending of its resident retirees, Laboratory visitor spending, and the economic activities in a growing constellation of “spinoff” companies founded on PNNL research, technology, and managerial expertise. PNNL also has a significant impact on science and technology education and community nonprofit organizations. PNNL is an active participant in the future scientific enterprise in Washington with the state’s K-12 schools, colleges, and universities. The Laboratory sends staff members to the classroom and brings hundreds of students to the PNNL campus to help train the next generation of scientists, engineers, mathematicians, and technicians. This investment in human capital, though difficult to measure in terms of current dollars of economic output, is among the important lasting legacies of the Laboratory. Finally, PNNL contributes to the local community with millions of dollars’ worth of cash and in-kind corporate and staff contributions, all of which strengthen the economy. This report quantifies these effects, providing detailed information on PNNL’s revenues and expenditures, as well as the impacts of its activities on the rest of the Washington State economy. This report also describes the impacts of the four closely related activities: health care spending, spinoff companies with roots in PNNL, visitors to the Laboratory, and PNNL retirees.

  6. Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    custody of such property and minerals to undertake such monitoring, maintenance, and emergency measures as necessary to protect public health and safety and other actions as the...

  7. Environmental Impact Statement Explained

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires Federal agencies to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for all major Federal actions that may significantly affect the quality of...

  8. National Laboratory Impact Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Laboratory Impact Initiative supports the relationship between the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy and the national laboratory enterprise.  The national laboratories...

  9. NREL: Innovation Impact - Bioenergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and catalytic conversion, for development to the pilot scale. Learn More Learn more Close Learn more about NREL's bioenergy innovation impacts. Photo and composite photo...

  10. ORISE: Health physics services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health physics services Nuclear power plant The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers comprehensive health physics services in a number of technical areas for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as well as other federal and state agencies. From radiological facility audits and reviews to dose modeling and technical evaluations, ORISE is nationally-recognized for its health physics support to decontamination and decommissioning

  11. ORISE: Public Health Communication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Communication Public Health Communication The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) assists government agencies and organizations in addressing public health challenges by developing evidence-based communication programs and social marketing initiatives that resonate with target populations. Because approximately half of American adults do not understand basic health information, ORISE develops the types of messages that will attract attention and motivate people to address their

  12. Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy recognizes the importance of maintaining a healthy and fit Federal workforce. To that end, our occupational health care professionals at the Headquarters Occupational...

  13. ORISE: Protecting Human Subjects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protecting Human Subjects Protecting Human Subjects The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Human Subjects Research Program exists to ensure that all research conducted at DOE institutions, whether supported with DOE funds or performed by DOE employees, addresses the protection of human subjects. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) supports DOE in its efforts to protect human subject by providing a number of capabilities and resources. Human Subjects Research Database Human

  14. The impact of corrosion on the oil and gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kermani, M.B.; Harrop, D.

    1996-08-01

    The impact of corrosion on the oil industry has been viewed in terms of its effect on both capital and operational expenditures (CAPEX and OPEX) and health, safety, and the environment (HSE). To fight against the high cost and the impact of corrosion within the oil industry, an overview of topical research and engineering activities is presented. This covers corrosion and metallurgy issues related to drilling, production, transportation, and refinery activities.

  15. The impact of corrosion on oil and gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kermani, M.B.; Harrop, D.

    1995-11-01

    The impact of corrosion on the oil industry has been viewed in terms of its effect on both capital and operational expenditures (CAPEX and OPEX) and health, safety and the environment (HSE). To fight against the high cost and the impact of corrosion within the oil industry, an overview of topical research and engineering activities is presented. This covers corrosion and metallurgy issues related to drilling, production, transportation and refinery activities.

  16. EIS-0303: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    : Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0303: Final Environmental Impact Statement High-Level Waste Tank Closure DOE proposes to close the high-level waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in accordance with applicable laws and regulations, DOE Orders, and the Industrial Wastewater Closure Plan for F- and H-Area High-Level Waste Tank Systems (approved by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control), which specifies the management of residuals as waste

  17. Creating LTS&M Efficiencies While Protecting Human Health and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    regulators to discontinue stream flow monitoring, citing ... Value added from these examples of continual improvement is ... Conference GEMS Mapping and Specific Information ...

  18. Safety and Health

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PPPO’s Safety and Health (S&H) program integrates safety and health requirements and controls into all work activities and oversees implementation of Integrated Safety Management (ISM) within contractor activities to ensure protection to workers, the public, and the environment.

  19. Information on a Major New Initiative: Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome (1986 DOE Memorandum)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    DeLisi, Charles (Associate Director, Health and Environmental Research, DOE Office of Energy Research)

    1986-05-06

    In the history of the Human Genome Program, Dr. Charles DeLisi and Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece of the Department of Energy (DOE) were instrumental in moving the seeds of the program forward. This May 1986 memo from DeLisi to Trivelpiece, Director of DOE's Office of Energy Research, documents this fact. Following the March 1986 Santa Fe workshop on the subject of mapping and sequencing the human genome, DeLisi's memo outlines workshop conclusions, explains the relevance of this project to DOE and the importance of the Department's laboratories and capabilities, notes the critical experience of DOE in managing projects of this scale and potential magnitude, and recognizes the fact that the project will impact biomedical science in ways which could not be fully anticipated at the time. Subsequently, program guidance was further sought from the DOE Health Effects Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) and the April 1987 HERAC report recommended that DOE and the nation commit to a large, multidisciplinary, scientific and technological undertaking to map and sequence the human genome.

  20. Development Impact Assessment (DIA) Case Study. South Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Sadie; Nawaz, Kathleen; Sandor, Debra

    2015-05-19

    This case study reviews South Africa’s experience in considering the impacts of climate change action on development goals, focusing on the South African energy sector and development impact assessments (DIAs) that have and could be used to influence energy policy or inform the selection of energy activities. It includes a review of assessments—conducted by government ministries, technical partners, and academic institutes and non-governmental organizations (NGOs)—that consider employment, health, and water implications of possible energy sector actions, as well as multi-criteria impact assessments.

  1. Health Insurance Marketplace Notice New Health Insurance Marketplace Coverage Options and Your Health Coverage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Insurance Marketplace Notice New Health Insurance Marketplace Coverage Options and Your Health Coverage PART A: General Information When key parts of the health care law take effect in 2014, there will be a new way to buy health insurance: the Health Insurance Marketplace. To assist you as you evaluate options for you and your family, this notice provides some basic information about the new Marketplace and employment based health coverage offered by your employer. What is the Health Insurance

  2. Human-machine interactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM); Abbott, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Brannon, Nathan G. (Albuquerque, NM); Bernard, Michael L. (Tijeras, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  3. Environmental impact report (draft)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The three projects as proposed by Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the environmental analysis of the projects are discussed. Sections on the natural and social environments of the proposed projects and their surrounding areas consist of descriptions of the setting, discussions of the adverse and beneficial consequences of the project, and potential mitigation measures to reduce the effects of adverse impacts. The Environmental Impact Report includes discussions of unavoidable adverse effects, irreversible changes, long-term and cumulative impacts, growth-inducing effects, and feasible alternatives to the project. (MHR)

  4. ORISE: Health Promotion and Outreach

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Promotion and Outreach Healthcare provider administering vaccination The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides health promotion and outreach support to government agencies and organizations seeking to provide health information to targeted populations. ORISE develops culturally-sensitive programs and audience-appropriate materials for those who require information on specific medical topics, health disparities and environmental health issues. ORISE's specific

  5. EA-1915: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1915: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Conveyance of Land at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Based on the analysis presented in the Final EA, which considered comments received on the Draft EA and the commitments specified in the Mitigation Action Plan, DOE has determined that the Proposed Action will not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, the

  6. EA-0984: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    84: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0984: Finding of No Significant Impact Deactivation of the N Reactor Facilities, Richland, Washington Based on the analysis in the EA, and and considering preapproval comments from the National Park Service, the State of Washington, and the Yakama Indian Nation, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of

  7. EA-1157: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    57: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1157: Finding of No Significant Impact Methyl Chloride via Oxyhydrochlorination of Methane: A Building Black for Chemicals and Fuels from Natural Gas The proposed Federal action, to provide cost-shared financial assistance for demonstration of the OHC process in an engineering scale facility, does not constitute a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment as defined by NEPA. This conclusion is based on the

  8. EA-1183: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    83: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1183: Finding of No Significant Impact Coal-fired Diesel Generator University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska Based on analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed Federal action, to provide cost-shared financial assistance for demonstrating the performance of a coal-fired generator at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, does not constitute a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment as defined by

  9. EA-2001: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-2001: Finding of No Significant Impact Energy Efficiency Design Standards: New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings Based upon the EA, DOE has determined that revising the Federal building energy efficiency standards for commercial and multi-family high-rise residential buildings to ASHRAE 90.1-2013 would not be a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human

  10. EA-2004: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-2004: Finding of No Significant Impact The Seneca Nation Wind Turbine Project, Cattaraugus Territory, Erie County, New York Based upon the EA, DOE has determined that authorizing the expenditure of federal funding to the Seneca Nation of Indians to design, permit, and construct up to a 2.0 megawatt wind turbine on Tribal common lands in the Cattaraugus Territory, New York would not be a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human

  11. EA-1091: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    91: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1091: Finding of No Significant Impact Calderon Cokemaking Process/Demonstration Project The proposed Federal action, to provide cost-shared financial assistance for a demonstration project including the modification of an existing process demonstration unit and operation for producing metallurgical grade coke, does not constitute a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment as defined by NEPA. This conclusion

  12. EA-1236: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1236: Finding of No Significant Impact Preparation for Transfer of Ownership of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Natrona County, Wyoming Based on the analysis of the Sitewide Environmental Assessment for Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) DOE has determined that the proposed action to conduct activities in anticipation of possible transfer of NPR-3 out of Federal operation is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human

  13. EA-1331: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1331: Finding of No Significant Impact Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site Based on the analysis and information provided in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed Federal action, to conduct air sparging at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site in Sweetwater County, Wyoming, does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human

  14. EA-1499: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1499: Finding of No Significant Impact Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex, Nevada Test Site The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1499) (EA) which analyzes the potential environmental effects of the proposed Rad/NucCTEC at the NTS. NNSA finds that the proposed action would not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human

  15. EA-1891: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1891: Finding of No Significant Impact Alvey-Fairview Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Oregon Based on the information in the EA, BPA determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, an EIS will not be prepared and BPA is issuing this FONSI for the proposed action. PDF icon EA-1891-FONSI-2014.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1891:

  16. EA-1901: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1901: Finding of No Significant Impact Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho Based on the information in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that significantly affects the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, preparation of an EIS is not required, and BPA is issuing this FONSI. PDF icon EA-1901-FONSI-2013.pdf More

  17. EA-1918: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1918: Finding of No Significant Impact Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings (Final Rule) Based upon the EA, DOE has determined that revising the Federal building energy efficiency standards for commercial and multi-family high-rise residential buildings to ASHRAE 90.1-2010 would not be a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the

  18. EA-1922: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1922: Finding of No Significant Impact Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska Based on the EA, DOE finds that providng federal funding for the Proposed Project is not a major action that constituents a significant effect on the human environment. This finding and decision is based on the consideration of DOE's NEPA implementing regulations (10 CFR Part 1021) and CEQ's criteria for significance (40 CFR 1508.27), both with regard to the

  19. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 enhances the differentiation and reduces the proliferation of adult human olfactory epithelium neural precursors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manceur, Aziza P.; Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Tseng, Michael; Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON; Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON ; Holowacz, Tamara; Witterick, Ian; Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, ON ; Weksberg, Rosanna; The Hospital for Sick Children, Research Institute, Program in Genetics and Genomic Biology, Toronto, Ontario Canada ; McCurdy, Richard D.; Warsh, Jerry J.; Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON; Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON ; Audet, Julie; Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

    2011-09-10

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) contains neural precursor cells which can be easily harvested from a minimally invasive nasal biopsy, making them a valuable cell source to study human neural cell lineages in health and disease. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) has been implicated in the etiology and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders and also in the regulation of murine neural precursor cell fate in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we examined the impact of decreased GSK-3 activity on the fate of adult human OE neural precursors in vitro. GSK-3 inhibition was achieved using ATP-competitive (6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime and CHIR99021) or substrate-competitive (TAT-eIF2B) inhibitors to eliminate potential confounding effects on cell fate due to off-target kinase inhibition. GSK-3 inhibitors decreased the number of neural precursor cells in OE cell cultures through a reduction in proliferation. Decreased proliferation was not associated with a reduction in cell survival but was accompanied by a reduction in nestin expression and a substantial increase in the expression of the neuronal differentiation markers MAP1B and neurofilament (NF-M) after 10 days in culture. Taken together, these results suggest that GSK-3 inhibition promotes the early stages of neuronal differentiation in cultures of adult human neural precursors and provide insights into the mechanisms by which alterations in GSK-3 signaling affect adult human neurogenesis, a cellular process strongly suspected to play a role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  20. Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer (HC-1) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Chief Human Capital Officer (HC-1) Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer (HC-1) HC-1 Mission and Function Statement The Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer (HC) provides leadership to the Department of Energy (DOE) on the impact and use of policies, proposals, programs, and partnership agreements/relationships related to all aspects of Human Capital Management (HCM). Within the framework of the organization, HCM is an integrated approach that links human resources,

  1. Bioenergy Impact Posters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On October 1, 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Technologies Office kicked off Energy Action Month by displaying bioenergy impacts posters in the DOE Forrestal Building in Washington, D.C.

  2. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Information Resources - FOIAXpress Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetext/neword/206/02061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY

  3. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextineword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE

  4. Innovation Impact Publications | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Impact Publications NREL has a rich history of scientific innovation and partnering with industry in research and development across our primary areas of renewable energy and energy efficiency research: analysis, bioenergy, buildings, manufacturing, solar, transportation, and wind technologies. Learn more about NREL's Innovation Impact by viewing the fact sheets below on our key breakthrough results. Analysis NREL Case Study Leads to International Partnership In 2012, NREL analysts

  5. ORISE: Public Health Preparedness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FEMA Work Group Aimed at Helping the U.S. Prepare for a Radiation Emergency Travelers' Health Campaign Takes Critical Messages Worldwide ORISE Responds to H1N1 Outbreak,...

  6. Improving landscape-level environmental impact evaluations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walston, L.J.; LaGory, K.E.; Vinikour, W.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.L.; Cantwell, B.

    2012-04-01

    New spatial data and advancements in GIS tools allow much more comprehensive and quantitative analyses of the large datasets required when making programmatic evaluations of the ecological effects of proposed activities that cover a large area or region. Understanding the environmental impacts of proposed human developments is critical to making appropriate siting decisions and designing mitigation strategies to reduce impacts on important resources. Impact analyses conducted under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) or Environmental Assessments (EAs) are intended to determine the resource-specific impacts of proposed activities of federal agencies and their alternatives using the best available information. Impacts to ecological resources are often a primary focus of these analyses. Information used in NEPA analyses include some measure of the known or probable presence of plants and wildlife in the project area, with special emphasis placed on threatened, endangered, and other special-status species. Site-specific information pertaining to ecological resources is usually easier to obtain for small-scale activities such as a local facility, road, or transmission upgrade project, where the ability to conduct fieldwork is more often feasible. However, site-specific data is more difficult-and sometimes impossible-to obtain for proposed activities that could affect a large area or region. These types of analyses often are considered in programmatic NEPA documents, in which a federal agency evaluates the implementation of a broad program or plan. Under these programmatic evaluations, the exact location and size of developments are often not known. Because obtaining quantitative information for ecological resources at such large spatial scales is difficult, programmatic impact evaluations typically rely on sketchy or partial information such as recorded species occurrences, species ranges, and general habitat descriptions. However, new spatial data and improved GIS tools allow much more comprehensive and quantitative analyses using large, readily available datasets. The availability of large-scale regional data such as GAP land-cover models or species habitat suitability models, combined with more robust spatial analysis procedures available through ArcGIS for Desktop software, allowed the analysis of multiple datasets at large spatial scales. This enabled researchers to surpass previous qualitative evaluations by developing a more accurate and quantitative approach for determining the environmental impacts of human activities at larger spatial scales. These approaches, combined with the utility of ModelBuilder and operability of Python scripts in ArcGIS, allow a more timely and cost-effective synthesis of available spatial data for programmatic evaluations and add a quantitative basis to environmental decision making.

  7. ORISE: Public Health Preparedness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preparedness Public Health Preparedness The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) recognizes that public health events will largely be managed at the local level, at least for the first 48 to 72 hours after a major event. As a result, ORISE works with community partners, and in conjunction with government agencies and organizations, to help address gaps and obstacles experienced at the local level in order to plan for an effective response. This is accomplished largely through

  8. Biosecurity and Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biosecurity and Health Biosecurity and Health Los Alamos scientists are developing science and technology designed to battle pathogens responsible for causing disease epidemics, and extreme cases, pandemics. Contact Us Kirsten McCabe Emerging Threats Program Manager Email Andrew Bradbury Bioscience Group Leader Email Nick Hengartner Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Group Leader Email Rebecca McDonald Communication Specialist Email Projects in this subject area are concerned with countering

  9. SRS Economic Impact Study - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the SRSCRO commissioned an Economic Impact Study to examine both SRS's value to the economy, as well as its overall impact on five SRSCRO counties, Aiken, Allendale, and...

  10. Environment/Health/Safety Concerns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EHS Emergencies Report AccidentIncident Stop Work Policy Environment, Health & Safety Concerns hardhat Environment Health Safety Concerns construction workers If you have a...

  11. ORISE: Applied health physics projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applied health physics projects The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides applied health physics services to government agencies needing technical support ...

  12. Federal Employee Health Benefits (FEHB)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) program is the largest employer-sponsored health insurance program in the world, covering more than 8 million Federal employees, retirees, former...

  13. Reproductive and developmental health risk from dioxin-like compounds: Insignificant risk from cement kilns burning waste-derived fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, L.C.; Pedelty, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    Cement kilns burning waste-derived fuels emit low levels of dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans and little or no PCB`s. Concern about possible effects on reproduction and development has prompted an evaluation of the research literature especially with regard to the reproductive and developmental effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). In sufficient doses, dioxins, furans, and PCB can cause adverse health effects in some animals or humans. Calculated doses of TCDD-EQ (dioxin equivalents) are dependent on many assumptions, but where human effects have been demonstrated, doses were 100--1,000 times higher than the usual background environmental doses. This would include those environmental doses that would be received by the most-exposed individual living near cement kilns burning WDF. There is evidence to suggest that PCB`s have had an adverse impact on some wildlife although there is no evidence that these PCB`s are associated with cement kiln emissions. There is no evidence to suggest that dioxins, at environmental levels or associated with emissions from WDF-burning cement kilns, have caused adverse effects in either wildlife or humans. 63 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. (Low frequency electromagnetic fields and public health)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, T.E.

    1988-05-23

    The traveler participated in the IARC-sponsored workshop entitled Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) and Public Health'' where he delivered the keynote address. This address set the stage for deliberations among the EMF public health professionals regarding strategies for international collaborative work on this topic. Strong emphasis was placed in explicit exposure monitoring. The traveler also participated in the Tenth Yves Biraud Seminar on rare-event surveillance as a sentinel system for detection potential environmental hazards. He presented an invited paper describing a means for making rapid, preliminary decisions regarding potential health impacts due to contamination of the environment around point sources of toxic substances. He served as the symposium's expert on numerical techniques on the use of spatial and temporal aggregation of rare health events. There is considerable variation among countries in emphasis on application of sentinel systems and application of sentinel systems and data gathering. France has a highly automated, statistically-sophisticated system involving individual physician reporting of specific reportable infectious diseases to a central location. The European Common Market nations are sold on this concept and are supporting the development of an internationally coordinated system.

  15. ORISE: Human Subjects Protection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Subjects Protection The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs technical assessments to assist U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories involved in human subjects research projects. Under DOE Order and Policy 443.1A, Protection of Human Subjects, and 10 CFR 745, DOE employees and contractors are expected to protect the rights and welfare of human research subjects. In support of the DOE Office of Science and the Human Subjects Protection Program (HSPP), ORISE

  16. Corporate Human Resources Information Services (CHIRS) PIA, Office of Human

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Capitol Management | Department of Energy Corporate Human Resources Information Services (CHIRS) PIA, Office of Human Capitol Management Corporate Human Resources Information Services (CHIRS) PIA, Office of Human Capitol Management Corporate Human Resources Information Services (CHIRS) PIA, Office of Human Capitol Management PDF icon Corporate Human Resources Information Services (CHIRS) PIA, Office of Human Capitol Management More Documents & Publications MOX Services Unclassified

  17. Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level waste (LLW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment method and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS and are not repeated in this report. This report presents additional information that is not presented in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLW. Included are definition of the LLW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, data related to the inventory and to the physical and radiological characteristics of WM LLW, an overview of the risk assessment method, and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLW alternative considered.

  18. Measuring the Economic Impacts of Federal Investments in Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, S; Merrill, S

    2011-08-31

    Measuring the Economic Impacts of Federal Investments in Research evaluates approaches to measuring the returns on federal research investments. This report identifies new methodologies and metrics that can be developed and used for assessing returns on research across a wide range of fields (biomedical, information technology, energy, agriculture, environment, and other biological and physical sciences, etc.), while using one or more background papers that review current methodologies as a starting point for the discussion. It focuses on tools that are able to exploit available data in the relatively near term rather than on methodologies that may require substantial new data collection. Over the last several years, there has been a growing interest in policy circles in identifying the payoffs from federal agency research investments, especially in terms of economic growth, competitiveness, and jobs. The extraordinary increase in research expenditures under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 and the President'?s commitment to science and technology (S&T) funding increases going forward have heightened the need for measuring the impacts of research investments. Without a credible analysis of their outcomes, the recent and proposed increases in S&T funding may not be sustained, especially given competing claims for federal funding and pressures to reduce projected federal budget deficits. Motivated by these needs and requirements, Measuring the Economic Impacts of Federal Investments in Research reviews and discusses the use of quantitative and qualitative data to evaluate the returns on federal research and development (R&D) investments. Despite the job-focused mandate of the current ARRA reporting requirements, the impact of S&T funding extend well beyond employment. For instance, federal funding in energy research may lead to innovations that would reduce energy costs at the household level, energy imports at the national level, and greenhouse gas emissions at the global level. In principle, these benefits can be measured as a return on research investments, with appropriate consideration of time lags to research outcomes and attribution to private as well as public expenditure. With appropriate metrics, the same could be true for benefits to public health, environmental quality, and food productivity and security. Federal funding of research leads to the development of human capital that is deployed in a variety of occupations with economic and social impacts. Research also produces information that is used in formal (e.g., regulatory and judicial) and informal (e.g., firm and consumer) decision making processes. In addition to reviewing the range of work (by academics, consultants, and research agencies themselves) that has been done in measuring research outcomes and providing a forum to discuss their methods, this report also considers the different methodologies used across fields of research (e.g., agriculture and energy research) to identifies which are applicable to a range of federal S&T funding.

  19. ORISE: Worker Health Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Exposure Data Collection Protecting Human Subjects How ORISE is Making a Difference Overview Argonne Electronic Medical Records System Beryllium Testing and Surveillance Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) U.S. Department of Energy Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) DOE IISP 10-Year Summary Report Resources Overview Reports Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles Human Subjects Resource Book How to Work With Us Contact Us Oak Ridge Institute for Science

  20. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 3, Sections 7-12, Appendices A-C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains references; a list of preparers and recipients; acronyms, abbreviations, and units of measure; a glossary; an index and three appendices.

  1. Economic Impact | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab's Hall A Jefferson Lab generates many economic benefits for the nation and Virginia, providing many well-paying jobs for highly skilled and well-educated workers. A D D I T I O N A L L I N K S: Brochures Fact Sheets JLab Video 12 GeV Construction Economic Impact top-right bottom-left-corner bottom-right-corner economic impact Jefferson Lab generates many economic benefits. For the nation, Jefferson Lab generates $679.1 million in economic output and 4,422 jobs. The economic output

  2. Human Reliability Considerations for Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara J. M.; Higgins, H.; DAgostino, A.; Erasmia, L.

    2012-01-27

    Small modular reactors (SMRs) are a promising approach to meeting future energy needs. Although the electrical output of an individual SMR is relatively small compared to that of typical commercial nuclear plants, they can be grouped to produce as much energy as a utility demands. Furthermore, SMRs can be used for other purposes, such as producing hydrogen and generating process heat. The design characteristics of many SMRs differ from those of current conventional plants and may require a distinct concept of operations. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) conducted research to examine the human factors engineering and the operational aspects of SMRs. The research identified thirty potential human-performance issues that should be considered in the NRC's reviews of SMR designs and in future research activities. The purpose of this report is to illustrate how the issues can support SMR probabilistic risk analyses and their review by identifying potential human failure events for a subset of the issues. As part of addressing the human contribution to plant risk, human reliability analysis practitioners identify and quantify the human failure events that can negatively impact normal or emergency plant operations. The results illustrated here can be generalized to identify additional human failure events for the issues discussed and can be applied to those issues not discussed in this report.

  3. Security, Safety and Health

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8, Fourth Quarter, 2012 www.fossil.energy.gov/news/energytoday.html HigHligHts inside 2 Security and Sustainability A Column from the FE Director of Health, Security, Safety and Health 4 Training Goes 3-D NETL's AVESTAR Center Deploys New Virtual Training System 5 Secretary Achievement Awards Two FE Teams Earn Secretary of Energy Recognition 7 Vast Energy Resource Identified FE Study Says Billions of Barrels of Oil in Residual Oil Zones 8 Presidential Award NETL-RUA Engineer Earns Highest

  4. High Impact Technology Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The High Impact Technology Hub is a one stop shop for information associated with technology demonstrations in occupied, operational buildings. Resources posted to Hub should accelerate the selection and evaluation of technology demonstration projects and enable transparency into DOEs market stimulation and tech to market activities.

  5. ARM - Human Causes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ListHuman Causes Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Human Causes Some of the human activities which can cause climate variability and other associated causes to climate change will be discussed here and these include: increased emission of greenhouse gases, development for human

  6. EA-1849-S1: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    -S1: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1849-S1: Finding of No Significant Impact Phase II Facility - Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant in Tuscarora, Nevada On the basis of the Final SEA, DOE has determined that issuing a disbursement from Federal loan guaranteed funding of to John Hancock Financial Services for Ormat to construct the Phase II facility at Tuscarora would not have a significant effect on the human environment. The preparation of an environmental impact statement is

  7. Report: Strategic Planning Impacts

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Strategic Planning Impacts September 30, 2009 Submitted by the EMAB ARRA Implementation and Oversight Subcommittee Background: EM plans to use the influx of stimulus funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to fulfill compliance agreements, complete construction projects, and address the program's lower-tier activities such as decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) and soil and groundwater remediation. Using the ARRA funds to reduce the physical size of the EM

  8. Impacts | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impacts At the MPC we provide research and developmental quantities of crucial materials that have changed the face of science. Our materials have paved the way for sonar technology used in the depths of the oceans and enabled critical scientific instruments to function in the most distant reaches of space. [EXTEND] The extensive bibliography of publications that cite the MPC (or more generically, the Ames Laboratory) as the source for the pure metals, alloys, or single crystals can provide you

  9. CBI Technology Impact Framework

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CBI Technology Impact Framework 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Images courtesy CREE, True Manufacturing, A.O. Smith, Bernstein Associates, Cambridge Engineering, Alliance Laundry Systems, NREL Amy Jiron, amy.jiron@go.doe.gov U.S. Department of Energy Dan Chwastyk, dan.chwastyk@navigant.com Navigant Consulting Project Summary Timeline: Start date: December 2013 Planned end date: TBD (annual go/no-go) Key Milestones 1. Initial tech sweep completed; Feb 2014 2. Release of RFI; Mar

  10. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Health Monitoring - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  11. Economic Impact of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on the State of Washington in Fiscal Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2015-11-09

    PNNL is a large economic entity with a total of 4,308 employees, $939 million (M) in total funding, and $1.02 billion (B) in total spending during FY 2014. The number of employees that live in Washington State is 4,026 or 93 percent of the Laboratory staff. he Laboratory directly and indirectly supported $1.45 billion in economic output, 6,832 jobs, and $517 million in Washington State wage income from current operations. The state also gained more than $1.19 billion in output, over 6,200 jobs, and $444 million in income through closely related economic activities such as visitors, health care spending, spending by resident retirees, and spinoff companies. PNNL affects Washington’s economy through commonly recognized economic channels, including spending on payrolls and other goods and services that support Laboratory operations. Less commonly recognized channels also have their own impacts and include company-supported spending on health care for its staff members and retirees, spending of its resident retirees, Laboratory visitor spending, and the economic activities in a growing constellation of “spinoff” companies founded on PNNL research, technology, and managerial expertise. PNNL also has a significant impact on science and technology education and community not-for-profit organizations. PNNL is an active participant in the future scientific enterprise in Washington with the state’s K-12 schools, colleges, and universities. The Laboratory sends staff members to the classroom and brings hundreds of students to the PNNL campus to help train the next generation of scientists, engineers, mathematicians, and technicians. This investment in human capital, though difficult to measure in terms of current dollars of economic output, is among the important lasting legacies of the Laboratory. Finally, PNNL contributes to the local community with millions of dollars’ worth of cash and in-kind corporate and staff contributions, all of which strengthen the economy. The purpose of this report is to quantify these effects, providing detailed information on PNNL’s revenues and expenditures, as well as the impacts of its activities on the rest of the Washington State economy.

  12. Operational health physics training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-06-01

    The initial four sections treat basic information concerning atomic structure and other useful physical quantities, natural radioactivity, the properties of {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, x rays and neutrons, and the concepts and units of radiation dosimetry (including SI units). Section 5 deals with biological effects and the risks associated with radiation exposure. Background radiation and man-made sources are discussed next. The basic recommendations of the ICRP concerning dose limitations: justification, optimization (ALARA concepts and applications) and dose limits are covered in Section seven. Section eight is an expanded version of shielding, and the internal dosimetry discussion has been extensively revised to reflect the concepts contained in the MIRD methodology and ICRP 30. The remaining sections discuss the operational health physics approach to monitoring radiation. Individual sections include radiation detection principles, instrument operation and counting statistics, health physics instruments and personnel monitoring devices. The last five sections deal with the nature of, operation principles of, health physics aspects of, and monitoring approaches to air sampling, reactors, nuclear safety, gloveboxes and hot cells, accelerators and x ray sources. Decontamination, waste disposal and transportation of radionuclides are added topics. Several appendices containing constants, symbols, selected mathematical topics, and the Chart of the Nuclides, and an index have been included.

  13. Economic Impact Analysis for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: To conduct an economic impact study for EGS and to develop a Geothermal Economics Calculator (GEC) tool to quantify (in economic terms) the potential job, energy and environmental impacts associated with electric power production from geothermal resources.

  14. Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact 2 June 2001 This page intentionally left blank. U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact 12 June 2001 This page intentionally left blank.

  15. Environmental Impact of Smart Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impact of Smart Grid January 10, 2011 2 Agenda * Review of Paper - Introduction - Key Areas of Impact - Findings - Conclusions - Recommended Topics for Further Research 3 3 Introduction Provide background for the current state of environmental impact of Smart Grid * Summarize key components of criteria pollutants from electricity and transportation sectors * Define the Smart Grid and how it can be used to reduce pollutants * Evaluate impact from Smart Grid on reducing pollutants through: -

  16. NREL: Innovation Impact Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioenergy Bioenergy Buildings Buildings Transportation Transportation Manufacturing Manufacturing Energy Systems Integration Energy Systems Integration Innovation Impact NREL...

  17. STATEOFNEWMEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STATEOFNEWMEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION, HAZARDOUS WASTE BUREAU, Complainant UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, and NUCLEAR WASTE PARTNERSIDP, LLC...

  18. Health Effects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health Effects Health Effects The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers research programs and monitoring activities, both domestic and international, that support the protection and promotion of the health of DOE workers, their families, and residents of neighboring communities near DOE sites, affected by exposure to hazardous materials from DOE sites or a result of nuclear weapons testing, use or accident. Domestic health activities include studies of historical workplace exposures,

  19. Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marten, Alex; Kopp, Robert E.; Shouse, Kate C.; Griffiths, Charles; Hodson, Elke L.; Kopits, Elizabeth; Mignone, Bryan K.; Moore, Chris; Newbold, Steve; Waldhoff, Stephanie T.; Wolverton, Ann

    2013-04-01

    The social cost of carbon (SCC) is a monetized metric for evaluating the benefits associated with marginal reductions in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. It represents the expected welfare loss from the future damages caused by the release of one tonne of CO2 in a given year, expressed in consumption equivalent terms. It is intended to be a comprehensive measure, taking into account changes in agricultural productivity, human health risks, loss of ecosystem services and biodiversity, and the frequency and severity of flooding and storms, among other possible impacts. Estimating the SCC requires long-term modeling of global economic activity, the climate system, and the linkages between the two through anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the effects of changing climatic conditions on economic activity and human well-being. The United States government currently uses the SCC in regulatory benefit-cost analyses to assess the welfare effects of changes in CO2 emissions. Consistent application of the SCC to federal rulemaking analyses began in 2009-2010 with the development of a set of global SCC estimates that employed three prominent integrated assessment models (IAMs) -- DICE, FUND, and PAGE. The U.S. government report identified a number of limitations associated with SCC estimates in general and its own assumptions in particular: an incomplete treatment of damages, including potential “catastrophic” impacts; uncertainty regarding the extrapolation of damage functions to high temperatures; incomplete treatment of adaptation and technological change; and the evaluation of uncertain outcomes in a risk-neutral fashion. External experts have identified other potential issues, including how best to model long-term socio-economic and emissions pathways, oversimplified physical climate and carbon cycle modeling within the IAMs, and an inconsistency between non-constant economic growth scenarios and constant discount rates. The U.S. government has committed to updating the estimates regularly as modeling capabilities and scientific and economic knowledge improves. To help foster further improvements in estimating the SCC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy hosted a pair of workshops on “Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis.” The first focused on conceptual and methodological issues related to integrated assessment modeling and the second brought together natural and social scientists to explore methods for improving damage assessment for multiple sectors. These two workshops provide the basis for the 13 papers in this special issue.

  20. Health assessment for Stringfellow, Glen Avon, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAT08001286. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-05-25

    The Stringfellow Hazardous Waste site lies at the head of the Pyrite Canyon in Riverside County less than a mile north of the community of Glen Avon. The principal contaminants of concern in the ground water include trichloroethene (TCE), chloroform, chlorobenzene, dichlorobenzene, nitrate, sodium, sulfate, para-chlorobenzene sulfonic acid (p-CBSA), chromium, and cadmium. The principal environmental pathways for contaminant transport include ground water, surface water, soil, sediment, and air. The Pyrite Canyon portion of the site is of public health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from probable past and present exposure to hazardous substances that may result in adverse human health effects.

  1. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 2, Sections 1-6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains the analysis of programmatic alternatives, project alternatives, affected environment of alternative sites, environmental consequences, and environmental regulations and permit requirements.

  2. Health and Safety Training Reciprocity

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-04-14

    Establishes a policy for reciprocity of employee health and safety training among DOE entities responsible for employee health and safety at DOE sites and facilities to increase efficiency and effectiveness of Departmental operations while meeting established health and safety requirements. Does not cancel other directives.

  3. Beryllium Health Advocates - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Advocates About Us Beryllium Program Beryllium Program Points of Contact Beryllium Facilities & Areas Beryllium Program Information Hanford CBDPP Committee Beryllium FAQs Beryllium Related Links Hanford Beryllium Awareness Group (BAG) Program Performance Assessments Beryllium Program Feedback Beryllium Health Advocates Primary Contractors/Employers Medical Testing and Surveillance Facilities General Resources Beryllium Health Advocates Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text

  4. Impact assisted segmented cutterhead

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Larson, David A. (Minneapolis, MN); Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, MN)

    1992-01-01

    An impact assisted segmented cutterhead device is provided for cutting various surfaces from coal to granite. The device comprises a plurality of cutting bit segments deployed in side by side relationship to form a continuous cutting face and a plurality of impactors individually associated with respective cutting bit segments. An impactor rod of each impactor connects that impactor to the corresponding cutting bit segment. A plurality of shock mounts dampening the vibration from the associated impactor. Mounting brackets are used in mounting the cutterhead to a base machine.

  5. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W. Thor (Idaho Falls, ID); Reutzel, Edward W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

  6. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W.T.; Reutzel, E.W.

    1998-08-18

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure. 8 figs.

  7. World Health Organization (WHO) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Health Organization (WHO) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: World Health Organization (WHO) Name: World Health Organization (WHO) Address: 20, avenue Appia 1211 Geneva, Switzerland...

  8. Southern Nevada Health District | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Health District Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Southern Nevada Health District Author Southern Nevada Health District Published...

  9. Human Resources | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Employee Relations Human Resources Installation Of A Cryomodule Workers prepare to install a cryomodule in Jefferson Lab's accelerator. Read more Business Services Human Resources Jefferson Lab Business Services Jefferson Lab provides opportunities for both large and small businesses to engage with the lab and its scientific mission. Read more Training Human Resources Training Programs at Jefferson Lab There exist many exciting career opportunities at Jefferson Lab, and the lab provides training

  10. FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER VULNERABILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leduc, D; Jeffery England, J; Roy Rothermel, R

    2009-02-09

    Cylindrical fuel casks often have impact limiters surrounding just the ends of the cask shaft in a typical 'dumbbell' arrangement. The primary purpose of these impact limiters is to absorb energy to reduce loads on the cask structure during impacts associated with a severe accident. Impact limiters are also credited in many packages with protecting closure seals and maintaining lower peak temperatures during fire events. For this credit to be taken in safety analyses, the impact limiter attachment system must be shown to retain the impact limiter following Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) impacts. Large casks are often certified by analysis only because of the costs associated with testing. Therefore, some cask impact limiter attachment systems have not been tested in real impacts. A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the impact limiter attachment system. Assumptions in the original Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs.

  11. HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EAT Health Fair EAT Featured Presentation March InsideOut 2016 WorkFit Training Patient Satisfaction Event Calendar Tobacco Cessation Class March 14, 2016 Weight Loss Convoy Class--First Quarter March 15, 2016 Weight Loss Convoy Class--First Quarter March 22, 2016 The EAT Challenge April 4, 2016 Convoy Alumni Meeting April 6, 2016 Weight Loss Convoy Class--Second Quarter April 12, 2016 News and Information February 25, 2016 EAT: Eating for a Healthy Weight February 25, 2016 EAT: The Price of

  12. EA-0856: Construction and Operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Berkeley, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a new laboratory for consolidation of current and future activities of the Human Genome Center at the U.S....

  13. ORISE: Human Subjects Protection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Subjects Protection The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs technical assessments to assist U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories involved...

  14. Human Genome: DOE Origins

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of the Department of Energy; DOE Technical Report; 1988 Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome; DOE Technical Report; 1988 Understanding our Genetic Inheritance: The U.S....

  15. EA-1871: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1871: Finding of No Significant Impact Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings Based on an DOE/EA-1871, DOE has determined that revising the Federal building energy efficiency standards to ASHRAE 90.1-2007 and IECC 2009 would not be a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA.

  16. Materials and society -- Impacts and responsibilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westwood, A.R.C.

    1995-11-01

    The needs of today`s advanced societies have moved well beyond the requirements for food and shelter, etc., and now are focused on such concerns as international peace and domestic security, affordable health care, the swift and secure transmission of information, the conservation of resources, and a clean environment. Progress in materials science and engineering is impacting each of these concerns. This paper will present some examples of how this is occurring, and then comment on ethical dilemmas that can arise as a consequence of technological advances. The need for engineers to participate more fully in the development of public policies that help resolve such dilemmas, and so promote the benefits of advancing technology to society, will be discussed.

  17. Protection of Human Subjects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-12-20

    The order establishes Department of Energy (DOE) procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects; and in DOE P 443.1A, Protection of Human Subjects, dated 12-20-07. Cancels DOE O 443.1. Canceled by DOE O 443.1B.

  18. Protection of Human Subjects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-05-15

    To establish DOE procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in 10 CFR Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects, ad in DOE P 443.1, Policy on the Protection of Human Subjects. Cancels DOE O 1300.3. Canceled by DOE O 443.1A.

  19. The human genome project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yager, T.D.; Zewert, T.E.; Hood, L.E. )

    1994-04-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is a coordinated worldwide effort to precisely map the human genome and the genomes of selected model organisms. The first explicit proposal for this project dates from 1985 although its foundations (both conceptual and technological) can be traced back many years in genetics, molecular biology, and biotechnology. The HGP has matured rapidly and is producing results of great significance.

  20. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Advocate Health Care

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advocate Health Care is named among the nation’s top five large health systems based on quality by Truven Analytics and is the largest health system in Illinois. As a health system, Advocate...

  1. Health and Safety Laws | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health and Safety Laws Health and Safety Laws Health and safety laws require working conditions that do not pose a risk of serious harm: Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 ...

  2. Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) Uranium Leasing...

  3. High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies The Energy Department released the High Impact Technology Catalyst: ...

  4. Environment, Health, and Safety | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environment, Health, and Safety NREL conducts research, support, and deployment activities in a manner that protects the safety and health of workers, visitors, the public, the environment, and laboratory assets. NREL's international certifications demonstrate the laboratory's commitment to staff, the local community, and the scientific community as a world-class research institution. An image of a worker applying window patterns at the ESIF. Environmental, Health, and Safety Policy Through our

  5. ORISE: Health Communication and Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multimedia Applications Health Promotion and Outreach How ORISE is Making a Difference Overview "Can I Eat This?" Mobile App Wins Award of Excellence from NAGC Operating Public Shelters in a Radiation Emergency Training Tools for Healthy Schools ORISE to Support CDC Infectious Disease Initiative ORISE Supports CDC's Know:BRCA Education Initiative CDC Travelers' Health Team Receives Innovation Award for Website Redesign CDC Travelers' Health Mobile App, Designed by ORISE, Gains

  6. Bioscience: Bioenergy, Biosecurity, and Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioscience: Bioenergy, Biosecurity, and Health /science-innovation/_assets/images/icon-science.jpg Bioscience: Bioenergy, Biosecurity, and Health Los Alamos scientists are developing science and technology to improve pathogen detection, create better therapeutics, and anticipate-even prevent-epidemics and pandemics. Bioscience Division» Bioenergy» Environmental Microbiology» Proteins» Biosecurity and Health» Genomics and Systems Biology» Algal vats Read caption + Los Alamos scientists used

  7. High Impact Technology Hub- Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Highlights, outcomes and activities to support the adoption of High Impact Technologies. Technology Highlights preview early results from current technology demonstrations. Case Studies overview...

  8. Bioenergy Impact on Wisconsin's Workforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Troy Runge, Wisconsin Bioenergy Initiative, presents on bioenergy's impact on Wisconsin's workforce development for the Biomass/Clean Cities States webinar.

  9. High Impact Technology HQ- Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Highlights, outcomes and activities to support the adoption of High Impact Technologies.  Technology Highlights preview early results from current technology demonstrations.  Case Studies overview...

  10. Environmental Impact of Smart Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pollutants * Evaluate impact from Smart Grid on reducing pollutants through: - Demand Response - Electric Vehicles - Demand Side Management - Renewables and Distributed Energy ...

  11. Powering Health | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Health AgencyCompany Organization: USAID Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Develop...

  12. Complementary Energy and Health Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call Series: Complementary Energy and Health Strategies, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, April 10, 2014.

  13. ORISE: Contact Environment, Safety & Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Star Status Environment Work Smart Standards Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Contact Us Use the form below to contact Environment, Safety & Health. Other contact...

  14. ORISE: Health Promotion and Outreach

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and outreach support to government agencies and organizations seeking to provide health information to targeted populations. ORISE develops culturally-sensitive programs and...

  15. Health Care Buildings: Subcategories Table

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Subcategories Table Selected Data by Type of Health Care Building Number of Buildings (thousand) Percent of Buildings Floorspace (million square feet) Percent of Floorspace Square...

  16. Health Care Buildings: Equipment Table

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Equipment Table Buildings, Size and Age Data by Equipment Types for Health Care Buildings Number of Buildings (thousand) Percent of Buildings Floorspace (million square feet)...

  17. Methodology for comparing the health effects of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhyne, W.R.; El-Bassioni, A.A.

    1981-12-08

    A methodology was developed for comparing the health risks of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels. The health effects attributable to the construction, operation, and decommissioning of each facility in the two fuel cycle were considered. The methodology is based on defining (1) requirement variables for the materials, energy, etc., (2) effluent variables associated with the requirement variables as well as with the fuel cycle facility operation, and (3) health impact variables for effluents and accidents. The materials, energy, etc., required for construction, operation, and decommissioning of each fuel cycle facility are defined as primary variables. The materials, energy, etc., needed to produce the primary variable are defined as secondary requirement variables. Each requirement variable (primary, secondary, etc.) has associated effluent variables and health impact variables. A diverging chain or tree is formed for each primary variable. Fortunately, most elements reoccur frequently to reduce the level of analysis complexity. 6 references, 11 figures, 6 tables.

  18. Key factors for determining groundwater impacts due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration reservoirs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carroll, Susan A.; Keating, Elizabeth; Mansoor, Kayyum; Dai, Zhenxue; Sun, Yunwei; Trainor-Guitton, Whitney; Brown, Chris; Bacon, Diana

    2014-09-07

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is developing a science-based toolset for the analysis of potential impacts to groundwater chemistry from CO2 injection (www.netldoe.gov/nrap). The toolset adopts a stochastic approach in which predictions address uncertainties in shallow groundwater and leakage scenarios. It is derived from detailed physics and chemistry simulation results that are used to train more computationally efficient models, referred to here as reduced-order models (ROMs), for each component system. In particular, these tools can be used to help regulators and operators understand the expected sizes and longevity of plumes in pH, TDS, and dissolved metals that could resultmore » from a leakage of brine and/or CO2 from a storage reservoir into aquifers. This information can inform, for example, decisions on monitoring strategies that are both effective and efficient. We have used this approach to develop predictive reduced-order models for two common types of reservoirs, but the approach could be used to develop a model for a specific aquifer or other common types of aquifers. In this paper we describe potential impacts to groundwater quality due to CO2 and brine leakage, discuss an approach to calculate thresholds under which no impact to groundwater occurs, describe the time scale for impact on groundwater, and discuss the probability of detecting a groundwater plume should leakage occur. To facilitate this, multi-phase flow and reactive transport simulations and emulations were developed for two classes of aquifers, considering uncertainty in leakage source terms and aquifer hydrogeology. We targeted an unconfined fractured carbonate aquifer based on the Edwards aquifer in Texas and a confined alluvium aquifer based on the High Plains Aquifer in Kansas, which share characteristics typical of many drinking water aquifers in the United States. The hypothetical leakage scenarios centered on the notion that wellbores are the most likely conduits for brine and CO2 leaks. Leakage uncertainty was based on hypothetical injection of CO2 for 50 years at a rate of 5 million tons per year into a depleted oil/gas reservoir with high permeability and, one or more wells provided leakage pathways from the storage reservoir to the overlying aquifer. This scenario corresponds to a storage site with historical oil/gas production and some poorly completed legacy wells that went undetected through site evaluation, operations, and post-closure. For the aquifer systems and leakage scenarios studied here, CO2 and brine leakage are likely to drive pH below and increase total dissolved solids (TDS) above the “no-impact thresholds;” and the subsequent plumes, although small, are likely to persist for long periods of time in the absence of remediation. In these scenarios, however, risk to human health may not be significant for two reasons. First, our simulated plume volumes are much smaller than the average inter-well spacing for these representative aquifers, so the impacted groundwater would be unlikely to be pumped for drinking water. Second, even within the impacted plume volumes little water exceeds the primary maximum contamination levels.« less

  19. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogatemore » measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for hospital environments, where they can impact patient health and the survival and spread of healthcare associated infections.« less

  20. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for hospital environments, where they can impact patient health and the survival and spread of healthcare associated infections.

  1. Mercury Speciation in Piscivorous Fish from Mining-impacted Reservoirs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mercury Speciation in Piscivorous Fish from Mining-impacted Reservoirs Mercury toxicity generates environmental concerns in diverse aquatic systems because methylmercury enters the water column in diverse ways then biomagnifies through food webs. At the apex of many freshwater food webs, piscivorous fish can then extend that trophic transfer and potential for neurotoxicity to wildlife and humans. Mining activities, particularly those associated with the San Francisco Bay region, can generate

  2. FY 2014 Economic Impact Analysis for DOE's Oak Ridge Office of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Environmental Management | Department of Energy FY 2014 Economic Impact Analysis for DOE's Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management FY 2014 Economic Impact Analysis for DOE's Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management The primary mission of the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OREM) is to protect the region's health and environment, enable the Department's vital missions locally, and make clean land available for future use. To accomplish this, we

  3. Health and environmental effects of coal-fired electric power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, S.C.; Hamilton, L.D.

    1984-05-01

    This paper describes health and environmental impacts of coal-fired electric power plants. Effects on man, agriculture, and natural ecosystems are considered. These effects may result from direct impacts or exposures via air, water, and food chains. The paper is organized by geographical extent of effect. Occupational health impacts and local environmental effects such as noise and solid waste leachate are treated first. Then, regional effects of air pollution, including acid rain, are analyzed. Finally, potential global impacts are examined. Occupational health concerns considered include exposure to noise, dust, asbestos, mercury, and combustion products, and resulting injury and disease. Local effects considered include noise; air and water emissions of coal storage piles, solid waste operations, and cooling systems. Air pollution, once an acute local problem, is now a regional concern. Acute and chronic direct health effects are considered. Special attention is given to potential effects of radionuclides in coal and of acid rain. Finally, potential global impacts associated with carbon dioxide emissions are considered. 88 references, 9 tables.

  4. Human Resource Management Delegation

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-06-28

    The notice is to clarifies and updates existing Human Resource Management Delegation Authorities and the levels to which they are delegated. Expired 6-28-97. Does not cancel any directives.

  5. Protection of Human Subjects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-12-20

    The Policy is to establish DOE-specific principles for the protection of human subjects involved in DOE research. Cancels DOE P 443.1. Canceled by DOE O 443.1B

  6. Protection of Human Subjects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-05-15

    The purpose of this Policy is to establish DOE-specific policy for the protection of human subjects involved in DOE research. Canceled by DOE P 443.1A.

  7. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JLab Diversity Policies 200 Human Resources 202 Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action 203 Employment 208 Employee Performance and Conduct 209 Staff Development 210 Employee Concerns and Grievances Employee Concerns Program (EDP)

  8. Human Reliability Program Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  9. High Impact Technology (HIT) Catalyst

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Technology (HIT) Catalyst Images courtesy CREE, True Manufacturing, A.O. Smith, Bernstein Associates, Cambridge Engineering, Alliance Laundry Systems, NREL Commercial Buildings Integration Building Technologies Office 2 How can we catalyze the adoption of high impact commercial building technologies? Occupants Financial Institutions Government Utilities Scientists Manufacturers Dealers Suppliers Owners Stakeholder Engagement & Partnerships Managers Designers Engineers 3 Building

  10. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Resources The Human Resources team is fully integrated with Jefferson Lab's mission, committed to providing quality customer service based on expertise, innovation and integrity. For general HR inquiries, contact (757) 269-7598. Announcements TIAA-CREF Retirement Counseling Session: To sign up for an appointment with Robert Jean, the TIAA-CREF Individual Consultant, go to http://www.tiaa-cref.org click on Meetings & Counseling and follow the menu. The sessions will be held in Support

  11. The people problems of NEPA: Social impact assessment and the role of public involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnes, S.A.

    1989-12-31

    This Chapter of the book `` The Scientific Challenges of NEPA`` discusses the people problems of NEPA and social impact assessment and the role of public involvement in NEPA. When Congress passed the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in 1969, there was little guidance on the preparation of environmental impact statements (EIS) and the role of the public in the NEPA process. Excepting the statutory language of NEPA, which referred to impacts on the human environment, nowhere was this more evident than with respect to people. Questions such as what impacts on people should be assessed, how impacts on people should be assessed, and how people, including but not limited to those persons potentially impacted, should be involved in the assessment itself as well as NEPA`s associated administrative processes, were simply not addressed.

  12. Potential impacts of nanotechnology on energy transmission applications and needs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-30

    The application of nanotechnologies to energy transmission has the potential to significantly impact both the deployed transmission technologies and the need for additional development. This could be a factor in assessing environmental impacts of right-of-way (ROW) development and use. For example, some nanotechnology applications may produce materials (e.g., cables) that are much stronger per unit volume than existing materials, enabling reduced footprints for construction and maintenance of electricity transmission lines. Other applications, such as more efficient lighting, lighter-weight materials for vehicle construction, and smaller batteries having greater storage capacities may reduce the need for long-distance transport of energy, and possibly reduce the need for extensive future ROW development and many attendant environmental impacts. This report introduces the field of nanotechnology, describes some of the ways in which processes and products developed with or incorporating nanomaterials differ from traditional processes and products, and identifies some examples of how nanotechnology may be used to reduce potential ROW impacts. Potential environmental, safety, and health impacts are also discussed.

  13. DOE Strategic Human Capital Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Strategic Human Capital Plan sets forth the framework for managing the Department of Energy’s (DOE) human capital system through 2015.

  14. ORISE: Protecting Human Subjects Website

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protecting Human Subjects Website Institutions that engage in human subjects research are required by federal policy to establish an institutional review board (IRB) to ensure that...

  15. DOE | Office of Health, Safety and Security | Health and Safety

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security | Health and Safety Rule 851 FAQs - Updated October 19, 2010 10 CFR 851 "Worker Safety and Health Program" Frequently Asked Questions Updated October 19, 2010 Please Note: The responses to the following Frequently Asked Questions are not Official interpretations, only the Office of General Counsel may issue and interpretive ruling. Please see 10 CFR 851.7 and 851.8 for more information. Subpart A-General Provisions 851.1Scope and

  16. Potential Health and Environmental Impact from Emerging Technologies and Fuels: A report from the Health Effects Insitute

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  17. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  18. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percent age improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  19. Human MSH2 protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    1997-01-01

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  20. Human MSH2 protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

    1997-01-07

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

  1. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-08-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  2. Apparatus and methods for a human de-amplifier system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kress, Reid L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Jansen, John F. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01

    A human de-amplifier system for interfacing a human operator and a physical object through a physical plant, wherein the physical object has dimensions in the range of 1 micrometer to 1 mm. The human de-amplifier system uses an inner-feedback loop to increases the equivalent damping of the operating system to stabilize the system when it contacts with the environment and reduces the impact of the environment variation by utilizing a high feedback gain, determined by a root locus sketch. Because the stability of the human de-amplifier system of the present invention is greatly enhanced over that of the prior art, the de-amplifier system is able to manipulate the physical object has dimensions in the range of 1 micrometer to 1 mm with high stability and accuracy. The system also has a monitoring device to monitor the motion of the physical object under manipulation.

  3. The Sequence and Analysis of Duplication Rich Human Chromosome 16

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-01-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  4. Energy Policy Socioeconomic Impact Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-05-13

    Econometric model simulates consumer demand response to residential demand-side management programs and two-part tariff electricity rate designs and assesses their economic impact on various population groups.

  5. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL Communications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Communications and Public Affairs Tour Tracker PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for reqUirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may

  6. Impact Assessments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Assessments Impact Assessments american-flag-802087_960_720.jpg PIA Template with Guidance (MS Word) DOE F 206.1 PIA Template (MS Word) Management and Administration (MA) Open Gov User Voice System (3WP) (pdf) DOE Open Government Plan Comment Box (pdf) Energy Contractor Registration System (EnCoRe) (pdf) Hiring Management Enterprise Solutions (HMES) (pdf) Foreign Travel Management System (FTMS) (pdf) FOIAXpress (pdf) Electronic Document Online Correspondence and Concurrence (eDOCS) (pdf)

  7. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Services HS Home Clinical Services Policies and Procedures Presentations Forms Contact Us AED Building 26 (510) 486-6266 Monday - Friday 7:00 am - 4:30 pm In case of...

  8. Industrial Hygienist/Health Physicist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position wil l serve as an Industrial Hygienist/Health Physicist in the Operations and Oversight Division, providing technical oversight of the Oak Ridge National...

  9. Health Care Buildings: Consumption Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption Tables Sum of Major Fuel Consumption by Size and Type of Health Care Building Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) Dollars per...

  10. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Health, Safety, and Security |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Health, Safety, and Security Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Health, Safety, and Security Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Health, Safety, and Security. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD No downloads found for this office.

  11. ORISE: Applied health physics projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applied health physics projects The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides applied health physics services to government agencies needing technical support for decommissioning projects. Whether the need is assistance with the development of technical basis documents or advice on how to identify, measure and assess the presence of radiological materials, ORISE can help determine the best course for an environmental cleanup project. Our key areas of expertise include fuel

  12. An update on environmental, health and safety issues of interest to the photovoltaic industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Viren, J.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-08-01

    There is growing interest in the environmental, health, and safety issues related to new photovoltaic technologies as they approach commercialization. Such issues include potential toxicity of II--VI compounds; the impacts of new environmental regulations on module manufacturers; and, the need for recycling of spent modules and manufacturing wastes. This paper will review these topics. 20 refs.

  13. New light on human evolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New light on human evolution New light on human evolution Scientists recently unearthed 8 million-year-old gorilla fossils from the Chorora Formation in Ethiopia, which indicate the human evolutionary split took place 10 million years ago. February 19, 2016 Human-gorilla divergence may have occurred two million years earlier than thought (Photo : Flickr: Rod Waddington) Human-gorilla divergence may have occurred two million years earlier than thought (Photo : Flickr: Rod Waddington) "Our

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuels & Vehicles Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health

  15. Safety and Health | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health Safety and Health The DOE Headquarters Safety and Health Program provides information, guidelines, documentation, training, and materials pertaining to many aspects of Safety and Health within the HQ buildings. Question concerning the Headquarters Safety and Health Program can be directed to the Industrial Hygiene and Safety Office on 202-586-1005, or via e-mail to HQSafetyandHealth@hq.doe.gov. Information for Department of Energy Headquarters Personnel The Office of Industrial Hygiene

  16. Potential Environmental Impacts of Hydrogen-based Transportation and Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grieb, Thomas M.; Mills, W. B.; Jacobson, Mark Z.; Summers, Karen V.; Crossan, A. Brook

    2010-12-31

    Hydrogen (H2) offers advantages as an energy carrier: minimal discharge of pollutants, production from multiple sources, increased thermodynamic efficiencies compared to fossil fuels, and reduced dependence on foreign oil. However, potential impacts from the H2 generation processes, transport and distribution of H2, and releases of H2 into the atmosphere have been proposed. The goal of this project was to analyze the effects of emissions of hydrogen, the six criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases on climate, human health, materials and structures. This project was part of a larger effort by DOE to assess the life-cycle costs and benefits and environmental impacts to inform decisions regarding future hydrogen research. Technical Approach: A modeling approach was developed and used to evaluate the potential environmental effects associated with the conversion of the on-road vehicle fleet from fossil-fuel vehicles to hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. GATOR-GCMOM was the primary tool used to predict atmospheric concentrations of gases and aerosols for selected scenarios. This model accounts for all feedbacks among major atmospheric processes based on first principles. The future scenarios and the emission rates selected for this analysis of hydrogen environmental effects are based on the scenarios developed by IPCC. The scenarios selected for the model simulations are a 2000 and 2050 A1B base cases, and a 2050 A1B case with hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs). The hydrogen fuel cell scenario assumed conversion of 90% of fossil-fuel on-road vehicles (FFOV) in developed countries and 45% of FFOVs vehicles in other countries to HFCVs, with the H2 produced by steam-reforming of natural gas (SHFCVs). Simulations were conducted to examine the effect of converting the world’s FFOVs to HFCVs, where the H2 is produced by wind-powered electrolysis (WHFCVs). In all scenarios a 3% leakage of H2 consumed was assumed. Two new models were developed that provide the ability to evaluate a wider range of conditions and address some of the uncertainties that exist in the evaluation of hydrogen emissions. A simplified global hydrogen cycle model that simulates hydrogen dynamics in the troposphere and stratosphere was developed. A Monte Carlo framework was developed to address hydrogen uptake variability for different types of ecosystems. Findings 1.Converting vehicles worldwide in 2050 to SHFCVs at 90% penetration in developed countries and 45% penetration in other countries is expected to reduce NOx, CO, CO2, CH4, some other organic gases, ozone, PAN, black carbon, and other particle components in the troposphere, but may increase some other organic gases, depending on emissions. Conversion to SHFCVs is also expected to cool the troposphere and warm the stratosphere, but to a lesser extent than WHFCVs. Finally, SHFCVs are expected to increase UTLS ozone while decreasing upper stratospheric ozone, but to a lesser extent than WHFCVs. 2.The predicted criteria pollutant concentrations from the GATOR-GCMOM simulations indicated that near-surface annual mean concentrations in the US are likely to increase from the 2000 base case to the 2050 A1B base case for CO2 and ozone due to the increased economic activity, but to decrease for CO, NO2, SO2, and PM10 due to improved pollution control equipment and energy efficiencies. The shift to SHFCVs in 2050 was predicted to result in decreased concentrations for all the criteria pollutants, except for SO2 and PM10. The higher predicted concentrations for SO2 and PM10 were attributed to increased emissions using the steam-reforming method to generate H2. If renewable methods such as wind-based electrolysis were used to generate H2, the emissions of SO2 and PM10 would be lower. 3.The effects on air quality, human health, ecosystem, and building structures were quantified by comparing the GATOR-GCMOM model output and accepted health and ecosystem effects levels and ambient air quality criteria. Shifting to HFCVs is expected to result in improved air quality and benefits to human health. Shifting to HFCVs is unlikely to result in damage to buildings. 4.Results are thought to be robust for larger leakage rates of H2 and for greater penetrations of HFCVs, since the controlling factor for stratospheric ozone impacts is the reduction in fossil-fuel greenhouse gases and the resulting surface cooling, which reduces water vapor emissions and stratospheric warming, which increases tropopause stability reducing water vapor transport to the stratosphere. 5.The supplemental modeling results were generally supportive of the results from the GATOR-GCMOM simulations, and recommendations for additional analyses were made. Extending the duration of the simulation to coincide with the time required for hydrogen mixing ratios to attain a steady state condition was recommended. Further evaluation of algorithms to describe hydrogen uptake in the model was also recommended.

  17. Induced Seismicity Impact | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seismicity Impact Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleInducedSeismicityImpact&oldid612409" Feedback Contact needs updating...

  18. EIS-0403: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0403: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States Abstract: The BLM...

  19. Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    April 1, 2003 EIS-0337: Draft Environmental Impact Statement West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management April 1, 2003 EIS-0312: Final Environmental Impact Statement Fish...

  20. Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 1, 2012 EIS-0457: Final Environmental Impact Statement Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR February 8, 2012 EIS-0476: Final Environmental Impact...

  1. Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    April 1, 1999 EIS-0222: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Revised Draft Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement and Comprehensive Land-Use Plan April 1, 1999...

  2. Preliminary Energy Savings Impact Evaluation: Better Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Savings Impact Evaluation: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Preliminary Energy Savings ... More Documents & Publications Savings and Economic Impacts of the Better Buildings ...

  3. Measuring the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency - Methodologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measuring the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency - Methodologies and the NYC Example Measuring the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency - Methodologies and the NYC Example ...

  4. Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) ...

  5. Environmental Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development at Existing Dams Environmental Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development at Existing Dams This report describes the ...

  6. IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program Results for CY2009 IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program Results for CY2009 PDF icon ...

  7. Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA309 Reviewers Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA309 Reviewers The ...

  8. Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PRIME Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by...

  9. NREL: Technology Deployment - Market Impact Newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impact is NREL's Technology Deployment newsletter that reports on the impact NREL's is making toward a clean energy future by working with industry and government agencies to...

  10. Information Concerning Reliability Impacts under Various System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Concerning Reliability Impacts under Various System Configurations of the Mirant Potomac River Plant Information Concerning Reliability Impacts under Various System Configurations...

  11. Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability...

  12. Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    September 22, 2006 EIS-0374: Final Environmental Impact Statement Klondike IIIBiglow Canyon Wind Integration Project August 1, 2006 EIS-0383: Draft Environmental Impact Statement...

  13. Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Statement Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah September 3, 2004 EIS-0346: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Salmon...

  14. Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. You are accessing a...

  15. Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart The Status Chart provides the...

  16. Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SWEIS Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement We analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with Laboratory operations and facilities. Contact Environmental...

  17. EIS-0377: Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Statement EIS-0377: Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project In May 2006, Western Area Power...

  18. Employment Impacts of Geothermal Electric Projects (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Employment Impacts of Geothermal Electric Projects Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Employment Impacts of Geothermal Electric Projects You are accessing a document...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: News: Economic Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Working with Sandia Economic Impact Sandia National Laboratories has a robust and widespread economic impact. Spending by the Labs exceeds 2...

  20. Analysis of Environmental Impacts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Selected documents on the Analysis of Environmental Impacts under NEPA. October 3, 1984 Policy and Procedures for the Review of Federal Actions Impacting the Environment This...

  1. ORISE Health Communication and Training: Contact Us

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Us Marcus Weseman Senior Associate Director; Health, Energy and Environment Work: 865.576.3420 health.communication@orau.org or technical.training@orau.org...

  2. Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy establishes Departmental expectations for worker safety and health through the development of rules, directives and guidance.

  3. EPA -- Addressing Children's Health through Reviews Conducted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addressing Children's Health through Reviews Conducted Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act and Section 309 of the Clean Air Act EPA -- Addressing Children's Health ...

  4. Memorandum, Health and Safety Training Reciprocity Program -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health and Safety Training Reciprocity Program - July 12, 2013 Memorandum, Health and Safety Training Reciprocity Program - July 12, 2013 July 12, 2013 The HSS reciprocity program ...

  5. ORISE Resources: Consumer Health Resource Information Service...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumer Health Resource Information Service (CHRIS) guide The Consumer Health Resource Information Service (CHRIS) guide for faith-based organizations and communities was...

  6. Safety & Occupational Health Specialist | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    & Occupational Health Specialist Safety & Occupational Health Specialist Submitted by admin on Sat, 2015-10-17 00:14 Job Summary Organization Name Department Of Energy Agency...

  7. ORISE: Resources for Worker Health Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Worker health studies reports, articles and books Worker Health Resources Resources produced by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) consist of...

  8. Assessment of mercury health risks to adults from coal combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipfert, F.W.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.; DePhillips, M.P.; Viren, J.; Saroff, L.

    1994-05-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is preparing, for the U.S. Congress, a report evaluating the need to regulate mercury (Hg) emissions from electric utilities. This study, to be completed in 1995, will have important health and economic implications. In support of these efforts, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, sponsored a risk assessment project at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to evaluate methylmercury (MeHg) hazards independently. In the BNL study, health risks to adults resulting from Hg emissions from a hypothetical 1000 MW{sub e} coal-fired power plant were estimated using probabilistic risk assessment techniques. The approach draws on the extant knowledge in each of the important steps in the calculation chain from emissions to health effects. Estimated results at key points in the chain were compared with actual measurements to help validate the modeled estimates. Two cases were considered: the baseline case (no local impacts), and the impact case (maximum local power-plant impact). The BNL study showed that the effects of emissions of a single power plant may double the background exposures to MeHg resulting from consuming fish obtained from a localized area near the power plant. Many implicit and explicit sources of uncertainty exist in this analysis. Those that appear to be most in need of improvement include data on doses and responses for potentially sensitive subpopulations (e.g., fetal exposures). Rather than considering hypothetical situations, it would also be preferable to assess the risks associated with actual coal-fired power plants and the nearby sensitive water bodies and susceptible subpopulations. Finally, annual total Hg emissions from coal burning and from other anthropogenic sources are still uncertain; this makes it difficult to estimate the effects of U.S. coal burning on global Hg concentration levels, especially over the long term.

  9. Individual Differences in Human Reliability Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey C. Joe; Ronald L. Boring

    2014-06-01

    While human reliability analysis (HRA) methods include uncertainty in quantification, the nominal model of human error in HRA typically assumes that operator performance does not vary significantly when they are given the same initiating event, indicators, procedures, and training, and that any differences in operator performance are simply aleatory (i.e., random). While this assumption generally holds true when performing routine actions, variability in operator response has been observed in multiple studies, especially in complex situations that go beyond training and procedures. As such, complexity can lead to differences in operator performance (e.g., operator understanding and decision-making). Furthermore, psychological research has shown that there are a number of known antecedents (i.e., attributable causes) that consistently contribute to observable and systematically measurable (i.e., not random) differences in behavior. This paper reviews examples of individual differences taken from operational experience and the psychological literature. The impact of these differences in human behavior and their implications for HRA are then discussed. We propose that individual differences should not be treated as aleatory, but rather as epistemic. Ultimately, by understanding the sources of individual differences, it is possible to remove some epistemic uncertainty from analyses.

  10. JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 High

  11. JC3 Low Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 Low

  12. JC3 Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 Medium

  13. National Environmental Health Association position on global climate change adopted July 2, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radtke, T.; Gist, G.L.; Wittkopf, T.E.

    1997-11-01

    The National Environmental Health Association (NEHA) supports the precept that anthropogenic sources, specifically greenhouse gases, are responsible for a significant portion of the measured change in global climate. Further, NEHA supports the concept of an association between global warming and an increased risk to public health. Reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere will benefit human health. This position paper reviews current information on the status of global climate change with particular emphasis on the implications for environmental and public health. It is intended to be used as a basis from which environmental and public health practitioners and colleagues in related fields can initiate discussions with policy makers at all levels -- local, state, national, and worldwide.

  14. International Symposium on Clusters and Nanostructures (Energy, Environment, and Health)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jena, Puru

    2011-11-10

    The international Symposium on Clusters and Nanostructures was held in Richmond, Virginia during November 7-10, 2011. The symposium focused on the roles clusters and nanostructures play in solving outstanding problems in clean and sustainable energy, environment, and health; three of the most important issues facing science and society. Many of the materials issues in renewable energies, environmental impacts of energy technologies as well as beneficial and toxicity issues of nanoparticles in health are intertwined. Realizing that both fundamental and applied materials issues require a multidisciplinary approach the symposium provided a forum by bringing researchers from physics, chemistry, materials science, and engineering fields to share their ideas and results, identify outstanding problems, and develop new collaborations. Clean and sustainable energy sessions addressed challenges in production, storage, conversion, and efficiency of renewable energies such as solar, wind, bio, thermo-electric, and hydrogen. Environmental issues dealt with air- and water-pollution and conservation, environmental remediation and hydrocarbon processing. Topics in health included therapeutic and diagnostic methods as well as health hazards attributed to nanoparticles. Cross-cutting topics such as reactions, catalysis, electronic, optical, and magnetic properties were also covered.

  15. Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project, Morrow County, Oregon: Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-01-01

    BPA is considering whether to transfer (wheel) electrical power from a proposed privately-owned, combustion-turbine electrical generation plant in Oregon. The plant would be fired by natural gas and would use combined-cycle technology to generate up to 440 average megawatts (aMW) of energy. The plant would be developed, owned, and operated by Portland General Electric Company (PGE). The project would be built in eastern Oregon, just east of the City of Boardman in Morrow County. The proposed plant would be built on a site within the Port of Morrow Industrial Park. The proposed use for the site is consistent with the County land use plan. Building the transmission line needed to interconnect the power plant to BPA`s transmission system would require a variance from Morrow County. BPA would transfer power from the plant to its McNary-Slatt 500-kV transmission line. PGE would pay BPA for wheeling services. Key environmental concerns identified in the scoping process and evaluated in the draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) include these potential impacts: (1) air quality impacts, such as emissions and their contributions to the {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} effect; (2) health and safety impacts, such as effects of electric and magnetic fields, (3) noise impacts, (4) farmland impacts, (5) water vapor impacts to transportation, (6) economic development and employment impacts, (7) visual impacts, (8) consistency with local comprehensive plans, and (9) water quality and supply impacts, such as the amount of wastewater discharged, and the source and amount of water required to operate the plant. These and other issues are discussed in the DEIS. The proposed project includes features designed to reduce environmental impacts. Based on studies completed for the DEIS, adverse environmental impacts associated with the proposed project were identified, and no evidence emerged to suggest that the proposed action is controversial.

  16. Hyaluronan in human malignancies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sironen, R.K.; Department of Pathology, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, FI-70211 Kuopio ; Tammi, M.; Tammi, R.; Auvinen, P.K.; Anttila, M.; Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, FI-70211 Kuopio ; Kosma, V-M.

    2011-02-15

    Hyaluronan, a major macropolysaccharide in the extracellular matrix of connective tissues, is intimately involved in the biology of cancer. Hyaluronan accumulates into the stroma of various human tumors and modulates intracellular signaling pathways, cell proliferation, motility and invasive properties of malignant cells. Experimental and clinicopathological evidence highlights the importance of hyaluronan in tumor growth and metastasis. A high stromal hyaluronan content is associated with poorly differentiated tumors and aggressive clinical behavior in human adenocarcinomas. Instead, the squamous cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas tend to have a reduced hyaluronan content. In addition to the stroma-cancer cell interaction, hyaluronan can influence stromal cell recruitment, tumor angiogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Hyaluronan receptors, hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronan degrading enzymes, hyaluronidases, are involved in the modulation of cancer progression, depending on the tumor type. Furthermore, intracellular signaling and angiogenesis are affected by the degradation products of hyaluronan. Hyaluronan has also therapeutic implications since it is involved in multidrug resistance.

  17. EA-0896: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center- West Virginia University

  18. EA-0970: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory Project No. 94-AA-01 Pantex Plant Amarillo, TX

  19. EA-1329: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wildfire Hazard Reduction and Forest Health Improvement Program, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

  20. First Steps Towards Tribal Weatherization: Human Capacity Development

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Towards Tribal Weatherization: Human Capacity Development October 2011 October 2011 Cook Inlet Tribal Council's Weatherization Apprenticeship October 2011 March 2010 - March 2012 Cook Inlet Tribal Council Vision October 2011 "To minimize our impacts to the environment by reducing global warming through energy efficiencies in existing and new buildings and an improved transportation system for tribal members." CITC Weatherization Apprenticeship October 2011 Overview: Weatherization

  1. First Steps Towards Tribal Weatherization: Human Capacity Development

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Steps Towards tribal weatherization: human capacity development October 2010 - Cook Inlet Tribal Council Weatherization Apprenticeship March 2010 February 2012 Cook Inlet Tribal Council Vision "To minimize our impacts to the environment by reducing global warming through energy efficiencies in existing and new buildings and an improved transportation system for tribal members." CITC Weatherization Apprenticeship Overview: Weatherization improvement services will be provided to Native

  2. Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs - Human Capacity Building

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Grant DE-PS36-06G096038 Human Capacity Building for Renewable Energy Development. Warm Spring Power and Water Enterprise Mark K. Johnson Jr. Prepared by: Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises Project Goals * To build a knowledge base within the tribal community regarding renewable energy development. * To educate the tribal community regarding energy development processes & impacts to reservation lands when developing renewable energy projects * Defining the benefits of renewable

  3. EIS-0288: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor

  4. Supply Impacts of an MTBE Ban

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyzes the supply impacts of removing methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) from gasoline.

  5. Submitting Environmental Impact Statements | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Submitting Environmental Impact Statements Submitting Environmental Impact Statements Guidance from the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Federal Activities on the filing of EISs. PDF icon Submitting Environmental Impact Statements More Documents & Publications EIS-0470: EPA Amended Notice of Adoption EPA -- Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance (2012) Frequently Asked Questions on Filing EISs with EPA's Office of Federal Activities

  6. Environment, Safety and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-01-01

    To ensure timely collection, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of information on environment, safety, and health issues as required by law or regulations or as needed to ensure that the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration are kept fully informed on a timely basis about events that could adversely affect the health and safety of the public or the workers, the environment, the intended purpose of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE O 210.1, DOE O 231.1, DOE O 232.1A. Canceled by DOE O 231.1B. DOE O 231.1B cancels all portions pertaining to environment, safety, and health reporting. Occurrence reporting and processing of operations information provisions remain in effect until January 1, 2012.

  7. Documentation of cumulative impacts in environmental impact statements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, T.A.; Canter, L.W.

    1997-11-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations in the United States require federal agencies to apply an environmental impact assessment (EIA) in decision-making related to their actions. One aspect requires an examination of direct, indirect and cumulative impacts (CIs). Historically, cumulative impact assessment (CIA) has been given limited attention in EIA and resultant environmental impact statements (EISs), not because of its lack of importance, but owing to limitations in methodologies and procedures, including documentation consistency. The objectives of this study were to identify deficiencies in the documentation of CIs and CIA in EISs and to formulate appropriate recommendations (potential solutions) related to such deficiencies. The study involved the systematic review of 33 EISs. The results indicate that improvements have been made in documentation practices since 1990; however, inconsistencies and inadequacies still exist. Therefore, the following recommendations were developed: (1) CIs should be reported in a separate part of the Environmental Consequences section, and they should be addressed for each pertinent environmental resource; (2) a summary of CIs should be included; (3) any CIs considered not significant should be mentioned plus the reason(s) for their non-significance; (4) spatial and temporal boundaries addressed within the CIA process should be defined for pertinent environmental resources; and (5) utilized guidelines and methodologies should be described.

  8. Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

  9. Program Impacts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About the Solid-State Lighting Program » Program Impacts Program Impacts The 230-plus solid-state lighting R&D projects DOE has funded since 2000 have resulted in more than 245 patents applied for or awarded and a huge industry footprint, with literally millions of SSL products currently on the market that are based on at least some DOE-funded R&D. Those products have contributed to more than $2.8 billion in energy savings so far-a remarkable return on the total DOE SSL program

  10. Impact Pilots | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Pilots Impact Pilots Dr. David Danielson announces that NREL will be the leading lab of a newly funded Lab-Corps Pilot program Dr. David Danielson announces that NREL will be the leading lab of a newly funded Lab-Corps Pilot program Dr. David Danielson, Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy announces that NREL will be the Leading lab of a newly funded Lab Core Pilot program, at a keynote speech at the 27th Industry Growth Forum in

  11. Where Are We Heading in Nanotechnology Environmental Health and Safety and Materials Characterization?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nel, Andre; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Chan, Warren C.; Xia, Tian; Hersam, Mark C.; Brinker, C. J.; Zink, Jeffery I.; Pinkerton, Kent E.; Baer, Donald R.; Weiss, Paul S.

    2015-06-23

    Every chemist, material scientist, physicist, engineer, or commercial enterprise involved in the synthesis and/or production of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) or nano-enabled products aspires to develop safe materials. Nanotechnology environmental health and safety (nanoEHS) is a research discipline that involves the study of the possible adverse health and biological effects that nanomaterials may have on humans and environmental organisms and ecosystems. NanoEHS research has provided a body of experimental evidence indicating the possibility of hazardous outcomes as a result of the interactions of unique ENM physicochemical properties with similar scale processes occurring at a wide range of nano/bio interfaces, including at biomolecular, cellular, subcellular, organ, systemic, whole organism, or ecosystems levels. This projected hazard and risk potential warrants rigorous attention to safety assessment, safe use, safe implementation, benign design, regulatory oversight, governance, and public awareness to address the possibility and prevention of nanotoxicity, now or at any time in the future.1 Thus, we should understand the properties of the ENMs that are responsible for the toxicological response, so that we can re-engineer their physicochemical characteristics for risk prevention and safer ENM design.2 However, in spite of widespread use, no human toxicological disease or major environmental impact has been reported for ENMs. Thus, while Nanotoxicology is a thriving sub-discipline of Nano-EHS, the use of the root word toxicology may elicit a feeling that nanomaterials are inherently toxic despite the fact that toxicity has not been established in real-life use so far. As a community, we may want to rename this sub-discipline as Nanosafety, since the objective is to use toxicology information to guide the design of safer nanomaterials for use in medicine, biology, electronics, lighting systems, etc. At ACS Nano, we are interested in publishing articles and forward-looking Perspectives and Reviews that determine and establish ENM physicochemical properties, structure-activity relationships, catalytic effects at the nano/bio interface, mechanistic injury responses, in vitro to in vivo prediction making, safer-by design strategies, actionable screening and detection methods, hazard and risk ranking, fate and transport, ENM categorization, theory and modeling, societal implications, and regulatory/governance decisions.3 Context is important in the immediate and longer-range impact of this research, as we are interested in realistic nanoEHS exposure scenarios conducted with systematic variation of ENM physicochemical properties rather than investigations of a single or a limited number of materials in isolated in vitro studies that only address cytotoxicity at unrealistic doses. In order to make these data useful for researchers, government and regulatory agencies, and other interested parties, these studies, where possible, should include either appropriate positive and negative controls or benchmark materials to answer the important question, as compared to what? Dosimetry should be explained in terms of appropriate dose metrics relative to the type of materials, their mechanisms of injury, and exposure conditions, using in vitro to in vivo extrapolations where possible. Another important component of these studies includes appropriate physicochemical characterization of the nanomaterials.

  12. Multi-parameter in vitro toxicity testing of crizotinib, sunitinib, erlotinib, and nilotinib in human cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, Kimberly R.; Wappel, Robert L.; Talbert, Dominique R.; Trusk, Patricia B.; Moran, Diarmuid M.; Kramer, James W.; Brown, Arthur M.; Shell, Scott A.; Bacus, Sarah

    2013-10-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKi) have greatly improved the treatment and prognosis of multiple cancer types. However, unexpected cardiotoxicity has arisen in a subset of patients treated with these agents that was not wholly predicted by pre-clinical testing, which centers around animal toxicity studies and inhibition of the human Ether--go-go-Related Gene (hERG) channel. Therefore, we sought to determine whether a multi-parameter test panel assessing the effect of drug treatment on cellular, molecular, and electrophysiological endpoints could accurately predict cardiotoxicity. We examined how 4 FDA-approved TKi agents impacted cell viability, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, metabolic status, impedance, and ion channel function in human cardiomyocytes. The 3 drugs clinically associated with severe cardiac adverse events (crizotinib, sunitinib, nilotinib) all proved to be cardiotoxic in our in vitro tests while the relatively cardiac-safe drug erlotinib showed only minor changes in cardiac cell health. Crizotinib, an ALK/MET inhibitor, led to increased ROS production, caspase activation, cholesterol accumulation, disruption in cardiac cell beat rate, and blockage of ion channels. The multi-targeted TKi sunitinib showed decreased cardiomyocyte viability, AMPK inhibition, increased lipid accumulation, disrupted beat pattern, and hERG block. Nilotinib, a second generation Bcr-Abl inhibitor, led to increased ROS generation, caspase activation, hERG block, and an arrhythmic beat pattern. Thus, each drug showed a unique toxicity profile that may reflect the multiple mechanisms leading to cardiotoxicity. This study demonstrates that a multi-parameter approach can provide a robust characterization of drug-induced cardiomyocyte damage that can be leveraged to improve drug safety during early phase development. - Highlights: TKi with known adverse effects show unique cardiotoxicity profiles in this panel. Crizotinib increases ROS, apoptosis, and cholesterol as well as alters beat rate. Sunitinib inhibits AMPK, increases lipids and alters the cardiac beat pattern. Nilotinib causes ROS and caspase activation, decreased lipids and arrhythmia. Erlotinib did not impact ROS, caspase, or lipid levels or affect the beat pattern.

  13. Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-08-19

    To ensure timely collection, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of information on environment, safety, and health issues as required by law or regulations or as needed to ensure that the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) are kept fully informed on a timely basis about events that could adversely affect the health and safety of the public or the workers, the environment, the intended purpose of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE O 210.1, DOE O 231.1, and DOE O 232.1A. Canceled by DOE O 232.2.

  14. Environmental, safety, and health engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodside, G.; Kocurek, D.

    1997-12-31

    A complete guide to environmental, safety, and health engineering, including an overview of EPA and OSHA regulations; principles of environmental engineering, including pollution prevention, waste and wastewater treatment and disposal, environmental statistics, air emissions and abatement engineering, and hazardous waste storage and containment; principles of safety engineering, including safety management, equipment safety, fire and life safety, process and system safety, confined space safety, and construction safety; and principles of industrial hygiene/occupational health engineering including chemical hazard assessment, personal protective equipment, industrial ventilation, ionizing and nonionizing radiation, noise, and ergonomics.

  15. Human Factors Engineering Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-03-04

    HFE-AT is a human factors engineering (HFE) software analysis tool (AT) for human-system interface design of process control systems, and is based primarily on NUREG-0700 guidance.

  16. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723).DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations:Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho;Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  17. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 15001508), and DOEs NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOEs Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  18. Environmental Impact Statement | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impact Statements DOE/EIS-0473 - W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project Notice of Intent (November 2011) Draft Environmental Impact Statement (September 2012) Final Environmental Impact Statement (February 2013) Record of Decision (May 2013) Mitigation Action Plan (June 2013) DOE/EIS-0464 - Lake Charles CCS Project Notice of Intent (April 2011) Draft Environmental Impact Statement (April 2013) Final Environmental Impact Statement (November 2013) Record of Decision

  19. WINDExchange: Jobs and Economic Development Impact Models

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Deployment Activities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Regional Resource Centers Economic Development Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Resources & Tools Siting Jobs and Economic Development Impact Models JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Fact Sheet PDF The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation at the local and state levels. Based on

  20. High Impact Technology HQ | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Impact Technology Catalyst » High Impact Technology HQ High Impact Technology HQ High Impact Technology HQ Home Resources for Evaluators -- Site Evaluation Checklists, General M&V Plans, General Templates Host a Site -- Current Opportunities for Owners and Operators Provide Information About Technologies -- Open Opportunities, Upcoming Events, Prioritization Tool Input Form Results -- Technology Highlights, Case Studies, Final Technical Reports, Market Stimulation Activities The High Impact

  1. ORISE: Protecting Human Subjects Website

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protecting Human Subjects Website Institutions that engage in human subjects research are required by federal policy to establish an institutional review board (IRB) to ensure that risks to human subjects in research are minimal and to provide protection with respect to the rights and welfare of research subjects. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) administers the Oak Ridge Sitewide Institutional Review Board (ORSIRB) and manages the ORISE Human Subjects website. The

  2. Worker Safety and Health | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety and Health Worker Safety and Health The Departmental expectations for worker safety and health are contained in a set of rules, directives, and technical standards developed by the Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy. These policies were developed to ensure workers are adequately protected from the various radiological and non-radiological hazards associated with DOE sites and operations and reflect national worker safety and health laws, regulations, and standards where applicable.

  3. Emergency Support Function #8 … Public Health and Medical Services Annex

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex June 2008 Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex NUC-1 Coordinating Agency: Department of Defense Department of Energy Department of Homeland Security Environmental Protection Agency National Aeronautics and Space Administration Nuclear Regulatory Commission Cooperating Agencies: Department of Agriculture Department of Commerce Department of Defense Department of Energy Department of Health and Human Services Department of Homeland Security Department of the

  4. Human Capital Management Accountability Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-08-01

    The Order establishes requirements, roles and responsibilities for the Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP) for human resources programs and personnel and ensures that human capital activities are regulatory and procedurally compliant with Federal statutes and Departmental policies. Does not cancel other directives.

  5. Ultrasonic-impact grinder system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Calkins, N.C.

    1982-09-30

    The disclosure relates to an ultrasonic impact grinding apparatus utilizing a counterweight to set an unloaded friction free condition. An added weight is used to optimize feed rate in accordance with the material to be cut, tool size and the like.

  6. Office of Economic Impact and Diversity 2003 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2004-05-01

    This report covers a one-year period in which the Office successfully completed several major activities. The Office of Economic Impact and Diversity (ED) is responsible for the development and implementation of Department-wide polices in the areas of small business, diversity and minority economic development. ED oversees civil rights laws, rules, and regulations, and establishes Department-wide civil rights policy. Additionally, ED promotes excellence in the workplace and adheres to the objectives stated below relative to the Presidents Management Agenda (PMA): Strategic management of human capital; Competitive sourcing; Improved financial performance; Expanded electronic government, and Budget and performance integration

  7. Impact of Radiation Biology on Fundamental Insights in Biology

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Setlow, Richard B.

    1982-07-27

    Research supported by OHER [Office of Health and Environmental Research] and its predecessors has as one of its major goals an understanding of the effects of radiation at low doses and dose rates on biological systems, so as to predict their effects on humans. It is not possible to measure such effects directly. They must be predicted from basic knowledge on how radiation affects cellular components such as DNA and membranes and how cells react to such changes. What is the probability of radiation producing human mutations and what are the probabilities of radiation producing cancer? The end results of such studies are radiation exposure standards for workers and for the general population. An extension of these goals is setting standards for exposure to chemicals involved in various energy technologies. This latter problem is much more difficult because chemical dosimetry is a primitive state compared to radiation dosimetry.

  8. Environment, Safety and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-27

    The order addresses DOE/NNSA receiving timely, accurate information about events that have affected or could adversely affect the health, safety and security of the public or workers, the environment, the operations of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Admin Chg 1, dated 11-28-12, Supersedes DOE O 231.1B.

  9. Human Genome Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The DOE Human Genome program has grown tremendously, as shown by the marked increase in the number of genome-funded projects since the last workshop held in 1991. The abstracts in this book describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors and invited guests, and all projects are represented at the workshop by posters. The 3-day meeting includes plenary sessions on ethical, legal, and social issues pertaining to the availability of genetic data; sequencing techniques, informatics support; and chromosome and cDNA mapping and sequencing.

  10. Human portable preconcentrator system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Bouchier, Francis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Hannum, David W. (Albuquerque, NM); Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01

    A preconcentrator system and apparatus suited to human portable use wherein sample potentially containing a target chemical substance is drawn into a chamber and through a pervious screen. The screen is adapted to capture target chemicals and then, upon heating, to release those chemicals into the chamber. Chemicals captured and then released in this fashion are then carried to a portable chemical detection device such as a portable ion mobility spectrometer. In the preferred embodiment, the means for drawing sample into the chamber comprises a reversible fan which, when operated in reverse direction, creates a backpressure that facilitates evolution of captured target chemicals into the chamber when the screen is heated.

  11. HUMAN MACHINE COOPERATIVE TELEROBOTICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William R. Hamel; Spivey Douglass; Sewoong Kim; Pamela Murray; Yang Shou; Sriram Sridharan; Ge Zhang; Scott Thayer; Rajiv V. Dubey

    2003-06-30

    The remediation and deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear waste storage tanks using telerobotics is one of the most challenging tasks faced in environmental cleanup. Since a number of tanks have reached the end of their design life and some of them have leaks, the unstructured, uncertain and radioactive environment makes the work inefficient and expensive. However, the execution time of teleoperation consumes ten to hundred times that of direct contact with an associated loss in quality. Thus, a considerable effort has been expended to improve the quality and efficiency of telerobotics by incorporating into teleoperation and robotic control functions such as planning, trajectory generation, vision, and 3-D modeling. One example is the Robot Task Space Analyzer (RTSA), which has been developed at the Robotics and Electromechanical Systems Laboratory (REMSL) at the University of Tennessee in support of the D&D robotic work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This system builds 3-D models of the area of interest in task space through automatic image processing and/or human interactive manual modeling. The RTSA generates a task plan file, which describes the execution of a task including manipulator and tooling motions. The high level controller of the manipulator interprets the task plan file and executes the task automatically. Thus, if the environment is not highly unstructured, a tooling task, which interacts with environment, will be executed in the autonomous mode. Therefore, the RTSA not only increases the system efficiency, but also improves the system reliability because the operator will act as backstop for safe operation after the 3-D models and task plan files are generated. However, unstructured conditions of environment and tasks necessitate that the telerobot operates in the teleoperation mode for successful execution of task. The inefficiency in the teleoperation mode led to the research described as Human Machine Cooperative Telerobotics (HMCTR). The HMCTR combines the telerobot with robotic control techniques to improve the system efficiency and reliability in teleoperation mode. In this topical report, the control strategy, configuration and experimental results of Human Machines Cooperative Telerobotics (HMCTR), which modifies and limits the commands of human operator to follow the predefined constraints in the teleoperation mode, is described. The current implementation is a laboratory-scale system that will be incorporated into an engineering-scale system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the future.

  12. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative.

  13. Assessing the Importance and Impact of Glycomics and Glycosciences Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolandz, Dorothy

    2013-02-07

    Glycans form one of the four basic classes of macromolecules in living systems, along with nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids. They are composed of individual sugar units that can be linked to one another in multiple ways, enabling them to form complex three-dimensional structures. In living systems, glycans are involved in myriad processes that are part of normal cellular physiology, development, and signaling, as well as in the development of both chronic and infectious diseases. Because of their ubiquity on cell surfaces, they are key components of biological interfaces and are involved in molecular recognition and signaling. They are also important molecules in cell adhesion and cell movement. Meanwhile, glycans on proteins inside cells participate in the cells responses to incoming signals, for example by helping to modulate gene expression and protein functions. Glycan polymers such as cellulose are important components of plant cell walls. Understanding how such walls are assembled and how they can be deconstructed is fundamental to basic plant biology, but also in the development of applications such as efficient conversion of biomass into fuels. Glycan polymers derived from plants and other organisms can also serve as sources of new materials with wide-ranging applications from tissue engineering scaffolds to flexible electronic displays. Achieving an understanding of the structures and functions of glycans is fundamental to understanding biology. The National Research Council report resulting from this project, Transforming Glycoscience: A Roadmap for the Future, discusses the impact glycoscience can have across health, energy, and materials science and lays out a roadmap of research goals whose achievement could help the field become a widely-recognized and integrated discipline rather than a niche area studied by a small number of specialists. Despite advances, gaps remain in the current suite of tools for investigating glycans and these tools often require expert users and facilities, presenting a barrier for many investigators. The field is poised to benefit from the pursuit of the framework laid out in the study, which incorporates not only human physiology and health but also plant, animal, and microbial research and efforts to improve tools for synthesis, analysis, data management, and other fundamental research infrastructure.

  14. Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP) Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP) Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP) is an online ...

  15. Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SAND2013-3108C

  16. Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  17. Sick of Soot: The Public Health and Economic Impacts of Diesel Pollution in California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Union of Concerned Scientists

  18. Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    magnetic resonance imaging to create images of injured soft tissues, such as the brain. ... of injured soft tissues, such as the brain. - 122015 The Los Alamos team's model is ...

  19. Exposure Based Health Issues Project Report: Phase I of High Level Tank Operations, Retrieval, Pretreatment, and Vitrification Exposure Based Health Issues Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.; Bowers, Harold N.; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Brady, William H.; Ladue, Buffi; Samuels, Joseph K.

    2001-11-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has the responsibility to understand the ''big picture'' of worker health and safety which includes fully recognizing the vulnerabilities and associated programs necessary to protect workers at the various DOE sites across the complex. Exposure analysis and medical surveillance are key aspects for understanding this big picture, as is understanding current health and safety practices and how they may need to change to relate to future health and safety management needs. The exposure-based health issues project was initiated to assemble the components necessary to understand potential exposure situations and their medical surveillance and clinical aspects. Phase I focused only on current Hanford tank farm operations and serves as a starting point for the overall project. It is also anticipated that once the pilot is fully developed for Hanford HLW (i.e., current operations, retrieval, pretreatment, vitrification, and disposal), the process and analysis methods developed will be available and applicable for other DOE operations and sites. The purpose of this Phase I project report is to present the health impact information collected regarding ongoing tank waste maintenance operations, show the various aspects of health and safety involved in protecting workers, introduce the reader to the kinds of information that will need to be analyzed in order to effectively manage worker safety.

  20. Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard

    2013-07-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

  1. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy: Human error and critical tasks in remote afterloading brachytherapy and approaches for improved system performance. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callan, J.R.; Kelly, R.T.; Quinn, M.L.

    1995-05-01

    Remote Afterloading Brachytherapy (RAB) is a medical process used in the treatment of cancer. RAB uses a computer-controlled device to remotely insert and remove radioactive sources close to a target (or tumor) in the body. Some RAB problems affecting the radiation dose to the patient have been reported and attributed to human error. To determine the root cause of human error in the RAB system, a human factors team visited 23 RAB treatment sites in the US The team observed RAB treatment planning and delivery, interviewed RAB personnel, and performed walk-throughs, during which staff demonstrated the procedures and practices used in performing RAB tasks. Factors leading to human error in the RAB system were identified. The impact of those factors on the performance of RAB was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance. Finally, the project identified and evaluated alternative approaches for resolving the safety significant problems related to human error.

  2. Human subjects research handbook: Protecting human research subjects. Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-30

    This handbook serves as a guide to understanding and implementing the Federal regulations and US DOE Orders established to protect human research subjects. Material in this handbook is directed towards new and continuing institutional review board (IRB) members, researchers, institutional administrators, DOE officials, and others who may be involved or interested in human subjects research. It offers comprehensive overview of the various requirements, procedures, and issues relating to human subject research today.

  3. EA-0856: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Construction and Operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Berkeley, California

  4. Impacts of Advanced Combustion Engines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impacts of Advanced Combustion Engines This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information VSS140 2015 U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting June 9, 2015 Principal Investigators: Scott Curran, Presenter Zhiming Gao, David Smith, Stuart Daw 2 ORNL - 2015 VSS 140 AMR OVERVIEW Timeline * Project start date: Oct. 2013 * Project end date: Continuing * Activity scope changes to

  5. FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COMMERCIAL DEMONSTRATION OF THE MANUFACTURED AGGREGATE PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY UTILIZING SPRAY DRYER ASH 1 AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1449, to analyze the potential environmental consequences of participating in a cooperative agreement with Universal Aggregates, LLC, for the design, construction, and operation of a plant to manufacture lightweight aggregates. The

  6. Environmental Impacts of Smart Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Impacts of Smart Grid January 10, 2011 DOE/NETL-2010/1428 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use

  7. Our Impact | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our Impact Argonne is the largest federally funded R&D center in Illinois and the entire Midwest. For 65 years, our scientific and engineering research has helped drive the region's economic growth and bring high-tech workers into the state. Today, as the United States faces major challenges in energy, environment and national security, research at Argonne fuels the economic competitiveness of Illinois, the Midwest and beyond. Our goal is to ignite an innovation ecology that strengthens

  8. Health and Environmental Research: summary of accomplishments. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    This is an account of some of the accomplishments of the health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Both direct and indirect societal benefits emerged from the new knowledge provided by the health and environmental research program. In many cases, the private sector took this knowledge and applied it well beyond the mission of supporting the defense and energy needs of the Nation. Industrial and medical applications, for example, have in several instances provided annual savings to society of $100 million or more. The form of this presentation is, in fact, through ''snapshots'' - examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of the areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The program's worth is not necessarily confined to such accomplishments; it extends, rather, to its ability to identify and help solve potential health and environmental problems before they become critical. This anticipatory mission has been pursued with an approach that combines applied problem solving with a commitment to fundamental research that is long-term and high-risk. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  9. Health and Environmental Research: Summary of Accomplishments. Volume 2

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    1986-08-01

    This is an account of some of the accomplishments of the health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Both direct and indirect societal benefits emerged from the new knowledge provided by the health and environmental research program. In many cases, the private sector took this knowledge and applied it well beyond the mission of supporting the defense and energy needs of the Nation. Industrial and medical applications, for example, have in several instances provided annual savings to society of $100 million or more. The form of this presentation is, in fact, through "snapshots" - examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of the areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The program's worth is not necessarily confined to such accomplishments; it extends, rather, to its ability to identify and help solve potential health and environmental problems before they become critical. This anticipatory mission has been pursued with an approach that combines applied problem solving with a commitment to fundamental research that is long-term and high-risk. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  10. Human Reliability Program Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landers, John; Rogers, Erin; Gerke, Gretchen

    2014-05-18

    A Human Reliability Program (HRP) is designed to protect national security as well as worker and public safety by continuously evaluating the reliability of those who have access to sensitive materials, facilities, and programs. Some elements of a site HRP include systematic (1) supervisory reviews, (2) medical and psychological assessments, (3) management evaluations, (4) personnel security reviews, and (4) training of HRP staff and critical positions. Over the years of implementing an HRP, the Department of Energy (DOE) has faced various challenges and overcome obstacles. During this 4-day activity, participants will examine programs that mitigate threats to nuclear security and the insider threat to include HRP, Nuclear Security Culture (NSC) Enhancement, and Employee Assistance Programs. The focus will be to develop an understanding of the need for a systematic HRP and to discuss challenges and best practices associated with mitigating the insider threat.

  11. Human-computer interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2004-12-21

    The present invention provides a method of human-computer interfacing. Force feedback allows intuitive navigation and control near a boundary between regions in a computer-represented space. For example, the method allows a user to interact with a virtual craft, then push through the windshield of the craft to interact with the virtual world surrounding the craft. As another example, the method allows a user to feel transitions between different control domains of a computer representation of a space. The method can provide for force feedback that increases as a user's locus of interaction moves near a boundary, then perceptibly changes (e.g., abruptly drops or changes direction) when the boundary is traversed.

  12. Human portable preconcentrator system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, Kevin L.; Brusseau, Charles A.; Hannum, David W.; Puissant, James G.; Varley, Nathan R.

    2003-08-12

    A preconcentrator system and apparatus suited to human portable use wherein sample potentially containing a target chemical substance is drawn into a chamber and through a pervious screen. The screen is adapted to capture target chemicals and then, upon heating, to release those chemicals into the chamber. Chemicals captured and then released in this fashion are then carried to a portable chemical detection device such as a portable ion mobility spectrometer. In the preferred embodiment, the means for drawing sample into the chamber comprises a reversible fan which, when operated in reverse direction, creates a backpressure that facilitates evolution of captured target chemicals into the chamber when the screen is heated. The screen can be positioned directly in front of the detector prior to heating to improve detection capability.

  13. Human Performance Modeling for Dynamic Human Reliability Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boring, Ronald Laurids; Joe, Jeffrey Clark; Mandelli, Diego

    2015-08-01

    Part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Light Water Reac- tor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Charac- terization (RISMC) Pathway develops approaches to estimating and managing safety margins. RISMC simulations pair deterministic plant physics models with probabilistic risk models. As human interactions are an essential element of plant risk, it is necessary to integrate human actions into the RISMC risk framework. In this paper, we review simulation based and non simulation based human reliability analysis (HRA) methods. This paper summarizes the founda- tional information needed to develop a feasible approach to modeling human in- teractions in RISMC simulations.

  14. Environment, Safety and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-27

    The order addresses DOE/NNSA receiving timely, accurate information about events that have affected or could adversely affect the health, safety and security of the public or workers, the environment, the operations of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE N 234.1. Supersedes DOE O 231.1A Chg 1, DOE M 231.1-1A Chg 2.

  15. Computational Human Performance Modeling For Alarm System Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques Hugo

    2012-07-01

    The introduction of new technologies like adaptive automation systems and advanced alarms processing and presentation techniques in nuclear power plants is already having an impact on the safety and effectiveness of plant operations and also the role of the control room operator. This impact is expected to escalate dramatically as more and more nuclear power utilities embark on upgrade projects in order to extend the lifetime of their plants. One of the most visible impacts in control rooms will be the need to replace aging alarm systems. Because most of these alarm systems use obsolete technologies, the methods, techniques and tools that were used to design the previous generation of alarm system designs are no longer effective and need to be updated. The same applies to the need to analyze and redefine operators alarm handling tasks. In the past, methods for analyzing human tasks and workload have relied on crude, paper-based methods that often lacked traceability. New approaches are needed to allow analysts to model and represent the new concepts of alarm operation and human-system interaction. State-of-the-art task simulation tools are now available that offer a cost-effective and efficient method for examining the effect of operator performance in different conditions and operational scenarios. A discrete event simulation system was used by human factors researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop a generic alarm handling model to examine the effect of operator performance with simulated modern alarm system. It allowed analysts to evaluate alarm generation patterns as well as critical task times and human workload predicted by the system.

  16. Ocean energy resources: the impact of OTEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ditmars, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The status of OTEC technological development is summarized with emphasis on the potential impacts of OTEC power production on the ocean environment, including implications for impacts to climate. (MHR)

  17. Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-11-07

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 231.1, ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY AND HEALTH REPORTING, which establishes management objectives and requirements for reporting environment, safety and health information. Chg 1, 11-7-96.

  18. Environment Safety and Health Reporting Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-30

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 231.1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which establishes management objectives and requirements for reporting environment, safety and health information. Does not cancel other directives.

  19. ORISE: Contact Us | Worker Health Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Us General Information Work: 865.576.3115 occ.health@orise.orau.gov Dr. Donna Cragle Director; Health, Energy and Environment Work: 865.576.3115 Donna.Cragle@orau.org Dr....

  20. Russian Health Studies Program- Program Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Russian Health Studies Program assesses worker and public health risks from radiation exposure resulting from nuclear weapons production activities in the former Soviet Union.

  1. PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request - Idaho National...

  2. Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SWEIS Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement We analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with Laboratory operations and facilities. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement forms the backbone of the National Environmental Policy Act documentation for LANL's continued facility operations. Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement The Site-wide

  3. EIS-0523: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nationwide Public Safety Broadband Network Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Non-Contiguous United States

  4. Partners and Stakeholders: Roles and Potential Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Partners and Stakeholders: Roles and Potential Impact, Chapter 6 from the Clean Energy Finance Guide, Third Edition

  5. Environmental Impact Statement Checklist | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Checklist Environmental Impact Statement Checklist This DOE Environmental Impact Statement Checklist is provided to assist EIS preparers and reviewers in meeting the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). PDF icon Environmental Impact Statement Checklist More Documents & Publications Mini-Guidance Articles from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports, Dec. 1994 to Sept. 2005 Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements

  6. National Laboratory Impact Initiative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Laboratory Impact Initiative National Laboratory Impact Initiative In an effort to better utilize national laboratory resources, DOE's Office of Renewable Energy (EERE) launched the National Laboratory Impact (Lab Impact) Initiative in December 2013. The Initiative emphasizes the importance of commercializing lab work by bringing together leaders from government, academia, the national laboratories, and the private sector to increase understanding and communication for an effective

  7. High Impact Technology Catalyst | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Buildings » High Impact Technology Catalyst High Impact Technology Catalyst High impact technologies (HITs) are cost-effective, underutilized energy-efficient commercial building technologies. Through the High Impact Technology Catalyst program, initiated in 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) identifies and guides HITs through their early market introduction phases, ultimately leading them to the broader market through partnerships with the commercial buildings industry via

  8. ORISE: Human Subjects Research Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Subjects Research Database Section 10, Part 745 of the Code of Federal Regulations and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 443.1 and 481.1 require the maintenance of information on all research projects that involve human subjects and that are funded by DOE, conducted in DOE facilities, performed by DOE personnel or involve DOE or contract personnel. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) maintains the Human Subjects Research Database (HSRD) for the Office of

  9. ORISE: Consumer Health Resource Information Service (CHRIS) ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that disproportionately affect minorities, including: HIVAIDS Cardiovascular disease Diabetes Immunization Cancer Infant mortality ORISE provides health information training for...

  10. Wind Turbine Structural Health Monitoring - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    existing wind farms Applications and Industries Wind turbine structural health monitoring Individual turbine maintenance Wind farm energy production optimization Technology...

  11. Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NEPA/309 Reviewers | Department of Energy Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers The environmental review process under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) provides a valuable opportunity for Federal agency NEPA/309 reviewers to incorporate pollution prevention and environmental impact reduction into actions (or projects). This Environmental

  12. Environmental Impact Statement Summary | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Summary Environmental Impact Statement Summary This DOE guidance is intended to help EIS preparers draft the EIS summary. PDF icon Environmental Impact Statement Summary More Documents & Publications "Frequently Asked Questions" on the Department of Energy's NEPA Regulations EIS-0456: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0245-SA-03: Supplement Analysis

  13. WIPP - Idaho Impacts | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presentation from the 2015 DOE National Cleanup Workshop by Jack Zimmerman, Deputy Manager for the Idaho Cleanup Project, DOE Idaho Operations Office. PDF icon WIPP - Idaho Impacts More Documents & Publications EIS-0200-SA-03: Supplement Analysis EIS-0026-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement How Does the WIPP Shutdown Impact New Mexico, Idaho, and South Carolina

  14. Protection of Human Research Subjects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-07-20

    Changes are made to harmonize the definitions in this Order with those in the Federal regulations for the protection of human subjects (10 CFR Part 745), specifically, splitting the definition "human subject research" into "research" and "human subject," and adopting, verbatim, the definitions of "research" and "human subject" from 10 CFR Part 745 and adding the definition of "generalizable," since the determination of whether a project is "research" in 10 CFR Part 745 hinges on whether the work being conducted is generalizable. Small corrections and updates have been made to the references, links, and organization titles.

  15. 2015 National Tribal Public Health Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Indian Health Board is hosting the 2015 National Tribal Public Health Summit, which is themed, "Strengthening the Circle: Building the Skills of the Tribal Public Health Workforce." The three-day conference features tribal listening sessions, workshops, and guest speakers.

  16. How social impact assessment can contribute to conflict management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prenzel, Paula V. Vanclay, Frank

    2014-02-15

    The potential for conflict is omnipresent in all projects, and even in all human interactions, and conflict itself leads to many second-order social impacts. This article examines the contribution of the methodological approach used in social impact assessment (SIA) to conflict management. We view conflict as a process that has its own dynamic, and is to be expected in all situations. By using game theory (prisoner's dilemma), we describe and conceptualize this process and highlight the importance of communication in managing conflict. We demonstrate the potential use of SIA in preventing, managing and resolving conflict. Emphasis is placed on the participatory character of SIA and the role of public media. In contrast to existing literature, our focus is not restricted to the typical fields of study of SIA (e.g. environmental conflicts), but understands conflict itself as a field of application. In this sense, conflict-sensitive SIA can be understood both as an extension to the SIA tool kit and a broadening of the scope of SIA application. -- Highlights: Conflict is omnipresent and creates both positive and negative social impacts. Conflict itself represents a possible field of application for SIA. Conflict escalation is a process that can be modeled in a game-theoretic framework. There needs to be concerted effort to prevent escalation to avoid harmful outcomes. Conflict-sensitive SIA can support conflict management and sustainable resolution.

  17. Mobile phone and my health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surducan, Aneta [Nicolae Balcescu High School, 6 Constanta St., 400158 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Nicolae Balcescu High School, 6 Constanta St., 400158 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Dabala, Dana [National Railways Medical Clinic,, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Republicii St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Railways Medical Clinic,, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Republicii St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Neamtu, Camelia, E-mail: emanoil.surducan@itim-cj.ro; Surducan, Vasile, E-mail: emanoil.surducan@itim-cj.ro; Surducan, Emanoil, E-mail: emanoil.surducan@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    The interaction of the microwave radiation emitted by mobile phones with the user's body is analyzed from the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) recommendations perspective as a correlation between the specific absorption ratio (SAR) of the mobile phone and the call duration. The relative position of the cell phone to the user's body, the dielectric properties of the exposed body parts, the SAR value and the call duration are considered in the local body temperature rise due to the microwave heating effect. The recommended local temperature rise limit in the human body is evaluated according to standards. The aim of this study is to disseminate information to young people, especially high school students, about the microwave thermal effects on the human body, to make them aware of the environmental electromagnetic pollution and to offer them a simple method of biological self protection.

  18. Report on {open_quotes}inspection of human subject research in intelligence and intelligence-related projects{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-16

    Executive Order 12333, {open_quotes}United States Intelligence Activities,{close_quotes} (1) designates the Department`s intelligence element as a member of the Intelligence Community, and (2) states that no agency within the Intelligence community shall sponsor, contract for or conduct research on human subjects except in accordance with guidelines issued by the Department of Health and Human Services. The Federal policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, which was based on Department of Health and Human Services regulations, was promulgated in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 745 by the Department of Energy. The purpose of this inspection was to review the internal control procedures used by the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security to manage selected intelligence and intelligence-related projects that involve human subject research.

  19. Managing the analysis of air quality impacts under NEPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Y.B.; Leslie, A.C.D.

    1995-12-31

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) mandates the analysis and evaluation of potential impacts of major Federal actions having the potential to affect the environment. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify an array of new air quality issues appropriate for analysis in compliance with NEPA. An example is emissions of the 189 hazardous air pollutants identified in Title III. The utility industry estimates that more than 2.4 billion pounds of toxic pollutants were emitted to the atmosphere in 1988, with the potential for resultant adverse health impacts such as cancer, reproductive effects, birth defects, and respiratory illness. The US Department of Energy (DOE) provides Federal funds for projects that utilize coal as the primary fuel, including the approximately 45 projects funded over the past ten years under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Provision of Federal funds brings these projects under NEPA review. While electric steam generating units greater than 25 MW are currently excluded from regulatory review for the 189 air toxics listed in Title III, they are not, due to their potential impacts, excluded from NEPA review when Federally funded, in whole or in part. The authors will discuss their experiences drawn from NEPA evaluations of coal-fired power projects, the differences between regulatory requirements and NEPA requirements, source categories, major and area sources, conformity, maximum achievable control technology, mandatory licensing, radionuclides, visibility, toxics found to be emitted from coal combustion, public involvement, citizen suits, the bounty system, and how NEPA review can result in beneficial changes to proposed projects through mitigation measures to avoid or minimize potentially adverse environmental impacts.

  20. Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.D.

    1992-09-18

    Almost daily, Americans receive reports from the mass news media about some new and frightening risk to health and welfare. Most such reports emphasize the newsworthiness of the risks -- the possibility of a crisis, disagreements among experts, how things happened, who is responsible for fixing them, how much will it cost, conflict among parties involved, etc. As a rule, the magnitudes of the risks, or the difficulty of estimating those magnitudes, have limited newsworthiness, and so they are not mentioned. Because of this emphasis in the news media, most people outside the risk assessment community must judge the relative significance of the various risks to which we all are exposed with only that information deemed newsworthy by reporters. This information is biased and shows risks in isolation. There is no basis for understanding and comparing the relative importance of risks among themselves, or for comparing one risk, perhaps a new or newly-discovered one, in the field of all risks. The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which we are routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies.

  1. An overview of the evolution of human reliability analysis in the context of probabilistic risk assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bley, Dennis C.; Lois, Erasmia; Kolaczkowski, Alan M.; Forester, John Alan; Wreathall, John; Cooper, Susan E.

    2009-01-01

    Since the Reactor Safety Study in the early 1970's, human reliability analysis (HRA) has been evolving towards a better ability to account for the factors and conditions that can lead humans to take unsafe actions and thereby provide better estimates of the likelihood of human error for probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs). The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of recent reviews of operational events and advances in the behavioral sciences that have impacted the evolution of HRA methods and contributed to improvements. The paper discusses the importance of human errors in complex human-technical systems, examines why humans contribute to accidents and unsafe conditions, and discusses how lessons learned over the years have changed the perspective and approach for modeling human behavior in PRAs of complicated domains such as nuclear power plants. It is argued that it has become increasingly more important to understand and model the more cognitive aspects of human performance and to address the broader range of factors that have been shown to influence human performance in complex domains. The paper concludes by addressing the current ability of HRA to adequately predict human failure events and their likelihood.

  2. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, K.H.

    1990-05-22

    An inertial impactor is designed which is to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air. The device may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

  3. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, K.H.

    1987-12-10

    An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

  4. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, Katharine H. (13150 Wenonah SE. Apt. 727, Albuquerque, NM 87123)

    1990-01-01

    An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  5. EIS-0382: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0382: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Mesaba Energy Project, Itasca, MN This Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) provides...

  6. Focus Series -- Chicago -- Energy Impact Illinois (EI2) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Series -- Chicago -- Energy Impact Illinois (EI2) Focus Series -- Chicago -- Energy Impact Illinois (EI2) Focus Series -- Chicago -- Energy Impact Illinois (EI2): A...

  7. EIS-0333: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0333: Final Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration, Maiden Wind Farm This Draft Environmental Impact Statement...

  8. The Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in Fiscal Year 1979 pursuant to Section 641 ... PART 3 - - MINORITY ECONOMIC IMPACT SEC. 641. MINORITY ECONOMIC IMPACT. "(a) Establishment ...

  9. EIS-0312: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0312: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts associated...

  10. EIS-0312: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0312: Final Environmental Impact Statement Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan In this final environmental impact statement (FEIS), with...

  11. EIS-0319: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0319: Draft Environmental Impact Statement This EIS evaluates the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental impacts...

  12. EIS-0469: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Statement EIS-0469: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Wilton IV Wind Energy Center; Burleigh County, North Dakota This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of...

  13. EIS-0423: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Impact Statement, DOEEIS-0423D (January 2010) More Documents & Publications EIS-0423-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0423: Final Environmental Impact...

  14. EIS-0332: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0332: Final Environmental Impact Statement McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project This document is the final Environmental Impact Statement...

  15. Global health response more accurate with automated influenza...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Global health response more accurate with automated influenza surveillance Global health response more accurate with automated influenza surveillance Public health officials will...

  16. Texas Department of State Health Services - WIPP Program | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Texas Department of State Health Services - WIPP Program Texas Department of State Health Services - WIPP Program Texas Department of State Health Services - WIPP Program More...

  17. ORISE: Environmental Assessments and Health Physics fact sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Assessments and Health Physics ORAU helps protect workers, the public and ... * Radiochemical Analysis * Health Physics Services * Health Physics and Radiation ...

  18. Office of Worker Safety and Health Assessments | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Worker Safety and Health Assessments Office of Worker Safety and Health Assessments MISSION The Office of Worker Safety and Health Assessments conducts assessments to provide ...

  19. Carlsbad Industrial Safety and Health PIA, Carlsbad Field Offce...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carlsbad Industrial Safety and Health PIA, Carlsbad Field Offce Carlsbad Industrial Safety and Health PIA, Carlsbad Field Offce Carlsbad Industrial Safety and Health PIA, Carlsbad ...

  20. ORISE: Travelers' Health Campaign | How ORISE is Making a Difference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Travelers' Health Campaign Travelers' Health Campaign takes critical messages worldwide Travelers' Health Campaign poster Click image to enlarge Traveling can be a dangerous...