Sample records for human health evaluation

  1. Evaluation of the Hazard of Microcystis Blooms for Human Health through Fish Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will be harmful to human health. #12;Proposed Work Microcystin Toxicokinetics Experiments Past experimentationEvaluation of the Hazard of Microcystis Blooms for Human Health through Fish Consumption Primary-Investigator: Duane Gossiaux - NOAA GLERL Overview Human exposure to the cyanobacterial toxin Microcystin occurs

  2. EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK OF AERIAL ULTRA-LOW VOLUME APPLICATIONS OF PYRETHRINS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK OF AERIAL ULTRA-LOW VOLUME APPLICATIONS OF PYRETHRINS). A human health risk assessment conducted by Peterson et al. (2006) for truck-mounted ultra-low volume (ULV to epidemic levels and dispersed to all 58 counties in the state, and was associated with low

  3. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the exciting stories about how our faculty, students, and alumni are engineering solutions to health careCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Human Health #12;Welcome to our Health issue ­ Please take the time to read to tackle large worldwide health problems. A few years ago, the College of Engineering made a strategic

  4. Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrys, Mark

    Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE Teaching Fellowship in Athletic of Science and Health, the School of Health and Human Performance at DCU is developing an international reputation in health and exercise science. As such, the School of Health and Human Performance is committed

  5. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Judith G.

    ; and translating and disseminating research findings to health care providers, researchers, policymakersDCP - 1 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH Drug Control Programs ..................................................................................................................................2 #12;DCP - 2 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Resource Summary

  6. Communities: Human Health and Community Development Webinar ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Communities: Human Health and Community Development Webinar Communities: Human Health and Community Development Webinar May 1, 2014 5:00PM to 6:30PM EDT The multi-agency...

  7. Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrys, Mark

    Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE Teaching Fellowship in Athletic Therapy (half time, 3 year contract) The School of Health and Human Performance invites applications from and assessment, have relevant qualifications and be experienced in emergency care training and be competent

  8. Public Health Air Surveillance Evaluation Project Public Health Air Surveillance Evaluation (PHASE) Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Public Health Air Surveillance Evaluation Project Public Health Air Surveillance Evaluation (PHASE) Project Evaluating, Developing, and Delivering Air Quality Characterization Data to Environmental Public Public Health Tracking (EPHT) Network. The EPA is developing routinely available air quality information

  9. Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    HUMAN HEALTH SCIENCE BLDG GEO HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Principal Investigator Source Heat Pumps Demo Projects May 20, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential,...

  10. Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Services Review Group Type Activity Grant the obligation to comply with Public Health Services terms and conditions if a grant is awarded as a result/PI SUBTOTALS CONSULTANT COSTS EQUIPMENT (Itemize) SUPPLIES (Itemize by category) TRAVEL INPATIENT CARE COSTS

  11. Climate Change and Human Health National Center for Environmental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change and Human Health National Center for Environmental Health Division of Environmental and Prevention October 17, 2012 #12;Coastal flooding Climate change effects: ·Temperature ·Sea level,civil conflict Anxiety,despair,depression Civil conflict Climate Change Health Effects Food & water Malnutrition

  12. PEOPLE OF CALIFORNIA HEALTH AND HUMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chair AIR RESOURCES BOARD Mary Nichols Chair DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH CARE SERVICES Toby Douglas DirectorPEOPLE OF CALIFORNIA HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES AGENCY Diana Dooley Secretary Michael Wilkening Deborah Raphael Director OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH HAZARD ASSESSMENT George Alexeeff Director

  13. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    , M.D. Technology Richard Nakamura., Ph.D. Andrea T. Norris #12;ES-3 FY 2015 Budget Request National 2015 Budget Page No. Organization ChartES-1 Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Executive Summary FY

  14. College of Human and Health Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    8988 College of Human and Health Sciences All research is delivered through discipline-focused research centres, which examine fields such as child research, ageing, psychology and social care, as well as midwifery, nursing and allied health professions. External funding from a number of prestigious bodies has

  15. Estimated human health risks of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the contaminants` toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks.

  16. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH &. HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH &. HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health of Intramural Research, OD Dr. James F. Taylor, Director Office ofAnimal Care and Use, OIR, OD Director, Division ofOccupational Health and Safety (DOHS) Scientific Resources, ORS Subject: Medical Surveillance of

  17. Global Warming and Human Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey(SC) GettingGit GitGlobal Warming and Human

  18. Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Construct a ground sourced heat pump, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system for the new Oakland University Human Health Sciences Building utilizing variable refrigerant flow (VRF) heat pumps. A pair of dedicated outdoor air supply units will utilize a thermally regenerated desiccant dehumidification section. A large solar thermal system along with a natural gas backup boiler will provide the thermal regeneration energy.

  19. Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide, July 29, 2009 Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide, July 29,...

  20. aeromonas human health: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of North Carolina at Charlotte, students and faculty help chart the course for health care Xie,Jiang (Linda) 10 Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  1. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

  2. Human Health Risk & Environmental Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the interplay between human health and environmental risks associated with energy production, hazardous waste, national security and natural disasters. Research findings...

  3. Adjunct Faculty Data Request College of Health and Human Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Adjunct Faculty Data Request College of Health and Human Services Bowling Green State University at Bowling Green State University are required to provide the following information. Appointments

  4. College of Health and Human Sciences School of Health Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    : Environmental health and toxicology program formed 1970s: Industrial hygiene added 1979-Present: Era of School components of the School: Environmental Health Sciences, Radiological Health, and Industrial Hygiene (1963 with Tom Miya) Occupational health (industrial hygiene) (1979 with Dennis Paustenbach) Medical

  5. Advancing Usability Evaluation through Human Reliability Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces a novel augmentation to the current heuristic usability evaluation methodology. The SPAR-H human reliability analysis method was developed for categorizing human performance in nuclear power plants. Despite the specialized use of SPAR-H for safety critical scenarios, the method also holds promise for use in commercial off-the-shelf software usability evaluations. The SPAR-H method shares task analysis underpinnings with human-computer interaction, and it can be easily adapted to incorporate usability heuristics as performance shaping factors. By assigning probabilistic modifiers to heuristics, it is possible to arrive at the usability error probability (UEP). This UEP is not a literal probability of error but nonetheless provides a quantitative basis to heuristic evaluation. When combined with a consequence matrix for usability errors, this method affords ready prioritization of usability issues.

  6. Human Resource Services Health Insurance Informational Session

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karonis, Nicholas T.

    will be defaulted to the Quality Care Health Plan Enrollment forms were mailed by Central Management Services February 1, 2013 Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) Quality Care Health Plan (D3) Open Access Plan (OAP) ­ Managed Care Coventry OAP (CH) HealthLink OAP (CF) Health Maintenance Organization (HMO

  7. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    FY 2015 Budget Page No. Appropriation Language ...............................................................................................40 #12;OA-2 National Institutes of Health FY 2015 Congressional Justification FY 2015 Appropriations

  8. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    ) Director, Research and Development Global Health, Population and Nutrition Contraceptive Technology and Gynecology Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine University of Iowa Health Care Iowa City, IA of Veterans Affairs Washington, DC 20420 LU, Michael C., M.D., M.P.H. Associate Administrator Maternal

  9. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    ,133.828 Drug Resources by Decision Unit National Institute on Drug Abuse 1 National Institute on Alcohol Abuse MISSION National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) The societal impact of substance abuse (alcohol, tobacco a year in health care, crime-related, and productivity losses. To provide a comprehensive public health

  10. Evaluating Soil Health Summary: Soil health can be measured, monitored and managed to increase sustainability and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Evaluating Soil Health Summary: Soil health can be measured, monitored and managed to increaseResourcesNonmedia, Producers, Web. From Sara Adlington, (406) 994-4602 Filename: Eval Soil Health PR2014 Web: Ag, Extension with Montana State University and MSU Extension have recommendations for growers on evaluating soil quality

  11. Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of ES&H Evaluations HSS Office of Health, Safety and Security ISM Integrated Safety Management QRB Quality Review Board TSR Technical Safety Requirement VSF Vital Systems...

  12. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    Resources by Decision Unit National Institute on Drug Abuse 1 National Institute on Alcohol Abuse Program Summary MISSION National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) The societal impact of substance abuse $600 billion a year in health care, crime-related, and productivity losses. Knowledge is the foundation

  13. Assessment Plans College of Education, Health and Human Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Program Plan Update LO Data Sched Education UG BS Early Childhood Education & Child Services Y 2014 Y Y YAssessment Plans 9/18/2014 College of Education, Health and Human Development Dept Level Degree Education UG BS Elementary Education K-8 Y 2014 Y Y N Education UG BS Secondary Education Y 2014 Y Y N

  14. Soil and human health: an epidemiological review R. L. HOUGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Soil and human health: an epidemiological review R. L. HOUGH The Macaulay Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH, UK Summary Two different approaches have been used to study relationships between soil in the geosciences and broadly relates spatial soil characteristics to geographic incidence of disease. However

  15. ('~ DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    and communicate research findings to patients and their families, health care providers, and the general public care professionals access to important health and science information from taxpayer to reach patients, health care providers, and our other audiences. While these communication efforts

  16. PhD Studentship Department of Health Policy Research Unit in Economic Evaluation of Health and Care Interventions (EEPRU) Studentship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    PhD Studentship ­ Department of Health Policy Research Unit in Economic Evaluation of Health Unit in Economic Evaluation located in the School of Health and Related Research (Sc for economic evaluation; social value of a QALY. The successful candidate will receive expert support from

  17. Assessing human health risk in the USDA forest service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, D.R. [Department of Agriculture-Forest Service, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper identifies the kinds of risk assessments being done by or for the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service. Summaries of data sources currently in use and the pesticide risk assessments completed by the agency or its contractors are discussed. An overview is provided of the agency`s standard operating procedures for the conduct of toxicological, ecological, environmental fate, and human health risk assessments.

  18. Indoor air and human health revisited: A recent IAQ symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gammage, R.B.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Indoor Air and Human Health Revisited was a speciality symposium examining the scientific underpinnings of sensory and sensitivity effects, allergy and respiratory disease, neurotoxicity and cancer. An organizing committee selected four persons to chain the sessions and invite experts to give state-of-the-art presentations that will be published as a book. A summary of the presentations is made and some critical issues identified.

  19. Evaluation Criteria for Human-Automation Performance Birsen Donmez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Mary "Missy"

    , Standardization, Theory. Keywords Metric Quality, Human Supervisory Control, Validity, Statistics, Experiments. 1Evaluation Criteria for Human-Automation Performance Metrics Birsen Donmez MIT Dept. of Aero(617)252-1512 missyc@mit.edu ABSTRACT Previous research has identified broad metric classes for human- automation

  20. Infrastructure, human resources, international cooperation, research and development, environment and health, societal issues, industrial innovation, Infrastructure, human resources, international cooperation, research and development, environment and hea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zürich, Universität

    Infrastructure, human resources, international cooperation, research and development, environment and health, societal issues, industrial innovation, Infrastructure, human resources, international Infrastructure, human resources, international cooperation, research and development, environment and health

  1. Human factors evaluation of the engineering test reactor control room

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banks, W.W.; Boone, M.P.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reactor and Process Control Rooms at the Engineering Test Reactor were evaluated by a team of human factors engineers using available human factors design criteria. During the evaluation, ETR, equipment and facilities were compared with MIL-STD-1472-B, Human Engineering design Criteria for Military Systems. The focus of recommendations centered on: (a) displays and controls; placing displays and controls in functional groups; (b) establishing a consistent color coding (in compliance with a standard if possible); (c) systematizing annunciator alarms and reducing their number; (d) organizing equipment in functional groups; and (e) modifying labeling and lines of demarcation.

  2. assessing human health: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Assessments Engineering Websites Summary: a next exam date recorded by the Student Health Care Center. Use this instruction guide to keep yourInstruction Guide Health...

  3. Human Factors Evaluation of Advanced Electric Power Grid Visualization Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Dauenhauer, Peter M.; Wierks, Tamara G.; Podmore, Robin

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes initial human factors evaluation of four visualization tools (Graphical Contingency Analysis, Force Directed Graphs, Phasor State Estimator and Mode Meter/ Mode Shapes) developed by PNNL, and proposed test plans that may be implemented to evaluate their utility in scenario-based experiments.

  4. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health NIH Division of Loan Repayment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Center The Year in Review 1 The Five Extramural Loan Repayment Programs 2 Applications, Awards of the NRSA Payback Service Center 18 The Year in Review 19 #12;U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

  5. Human-robot cross-training: Computational formulation, modeling and evaluation of a human team training strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolaidis, Stefanos

    We design and evaluate human-robot cross-training, a strategy widely used and validated for effective human team training. Cross-training is an interactive planning method in which a human and a robot iteratively switch ...

  6. Clay minerals and their beneficial effects upon human health. M. Isabel Carretero*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Clay minerals and their beneficial effects upon human health. A review M. Isabel Carretero* Dpto examines the beneficial effects for human health of clay minerals, describing their use in pharmaceutical process and in its possible degradation effect. Among their uses in spas, clay minerals therapeutic

  7. aerosols human health: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health and Safety, was established, and is dedicated to providing outstanding clinical care to improve the health and safety of University employees 4 Adjoint model...

  8. ancillary human health: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health and Safety, was established, and is dedicated to providing outstanding clinical care to improve the health and safety of University employees 4 Faculty of Science &...

  9. Human factors evaluation of electroluminescent display. number sign. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auflick, J.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of an an electroluminescent display, done by scientists and researchers in the Human Factors Research Unit at EG G, Idaho, Inc. The purpose of this evaluation was to examine the Sunlight Readability'' of one electroluminescent (EL) display; a display which may be incorporated into a new generation of US Army diesel generators. The basic finding of this evaluation is that this particular EL display is not sunlight readable. 2 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. Accident Sequence Evaluation Program: Human reliability analysis procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swain, A.D.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a shortened version of the procedure, models, and data for human reliability analysis (HRA) which are presented in the Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis With emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications (NUREG/CR-1278, August 1983). This shortened version was prepared and tried out as part of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and managed by Sandia National Laboratories. The intent of this new HRA procedure, called the ''ASEP HRA Procedure,'' is to enable systems analysts, with minimal support from experts in human reliability analysis, to make estimates of human error probabilities and other human performance characteristics which are sufficiently accurate for many probabilistic risk assessments. The ASEP HRA Procedure consists of a Pre-Accident Screening HRA, a Pre-Accident Nominal HRA, a Post-Accident Screening HRA, and a Post-Accident Nominal HRA. The procedure in this document includes changes made after tryout and evaluation of the procedure in four nuclear power plants by four different systems analysts and related personnel, including human reliability specialists. The changes consist of some additional explanatory material (including examples), and more detailed definitions of some of the terms. 42 refs.

  11. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    indicators in life-cycle assessment (LCA). Human Ecologicalindicators in life-cycle assessment (LCA). Human EcologicalI explore how life-cycle assessment (LCA) results can

  12. Waste management programmatic environmental impact statement methodology for estimating human health risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergenback, B. [Midwest Technical, Inc. (United States); Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has produced large quantities of radioactive and hazardous waste during years of nuclear weapons production. As a result, a large number of sites across the DOE Complex have become chemically and/or radiologically contaminated. In 1990, the Secretary of Energy charged the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM) with the task of preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS should identify and assess the potential environmental impacts of implementing several integrated Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) alternatives. The determination and integration of appropriate remediation activities and sound waste management practices is vital for ensuring the diminution of adverse human health impacts during site cleanup and waste management programs. This report documents the PEIS risk assessment methodology used to evaluate human health risks posed by WM activities. The methodology presents a programmatic cradle to grave risk assessment for EM program activities. A unit dose approach is used to estimate risks posed by WM activities and is the subject of this document.

  13. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Literature review. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of human factors evaluations were undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation therapists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was performed initially to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of workplace environment, system-user interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices. To further acquire an in-depth and up-to-date understanding of the practice of teletherapy in support of these evaluations, a systematic literature review was conducted. Factors that have a potential impact on the accuracy of treatment delivery were of primary concern. The present volume is the literature review. The volume starts with an overview of the multiphased nature of teletherapy, and then examines the requirement for precision, the increasing role of quality assurance, current conceptualizations of human error, and the role of system factors such as the workplace environment, user-system interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices.

  14. Communications Assistant The College of Health and Human Sciences Dean's Office is seeking a dynamic individual to help us get

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Communications College of Health and Human Sciences 226 L. L. Gibbons Building (970) 491-5182 | gretchen

  15. The coastal environment and human health: microbial indicators, pathogens, sentinels and reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin F.

    Innovative research relating oceans and human health is advancing our understanding of disease-causing organisms in coastal ecosystems. Novel techniques are elucidating the loading, transport and fate of pathogens in coastal ...

  16. SUSTAINABILITY PRINCIPLES Harvard University is committed to developing and maintaining an environment that enhances human health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulsson, Johan

    #12;#12;SUSTAINABILITY PRINCIPLES Harvard University is committed to developing and maintaining species. · · · Developing planning tools to enable comparative analysis of sustainability implications an environment that enhances human health and fosters a transition toward sustainability. Sustainability should

  17. Blood Pressure U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Your Blood Pressure Lowering Guide to U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute #12;Your Guide to Lowering Blood Pressure 2 What Are High Blood Pressure and Prehypertension? Blood pressure is the force of blood against

  18. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    cells James McBride, Stephen Pennycook #12;Disease... Pollution... Hunger... Global warming... Did you on important health issues, including what causes certain diseases and how to treat them safely and effectively

  19. Review of the Use of Electroencephalography as an Evaluation Method for Human-Computer Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to consumers. These issues could be resolved by using physio- logical sensors in HCI evaluation. WhileReview of the Use of Electroencephalography as an Evaluation Method for Human-Computer Interaction: HCI EVALUATION, EEG, ERRP, WORKLOAD, ATTENTION, EMOTIONS Abstract: Evaluating human

  20. Advanced human-system interface design review guideline. Evaluation procedures and guidelines for human factors engineering reviews

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Hara, J.M.; Brown, W.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Baker, C.C.; Welch, D.L.; Granda, T.M.; Vingelis, P.J. [Carlow International Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced control rooms will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator`s overall role in the system, the method of information presentation, and the ways in which operators interact with the system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The principal guidance available to the NRC, however, was developed more than ten years ago, well before these technological changes. Accordingly, the human factors guidance needs to be updated to serve as the basis for NRC review of these advanced designs. The purpose of this project was to develop a general approach to advanced HSI review and the human factors guidelines to support. NRC safety reviews of advanced systems. This two-volume report provides the results of the project. Volume I describes the development of the Advanced HSI Design Review Guideline (DRG) including (1) its theoretical and technical foundation, (2) a general model for the review of advanced HSIs, (3) guideline development in both hard-copy and computer-based versions, and (4) the tests and evaluations performed to develop and validate the DRG. Volume I also includes a discussion of the gaps in available guidance and a methodology for addressing them. Volume 2 provides the guidelines to be used for advanced HSI review and the procedures for their use.

  1. Energy and Human Health Kirk R. Smith,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved Keywords coal, air pollution, biomass fuel, petroleum, nuclear energy accrue to the harvesting and burning of solid fuels, coal and biomass, mainly in the form of occupational health risks and household and general ambient air pollution. Lack of access to clean fuels

  2. An Evaluation of some Health Risks of the Pollution from Fossil Fuel Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Workshop Economic Evaluation of Damage Caused by Acidifying Pollutants London, May 9 - 11,version1-3Apr2014 Author manuscript, published in "UN/ECE Workshop Economic Evaluation of Damage Caused94-27 An Evaluation of some Health Risks of the Pollution from Fossil Fuel Combustion Guy Landrieu

  3. Methods for thermodynamic evaluation of battery state of health

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yazami, Rachid; McMenamin, Joseph; Reynier, Yvan; Fultz, Brent T

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Described are systems and methods for accurately characterizing thermodynamic and materials properties of electrodes and battery systems and for characterizing the state of health of electrodes and battery systems. Measurement of physical attributes of electrodes and batteries corresponding to thermodynamically stabilized electrode conditions permit determination of thermodynamic parameters, including state functions such as the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of electrode/electrochemical cell reactions, that enable prediction of important performance attributes of electrode materials and battery systems, such as energy, power density, current rate, cycle life and state of health. Also provided are systems and methods for charging a battery according to its state of health.

  4. U.S. Department of Energy worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with environmental restoration and waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.; Travis, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Risk Management; Simek, M.A.; Sutherland, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Scofield, P.A. [Office of Environmental Compliance and Documentation (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM). The methodology is appropriate for estimating worker risks across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex at both programmatic and site-specific levels. This document supports the worker health risk methodology used to perform the human health risk assessment portion of the DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) although it has applications beyond the PEIS, such as installation-wide worker risk assessments, screening-level assessments, and site-specific assessments.

  5. Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

  6. Models and evaluation of human-machine systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayout Alvarenga, Marco Antonio

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of human-machine systems and human-machine interfaces is very multidisciplinary. We have to navigate between the knowledge waves brought by several areas of the human learning: cognitive psychology, artificial ...

  7. June 11, 2001 Investigation of Human Health Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Genetically Modified Corn A Report to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from the Centers for Disease Associated with Potential Exposure to Genetically Modified Corn A Report to the U.S. Food and Drug of this investigation highlight the importance of evaluating the allergic potential of genetically modified foods before

  8. Human Reliability Program (HRP) - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault SignInstituteDOE Origins ResourcesHuman

  9. Evaluation of Cultural Competence and Health Disparities Knowledge and Skill Sets of Public Health Department Staff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Marla

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Life expectancy and overall health have improved in recent years for most Americans, thanks in part to an increased focus on preventive medicine and dynamic new advances in medical technology. However, not all Americans are benefiting equally...

  10. M.S. in Health and Human Development Sustainable Food Systems Emphasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    to promote health, human development, and well-being. The sustainable food systems program focuses://sites.google.com/site/friendsoflocalfood/ Sustainable Food and Bioenergy Systems Undergraduate Program: www.sfbs.montana.edu Accredited Dietetics completed a bachelor's degree in food and nutrition, agricultural science, environmental or food studies

  11. Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety, therefore generating high

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety and a thumb-drive sized prototype system. I. INTRODUCTION xposure to air pollution consistently ranks among to occupational safety as energy demands rise. Airborne pollutants and explosive gases vary in both time and space

  12. el equilibrio: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    National Cancer Institute Publicación de NIH, No. 05-5274 Junio 2005 Cómo las familias encuentran el Health and Human Development (Instituto Nacional de Salud Infantil y Desarrollo Humano, NICHD) y el National Cancer Institute (Instituto Nacional del Cáncer, NCI). ¡Podemos! es un programa único, puesto que

  13. Human health impacts for Renewable Energy scenarios from the EnerGEO Platform of Integrated Assessment (PIA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Energy Agency with the use of the World En- ergy Model for the World Energy Outlook 2009, OrganizationHuman health impacts for Renewable Energy scenarios from the EnerGEO Platform of Integrated of renewable energy, affect concentrations of air pollutants and as a consequence affect human health. PM2

  14. Long-term fate of depleted uranium at Aberdeen and Yuma Proving Grounds: Human health and ecological risk assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebinger, M.H.; Beckman, R.J.; Myers, O.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kennedy, P.L.; Clements, W.; Bestgen, H.T. [Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate and long-term consequences of depleted uranium (DU) in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) and Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) for the Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) of the US Army. Specifically, we examined the potential for adverse radiological and toxicological effects to humans and ecosystems caused by exposure to DU at both installations. We developed contaminant transport models of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at APG and terrestrial ecosystems at YPG to assess potential adverse effects from DU exposure. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of the initial models showed the portions of the models that most influenced predicted DU concentrations, and the results of the sensitivity analyses were fundamental tools in designing field sampling campaigns at both installations. Results of uranium (U) isotope analyses of field samples provided data to evaluate the source of U in the environment and the toxicological and radiological doses to different ecosystem components and to humans. Probabilistic doses were estimated from the field data, and DU was identified in several components of the food chain at APG and YPG. Dose estimates from APG data indicated that U or DU uptake was insufficient to cause adverse toxicological or radiological effects. Dose estimates from YPG data indicated that U or DU uptake is insufficient to cause radiological effects in ecosystem components or in humans, but toxicological effects in small mammals (e.g., kangaroo rats and pocket mice) may occur from U or DU ingestion. The results of this study were used to modify environmental radiation monitoring plans at APG and YPG to ensure collection of adequate data for ongoing ecological and human health risk assessments.

  15. A Model for the Human Computer Interface Evaluation in Safety Critical Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreiber, Fabio A.

    A Model for the Human Computer Interface Evaluation in Safety Critical Computer Applications Fabio of the IEEE International Conference and Workshop: Engineering of Computer­Based Systems March 1998, Jerusalem, Israel #12; 179 A Model for the Human Computer Interface Evaluation in Safety Critical Computer

  16. Exploring Early Evaluation Techniques of Ambient Health Promoting Devices in Home Environments of Senior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connelly, Kay

    Plant and the MiMo (Mirror Motive). We used technology probe for early evaluation of the Ambient Plant of a familiar domestic object and practice. 2.1 Prototyping method for Ambient Plant: Technology Probe We upon the existing conceptual models of health monitoring ambient devices. Categories and Subject

  17. Energy Policy 30 (2002) 815826 Evaluating the health benefits of transitions in household energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Policy 30 (2002) 815­826 Evaluating the health benefits of transitions in household energy School of Public Policy and Energy and Resources Group (ERG), 310 Barrows Hall, University of California in disease from a range of interventions, including changes in energy technology (stove or fuel) and cooking

  18. Evaluating the Health of California's Loop Sensor Network Ram Rajagopal1 and Pravin Varaiya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varaiya, Pravin

    Evaluating the Health of California's Loop Sensor Network Ram Rajagopal1 and Pravin Varaiya The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) freeway sensor network has two compo- nents: the sensor system of 25,000 inductive loop sensors grouped into 8,000 vehicle detector sta- tions (VDS) and covering

  19. Evaluation Criteria for Human-Automation Performance Metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pina, Patricia Elena

    Previous research has identified broad metric classes for human-automation performance to facilitate metric selection, as well as understanding and comparison of research results. However, there is still lack of an objective ...

  20. Evaluation of Human Performance Issues for Fire Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bley, Dennis C.; Cooper, Susan E.; Forester, John A.; Kolaczkowski, Alan M.; Ramey-Smith, Ann; Thompson, Catherine M.; Whitehead, Donnie W.; Wreathall, John

    1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the current status of the treatment of human reliability in fire risk analyses for nuclear power plants and identifies areas that need to be addressed. A new approach is suggested to improve the modeling.

  1. Evaluation of human error probabilities for post-initiating events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Phillip Eng

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission is responsible for the safe operation of the United States nuclear power plant fleet, and human reliability analysis forms an important portion of the probabilistic risk ...

  2. Evaluating human fecal contamination sources in Kranji Reservoir Catchment, Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nshimyimana, Jean Pierre

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Singapore government through its Public Utilities Board is interested in opening Kranji Reservoir to recreational use. However, water courses within the Kranji Reservoir catchment contain human fecal indicator bacteria ...

  3. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 2001 Progress Report Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.G. Hoffman; K. Alvar; T. Buhl; E. Foltyn; W. Hansen; B. Erdal; P. Fresquez; D. Lee; B. Reinert

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report presents the results of 11 projects funded ($500K) in FY01 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division (ESH). Five projects fit into the Health Physics discipline, 5 projects are environmental science and one is industrial hygiene/safety. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published sixteen papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplement funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and workspace, were also provided to TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Divisions.

  4. Increased European biofuel cultivation could harm human health1 by James Morgan for www.scienceomega.com2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Bohemia, University of

    Increased European biofuel cultivation could harm human health1 by James Morgan for www that the large-scale production of biofuels in4 Europe could result in increased human mortality and crop losses that many biofuel plant species, including poplar and willow, release more isoprene ­ an6 ozone precursor

  5. VQ5. Ecosystem and Human Health How do changes in ecosystem composi9on and func9on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    VQ5. Ecosystem and Human Health How do changes in ecosystem composi9on Issue: ·Ecosystem condition affects the humans dependent on those ecosystems for life and livelihood. How do changes in ecosystem composition and function correlate with famine, exposure to harmful biotic

  6. Appendix F Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN RCD _WOMPOC:Human Health

  7. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH IMPACTS OF SEDIMENT DECONTAMINATION FACILITIES FOR NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROWE,M.D.; KLEIN,R.C.; JONES,K.W.

    1999-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediment is accumulating in New York/New Jersey Harbor, and shipping channels are rapidly becoming too shallow for large ships. The Port Authority of New York/New Jersey has determined that dredging of the ship channels is essential to keep them navigable. About five million cubic yards of sediment must be removed per year to keep the channels open. Without dredging, the channels will soon become unusable, and the shoreside shipping and warehousing businesses that depend on them will fade away. The economic loss to the area would be devastating. But the deeper layers of sediment in the Harbor contain a broad range of pollutants that are hazardous to humans and the environment-a legacy of past discharges that are no longer permitted. These include heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins. As a result, there are several million cubic yards of sediments to be dredged per year that do not meet applicable criteria for ocean disposal and must be dealt with in some other way. A possible solution to the problem is to treat the dredged material to immobilize or destroy the contaminants and make the treated sediments suitable for disposal in the ocean or on land at acceptable cost. A variety of technologies can be used to achieve this goal. The simplest approach is to make manufactured soil from untreated sediment. The most complex approaches involve high-temperature destruction of organic contaminants and immobilization of inorganic contaminants. When any of these technologies are used, there is potential for risks to human health from process wastes and from the treated materials themselves. Also, disposal or beneficial use of treated materials may generate other risks to human health or the environment. A description of some of the technologies considered is given in Table 1. Success in removing or immobilizing the contaminants, which varies significantly among technologies, is reported elsewhere. This report provides a preliminary evaluation, or ``screening assessment,'' of potential occupational, public, and environmental health risks from dredging, transporting, and treating contaminated harbor sediments with thermal treatment methods to render them suitable for disposal or beneficial use. The assessment was done in stages as the project advanced and data became available from other tasks on characteristics of sediments and treatment processes.

  8. Health hazard evaluation report No. HETA 81-112-1372, Culley Generating Station, Yankeetown, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zey, J.N.; Donohue, M.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To evaluate worker exposure to boiler gases and coal dust, NIOSH conducted a combined environmental and medical evaluation at the Culley facility in August 1981. Environmental samples were collected to evaluate employee exposure to airborne concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, sulfur dioxide, coal dust, fly ash, crystalline silica, and asbestos. In addition, boiler gas leaks were evaluated. While the majority of personal samples were below current criteria, a health hazard did exist for some employees exposed to sulfur dioxide. In addition, a potential for exposure to boiler gases exists due to boiler leaks. Respiratory symptoms of cough, phlegm production, and wheezing were twice the expected rate for this group of workers. The X-ray data revealed four cases of pneumoconiosis in the Culley workers. The relative youth and the low seniority of this workforce may explain the absence of group PFT reductions. If preventive engineering measures are employed, the occurrence of continued group health effects will likely be reduced. Recommendations are made for an improved respiratory protection program, reducing leaks from process equipment, and for periodic environmental monitoring of the employees.

  9. Developing and evaluating distributions for probabilistic human exposure assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Randy L.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research carried out at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to assist the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in developing a consistent yet flexible approach for evaluating the inputs to probabilistic risk assessments. The U.S. EPA Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (OERR) recently released Volume 3 Part A of Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS), as an update to the existing two-volume set of RAGS. The update provides policy and technical guidance on performing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). Consequently, EPA risk managers and decision-makers need to review and evaluate the adequacy of PRAs for supporting regulatory decisions. A critical part of evaluating a PRA is the problem of evaluating or judging the adequacy of input distributions PRA. Although the overarching theme of this report is the need to improve the ease and consistency of the regulatory review process, the specific objectives are presented in two parts. The objective of Part 1 is to develop a consistent yet flexible process for evaluating distributions in a PRA by identifying the critical attributes of an exposure factor distribution and discussing how these attributes relate to the task-specific adequacy of the input. This objective is carried out with emphasis on the perspective of a risk manager or decision-maker. The proposed evaluation procedure provides consistency to the review process without a loss of flexibility. As a result, the approach described in Part 1 provides an opportunity to apply a single review framework for all EPA regions and yet provide the regional risk manager with the flexibility to deal with site- and case-specific issues in the PRA process. However, as the number of inputs to a PRA increases, so does the complexity of the process for calculating, communicating and managing risk. As a result, there is increasing effort required of both the risk professionals performing the analysis and the risk manager reviewing it. For deterministic risk assessments, the use of default inputs has improved the ease and the consistency of both performing and reviewing assessments. By analogy, it is expected that similar advantage will be seen in the field of probabilistic risk assessment through the introduction of default distributions. In Part 2 of this report, we consider when a default distribution might be appropriate for use in PRA and work towards development of recommended task-specific distributions for several frequently used exposure factors. An approach that we develop using body weight and exposure duration as case studies offers a transparent way for developing task-specific exposure factor distributions. A third case study using water intake highlights the need for further study aimed at improving the relevance of ''short-term'' data before recommendations on task-specific distributions of water intake can be made.

  10. Heart Health Evaluation The following questions are about today's program. Place a check (T) in front of the answer.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EAT SMART Heart Health Evaluation The following questions are about today's program. Place a check not planning to use the information in this program. # I have heart disease or high blood pressure. YES

  11. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-392-2099, Loral Systems Group, Akron, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from the International Union, United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW), an evaluation was undertaken of possible health hazards at the Loral Systems Group (SIC-3728) located in Akron, Ohio. Concern was voiced about possible asbestos (1332214) exposure. The company produces wheels and brakes for civilian and military aircraft and currently employs about 1560 persons at the Akron facility. At the time of the study there were about 2300 living retirees. The precise number who had worked in one of the four areas of particular interest was unkown. Of the 166 persons found eligible for inclusion in the health hazard evaluation (15 or more years of potential asbestos exposure in at least one of the four identified programs and still residing in Ohio), 129 participated in a medical evaluation consisting of a chest x-ray, pulmonary function test, and completion of a questionnaire to detail medical and prior work histories. Abnormal pulmonary function results were noted in 39 of these individuals of whom 30 demonstrated an obstructive pattern, three a restrictive pattern, and six both an obstructive and restrictive component. Nonsmoking participants were more likely to report chronic cough, chronic phlegm, and chronic bronchitis than comparisons.

  12. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1999 Progress Report, Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry G. Hoffman

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report presents the results of 10 projects funded ($500K) in FY99 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Five are new projects for this year; seven projects have been completed in their third and final TDEA-funded year. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published thirty-four papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplemental funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and work space, were also provided to TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Division.

  13. Sustainable Material Selection of Toxic Chemicals in Design and Manufacturing From Human Health Impact Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human Toxicity Potential (HTP) method. Keywords: SustainableHuman Toxicity Potential (HTP) is used for the human healthassessment of toxic chemicals. HTP is a computed weighting

  14. BASELINE PARAMETER UPDATE FOR HUMAN HEALTH INPUT AND TRANSFER FACTORS FOR RADIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coffield, T; Patricia Lee, P

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to update parameters utilized in Human Health Exposure calculations and Bioaccumulation Transfer Factors utilized at SRS for Performance Assessment modeling. The reason for the update is to utilize more recent information issued, validate information currently used and correct minor inconsistencies between modeling efforts performed in SRS contiguous areas of the heavy industrialized central site usage areas called the General Separations Area (GSA). SRS parameters utilized were compared to a number of other DOE facilities and generic national/global references to establish relevance of the parameters selected and/or verify the regional differences of the southeast USA. The parameters selected were specifically chosen to be expected values along with identifying a range for these values versus the overly conservative specification of parameters for estimating an annual dose to the maximum exposed individual (MEI). The end uses are to establish a standardized source for these parameters that is up to date with existing data and maintain it via review of any future issued national references to evaluate the need for changes as new information is released. These reviews are to be added to this document by revision.

  15. A Model for Human Interruptability: Experimental Evaluation and Automatic Estimation from Wearable Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Model for Human Interruptability: Experimental Evaluation and Automatic Estimation from Wearable Sensors Nicky Kern, Stavros Antifakos, Bernt Schiele Perceptual Computing and Computer Vision ETH Zurich sensors. It is scalable for a large number of sensors, contexts, and situations and allows for online

  16. Three Quantities for Error Evaluation in Safety Critical Human Computer Interface 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreiber, Fabio A.

    1 Three Quantities for Error Evaluation in Safety Critical Human Computer Interface 1 Fabio A on the total dependability figures in safety critical systems: usability ­ expressed as a function interface, learning difficulty, MTBF, safety critical systems, usability 1. Introduction The embedding

  17. Theoretical evaluation on burn injury of human respiratory tract due to inhalation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jun

    at tissue temperature (kPa) mQ Metabolic rate of tissue (W/m3 ) R Ideal gas constant (J/molK) Re Reynolds1 Theoretical evaluation on burn injury of human respiratory tract due to inhalation of hot gas to predict the thermal impact of inhaled hot air during the early stage of fires. Influences of individual

  18. Illinois department of public health H1N1/A pandemic communications evaluation survey.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, D.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2010-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of heightened media coverage, a 24-hour news cycle and the potential miscommunication of health messages across all levels of government during the onset of the H1N1 influenza outbreak in spring 2009, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) decided to evaluate its H1N1 influenza A communications system. IDPH wanted to confirm its disease information and instructions were helping stakeholders prepare for and respond to a novel influenza outbreak. In addition, the time commitment involved in preparing, issuing, monitoring, updating, and responding to H1N1 federal guidelines/updates and media stories became a heavy burden for IDPH staff. The process and results of the H1N1 messaging survey represent a best practice that other health departments and emergency management agencies can replicate to improve coordination efforts with stakeholder groups during both emergency preparedness and response phases. Importantly, the H1N1 survey confirmed IDPH's messages were influencing stakeholders decisions to activate their pandemic plans and initiate response operations. While there was some dissatisfaction with IDPH's delivery of information and communication tools, such as the fax system, this report should demonstrate to IDPH that its core partners believe it has the ability and expertise to issue timely and accurate instructions that can help them respond to a large-scale disease outbreak in Illinois. The conclusion will focus on three main areas: (1) the survey development process, (2) survey results: best practices and areas for improvement and (3) recommendations: next steps.

  19. Health hazard evaluation report No. HETA 81-278-1371, Warrick Generating Station, Yankeetown, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zey, J.N.; Donohue, M.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental samples were collected to evaluate employee exposures to airborne concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, sulfur dioxide, coal dust, fly ash, crystalline silica, and inorganic metals. In addition, gas leaks from the boilers were evaluated. While the majority of personal samples were below current criteria, a health hazard did exist for some employees exposed to sulfur dioxide, coal dust, and crystalline silica. Highest concentrations were obtained on samples worn by electrical and maintenance personnel and employees working on the positive pressure boiler (unit 4). In addition, the potential exists for employee exposure to boiler gases due to boiler leaks. Respiratory symptoms of cough, phlegm production, and wheezing were twice the expected rate for this group of workers. If preventive maintenance and engineering measures are employed, the occurrence of continued group health effects will likely be reduced. Recommendations are made in the body of the full report for an improved respiratory protection program, reducing leaks from boiler units, and for periodic environmental monitoring of the employees.

  20. FY 2008FY 2008FY 2012 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Table of Contents The Year in Review 1 The Four Intramural Loan Repayment Programs 2 Applications Institutes of Health The Year in Review In Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, 92 individuals applied to the Intramural

  1. FY 2008FY 2008FY 2010 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    ­ National Institutes of Health NIH Intramural Loan Repayment Programs Table of Contents The Year in Review 1 Repayment Programs The Year in Review In Fiscal Year (FY) 2010, 96 individuals applied to the Intramural

  2. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 81-415-1385, High Voltage Maintenance Corporation, Mentor, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kominsky, J.R.; Lipscomb, J.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1981 the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) was requested to evaluate exposures to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and to chlorinated benzenes and ethanes for electricians at High Voltage Maintenance (HVM) Corp., Mentor, Ohio. The HVM Corp. services electrical power transformers and capacitors on a contract basis with the work performed both in the field and at the Mentor facilities. On the basis of the data collected, NIOSH concludes that workers were exposed to potentially toxic concentrations of airborne 1,1,1-trichloroethane and PCBs. Significant PCB contamination of work surfaces demonstrate a potential for continued exposure to PCBs via skin contact and ingestion. PCB blood levels also indicate excessive absorption of PCBs. Recommendations for decontamination of the buildings and exposure controls are offered in Section VIII of this report.

  3. Schematic Characterization of Human Health Impact of Toxic Chemicals for Sustainable Design and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris Y.; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human Toxicity Potential (HTP) method. With an explicitHuman toxicity potential (HTP), proposed by Guinée andassessment of toxic chemicals. HTP is a computed weighting

  4. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-232-1948, Consolidated Freightways, Pocono Summit, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blade, L.M.; Savery, H.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was made of possible hazardous working conditions at Consolidated Freightways, Pocono Summit, Pennsylvania. The request concerned potential exposure of dock workers to exhaust emissions from diesel-powered forklift trucks brought about by the health complaints of several of the workers there. Twenty-one workers were identified as symptomatic of exposure to diesel exhaust fumes. This included at least half of the midnight shift. Upper respiratory tract irritation was mentioned by all of these workers. Some reported eye irritation, cough productive of black-tinged sputum, and sore throat. These symptoms lessened during periods away from work. Airborne concentrations of all components measured at the site were well below the applicable exposure limits. A potential health hazard associated with exposure to diesel engine exhaust existed. The authors recommend that whenever a forklift truck is to be left unattended for more than the shortest of periods, the motor should be turned off. The newer forklifts should be used on a shift before the older, less emission controlled, lifts. Roof exhaust fans ordered are to be installed at the facility and their effectiveness evaluated.

  5. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 91-209-2249, Seaway Painting, Inc. , Annapolis, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sussell, A.; Mickelsen, R.L.; Rubin, C.; Freund, E.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request received from an engineering consultant, an evaluation was undertaken of health hazards at an elevated water storage tank in Annapolis, Maryland where exterior repainting was being carried out by Seaway Painting, Inc. The requestor was concerned about possible hazardous exposures to lead. The 135 foot high elevated water storage tank had an estimated exterior surface area of 35,000 square feet. It had been painted with a red lead primer, and an alkyd lead based paint. During moving and set up of a primary containment structure, personal airborne lead exposures were below the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 50 micrograms/cubic meter (microg/cu m). During abrasive blasting operations, levels outside the containment approached the PEL. Airborne lead concentrations in the con tainment ranged from 620 to 3000 microg/cu m. No workers had increased blood lead levels during the job. The authors conclude that a potential health hazard due to lead exposures existed during repainting of the structure; however, the worker protection program in place at the time of the study appeared to adequately protect the workers from the lead. The protection program was a comprehensive one which was in compliance with Maryland requirements.

  6. A human factors evaluation of computer keyboard interface devices for use by quadriplegics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleischer, Lawrence Blair

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering A HUMAN FACTORS EVALUATION OF COMPUTER KEYBOARD INTERFACE DEVICES FOR USE BY QUADRIPLEGICS A Thesis by LAWRENCE BLAIR FLEISCHER Approved as to style and content by... such as Morse Code makes this system very usable. Freewheel, another type of head movement device, is produce by Pointer Systems and available for use on IBM and compatible personal computers. Infrared light is transmitted from a box placed on top...

  7. Contact the College of Human and Health Sciences for more information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    , doctors and other health and social care practitioners. This part-time provision extends to postgraduate be applied retrospectively to existing modules and programmes u Work closely with health and social care providers and professional bodies u Engage with employers across the health and social care, social policy

  8. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy: Human error and critical tasks in remote afterloading brachytherapy and approaches for improved system performance. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callan, J.R.; Kelly, R.T.; Quinn, M.L. [Pacific Science and Engineering Group, San Diego, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote Afterloading Brachytherapy (RAB) is a medical process used in the treatment of cancer. RAB uses a computer-controlled device to remotely insert and remove radioactive sources close to a target (or tumor) in the body. Some RAB problems affecting the radiation dose to the patient have been reported and attributed to human error. To determine the root cause of human error in the RAB system, a human factors team visited 23 RAB treatment sites in the US The team observed RAB treatment planning and delivery, interviewed RAB personnel, and performed walk-throughs, during which staff demonstrated the procedures and practices used in performing RAB tasks. Factors leading to human error in the RAB system were identified. The impact of those factors on the performance of RAB was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance. Finally, the project identified and evaluated alternative approaches for resolving the safety significant problems related to human error.

  9. Nuclear power plant human computer interface design incorporating console simulation, operations personnel, and formal evaluation techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavez, C.; Edwards, R.M.; Goldberg, J.H.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    New CRT-based information displays which enhance the human machine interface are playing a very important role and are being increasingly used in control rooms since they present a higher degree of flexibility compared to conventional hardwired instrumentation. To prototype a new console configuration and information display system at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), an iterative process of console simulation and evaluation involving operations personnel is being pursued. Entire panels including selector switches and information displays are simulated and driven by plant dynamical simulations with realistic responses that reproduce the actual cognitive and physical environment. Careful analysis and formal evaluation of operator interaction while using the simulated console will be conducted to determine underlying principles for effective control console design for this particular group of operation personnel. Additional iterations of design, simulation, and evaluation will then be conducted as necessary.

  10. Using Organizational Modeling to Evaluate Health Care IS/IT Projects Andr Vasconcelos, Ricardo Mendes, Jos Tribolet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using Organizational Modeling to Evaluate Health Care IS/IT Projects André Vasconcelos, Ricardo developed by the Center for Organizational Engineering and a task force from Saúde XXI, the Portuguese is an UML-based organizational modeling framework that uses business process and information systems

  11. To advance and share knowledge, discover solutions and promote opportunities in food and agriculture, bioenergy, health, the environment and human well-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    and agriculture, bioenergy, health, the environment and human well- being. Vision: To lead in science, innovationMission: To advance and share knowledge, discover solutions and promote opportunities in food

  12. Public Policy for the Poor? A Randomized Evaluation of the Mexican Universal Health Insurance Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    : A Massive Reform medical services, preventive care, pharmaceuticals, and financial health protection Reform medical services, preventive care, pharmaceuticals, and financial health protection beneficiaries for the Poor? 3 / 31 #12;Seguro Popular: A Massive Reform medical services, preventive care, pharmaceuticals

  13. Human factors engineering evaluation of the Advanced Test Reactor Control Room

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boone, M.P.; Banks, W.W.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The information presented here represents preliminary findings related to an ongoing human engineering evaluation of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Control Room. Although many of the problems examined in this report have been previously noted by ATR operations personnel, the systematic approach used in this investigation produced many new insights. While many violations of Human Engineering military standards (MIL-STD) are noted, and numerous recommendations made, the recommendations should be examined cautiously. The reason for our suggested caution lies in the fact that many ATR operators have well over 10-years experience in operating the controls, meters, etc. Hence, it is assumed adaptation to the existing system is quite developed and the introduction of hardware/control changes, even though the changes enhance the system, may cause short-term (or long-term, depending upon the amount of operator experience and training) adjustment problems for operators adapting to the new controls/meters and physical layout.

  14. Smart Structures and Materials & Nondestructive Evaluation and Health Monitoring; 17th Annual International symposium, 7-11 March 2010; San Diego, California USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oza, Nikunj C.

    Smart Structures and Materials & Nondestructive Evaluation and Health Monitoring; 17th Annual International symposium, 7-11 March 2010; San Diego, California USA Propulsion Health Monitoring Of a Turbine companies in order to increase safety of operation and lower maintenance costs. Health monitoring remains

  15. Health-hazard-evaluation report HETA 87-371-2000, Technical Assistance to the Jamaican Ministry of Health, Kingston, Jamaica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matte, T.D.; Burr, G.A.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from the Jamaican Ministry of Health, a study was made of possible health hazards existing due to the operation of a secondary lead smelter in Saint Catherine Parish, Jamaica. Emission controls at the site were upgraded in 1974. A cottage industry of clandestine backyard smelters was also in operation in the area. The survey investigated the health of residents in 58 households in the Red Pond Road community and 21 households in Ebony Vale. Soil lead levels in Red Pond exceeded 500 parts per million at 24% of the households tested. Ten paint samples taken from Red Pond homes exceeded 1% lead by weight. The geometric mean blood lead level of those tested in Red Pond was more than twice the level found in those tested in Ebony Vale. Forty four percent of the children under 6 years of age in Red Pond had blood lead levels above 25 micrograms/deciliter. Soil lead contamination was the strongest predictor of blood lead levels among the Red Pond subjects under 12 years of age. Lead smelter work was an important predictor in the older subjects. The authors conclude that the backyard smelters in combination with the secondary smelter caused a high lead poisoning risk for area residents. The authors recommend that residents stop the backyard smelting operations, and that efforts be made to reduce exposure through hazard abatement, education, and establishment of clean play areas for children.

  16. Occupant Evaluation of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Certified Health Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Anorea M.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................................................................................................ 53 10 The Patrick Dollard Discovery Health Center Pie Chart of Job Position at the Facility.............................................................................................. 54 11 The Patrick Dollard Discovery Health Center Time... ......................................................................................................................... 262 T x LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 Flow Chart of Research Method for POE of LEED Health Centers.......... 37 2...

  17. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-449-1778, Agrico Chemical Company, Pierce, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singal, M.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from the International Chemical Workers Union an evaluation was made of respiratory problems among workers at the Agrico Chemical Company, Pierce, Florida, which closed in 1979. Specific concern had been expressed regarding exposures to silica, coke, and asbestos. Of 108 persons participating in the study, 91 had worked at the elemental phosphorus facility (EP). Of 88 participants who had ten or more years in the phosphate industry, the 36 workers with ten or more years in the EP facility were no more likely to have chronic cough, shortness of breath, abnormal lung sounds on physical examination, pulmonary function impairment, or x-ray signs of fibrogenic dust exposure than those with less than 10 years exposure. Those working longer than 10 years in the EP facility had numerically higher prevalence of chronic bronchitis and chronic wheeze, but the differences were not statistically significant. The author concludes that no association between health and time at the EP facility could be discerned from the available data, although it is possible that the study participants were not representative of all former facility workers.

  18. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-033-1576, Airco Carbon, St. Marys, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartle, R.W.; Morawetz, J.S.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), total particulates, and respirable free silica at the Airco Company (SIC-3624), Saint Marys, Pennsylvania in January, 1984. The evaluation was requested confidentially because of concern over exposures to soot, coal tar pitch volatiles, and sand in the car bottom and sagger bake operations. Forty-three employees were interviewed. Two of 19 total particulate samples exceeded the OSHA standard of 15 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m3), 17.3 and 32.7 mg/m3. Benzene soluble fractions ranged from 0.5 to 5.0 mg/m3. The OSHA standard for benzene soluble fractions is 0.2 mg/m3. Two of seven samples of silica were above the limit of detection, 0.09 and 0.06 mg/m3. In bulk samples, the benzene soluble fractions ranged from 0.44 to 860 mg/gram and the PAH content from 0 to 26,124 micrograms per gram. Employees working in the bake areas reported a significant excess incidence of symptoms such as skin, nose and eye irritation, cough, sore or dry throat, chest tightness, and breathing difficulty. The authors conclude that a health hazard exists at the facility. Recommendations include enclosing vehicles used in moving electrodes, cleaning up spilled dust, and controlling fumes emitted from the sagger kilns.

  19. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 82-341-1682, Great Lakes Carbon, Wilmington, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.A.; Lipscomb, J.A.; Neumeister, C.E.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of environmental conditions and possible health effects among workers exposed to coke dust was conducted. Personal breathing-zone (PBZ) concentrations of total airborne dust ranged from 0.1 to 12 milligrams/cubic meter (mg/m3) with a median of 1.6 mg/m3; mass median particle diameter was about 8 micrometers. Very high PBZ concentrations of coke dust occurred during a semimonthly cleanup of underground coke pits; levels ranged from 98 to 190mg/m3 with a mean of 140mg/m3. Oil mists were not detected. Exposures to polynuclear aromatic compounds were below the analytical limit of detection among workers for routine jobs. Abnormal pulmonary function tests were found in 12% of those tested. Five cases of chronic bronchitis and seven of chronic cough, 10 and 13% respectively, were identified among those interviewed. The authors conclude that there were potentially hazardous exposures to high dust levels during semimonthly coke-pit cleaning jobs.

  20. Health-Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 85-150-1767, Warwick Fire Department, Warwick, Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keenlyside, R.A.; House, L.A.; Kent, G.; Durand, J.M.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In answer to a request from the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF), an evaluation was made of health complaints noted by fire fighters exposed to plastic products and pesticides during two separate fires attended to by the Warwick Fire Department, located in Warwick, Rhode Island. Questionnaires were administered to 43 persons who were only present at the plastics fire and 46 who were only present at the pesticide fire and to 13 present at both fires. The men who fought the plastic products fire and the pesticide fire apparently experienced acute symptoms related to smoke and chemical inhalation during the fires, including headache, cough, sore throat, wheezing, shortness of breath, rash, dizziness, nausea, blurred vision, and numbness. The authors conclude that fire fighters at these two fires experienced acute irritant symptoms from smoke and chemical inhalation. The authors recommend use of protective clothing, use of protective equipment, prefire planning, implementation of medical surveillance for all fire fighters, and the proper cleanup of protective clothing and equipment after fires.

  1. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-484-1754, Detroit Fire Fighters, Detroit, Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, K.E.; Melius, J.M.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from the International Association of Fire Fighters on behalf of the Detroit Fire Fighters Association, Detroit, Michigan, a health hazard evaluation was made of respiratory symptoms and skin irritation in fire fighters involved in a large fire and explosion at a warehouse. Over 200 fire fighters from fire-fighting organizations in three communities were involved in the incident. Site runoff water contained chlordane and malathion in low parts per million; other samples were negative. Nose and throat irritation, cough, and shortness of breath were experienced by a large proportion of fire fighters following the fire, and in 14, 15, and 17 percent, respectively, symptoms persisted over 2 months. Symptoms were significantly associated with time spent at the scene and time spent in heavy smoke. Pulmonary function tests were abnormal in 14 cases, ten due to obstructive lung disease, three to restrictive lung disease, and one to a combination. The authors conclude that better protective equipment is needed for fire fighters at chemical fires. Recommendations include development of a hazardous-materials response team, and implementation of a routine medical surveillance program.

  2. Applying Human Factors Evaluation and Design Guidance to a Nuclear Power Plant Digital Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Ulrich; Ronald Boring; William Phoenix; Emily Dehority; Tim Whiting; Jonathan Morrell; Rhett Backstrom

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States (U.S.) nuclear industry, like similar process control industries, has moved toward upgrading its control rooms. The upgraded control rooms typically feature digital control system (DCS) displays embedded in the panels. These displays gather information from the system and represent that information on a single display surface. In this manner, the DCS combines many previously separate analog indicators and controls into a single digital display, whereby the operators can toggle between multiple windows to monitor and control different aspects of the plant. The design of the DCS depends on the function of the system it monitors, but revolves around presenting the information most germane to an operator at any point in time. DCSs require a carefully designed human system interface. This report centers on redesigning existing DCS displays for an example chemical volume control system (CVCS) at a U.S. nuclear power plant. The crucial nature of the CVCS, which controls coolant levels and boration in the primary system, requires a thorough human factors evaluation of its supporting DCS. The initial digital controls being developed for the DCSs tend to directly mimic the former analog controls. There are, however, unique operator interactions with a digital vs. analog interface, and the differences have not always been carefully factored in the translation of an analog interface to a replacement DCS. To ensure safety, efficiency, and usability of the emerging DCSs, a human factors usability evaluation was conducted on a CVCS DCS currently being used and refined at an existing U.S. nuclear power plant. Subject matter experts from process control engineering, software development, and human factors evaluated the DCS displays to document potential usability issues and propose design recommendations. The evaluation yielded 167 potential usability issues with the DCS. These issues should not be considered operator performance problems but rather opportunities identified by experts to improve upon the design of the DCS. A set of nine design recommendations was developed to address these potential issues. The design principles addressed the following areas: (1) color, (2) pop-up window structure, (3) navigation, (4) alarms, (5) process control diagram, (6) gestalt grouping, (7) typography, (8) terminology, and (9) data entry. Visuals illustrating the improved DCS displays accompany the design recommendations. These nine design principles serve as the starting point to a planned general DCS style guide that can be used across the U.S. nuclear industry to aid in the future design of effective DCS interfaces.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING GUIDANCE FOR SAFETY EVALUATIONS OF ADVANCED REACTORS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'HARA, J.; PERSENSKY, J.; SZABO, A.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced reactors are expected to be based on a concept of operations that is different from what is currently used in today's reactors. Therefore, regulatory staff may need new tools, developed from the best available technical bases, to support licensing evaluations. The areas in which new review guidance may be needed and the efforts underway to address the needs will be discussed. Our preliminary results focus on some of the technical issues to be addressed in three areas for which new guidance may be developed: automation and control, operations under degraded conditions, and new human factors engineering methods and tools.

  4. Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecoveryG -Hazmat work opensHealth

  5. A Multidisciplinary Paradigm and Approach to Protecting Human Health and the Environment, Society, and Stakeholders at Nuclear Facilities - 12244

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Joanna [Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Gochfeld, Michael [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Rutgers University, Piscataway NY, USA and Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Clarke, James; Powers, Charles W.; Kosson, David [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Rutgers University, Piscataway NY, USA and Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Civil and Environmental Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Department of Energy (DOE) continues to remediate its lands, and to consider moving toward long-term stewardship and the development of energy parks on its industrial, remediated land, it is essential to adequately characterize the environment around such facilities to protect society, human health, and the environment. While DOE sites re considering several different land-use scenarios, all of them require adequate protection of the environment. Even if DOE lands are developed for energy parks that are mainly for industrializes sections of DOE lands that will not be remediated to residential standards, there is still the need to consider the protection of human health and the environment. We present an approach to characterization and establishment of teams that will gather the information, and integrate that information for a full range of stakeholders from technical personnel, to public policy makers, and that public. Such information is needed to establish baselines, site new energy facilities in energy parks, protect existing nuclear facilities and nuclear wastes, improve the basis for emergency planning, devise suitable monitoring schemes to ensure continued protection, provide data to track local and regional response changes, and for mitigation, remediation and decommissioning planning. We suggest that there are five categories of information or data needs, including 1) geophysical, sources, fate and transport, 2) biological systems, 3) human health, 4) stakeholder and environmental justice, and 5) societal, economic, and political. These informational needs are more expansive than the traditional site characterization, but encompass a suite of physical, biological, and societal needs to protect all aspects of human health and the environment, not just physical health. We suggest a Site Committee be established that oversees technical teams for each of the major informational categories, with appropriate representation among teams and with a broad involvement of a range of governmental personnel, natural and social scientists, Native Americans, environmental justice communities, and other stakeholders. Such informational teams (and Oversight Committee) would report to a DOE-designated authority or Citizen's Advisory Board. Although designed for nuclear facilities and energy parks on DOE lands, the templates and information teams can be adapted for other hazardous facilities, such as a mercury storage facility at Oak Ridge. (authors)

  6. "Human Health Impact Characterization of Toxic Chemicals for Sustainable Design and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human toxicity potential (HTP), proposed by Guinée andassessment of toxic chemicals. HTP is a computed weightingmodel environment [5]. The HTP values of toxic chemicals are

  7. Human health benefits of ambient sulfate aerosol reductions under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chestnut, L.G. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Watkins, A.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Acid Rain Provisions (Title IV) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 call for about a 10 million ton reduction in annual SO{sub 2} emissions in the United States by the year 2010. Although the provisions apply nationwide, most of the reduction will take place in the eastern half of the United States, where use of high sulfur coal for electricity generation is most common. One potentially large benefit of Title IV is the expected reduction in adverse human health effects associated with exposure to ambient sulfate aerosols, a secondary pollutant formed in the atmosphere when SO{sub 2} is present. Sulfate aerosols are a significant constituent of fine particulate (PM{sub 2.5}). This paper combines available epidemiologic evidence of health effects associated with sulfate aerosols and economic estimates of willingness to pay for reductions in risks or incidence of health effects with available estimates of the difference between expected ambient sulfate concentrations in the eastern United States and southeastern Canada with and without Title IV to estimate the expected health benefits of Title IV. The results suggest a mean annual benefit in the eastern United States of $10.6 billion (in 1994 dollars) in 1997 and $40.0 billion in 2010, with an additional $1 billion benefit each year in Ontario and Quebec provinces.

  8. Evaluation of nitroimidazole hypoxic cell radiosensitizers in a human tumor cell line high in intracellular glutathione

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeGraff, W.G.; Russo, A.; Gamson, J.; Mitchell, J.B.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five nitroimidazole hypoxic cell radiosensitizers were evaluated in a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (A549) whose GSH level was 8-fold higher than Chinese hamster V79 cells. One millimolar concentrations of Misonidazole (MISO), SR-2508, RSU-1164, RSU-1172, and Ro-03-8799 sensitized hypoxic A549 cells to radiation, with Ro-03-8799 giving the highest sensitizer enhancement ration (SER) (2.3). However, MISO, SR-2508 and Ro-03-8799 were less effective in this cell line than in V79 cells, presumably due to higher GSH content of the A549 cells. Increased hypoxic radiosensitization was seen with 0.1 mM Ro-03-8799 after GSH depletion by BSO as compared to 0.1 mM Ro-03-8799 alone (SER-1.8 vs 1.3). The combination of GSH depletion and 0.1 mM Ro-03-8799 was considerably more toxic than 0.1 mM or 1.0 mM Ro-03-8799 alone. This sensitivity was much greater than has been observed for SR-2508. These data show that Ro-03-8799 was the most efficient hypoxic cell radiosensitizer in a human tumor cell line considerably higher in GSH than the rodent cell lines often used in hypoxic radiosensitization studies. Thus, Ro-03-8799 may be a more effective hypoxic cell sensitizer in human tumors that are high in GSH.

  9. Evaluation of the US Department of Energy's occupational safety and health program for its government-owned contractor-operated facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to present to Secretary of Energy James Watkins the findings and recommendations of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) evaluation of the Department of Energy's (DOE) programs for worker safety and health at DOE's government-owned contractor-operated (GOCO) nuclear facilities. The OSHA evaluation is based on an intensive and comprehensive review and analysis of DOE's worker safety and health programs including: written programs; safety and health inspection programs; and the adequacy of resource, training, and management controls. The evaluation began on April 10, 1990 and involved over three staff years before its conclusion. The evaluation was initiated by former Secretary of Labor Elizabeth Dole in response to Secretary of Energy James Watkins' request that OSHA assist him in determining the actions needed to assure that DOE has an exemplary safety and health program in place at its GOCOs. 6 figs.

  10. A taxonomic study of the Siphonaptera, or, fleas of Texas and an evaluation of their importance to public health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eads, Richard Bailey

    1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A TAXONOMIC STUDY OP THE SIPHDNAPTERA, OR FLEAS, OP TEXAS AND AN EVALUATION OF THEIR IMPORTANCE IN PUBLIC HEALTH A Dissertation By RICHARD BAILEY EADS Approved as to style and content by Chairman of Committee A TAXONOMIC STUDY... cheopis Has . Been Recorded......................................86 III. Texas Counties From hich Echidnophaga p-allinacea Has Been Recorded.................................. 87 1 A TAXONOMIC STUDY OF THE SIPHONAPTERA, OR PLEAS, OF TEXAS...

  11. Evaluating inter-continental transport of fine aerosols:(2) Global health impact Junfeng Liu a,*,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    health on the Eurasian continent and would also benefit public health in the United States. Ã? 2009.5 to be nearly 380 thousand (K) in 2000. Approximately half of these deaths occur in the Indian subcontinent (IN), mostly due to aerosols transported from Africa and the Middle East (ME). Approximately 90K deaths

  12. 1568 VOLUME 116 | NUMBER 11 | November 2008 Environmental Health Perspectives To evaluate the potential of environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    - mental Protection Agency, Office of Environmental and Health Hazard Assessment, contract OEHHA- 06-S34 for Environmental Economics and National Center for Environmental Assessment, contract EP07H001060; the Intramural1568 VOLUME 116 | NUMBER 11 | November 2008 · Environmental Health Perspectives Research

  13. Methods and systems for thermodynamic evaluation of battery state of health

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yazami, Rachid; McMenamin, Joseph; Reynier, Yvan; Fultz, Brent T

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Described are systems and methods for accurately characterizing thermodynamic and materials properties of electrodes and battery systems and for characterizing the state of health of electrodes and battery systems. Measurement of physical attributes of electrodes and batteries corresponding to thermodynamically stabilized electrode conditions permit determination of thermodynamic parameters, including state functions such as the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of electrode/electrochemical cell reactions, that enable prediction of important performance attributes of electrode materials and battery systems, such as energy, power density, current rate, cycle life and state of health. Also provided are systems and methods for charging a battery according to its state of health.

  14. Evaluating the Applicability of Current Models of Workload to Peer-based Human-robot Teams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tao

    -off possibility into a reality. Human Performance Moderator Functions (HPMFs) can be used to predict human. This trend was predicted by the IMPRINT Pro models. These results are the first to indicate that existing Terms Performance, Experimentation, Human Factors Keywords human-robot peer-based teams, human-performance

  15. PA-40-201 1 Department of Health and Human Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    (s), Year(s), by 5:00 PM local time of applicant organization. AIDS Application Due Date(s) Standard AIDS Organization(s) National Institutes of Health (NIH) Components of Participating Organizations National Cancer Library of Medicine (NLM) Fogarty International Center (FIC) National Center for Complementary

  16. Title of project Evaluating the sublethal impacts of current use pesticides on the environmental health of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    health of salmonids in the Columbia River Basin. BPA project number 35024 Business name of agency.scholz@noaa.gov The ISRP gave our proposal a very careful and thorough review, and we appreciate the opportunity to respond

  17. THE LOCAL IMPACTS OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS ON HUMAN HEALTH RISK. PROGRESS REPORT FOR THE PERIOD OF MARCH 2003 - MARCH 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN,T.M.LIPFERT,F.D.MORRIS,S.M.

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a follow-up to previous assessments of the health risks of mercury that BNL performed for the Department of Energy. Methylmercury is an organic form of mercury that has been implicated as the form of mercury that impacts human health. A comprehensive risk assessment report was prepared (Lipfert et al., 1994) that led to several journal articles and conference presentations (Lipfert et al. 1994, 1995, 1996). In 2001, a risk assessment of mercury exposure from fish consumption was performed for 3 regions of the U.S (Northeast, Southeast, and Midwest) identified by the EPA as regions of higher impact from coal emissions (Sullivan, 2001). The risk assessment addressed the effects of in utero exposure to children through consumption of fish by their mothers. Two population groups (general population and subsistence fishers) were considered. Three mercury levels were considered in the analysis, current conditions based on measured data, and hypothetical reductions in Hg levels due to a 50% and 90% reduction in mercury emissions from coal fired power plants. The findings of the analysis suggested that a 90% reduction in coal-fired emissions would lead to a small reduction in risk to the general population (population risk reduction on the order of 10{sup -5}) and that the population risk is born by less than 1% of the population (i.e. high end fish consumers). The study conducted in 2001 focused on the health impacts arising from regional deposition patterns as determined by measured data and modeling. Health impacts were assessed on a regional scale accounting for potential percent reductions in mercury emissions from coal. However, quantitative assessment of local deposition near actual power plants has not been attempted. Generic assessments have been performed, but these are not representative of any single power plant. In this study, general background information on the mercury cycle, mercury emissions from coal plants, and risk assessment are provided to provide the basis for examining the impacts of local deposition. A section that covers modeling of local deposition of mercury emitted from coal power plants follows. The code ISCST3 was used with mercury emissions data from two power plants and local meteorological conditions to assess local deposition. The deposition modeling results were used to estimate the potential increase in mercury deposition that could occur in the vicinity of the plant. Increased deposition was assumed to lead to a linearly proportional increase in mercury concentrations in fish in local water bodies. Fish are the major pathway for human health impacts and the potential for increased mercury exposure was evaluated and the risks of such exposure estimated. Based on the findings recommendations for future work and conclusions are provided. Mercury is receiving substantial attention in a number of areas including: understanding of mercury deposition, bioaccumulation, and transport through the atmosphere, and improvements to the understanding of health impacts created by exposure to mercury. A literature review of key articles is presented as Appendix A.

  18. Isoproterenol effects evaluated in heart slices of human and rat in comparison to rat heart in vivo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmann, Julia E.; Heale, Jason; Bieraugel, Mike; Ramos, Meg [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States); Fisher, Robyn L. [Vitron Inc., Tucson, AZ (United States); Vickers, Alison E.M., E-mail: vickers_alison@allergan.com [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury was evaluated by gene and protein pathway changes in human heart slices, and compared to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Isoproterenol (10 and 100 ?M) altered human and rat heart slice markers of oxidative stress (ATP and GSH) at 24 h. In this in vivo rat study (0.5 mg/kg), serum troponin concentrations increased with lesion severity, minimal to mild necrosis at 24 and 48 h. In the rat and the human heart, isoproterenol altered pathways for apoptosis/necrosis, stress/energy, inflammation, and remodeling/fibrosis. The rat and human heart slices were in an apoptotic phase, while the in vivo rat heart exhibited necrosis histologically and further progression of tissue remodeling. In human heart slices genes for several heat shock 70 kD members were altered, indicative of stress to mitigate apoptosis. The stress response included alterations in energy utilization, fatty acid processing, and the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a marker of increased oxidative stress in both species. Inflammation markers linked with remodeling included IL-1?, Il-1?, IL-6 and TNF? in both species. Tissue remodeling changes in both species included increases in the TIMP proteins, inhibitors of matrix degradation, the gene/protein of IL-4 linked with cardiac fibrosis, and the gene Ccl7 a chemokine that induces collagen synthesis, and Reg3b a growth factor for cardiac repair. This study demonstrates that the initial human heart slice response to isoproterenol cardiac injury results in apoptosis, stress/energy status, inflammation and tissue remodeling at concentrations similar to that in rat heart slices. - Highlights: • Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury evaluated in heart slices. • Isoproterenol altered apoptosis, energy, inflammation and remodeling pathways. • Human model verified by comparison to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. • Human and rat respond to isoproterenol at similar concentrations in vitro.

  19. Patterns of health and disease have undergone dramatic transitions during human history, reflecting social and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    of infectious disease and infant mortality decreased, lengthening life expectancy.At the same time,noninfectious chronic disease rose, accounting for a greater share of over- all mortality. Greater water and air dispersed into new habitats by phoresy (i.e.,one organism transporting another), flight, or wind, but human

  20. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 91-213-2123, G. T. Jones Tire and Battery Distributing Inc. , Birmingham, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gittleman, J.; Estacio, P.; O'Brien, D.; Montopoli, M.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request for technical assistance from the Alabama Health Department, possible hazardous working conditions at the G.T. Jones Tire and Battery Distributing Company (SIC-5093), Birmingham, Alabama were evaluated. The company employed 15 persons in battery breaking and recycling. Twelve of the workers had blood lead (7439921) levels over 60 micrograms/deciliter (microg/dl) and the average of the last three blood levels exceeded 50microg/dl for 13 of the employees. Blood lead levels greater than 60 were associated with biochemical evidence of impaired heme synthesis and impaired renal function. Fourteen workers had elevated zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) levels over 100microg/dl consistent with moderate lead poisoning. Three had ZPPs over 600 microg/dl, consistent with severe lead poisoning. The authors conclude that a health hazard existed from overexposure to lead. The authors recommend measures to reduce exposures.

  1. Approaches to advancing quantitative human health risk assessment of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Weihsueh A., E-mail: chiu.weihsueh@epa.gov [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC, 20460 (United States); Euling, Susan Y.; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Subramaniam, Ravi P. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC, 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The contribution of genomics and associated technologies to human health risk assessment for environmental chemicals has focused largely on elucidating mechanisms of toxicity, as discussed in other articles in this issue. However, there is interest in moving beyond hazard characterization to making more direct impacts on quantitative risk assessment (QRA) — i.e., the determination of toxicity values for setting exposure standards and cleanup values. We propose that the evolution of QRA of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era will involve three, somewhat overlapping phases in which different types of approaches begin to mature. The initial focus (in Phase I) has been and continues to be on “augmentation” of weight of evidence — using genomic and related technologies qualitatively to increase the confidence in and scientific basis of the results of QRA. Efforts aimed towards “integration” of these data with traditional animal-based approaches, in particular quantitative predictors, or surrogates, for the in vivo toxicity data to which they have been anchored are just beginning to be explored now (in Phase II). In parallel, there is a recognized need for “expansion” of the use of established biomarkers of susceptibility or risk of human diseases and disorders for QRA, particularly for addressing the issues of cumulative assessment and population risk. Ultimately (in Phase III), substantial further advances could be realized by the development of novel molecular and pathway-based biomarkers and statistical and in silico models that build on anticipated progress in understanding the pathways of human diseases and disorders. Such efforts would facilitate a gradual “reorientation” of QRA towards approaches that more directly link environmental exposures to human outcomes.

  2. Development and evaluation of probability density functions for a set of human exposure factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, R.L.; McKone, T.E.; Bodnar, A.; Jacobson, J.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to describe efforts carried out during 1998 and 1999 at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to assist the U.S. EPA in developing and ranking the robustness of a set of default probability distributions for exposure assessment factors. Among the current needs of the exposure-assessment community is the need to provide data for linking exposure, dose, and health information in ways that improve environmental surveillance, improve predictive models, and enhance risk assessment and risk management (NAS, 1994). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (OERR) plays a lead role in developing national guidance and planning future activities that support the EPA Superfund Program. OERR is in the process of updating its 1989 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS) as part of the EPA Superfund reform activities. Volume III of RAGS, when completed in 1999 will provide guidance for conducting probabilistic risk assessments. This revised document will contain technical information including probability density functions (PDFs) and methods used to develop and evaluate these PDFs. The PDFs provided in this EPA document are limited to those relating to exposure factors.

  3. Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 17061721 Evaluating impacts of air pollution in China on public health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the implementation of best available emission control technology (BACT) and advanced coal gasification technologies of additional pollution controls and particularly from the use of advanced coal gasification technology. Without-of-pipe environmental controls (BACT) and advanced coal gasification technologies (ACGT). This comparative health

  4. Technology and Health Care 16 (2008) 111118 111 Findings from a participatory evaluation of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhihai "Henry"

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that the sensors were not noticeable and residents did not change their routines. The participatory evaluation that address residents' needs. Keywords: Participatory evaluation, sensors, smart home, long term care facility and speech synthesizers [6]. In France, a smart home initiative examines the use of infrared motion sensors

  5. Evaluation of the US Department of Energy's occupational safety and health program for its government-owned contractor-operated facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of the Department of Energy's (DOE) occupational safety and health programs for its government-owned contractor-operated (GOCO) activities was completed by the Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in response to DOE's request for assistance. The purpose of the evaluation was to provide DOE with a blueprint for strengthening these programs. Under the leadership of Secretary of Energy James Watkins, DOE has launched a number of significant initiatives designed to instill a new culture of safety and health accountability within the Department. The Secretary of Energy's personal concern for safety and health was not being reflected in the priorities, resource allocation decisions and planning of DOE and GOCO managers. The report recommends that DOE consider major organizational changes, changes in priorities, and the development of operationally meaningful safety and health goals and objectives together with the accountability systems necessary to measure progress.

  6. Human mouth microbes provide insight into health, disease | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault SignInstituteDOEMaterialsHuman

  7. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-427-1613, Pikes Peak Dialysis Center, Colorado Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pryor, P.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and breathing zone samples were analyzed for formaldehyde at the Pikes Peak Dialysis Center, Colorado Springs, Colorado in August, 1984 and February, 1985. The evaluation was requested by a representative of the Center to determine if there was a health hazard due to formaldehyde. Eight employees were interviewed. The ventilation systems were investigated. Personal protective clothing was inspected. Breathing-zone samples contained 0 28 to 1.0 (mg/m/sup 3/) formaldehyde. The OSHA standard for formaldehyde is 3.7 mg/m/sup 3/. Area formaldehyde concentrations ranged from nondetectable to 0.75 mg/m/sup 3/. Health complaints reported included sore throat, congestion, cough, and eye, nose and throat irritation. Most of the complaints originated from employees in the formalin mixing, reuse sterilization, and dialysis unit packing sections. The exhaust system in the reuse sterilization area was not working efficiently. A variety of personal protective clothing was available including lab coats, protective goggles, aprons, respirators, and gloves. The author concludes that a health hazard from formaldehyde exposure exists at the facility. Recommendations include improving local exhaust ventilation in areas where formaldehyde is used extensively, avoiding skin and eye contact with formaldehyde, and training and educating employees in safe work practices.

  8. On the evaluation of human error probabilities for post-initiating events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presley, Mary R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantification of human error probabilities (HEPs) for the purpose of human reliability assessment (HRA) is very complex. Because of this complexity, the state of the art includes a variety of HRA models, each with its own ...

  9. Computational formulation, modeling and evaluation of human-robot team training techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolaidis, Stefanos Z

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is focused on designing mechanisms for programming robots and training people to perform human-robot collaborative tasks, drawing upon insights from practices widely used in human teams. First, we design and ...

  10. Evaluating Software Agents Using Human Robert D. Grant, Dewayne E. Perry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Dewayne E.

    the way for rigorous experiments comparing their performance with human benchmarks. Method: Little agents with human benchmarks. We hope future researchers will be able to perform controlled experiments performance with human performance on "identical" curricula in controlled experiments. This paper is a more

  11. Human health and wellbeing in environmental impact assessment in New South Wales, Australia: Auditing health impacts within environmental assessments of major projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Patrick J., E-mail: patrick.harris@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia); Harris, Elizabeth, E-mail: e.harris@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia); Thompson, Susan, E-mail: s.thompson@unsw.edu.a [Faculty of the Built Environment, UNSW, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Harris-Roxas, Ben, E-mail: b.harris-roxas@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia); Kemp, Lynn, E-mail: l.kemp@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Internationally the inclusion of health within environmental impact assessment (EIA) has been shown to be limited. While Australian EIA documentation has not been studied empirically to date, deficiencies in practice have been documented. This research developed an audit tool to undertake a qualitative descriptive analysis of 22 Major Project EAs in New South Wales, Australia. Results showed that health and wellbeing impacts were not considered explicitly. They were, however, included indirectly in the identification of traditional public health exposures associated with the physical environment and to a lesser extent the inclusion of social and economic impacts. However, no health data was used to inform any of the assessments, there was no reference to causal pathways between exposures or determinants and physical or mental health effects, and there was no inclusion of the differential distribution of exposures or health impacts on different populations. The results add conceptually and practically to the long standing integration debate, showing that health is in a position to add value to the EIA process as an explicit part of standard environmental, social and economic considerations. However, to overcome the consistently documented barriers to integrating health in EIA, capacity must be developed amongst EIA professionals, led by the health sector, to progress health related knowledge and tools.

  12. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 96-0137-2607, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Rowe, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sylvain, D.C.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from the Health and Safety Supervisor at the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (SIC-4911), Rowe, Massachusetts, an investigation was begun into ozone (10028156) exposure during plasma arc cutting and welding. Welders had reported chest tightness, dry cough, and throat and bronchial irritation. The nuclear power station was in the process of being decommissioned, and workers were dismantling components using welding and cutting methods. Of the operations observed during the site visit, the highest ozone concentrations were generated during plasma arc cutting, followed by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and arc welding. During plasma arc cutting the average and peak concentrations exceeded the NIOSH ceiling recommended exposure limit of 0.1 part per million. The author concludes that ozone exposure during plasma arc cutting and MIG welding presented a health hazard to welders. The author recommends that improvements be made in the local exhaust ventilation, that nitrogen-dioxide levels be monitored during hot work, and that many exposed workers wear protective clothing, use ultraviolet blocking lotion, and continue the use appropriate shade of eye protection.

  13. Evaluation of health effects in Sequoyah Fuels Corporation workers from accidental exposure to uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, D.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Swint, M.J.; Kathren, R.L. (Hanford Environmental Health Foundation, Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Urine bioassay measurements for uranium and medical laboratory results were studied to determine whether there were any health effects from uranium intake among a group of 31 workers exposed to uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) and hydrolysis products following the accidental rupture of a 14-ton shipping cylinder in early 1986 at the Sequoyah Fuels Corporation uranium conversion facility in Gore, Oklahoma. Physiological indicators studied to detect kidney tissue damage included tests for urinary protein, casts and cells, blood, specific gravity, and urine pH, blood urea nitrogen, and blood creatinine. We concluded after reviewing two years of follow-up medical data that none of the 31 workers sustained any observable health effects from exposure to uranium. The early excretion of uranium in urine showed more rapid systemic uptake of uranium from the lung than is assumed using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 30 and Publication 54 models. The urinary excretion data from these workers were used to develop an improved systemic recycling model for inhaled soluble uranium. We estimated initial intakes, clearance rates, kidney burdens, and resulting radiation doses to lungs, kidneys, and bone surfaces. 38 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 83-186-1628, Raytheon Missile Systems Division, Bristol, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salisbury, S.; Lucas, C.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for cutting-oil mists, metal working fluids, and mineral spirits at Raytheon Missile Systems Divisions, Bristol, Tennessee in July, 1985. The evaluation was requested confidentially to investigate the occurrence of skin rashes in Machine-Department employees.

  15. COM: A Method for Mining and Monitoring Human Activity Patterns in Home-based Health Monitoring Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    for the health care system due to the shortage of health care professionals and health care facilities. To remedy population in the coming decades will result in many complications for families, society and the government, such as the shortage of health care professionals and care facilities, an increase in age related diseases and rising

  16. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Health and safety plan (Revision 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dev, H.

    1994-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the Health and Safety Plan (HASP) for the demonstration of IITRI`s EM Treatment Technology. In this process, soil is heated in situ by means of electrical energy for the removal of hazardous organic contaminants. This process will be demonstrated on a small plot of contaminated soil located in the Pit Area of Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D, K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, TN. The purpose of the demonstration is to remove organic contaminants present in the soil by heating to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. The soil will be heated in situ by applying 60-Hz AC power to an array of electrodes placed in boreholes drilled through the soil. In this section a brief description of the process is given along with a description of the site and a listing of the contaminants found in the area.

  17. Health-hazard evaluation report MHETA 89-009-1990, Consolidation Coal Company, Humphrey No. 7 Mine, Pentress, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kullman, G.J.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation was made of worker exposure to hydraulic fluid used on the longwall-mining operations at Consolidated Coal Company's Humphrey Number 7 Mine, Pentress, West Virginia. Employees were complaining of headache, eye and throat irritation, congestion, and cough. A particular emulsion oil, Solcenic-3A, was used with water in the mine's hydraulic roof-support system. An analysis of the oil indicated the presence of methyl-isobutyl-carbinol (MIBC), dipropylene glycol, and paraffin hydrocarbons. Personal breathing-zone samples for MIBC were collected from all workers on the longwall mining operation during the two days of the visit. All the analysis indicated concentrations of MIBC below the limit of quantification, which was 0.6 parts per million for an 8 hour sample. These levels were well below the exposure recommendations of the Mine Safety and Health Administration. Exposure to MIBC may be occurring through skin contact with oil through hydraulic line leaks, accidents, and maintenance activity on the hydraulic machines. The report concludes that Solcenic-3A oil constituents in air did not pose a health hazard at the time of the survey.

  18. Influence of air quality model resolution on uncertainty associated with health impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Tammy M.

    We use regional air quality modeling to evaluate the impact of model resolution on uncertainty associated with the human health benefits resulting from proposed air quality regulations. Using a regional photochemical model ...

  19. THE INVESTIGATION OF CORROSION PROBLEMS, PRECAUTIONS AND THE NEW SYSTEMS REGARDING TO THE HUMAN HEALTH IN AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Evren Sar?yerli; Mercedes-benz Turk; Gökçe S. Sar?yerli

    In every part of our life and in every division of the industry, the corrosion is one of vital problems. It becomes a subject for research and progress in the automotive sector. Based on the knowledge that the lifetime is the most important insurance that is given to the customers by the firms in a though competition, the prevention of corrosion occurs depending on the environmental protection factors and the utilization of new technology. Necessary importance should be given to the human health and the production of vehicle according to the climate changes. On this study, primarily the types of corrosion in the automotive industry has been investigated and then the data of corrosion process and the protection concepts of corrosion have been given. Mostly the dynamic corrosion program and tests that have been applied to the test vehicle took place. And then the process of surface cathodic deep dying and the development of establishment have been mentioned. Lastly, the systems for the prevention of the corrosion with the environmental protection factor determined. The usage of test vehicle met with all the corrosion problems that normally do not happen, the region of corrosion can be easily determined and all the preventive precautions can be taken before corrosion occurs. Nowadays the advanced isolation techniques such as the phosphatising, the surface process, the cathodic deep dying, the coating of surface and the other protection concepts that realize the techniques to continue by the constructive application, the successful results on the surfaces of the vehicles have been taken.

  20. Reference-based vs. task-based evaluation of human language technology Andrei Popescu-Belis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the three types of evaluation synthesized in the ISO/IEC 9126 and 14598 standards ­ internal, external-based evaluation, for a smaller cost (Section 9). 2222.... Types of evaluation according to ISO The ISO/IEC that bear on its ability to satisfy stated or implied needs" (ISO/IEC, 2001 : p. 11). According to ISO/IEC

  1. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1995 progress report - Environmental, Safety, and Health (ESH) division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, L.L.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers six months of effort, including startup time. Five projects were supported by the division: Pilot Program for the Risk-Based Surveillance of Lung Cancer in Los Alamos National Laboratory Workers, Optimization of Placement of Workplace Continuous Air Monitoring Instrumentation, A Polymeric Barrier Monitor to Protect Workers, Evaluation of a Real-Time Beryllium Detection Instrument and the Implications of Its Use, and High-Energy Dosimetry. A project summary for each is provided. An appendix to the report includes the 1995 Request for Proposals, Committee Members, Priority Technical Areas of Interest for FY95, Relative Prioritization and Weighting Factors, Format for Proposals, and Charter.

  2. MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS LOCAL IMPACTS ON HUMAN HEALTH RISK.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN, T.M.; BOWERMAN, B.; ADAMS, J.; LIPFERT, F.; MORRIS, S.M.; BANDO, A.; PENA, R.; BLAKE, R.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thorough quantitative understanding of the processes of mercury emissions, deposition, and translocation through the food chain is currently not available. Complex atmospheric chemistry and dispersion models are required to predict concentration and deposition contributions, and aquatic process models are required to predict effects on fish. However, there are uncertainties in all of these predictions. Therefore, the most reliable method of understanding impacts of coal-fired power plants on Hg deposition is from empirical data. A review of the literature on mercury deposition around sources including coal-fired power plants found studies covering local mercury concentrations in soil, vegetation, and animals (fish and cows). There is strong evidence of enhanced local deposition within 3 km of the chlor-alkali plants, with elevated soil concentrations and estimated deposition rates of 10 times background. For coal-fired power plants, the data show that atmospheric deposition of Hg may be slightly enhanced. On the scale of a few km, modeling suggests that wet deposition may be increased by a factor of two or three over background. The measured data suggest lower increases of 15% or less. The effects of coal-fired plants seem to be less than 10% of total deposition on a national scale, based on emissions and global modeling. The following summarizes our findings from published reports on the impacts of local deposition. In terms of excesses over background the following increments have been observed within a few km of the plant: (1) local soil concentration Hg increments of 30%-60%, (2) sediment increments of 18-30%, (3) wet deposition increments of 11-12%, and (4) fish Hg increments of about 5-6%, based on an empirical finding that fish concentrations are proportional to the square root of deposition. Important uncertainties include possible reductions of RGM to Hg{sub 0} in power plant plumes and the role of water chemistry in the relationship between Hg deposition and fish content. Soil and vegetation sampling programs were performed around two mid-size coal fired power plants. The objectives were to determine if local mercury hot-spots exist, to determine if they could be attributed to deposition of coal-fired power plant emissions, and to determine if they correlated with model predictions. These programs found the following: (1) At both sites, there was no correlation between modeled mercury deposition and either soil concentrations or vegetation concentrations. At the Kincaid plant, there was excess soil Hg along heavily traveled roads. The spatial pattern of soil mercury concentrations did not match the pattern of vegetation Hg concentrations at either plant. (2) At both sites, the subsurface (5-10 cm) samples the Hg concentration correlated strongly with the surface samples (0-5 cm). Average subsurface sample concentrations were slightly less than the surface samples; however, the difference was not statistically significant. (3) An unequivocal definition of background Hg was not possible at either site. Using various assumed background soil mercury concentrations, the percentage of mercury deposited within 10 km of the plant ranged between 1.4 and 8.5% of the RGM emissions. Based on computer modeling, Hg deposition was primarily RGM with much lower deposition from elemental mercury. Estimates of the percentage of total Hg deposition ranged between 0.3 and 1.7%. These small percentages of deposition are consistent with the empirical findings of only minor perturbations in environmental levels, as opposed to ''hot spots'', near the plants. The major objective of this study was to determine if there was evidence for ''hot-spots'' of mercury deposition around coal-fired power plants. Although the term has been used extensively, it has never been defined. From a public health perspective, such a ''hot spot'' must be large enough to insure that it did not occur by chance, and it must affect water bodies large enough to support a population of subsistence fishers. The results of this study support the hypothesis that n

  3. National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health Department of Health and HumanNational Institute of Mental Health Division of Intramural Research Programs http://intramural.nimh.nih.gov/ [NIMH of Fellowship Training] National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health Department of Health

  4. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 90-223-2211, Thomson Consumer Electronics, Marion, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenhart, S.W.; Driscoll, R.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from the Corporate Medical Consultant to Thomson Consumer Electronics (SIC-3673), Marion, Indiana, a study was undertaken of an illness outbreak in workers at the facility. There were about 1900 workers at the facility, which produced television picture tubes. Production occurred over three shifts, 6 days a week. Charcoal tube sampling indicated the presence of acetone (67641) n-amyl-acetate (628637), n-butyl-acetate (123864), isoamyl-acetate (123922), toluene (108883), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (71556), and trichloroethylene (79016). No contaminants were detected in the bag samples of air collected from the in/house compressed air system. One or more symptoms were reported by 593 (82%) of the workers. Those most commonly reported included headache (68%), sore throat (53%), fatigue (51%), eye irritation (50%), itchy skin (47%), irritated nose (45%), dizziness (45%), unusual taste in mouth (45%), unusual smell (41%) and cough. The authors conclude that symptoms were consistent with stress related health complaints in occupational settings. Concentrations of chemicals measured in the facility would not be expected to produce the effects seen in the outbreak. The authors recommend that trichloroethylene degreasing units be replaced with equipment which uses a less toxic degreasing agent. The facility should hire a full time industrial hygienist.

  5. Health-hazard evaluation report MHETA 85-226-1839, Freshlabs, Inc. , Warren, Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanderson, W.T.; Ferguson, R.P.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from workers at the Freshlabs vitamin manufacturing facility located in Warren, Michigan, a study was made of dust exposures, with specific attention to asbestos in ceiling insulation. Over half of all workers (about 70) reported watery itchy eyes, sneezing, or runny stuff noses. Symptoms of skin rashes, cough, chest tightness, and shortness of breath were also reported throughout the facility. Dust concentrations were highest in the composition area, where all workers experienced irritation of eyes, nose, and throat, and a few developed occupational asthma confirmed by company physicians. Workers were exposed to several vitamin products which were irritating to eyes and nasal and respiratory mucosa because of acidity. Some workers became hypersensitive to dusts due to protein and polysaccharide contents. Most samples showed total and respirable dust measurements well below Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure limits for nuisance dusts. However, these are not common nuisance dust components. The authors suggest that the limits provide little protection for average workers exposed to such dusts. Asbestos sampling revealed potential hazard from falling insulation. Recommendations pertaining to local exhaust hoods, amended work practices, use of personal dust respirators, avoidance of skin contact, and proper ceiling insulation are offered.

  6. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 90-232-2138, Schulte Corporation, Cincinnati, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venable, H.L.; Kawamoto, M.M.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a confidential request from employees of the Schulte Corporation (SIC-3496), Cincinnati, Ohio, an evaluation was undertaken of complaints of chest tightness, itching, metallic taste in the mouth, and discharge of black dust from the noses of workers in the machine shop of the facility. The facility was involved in the manufacturing and shipping of epoxy coated steel wire shelving. Total dust samples taken in the breathing zone of the workers ranged from 0.49 to 4.78mg/cu m, well below the permissible limits. Respirable dust samples ranged from 0.05 to 0.43mg/cu m. Exposures to nitrogen oxides were well below acceptable limits. Aldehydes were not detected in samples evaluating exposure to two resistance welders. The NIOSH ceiling level of 0.1 part per million for ozone (10028156) was exceeded near welders. Six workers interviewed reported symptoms including black nasal discharge, headaches, sore throat, cough, hoarseness of voice, metallic taste and chest tightness. There was a potential ergonomic problem due to repetitive wrist motion. The authors conclude that a potential hazard from ozone exposure existed. The authors recommend measures to reduce exposures and development of a program for the prevention of cumulative trauma.

  7. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 85-030-1693, Fruehauf Corporation - Parts Plant, Delphos, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorman, R.; Ehrenberg, R.; Hunninen, K.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A request was received from union and management at the Fruehauf Corporations Parts Facility in Delphos, Ohio to evaluate possible exposures to total welding fume, metals, carbon-monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and ozone during welding operations. Total welding fume concentrations in 32 personal breathing zone samples ranged from 1.5 to 23.4 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m/sup 3/). Nine area samples ranged from 0.4 to 3.7mg/m/sup 3/. Three sample results exceeded OSHA standard of 15mg/m/sup 3/. Iron was the predominant metal found. Measurable quantities of aluminum, chromium, copper, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, tin, and vanadium were found. Results of a questionnaire, given to 33 of the 92 welders, indicated a relatively high prevalence of reported symptoms of mucous membrane and respiratory tract irritation, including eye irritation, sinus/nasal congestion, headaches, throat irritation and cough.

  8. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 84-239-1586, Ashland Super Valu, Ashland, Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, W.J.; Donohue, M.T.; Singal, M.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and brathing zone samples were analyzed for di(2-ethylhexyl)adipate, hydrogen-chloride, cyclohexanol, dicyclohexyl-phthalate, phthalic-anhydride, and total particulates at Ashland Super Valu, Ashland, Wisconsin in June, 1984. The evaluation was requested by a company representative due to complaints of respiratory problems by one of the meat department employees. Four meat department employees were interviewed. The authors conclude that it is not possible to determine whether or not the symptoms reported by the meat packer are due to emissions from heated meat wrap or label adhesive. Recommendations included not operating the cool rod cutter at a temperature above 280 degrees-F and installing local exhaust ventilation.

  9. of Health Care National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    of Health Care National Institutes of Health Expanding Horizons Strategic Plan 2005-2009 UR nesmohsirh retir,ztnelinaoJ #12;of Health Care Expanding Horizons Strategic Plan 2005-2009 National Center.S Department of Health and Human Services National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine #12;A M mo

  10. Programs director`s report for the Office of Health and Environmental Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its establishment, the Department of Energy`s Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has had responsibility for conducting biological research to develop the knowledge needed to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy use and development, including the potential health impacts of radiation. The Health Effects Research Program has established the basis for understanding the health consequences of radiation for humans, developed radiation dosimetry methodology, characterized and evaluated the health impacts of fossil fuels, and developed and conducted research to determine the health impacts of inhaled toxicants. The results of this research have provided input for setting genetic standards for radiation and chemical exposure.

  11. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 88-391-2156, Morton Salt Company, Weeks Island, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, R.P.; Knutti, E.B.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from the International Chemical Workers Union, project director, an evaluation was undertaken of possible hazardous working conditions at the Morton Salt Company (SIC-1479), Weeks Island, Louisiana. At Weeks Island the salt was mined from large domes, circular in shape and from a few hundred yards to a mile across. The only detectable overexposures in the mining operation were to coal-tar pitch volatiles. None of the 20 personal breathing zone and area air samples collected in the mill were above detectable limits for asbestos (1332214). The prevalences of chronic cough and chronic phlegm reported were statistically different, exceeding those reported by a group of nonexposed blue collar workers. Chronic symptoms were reported by underground workers in all smoking categories, but only by those surface workers who also smoked. There were more complaints about eye irritation and tearing of the eyes in the underground workers, consistent with diesel byproduct exposure. Four workers were identified through pulmonary function test results with mild obstructive lung disease and one with moderate obstructive lung disease. Three workers with mild restriction of lung volume were noted. None of the 61 chest films taken read positively for pneumoconiosis. The authors conclude that overexposures to coal-tar pitch volatiles existed at the time of the survey. The authors recommend measures for reducing occupational exposures to workplace contaminants. A follow up medical questionnaire survey should be conducted.

  12. Evaluation of USDA feeder calf grades and health status of steers and their impact on live and carcass performance in south Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groschke, David Wayne

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003-2004, the Texas A&M University Ranch to Rail South program evaluated 430 steers in Edroy, TX. Data were analyzed on several traits, but feeder calf frame and muscle grades and health status were emphasized. Muscle thickness grade (M), frame...

  13. transforming human health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenny, Paraic

    are in clinical trials: forodesine for treating leukemia and lymphoma, and BCX4208 for gout. Drugs to treat

  14. human health | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of strong brown carbon chromophores. Citation: Laskin J, A Laskin, S Nizkorodov, PJ Roach, PA Eckert, MK Gilles, B Wang, HJ Lee, and Q Hu.2014."Molecular Selectivity of Brown...

  15. EMSL - human health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MS) with high mass resolution (m&61636;m100,000). Solvent mixtures of acetonitrilewater and acetonitriletoluene were used to extract and ionize polar and non-polar...

  16. Evaluation of the use of engineering judgements applied to analytical human reliablity analysis methods (HRA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohlhepp, Katherine D.

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the scarcity of Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) data, one of the key elements of any HRA analysis is use of engineering judgment. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) HRA Calculator guides the user through the steps of any HRA...

  17. Evaluation of Hierarchical Sampling Strategies in 3D Human Pose Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremers, Daniel

    Engstler2, Michael Beetz1 1Intelligent Autonomous Systems Group, Department of Informatics, 2Ergonomics@cs.tum.edu, engstler@lfe.mw.tum.de, beetz@cs.tum.edu Abstract A common approach to the problem of 3D human pose

  18. MSW Social Work Experience 1995-97. Los Angeles County Mental Health, Los Angeles, Ca. Evaluation of AB3632,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    -93. Centro de Desarrollo Familiar, Huntington Park, Ca. Treatment of child 1995-97. sexual abuse cases Home Health Care. Casework services for home based health care with aging population. 1994. Participation in needs assessment for AIDS clients in the Austin area. 1994. Home Health Care. Paragon, Austin

  19. Research | Children’s Health Thyroid Function and Perchlorate in Drinking Water: An Evaluation among California Newborns, 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patricia A. Buffler; Michael A. Kelsh; Edmund C. Lau; Charlotte H. Edinboro; Julie C. Barnard; George W. Rutherford; Jorge J. Daaboul; Lynn Palmer; Fred W. Lorey

    ) has been detected in groundwater sources in numerous communities in California and other parts of the United States, raising concerns about potential impacts on health. For California communities where ClO 4 was tested in 1997 and 1998, we evaluated the prevalence of primary congenital hypothyroidism (PCH) and high thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels among the 342,257 California newborns screened in 1998. We compared thyroid function results among newborns from 24 communities with average ClO 4 concentrations in drinking water> 5 µg/L (n = 50,326) to newborns from 287 communities with average concentrations ? 5 µg/L (n = 291,931). ClO 4 concentrations obtained from the California Drinking Water Program provided source-specific data for estimating weighted average concentrations in community water. Fifteen cases of PCH from communities with average concentration> 5 µg/L were observed, with 20.4 expected [adjusted prevalence odds ratio (POR) = 0.71; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 0.40–1.19]. Although only 36 % of all California newborns were screened before 24 hr of

  20. A new cost-distance model for human accessibility and an evaluation of accessibility bias in permanent vegetation plots in Great Smoky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peet, Robert K.

    A new cost-distance model for human accessibility and an evaluation of accessibility bias-mail toddjobe@unc.edu Abstract Question: Can a new cost-distance model help us to evaluate the potential crossings, and vegeta- tion density were incorporated into a least-cost model of energetic expenditure

  1. Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies Health Services Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Six: [15 Credit Hours] NURS 45010 Health Care Policy and Delivery Systems or NURS 46000 Health CareRoadmap: Integrated Health Studies ­ Health Services ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-IHS-HLSV] College of Education, Health, and Human Services School of Health Sciences Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last

  2. NRC Reviewer Aid for Evaluating the Human Factors Engineering Aspects of Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.C.

    2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Small modular reactors (SMRs) are a promising approach to meeting future energy needs. Although the electrical output of an individual SMR is relatively small compared to that of typical commercial nuclear plants, they can be grouped to produce as much energy as a utility demands. Furthermore, SMRs can be used for other purposes, such as producing hydrogen and generating process heat. The design characteristics of many SMRs differ from those of current conventional plants and may require a distinct concept of operations (ConOps). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) conducted research to examine the human factors engineering (HFE) and the operational aspects of SMRs. The research identified thirty potential human-performance issues that should be considered in the NRC's reviews of SMR designs and in future research activities. The purpose of this report is to support NRC HFE reviewers of SMR applications by identifying some of the questions that can be asked of applicants whose designs have characteristics identified in the issues. The questions for each issue were identified and organized based on the review elements and guidance contained in Chapter 18 of the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), and the Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (NUREG-0711).

  3. An evaluation of radio-iodinated human serum albumin in the dog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hood, David Martin

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Prinzmetal's indicator-dilution curves much more practicable. This was accomplished by developing methods for the continuous quantitative recording of the arterial time-concentration isotope curves. The technique used by Huff (11) consists... with different isotopes of iodide were used in simultan- eously conducted dilution studies in the dog. The par- ameters of plasma volume and plasma clearance half-times were used for the comparative evaluation of the two radio- pharmaceuticals. Over a six...

  4. Mountain Health Choices Beneficiary Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    ................................................................................................................ 42 I. Access to Health Care Mountain Health Choices Beneficiary Report A Report to the West Virginia Bureau for Medical of Health and Human Resources, Bureau for Medical Services. #12; 1 Table of Contents I. EXECUTIVE

  5. 'Sifting the significance from the data' - the impact of high-throughput genomic technologies on human genetics and health care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Angus J; Cooper, David N; Krawczak, Michael; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Wallace, Helen M; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Raymond, Frances L; Chadwick, Ruth; Craddock, Nick; John, Ros; Gallacher, John; Chiano, Mathias

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    the system of governance also serves other, more institutional purposes. The prospect of internet-based marketing corporations using access to research data and to electronic health records as an op- portunity to market more products seems both manipu- lative...

  6. Occupational Health Nurse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Occupational Health Nurse position is located in the Talent Sustainment group within the Human Capital Management (HCM) organization. The Talent Sustainment organization ensures that effective...

  7. PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Programme name Health Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weyde, Tillman

    economic evaluation takes place; to familiarise students with key economic issues confronting health of microeconomics applied to health and health care. · Apply principles and methods of economic evaluation and economic evaluation Skills: · Appraise critically quantitative health economics research. · Work both

  8. assessing health risks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: SYLLABUS Introduction to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 SWES 418518 Time: Tuesday...

  9. assess health risks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: SYLLABUS Introduction to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 SWES 418518 Time: Tuesday...

  10. Health Information Systems for Primary Health Care: Thinking About Participation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahay, Sundeep

    Health Information Systems for Primary Health Care: Thinking About Participation Elaine Byrne in supporting primary health care functioning, the design, development and implementation of these systems information systems, human rights 1. Introduction: Primary health care is a crucial element of national health

  11. Overview of ozone human exposure and health risk analyses used in the U.S. EPA's review of the ozone air quality standard.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, R. G.

    1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of the ozone human exposure and health risk analyses developed under sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These analyses are being used in the current review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The analyses consist of three principal steps: (1) estimating short-term ozone exposure for particular populations (exposure model); (2) estimating population response to exposures or concentrations (exposure-response or concentration-response models); and (3) integrating concentrations or exposure with concentration-response or exposure-response models to produce overall risk estimates (risk model). The exposure model, called the probabilistic NAAQS exposure model for ozone (pNEM/03), incorporates the following factors: hourly ambient ozone concentrations; spatial distribution of concentrations; ventilation state of individuals at time of exposure; and movement of people through various microenvironments (e.g., outdoors, indoors, inside a vehicle) of varying air quality. Exposure estimates are represented by probability distributions. Exposure-response relationships have been developed for several respiratory symptom and lung function health effects, based on the results of controlled human exposure studies. These relationships also are probabilistic and reflect uncertainties associated with sample size and variability of response among subjects. The analyses also provide estimates of excess hospital admissions in the New York City area based on results from an epidemiology study. Overall risk results for selected health endpoints and recently analyzed air quality scenarios associated with alternative 8-hour NAAQS and the current 1-hour standard for outdoor children are used to illustrate application of the methodology.

  12. Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eide, Steven Arvid; Thomas Wierman

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environment, Safety and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) models human safety and health risk resulting from waste management and environmental restoration activities. Human safety and health risks include those associated with storing, handling, processing, transporting, and disposing of radionuclides and chemicals. Exposures to these materials, resulting from both accidents and normal, incident-free operation, are modeled. In addition, standard industrial risks (falls, explosions, transportation accidents, etc.) are evaluated. Finally, human safety and health impacts from cleanup of accidental releases of radionuclides and chemicals to the environment are estimated. Unlike environmental impact statements and safety analysis reports, ESHRAP risk predictions are meant to be best estimate, rather than bounding or conservatively high. Typically, ESHRAP studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management or environmental restoration program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, processing, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal. ESHRAP can be used to support complex environmental decision-making processes and to track risk reduction as activities progress.

  13. Graduate Assistant Health Insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Center (formerly NMSU Student Health Center) for all outpatient primary health care services. Campus:30 pm by Appt- Psychiatry & Women's Health · 7:30 am- 4:30 pm Urgent Care Evaluation, Pharmacy, Lab, X ­ prescription medications ­ testing & procedures ­ office visits for part-time students #12;United Health Care

  14. Human Pathogen Importation Importing "Human" Pathogens from Outside Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human Pathogen Importation Importing "Human" Pathogens from Outside Canada 1) Permits be obtained from the Public Health Agency Canada (PHAC) to facilitate customs clearance. 2) If a permit

  15. Tropical Medicine and International Health voLUME 2 NO rr SUPPLEMENT PP Ar-A54 NOVEMBER 1997 Human behaviour and cultural context in disease control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /faith in rural health care. Utilization rates are often low in rural clinics because health care wor

  16. Parental involvement in mental health services for diverse youth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, June

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. (2002). Mental health services for Latino adolescentsfamilies to mental health services: The role of the familyoutpatient mental health services. New York: Human Sciences

  17. Evaluation of dietary intake of lactating women in China and its potential impact on the health of mothers and infants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Haijiao; Wang, Ping; Han, Yaofeng; Ma, Jing; Troy, Frederic A; Wang, Bing

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Foord FA, Whitehead RG: Riboflavin requirements of lactatingintravenously administered riboflavin in healthy humans. AmThiamine (mg) 1.2 ± 0.07 a Riboflavin (mg) 2.9 ± 0.17 bd 3.2

  18. A framework for human microbiome research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Jonathan

    A variety of microbial communities and their genes (the microbiome) exist throughout the human body, with fundamental roles in human health and disease. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Human Microbiome Project ...

  19. Environmental assessment for the satellite power system-concept development and evaluation program-microwave health and ecological effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is concerned with the potential health and ecological effects of the microwave beam from the microwave power transmission system (MPTS) of the satellite power system (SPS). The report is written in the form of a detailed critical review of selected scientific articles from the published literature on the biological effects of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, followed by an assessment of the possible effects of the SPS, based on exposure values for the reference system (US DOE and NASA, 1978).

  20. STUDENT WELLNESS CENTER Student Health Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    HEALTH INFORMATION (For purposes other than treatment, payment or health care operations) It may take 5 or mental health services and treatment for alcohol and drug abuse. Please check below for items) ____________________________________________________ ________ Mental Health Evaluation/Treatment Other: (specify

  1. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 91-0190-2491, International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF), Jersey City, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinnes, G.M.; Deitchman, S.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from the International Association of Fire Fighters, an investigation was begun into the health and safety practices used during the handling of a fire at an illegal dumpsite by Jersey City Fire Department (SIC-9224), Jersey City, New Jersey. The investigation centered around the incident command system, safety management, the arrangements for medical service, and decontamination. High winds and several directional wind shifts hampered operations at the fire scene. Some fire fighters did not wear their self contained breathing apparatus or depleted their supply of air cylinders during the fire. Several fire fighters were treated at the scene for dizziness, mucosal irritation and elevated blood pressure. Abnormalities were noted on the field cardiac monitors for several of the firemen. A total of 171 fire fighters were transported to area hospitals and three were admitted. The fire department indicated that 68 fire fighters received incident related injuries. Findings indicated that exposure to methylene-chloride (75092) may have been responsible for some of the adverse health experiences reported. The authors conclude that it was not possible to determine a definitive environment cause for the health effects experienced by fire fighters during the dumpsite fire. The authors recommend that changes be made in incident command and safety procedures.

  2. The Magnitude of Pain and Suffering Damages from a Law and Economics and Health Economics Point of View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karapanou, Vaia; Visscher, Louis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theory and Methods of Economic Evaluation of Health Care,measures in economic evaluation’, (3) Health TechnologyMeasurement in Economic Evaluation’, (5) Health Economics

  3. assessing human risks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: SYLLABUS Introduction to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 SWES 418518 Time: Tuesday...

  4. All mercury lamps contain small amounts of mercury. An electric current passes through the lamp and vaporizes the mercury to generate light. Recycling mercury containing lamps protects human health and our environment from heavy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    and vaporizes the mercury to generate light. Recycling mercury containing lamps protects human health and our the environment by recycling universal wastes, contact EH&S at (949) 824-6200 or visit: www.ehs.uci.edu Mercury lamp recycling separates a number of materials for further use in new products. · The mercury is reused

  5. UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH PHS 915--INTERNATIONAL HEALTH SYSTEMS AND POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharer, John E.

    of health care to population health outcomes 3. Identify a set of broad criteria to evaluate health system performance 4. Evaluate the current performance of the U.S. health care system in comparison to other nationalUNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH PHS 915--INTERNATIONAL HEALTH SYSTEMS

  6. DEPARTMENTOFHEALTHANDHUMANSERVICES National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    DEPARTMENTOFHEALTHANDHUMANSERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Extramural Research 9000 Institutes of Health (NIH), part of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), is the principal health research agency of the U.S. Federal Government. The Office of Extramural Research (OER) provides

  7. Health Behavior Health Promotion -Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    chronic disease complications Improve quality of life Reduce health care costs #12;ImpactHealth Behavior Health Promotion - Prevention Modification of Health Attitudes and Health Behavior #12;Health Promotion: An Overview Basic philosophy Good health = individual and collective goal

  8. HUMAN MACHINE INTERFACE (HMI) EVALUATION OF ROOMS TA-50-1-60/60A AT THE RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY (RLWTF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, Walter E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stender, Kerith K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This effort addressed an evaluation of human machine interfaces (HMIs) in Room TA-50-1-60/60A of the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). The evaluation was performed in accordance with guidance outlined in DOE-STD-3009, DOE Standard Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, 2006 [DOE 2006]. Specifically, Chapter 13 of DOE 2006 highlights the 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, 2012, [CFR 2012] and DOE G 421.1-2 [DOE 2001a] requirements as they relate to the human factors process and, in this case, the safety of the RLWTF. The RLWTF is a Hazard Category 3 facility and, consequently, does not have safety-class (SSCs). However, safety-significant SSCs are identified. The transuranic (TRU) wastewater tanks and associated piping are the only safety-significant SSCs in Rooms TA-50-1-60/60A [LANL 2010]. Hence, the human factors evaluation described herein is only applicable to this particular assemblage of tanks and piping.

  9. HEALTH CARE ASSOCIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    HEALTH CARE COMPLIANCE ASSOCIATION 5780 Lincoln Drive · Suite 120 · Minneapolis, MN 55436 · 888 of the following document, "Evaluating and Improving a Compliance Program, A Resource for Health care Board Members, Health care Executives and Compliance Officers." This resource is now available to all HCCA members

  10. Health hazard evaluation report rdHETA 90-145-2086, Map International, Fairmont, West Virginia. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornwell, R.J.; Knutti, E.; Lyman, M.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen, and Helpers of America, a study was conducted of possible hazardous working conditions at MAP International (SIC-3296), Fairmont, West Virginia. The facility manufactured fibrous-glass for thermal and acoustical insulation. Personal breathing zone samples and area air samples were taken and analyzed for exposure to fibrous-glass (14808607), formaldehyde (50000), phenol (108952), ammonia (7664417), and organic vapors. The levels detected were all below allowable standards. Workers were not following recommended safety and health procedures prescribed in the Material Safety Data Sheets for the materials they were using. The medical questionnaires indicated workers were experiencing symptoms consistent with exposure to fibrous-glass and the materials used in its production. Eye irritation, upper respiratory irritation, skin irritation, chronic cough, and shortness of breath were demonstrated. The author recommends specific measures to reduce exposures and improve work practices.

  11. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(1):139149, Spring 2014 Evaluation of foliar sprays to reduce crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the anthraquinone-based product, Avipel (44 minutes/day) than on reference plots (132 minutes/day; P and economical in the field. Key words: anthraquinone, Canada geese, crop damage, human­wildlife conflicts

  12. Human Factors Process Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) Application in the Evaluation of Management Risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soguilon, Nenita M.

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    .3.1. Mechanisms of Prevention ............................................................................................... 11 2.4. Human Factors Process Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) ....................... 11 2.5. FMEA Components... ........................................................................................... 15 2.5.5. Risk Priority Number ....................................................................................................... 17 2.6. FMEA Model...

  13. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 85-060-1670, City of Norwood, Norwood, Ohio. [Toner powder exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruhe, R.L.; Bennett, D.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following a request from the Health Commissioner of Norwood, Ohio, employee exposure to toner powder used in Norwood Senior High Media Center photocopying machine was investigated. Personal and area air samples for total particulates were collected on preweighed filters and total sample weights determined. Indicator tube sampling was done for carbon monoxide and ozone. Medical interviews were conducted with three media center workers to elicit work related symptomatology. Exposure to total particulate ranged from less than the detection limit to 0.02 mg/m/sup 3/. Carbon monoxide and ozone were nondetectable. Two employees reported no symptoms associated with work. After operating the copy machine for 3 weeks, the third employee developed hives on both hands progressing to the earlobes and right cheek. Her condition improved on weekends. She also had a cough and shortness of breath when working with the duplicator. No positive response to patch testing was seen, but the employee developed cough, tearing eyes, and itching 2 hours after patch application. The authors conclude that one employee suffered an allergic reaction precipitated by materials inhaled in the duplicator area. It is recommended that this employee not use this machine, and improved ventilation be provided for the entire media center.

  14. Community Health Map: A geospatial and multivariate data visualization tool for public health datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shneiderman, Ben

    on health care. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services keeps track of a variety of health care that enables users to visualize health care data in multivariate space as well as geospatially. It is designed a compre- hensible and powerful interface for policy makers to visualize health care quality, public health

  15. Applied Health Sciences May 6, 2010 Class of 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Applied Health Sciences May 6, 2010 Class of 2010 PRESIDING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charlotte A. Tate PRESENTATION OF DEGREE CANDIDATES (see list on page 12) Biomedical and Health Information in · Biomedical Visualization · Health Informatics · Health Information Management Disability and Human

  16. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 86-273-1928, Mid-America Dairymen, Inc. , Monett, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, G.A.; Cantor, F.L.; Anastas, M.Y.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from management at Mid-America Dairymen, Inc., located in Monett, Missouri, an evaluation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at this site. Five workers had become ill with respiratory complaints between August of 1985 and March of 1986. Symptoms included dry cough, chest tightness, fatigue, shortness of breath, and weight loss. Of six full-time employees in the electrodialysis (ED) stack maintenance department, four were diagnosed with hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). One worker among 12 in the cheese finishing department was diagnosed with asthma. The two-story facility employs about 75 workers in the production of cheese curd, whey protein, and powdered milk. The study was not able to identify a specific agent or antigen responsible for the illnesses; however, there was a clear association in time and place between cleaning stacks of electrodialysis membranes and the HP in four workers diagnosed with the disease. Stacks of ED membranes waiting to be cleaned can provide an ideal growth medium for microbiological species. The authors recommend that engineering and work practice changes be introduced.

  17. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 85-064-1844, GTE/Valenite Corporation, Westminster, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, C.J.; Rondinelli, R.; Singal, M.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a confidential request, an evaluation of exposure to hard-metal dusts was made at GTE/VALENITE Corporation (SIC-3541), Westminster, South Carolina, employing 50 production workers. Dusts were generated during finish grinding of tungsten carbide cutting tool inserts. Personal and area air samples were analyzed for seven nitrosamines, cobalt, and tungsten. No nitrosamines were detected. Cobalt levels were nondetectable to 26.8 micrograms/cubic meter (microg/m/sup 3/) (American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Value, 50 microg/m/sup 3/). Tungsten levels were nondetectable to 0.41 mg/m/sup 3/ (NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limit, 5 mg/m/sup 3/). Medical survey of 35 workers showed respiratory symptoms associated with length of employment and smoking status. Symptoms did not correlate with exposure category. Personal air samples were taken for cobalt for ten workers giving urine samples pre and post shift. All had increased urine cobalt levels over shift. There was no correlation between total airborne and urine cobalt levels, but there was a significant association for post shift urinary and respirable cobalt. The authors recommend that air sampling for tungsten carbide and cobalt be continued. Good housekeeping and personal hygiene practices should be instituted and maintained. Change to a safer cutting fluid is recommended along with a medical surveillance program and careful follow up of employees with persistent symptoms of cough, chest tightness, shortness of breath, or wheezing.

  18. Community Health & Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Community Health & Public Health Preparedness in the Marcellus Shale Era 2011 Pennsylvania Public Photo credit: Pittsburgh Tribune- Review, Keith Hodan #12;Safety by the Numbers PA Marcellus Citations. Conference presentation, Spain. · County Commissioners Association of Pennsylvania (CCAP). (2010). Marcellus

  19. LAND AND WATER USE CHARACTERISTICS AND HUMAN HEALTH INPUT PARAMETERS FOR USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DOSIMETRY AND RISK ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T.; Karapatakis, D.; Lee, P.; Farfan, E.

    2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters but the use of site-specific values by the applicant is encouraged. A detailed survey of land and water use parameters was conducted in 1991 and is being updated here. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk and vegetable consumption rates as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS are documented. Based on comparisons to the 2009 SRS environmental compliance doses, the following effects are expected in future SRS compliance dose calculations: (1) Aquatic all-pathway maximally exposed individual doses may go up about 10 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors; (2) Aquatic all-pathway collective doses may go up about 5 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors that offset the reduction in average individual water consumption rates; (3) Irrigation pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go up about 40 percent due to increases in the element-specific transfer factors; (4) Irrigation pathway collective doses may go down about 50 percent due to changes in food productivity and production within the 50-mile radius of SRS; (5) Air pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go down about 10 percent due to the changes in food productivity in the SRS area and to the changes in element-specific transfer factors; and (6) Air pathway collective doses may go down about 30 percent mainly due to the decrease in the inhalation rate assumed for the average individual.

  20. Health-hazard Evaluation Report Heta 90-179-2172, National Park Service, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hilo, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, G.A.; Stephenson, R.L.; Kawamoto, M.W.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from the National Park Service, an evaluation was undertaken of possible hazardous exposures to volcanic emissions, both gases and particulates, at the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (SIC-7999) on the island of Hawaii in the State of Hawaii. Concerns included exposures to sulfur-dioxide (7446095) (SO2), asphalt decomposition products from burning pavement, acid mists when lava enters the ocean, volcanic caused smog, and Pele's hair (a fibrous glass like material). Two other related requests for study were also received in regard to civil defense workers in these areas. No detectable levels of SO2 were found during long term colorimetric detector tube sampling used to characterize park workers' personal full shift exposures. Short term detector tube samples collected near a naturally occurring sulfur vent showed SO2 levels of 1.2 parts per million (ppm). Work related symptoms reported by more than 50% of the respondents included headache, eye irritation, throat irritation, cough, and phlegm. Chest tightness or wheezing and shortness of breath were also frequently reported. Samples collected for hydrochloric-acid (7647010) and hydrofluoric-acid (7664393) recorded concentrations of up to 15ppm for the former and 1.0ppm for the latter acid. Airborne particulates in the laze plume were comprised largely of chloride salts. Airborne fibers were detected at a concentration of 0.16 fibers per cubic centimeter. The authors conclude that excessive exposure to SO2 can occur at some locations within the park. The authors recommend that workers and visitors to the park be informed of the potential for exposures.

  1. Center for Interdisciplinary Health Research and The Health Exchange: An Interdisciplinary Forum for Health Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    CIHRE Center for Interdisciplinary Health Research and Evaluation Fall 2012 The Health Exchange: An Interdisciplinary Forum for Health Research Wednesdays, 12- 1 PM HSN Building Room 135 Brown Bag: Bring Your Lunch Assistant Professor-- Social Work Department College of Health Sciences at The University of Texas at El

  2. University of Oklahoma Office of Human Resources Sample Performance Evaluation and Development Planning Document For Monthly Staff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    & Financial / Budget Management - Ability and extent to which the individual defines a project, gathers Planning Document For Monthly Staff For use with the administrative, professional, managerial, other monthly (exempt) staff. 1. The original Performance Evaluation and Development Planning Document

  3. Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G; Daniels, J; Wegrecki, A

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the human health and ecological risk assessment for the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF). Volume 1 is the text of the risk assessment, and Volume 2 (provided on a compact disc) is the supporting modeling data. The EWTF is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Site 300, which is located in the foothills between the cities of Livermore and Tracy, approximately 17 miles east of Livermore and 8 miles southwest of Tracy. Figure 1 is a map of the San Francisco Bay Area, showing the location of Site 300 and other points of reference. One of the principal activities of Site 300 is to test what are known as 'high explosives' for nuclear weapons. These are the highly energetic materials that provide the force to drive fissionable material to criticality. LLNL scientists develop and test the explosives and the integrated non-nuclear components in support of the United States nuclear stockpile stewardship program as well as in support of conventional weapons and the aircraft, mining, oil exploration, and construction industries. Many Site 300 facilities are used in support of high explosives research. Some facilities are used in the chemical formulation of explosives; others are locations where explosive charges are mechanically pressed; others are locations where the materials are inspected radiographically for such defects as cracks and voids. Finally, some facilities are locations where the machined charges are assembled before they are sent to the onsite test firing facilities, and additional facilities are locations where materials are stored. Wastes generated from high-explosives research are treated by open burning (OB) and open detonation (OD). OB and OD treatments are necessary because they are the safest methods for treating explosives wastes generated at these facilities, and they eliminate the requirement for further handling and transportation that would be required if the wastes were treated off site.

  4. Electronic Health Information Literacy: An Investigation of the Electronic Health Information Knowledge and Skills of Health Education Majors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanik, Bruce Walter

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    and evaluate electronic health information and a Q-study was conducted to investigate student characteristics that distinguish between those with high, middle, and low levels of e-health literacy. A convenience sample of 77 health education majors completed...

  5. The state and health care reform: the National Health Insurance and Public Health Act of 1949

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schemmer, Ruth Ann, 1960

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    forces affecting policy enactment can also prevent certain policies from being enacted. This study evaluates the capacity of these three theories to explain why the National Health Insurance and Public Health Act of 1949 was not enacted. This research...

  6. Funding Opportunity: Superfund Hazardous Substance Research and Training Program Sponsor: National Institute of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Funding Opportunity: Superfund Hazardous Substance Research and Training Program (P42) Sponsor Sciences (NIEHS) is announcing the continuation of the Superfund Hazardous Substance Research and Training techniques for the detection, assessment, and evaluation of the effect on human health of hazardous

  7. Space Science Technology Health General Sci-fi & Gaming Oddities International Business Politics Education Entertainment Sports Better Than The Human Eye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Education Entertainment Sports Better Than The Human Eye Posted on: Monday, 17 January 2011, 22:22 CST Tiny a curvilinear camera, much like the human eye, with the significant feature of a zoom capability, unlike the human eye. The "eyeball camera" has a 3.5x optical zoom, takes sharp images, is inexpensive to make

  8. Home National World Business Sports Cricket Entertainment Health Science Bollywood Celebs Geekwerks New curvilinear camera adds a zoom to the `human eye'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Geekwerks New curvilinear camera adds a zoom to the `human eye' From ANI Washington, Jan 18: Researchers have developed a curvilinear camera that mimics the human eye, but has the added feature of zooming-vision surveillance, robotic vision, endoscopic imaging and consumer electronics. "We were inspired by the human eye

  9. addressing complex health: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    work is properly cited. This article considers some of the effects of health sector reform on human resources for health (HRH) in developing countries and countries in...

  10. Developing Human Performance Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Joe; Bruce Hallbert; Larry Blackwood; Donald Dudehoeffer; Kent Hansen

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the reactor oversight process (ROP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors the performance of utilities licensed to operate nuclear power plants. The process is designed to assure public health and safety by providing reasonable assurance that licensees are meeting the cornerstones of safety and designated crosscutting elements. The reactor inspection program, together with performance indicators (PIs), and enforcement activities form the basis for the NRC’s risk-informed, performance based regulatory framework. While human performance is a key component in the safe operation of nuclear power plants and is a designated cross-cutting element of the ROP, there is currently no direct inspection or performance indicator for assessing human performance. Rather, when human performance is identified as a substantive cross cutting element in any 1 of 3 categories (resources, organizational or personnel), it is then evaluated for common themes to determine if follow-up actions are warranted. However, variability in human performance occurs from day to day, across activities that vary in complexity, and workgroups, contributing to the uncertainty in the outcomes of performance. While some variability in human performance may be random, much of the variability may be attributed to factors that are not currently assessed. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assure licensee performance and indicate when additional investigation may be required. This paper presents research that establishes a technical basis for developing human performance measures. In particular, we discuss: 1) how historical data already gives some indication of connection between human performance and overall plant performance, 2) how industry led efforts to measure and model human performance and organizational factors could serve as a data source and basis for a framework, 3) how our use of modeling and simulation techniques could be used to develop and validate measures of human performance, and 4) what the possible outcomes are from this research as the modeling and simulation efforts generate results.

  11. INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICINE AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engman, David M.

    INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICINE AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE CENTER FOR PATIENT- CENTERED FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICINE AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE CENTER FOR PATIENT-CENTERED OUTCOMES "Our work often seeks to understand human behavior and its interface with pressing health issues. We focus on the human

  12. PUBLIC HEALTH EVALUATION PROJECT RULISON

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8 7 +NewAugust 4,P -.,. ~iRPUBLIC

  13. ORISE: Research and Evaluation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (ORISE) assists government agencies and organizations create effective health communication programs that are built on solid research and evaluation. This information helps...

  14. Analysis of Assembly Bill 1600: Mental Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and preliminary economic evaluation. Health TechnologyM. Annotation: Economic evaluations of child and adolescentRJ, Henter I. An economic evaluation of manic-depressive

  15. Analysis of Assembly Bill 154: Mental Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and preliminary economic evaluation. Health TechnologyM. Annotation: Economic evaluations of child and adolescentRJ, Henter I. An economic evaluation of manic-depressive

  16. The Health Risks: Seafood Contamination, Harmful Algal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    health products from the sea. What is the central issue? Why should I care? How will OHH researchThe Health Risks: Seafood Contamination, Harmful Algal Blooms and Polluted Beaches Seafood associated public health costs. Announcing a New Interagency Report on Oceans and Human Health Research

  17. University Services University Health and Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Management Storm and Waste Water Compliance Promote Environmental Health Drinking Water Quality Human with environmental, health and safety standards, rules and best practices. Through partnerships with units with Capital Planning and Project Management, Facilities Management and academic departments throughout

  18. Mental Health Clinic Intake Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    Mental Health Clinic Intake Assessment Welcome to the Mental Health Clinic at Boynton Health Clinic. The Medical Social Worker can provide you with resources if you require an evaluation-- 612 Clinic utilizes a short-term model of psychotherapy. This means that we are able to offer eleven

  19. Innovative . Flexible . RegionalInnovative . Flexible . Regional Health Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    Executive Master in Innovative . Flexible . RegionalInnovative . Flexible . Regional Health Care Learning Outcomes Health Systems, Policy and Reform - Communicating with Policy Makers - Evidence - Human Resources Management - Data and Decision Making Executive Master in Health Care Leadership (EMHCL

  20. USGS National Wildlife Health Center Diagnostic Case Submission Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USGS National Wildlife Health Center Diagnostic Case Submission Guidelines The following guidelines broadly outline the framework used by the National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC to the submitting agency, its wildlife populations, or domestic animal and human health. Type of Specimens

  1. Health effects of risk-assessment categories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, C.F.; Rybicka, K.; Knutson, A.; Morris, S.C.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and occupational health effects associated with exposures to various chemicals are a subject of increasing concern. One recently developed methodology for assessing the health impacts of various chemical compounds involves the classification of similar chemicals into risk-assessment categories (RACs). This report reviews documented human health effects for a broad range of pollutants, classified by RACs. It complements other studies that have estimated human health effects by RAC based on analysis and extrapolation of data from animal research.

  2. Gasbuggy Site Assessment and Risk Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the geologic and hydrologic conditions and evaluates potential health risks to workers in the natural gas industry in the vicinity of the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site, where the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission detonated an underground nuclear device in 1967. The 29-kiloton detonation took place 4,240 feet below ground surface and was designed to evaluate the use of a nuclear detonation to enhance natural gas production from the Pictured Cliffs Formation in the San Juan Basin, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, on land administered by Carson National Forest. A site-specific conceptual model was developed based on current understanding of the hydrologic and geologic environment. This conceptual model was used for establishing plausible contaminant exposure scenarios, which were then evaluated for human health risk potential. The most mobile and, therefore, the most probable contaminant that could result in human exposure is tritium. Natural gas production wells were identified as having the greatest potential for bringing detonation-derived contaminants (tritium) to the ground surface in the form of tritiated produced water. Three exposure scenarios addressing potential contamination from gas wells were considered in the risk evaluation: a gas well worker during gas-well-drilling operations, a gas well worker performing routine maintenance, and a residential exposure. The residential exposure scenario was evaluated only for comparison; permanent residences on national forest lands at the Gasbuggy site are prohibited

  3. The Maximal Covering Location Problem: An Application in Reproductive Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seargeant, Daniel Bryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    women's use of reproductive health services. Family PlanningCA: California Department of Health Services. Retrieved fromEvaluating alternative health service models using these

  4. Audio visual information fusion for human activity analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thagadur Shivappa, Shankar

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recorded in a health smart home,” in LREC 2010 workshop onto the system. Health smart homes and assisted living forintelligent vehicles, smart homes and natural human-computer

  5. Department of Public Health and Community Medicine University of Verona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romeo, Alessandro

    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine University of Verona Section of Psychiatry (Head Collaborating Centre for Research and Training in Mental Health and Service Evaluation (Director: Professor of mental health, costs evaluation, evaluation of mental health services, effectiveness of psychosocial

  6. Analysis of Senate Bill 576: Health Care Coverage for Tobacco Cessation Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dependence: A US public health service report. The tobaccoHuman Services. Public Health Service. Javitz HS, Swan GE,Health. U.S. Public Health Service (PHS). (2000). Treating

  7. Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 110 | NUMBER 12 | December 2002 1239 DDT and Its Metabolites Alter Gene Expression in Human Uterine Cell Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLachlan, John

    Environmental Health Perspectives · VOLUME 110 | NUMBER 12 | December 2002 1239 DDT and Its- trichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites, have been shown to mimic estrogen, binding to and activating the ERs, thereby often pro- ducing estrogen-like effects (2,16­21). DDT and its metabolites have displayed harmful

  8. assessment environmental health: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOI 10.3310hta18690 and economic evaluation. Health Technol Assess 2014;18(69). Health Technology Assessment is indexed 298 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTREGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW...

  9. Roadmap: School Health Education -Health and Physical Education -Bachelor of Science in Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: School Health Education - Health and Physical Education - Bachelor of Science in Education [EH-BSE-SHED-HPE] College of Education, Health and Human Services School of Health Sciences Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 22-May-12/JS This roadmap is a recommended semester

  10. Roadmap: School Health Education -Health and Physical Education -Bachelor of Science in Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: School Health Education - Health and Physical Education - Bachelor of Science in Education [EH-BSE-SHED-HPE] College of Education, Health and Human Services School of Health Sciences Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 4-June-13/JS This roadmap is a recommended semester

  11. EAT SMART Sources: Heart Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -1- EAT SMART Sources: Heart Health American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide and Promotion; Home and Garden Bulletin Number 252; August 1992. Heart Attach Signs, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH Publication No. 01

  12. Wiebe, E. N. (1994). Evaluation of alternative methods of representing three-dimensional 1 objects on computer displays. In, Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on computer displays. In, Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 38th Annual Meeting, October

  13. ENVIRONMENTALENVIRONMENTALENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & HEALTHSCIENCE & HEALTHSCIENCE & HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    development, fisheries management, protected-area planning and assessment, and human health issues. Notable related to energy, water, transportation, etc., and help develop strategies for protecting human Courses ENST 387: Economics for Natural Resources and the Environment -- An introduction to the economic

  14. Combustion & Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, W.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) ? Combustion of fossil fuels for ? Electricity ? Industrial processes ? Vehicle propulsion ? Cooking and heat ? Other ? Munitions ? Fireworks ? Light ? Cigarettes, hookahs? FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH FFCOMBUSTION: THE THREAT ? SCALE (think health... for public health and strategies to reduce GHG ? Reduce CO2 emissions by 50% by 2030 ? Reduction in PM2.5 deaths greatly offset costs in all models FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH FFCOMBUSTION: PM EXPOSURE ? Combustion is source of most concern ? Health...

  15. Instructions for use JICA's Assistance in Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsunogai, Urumu

    and clinical care eg, strengthen health systems including the development of human resources, facilitiesInstructions for use #12;1 JICA's Assistance in Health Ryuji MATSUNAGA International Cooperation's Assistance in Health Example of JICA Programme/Projects 2 #12;An Overview of Japan's ODA 3 #12;Japan's ODA

  16. Health and safety evaluation of a modified tunnel-borer design for application to single-entry coal-mine development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, W. F.

    1982-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The health and safety analysis is part of an overall effort to identify and develop innovative underground coal extraction systems. The single-entry tunnel borer system was initially considered an innovative approach to underground mining because it exhibited a means of increasing the speed and efficiency of entry development by reducing the number of entries. However, to be considered a truly advanced system, the tunnel borer had to meet distinct safety criteria as well. The objective was to examine the tunnel borer design and determine whether it offset major health hazards, and satisfied the prescribed safety levels. As a baseline for comparison, the tunnel borer was compared against the continuous mining entry driving system. The results of the health analysis indicated that while the tunnel borer design offered improvements in dust control through the use of water sprays, a higher face ventilation rate, and the application of spalling rather than the conventional grinding process, it interjected an additional mutagenic is and toxic compound into the environment through the use of shotcrete. The tunnel borer system easily conformed with the prescribed fatality limit, but exceeded the required limits for disabling and overall injuries. It also exhibited projected disabling and overall injury rates considerably higher than existing continuous mining injury rates. Consequently, the tunnel borer system was not considered an advanced system.

  17. Genomic mosaicism in the human brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westra, Jurjen Willem

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zlokovic BV (2008) The blood-brain barrier in health andmosaicism in the human brain ………………………………………. Chapter Threethe Alzheimer’s disease brain ………………………………. Chapter Five DNA

  18. Evaluation of radioactive scrap metal recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Kohout, E.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wilson, S.E.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates the human health risks and environmental and socio-political impacts of options for recycling radioactive scrap metal (RSM) or disposing of and replacing it. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is assisting the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Oak Ridge Programs Division, in assessing the implications of RSM management alternatives. This study is intended to support the DOE contribution to a study of metal recycling being conducted by the Task Group on Recycling and Reuse of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The focus is on evaluating the justification for the practice of recycling RSM, and the case of iron and steel scrap is used as an example in assessing the impacts. To conduct the evaluation, a considerable set of data was compiled and developed. Much of this information is included in this document to provide a source book of information.

  19. Bioinformatics for the human microbiome project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gevers, Dirk

    Microbes inhabit virtually all sites of the human body, yet we know very little about the role they play in our health. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in studying human-associated microbial communities, ...

  20. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaye, S.V.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a brief progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology including Measurement Applications and Development, Pollutant Assessments, Measurement Systems Research, Dosimetry Applications Research, Metabolism and Dosimetry Research and Nuclear Medicine. Biological and Radiation Physics including Atomic, Molecular, and High Voltage Physics, Physics of Solids and Macromolecules, Liquid and Submicron Physics, Analytic Dosimetry and Surface Physics and Health Effects. Chemical Physics including Molecular Physics, Photophysics and Advanced Monitoring Development. Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis including Human Genome and Toxicology, Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication, Environmental Regulations and Remediation and Information Management Technology. Risk Analysis including Hazardous Waste.

  1. Health and Safety Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Hoesen, S.D.; Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Manis, L.W.; Barre, W.L. [Analysas Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S&H) issues. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water This plan explains additional site-specific health and safety requirements such as Site Specific Hazards Evaluation Addendums (SSHEAs) to the Site Safety and Health Plan which should be used in concert with this plan and existing established procedures.

  2. Wind Turbines and Health A Rapid Review of the Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    of the evidence from current literature on the issue of wind turbines and potential impacts on human health: There are no direct pathological effects from wind farms and that any potential impact on humans can be minimised regarding wind turbines and their potential effect on human health. It is important to note that these views

  3. CHS Graduate Student Competencies & Requirements in Health Economics Health Economics Competencies October 2012 --Page 1 of 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Description This program focuses on economic evaluation of interventions and treatments that impact health. The goal of health economic evaluation is to provide a framework and a set of techniques to measure three courses: MDCH 661 Health Economics MDCH 662 Economic Evaluation MDCH 663 Decision Analysis

  4. Designing a valid randomized pragmatic primary care implementation trial: the my own health report (MOHR) project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the BMJ. The BMJ Economic Evaluation Working Party. BmjGW: Methods for the economic evaluation in health caresystematic reviews of economic evaluations for the guide to

  5. Scaling up Primary Health Services in Rural Tamil Nadu: Public Investment Requirements and Health Sector Reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scaling up Primary Health Services in Rural Tamil Nadu: Public Investment Requirements and Health two key questions in this paper: 1) In terms of state-wide scaling up of rural services in the area of primary health, what will it cost financially and in terms of human resources to scale-up these services

  6. UNO Student Health Services Patient's Bill of Rights and Responsibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulp, Mark

    health care program. UNO Student Health Services Human Performance Center Rm. 109 (504) 280-6387 wwwUNO Student Health Services Patient's Bill of Rights and Responsibilities Patient's Bill of Rights to the Health Service regarding its operations and the right to change caregivers for any reason. #12;Patient

  7. MSc in Environmental Health The Place of Useful Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    ? Environmental Health is the assessment & management of environmental influences on human health, including study and the corresponding breadth of the degree reflect rapid technological progress. Environmental impact assessmentMSc in Environmental Health The Place of Useful Learning #12;What is Environmental Health

  8. Use of Calibrated Simulation for the Evaluation of Residential Energy Conservation Options of Two Habitat for Humanity Houses in Houston, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soebarto, V.; Reddy, A.; Bou-Saada, T. E.; Haberl, J. S.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a project where selected energy conservation measures in two Habitat for Humanity houses in Houston, Texas were measured using side-by- side measurements of identical houses and calibrated simulation. The measures include shell...

  9. Global Health and Economic Impacts of Future Ozone Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Mort D.

    We assess the human health and economic impacts of projected 2000-2050 changes in ozone pollution using the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis-Health Effects (EPPA-HE) model, in combination with results from the ...

  10. Office of Student Services Health Science Campus MS 1026

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Avenue Toledo, OH 43614-2598 419-383-5810 BSN Consortium Planning Guide Bowling Green State University College of Health & Human Services Nursing Advisor - Health Center Rm. 102 Bowling Green, OH 43403 419

  11. Health Sciences and Nursing Health Sociology ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    related to health problems and health care systems, through developing and applying theories, concepts44 Health Sciences and Nursing Health Sociology in interdisciplinary academic fields, involving health, medicine and nursing as well as the field of sociology

  12. Health Economics College of Public Health and Health Professions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    of health, the demand for health care, health insurance theory, the demand for health insurance, the health insurance market and managed care, the market for physicians' services, production and cost of health care care environment. #12;2 Apply general and health economics concepts and show demonstrated competence

  13. assessing health worker: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Human health impacts for Renewable Energy scenarios from the EnerGEO Platform of Integrated running the EnerGEO...

  14. Assessing the health risk of solar development on contaminated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 11, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint A recently published report from Argonne's Environmental Science (EVS) division presents a methodology for assessing potential human health...

  15. Emergency Response Health Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mena, RaJah [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis; Pemberton, Wendy [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis; Beal, William [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Andrews

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health; however, there are major differences between health physics for research or occupational safety and health physics during a large-scale radiological emergency. The deployment of a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) monitoring and assessment team to Japan in the wake of the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant yielded a wealth of lessons on these difference. Critical teams (CMOC (Consequence Management Outside the Continental U.S.) and CMHT (Consequence Management Home Team) ) worked together to collect, compile, review, and analyze radiological data from Japan to support the response needs of and answer questions from the Government of Japan, the U.S. military in Japan, the U.S. Embassy and U.S. citizens in Japan, and U.S. citizens in America. This paper addresses the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. A key lesson learned was that public perception and the availability of technology with social media requires a diligent effort to keep the public informed of the science behind the decisions in a manner that is meaningful to them.

  16. Evaluation of the Debye temperature for iron cores in human liver ferritin and its pharmaceutical analogue Ferrum Lek using Mossbauer spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubiel, S M; Alenkina, I V; Oshtrakh, M I; Semionkin, V A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An iron polymaltose complex Ferrum Lek used as antianemic drug and considered as a ferritin analogue and human liver ferritin were investigated in the temperature range from 295K to 90K by means of 57Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution i.e. in 4096 channels. The Debye temperatures equal to 502K for Ferrum Lek and to 461K for human liver ferritin were determined from the temperature dependence of the center shift obtained using two different fitting procedures.

  17. Potential health impacts from range fires at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willians, G.P.; Hermes, A.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Hartmann, H.M.; Tomasko, D.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study uses atmospheric dispersion computer models to evaluate the potential for human health impacts from exposure to contaminants that could be dispersed by fires on the testing ranges at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. It was designed as a screening study and does not estimate actual human health risks. Considered are five contaminants possibly present in the soil and vegetation from past human activities at APG--lead, arsenic, trichloroethylene (TCE), depleted uranium (DU), and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT); and two chemical warfare agents that could be released from unexploded ordnance rounds heated in a range fire--mustard and phosgene. For comparison, dispersion of two naturally occurring compounds that could be released by burning of uncontaminated vegetation--vinyl acetate and 2-furaldehyde--is also examined. Data from previous studies on soil contamination at APG are used in conjunction with conservative estimates about plant uptake of contaminants, atmospheric conditions, and size and frequency of range fires at APG to estimate dispersion and possible human exposure. The results are compared with US Environmental Protection Agency action levels. The comparisons indicate that for all of the anthropogenic contaminants except arsenic and mustard, exposure levels would be at least an order of magnitude lower than the corresponding action levels. Because of the compoundingly conservative nature of the assumptions made, they conclude that the potential for significant human health risks from range fires is low. The authors recommend that future efforts be directed at fire management and control, rather than at conducting additional studies to more accurately estimate actual human health risk from range fires.

  18. Fact Sheet HEALTH SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    · Long Term Care Administrator · Training Coordinator · Clinical Health Education Specialist · Health Media Director · Long Term Care Facilities Manager Fact Sheet HEALTH SCIENCE Highlights · Health Science

  19. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    consequences through its longstanding support for the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Unit and the Neonatal Research and improving the care and treatment of preterm and low birth weight infants, to work with the Office of the NIH-fetal gestations, due in a large part to the increased use of assisted reproductive technologies. Between 1980

  20. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    Budget FY 2015 Budget Page No. Organization Chart #12;OAR-3 Institute / Center FY 2013 Actual FY 2014 Enacted FY 2015 President's Budget FY 2015 +/- FY...........................................................................................................................2 Budget Authority by Institute and Center

  1. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Roadmap Initiative has the potential to have a profound and positive impact on how American medical. Because the Roadmap recognizes that one of the most powerful and unifying concepts of 21st century biology central to the research enterprise. Second is the Roadmap's requirement to "re-engineer the national

  2. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    Videocast Website: http://videocast.nih.gov/ Contact Number: 301-594-7232 AGENDA OPEN PORTION - Thursday

  3. Department of Health and Human Services PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Committee for Responsible Medicine Jonathan Balcombe, Ph.D., Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine

  4. Reduction in Work Force Unclassified Staff Office of Human Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Reduction in Work Force ­ Unclassified Staff 9.15 Office of Human Resources Applies to: Regular by the Health System. Health System employees should contact their human resource department for further information. The Ohio State University ­ Office of Human Resources Page 1 of 1 Policy 9.15 Reduction in Work

  5. Health Physicist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as a Health Physicist in the Facility Operations Division, Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OREM). The selectee will be regarded as a...

  6. THE UNIVERSITY Of TENNESSEE Health Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    THE UNIVERSITY Of TENNESSEE Health Science Center Human Resources 910 Madison Ave, Suite 722 Memphis, TN 38163 Tel: (901) 448-5600 Fax: (901) 448-5170 THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE HEALTH SCIENCE the Personnel Records of UT public domain. This gives any citizen of the State of Tennessee the right to view

  7. Office of Domestic and International Health Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Domestic and International Health Studies engages in the conduct of international scientific studies that may provide new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation in the workplace or people exposed in communities as a result of nuclear accidents, including providing health and environmental monitoring services to populations specified by law.

  8. Study downplays health concerns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stringer, J.

    1996-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A government-funded study has concluded that reformulated gasoline containing methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) does not increase short-term health risks when compared with gasoline that does not contain the additive. The study, performed by the Health Effects Institute (Cambridge, MA), compared data from dozens of animal, human, and epidemiological studies of health effects linked to oxygenates, including MTBE and ethanol, but did not find enough evidence to warrant an immediate reduction in oxygenate use. However, the study did recommend that additional research be conducted on possible health consequences associated with the gasoline additives, including neurotoxic effects, if oxygenates continue to be used long term. Oxygenates have been used in gasoline since 1992, when EPA mandated that several municipalities use MTBE or other oxygenates in reformulated gasoline to reduce carbon monoxide emissions and meet Clean Air Act requirements. Shortly after the program began, residents in areas where the oxygenates were used complained of nausea, headaches, and dizziness. The institute says the study--funded by EPA and the Centers for Disease Control--will be used for a broader review of gasoline oxygenates by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

  9. Status of health and environmental research relative to direct coal liquefaction: 1976 to the present

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, R.H.; Cowser, K.E. (eds.)

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the status of health and environmental research efforts, supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to assist in the development of environmentally acceptable coal liquefaction processes. Four major direct coal liquefaction processes are currently in (or have been investigated at) the pilot plant stage of development. Two solvent refined coal processes (SRC-I and -II), H-coal (a catalytic liquefaction process) and Exxon donor solvent (EDS). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was assigned responsibility for evaluating SRC process materials and prepared comprehensive health and environmental effects research program plans for SRC-I and -II. A similar program plan was prepared for H-coal process materials by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A program has been developed for EDS process materials by Exxon Research and Engineering Co. The program includes short-term screening of coal-derived materials for potential health and ecological effects. Longer-term assays are used to evaluate materials considered most representative of potential commercial practice and with greatest potential for human exposure or release to the environment. Effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential health and ecological effects are also being evaluated. These assessments are being conducted to assist in formulating cost-effective environmental research programs and to estimate health and environmental risks associated with a large-scale coal liquefaction industry. Significant results of DOE's health and environmental research efforts relative to coal liquefaction include the following: chemical characterization, health effects, ecological fate and effects, amelioration and risk assessment.

  10. Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) University of California at Davis, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Site Environmental Report for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Site (the Site) includes 1996 environmental monitoring data for Site air, soil, ground water, surface water, storm water and ambient radiation. DOE operation of LEHR as a functioning research location ceased in 1989, after the completion of three decades of research on the health effects of low-level radiation exposure (primarily strontium-90 and radium-226), using beagles to simulate effects on human health. During 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted activities at the Site in support of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Environmental remediation and the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of Site buildings. Extensive environmental data were collected in 1996 to evaluate appropriate remedial actions for the Site.

  11. National energy strategy: Recent studies comparing the health impacts of energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.D.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The human health impacts of energy technologies arise mostly from routine emissions of pollutants and from traumatic accidents, which may also release pollutants. The natures and magnitudes of the risks differ among technologies -- they are a lot different for some -- and so the differences must be included in any evaluation of their relative merits. Based on the characteristics of their health risks, energy technologies can be classified into three groups: The fuel group, the renewable resources group, and the nuclear group. Within these technology groups, health risks are similar in form and magnitude. But among the groups they are quite different. They occur in different parts of the fuel cycle, to different people, and their characteristics are different with respect to public perceptions of their relative importance in decision making. These groups are compared in this study.

  12. Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle-income countries to carry out health- related research within their own countries. Gl bal Health #12;3 | Global Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated

  13. HEALTH ECONOMICS Health Econ. (in press)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharfstein, Daniel

    health services/economics; costs and cost analysis; health services/utilization; quality of health careHEALTH ECONOMICS Health Econ. (in press) Published online in Wiley InterScience (www and ROBERT BLACKb a Department of Population and Family Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School

  14. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    "--today we hear that word bantered about more than ever. Whether the context is national (health care reformCollege of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection March 2010 Volume VIII (7) Greetings health sciences' colleagues, community

  15. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    with a variety of topics including substance abuse, worksite health promotion, health care cost containment the importance of health care as well as the promotion, protection and maintenance of health. Without a doubt things in the area of health promotion and health care. As the COHS look to the future, we need to take

  16. Linking coral reef health and human welfare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Sheila Marie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Baselines and degradation of coral reefs in the northernBaselines and degradation of coral reefs in the northern2006) Fisheries Resources: Coral ReefFishes. Solomon Islands

  17. Linking coral reef health and human welfare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Sheila Marie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    create a balanced factorial design. An additional 13 sitesa balanced natural factorial experimental design to test theusing a natural factorial experimental design (Fig. 1-1),

  18. D & D screening risk evaluation guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robers, S.K.; Golden, K.M.; Wollert, D.A.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Screening Risk Evaluation (SRE) guidance document is a set of guidelines provided for the uniform implementation of SREs performed on decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) facilities. Although this method has been developed for D&D facilities, it can be used for transition (EM-60) facilities as well. The SRE guidance produces screening risk scores reflecting levels of risk through the use of risk ranking indices. Five types of possible risk are calculated from the SRE: current releases, worker exposures, future releases, physical hazards, and criticality. The Current Release Index (CRI) calculates the current risk to human health and the environment, exterior to the building, from ongoing or probable releases within a one-year time period. The Worker Exposure Index (WEI) calculates the current risk to workers, occupants and visitors inside contaminated D&D facilities due to contaminant exposure. The Future Release Index (FRI) calculates the hypothetical risk of future releases of contaminants, after one year, to human health and the environment. The Physical Hazards Index (PHI) calculates the risks to human health due to factors other than that of contaminants. Criticality is approached as a modifying factor to the entire SRE, due to the fact that criticality issues are strictly regulated under DOE. Screening risk results will be tabulated in matrix form, and Total Risk will be calculated (weighted equation) to produce a score on which to base early action recommendations. Other recommendations from the screening risk scores will be made based either on individual index scores or from reweighted Total Risk calculations. All recommendations based on the SRE will be made based on a combination of screening risk scores, decision drivers, and other considerations, as determined on a project-by-project basis.

  19. Protecting Patients, Preserving Integrity, Advancing Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    values of protecting the integrity of their research, the well being of the human subjects whoProtecting Patients, Preserving Integrity, Advancing Health: Accelerating the Implementation of COI of Interest in Human Subjects Research February 2008 #12;Protecting Patients, Preserving Integrity, Advancing

  20. A new muscle fatigue and recovery model and its ergonomics application in human simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Liang; Bennis, Fouad; Zhang, Wei; Guillaume, François; 10.1080/17452759.2010.504056

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although automatic techniques have been employed in manufacturing industries to increase productivity and efficiency, there are still lots of manual handling jobs, especially for assembly and maintenance jobs. In these jobs, musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the major health problems due to overload and cumulative physical fatigue. With combination of conventional posture analysis techniques, digital human modelling and simulation (DHM) techniques have been developed and commercialized to evaluate the potential physical exposures. However, those ergonomics analysis tools are mainly based on posture analysis techniques, and until now there is still no fatigue index available in the commercial software to evaluate the physical fatigue easily and quickly. In this paper, a new muscle fatigue and recovery model is proposed and extended to evaluate joint fatigue level in manual handling jobs. A special application case is described and analyzed by digital human simulation technique.

  1. A new muscle fatigue and recovery model and its ergonomics application in human simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Liang; Bennis, Fouad; Zhang, Wei; Guillaume, François

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although automatic techniques have been employed in manufacturing industries to increase productivity and efficiency, there are still lots of manual handling jobs, especially for assembly and maintenance jobs. In these jobs, musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the major health problems due to overload and cumulative physical fatigue. With combination of conventional posture analysis techniques, digital human modelling and simulation (DHM) techniques have been developed and commercialized to evaluate the potential physical exposures. However, those ergonomics analysis tools are mainly based on posture analysis techniques, and until now there is still no fatigue index available in the commercial software to evaluate the physical fatigue easily and quickly. In this paper, a new muscle fatigue and recovery model is proposed and extended to evaluate joint fatigue level in manual handling jobs. A special application case is described and analyzed by digital human simulation technique.

  2. CANDU human performance analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, I.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of human performance is presented in this paper in the context of the operational safety management system. To focus on problems, an experience review program has been developed to establish trends, demonstrate the degree of compliance with standards, and determine the causes of poor performance. The primary method by which the experience review takes place is significant event reporting (SER). A significant event is an incident that causes an undesirable effect on safety, product quality, environmental protection, or product cost. In spite of advanced technology and the degree of automation of the Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) design, mistakes and malfunctions to occur. Considerable effort has been made to prevent or reduce the incidence of error. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations developed a system to analyze human error, called the Human Performance Evaluation System (HPES). To encourage an open exchange of information, the system is anonymous and nonpunitive. All data gathered during HPES evaluations are kept confidential.

  3. PREDICTIVE SIMULATION OF PIEZOELECTRIC WAFER ACTIVE SENSORS FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    1 PREDICTIVE SIMULATION OF PIEZOELECTRIC WAFER ACTIVE SENSORS FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING: structural health monitoring (SHM), piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS), nondestructive evaluation (NDE sensors (PWAS) are lightweight and inexpensive enablers for structural health monitoring (SHM). After

  4. Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes - DOE Directives...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Admin Chg 1, Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes by Carl Sykes Functional areas: Administrative Change, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Defense...

  5. OccupationalSafety andHealthResearchCenter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    Disorders, Safety, Slips/Trips/Falls, Work Organization w w w.oshrc.ic tas.vt.edu Separating humans from the safety and health of workers. OSHRC, formally known as the Center for Innova- tion in Construction Safety for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to innova- tively improve health and safety in the construction sector

  6. Communication and Effectiveness in Primary Health Jean Carletta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carletta, Jean

    Communication and Effectiveness in Primary Health Care Teams Jean Carletta Human Communication.Carletta@edinburgh.ac.uk ABSTRACT Primary health care team members need to communicate effectively with each other in order of cross-disciplinary team meetings, we describe communication in primary health care teams, explore

  7. CERTIFICATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDER FOR EMPLOYEE'S PREGNANCY DISABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eirinaki, Magdalini

    CERTIFICATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDER FOR EMPLOYEE'S PREGNANCY DISABILITY HUMAN RESOURCES Employee this form to your medical provider. Section II must be fully completed by the health care provider Department/College name: Campus Phone: I authorize my health care provider to complete this form and provide

  8. Poor Nutrition and Health Concerns in Low Income Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and foodborne illness, reduced indigent health care costs and improved quality of life. Contact: Dean McPoor Nutrition and Health Concerns in Low Income Population An estimated one out of every six in 1995 as a cooperative endeavor among the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, Texas Health and Human

  9. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    , College of Health Sciences. · "Innovative Ways to Address Idaho's Healthcare Needs: Long-Term CareCollege of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection February 2011 Volume IX (3) Since the last COHS newsletter, the faculty

  10. Students' Health Service Hampton House Health Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    .bristol.ac.uk/infectious-diseases/meningitis www.bristol.ac.uk/infectious-diseases/mumps www.bristol.ac.uk/infectious-diseases/measles. Health care / Health care Student support Health care Registering with a doctor It is important that you register' Health Service The Students' Health Service (SHS) offers full general practice care, including: ·travel

  11. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    today. In politics, in education, in health care, in society in general we are so turned inwardCollege of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection April/May 2010 Volume VIII (8) WOW! Spring semester of 2010 is almost

  12. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection April 2011 Volume IX (4) The end of the spring semester is quickly approaching accreditation review. Similarly, the Environmental and Occupational Health program also had a very positive

  13. Towards structural health monitoring in carbon nanotube reinforced composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wennie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation was conducted to understand the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) capabilities of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of several network architectures towards structural health monitoring (SHM). As ...

  14. animal health information: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    include blood smear evaluation: Blood Smear Keinan, Alon 11 English Almanacs and Animal Health Care in the Seventeenth Century CiteSeer Summary: In seventeenth-century England,...

  15. Gasbuggy Site Assessment and Risk Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gasbuggy site is in northern New Mexico in the San Juan Basin, Rio Arriba County (Figure 1-1). The Gasbuggy experiment was designed to evaluate the use of a nuclear detonation to enhance natural gas production from the Pictured Cliffs Formation, a tight, gas-bearing sandstone formation. The 29-kiloton-yield nuclear device was placed in a 17.5-inch wellbore at 4,240 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs), approximately 40 ft below the Pictured Cliffs/Lewis shale contact, in an attempt to force the cavity/chimney formed by the detonation up into the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone. The test was conducted below the southwest quarter of Section 36, Township 29 North, Range 4 West, New Mexico Principal Meridian. The device was detonated on December 10, 1967, creating a 335-ft-high chimney above the detonation point and a cavity 160 ft in diameter. The gas produced from GB-ER (the emplacement and reentry well) during the post-detonation production tests was radioactive and diluted, primarily by carbon dioxide. After 2 years, the energy content of the gas had recovered to 80 percent of the value of gas in conventionally developed wells in the area. There is currently no technology capable of remediating deep underground nuclear detonation cavities and chimneys. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must continue to manage the Gasbuggy site to ensure that no inadvertent intrusion into the residual contamination occurs. DOE has complete control over the 1/4 section (160 acres) containing the shot cavity, and no drilling is permitted on that property. However, oil and gas leases are on the surrounding land. Therefore, the most likely route of intrusion and potential exposure would be through contaminated natural gas or contaminated water migrating into a producing natural gas well outside the immediate vicinity of ground zero. The purpose of this report is to describe the current site conditions and evaluate the potential health risks posed by the most plausible contaminant exposure scenario, drilling of natural gas wells near the site. The results of this risk evaluation will guide DOE's future surveillance and monitoring activities in the area to ensure that site conditions are adequately protective of human health. This evaluation is not a comprehensive risk assessment for the site; it is intended to provide assurance that DOE's monitoring approach can detect the presence of site-related contamination at levels well below those that would pose an unacceptable risk to human health.

  16. Evaluation of the sensitizing potential of antibiotics in vitro using the human cell lines THP-1 and MUTZ-LC and primary monocyte?derived dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sebastian, Katrin, E-mail: ksebastian@ukaachen.de [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)] [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Ott, Hagen [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)] [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Zwadlo-Klarwasser, Gabriele [IZKF (BIOMAT), RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)] [IZKF (BIOMAT), RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Skazik-Voogt, Claudia; Marquardt, Yvonne; Czaja, Katharina; Merk, Hans F.; Baron, Jens Malte [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)] [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 7th amendment to the EU cosmetics directive foresees a complete ban on animal testing, alternative in vitro methods have been established to evaluate the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight compounds. To find out whether these novel in vitro assays are also capable to predict the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight drugs, model compounds such as beta-lactams and sulfonamides – which are the most frequent cause of adverse drug reactions – were co-incubated with THP-1, MUTZ-LC, or primary monocyte?derived dendritic cells for 48 h and subsequent expression of selected marker genes (IL-8, IL-1?, CES1, NQO1, GCLM, PIR and TRIM16) was studied by real time PCR. Benzylpenicillin and phenoxymethylpenicillin were recognized as sensitizing compounds because they are capable to induce the mRNA expression of these genes in moDCs and, except for IL-8, in THP-1 cells but not in MUTZ-LC. Ampicillin stimulated the expression of some marker genes in moDCs and THP-1 cells. SMX did not affect the expression of these genes in THP-1, however, in moDCs, at least PIR was enhanced and there was an increase of the release of IL-8. These data reveal that novel in vitro DC based assays might play a role in the evaluation of the allergenic potential of novel drug compounds, but these systems seem to lack the ability to detect the sensitizing potential of prohaptens that require metabolic activation prior to sensitization and moDCs seem to be superior with regard to the sensitivity compared with THP-1 and MUTZ-3 cell lines. -- Highlights: ? We tested the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight drugs in vitro. ? In vitro assays were performed with moDCs and THP-1 cells. ? Beta-lactam antibiotics can be recognized as sensitizing compounds. ? They affect the expression of metabolic enzymes, cytokines and transcription factors. ? Sulfamethoxazole has no measurable effect on THP-1 cells and moDCs.

  17. Global Health Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in global health: The challenges of investing in health and universal health coverage Although targets can help to focus global health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in global health

  18. Students' Health Service Hampton House Health Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    .ac.uk/infectious-diseases. Health care / Student support Other NHS services NHS 111 NHS 111 is a telephone service, giving in an emergency. Student support / Health care Student support Health care Registering with a doctor practice care, including: · travel immunisation and advice · contraceptive advice · sexual health testing

  19. Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    5th Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health Hosted by The Stanford WSDM* Center May 21;3 Welcome to the 5th Annual Women's Health Forum - hosted by the Stanford WSDM Center, also known as the Stanford Center for Health Research on Women and Sex Differences in Medicine. The Stanford WSDM Center

  20. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection December 2009 January 2010 Volume VIII (5) Moving from the Superficial the superficial level so that the result is the formation of deep relationships, caring, compassion, justice, love

  1. Center for Health & Counseling Services Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    College How is West Nile diagnosed? If a health care provider suspects WNV, samples of the patient's bloodCenter for Health & Counseling Services Health Services 505 Ramapo Valley Road, Mahwah, NJ 07430 Nile Virus outbreak is the biggest since the virus was first identified in the United States, health

  2. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    the sweeping changes associated with health care reform. Health care reform represents the most significant health care legislation since the development of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965. It has tremendous potential ramification for the future of our college. Health care reform will dramatically increase

  3. Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date General Degree and Humanities 3-4 DLS ENGL 202 Technical Communication 3 DLS ENVHLTH 102 Global Environmental Health 3 BIOL 192 320 Community Environmental Health Management ENVHLTH 415 Occupational Safety and Health ENVHLTH 416

  4. Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date General Degree and Humanities 3-4 DLS ENGL 202 Technical Communication 3 DLS ENVHLTH 102 Global Environmental Health 3 BIOL 192 320 Community Environmental Health Management ENVHLTH 415 Occupational Safety and Health ENVHLTH 416

  5. Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date General Degree and Humanities 3-4 DLS ENGL 202 Technical Communication 3 DLS ENVHLTH 102 Global Environmental Health 3 BIOL 192 Management ENVHLTH 320 Community Environmental Health Management ENVHLTH 415 Occupational Safety and Health

  6. The emerging role and benefits of boundary analysis in spatio-temporal epidemiology and public health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to study human health outcomes, correlates and determinants. Epidemiology has a strong clinical tradition-time change; health outcomes; environmental exposures; health-environment association 1. Introduction of the ingredients of living that are determinants of individual health status and outcomes. From this perspective

  7. Division of Human Resources Termination Of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Division of Human Resources Termination Of Domestic Partnership Health Stipend Questions (813) 974 Insurance Stipend will terminate as of the Effective Date on this Termination of Domestic Partnership Health. ______ The Domestic Partnership Declaration attested to and filed by me with USF shall be and is terminated

  8. Weatherization Works: Final Report of the National Weatherization Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.A.

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a comprehensive evaluation of its Weatherization Assistance Program, the nation's largest residential energy conservation program. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed the five-part study. This document summarizes the findings of the evaluation. Its conclusions are based mainly on data from the 1989 program year. The evaluation concludes that the Program meets the objectives of its enabling legislation and fulfills its mission statement. Specifically, it saves energy, lowers fuel bills, and improves the health and safety of dwellings occupied by low-income people. In addition, the Program achieves its mission in a cost-effective manner based on each of three perspectives employed by the evaluators. Finally, the evaluation estimates that the investments made in 1989 will, over a 20-year lifetime, save the equivalent of 12 million barrels of oil, roughly the amount of oil added to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in each of the past several years. The Program's mission is to reduce the heating and cooling costs for low-income families--particularly the elderly, persons with disabilities, and children by improving the energy efficiency of their homes and ensuring their health and safety. Substantial progress has been made, but the job is far from over. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reports that the average low-income family spends 12 percent of its income on residential energy, compared to only 3% for the average-income family. Homes where low-income families live also have a greater need for energy efficiency improvements, but less money to pay for them.

  9. White Paper Series Using Health Impact Assessments to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    professionals, decision makers, and communities § Saves health care dollars by considering short and longWhite Paper Series Using Health Impact Assessments to Evaluate Bicycle and Pedestrian Plans January of the Federal Highway Administration. Introduction Where we live, work, and play influences health, as well

  10. Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fouquet, Yannick

    Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes: different-cameras). · Context ­ pervasive watching systems for Health Smart Homes ­ detection of neuro-degenerative diseases (e ­ model of elderly persons activity in Health Smart Homes ­ evaluation of actimetric perseveration

  11. Human Computation Must Be Reproducible Praveen Paritosh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    and evaluation of experiments. We argue that human computation has similar properties, and that the resultsHuman Computation Must Be Reproducible Praveen Paritosh Google 345 Spear St, San Francisco, CA 94105. pkp@google.com ABSTRACT Human computation is the technique of performing a com- putational

  12. Introduction Health Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    with the originality and creativity to establish total health care, (2advanced healthcare specialists with abundant and researchers who can put total health care into practice. 21 20084 2 3 total health care #1232 Introduction Guide Entrance Life Career Inquiries Health Sciences Health Problems

  13. winter 2015 Health Informatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    UinG anD PrOfeSSiOnal eDUCatiOn HEALTH INFORMATICS ANd ANALYTICS #12;2 Advancing Health Care Through.S. health care prior to commencing study. High-quality, Convenient Online Learning Format All courses, computer science and health care. In this introductory course, gain broad exposure to the field of health

  14. Human Reliability Analysis for Design: Using Reliability Methods for Human Factors Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Laurids Boring

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the application of human reliability analysis methods to human factors design issues. An application framework is sketched in which aspects of modeling typically found in human reliability analysis are used in a complementary fashion to the existing human factors phases of design and testing. The paper provides best achievable practices for design, testing, and modeling. Such best achievable practices may be used to evaluate and human system interface in the context of design safety certifications.

  15. Sandia Energy - Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Health Monitoring Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Materials, Reliability, & Standards Structural Health Monitoring Structural Health...

  16. Environmental and health management in small and medium size enterprises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arredondo, Juan C. (Juan Carlos Arredondo Brun), 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Workers and employees are increasingly exposed in the workplace to chemical compounds and substances that are potentially toxic; for most of these compounds, no information exist regarding effects on human health. As one ...

  17. Medicine and public health in a multiethnic world 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhopal, Raj

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Achievement of medical and public health goals requires mutual understanding between professionals and the public, a challenge in diverse societies. Despite their massive diversity humans belong to one species, with race ...

  18. Addressing Genetics Delivering Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Addressing Genetics Delivering Health A strategy for advancing the dissemination and application of genetics knowledge throughout our health professions Funded by Hilary Burton September 2003 Executive education of health workers q providing strategic overview of education programme q collaborating

  19. DIRECTORY OF HEALTH SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Andrew

    a centralized resource of regional health care services for persons with developmental disabilitiesDIRECTORY OF HEALTH SERVICES FOR BRONX RESIDENTS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES 2012 Compiled Albert Einstein College of Medicine in collaboration with Health Services Committee, Bronx Developmental

  20. Decision Analytic Modelling in the Economic Evaluation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    Decision Analytic Modelling in the Economic Evaluation of Health Technologies A Consensus Statement when used for the economic evaluation of health technologies; there is limited guidanceforgoodmodelling developed in the context of broader healthcare and economic evaluations, for which ex- plicit guidelines

  1. A comparison between integrated risk assessment and classical health/environmental assessment: Emerging beneficial properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekizawa, Jun [Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, University of Tokushima, Japan, 1-1 Minamijosanjimacho, Tokushima 770-8502 (Japan)]. E-mail: sekizawa@ias.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Tanabe, Shinsuke [Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyocho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both humans and wildlife are exposed to various types of halogenated organic compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), typically old chemicals, and tris(4-chlorophenyl) methane (TCPM) and brominated flame retardants, some new chemicals, simultaneously. Classical risk assessment has evaluated health and ecological risks independently by experts from different disciplines. Taking into considerations the recent concerns about endocrine disrupting chemicals and the progress of research in related areas, we integrated and assessed data on exposure and potential effects in humans and wildlife. Comparisons were made for organ concentrations, body burdens of several organochlorine compounds (OCs), metabolic capacities between humans and various wildlife. When we integrate the knowledge on effects and exposure in humans and in wildlife, new insights were suggested about similarities and/or differences in potential effects among various human populations living on different foods and having different body burdens. Combining existing information with emerging knowledge of mechanisms of actions on endocrine disrupting chemicals after exposure to above chemicals during early developmental stages will further elucidate potential risks from exposure to those chemicals.

  2. University Health Care Health Sciences Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feschotte, Cedric

    University Health Care Health Sciences Center 30 N. 1900 E. 6DOW /DNH &LW\\ 87 84132-2204 Phone and your child. University Health Care School of Medicine Division of Pediatric Nephrology & Hypertension care physician after each visit. x If you would like a copy of your child's clinic note you must

  3. Health and Counselling Services SFU Health Promotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Health and Counselling Services SFU Health Promotion A division of Student Services HEALTHY CAMPUS COMMUNITY 2 0 1 3 R E P O R T #12;Dr. Tim Rahilly Dr. Nancy Johnston FOREWORD The health and well. We have a responsibility as a caring community to create a setting that not only supports students

  4. ORISE: Health Physics Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Physics Training Student performs an analysis during an ORAU health physics training course Training and educating a highly skilled workforce that can meet operational...

  5. ORISE: Public Health Communication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Communication Public Health Communication The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) assists government agencies and organizations in addressing public health...

  6. ORISE: Public Health Preparedness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by convening community-based workshops and key stakeholder meetings aimed at managing a health care surge during a public health emergency. By identifying and involving key...

  7. Health Effects Support Document for Hexachlorobutadiene Health Effects Support Document

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    For Hexachlorobutadiene

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), as amended in 1996, requires the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to establish a list of contaminants to aid the agency in regulatory priority setting for the drinking water program. In addition, SDWA requires EPA to make regulatory determinations for no fewer than five contaminants by August 2001. The criteria used to determine whether or not to regulate a chemical on the CCL are the following: The contaminant may have an adverse effect on the health of persons. The contaminant is known to occur or there is a substantial likelihood that the contaminant will occur in public water systems with a frequency and at levels of public health concern. In the sole judgment of the administrator, regulation of such contaminant presents a meaningful opportunity for health risk reduction for persons served by public water systems. The Agency’s findings for the three criteria are used in making a determination to regulate a contaminant. The Agency may determine that there is no need for regulation when a contaminant fails to meet one of the criteria. This document provides the health effects basis for the regulatory determination for hexachlorobutadiene. In arriving at the regulatory determination, data on toxicokinetics, human

  8. Suffolk County Department of Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . heavy metal sludges, mixtures and solutions in excess of the allowable concentrations listed in Title 6 ground or finished floor elevation. #12;Page #2 2.2 Commissioner - Commissioner of Suffolk County present, an actual or potential hazard to human health, or to the drinking water supply, if such substance

  9. Does Health Insurance and Seeing the Doctor Keep You Out of the Hospital? We obtain estimates of associations between health insurance and hospitalization and between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Jill M.

    health care reform debate, as illustrated by the quote from Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary of the U at a presentation of this research at the American Enterprise Institute for their comments. #12;1 "Our health care.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Indeed, primary care is central focus of the Patient Protection

  10. Policy Research Unit in Economic Evaluation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    Policy Research Unit in Economic Evaluation of Health and Care Interventions Responsiveprogrammeto of conducting economic evaluation The methodological approaches to this responsive strand of work can take. This project will develop fresh approaches to economic evaluations to advise on cost- effectiveness

  11. Master's Degree in Agriculture Plant Health Management Option Option Title: Master of Science (MS) in Agriculture: Plant Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Master's Degree in Agriculture ­ Plant Health Management Option Option Title: Master of Science (MS) in Agriculture: Plant Health Management Department(s) or Program(s): Supported of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences (CAHNRS) Contact Name: Dr. Kim Kidwell, Director MS

  12. CHEIBA TRUST Health Insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEIBA TRUST Health Insurance Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield www.anthem.com BlueAdvantage Point of Service Plan (HMO/POS) Prime Health Plan (PPO) and Custom Plus Health Plan Phone.................................................................................................................1-800-542-9402 Provider Directories Health and Dental www.anthem.com HMO Chiropractic Landmark

  13. IMMUNIZATION HEALTH SERVICES CHECKLIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsuda, Noboru

    (regardless of insurance coverage), as well as current staff and faculty. We offer medical care, health1 HEALTH AND IMMUNIZATION GUIDE #12;2 HEALTH SERVICES CHECKLIST Immunization Form due (one timeEdu and Haven Courses completed by: August 11, 2014 WWW.CMU.EDU/HEALTH-SERVICES Questions? Contact us at 412

  14. IMMUNIZATION HEALTH SERVICES CHECKLIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsuda, Noboru

    . We offer medical care, health promotion and insurance services, including: Alcohol and Drug1 HEALTH AND IMMUNIZATION GUIDE #12;2 HEALTH SERVICES CHECKLIST Immunization Form due (one time ­ September 5, 2014 Spring Semester 2015 ­ January 31, 2015 Summer Semester 2015 ­ June 15, 2015 WWW.CMU.EDU/HEALTH

  15. POSTGRADUATE Health Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    .Sc.Courses Cancer Care 54 Dementia 55 Gerontological Nursing 56 Mental Health 57 Midwifery 59 Nursing 60 Palliative Care 61 Postgraduate Diplomas Clinical Health Sciences Education 62 Nursing (Specialist) 63 HigherPOSTGRADUATE COURSES 2012 Health Sciences TheUniversityofDublinPostgraduateCourses2012Health

  16. Oregon Health & Science University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    to high-quality health care for all, especially Oregonians. 4. Help meet Oregon's health and science, however, has changed dramatically. National and statewide health care reform alters the ways care, including the changing health care environment, new and disruptive technologies, globalization, changing

  17. Removal site evaluation report for the Isotope Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This removal site evaluation (RmSE) report of the Isotope Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was prepared to provide the Environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around the Isotopes Facility pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment and if remedial site evaluations (RSEs) or removal actions are required. The scope of the project included: (1) a review of historical evidence regarding operations and use of the facility; (2) interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past operating practices; (3) a site inspection; and (4) identification of hazard areas requiring maintenance, removal, or remedial actions. The results of RmSE indicate that no substantial risks exist from contaminants present in the Isotope Facilities because adequate controls and practices exist to protect human health and the environment. The recommended correction from the RmSE are being conducted as maintenance actions; accordingly, this RmSE is considered complete and terminated.

  18. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment; evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provide estimates of: (1) individual risks based on central tendency exposure; (2) individual risks based on maximum environmental concentrations; (3) risks to highly exposed or susceptible subgroups of the population (e.g., subsistence farmers and school children); (4) risks associated with specific activities that may result in elevated exposures (e.g., subsistence fishermen and deer hunters); and (5) population risk. This approach allows for the estimation of risks to specific segments of the population taking into consideration activity patterns, number of individuals, and actual locations of individuals in these subgroups with respect to the facility. The fate and transport modeling of emissions from the facility to estimate exposures to identified subgroups is described.

  19. Energy Systems and Population Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ezzati, Majid; Bailis, Rob; Kammen, Daniel M.; Holloway, Tracey; Price, Lynn; Cifuentes, Luis A.; Barnes, Brendon; Chaurey, Akanksha; Dhanapala, Kiran N.

    2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well-documented that energy and energy systems have a central role in social and economic development and human welfare at all scales, from household and community to regional and national (41). Among its various welfare effects, energy is closely linked with people s health. Some of the effects of energy on health and welfare are direct. With abundant energy, more food or more frequent meals can be prepared; food can be refrigerated, increasing the types of food items that are consumed and reducing food contamination; water pumps can provide more water and eliminate the need for water storage leading to contamination or increased exposure to disease vectors such as mosquitoes or snails; water can be disinfected by boiling or using other technologies such as radiation. Other effects of energy on public health are mediated through more proximal determinants of health and disease. Abundant energy can lead to increased irrigation, agricultural productivity, and access to food and nutrition; access to energy can also increase small-scale income generation such as processing of agricultural commodities (e.g., producing refined oil from oil seeds, roasting coffee, drying and preserving fruits and meats) and production of crafts; ability to control lighting and heating allows education or economic activities to be shielded from daily or seasonal environmental constraints such as light, temperature, rainfall, or wind; time and other economic resources spent on collecting and/or transporting fuels can be used for other household needs if access to energy is facilitated; energy availability for transportation increases access to health and education facilities and allow increased economic activity by facilitating the transportation of goods and services to and from markets; energy for telecommunication technology (radio, television, telephone, or internet) provides increased access to information useful for health, education, or economic purposes; provision of energy to rural and urban health facilities allows increased delivery and coverage of 3 various health services and interventions such as tests and treatments, better storage of medicine and vaccines, disinfection of medical equipment by boiling or radiation, and more frequent and efficient health system encounters through mobile clinics or longer working hours; and so on. In fact, while the dominant view of development-energy-health linkages has been that improvements in energy and health are outcomes of the socioeconomic development process (e.g., the ''energy ladder'' framework discussed below), it has even been argued that access to higher quality energy sources and technologies can initiate a chain of demographic, health, and development outcomes by changing the household structure and socioeconomic relationships. For example, in addition to increased opportunities for food and income production, reduced infant mortality as a result of transition to cleaner fuels or increased coverage of vaccination with availability of refrigerators in rural clinics may initiate a process of ''demographic transition'' to low-mortality and low-fertility populations (14). Such a transition has historically been followed with further improvements in maternal and child health and increased female participation in the labor markets and other economic activities.

  20. Environmental Public Health Performance Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Public Health Performance Standards Environmental Health Program Self Agency: Total Environmental Health Program Budget: #12;Environmental Public Health Performance Standards (v. 2.0); Environmental Health Program Assessment Instrument, 1/7/2010 Page 2 Proportion

  1. Oleoresin Capsicum toxicology evaluation and hazard review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) is an extract of the pepper plant used for centuries as a culinary spice (hot peppers). This material has been identified as a safe and effective Less-Than- Lethal weapon for use by Law enforcement and security professionals against assault. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is currently also evaluating its use in conjunction with other Less-Than-Lethal agents such as aqueous foam for use in corrections applications. Therefore, a comprehensive toxicological review of the literature was performed for the National Institute of Justice Less-Than-Lethal Force program to review and update the information available on the toxicity and adverse health effects associated with OC exposure. The results of this evaluation indicate that exposure to OC can result in dermatitis, as well as adverse nasal, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal effects in humans. The primary effects of OC exposure include pain and irritation of the mucous membranes of the eyes, nose, and lining of the mouth. Blistering and rash have been shown to occur after chronic or prolonged dermal exposure. Ingestion of capsicum may cause acute stinging of the lips, tongue, and oral mucosa and may lead to vomiting and diarrhea with large doses. OC vapors may also cause significant pulmonary irritation and prolonged cough. There is no evidence of long term effects associated with an acute exposure to OC, and extensive use as a culinary additive and medicinal ointment has further provided no evidence of long term adverse effects following repeated or prolonged exposure.

  2. Graduate School of Public Health (Graduate School of Public Health) (Dept. of Public Health)`

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Guebuem

    including environmental health covering concept of contents and meanings. (Health Care Management-3-0 History of Health & Medical Care , , . , , , . This course reviews Graduate School of Public Health #12;#12;(Graduate School of Public Health) (Dept. of Public

  3. Informal Report PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    OF SEDIMENT DECONTAMINATION FACILITIES FOR NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR Michael D. Rowe Robert C. Klein Keith W PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH IMPACTS OF SEDIMENT DECONTAMINATION

  4. REPORT NO. 4 ESTIMATES AND EVALUATION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ESTIMATES AND EVALUATION OF FALLOUT IN THE UNITED STATES FROM NUCLEAR WEAPONS TESTING CONDUCTED THROUGH 1962 Section II History of Nuclear Weapons Testing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Section III Atmospheric, "Health Implications of Fallout From Nuclear Weapons Testing Through 1961", May 1962

  5. Potential Health Effects of Marcellus Shale Activities: The Need for Public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    . #12;Implications of the Gulf Oil Spill to Marcellus Shale Activities - Environmental and human health salt (Proprietary) 10.0 - 30.0% #12;Implications of the Gulf Oil Spill to Marcellus Shale ActivitiesPotential Health Effects of Marcellus Shale Activities: The Need for Public Health Surveillance

  6. Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies -Health Sciences Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Six: [14 Credit Hours] NURS 45010 Health Care Policy and Delivery Systems or NURS 46000 Health Care 41581 Health Psychology (3) or SOC 42563 Sociology in Health and Health Care (3) 3 Health Science 45080 Physiology of Exercise 3 PHIL 40005 Health Care Ethics 3 General Elective (lower or upper

  7. Human Ecology Human ecology Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Z. Jane

    Channel, Latin America. STUDIOS Architecture. #12;HUMAN ECOLOGY · APRIL 2005 1 Lisa Staiano-Coico, Ph Frey spins a green alternative for textiles. Fibers from rapidly renewable materials

  8. Space, light, and time : prospective analysis of Circadian illumination for health-based daylighting with applications to healthcare architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pechacek, Christopher S. (Christopher Scott)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light in architecture can be studied for its objective or perceptual effects. This thesis describes an objective link between human health and architectural design. Specifically, the link between daylight and human circadian ...

  9. Health and environmental effects document for direct coal liquefaction - 1981.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Wilson, B.W.; Mahlum, D.D.; Sever, L.E.; Olsen, A.R.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents initial estimates of potential human health effects from inhalation of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) that may be released from a future hypothetical industry producing about 600,000 bb1/day of synthetic fuel by direct liquefaction of coal. The assessment approach starts wth general assumptions that are then refined in a tiered sequence that considers available epidemiological, environmental and chemical data. The uncertainties involved in such an evaluation have been quantified where possible at this early stage of health risk analysis. Many surrogate data bases were considered for application to coal liquefaction including coke oven, British gas retort, roofing tar and asphalts, and cigarette smoke. The coke oven data base was selected for this assessment because the chemical and physical nature of coke oven emissions are judged to more closely approximate potential coal liquefaction emissions. Utilizing the extensive epidemiological data base for coke oven workers as a surrogate model, health effects from release of coal liquefaction NMHC may be quantified. This method results in estimates of about 1 x 10/sup -3/ excess cancer deaths/yr to an industrial work force of 7800 persons and 5 x 10/sup -2/ excess cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole from NMHC that boil above 600/sup 0/F. Sources of uncertainty in the estimates are listed. Using these uncertainties, it is estimated that from 2 x 10/sup -4/ to 5 x 10/sup -3/ lung cancer deaths/yr may occur in the industrial work force and from 1 x 10/sup -2/ to 2.5 x 10/sup -1/ lung cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole. On an individual basis, the excess lifetime risk to occupationally exposed workers is estimated to be 500 times greater than to members of the U.S. public.

  10. BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH Assessing the Environmental, Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH Assessing the Environmental, Health and Safety Impact of Nanoparticles are urgently needed to support risk assessments and regulatory policy decisions regarding materials containing · Environmental Protection Agency · DuPont · BASF · Evonik · Cabot · General Electric Approach The quartz crystal

  11. Evidence of Southern Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    POS Evidence of Coverage Southern Health Services, Inc. SH.POS.11-09 #12;Table of Contents SH................................................................................................10 Facts about Southern Health .....................................................................12 Members' Responsibilities to Know How and When to Seek Care ............................13 Section

  12. ORISE: Health Promotion and Outreach

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Promotion and Outreach Health Promotion & Outreach The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides health promotion and outreach support to government...

  13. Open Defecation and the Human Waste Crisis in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mozaffar, Parveen

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis analyzes the human waste crisis in India. The lack of sanitation facilities as well as open defecation seriously impacts India's ability to achieve its sanitation goals by 2015. More importantly, if the World Health Organization...

  14. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Human Fungal Pathogens Causing Paracoccidioidomycosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holder, Jason W.

    Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, ...

  15. Public Health Assessment Gopher State Ethanol, City of St. Paul

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Public Health Assessment Gopher State Ethanol, City of St. Paul Ramsey County, Minnesota September with the Gopher State Ethanol, St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota. It is based on a formal site evaluation....................................................................................................................... 3 Ethanol Production

  16. An assessment of health educators' likelihood of adopting genomic competencies for the public health workforce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Lei-Shih

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ) recommended that public health professionals 1) understand genomic factors in population health, 2) examine the clinical validity and value of genomic tests, and 3) assess individuals? family history in order to recommend genetic evaluations, intensive... are genetic-related ? that can affect large population groups. Furthermore, in recent years the term New Genetics also has been utilized to differentiate genetic studies from Eugenics, since the former implies individuals? autonomy and freedom of choice...

  17. Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Health & Safety Sub Department Name 480 Oak Rd, Stanford, CA 94305 T 650.723.0448 F 650.725.3468 DEPUTY DIRECTOR, ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY Exempt, Full-Time (100% FTE) Posted May 1, 2014 The Department of Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) at Stanford University seeks

  18. Health Insurance Marketplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    options. You may be able to get coverage now through existing programs. Visit HealthCare.gov to learn more, and coinsurance. You'll want to consider these details while you're exploring your options. Visit HealthCare will offer essential health benefits, including doctor visits, preventive care, hospitalization

  19. Being Interactive Health Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Being Interactive Treating Health Care T he numbers are staggering. In a chilling report, the U care, training staff, and accrediting staff and health-care facilities, which involve determin- ing.ahrq.gov/clinic/ptsafety/summary.htm). Pressures on Health Care To come up with a credible approach for improv- ing patient safety, we need

  20. Global Health Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Monday, January 27, 2014 2:30pm ­ 4:00pm (Reception to follow at the Center for Health Policy and the Woods Institute for the Environment. He studies how economic, political, and natural environments affect population health in developing countries using a mix of experimental

  1. Health Psychology Chapter Eleven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    % of health care research focuses on mortality or physiological indicators of morbidity to determine treatmentHealth Psychology Chapter Eleven: Management of Chronic Illness #12;Quality of Life: What outcome. #12;Kaplan's Model Argues that the most important indicators of health and wellness

  2. Public Health FAT FACTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    : THE UNITED STATES SPENDS MORE ON HEALTH CARE THAN ANY OTHER COUNTRY. YET WE CONTINUE TO FALL FAR BEHIND States spends an astonishing percent of our gross domestic product on health care--significantly moreColumbia Public Health HOT TOPIC Climate Change FAT FACTORS Obesity Prevention BOOK SMART

  3. Student Health Benefit Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    and programs tailored to the needs of students. The SHBP coordinates care with University Health Services (UHS), UMass Amherst's fully accredited health center. UHS provides comprehensive primary care, walk-in care2 2013-2014 Student Health Benefit Plan (SHBP) Designed for the Students of Policy Period: August 1

  4. STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    pastoral care as well as teaching Take positive steps to promote students well-being Ensure the health students to make contact with their GP or local mental health services. The Duty of Care and Negligence1 STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH POLICY Revised January 2013 #12;2 A. INTRODUCTION 1. Context Widening

  5. Horizon Health EAP Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Andrew

    /09) HorizonCareLinkSM ­ All the help you need online Horizon Health EAP also provides services through counselors- Child care or elder care services- Pet care and veterinarians- Adoption resources- Health clubsHorizon Health EAP Services Employee Assistance Program with Telephone and 3 Face

  6. PRIVACY OF HEALTH INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and civil fraud and abuse regulations. Finally, HIPAA was intended to streamline the health care system through the adoption of consistent standards for transmitting uniform electronic health care data between providers of health care services (e.g. MCW) and payers (e.g. Medicare). In order to adopt transmission

  7. PUBLIC HEALTH Noroviruses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    under special circumstances. Usually, health care providers will first try to rule out other germs or worsen, contact your health care provider. #12;What can you do to prevent NLV infection? Follow the tips), or the diarrhea is very bad, call your health care provider for advice. Are there any restrictions for people

  8. Engineering VA Health Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Mark

    Engineering VA Health Care The Department of Veterans Affairs is offering a unique career to all regions of the country and toward numerous health care leadership roles. B.S. degree or M engineers to be effective Healthcare Technology Program Managers in the Veterans Health Administration

  9. Millersville University Health Services Confidentiality and Privacy of Health Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    will share your health information with other designated business associates (ie: laboratories, radiology facilities) o Health Services may use and disclose health information to contact you o Health Services may

  10. Leadership in Health Care Systems: Health Care Organization Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Leadership in Health Care Systems: Health Care Organization Management and Leadership Track: ­ Health Care Organization, Management and Leadership ­ Clinical Research Coordinator ­ Clinical Nurse in health care ethics ­ Public mission ­ Fiscal stewardship ­ Inclusiveness and diversity ­ Theory based

  11. The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer Risk Assessment Factsheet environmental,M.,andToscano,W.(Eds).(2007).Risk Assessment for Environmental Health. · NationalAssociationofLocalBoardsofHealth.(2011).RiskAssessment assessment

  12. The South African Disease: Apartheid Health and Health Services by Cedric de Beer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robb, Judith

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apartheid Health and Health Services. Trenton, N.J. :Given that health and health services are directly relatedApartheid Health and Health Services, examines the truth of

  13. Certification of Health Care Provider for Employee's Serious Health Condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    of Health Care Provider for Employee's Serious Health Condition (Family and Medical Leave Act) SECTION I health condition to submit a medical certification issued by the employee's health care provider. Please: __________________________________________________________________________________ First Middle Last SECTION III: For Completion by the HEALTH CARE PROVIDER INSTRUCTIONS to the HEALTH

  14. Direct from CDC Environmental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    health specialists atAColorado's Tri-County Health Department, as well as at health departments in other, and Douglas counties, and have become more engaged in city planning. Tri-County's environmental health special

  15. Human Reliability Program Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landers, John; Rogers, Erin; Gerke, Gretchen

    2014-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A Human Reliability Program (HRP) is designed to protect national security as well as worker and public safety by continuously evaluating the reliability of those who have access to sensitive materials, facilities, and programs. Some elements of a site HRP include systematic (1) supervisory reviews, (2) medical and psychological assessments, (3) management evaluations, (4) personnel security reviews, and (4) training of HRP staff and critical positions. Over the years of implementing an HRP, the Department of Energy (DOE) has faced various challenges and overcome obstacles. During this 4-day activity, participants will examine programs that mitigate threats to nuclear security and the insider threat to include HRP, Nuclear Security Culture (NSC) Enhancement, and Employee Assistance Programs. The focus will be to develop an understanding of the need for a systematic HRP and to discuss challenges and best practices associated with mitigating the insider threat.

  16. Representative Seroprevalences of Brucellosis in Humans and Livestock in Kyrgyzstan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Representative Seroprevalences of Brucellosis in Humans and Livestock in Kyrgyzstan Bassirou Bonfoh), 60 Togolok Moldo Street, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan 3 Veterinary Public Health Institute, Vetsuisse Faculty, Swiss Red Cross, 187/1 Sydykova Street, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan 5 Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute

  17. Drug-free Workplace Policy Responsible Administrative Unit: Human Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .0 BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Mines is committed to protecting the health, safety and well-being of all employees significant health, safety and well-being concerns within the Mines working and learning environment. 1 Institutional Alcohol Policy. #12;Drug-free Workplace Policy Responsible Administrative Unit: Human Resources

  18. Can you recognize victims of human trafficking among the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    signs of physical abuse and torture · Substance abuse or addictions · Malnourishment and serious dental, phobias and panic attacks Preventive health care for victims of human trafficking is virtually non their lives by connecting them to basic services related to: · Housing · Health care · Immigration assistance

  19. Potential adverse health effects of wood smoke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierson, W.E.; Koenig, J.Q.; Bardana, E.J. Jr.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of wood stoves has increased greatly in the past decade, causing concern in many communities about the health effects of wood smoke. Wood smoke is known to contain such compounds as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, aldehydes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and fine respirable particulate matter. All of these have been shown to cause deleterious physiologic responses in laboratory studies in humans. Some compounds found in wood smoke--benzo(a)pyrene and formaldehyde--are possible human carcinogens. Fine particulate matter has been associated with decreased pulmonary function in children and with increased chronic lung disease in Nepal, where exposure to very high amounts of wood smoke occurs in residences. Wood smoke fumes, taken from both outdoor and indoor samples, have shown mutagenic activity in short-term bioassay tests. Because of the potential health effects of wood smoke, exposure to this source of air pollution should be minimal.29 references.

  20. FY08 VPP Program Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dossett, Sharon D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) is a recognized third-party certification of worker safety and health program excellence, based on industry best practices that focus on management leadership and employee involvement, as well as other safety and health program elements. This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) VPP Program Evaluation is the FY-2008 report of the PNNL VPP Steering Committee regarding the status of VPP at PNNL. It is an update of the previous annual report dated January, 2007 and was completed in January 2008. An annual evaluation of the status of VPP is required of all sites that participate in the DOE-VPP. This report provides a detailed summary of the PNNL VPP Steering Committee’s evaluation of program performance and documents both strengths and improvement opportunities related to the various aspects of the VPP model.

  1. The potential use of Chernobyl fallout data to test and evaluate the predictions of environmental radiological assessment models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, C.R.; Hoffman, F.O.; Blaylock, B.G.; Eckerman, K.F.; Lesslie, P.A.; Miller, C.W.; Ng, Y.C.; Till, J.E.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the Model Validation Committee were to collaborate with US and foreign scientists to collect, manage, and evaluate data for identifying critical research issues and data needs to support an integrated assessment of the Chernobyl nuclear accident; test environmental transport, human dosimetric, and health effects models against measured data to determine their efficacy in guiding decisions on protective actions and in estimating exposures to populations and individuals following a nuclear accident; and apply Chernobyl data to quantifications of key processes governing the environmental transport, fate and effects of radionuclides and other trace substances. 55 refs.

  2. Mobile phone and my health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surducan, Aneta [Nicolae Balcescu High School, 6 Constanta St., 400158 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Nicolae Balcescu High School, 6 Constanta St., 400158 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Dabala, Dana [National Railways Medical Clinic,, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Republicii St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Railways Medical Clinic,, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Republicii St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Neamtu, Camelia, E-mail: emanoil.surducan@itim-cj.ro; Surducan, Vasile, E-mail: emanoil.surducan@itim-cj.ro; Surducan, Emanoil, E-mail: emanoil.surducan@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of the microwave radiation emitted by mobile phones with the user's body is analyzed from the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) recommendations perspective as a correlation between the specific absorption ratio (SAR) of the mobile phone and the call duration. The relative position of the cell phone to the user's body, the dielectric properties of the exposed body parts, the SAR value and the call duration are considered in the local body temperature rise due to the microwave heating effect. The recommended local temperature rise limit in the human body is evaluated according to standards. The aim of this study is to disseminate information to young people, especially high school students, about the microwave thermal effects on the human body, to make them aware of the environmental electromagnetic pollution and to offer them a simple method of biological self protection.

  3. Biomedical Sciences Contributing to Progress in Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    Biomedical Sciences Contributing to Progress in Human Health as a Leading Integrated Research and global impact. The University also strives to complement this breadth of scholarship with focus Medicine, Nature Genetics, Lancet and Science ­ Contribution to 68 out of the 395 `top' papers from

  4. Roadmap: Public Health Health Services Administration Bachelor of Science in Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    and Control of Diseases 3 PH 30012 Communicable Diseases 3 PH 30015 United States Health Care System 3 42086 Economics of Health Care 3 PHIL 40005 Health Care Ethics 3 PH 40092 Internship in Public Health* 3 Sociology of Health and Health Care 3 *Fulfills ELR Ken

  5. The function of the clinic is to provide high-quality, low-cost mental health services for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    The function of the clinic is to provide high- quality, low-cost mental health services in mental health and marriage and family counseling obtain clinical experience. Student counselors the Human Development CliniDevelopment Clinic . . .c . . . Human Development Clinic 1501 S. 3rd Ave

  6. Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities University of Virginia School of Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    , 5:00 pm, Jordan Conference Center Auditorium Health Care Reform and End-of-Life Care Amy P-presented with the Institute for Practical Ethics and Public Life 7 October 2009 Queer Health Care: LGBTI Patients Foundation for the Humanities, History of the Health Sciences Lecture Series, and Buckner W. Clay Endowment

  7. Source: Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, Stanford,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    Source: Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, Stanford, CA is still a daunting problem in structural health monitoring and extreme event damage evaluation [1 series analysis of vibration signals was proposed by [3,4,5,6]. The structural health monitoring problem

  8. PROBABILISTIC STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING USING PASSIVE-ONLY DAMAGE DETECTION BY RECIPROCITY OF GREEN'S FUNCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PROBABILISTIC STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING USING PASSIVE- ONLY DAMAGE DETECTION BY RECIPROCITY-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) has become a particular attractive field of research studies. 7th European Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring July 8-11, 2014. La Cité, Nantes, France

  9. A Depth Space Approach to Human-Robot Collision Avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    A Depth Space Approach to Human-Robot Collision Avoidance Fabrizio Flacco Torsten Kr is presented for safe human-robot coexistence. The main contribution is a fast method to evaluate distances between the robot and possibly moving obstacles (including humans), based on the concept of depth space

  10. Nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martz, H.E.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research reported in the thrust area of nondestructive evaluation includes: advanced 3-D imaging technologies; new techniques in laser ultrasonic testing; infrared computed tomography for thermal NDE of materials, structures, sources, and processes; automated defect detection for large laser optics; multistatic micropower impulse radar imaging for nondestructive evaluation; and multi-modal NDE for AVLIS pod shielding components.

  11. Levels of organochlorine insecticides in human blood from Ahmedabad (rural), India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatnagar, V.K.; Patel, J.S.; Variya, M.R.; Venkaiah, K.; Shah, M.P.; Kashyap, S.K. (National Inst. of Occupational Health, Gujarat (India))

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments of human exposure to persistent organochlorine insecticides (OCI) through biological monitoring offers a profound criteria to evaluate the magnitude of potential health risk, if any, due to use of these chemicals. Residues of these chemicals especially DDT and HCH have been identified and reviewed in man and his environment from different parts of the world however, by comparison very high levels of DDT and its metabolites have been reported in human body fat, blood and milk samples in India. Since there is a definite relationship between the amount of DDT and its residues in blood and those present in human fat depot, blood can be easily be used for assessing the total body burden of persistent OCI in various populations. In view of fragmentary reports on the levels of DDT and HCH in human blood samples from India which categorically pertain to the general population of urban areas like Delhi and Lucknow. The authors attempted to provide a database on residues of DDT and HCH including other cyclodiene compounds, e.g. heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, aldrin, oxygchlordane, HCB and dieldrin in blood samples collected from general population of Ahmedabad (rural) area.

  12. A fully-integrated aptamer-based affinity assay platform for monitoring astronaut health in space.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xianbin (AM Biotechnologies LLC, Houston, TX); Durland, Ross H. (AM Biotechnologies LLC, Houston, TX); Hecht, Ariel H.; Singh, Anup K.; Sommer, Gregory Jon; Hatch, Anson V.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we demonstrate the suitability of robust nucleic acid affinity reagents in an integrated point-of-care diagnostic platform for monitoring proteomic biomarkers indicative of astronaut health in spaceflight applications. A model thioaptamer targeting nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) is evaluated in an on-chip electrophoretic gel-shift assay for human serum. Key steps of (i) mixing sample with the aptamer, (ii) buffer exchange, and (iii) preconcentration of sample were successfully integrated upstream of fluorescence-based detection. Challenges due to (i) nonspecific interactions with serum, and (ii) preconcentration at a nanoporous membrane are discussed and successfully resolved to yield a robust, rapid, and fully-integrated diagnostic system.

  13. Ambulatory Research and Education Center Oregon Health Science University. Environmental Assesment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0921) evaluating the proposed construction and operation of the Ambulatory Research and Education Center (AREC), which would be located on the top seven floors of the existing NeuroSensory Research Center (NRC) on the campus of the Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) at Portland, Oregon. The proposed action would combine activities scattered across the campus into a central facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  14. Development and Health The impact of health on development in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, University of

    · breakdown of health care delivery systems · inadequate application of TB control measures · increasing drug's population are at risk - increasing due to: · breakdown of health care delivery systems · growing drugDevelopment and Health The impact of health on development in Africa #12;Health challenges

  15. Chapter 1: What is Health Psychology Health Psychology &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    ) and correlations of health, illness and dysfunction 4. Improving the health care system and formulating health #12 Descartes: Interactionism #12;Models of Health Care: Biomedical Model Focus on illness Dominant model Health Care Costs Outcomes Research Rise of the Biopsychosocial Model #12;The Mind-Body Relationship

  16. UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH PROFESSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    and ideas concerning the organization of the public health and medical care systems COURSE of the health care system and the interaction of providers (hospitals, physicians, etc), patients, and sources of health care financing (Medicaid, private health insurance etc) The historical development of the health

  17. Re-Visiting Health Informatics What is Health Informatics?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    and the quality of care Facilitate remote healthcare at a patient's home #12;What do Health Informaticians DoRe-Visiting Health Informatics HINF1100 Fall 2008 #12;What is Health Informatics? · Health the effective organization, analysis, management and use of health information to improve the delivery

  18. Chapter 1: What is Health Psychology Health Psychology &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    of health, illness and dysfunction 4. Improving the health care system and formulating health #12;The Mind of Health Care: Biomedical Model ! Focus on illness ! Dominant model for the past 300 years ! All illness://www.sas.upenn.edu/~hatfield/ #12;! Changing Patterns of Illness! ! Escalating Health Care Costs! ! ! Outcomes Research! Rise

  19. Chapter 1: What is Health Psychology Health Psychology &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    . Improving the health care system and formulating health #12;The Mind-Body Relationship: A Brief History basis for diagnosis #12;Rene Descartes: Interactionism #12;Models of Health Care: Biomedical Model FocusChapter 1: What is Health Psychology Health Psychology & Behavioral Medicine Psyc 360 Dr. Meagher

  20. Health and Wellness @ U.Va. Department of Student Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    Health and Wellness @ U.Va. Department of Student Health Counseling and Psychological Services "Without health there is no happiness. An attention to health, then, should take the place of every other on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations 2013 Parents Handbook p. 36-41 #12;Student Health Services · 12:30am-2

  1. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES of Connecticut Health Center (UCHC), Correctional Managed Health Care (CMHC) shall establish and maintain in Prisons (P-B-01). 2008. National Commission on Correctional Health Care. Chicago, IL. Approved: UCHC

  2. Health risk assessment of environmental exposure to trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.P.; Farrar, D.G.; de Rooij, C.G. (Epidemiology Unit, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (England))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the animal data showed trichloroethylene (TRI) to be of low acute toxicity. Repeated exposure showed that the target organs were the liver, and to a lesser extent, the kidney. TRI is not mutagenic or only marginally mutagenic. There is no evidence of fetotoxicity or teratogenicity. TRI is judged not to exhibit chronic neurotoxicity. Lifetime bioassays resulted in tumors in both the mouse and the rat. However, because of qualitative and quantitative metabolic differences between rodent and human, no one suitable tumor site can be chosen for human health risk assessment. In addition, of the several epidemiology studies, none has demonstrated a positive association for increased tumor incidence. A review of the health effects in humans shows TRI to be of low acute toxicity and, following chronic high doses, to be hepatotoxic. Environmental exposure to TRI is mainly via the atmosphere, while the contribution from exposure to drinking water and foodstuffs is negligible. The total body burden was calculated as 22 micrograms/day. The safety margin approach based on human health effects showed that TRI levels are well within the safety margin for the human no-observable-effect level (10,000 times lower). The total body burden represents a risk of 1.4 X 10(-5) by linearized multistage modeling. Therefore, by either methodological approach to risk assessment, the environmental occurrence of TRI does not represent a significant health risk to the general population or to the population in areas close to industrial activities. 66 references.

  3. 2012 Environmental Performance Index: Environmental Health Objective The 2012 EPI builds on measures relevant to the goal of reducing environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    2012 Environmental Performance Index: Environmental Health Objective The 2012 EPI builds on measures relevant to the goal of reducing environmental stresses to human health, which are grouped into one objective category named environmental health. The objective weight is 30% of the overall EPI

  4. Annu. Rev. Public Health 2004. 25:24780 doi: 10.1146/annurev.publhealth.25.102802.124329

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominici, Francesca

    .edu, jsamet@jhsph.edu, fdominic@jhsph.edu Key Words air pollution, public health, epidemiology, regression models s Abstract Studies of air pollution and human health have evolved from descriptive studies of the early phenomena of large increases in adverse health effects following extreme air pollution episodes

  5. Grant Title: AHRQ HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH DEMONSTRATION AND DISSEMINATION GRANTS Funding Opportunity Number: PA-13-046. CFDA Number(s): 93.226.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: PA-13-046. CFDA Number(s): 93.226. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human

  6. Grant Title: MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH DISSERTATION GRANT TO INCREASE DIVERSITY (R36) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-12-103. CFDA Number(s): 93.242.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: PAR-12-103. CFDA Number(s): 93.242. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human

  7. counselling health promotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    health and counselling services health promotion 10 Ways to get active Most people find that power into your day. 1. take it outside. Ride a bike, go skating, fly a kite, throw a frisbee, kick chats for a power walk with friends and catch up face to face. 6. get involved locally. Join sports

  8. Health sciences Postgraduatecourses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    47 Cancer Care 47 Gerontological Nursing 48 Mental Health 49 Midwifery 51 Nursing 52 Palliative Care20 10 Health sciences Postgraduatecourses #12; Contents SCHOOL OF DENTAL SCIENCE 3 Named Degree Dentistry 6 Periodontics 6 Prosthodontics 7 Special Care Dentistry 8 Postgraduate Diplomas 9 Clinical

  9. Postgraduate Courses Health Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    Cancer Care 49 Gerontological Nursing 50 Mental Health 51 Midwifery 53 Nursing 52 Palliative Care 552011 Postgraduate Courses Health Sciences #12; SCHOOL OF DENTAL SCIENCE 3 Named Degree Courses 4 Periodontics 6 Prosthodontics 7 Special Care Dentistry 8 Postgraduate Diplomas 9 Clinical Dental Technology 9

  10. Environmental Public Health Performance Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Public Health Performance Standards (Version 2.0) Updated May 2014 National Center for Environmental Health Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services #12;#12;Environmental Public Health Performance Standards (Version 2.0) Updated May 2014 #12;Environmental Public Health Performance Standards

  11. Primary Health Faculty of Medicine,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albrecht, David

    School of Primary Health Care Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences Central Clinical Hospital Centre for Inflammatory Diseases School of Public Health & Preventive Medicine Australasian Disability Health Victoria School of Psychology and Psychiatry Centre for Rural Mental Health (in abeyance

  12. A Heart Health Alaska Natives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Honoring the Gift of Heart Health A Heart Health Educator's Manual for Alaska Natives U . S . D E Health Service Office of Prevention, Education, and Control #12;Honoring the Gift of Heart Health A Heart National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Indian Health Service NIH Publication No. 06-5218 Revised

  13. Health Care Services Harvard Pilgrim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lahav, Galit

    Health Care Services Harvard Pilgrim Health Care HMO 866-874-0817 www.harvardpilgrim.org Harvard Pilgrim Health Care POS 866-874-0817 www.harvardpilgrim.org Harvard University Group Health Program (HUGHP) HMO 617-495-2008 hughp.harvard.edu Harvard University Group Health Program (HUGHP) POS 617

  14. Health Status and Health Literacy in Older Adults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulton, Daphne Saxon

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between health literacy and the health status of older adults. The first section of the study consisted of a comprehensive literature review of prior research regarding cognitive, health, and behavioral...

  15. Health Insurance Marketplace Notice New Health Insurance Marketplace...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Options and Your Health Coverage PART A: General Information When key parts of the health care law take effect in 2014, there will be a new way to buy health insurance: the...

  16. Trends in the Health of Older Californians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Steven P.; Lee, Jennifer H.; Jawad, May Aydin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Status, Health Risks and Use of Health Services by SelectedPreventive Care and Use of Health Services Changes in HealthHealth Risks and Use of Health Services by County, Age 65

  17. Quantifying the health and economic impacts of mercury : an integrated assessment approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giang, Amanda (Amanda Chi Wen)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury is a toxic pollutant that endangers human and ecosystem health. Especially potent in the form of methyl mercury, exposure is known to lead to adverse neurological effects, and, a growing body of evidence suggests, ...

  18. Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of...

  19. Roadmap: Public Health Health Services Administration Bachelor of Science in Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Diseases 3 PH 30015 United States Health Care System 3 General Elective 6 Semester Seven: [15 CreditRoadmap: Public Health ­ Health Services Administration ­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-HSVA] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 29-May-13/LNHD This roadmap

  20. EA-0970: Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory Project No. 94-AA-01 Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to construct and operate an Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory and subsequent demolition of the existing Analytical...

  1. A framework to improve enterprise-wide implementations : the case of the Veterans Health Administration Telehealth Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andren, Julie C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research applies an implementation framework derived from enterprise systems thinking to the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Telehealth Expansion in order to characterize and evaluate the implementation methods ...

  2. Faculty of Health York University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Health York University Integrated Resource Plan 2012 ­ 2015 #12;Faculty of Health Integrated Resource Plan: 2012 ­ 2015 | Executive Summary Page 2 of 20 .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Faculty of Health Strategic Initiatives Summary

  3. Princeton University Health Services *** CONFIDENTIAL***

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    Princeton University Health Services *** CONFIDENTIAL*** Medical Profile and Consent for Care Give/program abroad sponsor and to be provided to health care personnel in the event that I require medical care: ____________________________________________________________________ Health Insurance: Company: ________________________ Policy No.: ______________________________ Group No

  4. Comparing and Contrasting Health and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    / private partnership Institutional Change In Health: · The Affordable Care Act (ACA) · The recognitionComparing and Contrasting Health and Transportation as Complex Sociotechnical Systems System: Comparing and Contrasting Health and Transportation as Complex Sociotechnical Systems Ideas about

  5. Health-Compromising Behaviors characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    , cognitive impairments, 15% of health care costs = Etoh abuse treatment, underestimate of health costsHealth-Compromising Behaviors characteristics substance abuse and dependence ­ opponent process theory ­ incentive salience ­ frontal executive effects alcohol abuse and dependence smoking #12

  6. Human Resources & Rebecca Leinen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    Division Construction Services & Contract Administration Health System Physical Plant John R. Rainey Chief

  7. Human Resources & Rebecca Leinen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    Systems Division Construction Services & Contract Administration Health System Physical Plant John R

  8. Headquarters Occupational Safety and Health Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    To implement the Occupational Safety and Health Program for Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters employees as an element of the DOE Integrated Safety Management System. Cancels: HQ 3790.2A. Canceled by DOE O 251.91. This directive was reviewed and certified as current and necessary by Bruce M. Carnes, Director, Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/Chief Financial Officer, 9/18/02. Canceled by DOE N 251.91.

  9. IPCC Makes Climate A Human Rights Issue | newmatilda.com https://newmatilda.com/2014/04/01/ipcc-makes-climate-human-rights-issue[2/04/2014 10:05:17 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    -human-rights-issue[2/04/2014 10:05:17 AM] Climate change is an issue for public health, law, poverty and even human Phelan The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has published its latest report upon the impacts of global warming, highlighting the pernicious impact of climate change upon public health, well

  10. Simulations of long-term health risk from shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, C.A.; Fields, D.E.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRESTO (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) is a computer code developed under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funding to evaluate possible health effects from shallow land burial of low-level radioactive wastes. The model is intended to assess radionuclide transport, ensuing exposure, and health impact to a static local population for up to 1000 years following the end of burial operations. Human exposure scenarios that may be considered by model include normal releases (including leaching and operational spillage), human intrusion, and near site farming. Pathways and processes of transit from the trench to an individual or population include:groundwater transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, resuspension, atmospheric transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, resuspension, atmospheric transport, deposition, inhalation, and ingestion of contaminated beef, milk, crops, and water. Off-site population and individual doses and cancer risks may be calculated as well as doses and risks to the intruder and farmer. Data have been compiled for three extant shallow land burial sites: Barnwell, South Carolina; Beatty, Nevada; and West Valley, New York. Some simulation results for the Barnwell site are presented. 13 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Development of human brain connectivity in health and disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colby, John Benjamin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jones D. K. , Klein J. C. , Bartsch A. J. , and Behrens T.D.K. , Klein, J.C. , Bartsch, A.J. , Behrens, T.E.J. , 2007.

  12. Correlation and climate sensitivity of human health and environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to and integrated with climate forecasts. This presentation will provide a template for how other tribal communities can use these methods to assist with climate change adaptation....

  13. Development of human brain connectivity in health and disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colby, John Benjamin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were acquired on a 1.5 T Siemens Sonata MRI scanner with sixare being collected on a Siemens Trio 3 Tesla scanner at theacquired on a 1.5 Tesla Siemens Sonata MRI scanner. Three

  14. Development of human brain connectivity in health and disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colby, John Benjamin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CT) often imposed some modest risk of harm to the subject (brain size have shown a modest but reproducible correlationects were isolated to only modest regions of the brainstem,

  15. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Life-cycle assessment of coal fly ash disposal: Influence ofto the case of coal fly ash disposal. The influence ofLife-cycle assessment of coal fly ash disposal: Influence of

  16. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    05 1.0E-04 1) Disposal in landfill or lagoon 1.5E-04 2 . 0Disposal of fly ash in landfill or lagoon (based on ChapterTrain Inert material landfill, infrastructure Inert material

  17. Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, Erica Dawn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk assessment procedures for mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present a problem due to the lack of available potency and toxicity data on mixtures and individual compounds. This study examines the toxicity of parent compound...

  18. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    leads to a change in the energy mix, energy efficiency,production. Concerning the energy mix, and especially thesensitive to either the energy mix or to the transportation

  19. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global warming Non-renewable energy Mineral extraction ResourcesGlobal warming Acidification Nutrification Ecotoxicity Land use & habitat losses Species & organism dispersal Natural resources: - minerals -

  20. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    environmental impacts are due to the energy-intensive production of Portland cement. Using coalimpacts of the coal-fired power plants. The potential environmental

  1. Bioanalysis of Pteroyl Derivatives in Various Aspects of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Haandel, Leon

    2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes the development of bioanalytical strategies for a group of experimental and known therapeutic agents and chemically related essential substances. The array of analytes include the antifolate ...

  2. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mexico mix) Electricity (UCTE (i.e. , Western Europe) mix) Electricity (California mix) Electricity (natural gas) Electricity (coal)

  3. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Society Bull 72(10), 77 – 81. Marceau ML, Gajda J, Van GreemIllinois, USA. Nisbet MA, Marceau ML, VanGreem M (2002).Society Bull 72(10), 77-81. Marceau ML, Gajda J, VanGreem

  4. Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Affairs 11-14-14JonathanElkind FT HFA.pdf More Documents & Publications Bioenergy for Sustainable Development Deliverables from U.S.-Africa Energy Ministerial 2014 Draft Agenda...

  5. Development of human brain connectivity in health and disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colby, John Benjamin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) often imposedthan ultra- sound, X-Ray, CT, or PET, but also does so in a

  6. Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, Erica Dawn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has delineated a set of rules for naming PAH compounds. There are only a select number of compounds that are given trivial names such as fluorene, chrysene, and pyrene (Figure 1). The numbering system is determined... 154.2 3.98 (3.66) NC Fluorene 166.2 800 4.18 (3.86) NC Anthracene 178.2 59 2.4x 10 -4 4.5 (4.15) NC Phenanthrene 178.2 435 6.8x 10 -4 4.46 (4.15) NC 2-Methylanthracene 192.3 21.3 4.77 NC 9-Methylphenanthrene 192.3 261 4.77 NC 1...

  7. Extreme weather-water-food linkage: Impact on human health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    and other precipitation, changing temperatures, and melting of summer ice caps are already occurring that predominantly affect people in developing world, and therefore, are perceived as less relevant to more developed & Adaptation in Ohio, Byrd Polar Research Center, May 15, 2014 #12;5/16/2014 5 Climate change directly affects

  8. Development of human brain connectivity in health and disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colby, John Benjamin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    label map (B) matching regions of the grid to differentmap method (2-dimensional): Euclidean distances are calculated from each point on a grid

  9. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    therefore stack emissions of coal power plant have the samecaused by stack emissions of the coal-power plant. Thiscoal power-plants generally involve high-stack emissions).

  10. Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:WhetherNovember 13, 2009Oak Ridge NationalBackgroundDr.ofBefore

  11. Human Health Risk & Environmental Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault SignInstituteDOE Origins Resources

  12. Business Affairs Environmental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Dapeng Oliver

    Business Affairs Environmental Health & Safety Dive Safety Facility/Fire Safety/ Building Codes Radiation Control & Radiological Services Occupational Safety/ Industrial Hygiene Risk Management IFAS Facility Safety Indoor Air Quality Industrial Hygiene Hearing Conservation OSHA Safety Underground

  13. Data driven health system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen Ceruolo, Melissa Beth

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective use of data is believed to be the key to address systemic inefficiencies in health innovation and delivery, and to significantly enhance value creation for patients and all stakeholders. However, there is no ...

  14. Essays on health economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafrin, Jason T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Quarterly Journal of Economics Davidson SM, Manheim LM,The Quarterly Journal of Economics 84(3): 488-500. Atella V,data. Journal of Health Economics 27(3): 770-785. Averett S

  15. Health & Medicine Heart Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    See Also: Health & Medicine Heart Disease· Medical Imaging· Vioxx· Matter & Energy Electronics· Technology· Medical Technology· Reference Artificial heart· Biosensor· Circuit design· Machine· Science and stretchable electronics can map waves of electrical activity in the heart with better resolution and speed

  16. Udaipur Health Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhijit Banerjee

    2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This data set contains data on the health histories of, and access to healthcare facilities for, individuals located in the Udaipur districts of Rajasthan, India. Data was collected at the household level, as well as at ...

  17. HEALTH SCIENCES POSTGRADUATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    methodology to derive research outcomes will include collaboration with clinical, biomedical sciences and Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. CHIRI adopts a multidisciplinary approach to research in these key areas synthesis and transfer. Key areas include patient safety and health outcomes, pharmacoepidemiology

  18. Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies -Health Sciences Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies - Health Sciences ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-IHS-HLSC] College Updated: 14-May-13/JS This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major Elective (upper division) 3 See note 3 on page 3 #12;Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies - Health Sciences

  19. Public Health Genomics Population Health Sciences 650 Section 023

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Public Health Genomics Population Health Sciences 650 Section 023 Summer 2009, 07/20/09 ­ 07: Public health genomics is a new discipline that uses knowledge gained from genetic and molecular research and the social sciences, and much more. This course will provide 1) an introduction to public health genomics, 2

  20. Health Sciences Allied health professionals change lives every day.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    an integral role in health care. #12;We are the University of Kentucky College of Health Sciences. We are committed to a brighter tomorrow. Together, we can solve the greatest health care challenges of our time-needed medical attention and care. They open their eyes to alternatives in health care and they realize

  1. Eat your way to better health Quality health plans & benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    Eat your way to better health Quality health plans & benefits Healthier living Financial well-being Intelligent solutions Good food is the key to good health If we ate a variety of healthy foods and didn't eat oils. Or those found in olive, canola and peanut oils. They can help improve your health when you use

  2. Rural Health Option The Rural Health Option requires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Rural Health Option The Rural Health Option requires: Membership in StORM Club, the Students include up to 3 sites/3physician-mentors Enrollment into BOTH rural health electives for a total of 2.sumner@okstate.edu) o Spring: Perspectives in Rural Health for OMSI or OMSII (or OMSIII with special permission) CLME

  3. J Occup Health 2003; 45: 382391 Occupational Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    J Occup Health 2003; 45: 382­391 Journal of Occupational Health Relationships of Job and Some National Institute for Health and Medical Research (Inserm), U 420, IFR25-RFRH, Réseau Fédératif de disorders. (J Occup Health 2003; 45: 382­391) Key words: Occupational injury, Job, Sex, Age, Overweight

  4. Johns Hopkins individualized Health Initiative Hopkins inHealth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    ;$2,593,644,000,000 #12;#12;#12;Why is U.S. health care so much more "expensive" but not more effective than in most OECD disease? #12;Older? #12;McKinsey Global Institute. 2008. Accounting for the costs of US health care: A newJohns Hopkins individualized Health Initiative Hopkins inHealth Scott L. Zeger Professor

  5. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES Managed Health Care (CMHC) shall ensure that newly admitted inmates to Connecticut Department include, but is not limited to, emergency health care, sick call, access to medication, dental and mental

  6. University of Florida College of Public Health & Health Professions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    -3930 Email: gatoreng@ufl.edu Office hours: TBD Course Overview Health care is provided by or through health on the access, quality, safety, and cost of health care. In this course we will review and apply the major "macro" theoretical perspectives to the study of health care organizations. Particular attention is given

  7. Human Capital Accountability Program--Withdrawn

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Withdrawn 3-26-14. The purpose of maintaining and updating this directive is to (1) Ensure compliance with applicable laws, regulations, and other directives. (2) Reduce the risk of DOE losing any of its personnel authorities. (3) Incorporate functional accountability to ensure that Human Resource Directors' position descriptions and classifications are appropriate, selections result in quality leadership with skills needed, and performance plans and evaluations are consistent with Department and Administration human resources priorities and audit findings.

  8. Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Qualitative risk evaluation for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a risk evaluation of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities on the Hanford Site. Also included are the related data that were compiled by the risk evaluation team during investigations performed on the facilities. Results are the product of a major effort performed in fiscal year 1993 to produce qualitative information that characterizes certain risks associated with these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km{sup 2} (570-mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30-km (20 mi) southeast of the 200 Area. During walkdown investigations of these facilities, data on real and potential hazards that threatened human health or safety or created potential environmental release issues were identified by the risk evaluation team. Using these findings, the team categorized the identified hazards by facility and evaluated the risk associated with each hazard. The factors contributing to each risk, and the consequence and likelihood of harm associated with each hazard also are included in this evaluation.

  9. Health Care at the Crossroads: Health Experiences and Perceived Health Access Among Emancipated Foster Youth in Alameda County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Anika A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    care, mental health services, substance abuse treatment, andcare, mental health and substance abuse services, treatment

  10. Human-machine interactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM); Abbott, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Brannon, Nathan G. (Albuquerque, NM); Bernard, Michael L. (Tijeras, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  11. University of Connecticut Health Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    the original documentation made by _____________________ (enter name of health care provider) accurately HCH-1352 Eff. 4/03 Rev. 11/10, 4/11, 6/12, 10/12, 12/13, 3/14 Page 2 of 2 NCR HEALTH CARE PRACTITIONERUniversity of Connecticut Health Center (Patient Identification) REQUEST FOR AMENDMENT OF HEALTH

  12. University of Connecticut Health Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    ; not working in the health care field; > 15mm induration. b. High Risk: Health Care workers or those with risk or other congregate settings, health care workers, children younger than 4 years of age, and highUniversity of Connecticut Health Center John Dempsey Hospital Department of Nursing (Patient

  13. Health Communication Master of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    » CommunicateHealth, Inc. » Health Care For All » Consumer Reports » Students Against Destructive DecisionsHealth Communication Master of Science Shaping innovatorS and leaderS "I chose Tufts for its visibility as a leader in innovation and health and its connection to a top tier medical school. I emerged

  14. Davison Health Center Price List*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    student account. Please see a Health Center representative for more information. Under the Affordable CareDavison Health Center Price List* Beginning Fall 2013, visits and most services to the Health Act, many of the immunizations and lab tests below are covered by insurance (sexual health testing

  15. School of Public Health ADMINISTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    career in health services organizations such as hospitals, community-based ambulatory care centers, man aged care plans, the health supply chain, and long-term care providers. These students will receiveSchool of Public Health HEALTHCARE ADMINISTRATION Mailing Address: MHA Program Division of Health

  16. Health Care Basics: Choosing the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    ;Health Care Basics 3 · Sickle Cell Anemia · HIV/AIDS(chroniccondition) · Low Back problems (chronic

  17. open access journal Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    open access journal Journal of Public Health in AfricaeISSN 2038-9930 i www the Journal of Public Health in Africa is a peer-reviewed, electronic quarterly, that focuses on health issues in the African continent. The journal editors seek high quality original articles on public health related issues

  18. Health Coaching - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanford LEED&soilASTI-SORTIHealth &Coaching Health

  19. Health Maintenance Exam - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanford LEED&soilASTI-SORTIHealthHealth

  20. Columbia College and Columbia Engineering Premedical Advisory Committee Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    1 Columbia College and Columbia Engineering Premedical Advisory Committee Evaluation Guidelines .....................................................................................................................................................13 Guidelines for Recommendation Letters for Pre-Health Students your request is received, you will be asked to confirm it. This is a security measure to ensure