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1

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human Health Print E-mail National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human Health Print E-mail National Institutes of Health Research Portfolio Monday, April 22, 2013 Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program What are the potential effects of global climate change on human health? This is a question that a growing number of federally funded studies seek to answer. A new analysis recently published in the journal, Environmental Health Perspectives, looks at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) research portfolio on climate change and human health. Climate change is affecting human health through environmental consequences, such as sea-level rise, changes in precipitation, heat waves, changes in intensity of hurricanes and storms, and degraded air quality, according to the World Health Organization and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

2

Impact evaluation of electrical equipments on human health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectives of study: - Measure of the electric and magnetic field from electric power station: Darste - Brasov, Lacu Sarat-Braila, Bradu-Arges; - Evaluation of human health from electric power station: Darste - Brasov, Lacu Sarat-Braila, Bradu-Arges; ... Keywords: electric and megnetic field, electric power stations, melatonin

Alice Raducanu; Aurica Suvergel; Angela Stanca; Marin Stefan; Cornella Marcolt; Corneliu Neagu

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Human Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Health Print E-mail Climate change can have a number of direct and indirect effects on human health. For example, rising temperatures can contribute to the number of deaths...

4

Electromagnetic field of the large power cables and impact on the human health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we survey our research on domain decomposition and related algorithms for large power electric cables and the impact on the human health. The equations that describe the behaviour of the fields in electromagnetic devices are coupled because ... Keywords: bioheat equation, coupled fields, electrical cables, finite element method

Daniela Cârstea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Ocean Health and Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. 2002. Indicators of ocean health and human health:Nature 423:280–283. Oceans and Human Health Act. 2003. S.Editorial Guest Editorial Ocean Health and Human Health

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Waste management programmatic environmental impact statement methodology for estimating human health risks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has produced large quantities of radioactive and hazardous waste during years of nuclear weapons production. As a result, a large number of sites across the DOE Complex have become chemically and/or radiologically contaminated. In 1990, the Secretary of Energy charged the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM) with the task of preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS should identify and assess the potential environmental impacts of implementing several integrated Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) alternatives. The determination and integration of appropriate remediation activities and sound waste management practices is vital for ensuring the diminution of adverse human health impacts during site cleanup and waste management programs. This report documents the PEIS risk assessment methodology used to evaluate human health risks posed by WM activities. The methodology presents a programmatic cradle to grave risk assessment for EM program activities. A unit dose approach is used to estimate risks posed by WM activities and is the subject of this document.

Bergenback, B. [Midwest Technical, Inc. (United States); Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Impact of Recent Heat Waves on Human Health in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the health impacts of recent heat waves statewide and for six subregions of California: the north and south coasts, Central Valley, Mojave, southern deserts, and northern forests. Using Canonical Correlation Analysis applied to ...

Kristen Guirguis; Alexander Gershunov; Alexander Tardy; Rupa Basu

8

Impacts of Particulate Matter on Human Health: An Updated Summary of EPRI Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hundreds of toxicological and epidemiological studies have been conducted over the past 20 years to better understand the effects of particulate matter (PM), and air pollution in general, on human health. Examples of environmental regulations and policies driven by these health concerns include the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), as well as State Implementation Plans (SIPs) and multi-pollutant control legislation. EPRI's PM/Health Research Program...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

9

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human Health Print E-mail National Institutes of Health Research Portfolio Monday, April 22, 2013 Featured by...

10

The impacts of aviation emissions on human health through changes in air quality and UV irradiance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World-wide demand for air transportation is rising steadily. The air transportation network may be limited by aviation's growing environmental impacts. These impacts take the form of climate impacts, noise impacts, and ...

Brunelle-Yeung, Elza

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Evaluation of means used to access the impacts of energy production on human health. LASL third life sciences symposium, Los Alamos, New Mexico, October 15--17, 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The symposium explored the various techniques and methods available to study the potential effects that various energy-producing industries may have on human health. Three papers presented at Session I dealt with national energy needs, resources, and future developments; responsibilities and capabilities in ERDA as related to the health and environmental impacts of energy productions; and health hazards associated with alternate energy sources. Four papers presented at Session II reviewed standards setting for the worker and for the public; the radiation experience; and developing health policies and standards as the responsibility of the scientist. Eight papers in Sessions III and IV, Sources of Information, dealt with developing a health standard from epidemiological and clinical data and from laboratory animal data; carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, teratogenesis, and behavior changes as end points in health impact assessments; new methods and approaches to health impact assessment; problems in sampling for health impact; and the application of scientific data to worker/workplace health decision making. Two papers at Session V covered bases for the application of scientific data to health standards and health and environmental standards from a legal viewpoint. A final discussion, Room for Controversy, was conducted by four panelists. (MCW)

Anderson, E.C.; Sullivan, E.M. (eds.) [eds.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS LOCAL IMPACTS ON HUMAN HEALTH RISK.  

SciTech Connect

A thorough quantitative understanding of the processes of mercury emissions, deposition, and translocation through the food chain is currently not available. Complex atmospheric chemistry and dispersion models are required to predict concentration and deposition contributions, and aquatic process models are required to predict effects on fish. However, there are uncertainties in all of these predictions. Therefore, the most reliable method of understanding impacts of coal-fired power plants on Hg deposition is from empirical data. A review of the literature on mercury deposition around sources including coal-fired power plants found studies covering local mercury concentrations in soil, vegetation, and animals (fish and cows). There is strong evidence of enhanced local deposition within 3 km of the chlor-alkali plants, with elevated soil concentrations and estimated deposition rates of 10 times background. For coal-fired power plants, the data show that atmospheric deposition of Hg may be slightly enhanced. On the scale of a few km, modeling suggests that wet deposition may be increased by a factor of two or three over background. The measured data suggest lower increases of 15% or less. The effects of coal-fired plants seem to be less than 10% of total deposition on a national scale, based on emissions and global modeling. The following summarizes our findings from published reports on the impacts of local deposition. In terms of excesses over background the following increments have been observed within a few km of the plant: (1) local soil concentration Hg increments of 30%-60%, (2) sediment increments of 18-30%, (3) wet deposition increments of 11-12%, and (4) fish Hg increments of about 5-6%, based on an empirical finding that fish concentrations are proportional to the square root of deposition. Important uncertainties include possible reductions of RGM to Hg{sub 0} in power plant plumes and the role of water chemistry in the relationship between Hg deposition and fish content. Soil and vegetation sampling programs were performed around two mid-size coal fired power plants. The objectives were to determine if local mercury hot-spots exist, to determine if they could be attributed to deposition of coal-fired power plant emissions, and to determine if they correlated with model predictions. These programs found the following: (1) At both sites, there was no correlation between modeled mercury deposition and either soil concentrations or vegetation concentrations. At the Kincaid plant, there was excess soil Hg along heavily traveled roads. The spatial pattern of soil mercury concentrations did not match the pattern of vegetation Hg concentrations at either plant. (2) At both sites, the subsurface (5-10 cm) samples the Hg concentration correlated strongly with the surface samples (0-5 cm). Average subsurface sample concentrations were slightly less than the surface samples; however, the difference was not statistically significant. (3) An unequivocal definition of background Hg was not possible at either site. Using various assumed background soil mercury concentrations, the percentage of mercury deposited within 10 km of the plant ranged between 1.4 and 8.5% of the RGM emissions. Based on computer modeling, Hg deposition was primarily RGM with much lower deposition from elemental mercury. Estimates of the percentage of total Hg deposition ranged between 0.3 and 1.7%. These small percentages of deposition are consistent with the empirical findings of only minor perturbations in environmental levels, as opposed to ''hot spots'', near the plants. The major objective of this study was to determine if there was evidence for ''hot-spots'' of mercury deposition around coal-fired power plants. Although the term has been used extensively, it has never been defined. From a public health perspective, such a ''hot spot'' must be large enough to insure that it did not occur by chance, and it must affect water bodies large enough to support a population of subsistence fishers. The results of this study support the hypothesis that n

SULLIVAN, T.M.; BOWERMAN, B.; ADAMS, J.; LIPFERT, F.; MORRIS, S.M.; BANDO, A.; PENA, R.; BLAKE, R.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Link Climate Change and Human Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Make Our Science Accessible Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally Link Climate Change and Human Health Print E-mail Health News Check out the latest climate change and human health news and announcements in our Health News Feed. Climate change poses unique challenges to human health. Unlike health threats caused by a particular toxin or disease pathogen, there are many ways that climate change can lead to potentially harmful health effects. Direct health impacts may include increased illnesses and deaths from extreme heat events, injuries and deaths from extreme weather events, and respiratory illnesses due to changes in air quality Indirect health impacts include illnesses and deaths that may arise from

14

Clinical solid waste management practices and its impact on human health and environment - A review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research highlights: > Appropriate waste management technology for safe handling and disposal of clinical solid waste. > Infectious risk assessment on unsafe handling of clinical solid waste. > Recycling-reuse program of clinical solid waste materials. > Effective sterilization technology to reduce exposure of infectious risk. - Abstract: The management of clinical solid waste (CSW) continues to be a major challenge, particularly, in most healthcare facilities of the developing world. Poor conduct and inappropriate disposal methods exercised during handling and disposal of CSW is increasing significant health hazards and environmental pollution due to the infectious nature of the waste. This article summarises a literature review into existing CSW management practices in the healthcare centers. The information gathered in this paper has been derived from the desk study of open literature survey. Numerous researches have been conducted on the management of CSW. Although, significant steps have been taken on matters related to safe handling and disposal of the clinical waste, but improper management practice is evident from the point of initial collection to the final disposal. In most cases, the main reasons of the mismanagement of CSW are the lack of appropriate legislation, lack of specialized clinical staffs, lack of awareness and effective control. Furthermore, most of the healthcare centers of the developing world have faced financial difficulties and therefore looking for cost effective disposal methods of clinical waste. This paper emphasizes to continue the recycle-reuse program of CSW materials after sterilization by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SF-CO2) sterilization technology at the point of initial collection. Emphasis is on the priority to inactivate the infectious micro-organisms in CSW. In that case, waste would not pose any threat to healthcare workers. The recycling-reuse program would be carried out successfully with the non-specialized clinical staffs. Therefore, the adoption of SF-CO2 sterilization technology in management of clinical solid waste can reduce exposure to infectious waste, decrease labor, lower costs, and yield better compliance with regulatory. Thus healthcare facilities can both save money and provide a safe environment for patients, healthcare staffs and clinical staffs.

Hossain, Md. Sohrab [Department of Environmental Technology, School of Industrial Technology, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Santhanam, Amutha [Institute for Research in Molecular Medicine, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Nik Norulaini, N.A. [School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Omar, A.K. Mohd, E-mail: akmomar@usm.my [Department of Environmental Technology, School of Industrial Technology, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

Global Health and Economic Impacts of Future Ozone Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We assess the human health and economic impacts of projected 2000-2050 changes in ozone pollution using the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis-Health Effects (EPPA-HE) model, in combination with results from the ...

Webster, Mort D.

16

Health impact assessment in Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, Health Impact Assessment has gained great attention in Korea. First, the Ministry of Environment introduced HIA within existing Environment Impact Assessment. Second, the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs began an HIA program in 2008 in alliance with Healthy Cities. In this short report, these two different efforts are introduced and their opportunities and challenges discussed. We believe these two approaches complement each other and both need to be strengthened. We also believe that both can contribute to the development of health in policy and project development and ultimately to improvements in the Korean population's health.

Kang, Eunjeong, E-mail: marchej@kihasa.re.r [Division for Health Promotion Research, Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs, 268 Jinheung-ro, Bulgwang-dong, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Youngsoo, E-mail: leeys@kei.re.k [Centre for Environmental Impact Assessment Review, Korea Environment Institute, 290 Jinheung-ro, Bulgwang-dong, Eunpyeong-gu (Korea, Republic of); Harris, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.harris@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1981 (Australia); Koh, Kwangwook, E-mail: kwkoh@hanafos.co [Department of Preventive Medicine, Kosin University, 149-1 Dongsam-1-dong, Youngdo-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Keonyeop, E-mail: pmkky@knu.ac.k [Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine and Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Public Health, KyungPook National University, 101 Dongin 2 , Jung-gu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Characterization of energy production and health impact in Romanian context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main aim of the paper is to establish appropriate approaches for assessing the impact of power generation plants on human health, considering the Romanian situation. As a consequence of the technology used in energy production and of the type of ... Keywords: air pollution, assessment, health impact, power plants

Diana Mariana Cocarta; Adrian Badea; Tiberiu Apostol

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Health Impacts Research - Emissions & Emission Controls - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Impacts Research Health Impacts Research Another aspect of the emissions research at ORNL focuses on Health Impacts. This effort concentrates on analyzing exhaust for Mobile Source Air Toxics (MSATs) or other unregulated exhaust species that have the potential to harm human health. MSATs are a group of chemical species defined by the U.S. EPA that may pose risk to humans; formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, 1,3-butadiene, benzene, and toluene are some example species. Engines operated with new combustion modes and alternative fuels are studied for MSAT emissions to determine insure that the advanced technologies being developed pose no additional risk to humans. A large part of the Health Impacts research effort at ORNL focuses on particulate matter (PM) which is also defined as an MSAT by the U.S. EPA.

19

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES DATE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES DATE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH ANIMAL HEALTH AND SHIPPING CERTIFICATE Health The animals described hereon have been examined and found on visual observation. Unless otherwise stated, no laboratory tests have been performed. I hereby certify

Bandettini, Peter A.

20

Health impact assessment of air pollution using a dynamic exposure profile: Implications for exposure and health impact estimates  

SciTech Connect

In both ambient air pollution epidemiology and health impact assessment an accurate assessment of the population exposure is crucial. Although considerable advances have been made in assessing human exposure outdoors, the assessments often do not consider the impact of individual travel behavior on such exposures. Population-based exposures to NO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} using only home addresses were compared with models that integrate all time-activity patterns-including time in commute-for Flanders and Brussels. The exposure estimates were used to estimate the air pollution impact on years of life lost due to respiratory mortality. Health impact of NO{sub 2} using an exposure that integrates time-activity information was on average 1.2% higher than when assuming that people are always at their home address. For ozone the overall estimated health impact was 0.8% lower. Local differences could be much larger, with estimates that differ up to 12% from the exposure using residential addresses only. Depending on age and gender, deviations from the population average were seen. Our results showed modest differences on a regional level. At the local level, however, time-activity patterns indicated larger differences in exposure and health impact estimates, mainly for people living in more rural areas. These results suggest that for local analyses the dynamic approach can contribute to an improved assessment of the health impact of various types of pollution and to the understanding of exposure differences between population groups. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exposure to ambient air pollution was assessed integrating population mobility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This dynamic exposure was integrated into a health impact assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differences between the dynamic and residential exposure were quantified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modest differences in health impact were found at a regional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At municipal level larger differences were found, influenced by gender and age.

Dhondt, Stijn, E-mail: stijn.dhondt@vub.ac.be [Department of Medical Sociology and Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, B-1090, Brussels (Belgium); Beckx, Carolien, E-mail: Carolien.Beckx@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Degraeuwe, Bart, E-mail: Bart.Degraeuwe@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Lefebvre, Wouter, E-mail: Wouter.Lefebvre@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Kochan, Bruno, E-mail: Bruno.Kochan@uhasselt.be [Transportation Research Institute, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 5 bus 6, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Bellemans, Tom, E-mail: Tom.Bellemans@uhasselt.be [Transportation Research Institute, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 5 bus 6, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Int Panis, Luc, E-mail: Luc.intpanis@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Transportation Research Institute, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 5 bus 6, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Macharis, Cathy, E-mail: cjmachar@vub.ac.be [Department MOSI-Transport and Logistics, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050, Brussels (Belgium); Putman, Koen, E-mail: kputman@vub.ac.be [Department of Medical Sociology and Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, B-1090, Brussels (Belgium); Interuniversity Centre for Health Economics Research (I-CHER), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Human health implications of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Environmental problems consist of the release of noncondensable gases and vapors, disposal of saline fluids, possible land subsidence and enhanced seismicity, noise, accidents such as well blowouts, and socioeconomic impacts. The most important issue related to human health is believed to be the emission of noncondensable gases, including hydrogen sulfide, mercury, and radon. Based upon data at The Geysers, California, Power Plant, emissions of mercury and radon are not large enough to result in concerns for human health. Hydrogen sulfide emissions, however, have resulted in complaints of odor annoyance and health impairment. These complaints have been caused by exposure to levels of up to approximately 0.1 ppmv in ambient air. This is above the California standard of 0.03 ppmv. Achievement of this standard may not eliminate annoyance complaints, as the odor detection threshold is lognormally distributed and about 20% of the population can detect hydrogen sulfide at levels of 0.002 ppmv. Abatement systems for hydrogen sulfide have been utilized at The Geysers since 1975. This has resulted in an increase of occupational illness caused by exposure to the abatement chemicals and wastes. More effective, and hopefully safer, abatement systems are now being tested. Occupational hazards are evaluated; the more significant ones are exposure to toxic chemicals and hazardous materials and noise. Available occupational illness data are summarized; there clearly indicate that the most significant cause of illness has been exposure to the chemicals and wastes associated with hydrogen sulfide abatement.

Anspaugh, L.R.; Hahn, J.L.

1979-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

22

Health impacts of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus is on electric power production using geothermal resources greater than 150/sup 0/C because this form of geothermal energy utilization has the most serious health-related consequences. Based on measurements and experience at existing geothermal power plants, atmospheric emissions of noncondensing gases such as hydrogen sulfide and benzene pose the greatest hazards to public health. Surface and ground waters contaminated by discharges of spent geothermal fluids constitute another health hazard. It is shown that hydrogen sulfide emissions from most geothermal power plants are apt to cause odor annoyances among members of the exposed public - some of whom can detect this gas at concentrations as low as 0.002 parts per million by volume. A risk assessment model is used to estimate the lifetime risk of incurring leukemia from atmospheric benzene caused by 2000 MW(e) of geothermal development in California's Imperial Valley. The risk of skin cancer due to the ingestion of river water in New Zealand that is contaminated by waste geothermal fluids containing arsenic is also assessed. Finally, data on the occurrence of occupational disease in the geothermal industry are summarized briefly.

Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.

1981-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

(. 4 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH &..HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~..""~ "+" ~. (. 4 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH &..HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service ~,~..Health Bethesda, Maryland 20892 January 18, 1995 TO: Addressees FROM: Deputy Director for Intramural Research SUBJECT: Disposition of Laboratory Animals There was an incident over

Bandettini, Peter A.

24

Influence of air quality model resolution on uncertainty associated with health impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use regional air quality modeling to evaluate the impact of model resolution on uncertainty associated with the human health benefits resulting from proposed air quality regulations. Using a regional photochemical model ...

Thompson, Tammy M.

25

Contaminants, Water and Human Health: New Lessons from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminants, Water and Human Health: New Lessons from Alligators. Purpose: Many chemicals introduced into the environment ...

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Safety Health Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Occupational Safety & Health - Occupational Injury & Illness System PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1 J Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date June 12, 2009 Departmental Idaho National Laboratory Element & Site Name of Infonnatlon Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) System or IT Project Exhibit Project UID 136 New PIA ~ Update D Name, Title Contact Information Phone, Email Anthony J. Kavran (208) 526-5826

27

2013-2014 Student Health Services Health Promotion GA IMPACT Program Instructor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

schedule. · Ability to conduct research and work on program development2013-2014 Student Health Services ­ Health Promotion GA IMPACT Program Description The IMPACT program seeks to provide students with education and feedback

Tullos, Desiree

28

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Human Resources Personal Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Human Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetext/neword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element & Site Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Engineering Research Office Building (EROB) Name of Information Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request System or IT Project Business Enclave Exhibit Project UID 106800 NewPIA ~ Update D N T 'tl I Contact Information arne,

29

White Paper Series Using Health Impact Assessments to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White Paper Series Using Health Impact Assessments to Evaluate Bicycle and Pedestrian Plans January to conduct HIAs in the Gothenburg Consensus Paper [8] (see http

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

30

high impact Designing a human-powered  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the local mill and pay to have it ground into flour, or grind it themselves by hand with a mortar and pestleLow tech, high impact Designing a human-powered grain mill for Africa Ten-year-old Solomoni Mafuta) to a diesel-pow- ered mill to be ground. The time-consuming task has pulled him away from his studies

Endres. William J.

31

College of Health, Education, and Human Development DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; and the Outdoor Laboratory. Collaboration within the col- lege between academics and community outreach services98 College of Health, Education, and Human Development 98 COLLEGE OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT The College of Health, Education, and Human Development provides students the means by which

Stuart, Steven J.

32

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health examination, order laboratory tests (primarily blood tests), and recommend any other tests that seem

33

~+.,..;.. '1I.Ylcrl.~ (!DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INSTITUTES OF HEALTH ......SERVICE DELIVERY: Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare in compliance with the Public Health Service (PHS) Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (Policy~+.,..;.. '1I.Ylcrl.~ (!DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE NATIONAL

Oliver, Douglas L.

34

Globalisation and health: impact pathways and recent evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Poverty in an Era of Liberalisation and Globalisation”,economy through the liberalisation of the markets for goods,and health impact of a liberalisation and globalisation that

Cornia, Giovanni Andrea; Rosignoli, Stefano; Tiberti, Luca

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

The air quality and health impacts of aviation in Asia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aviation in Asia is growing more rapidly than other regions around the world. Adverse health impacts of aviation are linked to an increase in the concentration of particulate matter smaller than 2.5 [mu]m in diameter ...

Lee, In Hwan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Reclamation of automotive batteries: Assessment of health impacts and recycling technology. Task 2: Assessment of health impacts; Final report  

SciTech Connect

The task 2 report compares the relative health and hazard impacts of EV battery recycling technologies. Task 2 compared the relative impact of recycling EV batteries in terms of cancer, toxicity, and ecotoxicological potential, as well as leachability, flammability, and corrosivity/reactivity hazards. Impacts were evaluated for lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, sodium sulfur, sodium-nickel chloride, lithium-iron sulfide and disulfide, lithium-polymer, lithium-ion, and zinc-air batteries. Health/hazard impacts were evaluated for recycling methods including smelting, electrowinning, and other appropriate techniques that apply to different battery technologies.

Unnasch, S.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Impact of actinide recycle on nuclear fuel cycle health risks  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this background paper is to summarize what is presently known about potential impacts on the impacts on the health risk of the nuclear fuel cycle form deployment of the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR){sup 1} and Integral Fast Reactor (IF){sup 2} technology as an actinide burning system. In a companion paper the impact on waste repository risk is addressed in some detail. Therefore, this paper focuses on the remainder of the fuel cycle.

Michaels, G.E.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Human Health Risk & Environmental Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to examine the interplay between human health and environmental risks associated with energy production, hazardous waste, national security and natural disasters. Research...

39

Oakland University Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Oakland University Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pump Systems Project Type Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal...

40

( / ....V'(II.', DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERViCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERViCE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH' SERVICE DELIVERY: FOR EXPRESS MAIL Office of Laboratory Anim~1 Welfare Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare Service (PHS) Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (Policy), as revised August 2002. Your

Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill PI ConferenceDeepwater Horizon Oil Spill PI Conference Session: Crude oil & dispersants-impact on human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill PI ConferenceDeepwater Horizon Oil Spill PI Conference Session: Crude oil & dispersants-impact on human health & socioeconomic systems Panelist: James H. Diaz, MD, MPH, Dr Health #12;Oil/dispersants: impact health & S-E systems. Outline of Research Questions? 1. What

42

Healthful LipidsChapter 12 CLA Sources and Human Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthful Lipids Chapter 12 CLA Sources and Human Studies Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press BE8A2AF8640552A5AF80E9DF60E25D15 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf ...

43

Health Impacts from Acute Radiation Exposure  

SciTech Connect

Absorbed doses above1-2 Gy (100-200 rads) received over a period of a day or less lead to one or another of the acute radiation syndromes. These are the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome, the cerebrovascular (CV) syndrome, the pulmonary syndrome, or the cutaneous syndrome. The dose that will kill about 50% of the exposed people within 60 days with minimal medical care, LD50-60, is around 4.5 Gy (450 rads) of low-LET radiation measured free in air. The GI syndrome may not be fatal with supportive medical care and growth factors below about 10 Gy (1000 rads), but above this is likely to be fatal. Pulmonary and cutaneous syndromes may or may not be fatal, depending on many factors. The CV syndrome is invariably fatal. Lower acute doses, or protracted doses delivered over days or weeks, may lead to many other health outcomes than death. These include loss of pregnancy, cataract, impaired fertility or temporary or permanent sterility, hair loss, skin ulceration, local tissue necrosis, developmental abnormalities including mental and growth retardation in persons irradiated as children or fetuses, radiation dermatitis, and other symptoms listed in Table 2 on page 12. Children of parents irradiated prior to conception may experience heritable ill-health, that is, genetic changes from their parents. These effects are less strongly expressed than previously thought. Populations irradiated to high doses at high dose rates have increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality, taken as about 10-20% incidence and perhaps 5-10% mortality per sievert of effective dose of any radiation or per gray of whole-body absorbed dose low-LET radiation. Cancer risks for non-uniform irradiation will be less.

Strom, Daniel J.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

Differing forms, differing purposes: A typology of health impact assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is currently considerable diversity in health impact assessment (HIA) practice internationally. Historically this diversity has been described as simple dichotomies, for example the differences between HIAs of projects and policies. However these distinctions have failed to adequately describe the differences that can be observed between different forms of HIAs. This paper describes the three historical and disciplinary fields from which HIA has emerged - environmental health, a social view of health, and health equity. It also puts forward a typology of four different forms of HIA that can be observed in current HIA practice: mandated, decision-support, advocacy, and community-led HIAs. This paper argues that these different forms of HIA serve different purposes and are not necessarily in competition; rather they allow HIA to be responsive to a range of population health concerns and purposes.

Harris-Roxas, Ben, E-mail: b.harris-roxas@unsw.edu.au; Harris, Elizabeth, E-mail: e.harris@unsw.edu.a

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Putting climate change and human health science into practice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Putting climate change and human health science into practice Print E-mail Putting climate change and human health science into practice Print E-mail Landsat Data Continuity Mission Tuesday, March 26, 2013 Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program For the first time, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) formally brought together their grantees working on climate change and human health, to share their research findings and discuss practical strategies for implementing this knowledge. "The goal of this meeting was for grantees to share latest advances, as well as for participants to network with each other to build new relationships and plant the seeds for future collaborations toward solving one of the most critical public health issues facing our world," said Caroline Dilworth, Ph.D., NIEHS health scientist administrator.

46

Bioscience & Health Homeland Security/Forensics/Human ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... vehicle Experts Recommend Measures to Reduce Human Error in Fingerprint Analysis. 13DO003_oles_fingerprintmap_CS ...

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

47

Initial impact of the sequencing of the human genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sequence of the human genome has dramatically accelerated biomedical research. Here I explore its impact, in the decade since its publication, on our understanding of the biological functions encoded in the genome, on ...

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Biology; Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard; Lander, Eric S.; Lander, Eric S.

48

Putting climate change and human health science into practice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Putting climate change and human health science into practice Print E-mail Landsat Data Continuity Mission Tuesday, March 26, 2013 Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global...

49

Health Information Technology (IT), Human Factor Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on a research program aimed at developing human factors guidelines for ... technical guidelines will help support safe, effective, error-free EHR use ...

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

50

other hospital U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There's no other hospital like it U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES · National the laboratory into better health and health care has been the Clinical Center's focus since the facility Institutes of Health 2008D I R E C T O R ' S A N N U A L R E P O R T · N I H C L I N I C A L C E N T E R P R

51

Fish, Omega 3 and Human Health, 2nd Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second edition of Fish, Omega-3 and Human Health reaffirms that the essential fatty acids in the foods we eat form hormones that have powerful effects on human life. While many find it hard to believe that a simple change of diet can affect so many asp

52

Integrating health impact assessment into the triple bottom line concept  

SciTech Connect

This theoretical study explores the links between the Triple Bottom Line (TBL) concept and the principles of HIA and considers the potential role of HIA to provide a mechanism for integrating health concerns within a broader agenda of government and business. TBL is a framework linked to the broader sustainability agenda that underpins and reviews environmental, economic and social performance of organizations. In its simplest form, TBL acts as a tool for reporting to stakeholders/shareholders organizational performance and the nature of the impacts on the community. The links to HIA are clear as both seek to determine the impact (potential and actual) on the health and well-being of the population. The study found that TBL can operate at four levels within organizations ranging from reporting through to full integration with the organization's goals and practices. Health is narrowly defined and there are tensions about how to undertake the social accountability functions. The study shows the potential role for HIA within the broader policy and accountability agenda. As health is one of the main outcomes of an organization's activities it needs to be taken into account at all levels of activity.

Mahoney, Mary; Potter, Jenny-Lynn

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Indoor air and human health: major indoor air pollutants and their health implications  

SciTech Connect

This publication is a collection of abstracts of papers presented at the Indoor Air and Human Health symposium. Session titles include: Radon, Microorganisms, Passive Cigarette Smoke, Combustion Products, Organics, and Panel and Audience Discussion.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Clean Slate transportation and human health risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

Public concern regarding activities involving radioactive material generally focuses on the human health risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation. This report describes the results of a risk analysis conducted to evaluate risk for excavation, handling, and transport of soil contaminated with transuranics at the Clean Slate sites. Transportation risks were estimated for public transport routes from the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to the Envirocore disposal facility or to the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for both radiological risk and risk due to traffic accidents. Human health risks were evaluated for occupational and radiation-related health effects to workers. This report was generated to respond to this public concern, to provide an evaluation of the risk, and to assess feasibility of transport of the contaminated soil for disposal.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Virtual impact: visualizing the potential effects of cosmic impact in human history  

SciTech Connect

Current models indicate that catastrophic impacts by asteroids and comets capable of killing more than one quarter of Earth's human population have occurred on average once every million years; smaller impacts, such the 1908 Tunguska impact that leveled more than 2,000 square km of Siberian forest, occur every 200-300 years. Therefore, cosmic impact likely significantly affected hominine evolution and conceivably played a role in Holocene period human culture history. Regrettably, few archaeologists are trained to appreciate the nature and potential effects of cosmic impact. We have developed a conceptual model for an extensible set of educational and research tools based on virtual reality collaborative environments to engage archaeologists and the general public on the topic of the role of cosmic impact in human history. Our initial focus is on two documented asteroid impacts in Argentina during the period of 4000 to 1000 B.C. Campo del Cicio resulted in an energy release of around 2-3 megatons (100-150 times the Hiroshima atomic weapon), and left several craters and a strewn field covering 493 km{sup 2} in northeastern Argentina. Rio Cuarto was likely more than 1000 megatons and may have devastated an area greater than 50,000 km{sup 2} in central Argentina. We are focusing on reconstructions of these events and their potential effects on contemporary hunter and gatherers. Our vinual reality tools also introduce interactive variables (e.g., impactor physical properties, climate, vegetation, topography, and social complexity) to allow researchers and students to better investigate and evaluate the factors that significantly influence cosmic impact effects.

Masse, W Bruce [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Janecky, David R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Forte, Maurizio [UC MERCED; Barrientos, Gustavo [UNIV OF LA PLATA, ARG.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Procedures for evaluating health impacts resulting from development of energy resources. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This manual is a compilation of formats, protocols, and procedures that may be used by communities and state agencies to evaluate health impacts resulting from the development of energy resources. The manual also considers ways of using these evaluations to develop plans for coping with health impacts. It is an outgrowth of a study of health problems experienced by impacted communities in Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Organizational Factors Impacting Implementation of Culturally Competent Care Modules in a Large Health Maintenance Organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organizational accommodations affecting access to and utilization of healthorganizational accommodations affecting access to and utilization of healthOrganizational Factors Impacting Implementation of Culturally Competent Care Modules in a Large Health

Koh, Karen Leanne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Fish, Omega 3 and Human Health, 2nd EditionChapter 12 Maps and the Unknown  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish, Omega 3 and Human Health, 2nd Edition Chapter 12 Maps and the Unknown Health Omega 3 eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Nutrition Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 12 Maps and the Unknown from the

59

Healthful LipidsChapter 25 Lipids in Infant Formulas and Human Milk Fat Substitutes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthful Lipids Chapter 25 Lipids in Infant Formulas and Human Milk Fat Substitutes Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 25 Lipids in

60

Fish, Omega 3 and Human Health, 2nd EditionChapter 16 Pathways to Leukotrienes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish, Omega 3 and Human Health, 2nd Edition Chapter 16 Pathways to Leukotrienes Health Omega 3 eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Nutrition Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 15 Prostaglandin Formation F

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 19 Blood Response to Caroten Supplemenataion in Humans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 19 Blood Response to Caroten Supplemenataion in Humans Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   D

62

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 6 Raman Detection of Carotenoids in Human Tissue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 6 Raman Detection of Carotenoids in Human Tissue Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   Downloa

63

Assessing the Environmental, Health and Safety Impact of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nanomaterials" with partners from Evonik, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, BASF, DuPont and General Electric. ...

2013-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

64

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 20 Effects of Dietary Fatty Acids on Human Microbes: Role in Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 20 Effects of Dietary Fatty Acids on Human Microbes: Role in Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadab

65

Assessing health impacts in complex eco-epidemiological settings in the humid tropics: Modular baseline health surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quantitative assessment of health impacts has been identified as a crucial feature for realising the full potential of health impact assessment (HIA). In settings where demographic and health data are notoriously scarce, but there is a broad range of ascertainable ecological, environmental, epidemiological and socioeconomic information, a diverse toolkit of data collection strategies becomes relevant for the mainly small-area impacts of interest. We present a modular, cross-sectional baseline health survey study design, which has been developed for HIA of industrial development projects in the humid tropics. The modular nature of our toolkit allows our methodology to be readily adapted to the prevailing eco-epidemiological characteristics of a given project setting. Central to our design is a broad set of key performance indicators, covering a multiplicity of health outcomes and determinants at different levels and scales. We present experience and key findings from our modular baseline health survey methodology employed in 14 selected sentinel sites within an iron ore mining project in the Republic of Guinea. We argue that our methodology is a generic example of rapid evidence assembly in difficult-to-reach localities, where improvement of the predictive validity of the assessment and establishment of a benchmark for longitudinal monitoring of project impacts and mitigation efforts is needed.

Winkler, Mirko S., E-mail: mirko.winkler@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); Divall, Mark J., E-mail: mdivall@shapeconsulting.org [SHAPE Consulting Ltd., Pretoria 0062 (South Africa); Krieger, Gary R., E-mail: gkrieger@newfields.com [NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Schmidlin, Sandro, E-mail: sandro.schmidlin@gmail.com [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); Magassouba, Mohamed L., E-mail: laminemagass@yahoo.fr [Clinique Ambroise Pare, P.O. Box, 1042 Conakry (Guinea); Knoblauch, Astrid M., E-mail: astrid.knoblauch@me.com [SHAPE Consulting Ltd., Pretoria 0062 (South Africa); Singer, Burton H., E-mail: bhsinger@epi.ufl.edu [Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Utzinger, Juerg, E-mail: juerg.utzinger@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global warming Non-renewable energy Mineral extraction9-4) and primary non-renewable energy (resource) (upperMJ of primary non-renewable energy). Results are presented

Humbert, Sebastien

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stack (e.g. , residential wood combustion), and ground-levelvehicles (T) Residential wood combustion (L) Road dust b (T)based on residential wood combustion and solvent emissions a

Humbert, Sebastien

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shipped from a regional coal fired plant (i.e. , no fartherimpacts from the coal-fired power plant to the fly ash wouldby combustion in coal-fired power plants. In 2006, more than

Humbert, Sebastien

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. Residences Title A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. Residences Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-5267E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Phillip N. Price, Max H. Sherman, and Brett C. Singer Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 120 Start Page 216 Pagination 216-222 Date Published 11/2011 Keywords air toxics, criteria pollutants, DALYs, exposure, impact assessment, indoor air pollutants, indoor air quality Abstract Background: Indoor air pollutants (IAPs) cause multiple health impacts. Prioritizing mitigation options that differentially impact individual pollutants and comparing IAPs to other environmental health hazards requires a common metric of harm. Objectives: The objective was to demonstrate a methodology to quantify and compare health impacts from IAPs. The methodology is needed to assess population health impacts of large-scale initiatives - including energy efficiency upgrades and ventilation standards - that affect indoor air quality (IAQ). Methods: Available disease incidence and disease impact models for specific pollutant-disease combinations were synthesized with data on measured concentrations to estimate the chronic heath impact, in Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs), due to inhalation of a subset of IAPs in U.S. residences. Model results were compared to independent estimates of DALYs lost due to disease. Results: PM2.5, acrolein, and formaldehyde accounted for the vast majority of DALY losses caused by IAPs considered in this analysis, with impacts on par or greater than estimates for secondhand tobacco smoke and radon. Confidence intervals of DALYs lost derived from epidemiology-based response functions are tighter than those derived from toxicology-based, inter-species extrapolations. Statistics on disease incidence in the US indicate that the upper-bound confidence interval for aggregate IAP harm is implausibly high. Conclusions: The demonstrated approach may be used to assess regional and national initiatives that impact IAQ at the population level. Cumulative health impacts from inhalation in U.S. residences of the IAPs assessed in this study are estimated at 400-1100 DALYs annually per 100,000 people.

70

Energy portfolio simulation considering environmental and public health impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional thermal electricity production is associated with undesirable public health and environment consequences. There is growing interest in the production of electricity from renewable sources such as wind, solar, and biomass. Not unlike traditional ... Keywords: energy portfolio, environmental pollution, public health, simulation, system dynamics

Rafael Diaz; Joshua Behr; Mandar Tulpule

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Participatory health impact assessment for the development of local government regulation on hazard control  

SciTech Connect

The Thai Public Health Act 1992 required the Thai local governments to issue respective regulations to take control of any possible health-hazard related activities, both from commercial and noncommercial sources. Since 1999, there has been centrally decentralized of power to a new form of local government establishment, namely Sub-district Administrative Organization (SAO). The SAO is asmall-scale local governing structure while its legitimate function is for community services, including control of health impact related activities. Most elected SAO administrators and officers are new and less experience with any of public health code of practice, particularly on health-hazard control. This action research attempted to introduce and apply a participatory health impact assessment (HIA) tool for the development of SAO health-hazard control regulation. The study sites were at Ban Meang and Kok See SAOs, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand, while all intervention activities conducted during May 2005-April 2006. A set of cooperative activities between researchers and community representatives were planned and organized by; surveying and identifying place and service base locally causing local environmental health problems, organizing community participatory workshops for drafting and proposing the health-hazard control regulation, and appropriate practices for health-hazard controlling measures. This action research eventually could successfully enable the SAO administrators and officers understanding of local environmental-related health problem, as well as development of imposed health-hazard control regulation for local community.

Inmuong, Uraiwan, E-mail: uraiwan@kku.ac.t [Department of Environmental Health Science, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University (Thailand); Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Thailand 123 Mittrapharb Road, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Rithmak, Panee, E-mail: panrit@kku.ac.t [Department of Environmental Health Science, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University (Thailand); Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Thailand 123 Mittrapharb Road, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Srisookwatana, Soomol, E-mail: soomol.s@anamai.mail.go.t [Public Health Law Administration Center, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health (Thailand); Traithin, Nathathai, E-mail: nathathai.t@anamai.mail.go.t [Public Health Law Administration Center, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health (Thailand); Maisuporn, Pornpun, E-mail: pornpun.m@anamai.mail.go.t [Public Health Law Administration Center, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health (Thailand)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

State of California Health and Human Services Agency California Department of Public Health APPLICATION FOR CERTIFIED COPY OF MARRIAGE RECORD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State of California ­ Health and Human Services Agency enforcement or local or state governmental agency.) I would like a Certified Informational Copy. This document will be printed with a legend on the face of the document that states

73

Health information technology and its impact on the quality and cost of healthcare delivery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of health information technologies (HIT) on the quality of healthcare delivery is a topic of significant importance and recent research has yielded mixed evidence. We use archival data on HIT usage in combination with data on quality of care ... Keywords: Electronic medical record, Health information technology, Process quality

Indranil R. Bardhan, Mark F. Thouin

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Mental health and the impact of ubiquitous technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Theme issue focuses on the emerging research of ubiquitous technologies to support mental health. So far, the majority of work presented in the field of ubiquitous healthcare has focused on supporting people affected by somatic diseases. However, ...

Bert Arnrich; Venet Osmani; Jakob Bardram

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Food-Web Structure of Seagrass Communities across Different Spatial Scales and Human Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food-Web Structure of Seagrass Communities across Different Spatial Scales and Human Impacts Marta, a quantification of their food-web structure and functioning, and how these change across space and human impacts the structural features of food webs associated with Zostera marina across 16 study sites in 3 provinces

Myers, Ransom A.

76

Assessment of impact of degree of automation on human roles: the experts' analysis using gaming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of the two assessments performed to evaluate the impact of increasing levels of automation (LoA) on Human Factors aspects and the impact on their responsibilities and interactions. This activity has been developed within ... Keywords: ATM, assessment, automation, gaming, human factors

R. Casar, A. Arranz, B. Escribano, A. Grosskreutz, R. Garcia, R. Suikat, M. Jipp, G. D. R. Zon, M. Joosse

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Quantifying the health and economic impacts of mercury : an integrated assessment approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury is a toxic pollutant that endangers human and ecosystem health. Especially potent in the form of methyl mercury, exposure is known to lead to adverse neurological effects, and, a growing body of evidence suggests, ...

Giang, Amanda (Amanda Chi Wen)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Evaluation of the Science in Support of Human Health Ambient Water Criteria Values for Boron Compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the available human health water quality criteria for boron and boron compounds and critically reviewed the science that results in different water quality criteria recommended by different regulatory bodies. Currently, water quality criteria for boron and boron compounds are recommended by several regulatory bodies, including EPA, the World Health Organization, Health Canada, the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, California Department of Public Health, ...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

79

Imperial County baseline health survey potential impact of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The survey purpose, methods, and statistical methods are presented. Results are discussed according to: area differences in background variables, area differences in health variables, area differences in annoyance reactions, and comparison of symptom frequencies with age, smoking, and drinking. Included in appendices are tables of data, enumeration forms, the questionnaire, interviewer cards, and interviewer instructions. (MHR)

Deane, M.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk assessment procedures for mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present a problem due to the lack of available potency and toxicity data on mixtures and individual compounds. This study examines the toxicity of parent compound PAHs and binary mixtures of PAHs in order to bridge the gap between component assessment and mixture assessment. Seven pure parent compound PAHs and four binary mixtures of PAHs were examined in the Salmonella/Microsome Mutagenicity Assay, a Gap Junction Intercellular Communication (GJIC) assay and the 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase assay (EROD). These assays were chosen for their ability to measure specific toxic endpoints related to the carcinogenic process (i.e. initiation, promotion, progression). Data from these assays was used in further studies to build Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) to estimate toxic endpoints and to test the additive assumption in PAH mixtures. These QSAR models will allow for the development of bioassay based potential potencies (PPB) or toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) that are derived not only from bioassay data, but also from structure, activity, and physical/chemical properties. These models can be extended to any environmental media to evaluate risk to human health from exposures to PAHs.

Bruce, Erica Dawn

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Proceedings from the 5th International Symposium on Light and Human Health: November 3-5, 2002, Orlando, Florida--EPRI Lighting Rese arch Office  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 5th EPRI/LRO Lighting Research Symposium (November, 2002) was organized to present and examine current research information on the subject of Light and Human Health in response to a growing sense that light -- both electric lighting and daylighting -- impacts human beings well beyond what has been traditionally studied as vision and visual performance. This Final Report of the Symposium is a collection of 23 presented and seven poster papers grouped under the following headings: I – Medical App...

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

82

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Deputy Secretary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

name of Marine Hospital Service to the Public Health and Marine Hospital Service. Hygienic Laboratory and Marine Hospital Service renamed Public Health Service. 1921 Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever LaboratoryU.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Deputy Secretary Chief of Staff Office

Bandettini, Peter A.

83

The impact of Global Health Initiatives and HIV and AIDS Programs on the Zambian Health System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Background: The Human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) and Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic peaked in 1999, which led to an increase in funding by… (more)

Lundström, Tomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Appendix F Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Human Health Risk Assessment Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F This appendix presents the detailed calculations used to estimate risks to human health. It includes the exposure factors, equations, abbreviations, assumptions, and references. Separate spreadsheets for ground water ingestion for the near-term and 20-year assumptio~ls have also been provided. The following spreadsheets are included in this appendix: Overview (Exposure Factors, Equations, Abbreviations, and COPCs) .......................... F-3 * Contaminant Concentrations-Near-Tern1 Ground Water Concentrations .................... F-6 Toxicity Factors ...................................... .. ............................................................ F-8 * Lower Montezuma'creek Exposure Scenario-Reasonable Maximurn Exposure ...... F-10

85

Public Health-Related Impacts of Climate Change inCalifornia  

SciTech Connect

In June 2005 Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger issued Executive Order S-3-05 that set greenhouse gas emission reduction targets for California, and directed the Secretary of the California Environmental Protection Agency to report to the governor and the State legislature by January 2006 and biannually thereafter on the impacts to California of global warming, including impacts to water supply, public health, agriculture, the coastline, and forestry, and to prepare and report on mitigation and adaptation plans to combat these impacts. This report is a part of the report to the governor and legislature, and focuses on public health impacts that have been associated with climate change. Considerable evidence suggests that average ambient temperature is increasing worldwide, that temperatures will continue to increase into the future, and that global warming will result in changes to many aspects of climate, including temperature, humidity, and precipitation (McMichael and Githeko, 2001). It is expected that California will experience changes in both temperature and precipitation under current trends. Many of the changes in climate projected for California could have ramifications for public health (McMichael and Githeko, 2001), and this document summarizes the impacts judged most likely to occur in California, based on a review of available peer-reviewed scientific literature and new modeling and statistical analyses. The impacts identified as most significant to public health in California include mortality and morbidity related to temperature, air pollution, vector and water-borne diseases, and wildfires. There is considerable complexity underlying the health of a population with many contributing factors including biological, ecological, social, political, and geographical. In addition, the relationship between climate change and changes in public health is difficult to predict for the most part, although more detailed information is available on temperature-related mortality and air pollution effects than the other endpoints discussed in this document. Consequently, these two topics are discussed in greater detail. Where possible, estimates of the magnitude and significance of these impacts are also discussed, along with possible adaptations that could reduce climate-related health impacts. In the context of this review, weather refers to meteorological conditions at a specific place and time over a relatively short time frame, such as up to a year or two. Climate, on the other hand, refers to the same meteorological conditions, but over a longer time frame, such as decades or centuries.

Drechsler, D.M.; Motallebi, N.; Kleeman, M.; Cayan, D.; Hayhoe,K.; Kalkstein, L.S.; Miller, N.L.; Jin, J.; VanCuren, R.A.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 1 Seeking Better Dietary Fats for Human Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 1 Seeking Better Dietary Fats for Human Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 1 Seeki

87

Urbanization impact on temperature change in China with emphasis on land cover change and human activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of urbanization on temperature trends in China was investigated with emphasis on two aspects of urbanization, land cover change and human activity. A new station classification scheme was developed to incorporate these two aspects by ...

Yan Li; Lijuan Zhu; Xinyi Zhao; Shuangcheng Li; Yan Yan

88

FIA-13-0049 - In the Matter of UNROW Human Rights Impact Litigation Clinic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 - In the Matter of UNROW Human Rights Impact Litigation 9 - In the Matter of UNROW Human Rights Impact Litigation Clinic FIA-13-0049 - In the Matter of UNROW Human Rights Impact Litigation Clinic On July 25, 2013, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) denied a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Appeal filed by UNROW Human Rights Impact Litigation Clinic (Appellant) of a determination issued by the Office of Information Resources (OIR). In its request, the Appellant asked for a copy of the "cable from the Embassy of the United State in London bearing the reference ID '09LONDON1156' sent on May 15, 2009, with the subject 'HMG Floats Proposal for Marine Reserve Covering the Chagos Archipelago (British Indian Ocean Territory.'" In its determination, OIR stated that the document was "under the jurisdiction

89

2007-No54-BoilingPoint Health and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biomass and Fossil Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007-No54-BoilingPoint Theme Health and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biomass and Fossil Fuel Energy nations. In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), biomass provides more than 90% of household energy needs in many nations. The combustion of biomass emits pollutants that currently cause over 1.6 million annual deaths

Kammen, Daniel M.

90

Evaluating Potential Human Health Risks Associated with the Developmen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To obtain the value for MF d , the EPA screening model for evaluating air quality impact, SCREEN3, was used. SCREEN3 (EPA 1995a) is a single-source Gaussian plume model that...

91

Using Constraint Satisfaction Problem approach to solve human resource allocation problems in cooperative health services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In developing countries, the increasing utilization of health services, due to a great life expectancy, is followed by a reduction in incomes from the public health system and from private insurance companies, to the payment of medical procedures. Beyond ... Keywords: Backtracking search algorithm, Constraint Satisfaction Problem, Cooperative services, Heuristics, Human resource allocation

Cicero Ferreira Fernandes Costa Filho; Dayse Aparecida Rivera Rocha; Marly Guimarães Fernandes Costa; Wagner Coelho de Albuquerque Pereira

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Human Resources for Health BioMed Central Commentary Public health workforce: challenges and policy issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL. This paper reviews the challenges facing the public health workforce in developing countries and the main policy issues that must be addressed in order to strengthen the public health workforce. The public health workforce is diverse and includes all those whose prime responsibility is the provision of core public health activities, irrespective of their organizational base. Although the public health workforce is central to the performance of health systems, very little is known about its composition, training or performance. The key policy question is: Should governments invest more in building and supporting the public health workforce and infrastructure to ensure the more effective functioning of health systems? Other questions concern: the nature of the public health workforce, including its size, composition, skills, training needs, current functions and performance; the appropriate roles of the workforce; and how the workforce can be strengthened to support new approaches to priority health problems. The available evidence to shed light on these policy issues is limited. The World Health Organization is supporting the development of evidence to inform discussion on the best

Robert Beaglehole; Mario R Dal Poz; Robert Beaglehole; Mario R Dal Poz

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy August 28, 2010 August 2010 Memorandum of Understanding between HHS and DOE regarding the authorities, responsibilities and procedures to conduc mandated activities relating to the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000. This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) serves to set forth the authorities, responsibilities, and procedures by which the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct statutorily mandated activities required to assist with claims processing

94

Using Factor Analysis to Attribute Health Impacts to Particulate Pollution Sources1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factor Analysis to Attribute Health Impacts to Particulate Factor Analysis to Attribute Health Impacts to Particulate Pollution Sources 1 Thomas Grahame U. S. Department of Energy Washington, DC George Hidy Envair/Aerochem Placitas, NM ABSTRACT Laden et al. (2000) recently reported results of applying factor analysis to data taken in six cities from1979 to1988, identifying airborne particle sources potentially affecting daily mortality. These authors sought relationships between source groups and risk measures using source tracer elements, Se (coal combustion), Pb (light duty motor vehicle sources), and Si (crustal--soil dispersion). Combined data analyses of this kind may overlook the complexity of source contributions, which have common tracer elements. In one of the cities, Boston for example, the authors found coal combustion

95

FAQ 41-What are the potential environmental impacts from manufacture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

environmental impacts from manufacture of depleted uranium shielded casks? In addition to human health and safety consequences, the PEIS evaluated the potential consequences of...

96

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences NAME:_______________________________________ (Administration Concentration or Human Services minor) UIN:_________________________________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:_______________________________________ Students must have an associate degree in a health-related area or license or certification to practice with CHP 400) The Nature of Science ________8___________________ BIO 108N-109N, CHEM 105N/106N-107N/108NS; PSYC 201S, 203S; SOC201S; WMST 201S Impact of Technology (satisfied in major with CHP 485) Choose

97

Human health issues for plutonium inhalation: Perspectives from laboratory animal studies  

SciTech Connect

Since the first production of plutonium in the 1940s, potential health effects from plutonium have been a concern for humans. The few people exposed to plutonium and the relatively small intakes that have occurred, at least in the Western world, have resulted in very little direct information from human population studies. The Manhattan Project workers have been followed for decades, and few health effects have been observed. The situation is similar for the population of workers at the Rocky Flats facility. Some information is now being released from the former Soviet Union on selected worker populations who show biological effects, primarily pulmonary fibrosis and some increase in lung cancers.

Muggenburg, B.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Guilmette, R.A. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Health impacts from urban air pollution in China : the burden to the economy and the benefits of policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In China, elevated levels of urban air pollution result in significant adverse health impacts for its large and rapidly growing urban population. An expanded version of the Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA), ...

Matus, Kira J. (Kira Jen)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Human Health Risk Assessment for Petroleum Refining Industry of the Remaining Air Toxics after MACT I Emissions Reductions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Inhalation risks on human health for hazardous air pollutants emitted from MACT I petroleum refining industry were determined using EPA HEM-3 Program. Methodology included compiling… (more)

Roa, Nadia C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Human Health Risk Assessment of Chemicals Encountered in Vegetation Management on Electric Utility Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the human health risk assessment of chemicals encountered in vegetation management on electric utility rights-of-way (ROWs).

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EI04~ PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL PeopleSoft Human Resource  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EI04~ PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL PeopleSoft - Human Resource System PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT June 11, 2009 oep"rtrnental Element &Site Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Building Number: REC 608 Building Name: IORC Name 'of Infonnatlon System, or IT Project INL PeopleSoft - Human Resource System exhibit ProJect UID 157044 NewPIA D Update ~ _____ i DOE PIA - Peoplesoft Final.doc

102

Fabrication of a Miniaturized Room Temperature Ionic Liquid Gas Sensor for Human Health and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fabrication of a Miniaturized Room Temperature Ionic Liquid Gas Sensor for Human Health and Safety temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) gas sensors utilizing electrochemical instrumentation demonstrate promising that enables miniaturized, rapid response, gas sensors to be realized using RTIL interfaces on a permeable

Mason, Andrew

103

Some proves of integrated influence of geomagnetic activity and weather changes on human health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our environment includes many factors, and each person on the Earth is permanently influenced by two of them: weather and magnetic field. It was found in the works of many investigators that the weather changes correlate with human health state. In the same time, disturbances of geomagnetic field (as one of the space weather manifestations) may influence bioobjects, including people. In this work we demonstrate the cumulative effect of different external factors (space weather and meteorological weather parameters) on human health on the base of medical experimental data (blood pressure and heart rate data rows for 86 people). It is shown that inclusion both solar-geomagnetic and weather parameters in simulation process give adjusting mixed parameter, which correlates with health state significantly better, than separated environmental parameters do.

Khabarova, O V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Benzo(C)fluorine, PAH with possible human health implications. (To BAP or  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benzo(C)fluorine, PAH with possible human health implications. (To BAP or Benzo(C)fluorine, PAH with possible human health implications. (To BAP or not to BAP) Speaker(s): Larry Goldstein Date: November 7, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants with potential health consequences. Essentially all the cancer risk from exposure to coal tar, cigarette smoke and other products of incomplete combustion is thought to reflect the contributions of PAHs with 4 or more fused rings. In risk assessment as currently practiced the major contributor to overall risk is the 5-ring PAH benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P).However, recent studies using a lifetime feeding protocol indicate that B(a)P does not meet criteria for application to risk assessment since it does not induce lung tumors, the endpoint upon which risk assessments

105

Environmental Impact  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Environmental Impact - a single comprehensive bibliographic information resource on climate change & other impacts of humans on the biosphere.

106

Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

107

Health impact assessment: A comparison of 45 local, national, and international guidelines  

SciTech Connect

This article provides a comparison of health impact assessment (HIA) guidelines from around the world and for multiple geographic scales. We identify commonalities and differences within HIA guides to discuss the plausibility of consensus guidelines and to inform guideline development. The practice of HIA has grown over the last two decades with a concurrent growth of HIA guides. This study expands on earlier review work and includes guides published since 2007 (Mindell, Boltong and Forde, 2008). From April 2010 to October 2011, 45 HIA guides were identified through an internet search and review of previous research. Common characteristics, key features, and the HIA process were analyzed. The 45 documents recommended similar but not identical processes for conducting HIAs. These analyses suggest that guidelines for HIAs are similar in many areas of the world and that new HIA practitioners can use these findings to inform their approach. Further discussion is needed to determine if the approaches established in these guidelines are followed and if one set of common guidelines could be written for use in numerous countries and regions. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyze 45 health impact assessment (HIA) guidelines worldwide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine similarities and unique attributes of each guideline. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of developing consensus guidelines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identifying additional guidelines aides in future HIA work and evaluation.

Hebert, Katherine A., E-mail: jsx3@cdc.gov; Wendel, Arthur M., E-mail: dvq6@cdc.gov; Kennedy, Sarah K., E-mail: heaton.sarah@gmail.com; Dannenberg, Andrew L., E-mail: adannenberg2@gmail.com

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Advanced Combustion, Emission Control, Health Impacts, and Fuels Merit Review and Peer Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

06 06 a n n u a l p r o g r e s s r e p o r t L e s s d e p e n d e n c e o n f o r e i g n o i l t o d a y, a n d t r a n s i t i o n t o a p e t r o l e u m - f r e e , e m i s s i o n s - f r e e v e h i c l e t o m o r r o w . F r e e d o m C A r A n d V e h i C l e T e C h n o l o g i e s P r o g r A m AdvAnced combustion, emission controls, HeAltH impActs, And Fuels merit review And peer evAluAtion Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 2006 Dear Colleague: This document summarizes the comments provided by the Review Panel for the FY 2006 Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Combustion, Emission Controls, Health Impacts, and Fuels Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, the "ACE Review," held on May 15-18, 2006 at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The raw evaluations and comments of the panel were provided (with reviewers' names deleted) to the presenters in early June and were used by national laboratory

109

Health impact assessment in Australia: A review and directions for progress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article provides an overview of Health Impact Assessment (HIA) within Australia. We discuss the development and current position of HIA and offer some directions for HIA's progression. Since the early 1990s HIA activity in Australia has increased and diversified in application and practice. This article first highlights the emergent streams of HIA practice across environmental, policy and health equity foci, and how these have developed within Australia. The article then provides summaries of current practice provided by each Australian state and territory. We then offer some insight into current issues that require further progression or resolution if HIA is to progress effectively in Australia. This progress rests both on developing broad system support for HIA across government, led by the health sector, and developing system capacity to undertake, commission or review HIAs. We argue that a unified and clear HIA approach is required as a prerequisite to gaining the understanding and support for HIA in the public and private sectors and the wider community.

Harris, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.harris@unsw.edu.a [Research Fellow, Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, Part of the Centres for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia); Spickett, Jeff, E-mail: J.Spickett@curtin.edu.a [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987 Perth, Western Australia (Australia)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume I: Human Health Evaluation Manual Supplemental Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-921314 1-921314 OSWER DIRECTIVE: 9285.6-03 March 25, 1991 RISK ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE FOR SUPERFUND VOLUME I: HUMAN HEALTH EVALUATION MANUAL SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE "STANDARD DEFAULT EXPOSURE FACTORS" INTERIM FINAL Office of Emergency and Remedial Response Toxics Integration Branch U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. 20460 (202)475-9486 REPRODUCED BY U.S.DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE SPRINGFIELD, VA 22161 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 MAR 25 1991 S O L I D W A S T E A N D E M E R G E N C Y R E S P O N S E O F F I C E O F OSWER Directive 9285.6-03 MEMORANDUM SUBJECT: FROM: Human Health Evaluation Manual, Supplemental Guidance: TO: Director, Waste Management Division, Regions I, IV, V, & VII Director, Emergency & Remedial Response Division,

111

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 13 Effect of Feeding and Then Depleteing a High Fruit and Vegetable Diet on Oxidizability in Human Serum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 13 Effect of Feeding and Then Depleteing a High Fruit and Vegetable Diet on Oxidizability in Human Serum Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - B

112

An assessment of potential health impacts on Utrok Atoll from exposure to cesium-137 (137Cs) and plutonium  

SciTech Connect

Residual fallout contamination from the nuclear test program in the Marshall Islands is a concern to Marshall Islanders because of the potential health risks associated with exposure to residual fallout contamination in the environment. Scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been monitoring the amount of fallout radiation delivered to Utrok Atoll residents over the past 4 years. This briefing document gives an outline of our findings from the whole body counting and plutonium bioassay monitoring programs. Additional information can be found on the Marshall Islands web site (http://eed.lnl.gov/mi/). Cesium-137 is an important radioactive isotope produced in nuclear detonations and can be taken up from coral soils into locally grown food crop products that form an important part of the Marshallese diet. The Marshall Islands whole body counting program has clearly demonstrated that the majority of Utrok Atoll residents acquire a very small but measurable quantity of cesium-137 in their bodies (Hamilton et al., 2006; Hamilton et. al., 2007a; 2007b;). During 2006, a typical resident of Utrok Atoll received about 3 mrem of radiation from internally deposited cesium-137 (Hamilton et al., 2007a). The population-average dose contribution from cesium-137 is around 2% of the total radiation dose that people normally experience from naturally occurring radiation sources in the Marshall Islands and is thousands of times lower than the level where radiation exposure is known to produce measurable health effects. The existing dose estimates from the whole body counting and plutonium bioassay programs are also well below radiological protection standards for protection of the public as prescribed by U.S. regulators and international agencies including the Marshall Islands Nuclear Claim Tribunal (NCT). Similarly, the level of internally deposited plutonium found in Utrok Atoll residents is well within the range normally expected for people living in the Northern Hemisphere. In addition, the preliminary results of the bioassay program on Utrok Atoll (Hamilton et al., 2007b) provide clear evidence that residents of Utrok Atoll have never acquired a significant uptake of plutonium either through an acute exposure event or from long-term chronic exposure to plutonium in the environment. This information and data should provide a level of assurance to the Utrok Atoll population group and its leadership that the dose contribution from exposure to residual radioactive fallout contamination on Utrok Atoll is very low, and is not likely to have any discernible impact on human health. We also estimate that the dose contribution based on current radiological exposure conditions will not produce any additional cancer fatalities (or any other measurable health condition) above that normally expected to arise in a population group of similar size. The potential risks from any genetic illnesses caused by exposure to residual fallout contamination in the environment will be even lower still. In conclusion, the data and information developed from the radiological protection monitoring program on Utrok appear to support a consensus that it is safe to live on Utrok Atoll. The health risks from exposure to residual fallout contamination on the atoll are minimal when compared with other lifetime risks that people normally experience, and are very small when compared to the threshold where radiation health effects could be either medically diagnosed in an individual or epidemiologically discerned in a group of people.

Hamilton, T

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

113

Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 1. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of a project on the health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. In addition to presenting an executive summary of the project, it sets forth the main results of the four tasks of the project: to review the health impacts (and related standards) of these forms of power generation, to review the status of standards related to plant safety (with an emphasis on nuclear power), to consider the role of the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission in selection of standards, and to set forth methodologies whereby that Commission may review the health and safety aspects of proposed sites and facilities.

Nero, A.V. Jr.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Multi-Pathway Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for a Model Coal-Fired Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a multimedia human health and ecosystem risk study of a model coal-fired power plant in a model setting, using data on an actual power plant transposed to a lakeside setting in the same state.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Form Approved Through 9/30/2007 OMB No. 0925-0001 Department of Health and Human Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Form Approved Through 9/30/2007 OMB No. 0925-0001 Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Services Review Group Type Activity Grant Number Total Project Period From: Through: Requested, SERVICE, LABORATORY, OR EQUIVALENT 5. TITLE AND ADDRESS OF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICIAL 2d. MAJOR SUBDIVISION E

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

116

Form Approved Through 6/30/2012 OMB No. 0925-0001 Department of Health and Human Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Form Approved Through 6/30/2012 OMB No. 0925-0001 Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Services Grant Application Do not exceed character length restrictions indicated. LEAVE BLANK) E-MAIL ADDRESS: 3e. DEPARTMENT, SERVICE, LABORATORY, OR EQUIVALENT 3f. MAJOR SUBDIVISION 3g

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

117

Mathematical study of the selective removal of different classes of atmospheric aerosols by coagulation, condensation, and gravitational settling, and the health impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to study the scavenging efficiencies of aerosol particles after some given dynamic mechanisms of removal (known as coagulation, condensation, and gravitational settling) as a function of time. In addition, the health impact of ... Keywords: Aerosols, Computational fluid dynamics, Health impact, Numerical methods, Precipitation scavenging

P. J. García Nieto; J. J. Del Coz Diaz; A. Martín Rodríguez; J. M. Matías Fernández

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Assessing health impacts in complex eco-epidemiological settings in the humid tropics: The centrality of scoping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural resources development projects are - and have been for more than 150 years - located in remote rural areas in developing countries, where local level data on community health is notoriously scarce. Health impact assessment (HIA) aims at identifying potential negative health consequences of such projects and providing the initial evidence-base for prevention and mitigation of diseases, injuries and risk factors, as well as promotion of positive effects. An important, but under-systematised early phase of the HIA process is scoping. It aims at organising diverse, often fragmentary, evidence and identifying potential project-related health impacts and underlying data gaps. It is also a key element in defining the terms of reference for the entire assessment. We present novel methodological features for the scoping process, emphasising the evaluation of quality of evidence, and illustrate its use in a contemporary HIA of the Simandou iron ore project in the Republic of Guinea. Assessment of data quality is integrated with specific content information via an analytical framework for the systematic identification of health outcomes and determinants of major concern. A subsequent gap analysis is utilised to assess the need for further baseline data collection and to facilitate the specification of a set of potential key performance indicators and strategies to inform the required evidence-base. We argue that scoping also plays a central role in the design of surveillance systems for longitudinal monitoring of health, equity and wellbeing following project implementation.

Winkler, Mirko S., E-mail: mirko.winkler@unibas.c [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); Divall, Mark J., E-mail: mdivall@newfields.co [NewFields, LLC, Pretoria 0062 (South Africa); Krieger, Gary R., E-mail: gkrieger@newfields.co [NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Balge, Marci Z., E-mail: mbalge@newfields.co [NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Singer, Burton H., E-mail: bhsinger@epi.ufl.ed [Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Utzinger, Juerg, E-mail: juerg.utzinger@unibas.c [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Health impact assessment research and practice: A place for paradigm positioning?  

SciTech Connect

In this article, we provide a critical review of the place of paradigm in health impact assessment (HIA) research and practice. We contend that most HIA practitioners have given insufficient attention to paradigm positioning when developing and applying HIA methodologies and that some concerns about current HIA practice can be attributed to this. We review HIA literature to assess the extent and nature of attention given to paradigm positioning and these related concerns. We then respond to our critique by exploring the implications, opportunities and challenges of adopting a critical realist paradigm, which we believe has the potential to help HIA practitioners to develop HIA methodology in a way that addresses these issues. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide a critical review of the place of paradigm in HIA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that HIA practitioners give insufficient attention to paradigm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The implications, opportunities and challenges of adopting a critical realist paradigm are explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first paper, to our knowledge, that discusses a critical realist approach to HIA.

Haigh, Fiona, E-mail: f.haigh@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation (CHETRE), Part of the UNSW Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Harris, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.harris@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation (CHETRE), Part of the UNSW Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Haigh, Neil, E-mail: neil.haigh@aut.ac.nz [Research and Scholarship Development, Centre for Learning and Teaching, AUT University, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Variation in Estimated Ozone-Related Health Impacts of Climate Change due to Modeling Choices and Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

Future climate change may cause air quality degradation via climate-induced changes in meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and emissions into the air. Few studies have explicitly modeled the potential relationships between climate change, air quality, and human health, and fewer still have investigated the sensitivity of estimates to the underlying modeling choices.

Post, Ellen S.; Grambsch, A.; Weaver, C. P.; Morefield, Philip; Huang, Jin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Nolte, Christopher G.; Adams, P. J.; Liang, Xin-Zhong; Zhu, J.; Mahoney, Hardee

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Literature Review of Airflow Fluid Characteristics and their Impact on Human Thermal Comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airflow dynamics significantly impact indoor thermal environment and human thermal comfort. Studies on the effects of airflow fluctuations on thermal comfort mainly focus on the effects of turbulence intensity and fluctuation frequency. The fluctuant characteristics of natural wind and mechanical wind are obviously different. However, the fluctuant characteristics of mechanical wind can shift to those of natural wind in some conditions. With the development of turbulence statistical theory, chaos and fractal theory, researchers began to use these theories to describe the structural characteristics of the fluctuating airflow in different environments or by different generating sources. The results of studies on airflow fluctuation and thermal environment are reviewed in this paper from two aspects: 1) the effect of the airflow fluctuations on thermal comfort, and 2) the physical structure of airflow fluctuations. This paper first reviews these achievements, and then summarizes studies conducted at Tsinghua University.

Zhao, R.; Zhang, Y.; Yu, N.; Di, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

UCRL-JC-1197l5 PREPRINT HUMAN HEALTH RISKS FROM TNT, RDX, and HMX  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

197l5 197l5 PREPRINT HUMAN HEALTH RISKS FROM TNT, RDX, and HMX IN ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA AND CONSIDERATION OF THE U.S. REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT Jeffrey I. Daniels John P. Knezovich This paper was pre ared for submittal to the Luxembourg, Luxembourg November 14-16,1994 Procee ap ings Demil '94 December 1994 Thisis apreprintof apaperintendedfor publicationin a journal orproceedings. Since changes may be made before publication, this preprint is made available with the understanding that it will not be cited or reproduced without the permission of the author. ~ T WSTRIBUTION OF THIS DOCUMENT tS UNLlMfTEa

123

Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment Work Plan Mud Pit Release Sites, Amchitka Island, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

This Work Plan describes the approach that will be used to conduct human health and ecological risk assessments for Amchitka Island, Alaska, which was utilized as an underground nuclear test site between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U.S. Department of Energy) conducted two nuclear tests (known as Long Shot and Milrow) and assisted the U.S. Department of Defense with a third test (known as Cannikin). Amchitka Island is approximately 42 miles long and located 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, in the western end of the Aleutian Island archipelago in a group of islands known as the Rat Islands. Historically including deep drilling operations required large volumes of drilling mud, a considerable amount of which was left on the island in exposed mud pits after testing was completed. Therefore, there is a need for drilling mud pit remediation and risk assessment of historical mud pit releases. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the constituents in soil, surface water, and sediment at these former testing sites. Its goal is the collection of data in sufficient quantity and quality to determine current site conditions, support a risk assessment for the site surfaces, and evaluate what further remedial action is required to achieve permanent closure of these three sites that will protect both human health and the environment. Suspected compounds of potential ecological concern for investigative analysis at these sites include diesel-range organics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, volatile organic compounds, and chromium. The results of these characterizations and risk assessments will be used to evaluate corrective action alternatives to include no further action, the implementation of institutional controls, capping on site, or off-sit e disposal of contaminated waste. The results of this evaluation will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

DOE /NV

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

124

Deriving Criteria Weights for Health Decision Making: A Brief Tutorial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? j Health Impact Strategic Alignment Organizational ImpactCriterion Health Impact Strategic Alignment OrganizationalHealth Impact (HI) Strategic Alignment (SA) Organizational

Aragon, Tomas J; Dalnoki-Veress, Ferenc; Shiu, Karen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Quantifying the relative contribution of the climate and direct human impacts on mean annual streamflow in the contiguous United States  

SciTech Connect

Climate change and human activities are known to have induced changes to hydrology. Quantifying the relative contribution of the impact of each factor on the hydrologic response of watersheds requires the use of some type of model. In this paper, a decomposition method based on the Budyko model is used to divide the relative contribution of climate and human on mean annual streamflow for 413 watersheds in the contiguous United States. The data of annual precipitation, runoff and potential evaporation of each of the watersheds are obtained from the international Model Parameter Estimation Project (MOPEX), which is often assumed to only include gages unaffected by human activities. The data is split in to two periods (1948-1970 and 1971-2003). The relative contributions of climate change and human activities to the observed change in mean annual streamflow between the two periods are estimated. Although climate change is found to impact annual streamflow more than human activities, the results show that assuming the dataset is unaffected by human activities is far unrealistic. Also climate and human induced changes are more stringent in arid regions where water is limited. The results are compared using four single-parameter functional forms and with previously published data.

Wang, Dingbao; Hejazi, Mohamad I.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

126

OMB No. 0990-0115 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PHS 2013-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2013-1, Solicitation for SBIR Contract Proposals 5 1.5 REPORT FRAUD, WASTE AND ABUSE The OfficeOMB No. 0990-0115 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PHS 2013-1 SOLICITATION #12;PHS 2013-1, Solicitation for SBIR Contract Proposals ii TABLE OF CONTENTS PART I INSTRUCTIONS

Martin, Alex

127

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PHS 2013-2 OMNIBUS SOLICITATION OF THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PHS 2013-2 OMNIBUS SOLICITATION OF THE NATIONAL SUBMISSION DATES APRIL 5, AUGUST 5, AND DECEMBER 5, 2013 (MAY 7, SEPTEMBER 7, 2013 AND JANUARY 7, 2014 2013-2, Omnibus Solicitation for SBIR/STTR Grant Applications January 2013 NIH, CDC, FDA, and ACF

Baker, Chris I.

128

A system dynamics model for the screening-level long-term assessment of human health risks at contaminated sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the design of sustainable and cost-effective management strategies for contaminated sites, decision makers need appropriate tools, i.e. environmental decision support systems to assist them in the planning, assessment, selection and optimisation ... Keywords: Contaminated sites, EDSS, Human health risk assessment, Monitored natural attenuation, Risk-based land management, System dynamics, Uncertainty, Vensim

Ursula S. Mcknight; Michael Finkel

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Adjoint sensitivity analysis of the intercontinental impacts of aviation emissions on air quality and health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over 10,000 premature mortalities per year globally are attributed to the exposure to particulate matter caused by aircraft emissions. Unlike previous studies that focus on the regional impacts from the aircraft emissions ...

Koo, Jamin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Programs director`s report for the Office of Health and Environmental Research  

SciTech Connect

Since its establishment, the Department of Energy`s Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has had responsibility for conducting biological research to develop the knowledge needed to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy use and development, including the potential health impacts of radiation. The Health Effects Research Program has established the basis for understanding the health consequences of radiation for humans, developed radiation dosimetry methodology, characterized and evaluated the health impacts of fossil fuels, and developed and conducted research to determine the health impacts of inhaled toxicants. The results of this research have provided input for setting genetic standards for radiation and chemical exposure.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

members) Subject: Technical evaluation of “EPA’s analysis of Florida drywall samples 1 and review of analytical results from the Florida Department of Health, ” from the EPA’s National Air

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Human Influences on Wildfire in Alaska from 1988 through 2005: An Analysis of the Spatial Patterns of Human Impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boreal ecosystems in Alaska are responding to climate change in many ways, including changes in the fire regime. While large-scale wildfires are an essential part of the boreal forest ecosystem, humans are changing fire regimes through ignition ...

M. P. Calef; A. D. McGuire; F. S. Chapin III

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Recent developments in coal mining technology and their impact on miners' health  

SciTech Connect

Advances in technology have significantly reduced the long-term health risks associated with underground coal mining. While the potential risks include exposure to hazardous substances and noise, the reduction of respirable dust in the workplace has been emphasized here because of the greater probability of exposure and the well-documented consequences. Since enactment of the Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, great strides have been made in reducing worker exposure to respirable dust. As production rates continue to increase, particularly in longwall sections, continued advances in dust control technology will be required. These advances will be needed to meet existing, and perhaps even more stringent future, exposure limits. Mechanization has resulted in a significant reduction in exposure to hazards while increasing productivity. Use of remotely controlled equipment is also increasing rapidly, and efforts are underway to develop completely automated mining systems. These automated systems may further reduce the risk of health impairment due to the underground working environment. 80 refs.

Taylor, L.D.; Thakur, P.C. (CONSOL Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The development and application of the chemical mixture methodology in analysis of potential health impacts from airborne release in emergencies  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM) is used for emergency response and safety planning by the U.S. Department of Energy, its contractors, and other private and public sector organizations. The CMM estimates potential health impacts on individuals and their ability to take protective actions as a result of exposure to airborne chemical mixtures. They are based on the concentration of each chemical in the mixture at a designated receptor location, the protective action criteria (PAC) providing chemical-specific exposure limit values, and the health code numbers (HCNs) that identify the target organ groupings that may be impacted by exposure to each chemical in a mixture. The CMM has been significantly improved since its introduction more than 10 years ago. Major enhancements involve the expansion of the number of HCNs from 44 to 60 and inclusion of updated PAC values based on an improved development methodology and updates in the data used to derive the PAC values. Comparisons between the 1999 and 2009 versions of the CMM show potentially substantial changes in the assessment results for selected sets of chemical mixtures. In particular, the toxic mode hazard indices (HIs) and target organ HIs are based on more refined acute HCNs, thereby improving the quality of chemical consequence assessment, emergency planning, and emergency response decision making. Seven hypothetical chemical storage and processing scenarios are used to demonstrate how the CMM is applied in emergency planning and hazard assessment.

Yu, Xiao-Ying; Petrocchi, Achille J.; Craig, Douglas K.; Glantz, Clifford S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ciolek, John T.; Lu, Po-Yung; Bond, Jayne-Anne; Tuccinardi, Thomas E.; Bouslaugh, Philip R.

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Potential Health and Environmental Impacts Associated with the Manufacture and Use of Photovoltaic Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI and the California Energy Commission (CEC), the principal sponsor of this project, have collected information on potential environmental impacts of chemicals used in California's photovoltaic (PV) industry. This report provides an overview of the photovoltaic industry and includes the types of cells that were manufactured or under development through 2002 and the chemicals used in the manufacturing processes and final modules. The potential for chemicals used in PV cells to be released to air, surfa...

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

136

Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies appropriations for 1994. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

These hearings of the HR Subcommittee on the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Services, include appropriation considerations and testimony for the National Center for Human Genome Research under the National Institutes of Health appropriation.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Human infrastructure as process and effect: its impact on individual scientists' participation in international collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We adopt the concept of human infrastructure as our analytic lens to examine two high energy physics collaborations. Our analysis goes beyond the macro level of virtual organizations to include the human infrastructures in scientists' home institutions ... Keywords: collaboration between differently resourced nations, high energy physics, human infrastructure, international collaboration

Airong Luo; Margaret Ann Murphy; Ted Hanss

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Deep Atomic Binding (DAB) Approach in Interpretation of Fission Products Behavior in Human Body, and Health Consequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to models used to predict health effects of fission products enter the human body, a large number of fatalities, malignancies, thyroid cancer, born (genetic) defects,...etc.. But the actual data after Chernobyl and TMI accidents, and nuclear detonations in USA and Marshal Islands, were not consistent with these models. According to DAB, these data could be interpreted, and conflicts between former models predictions and actual field data explained. (author)

Ajlouni, Abdul-Wali M.S. [Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Amman 11814 (Jordan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Health Impacts of Traditional Medicines and Bio-prospecting: A World Scenario Accentuating Bhutan's Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

medicinal plants as indispensable cures for many ailments. Although some cultures used individual natural products as medicines, many traditions propounded powerful combinations with different ingredients known as poultices, tinctures and mixtures... health care, the natural products also play significant role in the discovery of the natural product-based drugs. The natural products like plants, animals, microorganisms, marine organisms and the extremophiles have been an important sources...

Wangchuk, Phurpa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Health effects and related standards for fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants. Volume 6 of health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. [In California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews health effects and related standards for fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants, emphasizing impacts which may occur through emissions into the atmosphere, and treating other impacts briefly. Federal regulations as well as California state and local regulations are reviewed. Emissions are characterized by power plant type, including: coal-fired, oil-fired, gas-fired, combined cycle and advanced fossil-fuel plants; and liquid and vapor geothermal systems. Dispersion and transformation of emissions are treated. The state of knowledge of health effects, based on epidemiological, physiological, and biomedical studies, is reviewed.

Case, G.D.; Bertolli, T.A.; Bodington, J.C.; Choy, T.A.; Nero, A.V.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Biopersistence of man-made vitreous silicate fibers in the human lung. Environ Health Perspect 102(Suppl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is now a substantial body of experimental data on the pulmonary biopersistence of man-made vitreous silicate fibers (MMVSF), but human data are seriously lacking. Our knowledge in this field is essentially limited to a few reports of measurements of fibers retained in lung tissue samples taken at autopsy from workers manufacturing these products. Three types of exposure were studied: fibrous glass, mineral wool, and refractory ceramic fibers. Overall, the available data do not provide evidence for substantial long-term retention of fibers in the human lung after occupational exposure to MMVSF dusts. A word of caution, however; the amount of data supporting the previous statement is much greater for fibrous glass than for either mineral wool or refractory ceramic fibers. There is no human data on the key question of the kinetics of pulmonary clearance of inhaled MMVSF.- Environ Health Perspect 102(Suppl 5):225-228 (1994)

R Sebastien

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric power lines and climate change model Electric power lines and climate change model Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts application/pdf icon eaei-org-chart-11-2013.pdf The Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department analyzes U.S. and global energy consumption and the associated social, economic, and environmental impacts, including human health, greenhouse gas emissions, and global climate change. Researchers conduct R&D and provide technical assistance to governments on: Lifecycle analysis of products and industries; How energy use affects health in the indoor environment; Energy markets and utility policy; Renewable energy policy and economics; Energy efficiency standards and codes; International energy and environmental impacts in the developed and

143

Multi-Pathway Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for a Model Coal-Fired Power Plant Using a Revised Arsenic Bioconcentratio n Factor for Edible Fish  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a multimedia human health and ecosystem risk study of a model coal-fired power plant in a model setting, using data from an actual power plant that have been transposed to a lakeside setting in the same state. Values of arsenic concentrations in similar ecosystem settings were applied to calculate its contributions to risk.BackgroundThere is increased scientific and regulatory interest in the suite of risks to human health and ecosystems ...

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

144

Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Model of medical supply demand and astronaut health for long-duration human space flight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The medical care of space crews is the primary limiting factor in the achievement of long-duration space missions. (Nicogossian 2003) The goal of this thesis was to develop a model of long-duration human space flight ...

Assad, Albert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Health IT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fewer errors and redundant tests. ... Since 2004, NIST has worked closely with the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of the National ...

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

147

Weekly August 14, 2009 / Vol. 58 / No. 31 department of health and human services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

caused by gasoline-powered generators, and two were caused by house fires. The median age of patients in the southeastern portion of the state without electricity (2). Six days later, 1.3 million homes were still without electrical power (2). To assess the impact of storm- related CO exposures and to enhance prevention efforts

148

Development of techniques for rapidly assessing the local air quality impacts of airports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The combustion of fossil fuels for aviation activity harms air quality and human health near airports through the production of PM2.5. Currently, dispersion models can assess these local-scale (distances ~10 km) impacts, ...

Lee, Gideon (Gideon Luther)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Protecting People and the Planet a proposal to address the human rights impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and energy justice, anti-corruption, water rights, rule of law, and human rights. For more infor- mation by gender, age, ethnicity, or other characteristics) in policy formation.40 Another example of how Due to gender-based distribution dynamics within families, women and girls also are least likely

Kammen, Daniel M.

150

The impact of environmental factors on human life-history evolution: an optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

life-history evolution, infection stresses, life expectancy, optimal energy allocation, size is vtEt, the amount of energy allocated to Evolutionary optimization model of human life history 1201, E.V. 2001. Evolution of life history: models based on optimization of energy allocation (in Russian

151

A framework for simulating human cognitive behavior and movement when predicting impacts of catastrophic events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our nation has seen an increased need to train its civil authorities and emergency personnel under life-threatening scenarios where human life and critical infrastructure are assumed to be at risk. This training is typically obtained or re-enforced via ...

Mary Court; Jennifer Pittman; Christos Alexopoulos; David Goldsman; Seong-Hee Kim; Margaret Loper; Amy Pritchett; Jorge Haddock

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Impact of Preoperative Radiotherapy on General and Disease-Specific Health Status of Rectal Cancer Survivors: A Population-Based Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To date, few studies have evaluated the impact of preoperative radiotherapy (pRT) on long-term health status of rectal cancer survivors. Using a population-based sample, we assessed the impact of pRT on general and disease-specific health status of rectal cancer survivors up to 10 years postdiagnosis. The health status of older ({>=}75 years old at diagnosis) pRT survivors was also compared with that of younger survivors. Methods and Materials: Survivors identified from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry treated with surgery only (SU) or with pRT between 1998 and 2007 were included. Survivors completed the Short Form-36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Colorectal 38 (EORTC QLQ-CR38) questionnaire. The SF-36 and EORTC QLQ-CR38 (sexuality subscale) scores of the survivors were compared to an age- and sex-matched Dutch normal population. Results: A total of 340 survivors (response, 85%; pRT survivors, 71%) were analyzed. Overall, survivors had similar general health status. Both short-term (<5 years) and long-term ({>=}5 years) pRT survivors had significantly poorer body image and more problems with gastrointestinal function, male sexual dysfunction, and defecation than SU survivors. Survivors had comparable general health status but greater sexual dysfunction than the normal population. Older pRT survivors had general and disease-specific health status comparable to that of younger pRT survivors. Conclusions: For better survivorship care, rectal cancer survivors could benefit from increased clinical and psychological focus on the possible long-term morbidity of treatment and its effects on health status.

Thong, Melissa S.Y., E-mail: M.Thong@uvt.nl [Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University (Netherlands); Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mols, Floortje [Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University (Netherlands); Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lemmens, Valery E.P.P. [Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rutten, Harm J.T. [Department of Surgery, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Roukema, Jan A. [Department of Surgery, St. Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands); Martijn, Hendrik [Department of Radiotherapy, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de [Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University (Netherlands); Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Lessons learned: Needs for improving human health risk assessment at USDOE Sites  

SciTech Connect

Realistic health risk assessments were performed in a pilot study of three U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites. These assessments, covering a broad spectrum of data and methods, were used to identify needs for improving future health risk assessments at USDOE sites. Topics receiving specific recommendations for additional research include: choice of distributions for Monte Carlo simulation; estimation of risk reduction; analysis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Database on food and nutrient intakes; investigations on effects of food processing on contaminant levels; background food and environmental concentrations of contaminants; method for handling exposures to groundwater plumes, methods for analyzing less than lifetime exposure to carcinogens; and improvement of bioaccumulation factors.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Building research capacity for indigenous health : a case study of the National Health and Medical Research Council : the evolution and impact of policy and capacity building strategies for indigenous health research over a decade from 1996 to 2006.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As Australia’s leading agency for funding health research (expending over $400 million in 2006), the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) has a major… (more)

Leon de la Barra, Sophia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human sources weapons test fallout medical exposures clU};es as those due to fallout from weapons testing, todegree of voluntary exposure, fallout contributions being

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Technology assessment: environmental, health, and safety impacts associated with oil recovery from US tar-sand deposits  

SciTech Connect

The tar-sand resources of the US have the potential to yield as much as 36 billion barrels (bbls) of oil. The tar-sand petroleum-extraction technologies now being considered for commercialization in the United States include both surface (above ground) systems and in situ (underground) procedures. The surface systems currently receiving the most attention include: (1) thermal decomposition processes (retorting); (2) suspension methods (solvent extraction); and (3) washing techniques (water separation). Underground bitumen extraction techniques now being field tested are: (1) in situ combustion; and (2) in situ steam-injection procedures. At this time, any commercial tar-sand facility in the US will have to comply with at least 7 major federal regulations in addition to state regulations; building, electrical, and fire codes; and petroleum-industry construction standards. Pollution-control methods needed by tar-sand technologies to comply with regulatory standards and to protect air, land, and water quality will probably be similar to those already proposed for commercial oil-shale systems. The costs of these systems could range from about $1.20 to $2.45 per barrel of oil produced. Estimates of potential pollution-emisson levels affecting land, air, and water were calculated from available data related to current surface and in situ tar-sand field experiments in the US. These data were then extrapolated to determine pollutant levels expected from conceptual commercial surface and in situ facilities producing 20,000 bbl/d. The likelihood-of-occurrence of these impacts was then assessed. Experience from other industries, including information concerning health and ecosystem damage from air pollutants, measurements of ground-water transport of organic pollutants, and the effectiveness of environmental-control technologies was used to make this assessment.

Daniels, J.I.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Ricker, Y.E.

1981-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

157

Memorandum of Understanding Between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES AND THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY I. INTRODUCTION This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) serves to set forth the authorities, responsibilities, and procedures by which the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct statutorily mandated activities required to assist with claims processing under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (EEOICP A). EEOICP A provides for timely, uniform, and adequate compensation of covered employees and, where applicable, survivors of such employees suffering from illnesses incurred by such employees in the performance of duty. HHS and DOE will make every effort to ensure that activities conducted under this MOU, as

158

4.0 IMPACTS OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 IMPACTS OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 0 IMPACTS OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES This chapter evaluates the environmental consequences of the proposed action (Section 4.1) and of the alternatives (Section 4.2) . The analysis focuses primarily on impacts associated with routine operation of the glass melter. In some instances (such as human health) , additional analysis is provided for accident conditions. 4.1 THE PROPOSED ACTION The proposed action was evaluated to determine the potential impacts of a number of environmental components, including air quality, surface water quality, and biological resources, as well as the potential effects to human health and safety. The potential impacts to these receptors are evaluated in the following subsections. No impact pathways were identified for land use, socioeconomics, or groundwater resources.

159

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I-Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C, Risk C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/004 Publication 9285.7-01 C December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper NOTICE The policies set out in [his document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

160

5.0 POTENTIAL ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM URANIUM MINES This document has focused on the potential risks to humans from exposures to unreclaimed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5.0 POTENTIAL ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM URANIUM MINES This document has focused on the potential risks to humans from exposures to unreclaimed uranium mining materials. The potential effects in the consideration of unreclaimed uranium mines. Although the Superfund characterization process includes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The potential human health effect(s) of the metal uranium in the environment. Report on the known human health effects associated with the exposure to the metal uranium  

SciTech Connect

Concern over the levels of the metal uranium in the environment as a result of industrial activities has been expressed by several Federal and State agencies. This concern is associated with potential human health effects of this metal on kidney function and bone formation. Although limits for the Metal uranium in the environment remain to be set, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently in the process of establishing guidance limits for this metal in water and soil. These limits will be established for both the metal and the associated radioactivity. The suggested limits currently being considered for water and soil are, 20 pCi/liter and 10 pCi/gram wet weight, respectively. For naturally occurring uranium EPA assumes that 1 ug of uranium metal equals 0.67 pCi at equilibrium (i.e. at equilibrium the mass ratio of {sup 234}uranium to {sup 238}uranium is small but their activities are equal). Thus the limits for water and soil on weight basis for the uranium metal would be 30 ug/liter and 15 ug/gram wet weight, respectively. These limits are being established based on the potential increase in cancer death in populations that exceed this limit. Since there does not appear to be a significant correlation between cancer deaths and.uranium metal exposure (see discussion below), these limits will probably be established based on the known association between radionuclides exposure and cancer deaths. The exposure limits for other health effects such as kidney damage and retardation in bone formation apparently are not being considered by EPA.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

C. J. Li et al. (Eds), Plant nutrition for food security, human health and environmental protection. 44-45, 2005 2005 Tsinghua University Press. Printed in Beijing, China.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. J. Li et al. (Eds), Plant nutrition for food security, human health and environmental protection of Na+ through K+ transporters or channels (Blumwald et al. 2000). This Na+ entry disrupts the normally cytosolic K+ /Na+ concentration is a key requirement for plant salt tolerance (Glenn et al. 1999

Zhu, Jian-Kang

163

User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a user's guide to EPRI's RIVRISK framework, Version 5.0, which can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. The report also documents RIVRISK's theoretical foundation and graphical user interface. Industrial and government staff concerned with chemical and thermal releases will find this report useful.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

164

Study of the potential health and environmental impacts from the development of liquid-dominated geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes seven programs to provide scientific input, understanding, and forecasting capability for hydrothermal energy areas needing resolution. The three major areas addressed are (1) the impacts on living components of the aqueous and terrestrial ecosystems, (2) the impacts on the quality of the abiotic environment itself, and (3) the techniques needed to measure releases from hydrothermal activities.

Williams, J.M. (ed.)

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP)  

SciTech Connect

The Environment, Safety and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) models human safety and health risk resulting from waste management and environmental restoration activities. Human safety and health risks include those associated with storing, handling, processing, transporting, and disposing of radionuclides and chemicals. Exposures to these materials, resulting from both accidents and normal, incident-free operation, are modeled. In addition, standard industrial risks (falls, explosions, transportation accidents, etc.) are evaluated. Finally, human safety and health impacts from cleanup of accidental releases of radionuclides and chemicals to the environment are estimated. Unlike environmental impact statements and safety analysis reports, ESHRAP risk predictions are meant to be best estimate, rather than bounding or conservatively high. Typically, ESHRAP studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management or environmental restoration program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, processing, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal. ESHRAP can be used to support complex environmental decision-making processes and to track risk reduction as activities progress.

Eide, Steven Arvid; Thomas Wierman

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Health IT Workshop Notice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... among NVLAP, the NIST Information Technology Laboratory, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), laboratories interested in ...

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

167

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1978 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health and safety  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report is in four sections, corresponding to the program elements: technology impacts, environmental control engineering, operational and environmental compliance and human health studies. Each section was abstracted and indexed separately. (JGB)

Bair, W.J.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Regulating mercury with the Clear Skies Act : the resulting impacts on innovation, human health, and the global community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments require the U.S. EPA to control mercury emission outputs from coal-burning power plants through implementation of MACT, Maximum Achievable Control Technology, standards. However, in 2003 ...

Sweeney, Meghan (Meghan Kathleen)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

'Sifting the significance from the data' - the impact of high-throughput genomic technologies on human genetics and health care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be particularly high for common diseases. Mapping the ‘polygenes’ Krawczak also discussed the limitations of the available strategies for mapping the loci which contribute to the common, complex disorders. The power of the affected sib pair (ASP) linkage approach... , Latimer C, Dicks E, Menzies A, Stephens P, Blow M, Greenman C, Xue Y, Tyler- Smith C, Thompson D, Gray K, Andrews J, Barthorpe S, Buck G, Cole J, Dunmore R, Jones D, Maddison M, Mironenko T, Turner R, Turrell K, Varian J, West S, Widaa S, et al: A...

Clarke, Angus J; Cooper, David N; Krawczak, Michael; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Wallace, Helen M; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Raymond, Frances L; Chadwick, Ruth; Craddock, Nick; John, Ros; Gallacher, John; Chiano, Mathias

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

170

Synthetic fossil fuel technologies: health problems and intersociety cooperation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential health impacts of synthetic fossil fuel products are considered mainly in terms of complex and potentially carcinogenic mixtures of polynuclear aromatic (PNA) compounds. These components of oils and tars present an especially perplexing range of problems to those concerned with health protection. The nature of these problems, such as multifactorial exposure, are discussed within a framework of current and future standards to regulate human exposure. Some activities of government agencies, national laboratories, and professional societies are described. A case can be made for pooling the resources of these groups to achieve better solutions for assessing the acceptability of the various technologies and safeguarding human health.

Gammage, R B; Turner, J E

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Health physicist William J. Bair, Ph.D., October 14, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is a transcript of an interview of William J. Blair by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Blair was selected for this interview because of of his participation in the University of Rochester Atomic Energy Project and for his radiological inhalation research at Hanford Site. After a brief biographical sketch Dr. Blair discusses his remembrances on a wide rage of topics. Discussions include his graduate studies at Rochester University, use of human subjects at Rochester, his inhalation studies, his limited involvement with human studies, differing biological effects of plutonium 238 and 239, emissions from proposed nuclear-propelled aircraft, cancer research, cleanup at Nevada Test Site and Marshall Islands, impact of Langham studies to understand Plutonium exposure, and AEC controversies and colleagues.

Harrell, D.; Shindledecker, C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

EA-1110: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

110: Finding of No Significant Impact 110: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1110: Finding of No Significant Impact Use of Herbicide for Vegetation Control at VHF Stations, Microwave Stations, Electrical Substations, and Pole Yards Southwestern Power Administration has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) that addressed vegetation control at Southwestern's substations, radio stations, and pole yards. Based on the analysis developed in the EA, Southwestern has concluded, that with proper herbicide application restrictions, there will be no significant environmental impact to the air quality, surface water quality, ground water quality, wetlands, wildlife, aquatic life, threatened and endangered species, cultural resources, human health effects, transportation, or disposal of waste materials.

173

Photographer: Unknown Prepared by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

serves the public by using the best science, taking responsive public health actions, and providing trusted health information to prevent harmful exposures and diseases related to toxic substances. You may contact ATSDR toll free at 800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

EA-0970: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

70: Finding of No Significant Impact 70: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0970: Finding of No Significant Impact Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory Project No. 94-AA-01 Pantex Plant Amarillo, TX Based on the information contained in the Environmental Assessment, the DOE determines that the construction and operation of the Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory at Pantex Plant and demolition of the existing Analytical Chemistry Laboratory does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. EA-0970-FONSI-1995.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-0970: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1533: Finding of No Significant Impact

176

Transgene Excision Has No Impact on In Vivo Integration of Human iPS Derived Neural Precursors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The derivation of induced human pluripotent stem cells (hiPS) has generated significant enthusiasm particularly for the prospects of cell-based therapy. But there are concerns about the suitability of iPS cells for in vivo ...

Major, Tamara

177

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of health physicist Karl Z. Morgan, Ph.D., conducted January 7, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report provided a transcript of an interview of Dr. Karl. Z. Morgan by representatives of the DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Morgan was selected for this interview because of his research for the Manhattan Project at the Metallurgical Laboratory in Chicago and his work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The oral history covers Dr. Morgan`s work as a pioneer in the field of Health Physics, his research at ORNL and his work since he retired from ORNL.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 4: Environmental Impact Assessment Approach, Assumptions, and Methodology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 4 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT APPROACH, ASSUMPTIONS, AND METHODOLOGY This EIS evaluates potential impacts on human health and the natural environment from building and operating a DUF 6 conversion facility at three alternative locations at the Paducah site and for a no action alternative. These impacts might be positive, in that they would improve conditions in the human or natural environment, or negative, in that they would cause a decline in those conditions. This chapter provides an overview of the methods used to estimate the potential impacts associated with the EIS alternatives, summarizes the major assumptions that formed the basis of the evaluation, and provides some background information on human health

179

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Potential Environmental Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Environmental Impacts of Hydrogen-Based Transportation & Power Potential Environmental Impacts of Hydrogen-Based Transportation & Power Systems Project Summary Full Title: Potential Environmental Impacts of Hydrogen-Based Transportation & Power Systems Project ID: 245 Principal Investigator: Thomas Grieb Brief Description: The goal of this project is to analyze the effects of emissions of hydrogen, the six criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases on climate, human health, ecosystems, and structures. Purpose The overall goal of the project is to compare emissions of hydrogen, the six criteria pollutants (CO, SOX, NO2, particulate matter, ozone, and lead), and greenhouse gases from near- and long-term methods of generating hydrogen for vehicles and stationary power systems, and the effects of those emissions on climate, human health, the ecosystem, and structures.

180

Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Fukushima  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Fukushima Dai-ichi Incident Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Fukushima Dai-ichi Incident April 12, 2013 - 3:09pm Addthis An LM scientist points to star reindeer lichen on Adak Island, Alaska. An LM scientist points to star reindeer lichen on Adak Island, Alaska. What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment The U.S. Department of Energy Office Legacy Management (LM) has a long-term stewardship mission to protect human health and the environment from the legacy of underground nuclear testing conducted at Amchitka Island, Alaska, from 1965 to 1971. As part of its mission, LM collected biological and seawater samples from Amchitka and Adak Islands, for background comparison,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Evaluation of Potential Human Health Inhalation Risks from Mercury in Building and Construction Materials Containing Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns have been raised regarding the potential public health risks from mercury that is associated with the use of coal combustion products in building materials and construction applications. This report presents the results of a risk assessment that evaluated mercury inhalation under several exposure scenarios, including concrete and wallboard in residential and classroom settings.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

182

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FY 2002 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS VOLUME 1 Foreword of an Interdisciplinary Approach.................................17 Section III: Department of Health and Human ServicesNATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH National Institutes of Health Strategic Research Plan and Budget

Bandettini, Peter A.

183

Wind Turbines and Health A Rapid Review of the Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to present findings from a rapid review of the evidence from current literature on the issue of wind turbines and potential impacts on human health. In particular the paper seeks to ascertain if the following statement can be supported by the evidence: There are no direct pathological effects from wind farms and that any potential impact on humans can be minimised by following existing planning guidelines. This statement is supported by the 2009 expert review commissioned by the American and

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

-----_ _111 _ _ _ __ HEALTH STATU~S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- - - - -_ _111 _ _ _ __ HEALTH STATU~S OF VIETNAM VETER~I~NS SUPPLEMENT A LABORATORY METHOD~3 AND QUALITY CONTROL U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SEIIVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE Control Vietnam Experience Study January 1989 t t U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

185

DOE Issues Final Mercury Storage Environmental Impact Statement: Texas Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Issues Final Mercury Storage Environmental Impact Statement: DOE Issues Final Mercury Storage Environmental Impact Statement: Texas Site Is Preferred for Long-Term Mercury Storage DOE Issues Final Mercury Storage Environmental Impact Statement: Texas Site Is Preferred for Long-Term Mercury Storage January 19, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Department of Energy has prepared a Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement to analyze the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven locations. Based on these factors, DOE identified the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas, as the preferred alternative for long-term management and storage of mercury. DOE will consider the environmental impact information presented in this

186

California Beach Health: Evaluation of Grunion as an Indicator Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Grunion and Sandy Beaches: Considerations for theAbout Human Impacts on Sandy Beaches. ” Martin, K. Keynotescientists. “Human Impacts on Sandy Beaches in California. ”

Martin, Karen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

ITL Bulletin The Exchange of Health Care Information ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... HIPAA requires the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HSS) to adopt, among other standards, security standards for certain health ...

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

188

NIST, Partners Develop Testing Infrastructure for Health IT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Health and Human Services (HHS) identified ... The health IT testing infrastructure does ... NIST's National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program ...

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

189

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1979 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health, and safety  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Part 5 of the 1979 Annual Report to the Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for the Environment presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Technology Impacts, the Office of Environmental Compliance and Overview, and the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The report is in four sections, corresponding to the program elements: technology impacts, environmental control engineering, operational and environmental compliance, and human health studies. In each section, articles describe progress made during FY 1979 on individual projects.

Baalman, R.W.; Dotson, C.W. (eds.)

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B, B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/003 Publication 9285.7-01 B December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper N O T I C E The policies set out in this document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

191

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I. Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part D, Standardized Planning, Reporting, and Review of Superfund Risk Assessments)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publication 9285.7-01D Publication 9285.7-01D January 1998 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part D, Standardized Planning, Reporting, and Review of Superfund Risk Assessments) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Revision No. 0 ii January 1998 NOTICE This document provides guidance to EPA staff. The guidance is designed to communicate National policy on the planning, reporting and review of Superfund risk assessments. The document does not, however, substitute for EPA's statutes or regulations, nor is it a regulation itself. Thus, it cannot impose legally-binding requirements on EPA, States, or the regulated community, and may not apply to a particular situation based upon

192

STAFF REPORT LOCALIZED HEALTH IMPACTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Battery Management System Integration Facilities for Lithium Ion Batteries." Keywords: Air quality an "Expansion of Battery Management System Integration Facilities for Lithium Ion Battery Modules" to: o systems with lithium ion battery modules. In normal operations, these facilities and projects do

193

EIS-0244: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0244: Final Environmental Impact Statement Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization This EIS evaluates the impacts on the human...

194

Human Performance - Fossil Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All humans make errors. Industrial human errors can result in a loss of life and can significantly impact the productivity and cost effectiveness of any facility or company. Several industries in which human error has had a significant impact (for example, airline, medical, military, nuclear power, aviation, and chemical) have implemented human performance programs with excellent results. Human errors by fossil plant operators can easily challenge plant safety and production. In the fossil operations are...

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

195

Climate Instability and Public Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Instability and Public Health Climate Instability and Public Health Speaker(s): Paul Epstein Date: August 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Evan Mills Climate restricts the range of infectious diseases, while weather affects the timing and intensity of outbreaks. The ranges of several key diseases or their vectors are changing, along with shifts in plant communities and the retreat of alpine glaciers. In addition, extreme weather events associated with warming create conditions conducive to "clusters" of disease outbreaks. The rapid spread of West Nile virus in the Americas is related, paradoxically, to drought and its impact on wildlife (230 species of animals, 138 species of birds) could alter the ratios of predator birds to their prey (including rodents) and thus have implications for human

196

DOE/EIS-0365; Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Imperial-Mexicali 230-kV Transmission Lines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Imperial-Mexicali Imperial-Mexicali FEIS S-67 December 2004 TABLE S-3 Summary of Impacts for Proposed Action and Other Alternatives by Resource Area a For the proposed action, that is, the granting of one or both of the Presidential permits and ROWs, for most resource areas, the analysis was bounded by calculating impacts as if both lines had been allowed. This serves two purposes. First, it demonstrates the maximum possible impacts; second, it clearly presents the combined impacts of the agencies' preferred alternative, that is, permitting both facilities. The only exceptions to this methodology are in the areas of air, water, and human health. Impacts to air, water, and human health attributable to permitting each transmission line separately are contained in Sections 4.2, 4.3, and 4.11 of Volume 1 of this EIS, respectively.

197

Economic Impact & Diversity (WCF) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Impact & Diversity (WCF) Economic Impact & Diversity (WCF) The purpose of the workforce Plan is to provide focus and direction to Human Resources (HR) strategy. This will...

198

The impact of ciminal background checks on the selection of school volunteers as reported by human resource professionals of selected Texas public school districts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of criminal background checks on the selection of school volunteers as reported by human resource professionals in selected Texas public school districts. Ninety Texas school districts were randomly selected for this study, and results were categorized by the size of the school district based on student population. Survey responses were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. A Chi-square analysis was performed to determine if there were significant differences (p ? 0.05) in responses to research questions based on size of the school district. Findings in the study included the following: 1. There was no difference in the school district approach to policy and procedure development based on the size of the school district as it pertained to criminal background checks of school volunteers. 2. There was no difference in response rate based on the size of the school district regarding type of offense, number of offenses, adjudication process, and type of criminal history data search. 3. There was a significant difference (p ? 0.05) in approach between largesized and small-sized school districts regarding the acceptable timeframe concerning recency of offense on a volunteer criminal history record. 4. There was no difference in response rate based on the size of the school district regarding the effectiveness of criminal background check procedures in eliminating potential volunteers who might pose a threat or risk to teachers, staff, and students. The following are recommendations for further study: 1. A similar study could assess the responses from teachers, staff, and/or students to determine if these different education categories possess different perceptions regarding the impact of criminal background checks on school volunteers. 2. A further study could analyze the specific written policies of school districts and determine the decision criteria for each level of offense. 3. This study focused on school volunteers. A research study could specifically focus on the impact of criminal background checks on parent volunteers, or conversely be more general, focusing on the impact of criminal background checks on professional or auxiliary employees.

Smith, Richard Kimball

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Comparative Inter-Species Pharmacokinetics of Phenoxyacetic Acid Herbicides and Related Organic Acids. Evidence that the Dog is Not a Relevant Species for Evaluation of Human Health Risk.  

SciTech Connect

Phenoxyacetic acids including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) are widely utilized organic acid herbicides that have undergone extensive toxicity and pharmacokinetic analyses. The dog is particularly susceptible to the toxicity of phenoxyacetic acids and related organic acids relative to other species. Active renal clearance mechanisms for organic acids are ubiquitous in mammalian species, and thus a likely mechanism responsible for the increased sensitivity of the dog to these agents is linked to a lower capacity to secrete organic acids from the kidney. Using published data describing the pharmacokinetics of phenoxyacetic and structurally related organic acids in a variety of species including humans, inter-species comparative pharmacokinetics were evaluated using allometic parameter scaling. For both 2,4-D and MCPA the dog plasma half-life (t1/2) and renal clearance (Clr; ml hr-1) rates did not scale as a function of body weight across species; whereas for all other species evaluated, including humans, these pharmacokinetic parameters reasonably scaled. This exceptional response in the dog is clearly illustrated by comparing the plasma t1/2 at comparable doses of 2,4-D and MCPA, across several species. At a dosage of 5 mg/kg, in dogs the plasma t1/2 for 2,4-D and MCPA were {approx}92 - 106 hr and 63 hr, respectively, which is substantially longer than in the rat ({approx}1 and 6 hr, respectively) or in humans (12 and 11 hr, respectively). This longer t1/2, and slower elimination in the dog, results in substantially higher body burdens of these organic acids, at comparable doses, relative to other species. Although these results indicate the important role of renal transport clearance mechanisms as determinants of the clearance and potential toxicity outcomes of phenoxyacetic acid herbicides across several species, other contributing mechanisms such as reabsorption from the renal tubules is highly likely. These findings suggest that for new structurally similar organic acids, a limited comparative species (rat vs. dog) pharmacokinetic analysis early in the toxicology evaluation process may provide important insight into the relevance of the dog. In summary, the substantial difference between the pharmacokinetics of phenoxyacetic acids and related organic acids in dogs relative to other species, including humans, questions the relevance of using dog toxicity data for the extrapolation of human health risk.

Timchalk, Chuck

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Office of International Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Health Studies International Health Studies Home Mission and Functions Japan Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) Studies Marshall Islands Program Russian Health Studies Program Russian Radiobiology Human Tissue Repository Spain (Palomares) Program Health and Safety HSS Logo Office of International Health Studies Reports to the Office of Health and Safety Mission and Functions Mission The Office of International Health Studies engages in the conduct of international scientific studies that may provide new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation in the workplace or people exposed in communities as a result of nuclear accidents. The mission includes providing health and environmental monitoring services to populations specified by law.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A possible connection between thermal comfort and health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is a well-established fact that cardiovascular health requires periodic exercise during which the human body often experiences significant physical discomfort. It is not obvious to the exerciser that the short-term pain and discomfort has a long-term positive health impact. Many cultures have well-established practices that involve exposing the body to periodic thermal discomfort. Scandinavian saunas and American Indian sweat lodges are two examples. Both are believed to promote health and well-being. Vacations often intentionally include significant thermal discomfort as part of the experience (e.g., sunbathing, and downhill skiing). So people often intentionally make themselves thermally uncomfortable yet the entire foundation of providing the thermal environment in our buildings is done to minimize the percentage of people thermally dissatisfied. We must provide an environment that does not negatively impact short-term health and we need to consider productivity but are our current thermal comfort standards too narrowly defined and do these standards actually contribute to longer-term negative health impacts? This paper examines the possibility that the human body thermoregulatory system has a corollary relationship to the cardiovascular system. It explores the possibility that we have an inherent need to exercise our thermoregulatory system. Potential, physiological, sociological and energy ramifications of these possibilities are discussed.

Stoops, John L.

2004-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

202

EIS-0120: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Final Environmental Impact Statement 0: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0120: Final Environmental Impact Statement Waste Management Activities for Groundwater Protection Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this environmental impact statement (EIS) to assess the environmental consequences of the implementation of modified waste management activities for hazardous, low-level radioactive, and mixed wastes for the protection of groundwater, human health, and the environment at its Savannah River Plant (SRP) in Aiken, South Carolina. This EIS, which is both programmatic and project-specific, has been prepared in accordance with Section 102(2)(C) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended. DOE/EIS-0120, Final Environmental Impact Statement Waste Management

203

EIS-0423: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0423: Final Environmental Impact Statement Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. EIS-0423-FEIS-Summary-2011.pdf Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement: Volume 1, DOE/EIS-0423 (January 2011)

204

Health and Environmental Research. Summary of Accomplishments  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This is a short account of a 40-year-old health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Under the sponsorship of the federal agencies that were consecutively responsible for the national energy mission, this research program has contributed to the understanding of the human health and environmental effects of emergining energy technologies. In so doing, it has also evolved several nuclear techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of human ills. The form of this presentation is through examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of these areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

1984-04-00T23:59:59.000Z

205

Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researchers Model Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Research may clarify the effectiveness of regional pollution controls May 28, 2013 | Tags: Climate Research, Hopper Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, (510) 495-2404 LosAngelesSmogv1.jpg Smog over downtown Los Angeles. Aerosols are microscopic particles-like dust, pollen and soot-that ubiquitously float around in our atmosphere. Despite their tiny stature, these particles can have a huge impact on human health, climate and the environment. So scientists from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Colorado State University and the California Air Resources Board have set out to characterize the roles of various particles as atmospheric change agents on a regional scale.

206

A framework for human microbiome research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of microbial communities and their genes (the microbiome) exist throughout the human body, with fundamental roles in human health and disease. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Human Microbiome Project ...

Friedman, Jonathan

207

Health impacts from diesel freight emissions: Development of a geospatial analytical framework for policy evaluation with a case study of Sacramento, CA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diesel particulate matter, emitted by many types of freight transport, poses a health risk to populations living near freight activity. Accurate information about the magnitude… (more)

Murphy, Colin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Linking public health and the health of the Chesapeake Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chesapeake Bay has a profound impact on the lives of all who reside in the 64,000 square miles of its watershed. From crab cakes to sailboats, drinking water to naval ships, the Bay touches virtually every aspect of life in the region. The Bay has inspired literature, driven the regional economy, and shaped political decision making and development patterns for homes, industry, agriculture, and transportation. As population demands increase and urban boundaries expand into pristine landscapes, the sustainability of the Chesapeake Bay and its resources face unprecedented pressures. Consequently, the public's health also is vulnerable to Bay pollution and other stresses stemming from development activities and widespread growth occurring throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed. This paper will examine the linkages between the environmental quality of the Bay and the population health status, recommend ways to bridge ecological and human health concerns in the context of the Bay, and finally present a framework for developing a public health report card for the Bay.

Burke, T.A.; Litt, J.S.; Fox, M.A.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

368 Health Science 1997/98 CSULB Catalog HEALTH SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

368 · Health Science · 1997/98 CSULB Catalog HEALTH SCIENCE College of Health and Human Services Champlin Director, Radiation Therapy Stephanie Eatmon Director, School Health Education Susan C. Giarratano Coordinator, Student Affairs/Radiation Therapy Robert Pfister Advisor, Single Subject Credential Dale W. Evans

Sorin, Eric J.

210

Your Environment.Your Health. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services #12;Your Environment.Your Health. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH),a part of the U.S.Department of Health and Human

Bandettini, Peter A.

211

Electromagnetic field of the large power cables and interaction with the human body  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we survey our research on domain decomposition and related algorithms for large power electric cables and the impact on the human health. The equations that describe the behaviour of the fields in electromagnetic devices are coupled because ... Keywords: bioheat equation, coupled fields, electrical cables, finite element method

Daniela Cârstea

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Deployment related mental health care seeking behaviors in the U.S. military and the use of telehealth to mitigate their impacts on access to care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interviewees report that groups of service members returning from Iraq and Afghanistan often require substantial amounts of mental health care, causing surges in demand at military hospitals. These hospitals have difficulty ...

Hess, John (John Thomas)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The impact of individual-, unit-, and enterprise-level factors on psychological health outcomes : a system dynamics study of the U.S. military  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other psychological health issues have emerged as a signature pathology of combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. However, the full continuum of care in the U.S. military for ...

Wang, Judy Y. H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

EA-1388: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

388: Finding of No Significant Impact 388: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1388: Finding of No Significant Impact Groundwater Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site The U.S. Department of Energy is proposing three ground water compliance strategies for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. These proposed strategies were derived through consultation with representatives of the Navajo UMTRA Program, the Navajo Environmental Protection Agency, and other agencies. The strategies are designed to minimize risk to human health and the environment that result from mill-related constituents in ground water and surface water. Finding of No Significant Impact Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings SIte DOE/EA-1388 (September 2001)

215

LAND AND WATER USE CHARACTERISTICS AND HUMAN HEALTH INPUT PARAMETERS FOR USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DOSIMETRY AND RISK ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters but the use of site-specific values by the applicant is encouraged. A detailed survey of land and water use parameters was conducted in 1991 and is being updated here. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk and vegetable consumption rates as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS are documented. Based on comparisons to the 2009 SRS environmental compliance doses, the following effects are expected in future SRS compliance dose calculations: (1) Aquatic all-pathway maximally exposed individual doses may go up about 10 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors; (2) Aquatic all-pathway collective doses may go up about 5 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors that offset the reduction in average individual water consumption rates; (3) Irrigation pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go up about 40 percent due to increases in the element-specific transfer factors; (4) Irrigation pathway collective doses may go down about 50 percent due to changes in food productivity and production within the 50-mile radius of SRS; (5) Air pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go down about 10 percent due to the changes in food productivity in the SRS area and to the changes in element-specific transfer factors; and (6) Air pathway collective doses may go down about 30 percent mainly due to the decrease in the inhalation rate assumed for the average individual.

Jannik, T.; Karapatakis, D.; Lee, P.; Farfan, E.

2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

216

Environment, pollution and human health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This could be the result of a greater mobility of uranium, leading to a depleted content of this element their natural intrinsic content in uranium and thorium. A black shale collected from Timahdit (Morocco, 230 Th, 228 Th have multiples modes of occurrence in the Moroccan's black shale. Uranium

Brierley, Andrew

217

Addendum to the User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an addendum to the User's Guide for EPRI's RIVRISK analytic framework, Version 5.0. RIVRISK can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. Some minor inconsistencies between the original User's Guide (EPRI Report 1000733) and the model examples were discovered during model applications. This addendum provides modified pages of the User's Guide that correct those inconsistencies. Those planning to use RIVR...

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

218

Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1987--September 30, 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) is to provide a sound scientific basis for the measurement and assessment of human health impacts of radiological and chemical substances. Our approach to fulfilling this mission is to conduct a broad program of experimental, theoretical, and field research based on a strong foundation of fundamental physical studies that blend into well-established programs in life sciences. Topics include biomedical screening techniques, biological and chemical sensors, risk assessment, health hazards, dosimetry, nuclear medicine, environmental pollution monitoring, electron-molecule interactions, interphase physics, surface physics, data base management, environmental mutagens, carcinogens, and tetratogens.

Kaye, S.V.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

2012 Annual Planning Summary for Health, Safety and Security...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within Health, Safety and Security. APS-2012-HSS.pdf More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Health, Safety and...

220

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COVER: Climate change impacts have been linked to ecological and agricultural shifts, public health and economic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY i #12;COVER: Climate change impacts have been linked to ecological assessment Research Report from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Office of Biological://www.sc.doe.gov/ober/BER_workshops.html PNNL-18417 #12;#12;U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY v PREFaCE This report represents the discussions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Environmental Assessment Fact Sheet - Potential Impacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE has prepared a draft Environmental Assessment for Conducting Astrophysics and Other Basic Science Experiments at the WIPP Site. It examines the potential environmental consequences from conducting particular types of scientific experiments in an area of the WIPP underground called the experiment gallery. The environmental assessment also looks at the potential cumulative impacts of conducting experiments and operating the WIPP as a transuranic waste repository. This fact sheet presents questions and answers about potential impacts to human health and the environment and proposed protections and mitigations, based on the draft environmental assessment. The deep geologic repository at the WIPP could be the most favorable U.S. environment currently available for experiments in many scientific disciplines, including particle astro-

222

Changing scenario of micronutrient deficiencies in India during four decades and its impact on crop responses and nutritional health of human and animals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004) Zinc in soils and crop nutrition. IZA Publications.MV (2006) Micronutrients in crops and in soils of India.micronutrients for global crop production. (Ed. BJ Alloway),

Singh, M V; Narwal, R P; G, Bhupal Raj; Patel, K P; Sadana, U S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Health, Safety and Security (HSS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within Health, Safety and Security (HSS).

224

Systematic examination of the impact of pre-stimulus alpha- mu and gamma band oscillations on perception : correlative and causal manipulation in mouse and human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The over-arching hypothesis that drives my work is that neural dynamics, fluctuating on millisecond to second time scales, powerfully impact perception. In this thesis, I employ correlative electrophysiological recording ...

Pritchett, Dominique L. (Dominique Leon)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Wind Turbines and Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power has been gaining prominence as a viable sustainable alternative to other forms of energy production. Studies have found that there is increasing population demand for ‘green’ energy 1,2. In Australia, this has been encouraged by the introduction of the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Act in 2000 and the Renewable Energy Target Scheme in 2009. As with any new technology, wind turbines are not without controversy. Those who oppose the development of wind farms contend that wind turbines can adversely impact the health of individuals living in close proximity. Do wind turbines impact on health? Concerns regarding the adverse health impacts of wind turbines focus on infrasound noise, electromagnetic interference, shadow flicker and blade glint produced

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Wind Turbines and Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power has been gaining prominence as a viable sustainable alternative to other forms of energy production. Studies have found that there is increasing population demand for ‘green’ energy1,2. In Australia, this has been encouraged by the introduction of the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Act in 2000 and the Renewable Energy Target Scheme in 2009. As with any new technology, wind turbines are not without controversy. Those who oppose the development of wind farms contend that wind turbines can adversely impact the health of individuals living in close proximity. Do wind turbines impact on health? Concerns regarding the adverse health impacts of wind turbines focus on infrasound noise, electromagnetic interference, shadow flicker and blade glint produced

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Design and potential clinical impact of a noninvasive thermal diffusion sensor to monitor human peripheral microvascular perfusion in real-time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perfusion in peripheral tissues is fundamental to the characterization of both local and global cardiovascular health. However, despite the inherent accessibility of tissues such as skin to microvascular measurements, there ...

Li, Vivian V. (Vivian Victoria)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Africa's Changing Markets for Health and Veterinary Services: The New Institutional Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

delivery to the organizational structure of health services.of the organizational structure of the health services (pre-crisis organizational structure of human health care has

Leonard, David K.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Quantum physics and human values  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the following concepts: the quantum conception of nature; the quantum conception of man; and the impact upon human values. (LSP).

Stapp, H.P.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

EIS-0286: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0286: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program, Richland, Washington DOE needs to provide capabilities to continue, or modify, the way it treats, stores, and/or disposes of existing and anticipated quantities of solid LLW, MLLW, TRU waste, and ILAW at the Hanford Site in order to protect human health and the environment; facilitate cleanup at Hanford and other DOE facilities; take actions consistent with decisions reached by DOE under the WM PEIS; comply with local, State, and federal laws and regulations; and meet other obligations such as the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (also referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement, or TPA) (Ecology et al. 1989).

231

Biofuels Impact Study2010 Biofuel Impact Study Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oregon has abundant human and natural capital that can contribute significantly to the State’s energy future. Our biomass resources have the potential to contribute to future energy needs while encouraging job creation and economic opportunities in rural Oregon. The Governor and the Oregon State Legislature have made significant commitments and investments towards realizing the full potential that bioenergy has for Oregon. Oregon has led the nation with policies that promote the use of biomass for fuel and energy production. State agencies, non-profits and the private sector are working hard to deliver this commitment of job creation, energy savings, and energy independence for Oregon businesses and residents. This is the first periodic report issued to the Legislature that assesses the impact of the State’s biofuel program. The report includes a summary of current incentives and policies that support biofuels, statistics about jobs at Oregon’s bioenergy facilities, and a description of the status of the bioenergy and biofuels industries in Oregon. More data is necessary to truly evaluate the impacts of Oregon’s bioenergy incentives to the health of the bioenergy industry and the creation of jobs. Several state agencies are working to collect some of these data, which will provide a clearer picture of the industry at the time of our next report to the Legislature. Biomass heating facility at the Harney Hospital in Burns, OR

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Catalogue of OSD and HID Offshore Research by Key Human Factor Elements – 2002 Revision. Prepared by AEA Technology Environment for the Health and Safety Executive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The catalogue of OSD and HID Offshore human factors research was conceived by HSE OSD OD6 as an aid to OSD Inspectors and the offshore Industry. It was originally published in 1999 under Project 3696. This catalogue has now been updated by AEA Technology Environment. OSD Offshore has been renamed HID Offshore and hence the catalogue contains both OSD and HID Offshore human factors research, although the majority of the projects included date from the HSE Offshore Safety Division era. The catalogue provides: • description of the human factor elements as derived by AEA Technology from the Revision

Angela Crosbie; Fiona Davies

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Laboratory Reporting Level MCL, Maximum Contaminant Level MRL, Maximum Reporting Level MTBE, Methyl tert Figures 3 #12;Abstract BACKGROUND: As the population and demand for safe drinking water from domestic concentrations to U.S. EPA Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) and Health-Based Screening Levels. RESULTS: VOCs

234

Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 5: Appendix F -- Baseline human health risk assessment report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix F documents potential risks and provides information necessary for making remediation decisions. A quantitative analysis of the inorganic, organic, and radiological site-related contaminants found in various media is used to characterize the potential risks to human health associated with exposure to these contaminants.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Implementation plan: Executive summary. Environmental restoration and waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

In November 1989, the Secretary of Energy established the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. This action consolidated the Department`s environmental restoration and waste management activities throughout the nation. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy decided that the Department would prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on the proposed integrated Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. The principal focus of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement process will be the evaluation of strategies for conducting remediation of Department sites and facilities to ensure the protection of human health and the environment; and the evaluation of potential configurations for waste management capabilities.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

WHAT GOOD IS WEALTH WITHOUT HEALTH? THE EFFECT OF HEALTH ON THE MARGINAL UTILITY OF CONSUMPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate how the marginal utility of consumption varies with health. To do so, we develop a simple model in which the impact of health on the marginal utility of consumption can be estimated from data on permanent income, ...

Finkelstein, Amy

237

Healthful Lipids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthful Lipids addresses critical and current regulatory issues and emerging technologies, as well as the efforts made toward the production of healthier lipids. Healthful Lipids Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants d

238

Vice President for Student Affairs Executive Director, CSU Health Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Director of Medical Services Pharmacy Dental Services Laboratory Services Women's Clinic Assistant Director Behavioral Health Director of Specialty Counseling Services Drugs, Alcohol, & You (DAY) Programs i Behavioral Health Director of Business Services Accounting Student Health Insurance Human Resources Manager

239

EIS-0303: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0303: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Closure of High-Level Waste Tanks at the Savannah RIver Site, Aiken, South Carolina The Department of Energy (DOE) intends to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) on the proposed closing of high-level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE proposes to close the tanks to protect human health and the environment and to promote safety. DOE's preferred alternative is to remove the residual waste from the tanks to the extent technically and economically feasible, and then to fill them with a reducing grout to bind up residual waste and a structural material to prevent collapse of the tanks.

240

EIS-0303: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

03: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact 03: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0303: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Closure of High-Level Waste Tanks at the Savannah RIver Site, Aiken, South Carolina The Department of Energy (DOE) intends to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) on the proposed closing of high-level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE proposes to close the tanks to protect human health and the environment and to promote safety. DOE's preferred alternative is to remove the residual waste from the tanks to the extent technically and economically feasible, and then to fill them with a reducing grout to bind up residual waste and a structural material to prevent collapse of the tanks.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of health physicist Constantine J. Maletskos, Ph.D., conducted January 20, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report is a transcript of an interview with Dr. Constatine J. Maletskos by representatives of the DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Maletskos was selected for this interview because of his research at the Radioactivity Center of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), at the Harvard Medical School, and at the New England Deaconess Hospital. After a brief biographical sketches Dr. Maletskos discusses at length about his work at the Center on research that used subjects from the Walter E. Fernald State School in Waverly, Massachusetts and the New England Center for Aging, as well as blood volume work involving pregnant women. He further discusses his work with radium Dial Painters, his work with Dr. Robley Evans, and various other subjects concerning experiments with human subjects under the auspices of the AEC.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Air quality analysis and related risk assessment for the Bonneville Power Administration's Resource Program Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is considering 12 different alternatives for acquiring energy resources over the next 20 years. Each of the alternatives utilizes a full range of energy resources (e.g., coal, cogeneration, conservation, and nuclear); however, individual alternatives place greater emphases on different types of power-producing resources and employ different timetables for implementing these resources. The environmental impacts that would result from the implementation of each alternative and the economic valuations of these impacts, will be an important consideration in the alternative selection process. In this report we discuss the methods used to estimate environmental impacts from the resource alternatives. We focus on pollutant emissions rates, ground-level air concentrations of basic criteria pollutants, the acidity of rain, particulate deposition, ozone concentrations, visibility attenuation, global warming, human health effects, agricultural and forest impacts, and wildlife impacts. For this study, pollutant emission rates are computed by processing BPA data on power production and associated pollutant emissions. The assessment of human health effects from ozone indicated little variation between the resource alternatives. Impacts on plants, crops, and wildlife populations from power plant emissions are projected to be minimal for all resource alternatives.

Glantz, C S; Burk, K W; Driver, C J; Liljegren, J C; Neitzel, D A; Schwartz, M N; Dana, M T; Laws, G L; Mahoney, L A; Rhoads, K

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Lawrence Livermore study finds human activity affects vertical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

human activity affects vertical structure of atmospheric temperature Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Human influences have directly impacted the latitude...

244

Children's physical activity and parents' perception of the neighborhood environment: neighborhood impact on kids study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health: The built environment: Designing communities toRosenberg DE: Neighborhood environment and physical activity455. 3. Impact of the built environment on health. http://

Tappe, Karyn A; Glanz, Karen; Sallis, James F; Zhou, Chuan; Saelens, Brian E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Identification of contaminants of concern Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA) Project at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is evaluating the current human and ecological risks from contaminants in the Columbia River. The risks to be studied are those attributable to past and present activities on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is located in southcentral Washington State near the town of Richland. Human risk from exposure to radioactive and hazardous materials will be addressed for a range of river use options. Ecological risk will be evaluated relative to the health of the current river ecosystem. The overall purpose of the project is to determine if enough contamination exists in the Columbia River to warrant cleanup actions under applicable environmental regulations. This report documents an initial review, from a risk perspective, of the wealth of historical data concerning current or potential contamination in the Columbia River. Sampling data were examined for over 600 contaminants. A screening analysis was performed to identify those substances present in such quantities that they may pose a significant human or ecological risk. These substances will require a more detailed analysis to assess their impact on humans or the river ecosystem.

Napier, B.A.; Batishko, N.C.; Heise-Craff, D.A.; Jarvis, M.F.; Snyder, S.F.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WVDP Waste Management EIS WVDP Waste Management EIS S-3 Figure S-1. Location of the West Valley Demonstration Project Not to scale Final WVDP Waste Management EIS S-23 Table S-2. Summary of Normal Operational Impacts at West Valley Impact Area Unit of Measure No Action Alternative Alternative A - Preferred Alternative B Human Health Impacts a Public Impacts from Ongoing Operations MEI LCF 3.7 × 10 -7 3.7 × 10 -7 3.7 × 10 -7 Population LCF 1.5 × 10 -3 1.5 × 10 -3 1.5 × 10 -3 Worker Impacts Involved worker MEI LCF 3.4 × 10 -4 1.3 × 10 -3 1.3 × 10 -3 Noninvolved worker MEI LCF 3.0 × 10 -4 3.0 × 10 -4 3.0 × 10 -4 Involved worker population LCF 2.1 × 10 -3 0.031 0.031 Noninvolved worker population LCF 0.075 0.075 0.075 Total worker population LCF 0.077 0.11 0.11

247

STAFF REPORT LOCALIZED HEALTH IMPACTS REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of these synergies, the 300 refuse trucks currently operating on LNG could be readily converted to operate on CNG, H2 gas (CNG) can reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (g-CO2 equivalent/ mile) by ~21%. Converting NG on CNG or liquefied natural gas (LNG). Current ICEs will need to be modified for use with NG, however

248

STAFF REPORT LOCALIZED HEALTH IMPACTS REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, compressed natural gas (CNG), criteria emissions, demographic, E85, Energy Commission, environmental justice Category: Natural Gas for School Fleets, CNG Station, LNG or L/CNG Station · Bear Valley Unified School to the wholesale or retail distribution and sales stations. The projects will be assessed in two separate rounds

249

Global Aerosol Health Impacts: Quantifying Uncertainties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric fine particulate matter <2.5 ?m (PM2.5) can cause cardiovasculatory and respiratory damages and mortalities. Assessing population exposure to and damages from PM2.5 is important for policy, but measurement ...

Selin, Noelle E.

250

The land around typical Darfur refugee camps is cleared of all wood 2 T H E T R O U B L E W I T H C O O K I N Gthe impact of biomass-burning on health & enviornment and what we are doing about it  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O O K I N Gthe impact of biomass-burning on health & enviornment and what we are doing about it H fire By 2030, biomass use for cooking is projected to in- crease by an addi- tional 30%13 References [1-Darfur Stove World Population 3B 7B 3B 4B Biomass Users Non-Biomass Users 2 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0deaths annually

Eisen, Michael

251

Trace-element geochemistry of coal resource development related to environmental quality and health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses for decision makers and those involved in coal resource development the environmental and health impacts of trace-element effects arising from significant increases in the use of coal, unless unusual precautions are invoked. Increasing demands for energy and the pressing need for decreased dependence of the United States on imported oil require greater use of coal to meet the nation's energy needs during the next decade. If coal production and consumption are increased at a greatly accelerated rate, concern arises over the release, mobilization, transportation, distribution, and assimilation of certain trace elements, with possible adverse effects on the environment and human health. It is, therefore, important to understand their geochemical pathways from coal and rocks via air, water, and soil to plants, animals, and ultimately humans, and their relation to health and disease. To address this problem, the Panel on Trace Element Geochemistry of Coal Resource Development Related to Health (PECH) was established. Certain assumptions were made by the Panel to highlight the central issues of trace elements and health and to avoid unwarranted duplication of other studies. Based on the charge to the Panel and these assumptions, this report describes the amounts and distribution of trace elements related to the coal source; the various methods of coal extraction, preparation, transportation, and use; and the disposal or recycling of the remaining residues or wastes. The known or projected health effects are discussed at the end of each section.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Health News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Open Data for Climate and Health Insights Print E-mail Metadata Access Tool for Climate and Health (MATCH) Website Thursday, May 9, 2013 Posted by Tom Armstrong, Executive...

253

Emergency Response Health Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health. Topics of discussion included in this manuscript are related to responding to a radiation emergency, and the necessary balance between desired high accuracy laboratory results and rapid turnaround requirements. Considerations are addressed for methodology with which to provide the most competent solutions despite challenges presented from incomplete datasets and, at times, limited methodology. An emphasis is placed on error and uncertainty of sample analysis results, how error affects products, and what is communicated in the final product.

Mena, R., Pemberton, W., Beal, W.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Models for managing the impact of an epidemic Daniel Bienstock ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

However, even a much milder epidemic would have vast social impact as services such as health care, police and utilities became severely hampered by staff.

255

California's Public Health Laboratories: Inter-organizational cooperation models to bolster laboratory capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The organizational and administrative structure of healthin inter-organizational relationships in health and humanPublic Health Laboratories: Inter-organizational cooperation

Hsieh, Kristina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arise from a single human error poor layout of the importantBWR is most sensitive to human error. similar Information8 fi 2 84 E-] 1 F.vent, m Human Error G 82E-8 SUE -8 50E-B

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Health and safety.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides information on the possible human exposure to environmental media potentially contaminated with radiological materials and chemical constituents from operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This report is based on the best available information for Calendar Year (CY) 2008, and was prepared in support of future analyses, including those that may be performed as part of the SNL/NM Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement.

Avery, Rosemary Penelope; Johns, William

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

College of Medicine Department of Environmental Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical IRB review of graduate student activities that involve Human Subjects Research. Thesis Activities that involve Human Subjects Research in the Department of Environmental Health. a. The UC IRB of a graduate degree" that involve human subjects research. b. The UC IRB may accept CCHMC as the IRB

Papautsky, Ian

259

Regional Climate Projections of Extreme Heat Events in Nine Pilot Canadian Communities for Public Health Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Public health planning needs the support of evidence-based information on current and future climate, that could be used by health professionals and decision-makers to better understand and respond to the health impacts of extreme heat. Climate ...

Barbara Casati; Abderrahmane Yagouti; Diane Chaumont

260

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Imperial-Mexicali 230-kV Transmission Lines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Imperial-Mexicali Imperial-Mexicali DEIS 1-4 May 2004 FIGURE 1.1-1 Regional Setting for Imperial-Mexicali 230-kV Transmission Lines Introduction Imperial-Mexicali DEIS 1-5 May 2004 FIGURE 1.1-2 La Rosita Power Complex: Electrical Distribution 2-40 May 2004 Alternatives Imperial-Mexicali DEIS TABLE 2.5-1 Summary of Impacts for Proposed Action and Other Alternatives by Resource Area a For the proposed action, that is, the granting of one or both of the Presidential permits and ROWs, for most resource areas, the analysis was bounded by calculating impacts as if both lines had been allowed. This serves two purposes. First, it demonstrates the maximum possible impacts; second, it clearly presents the combined impacts of the agencies' preferred alternative, that is, permitting both facilities. The only exceptions to this methodology are in the areas of air, water, and human health. Impacts to air, water, and human

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Investigating impacts of natural and human-induced environmental changes on hydrological processes and flood hazards using a GIS-based hydrological/hydraulic model and remote sensing data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural and human-induced environmental changes have been altering the earth's surface and hydrological processes, and thus directly contribute to the severity of flood hazards. To understand these changes and their impacts, this research developed a GISbased hydrological and hydraulic modeling system, which incorporates state-of-the-art remote sensing data to simulate flood under various scenarios. The conceptual framework and technical issues of incorporating multi-scale remote sensing data have been addressed. This research develops an object-oriented hydrological modeling framework. Compared with traditional lumped or cell-based distributed hydrological modeling frameworks, the object-oriented framework allows basic spatial hydrologic units to have various size and irregular shape. This framework is capable of assimilating various GIS and remotely-sensed data with different spatial resolutions. It ensures the computational efficiency, while preserving sufficient spatial details of input data and model outputs. Sensitivity analysis and comparison of high resolution LIDAR DEM with traditional USGS 30m resolution DEM suggests that the use of LIDAR DEMs can greatly reduce uncertainty in calibration of flow parameters in the hydrologic model and hence increase the reliability of modeling results. In addition, subtle topographic features and hydrologic objects like surface depressions and detention basins can be extracted from the high resolution LiDAR DEMs. An innovative algorithm has been developed to efficiently delineate surface depressions and detention basins from LiDAR DEMs. Using a time series of Landsat images, a retrospective analysis of surface imperviousness has been conducted to assess the hydrologic impact of urbanization. The analysis reveals that with rapid urbanization the impervious surface has been increased from 10.1% to 38.4% for the case study area during 1974 - 2002. As a result, the peak flow for a 100-year flood event has increased by 20% and the floodplain extent has expanded by about 21.6%. The quantitative analysis suggests that the large regional detentions basins have effectively offset the adverse effect of increased impervious surface during the urbanization process. Based on the simulation and scenario analyses of land subsidence and potential climate changes, some planning measures and policy implications have been derived for guiding smart urban growth and sustainable resource development and management to minimize flood hazards.

Wang, Lei

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Alternative Exposure Metrics and Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure assessments are critical components of human health studies. These assessments may be geared toward defining where an environmental agent might be present, its levels or concentrations, the conditions under which exposure occurs, those exposed, and additional details of possible exposure scenarios. The assessments may also be used by epidemiologists to address potential linkages between the exposure and health outcomes.Electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure science has evolved due ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

FAQ 38-What are the potential environmental impacts from continued...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

continued storage of depleted uranium hexafluoride? What are the potential environmental impacts from continued storage of depleted uranium hexafluoride? In addition to human...

264

Emergency Response Health Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health; however, there are major differences between health physics for research or occupational safety and health physics during a large-scale radiological emergency. The deployment of a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) monitoring and assessment team to Japan in the wake of the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant yielded a wealth of lessons on these difference. Critical teams (CMOC (Consequence Management Outside the Continental U.S.) and CMHT (Consequence Management Home Team) ) worked together to collect, compile, review, and analyze radiological data from Japan to support the response needs of and answer questions from the Government of Japan, the U.S. military in Japan, the U.S. Embassy and U.S. citizens in Japan, and U.S. citizens in America. This paper addresses the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. A key lesson learned was that public perception and the availability of technology with social media requires a diligent effort to keep the public informed of the science behind the decisions in a manner that is meaningful to them.

Mena, RaJah [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis; Pemberton, Wendy [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis; Beal, William [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Andrews

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Human impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Manicina areolata Fleshy Algae Acanthophora spp. Anadyomenespp. Crustose Coralline Algae (CCA) OctoCoral Briareum spp.2006) Indirect effects of algae on coral: algae- mediated,

Hardt, Marah Justine

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Human-Centered Sustainable Product !!Environmental impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

·! 65.2% of total U.S. electricity consumption ·! 30% of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions ·! 40% of raw materials use globally (3 billion tons annually) ·! 40% of landfill material in the U.S. (136 (first launched in '98) ·! LEED-EB: Existing building operations ·! LEED-CI: Commercial interiors

Agogino, Alice M.

267

Human impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Price, 1975; Porter, 1976; Fadallah, 1983) and corallite area has been used as a linear approximation for biomass (and Price, 1975; Porter, 1976; Fadallah, 1983; Edwards and Gates, 2002), but there are no comprehensive comparative data on how biomass

Hardt, Marah Justine

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Environmental Science and Health Effects Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Environmental Science and Health Effect Program is to conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources.

Michael Gurevich; Doug Lawson; Joe Mauderly

2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

269

Interagency Oceans and Human Health Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

does not constitute an endorsement. Acknowledgements This is Contribution 72 of the National Fire plants to increased nutrient cycling in the forest ecosystem, the herbaceous plant community does compete

270

1 HUMAN HEALTH SAFETY EVALUATION OF HALON ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is the establishment of cardiac response of each individual dog to ... 10,000** 7 days** ... test atmosphere the bag should be stored in the dark or under ...

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Office of Health & Safety - Health Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search System Public Health Activities Agenda for Public Health Activities Access Handbook - Guidelines for Researchers Conducting Health Studies at DOE HHS Communication...

272

Engineered nanoparticles in wastewater and wastewater sludge - Evidence and impacts  

SciTech Connect

Nanotechnology has widespread application in agricultural, environmental and industrial sectors ranging from fabrication of molecular assemblies to microbial array chips. Despite the booming application of nanotechnology, there have been serious implications which are coming into light in the recent years within different environmental compartments, namely air, water and soil and its likely impact on the human health. Health and environmental effects of common metals and materials are well-known, however, when the metals and materials take the form of nanoparticles - consequential hazards based on shape and size are yet to be explored. The nanoparticles released from different nanomaterials used in our household and industrial commodities find their way through waste disposal routes into the wastewater treatment facilities and end up in wastewater sludge. Further escape of these nanoparticles into the effluent will contaminate the aquatic and soil environment. Hence, an understanding of the presence, behavior and impact of these nanoparticles in wastewater and wastewater sludge is necessary and timely. Despite the lack of sufficient literature, the present review attempts to link various compartmentalization aspects of the nanoparticles, their physical properties and toxicity in wastewater and wastewater sludge through simile drawn from other environmental streams.

Brar, Satinder K., E-mail: satinder.brar@ete.inrs.c [INRS-ETE, Universite du Quebec, 490, Rue de la Couronne, Quebec, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Verma, Mausam [Department of Biological Engineering, Sexton Campus, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3J 2X4 (Canada); Tyagi, R.D. [INRS-ETE, Universite du Quebec, 490, Rue de la Couronne, Quebec, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Surampalli, R.Y. [US Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 17-2141, Kansas City, KS 66117 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Economic impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In federal fiscal year 2000 (FY00), Berkeley Lab had 4,347 full- and part-time employees. In addition, at any given time of the year, there were more than 1,000 Laboratory guests. These guests, who also reside locally, have an important economic impact on the nine-county Bay Area. However, Berkeley Lab's total economic impact transcends the direct effects of payroll and purchasing. The direct dollars paid to the Lab's employees in the form of wages, salaries, and benefits, and payments made to contractors for goods and services, are respent by employees and contractors again and again in the local and greater economy. Further, while Berkeley Lab has a strong reputation for basic scientific research, many of the Lab's scientific discoveries and inventions have had direct application in industry, spawning new businesses and creating new opportunities for existing firms. This analysis updates the Economic Impact Analysis done in 1996, and its purpose is to describe the economic and geographic impact of Laboratory expenditures and to provide a qualitative understanding of how Berkeley Lab impacts and supports the local community. It is intended as a guide for state, local, and national policy makers as well as local community members. Unless otherwise noted, this analysis uses data from FY00, the most recent year for which full data are available.

Technology Transfer Department

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

BMC Health Services Research Research article Describing the impact of health research: a Research Impact Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Shyama Kuruvilla; Nicholas Mays; Andrew Pleasant; Gill Walt; Biomed Central; Andrew Pleasant; Gill Walt

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

TAO: Impact  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact Impact Home Download Documentation Publications Referencing TAO Impact Who We Are Acknowledgements License Contact Us Research and Publications that make use of TAO Dressed TDDFT study of low-lying electronic excited states in selected linear polyenes and diphenylopolyenes, Mazur, G., Makowski, M., Włodarczyk, R., and Aoki, Y., International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, 111, 4, 819--825, 2011. BibTeX Secondary thermal cracks in EGS: a variational approach, Bourdin, B., Knepley, M., and Maurini, C., Proceedings of the 34th annual meeting of the Geothermal resources council, 2010. BibTeX Adaptive Real-Time Bioheat Transfer Models for Computer Driven MR-guided Laser Induced Thermal Therapy, Fuentes, D., Feng, Y., Elliott, A., Shetty, A., McNichols, R. J., Oden, J. T., and Stafford, R. J., IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., 5, 1024--1030, 2010. BibTeX

276

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed McIntosh Unit 4 Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project, March 25, 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 10 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 58 / Friday, March 26, 1999 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed McIntosh Unit 4 Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) NEPA regulations (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508), and the DOE NEPA regulations (10 CFR Part 1021), to assess the potential environmental and human health impacts of a proposed project to expand the C. D. McIntosh, Jr. Power

277

Tailoring persuasive health games to gamer type  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Persuasive games are an effective approach for motivating health behavior, and recent years have seen an increase in games designed for changing human behaviors or attitudes. However, these games are limited in two major ways: first, they are not based ... Keywords: behavior theory, hbm, player typology, gamer types, games design, health, persuasive game, serious games

Rita Orji; Regan L. Mandryk; Julita Vassileva; Kathrin M. Gerling

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Continued on page 2 IMPLEMENTING THE HEALTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rule, were published by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) on February 20, 2003. PurposeApril 2005 Continued on page 2 IMPLEMENTING THE HEALTH INSURANCE PORTABILITY AND ACCOUNTABILITY ACT (HIPAA) SECURITY RULE By Joan S. Hash, Computer Security Division, Information Technology Laboratory

279

Technology's Impact on Production  

SciTech Connect

As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) - entitled Technology's Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level - the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: (1) Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. (2) Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. (3) Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies - Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

Rachel Amann; Ellis Deweese; Deborah Shipman

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

Technology's Impact on Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) ?? entitled Technology’s Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level ? ? the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies ??Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

Amann, Rachel; Deweese, Ellis; Shipman, Deborah

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Integrated multimedia medical data agent in E-health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

E-Health is producing a great impact in the field of information distribution of the health services to the intra-hospital and the public. Previous research have addressed the development of system architectures in the aim of integrating the distributed ... Keywords: E-health, XML, XSLT, multimedia database, system interoperability

Jinman Kim; David Dagan Feng; Tom Weidong Cai; Stefan Eberl

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Health Plans | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Plans Health Plans Health Plans A side-by side benefit comparison for medical, vision, and prescription drugs is provided here for your information. A similar comparison is provided for the two dental plans. The plans are available to employees and pre-65 retirees. As required under health care reform, employer group health plans must complete a Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC) document for each medical plan offered in 2014. The SBC must be provided to plan participants. This requirement applies even if the plan benefits are not changing. The Y-12 health plans impacted by the 2014 health reform notice requirements are the medical and prescription drug benefit plans. If the medical and prescription benefits are not changing, then they are referred to as "grandfathered" plans, and participants must be told the benefits

283

Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Environmental Impact Statements are detailed written statements that are required by section 102(2)(C) of NEPA for a proposed major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If you have any trouble finding a specific document, please contact AskNEPA@hq.doe.gov for assistance. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 1, 1999 EIS-0222: Final Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 1, 1999 EIS-0285: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program (August 1999) August 1, 1999 EIS-0289: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

284

Health Satisfaction and Energy Spending  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the direct link between energy spending and health satisfaction and control for impacts of other determinants such as access to gas, age, income, and satisfaction levels in other domains of life such as social life or leisure. Indirect effects are assumed... in the context with energy affordability. Rising energy prices and the realization of climate change objectives will have impacts on energy usage and spending of households. At least for some households it will for example be more difficult to warm their homes...

Meier, Helena

285

Update of Part 61 Impacts Analysis Methodology. Methodology report. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Envirosphere Company has expanded and updated the impacts analysis methodology used during the development of the 10 CFR Part 61 rule to allow improved consideration of the costs and impacts of treatment and disposal of low-level waste that is close to or exceeds Class C concentrations. The modifications described in this report principally include: (1) an update of the low-level radioactive waste source term, (2) consideration of additional alternative disposal technologies, (3) expansion of the methodology used to calculate disposal costs, (4) consideration of an additional exposure pathway involving direct human contact with disposed waste due to a hypothetical drilling scenario, and (5) use of updated health physics analysis procedures (ICRP-30). Volume 1 of this report describes the calculational algorithms of the updated analysis methodology.

Oztunali, O.I.; Roles, G.W.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas. Final Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) of the construction and operation of an Environmental Safety and Health (ES&H) Analytical Laboratory and subsequent demolition of the existing Analytical Chemistry Laboratory building at Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. In accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality requirements contained in 40 CFR 1500--1508.9, the Environmental Assessment examined the environmental impacts of the Proposed Action and discussed potential alternatives. Based on the analysis of impacts in the EA, conducting the proposed action, construction of an analytical laboratory and demolition of the existing facility, would not significantly effect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality regulations in 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This Programmatic Health and Safety plan (PHASP) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. This plan follows the format recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for remedial investigations and feasibility studies and that recommended by the EM40 Health and Safety Plan (HASP) Guidelines (DOE February 1994). This plan complies with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements found in 29 CFR 1910.120 and EM-40 guidelines for any activities dealing with hazardous waste operations and emergency response efforts and with OSHA requirements found in 29 CFR 1926.65. The policies and procedures in this plan apply to all Environmental Restoration sites and activities including employees of Energy Systems, subcontractors, and prime contractors performing work for the DOE ORNL ER Program. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health and safety and to the environment from event such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water.

Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N.; Cipriano, D.J. Jr.; Uziel, M.S.; Kleinhans, K.R.; Tiner, P.F.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center)'s Environmental Health Laboratory at bisphenolAandtriclosan; the National Center for Environmental Health for Environmental Health #12;1 Background The National Report on Human Exposure to For the National Exposure Report

289

Office of Student Services Health Science Campus MS 1026  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Student Services Health Science Campus MS 1026 Collier Building 4405 3000 Arlington Avenue Toledo, OH 43614-2598 419-383-5810 BSN Consortium Planning Guide Bowling Green State University College of Health & Human Services Nursing Advisor - Health Center Rm. 102 Bowling Green, OH 43403 419

Moore, Paul A.

290

February 29, 2012 National Institutes of Health Genetic Testing Registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tests would be beneficial for several groups such as health care providers, researchers, laboratories to the Charge of the Secretary of Health and Human Services. 2008. See http://oba.odFebruary 29, 2012 National Institutes of Health Genetic Testing Registry Scientific advances over

Levin, Judith G.

291

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH | National Cancer Institute LABORATORY OF PATHOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH | National Cancer Institute LABORATORY OF PATHOLOGY National Cancer Institute (NCI) The Laboratory of Pathology, based in the NCI, provides clinical service in anatomic-scientists DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute, Center

292

ORNL Health Services Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Page ORNL Home | ESH&Q Home | Health Services Internal A division in the Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Directorate The Health Services Division at Oak Ridge...

293

Health Risks Associated with Low Doses of Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite a wealth of information, there remains uncertainty concerning human radiation effects at low dose levels. This report provides background information and a literature review of research on the potential health hazards associated with exposure to low-level ionizing radiation. Topics include radiation characteristics, protection standards, epidemiologic data and risk models, the nature of human health exposure-related effects, important radiation health studies to date, and the scientific method fo...

1994-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

294

The NIH Almanac -National Institutes of Health (NIH) Page 1 of 1 Begun as a one-room Laboratory of Hygiene in 1887, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) today is one of the world's foremost medical research centers. An  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NIH Almanac - National Institutes of Health (NIH) Page 1 of 1 Begun as a one-room Laboratory research centers. An agency of the Department of Health and Human Services, the NIH is the Federal focal...Turning Discovery into Health" is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The NIH Almanac

Levin, Judith G.

295

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forms Beryllium Health Surveillance Program Summary Beryllium-Associated Workers: Medical Surveillance Beryllium Health Surveillance Program Forms Appendix B to the Preamble...

296

THE HUMAN FACTOR* By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*I gratefully acknowledge the advice, encouragement, and inspiration of Nuria Chinchilla from IESE who encouraged me to think about the issue of human sustainability in both societies and companies. The helpful comments of the editor and the reviewers substantially clarified the arguments. ACADEMY OF MANAGEMENT PERSPECTIVES, (in press) Although most of the research and public pressure concerning sustainability has been focused on the effects of business and organizational activity on the physical environment, companies and their management practices profoundly affect the human and social environment as well. This article briefly reviews the literature on the direct and indirect effects of organizations and their decisions about people on human health and mortality. It then considers some possible explanations for why social sustainability has received relatively short shrift in management writing, and outlines a research agenda for investigating the links between social sustainability and organizational effectiveness as well as the role

Jeffrey Pfeffer; R Esearch; P Aper; S Eries; Building Sustainable Organizations; Jeffrey Pfeffer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Impact Assessments | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact Assessments Impact Assessments Impact Assessments PIA Template with Guidance (MS Word) Management and Administration (MA) Open Gov User Voice System (3WP) (pdf) DOE Open Government Plan Comment Box (pdf) Energy Contractor Registration System (EnCoRe) (pdf) Hiring Management Enterprise Solutions (HMES) (pdf) Foreign Travel Management System (FTMS) (pdf) FOIAXpress (pdf) Electronic Document Online Correspondence and Concurrence (eDOCS) (pdf) DOE Jobs Online (Hiring Management) (pdf) FORM EIA 457-A/G Residential Energy Consumption Survey (pdf) Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Tracking System (pdf) Corporate Human Resources Information System (CHRIS) (pdf) Energy Inspector General Project Tracking System (EIGPT) (pdf) Electronic DOE Information Security System (eDISS) (pdf)

298

Remote Sensing of Forest Health Trends in the Northern Green Mountains of Vermont.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Northeastern forests are being impacted by unprecedented environmental stressors, including acid deposition, invasive pests, and climate change. Forest health monitoring at a landscape scale is… (more)

Olson, Michael G.

299

Health and Safety Research Division progress report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1990  

SciTech Connect

The Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) continues to maintain an outstanding program of basic and applied research displaying a high level of creativity and achievement as documented by awards, publications, professional service, and successful completion of variety of projects. Our focus is on human health and the scientific basis for measurement and assessment of health-related impacts of energy technologies. It is our custom to publish a division progress report every 18 months that summarizes our programmatic progress and other measures of achievement over the reporting period. Since it is not feasible to summarize in detail all of our work over the period covered by this report (October 1, 1988, to March 30, 1990), we intend this document to point the way to the expensive open literature that documents our findings. During the reporting period the Division continued to maintain strong programs in its traditional areas of R D, but also achieved noteworthy progress in other areas. Much of the Division's work on site characterization, development of new field instruments, compilation of data bases, and methodology development fits into this initiative. Other new work in tunneling microscopy in support of DOE's Human Genome Program and the comprehensive R D work related to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy have attained new and exciting results. These examples of our progress and numerous other activities are highlighted in this report.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS  

SciTech Connect

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) should be used to assist carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) planners to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and avoid unintended environmental trade-offs. LCA is an analytical framework for determining environmental impacts resulting from processes, products, and services. All life cycle stages are evaluated including raw material sourcing, processing, operation, maintenance, and component end-of-life, as well as intermediate stages such as transportation. In recent years a growing number of LCA studies have analyzed CCS systems. We reviewed 50+ LCA studies, and selected 11 studies that compared the environmental performance of 23 electric power plants with and without CCS. Here we summarize and interpret the findings of these studies. Regarding overall climatemitigation effectiveness of CCS, we distinguish between the capture percentage of carbon in the fuels, the net carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reduction, and the net GHG emission reduction. We also identify trade-offs between the climate benefits and the potential increased non-climate impacts of CCS. Emissions of non-CO2 flue gases such as NOx may increase due to the greater throughput of fuel, and toxicity issues may arise due to the use of monoethanolamine (MEA) capture solvent, resulting in ecological and human health impacts. We discuss areas where improvements in LCA data or methods are needed. The decision to implement CCS should be based on knowledge of the overall environmental impacts of the technologies, not just their carbon capture effectiveness. LCA will be an important tool in providing that knowledge.

Sathre, Roger; Masanet, Eric; Cain, Jennifer; Chester, Mikhail

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Healthcare Energy Impact Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Healthcare Energy Impact Calculator Healthcare Energy Impact Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Healthcare Energy Impact Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Practice Greenhealth Sector: Climate User Interface: Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: www.eichealth.org/ Cost: Free Related Tools UNEP-Bioenergy Decision Support Tool Global Relationship Assessment to Protect the Environment (GRAPE) World Induced Technical Change Hybrid (WITCH) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS An online tool based on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analysis of health impacts of power plant emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and mercury, this tool estimates premature deaths, chronic bronchitis, asthma attacks, emergency room visits, and more, by kWh/year.

302

Essays on the economics of education and health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation is a collection of three essays exploring the impact of incentives on participation in public education and health programs. The first two essays analyze the demand for Special Education (a program for ...

Cohen, Jessica Lee

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Chronic Health Damage of Air Pollutants in U  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in .S. Residences U J.M. Logue 1 , P.N. Price, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division November 2011...

304

Millersville University Health Services Health Form Instructions Millersville University Health Services is dedicated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

laboratories as ordered by a medical provider. Health Services works cooperatively with Quest, ACM, and CDDMillersville University Health Services Health Form Instructions Millersville University Health, and health education. Health Services Information Millersville University Health Services is centrally

Hardy, Christopher R.

305

Health Consultation Des Moines (Ex) Ordnance Site Landfill and Lagoon Complex Prairie Trail Development Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This letter has been prepared as a consultation to evaluate human health impacts that will remain in a commercial and residential area within Ankeny, Iowa known as the Prairie Trail Development Site. The Iowa Department of Public Health’s priority is to ensure the Ankeny community has the best information possible to safeguard its health. That information is included in the following paragraphs. Background and Statement of Issues The Prairie Trail Development Area is located in the southern portion of Ankeny, Iowa. This development area is located in an area that was formally occupied by the Des Moines Ordnance Plant. The Des Moines Ordnance Plant was constructed for the production and testing of small arms munitions for use during World War II. The Landfill and Lagoon Complex was utilized for disposal of wastes from the ordnance plant and also from various entities that utilized the site property until 1991. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is overseeing the cleanup of the Landfill and Lagoon Complex. A portion of the remainder of the site property had been used for burning of scrap explosives, the storage and disposal of chemicals, a disposal pond, testing of products, and various munitions manufacturing activities. The Iowa Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) is overseeing the cleanup of this remaining portion of the site property.

Terry E. Branstad; Kim Reynolds

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Resources with Additional Information Charles DeLisi As head of DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research, Charles DeLisi played a pivotal role in proposing and initiating the Human Genome Program in 1986. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has historically been active in supporting human genome research. On September 10, 2003, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham presented the Secretary's Gold Award to Aristides Patrinos and Francis Collins for their leadership of the government's Human Genome Project. At DOE's Office of Science, Dr. Patrinos is the Associate Director for Biological and Environmental Research. He has been a researcher at the department's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory.

307

Basis for Changing Chromium Regulatory Health Values  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), acts as a chemical driver for many human health risk assessments under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and other regulatory programs across a range of industrial sectors, including the electric power sector. To characterize and manage the health and environmental risk related to toxics, agencies and the regulated sectors must rely on the development of scientific estimates of the exposure-to-response relationship to understand and quantify the potential hazard ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

Environmental Impacts From the Installation and Operation of Large-scale Solar Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale solar power plants are being developed at a rapid rate, and are setting up to use thousands or millions of acres of land globally. The environmental issues related to the installation and operation phases of such facilities have not, so far, been addressed comprehensively in the literature. Here we identify and appraise 32 impacts from these phases, under the themes of land use intensity, human health and well-being, plant and animal life, geohydrological resources, and climate change. Our appraisals assume that electricity generated by new solar power facilities will displace electricity from traditional U.S. generation technologies. Altogether we find 22 of the considered 32 impacts to be beneficial. Of the remaining 10 impacts, 4 are neutral, and 6 require further research before they can be appraised. None of the impacts are negative relative to traditional power generation. We rank the impacts in terms of priority, and find all the high-priority impacts to be beneficial. In quantitative terms, large-scale solar power plants occupy the same or less land per kW h than coal power plant life cycles. Removal of forests to make space for solar power causes CO{sub 2} emissions as high as 36 g CO{sub 2} kW h{sup -1}, which is a significant contribution to the life cycle CO{sub 2} emissions of solar power, but is still low compared to CO{sub 2} emissions from coal-based electricity that are about 1100 g CO{sub 2} kW h{sup -1}.

Fthenakis, V.; Turney, Damon

2011-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

309

Small Particles, Big Impact  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Particles, Big Impact Small Particles, Big Impact Small-scale effects of Aerosols Add up Over Time August 24, 2011 | Tags: Climate Research, Earth Sciences, Environmental...

310

Developing Human Performance Measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the reactor oversight process (ROP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors the performance of utilities licensed to operate nuclear power plants. The process is designed to assure public health and safety by providing reasonable assurance that licensees are meeting the cornerstones of safety and designated crosscutting elements. The reactor inspection program, together with performance indicators (PIs), and enforcement activities form the basis for the NRC’s risk-informed, performance based regulatory framework. While human performance is a key component in the safe operation of nuclear power plants and is a designated cross-cutting element of the ROP, there is currently no direct inspection or performance indicator for assessing human performance. Rather, when human performance is identified as a substantive cross cutting element in any 1 of 3 categories (resources, organizational or personnel), it is then evaluated for common themes to determine if follow-up actions are warranted. However, variability in human performance occurs from day to day, across activities that vary in complexity, and workgroups, contributing to the uncertainty in the outcomes of performance. While some variability in human performance may be random, much of the variability may be attributed to factors that are not currently assessed. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assure licensee performance and indicate when additional investigation may be required. This paper presents research that establishes a technical basis for developing human performance measures. In particular, we discuss: 1) how historical data already gives some indication of connection between human performance and overall plant performance, 2) how industry led efforts to measure and model human performance and organizational factors could serve as a data source and basis for a framework, 3) how our use of modeling and simulation techniques could be used to develop and validate measures of human performance, and 4) what the possible outcomes are from this research as the modeling and simulation efforts generate results.

Jeffrey Joe; Bruce Hallbert; Larry Blackwood; Donald Dudehoeffer; Kent Hansen

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities January 8, 2013 - 1:55pm Addthis Speaker Dr. Daniel Rahn at the Health Disparaties Conference. Speaker Dr. Daniel Rahn at the Health Disparaties Conference. What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment The Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities, Reducing Health Disparities through Sustaining and Strengthening Healthy Communities, was held in Little Rock, Arkansas, November 28 through December 1, 2012, at The Peabody Little Rock. Like its five predecessors, the 2012 conference focused on policies and programs to reduce health disparities among minority and low-income populations. Presenters emphasized the role of

312

Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System  

SciTech Connect

Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System  

SciTech Connect

Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

III. Finding of No Significant Impact On  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the basis of the environmental assessment, the NRC concludes that the proposed action will not have a significant effect on the quality of the human environment. Accordingly, the NRC has determined not to prepare an environmental impact statement for the proposed action. IV. Further Information Documents related to this action are available electronically at the NRC Library at

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

ORISE: Health physics services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health physics services Nuclear power plant The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers comprehensive health physics services in a number of technical areas...

316

ORISE: Worker Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Worker Health Studies Capabilities Overview Illness and Injury Surveillance Worker Health Research Medical Data Management Beryllium Exposure Studies and Testing Radiation Exposure...

317

ORISE: Health physics training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surveys Health physics services Radiochemical analyses Health physics training How ORISE is Making a Difference Overview Environmental characterization at ORNL a...

318

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT Wibursement of $65 Million by the U . S . Department of Energy to the State of T e x a s for Construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center at the Former Superconducting Super Collider Site, Waxahachie, Texas AGENCY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ACTION FXNDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an environmental assessment @OE/EA-1090) of the proposed disbursement of $65 million to the State of Texas for construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center (RMTC) near Waxahachie, Texas. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment

319

Environmental and health management in small and medium size enterprises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workers and employees are increasingly exposed in the workplace to chemical compounds and substances that are potentially toxic; for most of these compounds, no information exist regarding effects on human health. As one ...

Arredondo, Juan C. (Juan Carlos Arredondo Brun), 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Environmental Impacts of Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

~~"'"""""""""'l.. _ _ 4 Environmental Impacts of Repository Construction, Operation and Monitoring, and Closure 4-iii Environmental Impacts of Repository Construction, Operations, Monitoring, and Closure TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 4. Environmental Impacts of Repository Construction, Operations, Monitoring, and Closure ..............4-1 4.1 Preclosure Environmental Impacts of Construction, Operations, Monitoring, and Closure of a Repository ...............................................................................................................................4-3 4.1.1 Impacts to Land Use and Ownership .......................................................................................4-4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Worker and Public Health Activities Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health and Safety Programs Health and Safety Programs Home About HS-13 What's New HS-13 Staff Pandemic Influenza Beryllium-Associated Worker Registry CEDR Illness and Injury Surveillance Program Epi Moratorium United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries Occupational Medicine Worker and Community Public Health Activities Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) Program Chronic Beryllium Disease Bio-repository Initiative Articles Links HSS Logo Worker and Public Health Activities Program The aim of the Worker and Public Health Activities Program is to improve our understanding of the consequences of exposures to ionizing radiation and other hazardous materials to workers and to the public. One of the program's strategic objectives is to support studies related to current and past operations of DOE facilities that ascribe to the highest scientific standards and policies and to communicate the health effects into impact-driven practices for improving worker and public health. This objective strives to ensure that the studies and public health activities address the most relevant research pertaining to DOE operations and provide a framework for intervention. Periodic evaluation of the research via independent external peer review enhances this objective. DOE encourages publication in scientific peer-reviewed journals and presentations at scientific meetings.

322

Health Equity in a New Urbanist Environment: Land Use Planning and Community Capacity Building in Fresno, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the links between land use, air pollution and health inlinks between land use and air pollution were simultaneouslyof land- use siting and cumulative air pollution impacts. ”

ZUK, MIRIAM ZOFITH

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Impact of technology applications to the management of low-level radioactive wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-level radioactive wastes are generated from reactor sources (nuclear power reactors) as well as from nonreactor sources (academic, medical, governmental, and industrial). In recent years, about 50,000 m{sup 3} per year of such wastes have been generated in the United States and about 10,000 m{sup 3} per year in Canada. Direct disposal of these wastes in shallow ground has been a favored method in both countries in the past. In the United States, three operating commercial sites at Barnwell, South Carolina; Beatty, Nevada; and Richland, Washington, receive most of the commercial low-level waste generated. However, with recent advances in waste management, technologies are being applied to achieve optimum goals in terms of protection of human health and safety and the environment, as well as cost-effectiveness. These technologies must be applied from the generation sources through waste minimization and optimum segregation -- followed by waste processing, conditioning, storage, and disposal. A number of technologies that are available and can be applied as appropriate -- given the physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics of the waste -- include shredding, baling, compaction, supercompaction, decontamination, incineration, chemical treatment/conditioning, immobilization, and packaging. Interim and retrievable storage can be accomplished in a wide variety of storage structures, and several types of engineered disposal facility designs are now available. By applying an integrated approach to radioactive waste management, potential adverse impacts on human health and safety and the environment can be minimized. 15 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Devgun, J.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The NIEHS supports a wide variety of research programs directed toward preventing health problems caused by our environment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Unlike the other NIH institutes, the NIEHS is locatedThe NIEHS supports a wide variety of research programs directed toward preventing health problems that may affect human health. Current NTP initiatives are examining the effects of cell phone radiation

Bandettini, Peter A.

325

Trust in health infomediaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health infomediaries play an increasingly critical role in providing support for people's health and wellness decisions. Effectiveness of health infomediaries depends on people's trust in them. In this paper, we conceptualize a comprehensive synthesis ... Keywords: Health infomediary, Information quality, Risk belief, System quality, Trust, Trust beliefs, Trust signs

Jaeki Song; Fatemeh "Mariam" Zahedi

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Henry Ford Health System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Serving Southeast Michigan with More than Health Care. The HFHS workforce supports southeast Michigan with annually ...

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

327

Evaluating Energy Policy: Quantifying Air Pollution and Health Co-Benefits Tammy M Thompson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluating Energy Policy: Quantifying Air Pollution and Health Co-Benefits Tammy M Thompson Noelle profound impacts on the other. Therefore, it is important to consider both U.S. Regional Energy Policy Energy Policy Scenarios Criteria Pollution Impacts on Air Quality one realm can have profound impacts

328

Health Care Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Health Care Health Care Characteristics by Activity... Health Care Health care buildings are those used as diagnostic and treatment facilities for both inpatient and outpatient care. Doctor's and dentist's offices are considered health care if they use any type of diagnostic medical equipment and office if they do not. Skilled nursing or other residential care buildings are categorized as lodging. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Health Care Buildings... Health care buildings in the South tended to be smaller and were more numerous than those in other regions of the country. Buildings on health care complexes tended to be newer than those not on multibuilding facilities. The median age for buildings on health care complexes was 9.5 years, compared to 29.5 years for health care buildings not on a multibuilding facility.

329

Final Environmental Impact Statement Waste Management Activities for Groundwater Protection Savannah River Plant Aiken, South Carolina  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PURPOSE PURPOSE The U.S. Department of Energv SUMRY (DOE) has Dreuared this environmental impact -. . . statement (EIS) to assess the environmental consequences of the implementation of modified waste management activities for hazardous, low-level radioactive, and mixed wastes for the protection of groundwater, human health, and the environment at its Savannah River Plant (SRP) in Aiken, South Carolina. This EIS, which is both programmatic and project-specific, has been prepared in accordance with Section 102(2)(C) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended. It is intended to support broad decisions on future actions on SRP waste management activities and to provide project- related environmental input and support for project-specific decisions on pro- ceeding with cleanup activities at existing waste sites in the R- and F-Areas, establishing new waste

330

Apparatus and methods for a human extender  

SciTech Connect

A human extender controller for interface between a human operator and a physical object through a physical plant. The human extender controller uses an inner-feedback loop to increase the equivalent damping of the operating system to stabilize the system when it contacts with the environment and reduces the impact of the environment variation by utilizing a high feedback gain, determined by a root locus sketch. Because the stability of the human extender controller of the present invention is greatly enhanced over that of the prior art, the present invention is able to achieve a force reflection ratio 500 to 1 and capable of handling loads above the two (2) ton range.

Jansen, John F. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

EA-0970: Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory Project No.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

70: Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory 70: Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory Project No. 94-AA-01 Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas EA-0970: Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory Project No. 94-AA-01 Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to construct and operate an Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory and subsequent demolition of the existing Analytical Chemistry Laboratory building at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 6, 1995 EA-0970: Finding of No Significant Impact Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory Project No. 94-AA-01 Pantex Plant Amarillo, TX

332

Energy Systems and Population Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well-documented that energy and energy systems have a central role in social and economic development and human welfare at all scales, from household and community to regional and national (41). Among its various welfare effects, energy is closely linked with people s health. Some of the effects of energy on health and welfare are direct. With abundant energy, more food or more frequent meals can be prepared; food can be refrigerated, increasing the types of food items that are consumed and reducing food contamination; water pumps can provide more water and eliminate the need for water storage leading to contamination or increased exposure to disease vectors such as mosquitoes or snails; water can be disinfected by boiling or using other technologies such as radiation. Other effects of energy on public health are mediated through more proximal determinants of health and disease. Abundant energy can lead to increased irrigation, agricultural productivity, and access to food and nutrition; access to energy can also increase small-scale income generation such as processing of agricultural commodities (e.g., producing refined oil from oil seeds, roasting coffee, drying and preserving fruits and meats) and production of crafts; ability to control lighting and heating allows education or economic activities to be shielded from daily or seasonal environmental constraints such as light, temperature, rainfall, or wind; time and other economic resources spent on collecting and/or transporting fuels can be used for other household needs if access to energy is facilitated; energy availability for transportation increases access to health and education facilities and allow increased economic activity by facilitating the transportation of goods and services to and from markets; energy for telecommunication technology (radio, television, telephone, or internet) provides increased access to information useful for health, education, or economic purposes; provision of energy to rural and urban health facilities allows increased delivery and coverage of 3 various health services and interventions such as tests and treatments, better storage of medicine and vaccines, disinfection of medical equipment by boiling or radiation, and more frequent and efficient health system encounters through mobile clinics or longer working hours; and so on. In fact, while the dominant view of development-energy-health linkages has been that improvements in energy and health are outcomes of the socioeconomic development process (e.g., the ''energy ladder'' framework discussed below), it has even been argued that access to higher quality energy sources and technologies can initiate a chain of demographic, health, and development outcomes by changing the household structure and socioeconomic relationships. For example, in addition to increased opportunities for food and income production, reduced infant mortality as a result of transition to cleaner fuels or increased coverage of vaccination with availability of refrigerators in rural clinics may initiate a process of ''demographic transition'' to low-mortality and low-fertility populations (14). Such a transition has historically been followed with further improvements in maternal and child health and increased female participation in the labor markets and other economic activities.

Ezzati, Majid; Bailis, Rob; Kammen, Daniel M.; Holloway, Tracey; Price, Lynn; Cifuentes, Luis A.; Barnes, Brendon; Chaurey, Akanksha; Dhanapala, Kiran N.

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

333

Can tailoring increase elaboration of health messages delivered via an adaptive educational site on adolescent sexual health and decision making?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tailoring, the development of health messages based on assessment of key psychosocial variables that influence a prescribed behavior, has been gaining ground as an effective health education approach. The efficacy of this approach is based on the assumption ... Keywords: human computer interaction, information processing

Juliann Cortese; Mia Liza A. Lustria

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & EChapter 10 Bioavailability and Biopotency of Vitamin E in Humans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & E Chapter 10 Bioavailability and Biopotency of Vitamin E in Humans Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 10 Bio

335

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 4 Analysis and Bioavailability of Lignans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 4 Analysis and Bioavailability of Lignans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Download

336

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 9 Flaxseed, Lignans, and Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 9 Flaxseed, Lignans, and Cancer Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

337

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 5 Oxidative Metabolism of Lignans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 5 Oxidative Metabolism of Lignans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf

338

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 7 Nutritional and Hematological Effects of Flaxseed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 7 Nutritional and Hematological Effects of Flaxseed Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

339

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 24 Effects of Feeding Flaxseed to Pigs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 24 Effects of Feeding Flaxseed to Pigs Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadabl

340

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 11 a-Linolenic Acid and Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 11 a-Linolenic Acid and Cancer Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Soy Protein ProductsChapter 3 Protein Quality and Human Nutrition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soy Protein Products Chapter 3 Protein Quality and Human Nutrition Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry EB488804B9D11995A2463507F5B3CE67 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Ch

342

Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » NEPA Documents » Findings of No Significant Impact Services » NEPA Documents » Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Findings of No Significant Impact are public documents issued by a Federal agency briefly presenting the reasons why an action for which the agency has prepared an environmental assessment will not have a significant effect on the human environment and, therefore, will not require preparation of an environmental impact statement. If you have any trouble finding a specific document, please contact AskNEPA@hq.doe.gov for assistance. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD October 9, 2002 EA-1434: Finding of No Significant Impact Sunrise II Water Supply Line, Kern County, California October 2, 2002 EA-1449: Finding of No Significant Impact Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing

343

EA-0923: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

923: Finding of No Significant Impact 923: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0923: Finding of No Significant Impact Winnett School District Boiler Replacement Project Based on the analysis in the Environmental Assessment, the Department has determined that the installation of a new coal-fired system at the Winnett School District Complex does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact. EA-0923-FONSI-1993.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-0923: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1183: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0962: Finding of No Significant Impact

344

EA-1605: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1605: Finding of No Significant Impact Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina The Department of Energy has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1605) to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction and operation of new biomass cogeneration and heating facilities located at the Savannah River Site (SRS). DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment . Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and DOE is issuing this finding of no significant impact (FONSI). Finding of No Significant Impact for Biomass Cogeneration and Heating

345

ORISE: Health Literacy Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Literacy Development Literacy Development While health disparities may be attributed to a number of factors, health literacy development and access to health information can help special populations gain a better understanding of wellness and prevention. The Internet and other means of electronic communication have become popular tools that are allowing people to take control of their health. According to Healthy People 2010, nearly half of American adults (90 million people) are deemed "health illiterate"-an increasing problem among special populations that appears to contribute to health disparities. Health literacy refers to the ability to read and understand materials related to personal health, as well as navigate the health system. To assist government agencies and organizations educate populations facing

346

Integrated assessment of the spatial variability of ozone impacts from emissions of nitrogen oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the ozone (O{sub 3}) damages caused by nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions in different locations around the Atlanta metropolitan area during a summer month. Ozone impacts are calculated using a new integrated assessment model that links pollution emissions to their chemical transformation, transport, population exposures, and effects on human health. It was found that increased NOx emissions in rural areas around Atlanta increase human exposure to ambient O{sub 3} twice as much as suburban emissions. However, increased NOx emissions in central city Atlanta actually reduce O{sub 3} exposures. For downtown emissions, the reduction in human exposures to O{sub 3} from titration by NO in the central city outweighs the effects from increased downwind O{sub 3}. The results indicate that the marginal damage from NOx emissions varies greatly across a metropolitan area. The results raise concerns if cap and trade regulations cause emissions to migrate toward higher marginal damage locations. 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Daniel Q. Tong; Nicholas Z. Muller; Denise L. Mauzerall; Robert O. Mendelsohn [Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States). Science, Technology and Environmental Policy Program, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Page 4, Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 of 11 4 of 11 Previous Page Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Initial Election Period As a new employee, you have 60 days from your date of appointment to make an election for the health benefits program. Your completed Health Benefits Election Form, SF-2809, must be submitted to your servicing Human Resources Office in a timely manner. If you fail to make an election within the required deadline, you are considered to have declined coverage. You will not have another opportunity to enroll until the annual open season (conducted November/December) or unless you experience a qualifying life event (see http://www.opm.gov/insure/health/planinfo/qle.asp) that would allow you to enroll. Please note that the SF-2809 should be completed and submitted even if you are declining coverage.

348

ORISE: Public Health Communication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Communication Communication Public Health Communication The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) assists government agencies and organizations in addressing public health challenges by developing evidence-based communication programs and social marketing initiatives that resonate with target populations. Because approximately half of American adults do not understand basic health information, ORISE develops the types of messages that will attract attention and motivate people to address their personal and family health. ORISE also develops and executes evidence-based and culturally-competent public health communication programs that help change behaviors and result in healthier lifestyles. Communication Planning and Products Public health organizations are faced with increasing demands for

349

A semantic approach to life cycle assessment applied on energy environmental impact data management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental impact assessment of goods and services is nowadays a major challenge for both economic and ethical reasons. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) provides a well-accepted methodology for modelling environmental impacts of human activities. One stage ... Keywords: energy impact data management, life cycle assessment, ontology

Benjamin Bertin; Vasile-Marian Scuturici; Emmanuel Risler; Jean-Marie Pinon

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

UTCA Project 00214 Environmental Health, Public Safety, and Social Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Alabama during the past ten years, involving a large variety of different materials. The petroleum materials. Two examples are also presented describing problems associated with spills of petroleum.......................................................................................................73 Potential Sources of Accidental Releases

Pitt, Robert E.

351

Public Health-Related Impacts of Climate Change in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Disease Arboviruses* Lyme Disease *WEE, SLV, andin the United States is Lyme Disease, caused by the bacteria

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Public Health-Related Impacts of Climate Change in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from fireplace combustion of wood. Environmental Science &accumulation of wood smoke and other combustion particles

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Modeling the impact of lifestyle on health at scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research in computational epidemiology to date has concentrated on estimating summary statistics of populations and simulated scenarios of disease outbreaks. Detailed studies have been limited to small domains, as scaling the methods involved poses considerable ... Keywords: computational epidemiology, geo-temporal modeling, machine learning, online social networks, ubiquitous computing

Adam Sadilek; Henry Kautz

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Computer simulation of the activity of the elderly person living independently in a Health Smart Home  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a simulator of human activities collected with presence sensors in our experimental Health Smart Home ''Habitat Intelligent pour la Sante (HIS)''. We recorded 1492 days of data on several experimental HIS during the French national project ... Keywords: Correlation, Distance, Health Smart Homes, Hidden Markov Machine, Human activity, Polya Urn, Similarity, Simulator

N. Noury; T. Hadidi

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 1, Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Drart environmental impact statement siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 4, Appendices D-R  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains 15 appendices.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

EA-1664: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Finding of No Significant Impact 4: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1664: Finding of No Significant Impact Energy Conservation Standards: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps The U.S. Department of Energy has determined that the adoption of energy conservation standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps as described in the final rule titled the "energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector lamps," would not be a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. Finding of No Significant Impact for 10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Standards: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent and Incandescent

358

Replacement of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Health Physics Instrumentation Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE-Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the replacement of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Health Physics Instrumentation Laboratory at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of this project is to replace the existing Health Physics Instrumentation Laboratory (HPIL) with a new facility to provide a safe environment for maintaining and calibrating radiation detection instruments used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The existing HPIL facility provides portable health physics monitoring instrumentation and direct reading dosimetry procurement, maintenance and calibration of radiation detection instruments, and research and development support-services to the INEL and others. However, the existing facility was not originally designed for laboratory activities and does not provide an adequate, safe environment for calibration activities. The EA examined the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and evaluated reasonable alternatives, including the no action alternative in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508). Based on the environmental analysis in the attached EA, the proposed action will not have a significant effect on the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and 40 CFR Parts 1508.18 and 1508.27. The selected action (the proposed alternative) is composed of the following elements, each described or evaluated in the attached EA on the pages referenced. The proposed action is expected to begin in 1997 and will be completed within three years: design and construction of a new facility at the Central Facility Area of the INEL; operation of the facility, including instrument receipt, inspections and repairs, precision testing and calibration, and storage and issuance. The selected action will result in no significant environmental impacts.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

An Evolutionary Genomic Approach to Identify Genes Involved in Human Birth Timing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coordination of fetal maturation with birth timing is essential for mammalian reproduction. In humans, preterm birth is a disorder of profound global health significance. The signals initiating parturition in humans have ...

Plunkett, Jevon

360

Radiation effects on humans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Health and Nutrition Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Health and Nutrition Division promotes and facilitates communication and cooperation among professionals whose interests in lipid biochemistry and physiology relate to all aspects of dietary fats and health; encompasses the technical areas of dietary f

362

ORISE: Worker Health Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Worker Health Research Worker Health Research Worker Health Research The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides technical assistance to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other government agencies by performing specialized worker health research to assess the health of workers and other populations. Statistical methods, epidemiologic research and hazard assessments are core ORISE worker health research competencies. Because information technology is an integral part of the epidemiologic research process, ORISE also capitalizes on its benefits by organizing worker health research data into manageable databases. By providing DOE and the scientific community with accessible information on the long-term health outcomes of occupational exposures, ORISE is helping improve the

363

Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and decisions and, on a limited but growing scale, improving communication between clinicians and patients. [10] Some health care delivery organizations have already suc- edge for clinicians improves the quality and/or safety and efficiency of health care... by the individual or family, plus non-clinical information such as self-care trackers and directories of health care providers. The health care delivery dimension includes information such as pro- vider notes, clinical orders, decision-support programs, digital...

Detmer, Don E

2003-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

364

Wellness, Health & Counseling Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness, Health & Counseling Services Dr. Marcelle Holmes Assistant Vice Chancellor CARE Career Student Health Center #12;The mission of the Wellness, Health & Counseling Services cluster is to support · Dedicated to promoting principles of wellness, prevention and healthy life-style choices for students

Stanford, Kyle

365

Environmental Public Health at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requiring special laboratory expertise · The Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services, which, environmental sanitation, and laboratory sciences----to protect public health · Responding and sharing solutions to environmental public health problems worldwide "We" are---- · The Division of Laboratory Sciences, which

366

NETL: Health Effects - Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Given that mercury emissions from coal power plants will almost certainly be limited by some form of national regulation or legislation, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is performing an assessment of the reduction in human health risk that may be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of mercury. The primary pathway for mercury exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to mercury exposure is the fetus. Therefore, the risk assessment focuses on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Preliminary Risk Assessment A preliminary risk assessment was conducted using a simplified approach based on three major topics: Hg emissions and deposition (emphasizing coal plants), Hg consumption through fish, and dose-response functions for Hg. Using information available from recent literature, dose response factors (DRFs) were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions.

367

Potential Health Effects of Marcellus Shale Activities: The Need for Public  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. #12;Implications of the Gulf Oil Spill to Marcellus Shale Activities - Environmental and human health salt (Proprietary) 10.0 - 30.0% #12;Implications of the Gulf Oil Spill to Marcellus Shale ActivitiesPotential Health Effects of Marcellus Shale Activities: The Need for Public Health Surveillance

Sibille, Etienne

368

Health IT at NIST NIST research and development in standards, testing,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and leadership. Since 2004, NIST has worked closely with the Department of Health and Human Services' Office Senior Advisor and Program Coordinator, Health IT Information Technology Laboratory bjlide@nist.gov (301Health IT at NIST NIST research and development in standards, testing, security and privacy

369

Environmental Impact | Browse Tree Results  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Environmental Impact. From climate change to biodiversity loss - documenting man's impact. CAB International. Home. Abstracts Database. News Articles. ...

370

EIS-0277: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0277: Final Environmental Impact Statement Management of Certain Plutonium Residues and Scrub Alloy Stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site This EIS evaluates the potential alternatives and impacts associated with a proposal to process certain plutonium residues and all of the scrub alloy currently stored at Rocky Flats. While ongoing stabilization activities at Rocky Flats are addressing immediate health and safety concerns associated with existing storage conditions, the indefinite storage of these materials, even after stabilization, would continue to present health and safety concerns that could only be eliminated by disposal or other disposition of the materials. Thus, this EIS evaluates alternative processing technologies to prepare these

371

Space, light, and time : prospective analysis of Circadian illumination for health-based daylighting with applications to healthcare architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light in architecture can be studied for its objective or perceptual effects. This thesis describes an objective link between human health and architectural design. Specifically, the link between daylight and human circadian ...

Pechacek, Christopher S. (Christopher Scott)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Environment, Safety, Health, & Security | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable PPPL Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety Procurement Division Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library Contact Us Lab Leadership Directory Careers/ Human Resources Environment, Safety & Health Sustainable PPPL Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety Procurement Division Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library Environment, Safety, Health, & Security About PPPL ESH&S The Environment, Safety, Health, & Security Department provides safety oversight and assistance for the wide variety of plasma and fusion research projects undertaken at the Laboratory as well as stewardship for the environment and our property and assets. The department is comprised of four divisions: Environmental Services, Safety, Health Physics, and Site

373

Environmental assessment for the decommissioning and decontamination of contaminated facilities at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) was established in 1958 at its present location by the Atomic Energy Commission. Research at LEHR originally focused on the health effects from chronic exposures to radionuclides, primarily strontium 90 and radium 226, using beagles to simulate radiation effects on humans. In 1988, pursuant to a memorandum of agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California, DOE`s Office of Energy Research decided to close out the research program, shut down LEHR, and turn the facilities and site over to the University of California, Davis (UCD) after remediation. The decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of LEHR will be managed by the San Francisco Operations Office (SF) under DOE`s Environmental Restoration Program. This environmental assessment (EA) addresses the D&D of four site buildings and a tank trailer, and the removal of the on-site cobalt 60 (Co-60) source. Future activities at the site will include D&D of the Imhoff building and the outdoor dog pens, and may include remediation of underground tanks, and the landfill and radioactive disposal trenches. The remaining buildings on the LEHR site are not contaminated. The environmental impacts of the future activities cannot be determined at this time because the extent of contamination has not yet been ascertained. The impacts of these future activities (including the cumulative impacts of the future activities and those addressed in this EA) will be addressed in future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Asset Health Workshop Fundamentals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report represents the initial findings and expectations from member asset managers with regard to asset health. Principal objectives were expressed at an asset health workshop hosted by BC Hydro July 7th, 2007. Participants shared experiences in asset health and aligned on an approach to capture and use asset health information. Asset health will be a key component of EPRI's asset and risk management program. The notes of the meeting will be utilized as a starting point for framing out the asset hea...

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

375

Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements, Second Edition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recommendations Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Second Edition December 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Environment, Safety and Health Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Second Edition December 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Environment, Safety and Health Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance printed on recycled paper Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements, Second Edition Preface This document provides recommendations for the Department of Energy's (DOE's) preparation of environmental assessments and environmental impact statements under the National Environmental

376

EA-1001: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

001: Finding of No Significant Impact 001: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1001: Finding of No Significant Impact Commercialization of the Mound Plant Based on the analysis of impacts in the environmental assessment, the proposed action to lease all or portions of the Mound Plant to commercial enterprises for sublease to other potential business enterprises for commercial use consistent with the "Mound Plant Future Use Plan" and the environmental assessment for the proposed action would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact and an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. EA-1001-FONSI-1994.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1001: Final Environmental Assessment

377

Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » NEPA Documents » Findings of No Significant Impact Services » NEPA Documents » Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Findings of No Significant Impact are public documents issued by a Federal agency briefly presenting the reasons why an action for which the agency has prepared an environmental assessment will not have a significant effect on the human environment and, therefore, will not require preparation of an environmental impact statement. If you have any trouble finding a specific document, please contact AskNEPA@hq.doe.gov for assistance. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD November 13, 2013 EA-1965: Finding of No Significant Impact Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center's Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida

378

EA-1331: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Finding of No Significant Impact 1: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1331: Finding of No Significant Impact Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site Based on the analysis and information provided in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed Federal action, to conduct air sparging at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site in Sweetwater County, Wyoming, does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact. EA-1331-FONSI-2000.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1331: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1219: Finding of No Significant Impact

379

EA-1255: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1255: Finding of No Significant Impact 1255: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1255: Finding of No Significant Impact Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia Based on the analysis in the Environmental Assessment for Project Partnership, and based on the previous Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1006) and Finding of No Significant Impact for Project Sapphire, DOE has determined that the transportation of about 5 kilograms of enriched uranium nuclear fuel from the Republic of Georgia to the United Kingdom does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the human environment. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required. EA-1255-FONSI-1998.pdf More Documents & Publications EA- 1255: Finding of No Significant Impact

380

EA-1699: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Finding of No Significant Impact 9: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1699: Finding of No Significant Impact Pope/Douglas Third Combustor Expansion Project, Alexandria, Minnesota The United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) to analyze the potential environmental impacts of providing funding for the proposed Pope/Douglas Third Combustor Expansion Project in Alexandria, Minnesota. Based on the EA, DOE determined that its proposed action would result in no significant adverse impacts to the human environment Finding of No significant Impact for the Pope/Douglas Third Combustor Expansion Project, Alexandria, Minnesota, DOE/EA-1699 (May 2010) More Documents & Publications EA-1699: Final Environmental Assessment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

EA-1606: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

606: Finding of No Significant Impact 606: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1606: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military Training, SC DOE prepared an environmental assessment to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed use of Savannah River Site lands and facilities for military training. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, the prepation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1606-FONSI-2011.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1606: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1606: Draft Environmental Assessment

382

EA-1260: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

260: Finding of No Significant Impact 260: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1260: Finding of No Significant Impact Transfer of 1100 Area, Southern Rail Connection and Rolling Stock, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Based on the analysis in the EA and comments received on the draft EA, DOE had decided that the proposed transfer of the 1100 "Area, southern rail connection, and rolling stockto a non-federal entity does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting thequality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, an EIS for the proposed action is not required. EA-1260-FONSI-1998.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1260: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact EIS-0222: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0222: Final Environmental Impact Statement

383

EA-1137: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

37: Finding of No Significant Impact 37: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1137: Finding of No Significant Impact Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant Kansas City, Missouri Based on the analysis of impacts in the EA, the proposed action to use an electrochemical etching process on solid depleted uranium components at the DOE's Kansas City Plant would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, the Department is issuing this finding of no significant impact and the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required. Furthermore, there is no practicable alternative to locating the proposed action in the floodplain (because the Kansas City Plant is located entirely within the floodplain),

384

EA-1120: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20: Finding of No Significant Impact 20: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1120: Finding of No Significant Impact Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Based on the information and analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed treatment, repackaging and storage of solid residues at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact for the proposed action. EA-1120-FONSI-1996.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1120: Final Environmental Assessment EA-0995: Finding of No Significant Impact

385

EA-1157: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

157: Finding of No Significant Impact 157: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1157: Finding of No Significant Impact Methyl Chloride via Oxyhydrochlorination of Methane: A Building Black for Chemicals and Fuels from Natural Gas The proposed Federal action, to provide cost-shared financial assistance for demonstration of the OHC process in an engineering scale facility, does not constitute a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment as defined by NEPA. This conclusion is based on the analysis contained in the EA. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is issuing this FONSI. EA-1157-FONSI-1996.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1157: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1091: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1183: Finding of No Significant Impact

386

EA-1087: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

87: Finding of No Significant Impact 87: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1087: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California Based on the information and analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposal to construct and operate the Induction Linac System Experiments project does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, a Finding of No Significant Impact is made and an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. EA-1087-FONSI-1995.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1087: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1065: Finding of No Significant Impact

387

EA-1065: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Finding of No Significant Impact 5: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1065: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Construction and Operation of a Genome Sequencing Facility in Building 64 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California Based on the information and analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposal to construct and operate the Genome Sequencing Facility does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, a Finding of No Significant Impact is made and an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. EA-1065-FONSI-1995.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1065: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1087: Finding of No Significant Impact

388

EA- 1255: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1255: Finding of No Significant Impact 1255: Finding of No Significant Impact EA- 1255: Finding of No Significant Impact Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia Based on the analysis in this EA for Project Partnership, and based on the previous EA and Finding of No Significant Impact for Project Sapphire, the DOE has determined that the transportation of about 5 kilograms of enriched uranium nuclear fuel from the Republic of Georgia to the United Kingdom does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. EA-1255-FONSI-1998.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1255: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1255: Final Environmental Assessment

389

Primer on Cumulative Impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cumulative impacts have become one of the most important aspects of environmental analysis and reporting in terms of transmission siting. This primer provides EPRI members with background information and fundamental understanding of the analysis process. The primer reviews the legal and regulatory framework, briefly examines case law that has helped to define both the cumulative impacts concept and subsequent analysis, and provides a structure for conducting or reviewing cumulative impacts analyses.

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

mep client impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the mep net W or K Utah Manufacturing Extension Partnership ... Making an Impact on US Manufacturing manuFacturing extension partnership UTAH ...

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

391

NYCCS | Economic Impact  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

biotechnology, national security and finance, is accomplished through high performance computing. Some examples of impactful areas are listed below: Modeling, simulation and...

392

Hypervelocity impact jet formation  

SciTech Connect

The hypervelocity impact of a particle on a surface generates a jet of shocked material which is thrown from the impact site. A simple analytic model has been developed to obtain expressions for the evolution of this jet of ejecta. The analysis is based on applying the conservation equations of mass and momentum to the problem of a normal impact of a sphere against a semi-infinite flat target. Expressions are developed for the evolution of the jet velocity, jet release point and the locus of points which describe the ejecta envelope. These analytical ejecta profiles are compared with high speed photographs of impact jet formation. 6 refs., 7 figs.

Ang, J.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Anthropological Insights in the Delivery of Health Services in Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The impact of environment and genetic factors are further additive one which complicate the situation. Some of the studies done by some anthropologists also reveal that non-availability of safe drinking water, proper sanitation and hygiene coupled... micronutrients (such as iron, vitamin A, calcium and iodine) as well as the inadequate intake of calories and proteins remain important reasons for the lack of better health. Environmental factors are barriers in achieving better health, It is estimated that only...

Regmi, Rishikeshab Raj

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Including the Human Factor in Dependability Benchmarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the construction of a dependability benchmark that captures the impact of the human system operator on the tested system. Our benchmark follows the usual model of injecting faults and perturbations into the tested system; however, our perturbations are generated by the unscripted actions of actual human operators participating in the benchmark procedure in addition to more traditional fault injection. We introduce the issues that arise as we attempt to incorporate human behavior into a dependability benchmark and describe the possible solutions that we have arrived at through preliminary experimentation. Finally, we describe the implementation of our techniques in a dependability benchmark that we are currently developing

Aaron B. Brown; Leonard C. Chung; David A. Patterson

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

CO2 Health Effects in Wildlife Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impetus for this project is the possible development of large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, transport, and storage (CCS) sites that have the potential to release CO2 into the environment and cause adverse health effects. The purpose of this project is to obtain information from the scientific literature on the effects of CO2 exposure in wildlife animal species. This report, along with previously documented information on the effects of CO2 in humans, laboratory animals, and domesticated animals...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

396

Health Effects for Boron and Borates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boron occurs in varying concentrations in coal fly ash and is typically found in fly ash leachates. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is in the process of performing a risk assessment to determine safe levels of boron for human ingestion. This report describes existing information on the health effects of boron and how that information is being used to calculate a reference dose (RfD) and acceptable concentration in drinking water.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

397

The Economic Impact of Extending Marriage to Same-Sex Couples in Vermont  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 2008). A copy of a Vermont marriage license costs $10.00. Vermont Department of Health. http://Impact on the State of Vermont of Allowing Same-Sex Couples

Ramos, Christopher; Badgett, M.V. Lee; Sears, Brad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The Economic Impact of Extending Marriage to Same-Sex Couples in the District of Columbia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact on the State of Vermont of Allowing Same-Sex Couples102,639). See Cindy Chooley, Vermont Department of Health.for same-sex couples in Vermont, 2,435). Gates, Gary J. ,

Ramos, Christopher; Badgett, M V Lee; Sears, Brad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The Impact of the Colorado Domestic Partnership Act on Colorado's State Budget  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Vital Records, Vermont Department of Health). "Vermont civil union statistics." Email to author. July 11,Impact on the State of Vermont of Allowing Same-Sex Couples

Badgett, M.V. Lee; Sears, Brad; Lee, Roger; MacCartney, Danielle

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Impact of Extending Marriage to Same-Sex Couples on the New Jersey Budget  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact on the State of Vermont of Allowing Same-Sex CouplesCouncil. 2002. Report of the Vermont Domestic partnership21,956). See Cindy Chooley, Vermont Department of Health.

Sears, Brad; Badgett, M.V. Lee

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

North Mississippi Health Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... including APs (2.1a(1)). A most pressing adverse impact of HC ... NMMC-Tupelo campus is the CEN- TRAL STERILE PROCESSING (CSP) Case Cart ...

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

402

Depleted Uranium Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Discussion of health effects of external exposure, ingestion, and inhalation of depleted uranium. Depleted uranium is not a significant health hazard unless it is taken into the body. External exposure to radiation from depleted uranium is generally not a major concern because the alpha particles emitted by its isotopes travel only a few centimeters in air or can be stopped by a sheet of paper. Also, the uranium-235 that remains in depleted uranium emits only a small amount of low-energy gamma radiation. However, if allowed to enter the body, depleted uranium, like natural uranium, has the potential for both chemical and radiological toxicity with the two important target organs

403

ORISE: Health physics services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health physics services Health physics services Nuclear power plant The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers comprehensive health physics services in a number of technical areas for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as well as other federal and state agencies. From radiological facility audits and reviews to dose modeling and technical evaluations, ORISE is nationally-recognized for its health physics support to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects across the United States. Our health physics services include: Environmental survey Applied health physics projects We work with government agencies and organizations to identify, measure and assess the presence of radiological materials during the D&D process. ORISE

404

Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employees Health Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Initial Election Period As a new employee, you have 60 days from your date of appointment to make an election for the health benefits program. Your completed Health Benefits Election Form, SF-2809, must be submitted to your servicing Human Resources Office in a timely manner. If you fail to make an election within the required deadline, you are considered to have declined coverage. You will not have another opportunity to enroll until the annual open season (conducted in late Fall) or unless you experience a qualifying life event (see http://www.opm.gov/insure/health/planinfo/qle.asp) that would allow you to enroll. Please note that the SF-2809 should be completed and submitted even if you are declining coverage.

405

Medical Examination Office of Human Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Examination 4.40 Office of Human Resources Applies to: Faculty, staff, graduate associates-292-2800 ohrc@hr.osu.edu hr.osu.edu/elr Policy clarification for medical center employees Medical Center Employee Relations 614-293-4988 Medical exam arrangements Employee Health Services 614-293-8146 #12;

Howat, Ian M.

406

Learning and Applying Health Disparity Education through Texas TEKS Curriculum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the US population grows in diversity, so has the number of health disparities. Health disparities continue to affect a large portion of the minority population resulting in negative health outcomes. Education remains a key element in the prevention of these adverse health conditions, especially among the ethnically diverse youth. Health education presently fails to be effectively implemented in the activities and instruction in classrooms, which is greatly impacted by the lack of knowledge and training of educators. Through the development and implementation of a new Texas health-science curriculum, educators can acquire the skills and framework necessary to approach a diverse classroom on good health practices. This program will identify the concepts of cultural competency and cultural influences to allow instructors the capacity to adapt a curriculum that suits all students. The analysis and reconstruction of current TEKS curricula is the purpose of this research study. Through studying these sets of data, an increased understanding in health education can be formulated and relayed to grade school level students. Thus, by the increase in health education students of minority can develop good behavioral norms; reducing the risks associated with rising health disparities.

Mazac, Taylor T

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

PUBLIC HEALTH STATEMENT MERCURY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Public Health Statement is the summary chapter from the Toxicological Profile for Mercury. It is one in a series of Public Health Statements about hazardous substances and their health effects. A shorter version, the ToxFAQs™, is also available. This information is important because this substance may harm you. The effects of exposure to any hazardous substance depend on the dose, the duration, how you are exposed, personal traits and habits, and whether other chemicals are

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The Environmental Science & Health Effects Program at the at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources.

Lawson, Douglas R.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

409

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd Edition Chapter 5 The Effect of Diacylglycerols on Energy Expenditure and Substrate Utilization in Humans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd Edition Chapter 5 The Effect of Diacylglycerols on Energy Expenditure and Substrate Utilization in Humans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bioc

410

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3Chapter 12 Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Healthy and Cancerous Human Tissues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3 Chapter 12 Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Healthy and Cancerous Human Tissues Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS 2526793B0420777596C5A5

411

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 20 Human Nutrition Value of Soybean Oil and Soy Protein  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 20 Human Nutrition Value of Soybean Oil and Soy Protein Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health -

412

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 21 Flaxseed Proteins: Potential Food Applications and Process-Induced Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 21 Flaxseed Proteins: Potential Food Applications and Process-Induced Changes Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemi

413

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 13 Flaxseed and Prevention of Experimental Hypercholesterolemic Atherosclerosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 13 Flaxseed and Prevention of Experimental Hypercholesterolemic Atherosclerosis Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bioche

414

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 5 Phospholipid Composition of Human Sperm and Seminal Plasmain Relation to Sperm Fertility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 5 Phospholipid Composition of Human Sperm and Seminal Plasmain Relation to Sperm Fertility Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downl

415

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 6 Effects of Flaxseed on Sex Hormone Metabolism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 6 Effects of Flaxseed on Sex Hormone Metabolism Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Do

416

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 12 a-Linolenic Acid and Heart Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 12 a-Linolenic Acid and Heart Disease Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable

417

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 22 Availability and Labeling of Flaxseed Food Products and Supplements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 22 Availability and Labeling of Flaxseed Food Products and Supplements Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry P

418

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 23 Flaxseed in Poultry Diets: Meat and Eggs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 23 Flaxseed in Poultry Diets: Meat and Eggs Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downlo

419

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 3 Dietary Sources and Metabolism of a-Linolenic Acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 3 Dietary Sources and Metabolism of a-Linolenic Acid Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

420

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 16 Flaxseed and Flaxseed Products in Kidney Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 16 Flaxseed and Flaxseed Products in Kidney Disease Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 17 Effect of Flaxseed on Bone Metabolism and Menopauseolism and Menopause  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 17 Effect of Flaxseed on Bone Metabolism and Menopause olism and Menopause Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

422

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 1 Structure, Composition, and Variety Development of Flaxseed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 1 Structure, Composition, and Variety Development of Flaxseed Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

423

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 8 a-Linolenic Acid in Brain Function and Infant Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 8 a-Linolenic Acid in Brain Function and Infant Development Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

424

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 15 Flaxseed, Fiber and Coronary Heart Disease: Clinical Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 15 Flaxseed, Fiber and Coronary Heart Disease: Clinical Studies Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

425

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 20 Processing of Flaxseed Fiber, Oil, Protein, and Lignan Fractions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 20 Processing of Flaxseed Fiber, Oil, Protein, and Lignan Fractions Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pres

426

History of the DOE Human Genome Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

History of the DOE Human Genome Program History of the DOE Human Genome Program The following history is taken from the U.S. Department of Energy 1991-91 Human Genome Program Report (June 1992). This is an archived item. A brief history of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Human Genome Program will be useful in a discussion of the objectives of the DOE program as well as those of the collaborative U.S. Human Genome Project. The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of DOE and its predecessor agencies--the Atomic Energy Commission and the Energy Research and Development Administration--have long sponsored research into genetics, both in microbial systems and in mammals, including basic studies on genome structure, replication, damage, and repair and the consequences of genetic

427

Environmental Impacts of Tourism in Khao Yai National Park, Thailand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of visitor impacts is critical for sustainable tourism management in national parks. The focus of past tourism impact research on national parks is either on bio-physical impacts (conducted as recreation ecology research) or on social impacts (human dimensions, including environmental perception and crowding). Research integrating these two dimensions has been rarely conducted. This research aims to fill this gap through the integrative approach that attempts to understand current biophysical impacts of visitor activities in a national park, and it examines how visitors perceive these impacts. The primary objectives of this dissertation are 1) to provide a synthesis of existing of bio-physical impacts of visitor activities in the Khao Yai National Park (KYNP) and 2) to examine visitors’ perception of those impacts. Also, the factors affecting visitors’ perception are analyzed. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used in this study. Previous impact studies conducted in KYNP were reviewed. A visitor survey was conducted between December 2008 and February 2009. The questionnaires were distributed to 628 domestic and 40 international visitors. The 38 KYNP official interviews were completed. Based on previous impact research in KYNP, the most common bio-physical impacts include soil compaction, removal of humus layer, erosion, plant damage, soil and root exposure, water quality deterioration, disturbance and feeding wildlife. Other environmental impacts include noise pollution and garbage accumulation. The results indicate that more than 30 percent of visitors do not recognize the negative results of their activities. With the exception of vegetation and water impacts, overall, visitors perceive the impacts as less severe than the actual impacts. Environmental impacts are rated differently by the KYNP officials, domestic, and international visitors. Also, significant differences were found among birders, hikers, and campers. The key factors influencing impact perceptions include income level, education level, residential location, park visitation experience, length of stay in KYNP, recreation activity, frequency of activity, group type, and group size. It is suggested that both the quality and the quantity of visitor impact research are needed to construct the body of knowledge of impacts in KYNP. A long-term impact monitoring is required to sustain the ecological integrity in KYNP.

Phumsathan, Sangsan

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Information on a Major New Initiative: Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome (1986 DOE Memorandum)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

In the history of the Human Genome Program, Dr. Charles DeLisi and Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece of the Department of Energy (DOE) were instrumental in moving the seeds of the program forward. This May 1986 memo from DeLisi to Trivelpiece, Director of DOE's Office of Energy Research, documents this fact. Following the March 1986 Santa Fe workshop on the subject of mapping and sequencing the human genome, DeLisi's memo outlines workshop conclusions, explains the relevance of this project to DOE and the importance of the Department's laboratories and capabilities, notes the critical experience of DOE in managing projects of this scale and potential magnitude, and recognizes the fact that the project will impact biomedical science in ways which could not be fully anticipated at the time. Subsequently, program guidance was further sought from the DOE Health Effects Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) and the April 1987 HERAC report recommended that DOE and the nation commit to a large, multidisciplinary, scientific and technological undertaking to map and sequence the human genome.

DeLisi, Charles (Associate Director, Health and Environmental Research, DOE Office of Energy Research)

1986-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

429

Importance of physical interaction between human and robot for therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mental health care of the elderly people is a common problem in advanced countries. Recently, high technology has developed robots for use not only in factories but also for our living environment. In particular, human interactive robots for psychological ... Keywords: elderly care, human-robot interaction, mental commitment robot, robot therapy

Takanori Shibata

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Environment, health, socioeconomics and environmental control technology. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the important findings of a two-volume report that deals with the potential impacts and environmental controls associated with the operation of geothermal power plants in California's Imperial Valley. The valley contains nearly a third of the nation's total energy potential for identified hot-water resources. Possible impacts of developing those resources include violation of air quality standards if emissions of hydrogen sulfide are not abated, negative ecological effects resulting from increased in the salinity of the Salton Sea, and damage to irrigation systems caused by land subsidence induced by the extraction of geothermal fluids. Other minor impacts concern occupational health and safety, socioeconomics, and hazardous wastes. Analyses of environmental impacts and the control measures for minimizing negative impacts are based primarily on a projected production of 3000 MW of electrical power by the year 2010.

Layton, D.W.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Progressing UK Energy Research for a Coherent Structure with Impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the deployment of affordable green energy technologies that decarbonise our energy supply and increase energy with their collaborators in industry who are so vital to the health of UK Energy research, for rising to the challengesProgressing UK Energy Research for a Coherent Structure with Impact Report of the International

Berzins, M.

432

Health and Nutrition News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US National Institutes of Health (NIH)used modern statistics to review data that were not included in the original 1978 publication of results from the Sydney Diet Heart Study (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology 109:317–330). Health and Nutritio

433

Technology in mental health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mental illness has been identified as one of the greatest challenges facing society in the coming decades. However, there are significant barriers to access for many people suffering from mental illness, including overburdened public health care systems, ... Keywords: cognitive rehabilitation, computer based treatment, engagement, ethics, exposure therapy, mental health, psychotherapy, stigma, universal design, user centered design

Gavin Doherty; John Sharry; Magnus Bang; Mariano Alcañiz; Rosa Baños

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Environmental impact report (draft)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The three projects as proposed by Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the environmental analysis of the projects are discussed. Sections on the natural and social environments of the proposed projects and their surrounding areas consist of descriptions of the setting, discussions of the adverse and beneficial consequences of the project, and potential mitigation measures to reduce the effects of adverse impacts. The Environmental Impact Report includes discussions of unavoidable adverse effects, irreversible changes, long-term and cumulative impacts, growth-inducing effects, and feasible alternatives to the project. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Improving landscape-level environmental impact evaluations.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New spatial data and advancements in GIS tools allow much more comprehensive and quantitative analyses of the large datasets required when making programmatic evaluations of the ecological effects of proposed activities that cover a large area or region. Understanding the environmental impacts of proposed human developments is critical to making appropriate siting decisions and designing mitigation strategies to reduce impacts on important resources. Impact analyses conducted under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) or Environmental Assessments (EAs) are intended to determine the resource-specific impacts of proposed activities of federal agencies and their alternatives using the best available information. Impacts to ecological resources are often a primary focus of these analyses. Information used in NEPA analyses include some measure of the known or probable presence of plants and wildlife in the project area, with special emphasis placed on threatened, endangered, and other special-status species. Site-specific information pertaining to ecological resources is usually easier to obtain for small-scale activities such as a local facility, road, or transmission upgrade project, where the ability to conduct fieldwork is more often feasible. However, site-specific data is more difficult-and sometimes impossible-to obtain for proposed activities that could affect a large area or region. These types of analyses often are considered in programmatic NEPA documents, in which a federal agency evaluates the implementation of a broad program or plan. Under these programmatic evaluations, the exact location and size of developments are often not known. Because obtaining quantitative information for ecological resources at such large spatial scales is difficult, programmatic impact evaluations typically rely on sketchy or partial information such as recorded species occurrences, species ranges, and general habitat descriptions. However, new spatial data and improved GIS tools allow much more comprehensive and quantitative analyses using large, readily available datasets. The availability of large-scale regional data such as GAP land-cover models or species habitat suitability models, combined with more robust spatial analysis procedures available through ArcGIS for Desktop software, allowed the analysis of multiple datasets at large spatial scales. This enabled researchers to surpass previous qualitative evaluations by developing a more accurate and quantitative approach for determining the environmental impacts of human activities at larger spatial scales. These approaches, combined with the utility of ModelBuilder and operability of Python scripts in ArcGIS, allow a more timely and cost-effective synthesis of available spatial data for programmatic evaluations and add a quantitative basis to environmental decision making.

Walston, L.J.; LaGory, K.E.; Vinikour, W.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.L.; Cantwell, B. (Environmental Science Division)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

HOODOOS—See COASTAL HOODOOS HUMAN IMPACT ON ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure H9 Honeycomb weathering in sandstone near Baku, Azerbaijan on the west coast of the Caspian Sea. (Photo, M.L. Schwartz.) gFiure H10 y g.

437

Design Tools for Evaluating Alternative Strategies' Impact on Human Comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many designers recognize that energy savings can be achieved with alternative or innovative strategies; however, few design tools have been available to assist designers with evaluating alternatives. This paper demonstrates the use of a standard psychrometric chart enhanced with an expanded comfort zone plot based on multiple energy conservation strategies. Average local weather conditions can be plotted by month on the psychrometric chart to indicate which design alternatives have the greatest potential benefits. By utilizing a familiar engineering design tool to communicate integrated design techniques, better coordination can be achieved between architects and engineers. Victor Olgyay pioneered similar work at Notre Dame in the 1950's; however, his unusual graphical presentation has hindered widespread understanding and use of the fundamentals of expanded comfort zones. This paper outlines the basic concept of the expanded comfort zone with applications for use of mean radiant temperatures, direct radiation. air movement and evaporative cooling with examples shown for Dallas and Houston climates.

Holder, L. M. III; Hart, M. N.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Independent Scientific Advisory Board Human Population Impacts on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................................................................................................................................................23 Chemical Effects ......................................................................................................................................52 Acquisition and Conversion of Water Rights that is expected to continue. Population growth is a primary reason for the conversion through increases in demand

439

Health Risks Associated with Conversion of Depleted UF6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conversion Conversion DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Conversion A discussion of health risks associated with conversion of depleted UF6 to another chemical form. General Health Risks of Conversion The potential environmental impacts, including potential health risks, associated with conversion activities will be evaluated in detail as part of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride management program after a contract is awarded for conversion services. This section discusses in general the types of health risks associated with the conversion process. The conversion of depleted UF6 to another chemical form will be done in an industrial facility dedicated to the conversion process. Conversion will involve the handling of depleted UF6 cylinders. Hazardous chemicals, such

440

Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level mixed waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

This report provides supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The assessment considers both the radioactive and chemical hazards associated with LLMW transportation. Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment methods and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS. This report presents additional information that is not included in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLMW. Included are definitions of the LLMW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS; data related to the inventory and to the physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics of WM LLMW; an overview of the risk assessment methods; and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLMW case considered.

Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Lazaro, M.A.; Antonopoulos, A.A.; Hartmann, H.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level waste (LLW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment method and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS and are not repeated in this report. This report presents additional information that is not presented in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLW. Included are definition of the LLW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, data related to the inventory and to the physical and radiological characteristics of WM LLW, an overview of the risk assessment method, and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLW alternative considered.

Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Minority Economic Impact | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Minority Economic Impact Minority Economic Impact Diversity and Inclusion Supporting Small Businesses Minority Economic Impact Partnering with Minority Serving Institutions...

443

Issues Impacting Texas Communities Julie Winckler, Communications Director, TRUST For A Smoke-Free  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Session, including funding a statewide comprehensive tobacco cessation and prevention program, a cigarette tax, securitization and preemption, could dramatically impact community efforts to reduce tobacco use. Community members and policy makers need to be familiar with these issues and understand their impact on the tobacco control movement. Community Health Costs Money- How Much?

Smokeless States; Tobacco Initiative; Rwj Foundation

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 3, Sections 7-12, Appendices A-C  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains references; a list of preparers and recipients; acronyms, abbreviations, and units of measure; a glossary; an index and three appendices.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

EA-1310: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10: Finding of No Significant Impact 10: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1310: Finding of No Significant Impact Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Based on the analysis presented in the attached EA, and on public comment received on the draft predecision EA, I have determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required. EA-1310-FONSI-2000.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1310: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1772: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1083: Final Environmental Assessment

446

EA-1758: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Finding of No Significant Impact 8: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1758: Finding of No Significant Impact Drilling, Testing, and Monitoring of up to 12 Temperature Gradient/Passive Seismic Geothermal Exploratory Wells, Deschutes County, Oregon This FONSI supports DOE's decision to provide cost-shared funding to Davenport Newberry Holdings LLC's proposed project for drilling, testing, and monitoring up to 12 temperature gradient/passive seismic geothermal exploratory wells and describes the process by which DOE determined that funding the proposed project would not have a significant impact on the human environment. Finding of No Significant Impact Drilling, Testing and Monitoring of up to 12 Temperature Gradient/Passive Seismic Geothermal Exploratory Wells, Deschutes County, Oregon

447

EA-1682: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

682: Finding of No Significant Impact 682: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1682: Finding of No Significant Impact Upgrades and Life Extension of the 242-A Evaporator, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, Conducted under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 This EA evaluates the potential impacts from upgrading and extending the service life of the existing 242-A Evaporator located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The Department of Energy has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Finding of no Significant Impact for the Upgrades and Life Extension of the 242-A Evaporator, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Conducted Under the

448

EA-1965: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

965: Finding of No Significant Impact 965: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1965: Finding of No Significant Impact Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center's Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida Based on the environmental assessment (EA), DOE finds that the proposed action is not a major federal action that constitutes a significant effect on the human environment. This finding and decision is based on the consideration of DOE's NEPA implementing regulations (40 CFR Part 1021) and Council on Environmental Quality criteria for significance (40 CFR 1508.27), both with regard to the context and the intensity of impacts analyzed in the EA. Therefore, the proposed action does not require the preparation of an environmental impact statement.

449

EA-1563: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1563: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1563: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1563: Finding of No Significant Impact National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Stormwater Compliance Alternatives at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina The Department of Energy has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1563) to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed and alternative actions to protect the quality of State waters at 38 stormwater outfalls located at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Finding of No Significant Impact for the National Pollutant Discharge

450

EA-1236: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

236: Finding of No Significant Impact 236: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1236: Finding of No Significant Impact Preparation for Transfer of Ownership of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Natrona County, Wyoming Based on the analysis of the Sitewide Environmental Assessment for Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) DOE has determined that the proposed action to conduct activities in anticipation of possible transfer of NPR-3 out of Federal operation is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act. Therefore an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this finding of no significant impact. EA-1236-FONSI-1998.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1008: Final Environmental Assessment

451

EA-0881: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0881: Finding of No Significant Impact Tank 241-c-103 Organic Vapor and Liquid Characterization and Supporting Activities, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington The proposed sampling of the vapor space and organic layer in Tank 241-C-103 and measuring of the thickness of the organic layer does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the NEPA. This finding is based on information and analysis in the EA. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required for this proposed action. EA-0881-FONSI-1992.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-0881: Final Environmental Assessment EA-0915: Final Environmental Assessment EA-0904: Finding of No Significant Impact

452

EA-1146: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

46: Finding of No Significant Impact 46: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1146: Finding of No Significant Impact Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado Based on the information and analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed increase in, and operation of, radioactive waste storage capacity at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 as amended. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact for the proposed action. EA-1146-FONSI-1996.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1146: Final Environmental Assessment

453

EA-1219: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19: Finding of No Significant Impact 19: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1219: Finding of No Significant Impact Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation Based upon the information and analysis provided in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed Federal action, to conduct air sparging with bioremediation at the Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site in Campbell County, Wyoming, does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact. EA-1219-FONSI-1997.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1219: Final Environmental Assessment

454

EA-0912: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12: Finding of No Significant Impact 12: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0912: Finding of No Significant Impact Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Based on the analysis in the Environmental Assessment, and after careful consideration of comments received, DOE has determined that the acceptance of up to 409 spent nuclear fuel elements from eight foreign research reactors in Europe for storage at the Savannah River Site does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and DOE issues this Finding of No Significant Impact. EA-0912-FONSI-1994.pdf More Documents & Publications

455

EA-1917: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1917: Finding of No Significant Impact Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR Based on the information presented in the Final EA, (DOE/EA-1917), and the commitment in the MAP to mitigate impacts on biological resources, including species protected under the ESA and the Marine Mammal Protection Act, to less-than-significant levels, DOE has determined that the Proposed Action will not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the context of NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this Mitigated FONSI. EA-1917-FONSI-2012.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1917: Draft Environmental Assessment

456

EA-1918: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18: Finding of No Significant Impact 18: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1918: Finding of No Significant Impact Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings (Final Rule) Based upon the EA, DOE has determined that revising the Federal building energy efficiency standards for commercial and multi-family high-rise residential buildings to ASHRAE 90.1-2010 would not be a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this FONSI. EA-1918-FONSI-2013.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1918: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1871: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1872: Draft Environmental Assessment

457

EA-0510: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Finding of No Significant Impact 0: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0510: Finding of No Significant Impact High-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (Sofc) Generator Development Project (METC) The proposed action, the Westinghouse Tubular SOFC Generator Development Project, does not constitute a major federal action normally requiring the preparation of an environmental impact statement. Based on the analysis provided in the EA, DOE determines that this action will not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. EA-0510-FONSI-1991.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-0510: Final Environmental Assessment WA_97_007_WESTINGHOUSE_ELECTRIC_CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Domest.pdf

458

EA-1134: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Finding of No Significant Impact 4: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1134: Finding of No Significant Impact Disposition of Prehistoric Remains Associated with the Public Water Supply Project Environmental Impacts associated with the proposed action are expected to be minor. Based on this, and on the fact that on-property reburial of the remains is generally in accordance with the wishes of the Native American Tribes and Groups, DOE-FEMP has determined that the proposed action would have no significant impact on the human environment. Therefore, no further NEPA documentation is required. EA-1134-FONSI-1997.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1134: Final Environmental Assessment Preliminary Notice of Violation, Fluor Fernald, Inc - EA-2001-06 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 1997

459

EA-1651: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1651: Finding of No Significant Impact U-233 Material Downblending and Disposition Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the impacts of planned activities to modify selected Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) facilities; process the ORNL inventory of uranium-233 (U-233); and transport the processed material to a long-term disposal facility. Based on the results of the analyses reported in the Final EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Finding of No Significant Impact for U-233 Material Downblending and

460

EA-1682: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Finding of No Significant Impact 2: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1682: Finding of No Significant Impact Upgrades and Life Extension of the 242-A Evaporator, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, Conducted under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 This EA evaluates the potential impacts from upgrading and extending the service life of the existing 242-A Evaporator located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The Department of Energy has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Finding of no Significant Impact for the Upgrades and Life Extension of the 242-A Evaporator, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Conducted Under the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health impacts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EA-0507: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-0507: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0507: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0507: Finding of No Significant Impact Federal Aviation Agency Explosive Detection System Independent Validation and Verification Program Idaho National Engineering Laboratory The proposed action to independently test explosive detection systems for the FAA at the INEL does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. This finding is based on the analysis in the environmental assessment. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required for this proposed action. EA-0507-FONSI-1991.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-0507: Final Environmental Assessment EA-0822: Finding of No Significant Impact

462

EA-1131: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

131: Finding of No Significant Impact 131: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1131: Finding of No Significant Impact Relocation of Neutron Tube Target Loading Operation, Los Alamos Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico The United States Department of Energy finds that there would be no significant impact from proceeding with its proposal to relocate NTTL operations from TA-21 to TA-16 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. DOE makes this Finding of No Significant Impact pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), the Council on Environmental Quality regulations, and the DOE NEPA regulations. Based on the environmental assessment that analyzes the relocation of operations, the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action which would significantly affect the human environment

463

EA-1059: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1059: Finding of No Significant Impact 1059: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1059: Finding of No Significant Impact Radioactive Source Recovery Program The United States Department of Energy (DOE) finds that there would be no significant impact from proceeding with its proposal to establish a routine radioactive source recovery program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. DOE makes this Finding of No Significant Impact pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Council on Environmental Quality regulations, and the DOE NEPA regulations. Based on the environmental assessment that analyzes the source recovery program, the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action which would significantly affect the human environment within the meaning of NEPA.

464

EA-1336: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

336: Finding of No Significant Impact 336: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1336: Finding of No Significant Impact Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment This Finding of No Significant Impact is made pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 [42 U.S. Code 4321 et seq.]; the Council on Environmental Quality's Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA, Title 40 CFR, Part 1500-1508; and the DOE's NEPA Implementing Procedures, Title 10 CFR, Part 1021. The Proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is issuing this FONSI. EA-1336-FEA-2001

465

EA-1535: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1535: Finding of No Significant Impact Uranium Leasing Program U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management prepared the Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA) (DOE/EA-1535) to evaluate its management alternatives for the future of DOE's Uranium Leasing Program (ULP). Based on the analyses in the final PEA, I have determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. Finding of No Significant Impact for the Uranium Leasing Program, DOE/EA-1535 (July 2007) More Documents & Publications EA-1535: Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment EIS-0472: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact

466

EA-1097: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Finding of No Significant Impact 7: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1097: Finding of No Significant Impact Solid waste Disposal - Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada Based on the information and analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action to modify the Area 23 landfill to comply with the new regulations and to close the Area 9 landfill and reopen it as Construction and Demolition debris landfill does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act. Thus, an environmental impact statement is not required to implement this action. EA-1097-FONSI-1995.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1097: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1097: Finding of No Significant Impact

467

EA-1188: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1188: Finding of No Significant Impact Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc. Midway Valley 3D Seismic Project, Kern County, California Based on the results of the analysis in the Assessment, the Department of Energy has determined that the proposed 3-dimensional seismic survey does not constitute a major federal action that significantly affects the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and the Department of Energy is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact. EA-1188-FONSI-1999.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1188: Final Environmental Assessment CX-009523: Categorical Exclusion Determination

468

EA-1503: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1503: Finding of No Significant Impact 1503: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1503: Finding of No Significant Impact Vermont Electric Power Company Proposed Northern Loop Project In compliance with NEPA, DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA; DOE/EA-1503), entitled Vermont Electric Power Company Proposed Northern Loop Project, to analyze the environmental impacts related to the proposed Federal action of authorizing the requested modifications to the existing PP-66 and PP-82 facilities. Based on the information contained in the EA, DOE has determined that the amendment of Presidential Permits PP-66 and PP-82, as requested in VELC0's application, would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment and, therefore, does not require preparation of an environmental impact

469

EA-1871: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1871: Finding of No Significant Impact Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings Based on an DOE/EA-1871, DOE has determined that revising the Federal building energy efficiency standards to ASHRAE 90.1-2007 and IECC 2009 would not be a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, an EIS is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact. EA-1871-FONSI-2011.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1871: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1872: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1918: Finding of No Significant Impact

470

EA-1091: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Finding of No Significant Impact 1: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1091: Finding of No Significant Impact Calderon Cokemaking Process/Demonstration Project The proposed Federal action, to provide cost-shared financial assistance for a demonstration project including the modification of an existing process demonstration unit and operation for producing metallurgical grade coke, does not constitute a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment as defined by NEPA. This conclusion is based on the analysis contained in the EA. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is issuing this FONSI. EA-1091-FONSI-1996.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1091: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1157: Finding of No Significant Impact

471

EA-1793: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1793: Finding of No Significant Impact Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Generated at the Department of Energy's Idaho Site DOE prepared an environmental assessment (EA), for the Replacement Capability for the Disposal of Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Generated at the Department of Energy's Idaho Site to evaluate potential environmental impacts related to replacement capability options. Based on the analysis presented in the EA, the selected action would not significantly affect the quality ofthe human environment. Therefore, preparation ofan environmental impact statement is not required. EA-1793-FONSI-2011.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1793: Final Environmental Assessment

472

EA-1965: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1965: Finding of No Significant Impact Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center's Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida Based on the environmental assessment (EA), DOE finds that the proposed action is not a major federal action that constitutes a significant effect on the human environment. This finding and decision is based on the consideration of DOE's NEPA implementing regulations (40 CFR Part 1021) and Council on Environmental Quality criteria for significance (40 CFR 1508.27), both with regard to the context and the intensity of impacts analyzed in the EA. Therefore, the proposed action does not require the preparation of an environmental impact statement.

473

EA-1922: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1922: Finding of No Significant Impact Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska Based on the EA, DOE finds that providng federal funding for the Proposed Project is not a major action that constituents a significant effect on the human environment. This finding and decision is based on the consideration of DOE's NEPA implementing regulations (10 CFR Part 1021) and CEQ's criteria for significance (40 CFR 1508.27), both with regard to the context and the intensity of impacts analyzed in trhe EA. Accordingly, the Proposed Project does not require the preparation of an environmental impact statement. EA-1922-FONSI-2013.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1922: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1922: Draft Environmental Assessment

474

Open Data for Climate and Health Insights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Open Data for Climate and Health Insights Print E-mail Open Data for Climate and Health Insights Print E-mail Metadata Access Tool for Climate and Health (MATCH) Website Thursday, May 9, 2013 Posted by Tom Armstrong, Executive Director, U.S. Global Change Research Program Today, in conjunction with a series of landmark steps announced by the Obama Administration to unleash troves of useful data from the vaults of government, the interagency US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) launched a new online tool that promises to accelerate research relating to climate change and human health-the Metadata Access Tool for Climate and Health, or "MATCH." The Administration announcements made today include an Executive Order signed by the President declaring that information is a valuable national resource and strategic asset, and a new government-wide Open Data Policy requiring that, going forward, data generated by the government shall be made available in open, machine-readable formats. The move will make troves of previously inaccessible or unmanageable data more readily available to entrepreneurs, researchers, and others who can use open data as fuel for innovation, businesses and new services and tools.

475

Demand Impacted by Weather  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When you look at demand, it’s also interesting to note the weather. The weather has a big impact on the demand of heating fuels, if it’s cold, consumers will use ...

476

Oral Histories: Health Physicist William J. Bair, Ph.D.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 HUMAN RADIATION STUDIES: REMEMBERING THE EARLY YEARS Oral History of Health Physicist William J. Bair, Ph.D. Conducted October 14, 1994 United States Department of Energy Office of Human Radiation Experiments June 1995 CONTENTS Foreword Short Biography Graduate Studies at University of Rochester AEC-Funded Research at University of Rochester Use of Human Subjects at University of Rochester AEC Direction of University of Rochester Research Contacts With Researchers Into Radiation Effects No Knowledge of Uranium Injections at Rochester Beginning a Career at Hanford Radionuclide Inhalation Studies at Hanford Use of Animals in Radiation Studies Identifying Health Effects of Inhaled Radionuclides Expanded Customer Base for Inhalation Studies Limited Involvement With Human Studies

477

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume I Human Health...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies of the Mortality of A-Bomb Survivors. Report 7 Part 1, Cancer Mortality Among Atomic Bomb Survivors, 1950-78. Radiation Research 90:395-432. Kocher, D. 1981. Radioactive...

478

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adolescence, with a current focus on the emergence of dieting and problems of energy balance in girls during: DSD11@PSU.EDU Research Interests Psychosocial determinants of exercise (age, gender, race

Yener, Aylin