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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Human Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Health Print E-mail Climate change can have a number of direct and indirect effects on human health. For example, rising temperatures can contribute to the number of deaths...

2

Ocean Health and Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. 2002. Indicators of ocean health and human health:Nature 423:280–283. Oceans and Human Health Act. 2003. S.Editorial Guest Editorial Ocean Health and Human Health

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 20 Effects of Dietary Fatty Acids on Human Microbes: Role in Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 20 Effects of Dietary Fatty Acids on Human Microbes: Role in Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadab

4

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 13 Effect of Feeding and Then Depleteing a High Fruit and Vegetable Diet on Oxidizability in Human Serum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 13 Effect of Feeding and Then Depleteing a High Fruit and Vegetable Diet on Oxidizability in Human Serum Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - B

5

Link Climate Change and Human Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Make Our Science Accessible Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally Link Climate Change and Human Health Print E-mail Health News Check out the latest climate change and human health news and announcements in our Health News Feed. Climate change poses unique challenges to human health. Unlike health threats caused by a particular toxin or disease pathogen, there are many ways that climate change can lead to potentially harmful health effects. Direct health impacts may include increased illnesses and deaths from extreme heat events, injuries and deaths from extreme weather events, and respiratory illnesses due to changes in air quality Indirect health impacts include illnesses and deaths that may arise from

6

The potential human health effect(s) of the metal uranium in the environment. Report on the known human health effects associated with the exposure to the metal uranium  

SciTech Connect

Concern over the levels of the metal uranium in the environment as a result of industrial activities has been expressed by several Federal and State agencies. This concern is associated with potential human health effects of this metal on kidney function and bone formation. Although limits for the Metal uranium in the environment remain to be set, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently in the process of establishing guidance limits for this metal in water and soil. These limits will be established for both the metal and the associated radioactivity. The suggested limits currently being considered for water and soil are, 20 pCi/liter and 10 pCi/gram wet weight, respectively. For naturally occurring uranium EPA assumes that 1 ug of uranium metal equals 0.67 pCi at equilibrium (i.e. at equilibrium the mass ratio of {sup 234}uranium to {sup 238}uranium is small but their activities are equal). Thus the limits for water and soil on weight basis for the uranium metal would be 30 ug/liter and 15 ug/gram wet weight, respectively. These limits are being established based on the potential increase in cancer death in populations that exceed this limit. Since there does not appear to be a significant correlation between cancer deaths and.uranium metal exposure (see discussion below), these limits will probably be established based on the known association between radionuclides exposure and cancer deaths. The exposure limits for other health effects such as kidney damage and retardation in bone formation apparently are not being considered by EPA.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES DATE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES DATE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH ANIMAL HEALTH AND SHIPPING CERTIFICATE Health The animals described hereon have been examined and found on visual observation. Unless otherwise stated, no laboratory tests have been performed. I hereby certify

Bandettini, Peter A.

8

Depleted Uranium Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Discussion of health effects of external exposure, ingestion, and inhalation of depleted uranium. Depleted uranium is not a significant health hazard unless it is taken into the body. External exposure to radiation from depleted uranium is generally not a major concern because the alpha particles emitted by its isotopes travel only a few centimeters in air or can be stopped by a sheet of paper. Also, the uranium-235 that remains in depleted uranium emits only a small amount of low-energy gamma radiation. However, if allowed to enter the body, depleted uranium, like natural uranium, has the potential for both chemical and radiological toxicity with the two important target organs

9

Radiation effects on humans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

10

Human health implications of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Environmental problems consist of the release of noncondensable gases and vapors, disposal of saline fluids, possible land subsidence and enhanced seismicity, noise, accidents such as well blowouts, and socioeconomic impacts. The most important issue related to human health is believed to be the emission of noncondensable gases, including hydrogen sulfide, mercury, and radon. Based upon data at The Geysers, California, Power Plant, emissions of mercury and radon are not large enough to result in concerns for human health. Hydrogen sulfide emissions, however, have resulted in complaints of odor annoyance and health impairment. These complaints have been caused by exposure to levels of up to approximately 0.1 ppmv in ambient air. This is above the California standard of 0.03 ppmv. Achievement of this standard may not eliminate annoyance complaints, as the odor detection threshold is lognormally distributed and about 20% of the population can detect hydrogen sulfide at levels of 0.002 ppmv. Abatement systems for hydrogen sulfide have been utilized at The Geysers since 1975. This has resulted in an increase of occupational illness caused by exposure to the abatement chemicals and wastes. More effective, and hopefully safer, abatement systems are now being tested. Occupational hazards are evaluated; the more significant ones are exposure to toxic chemicals and hazardous materials and noise. Available occupational illness data are summarized; there clearly indicate that the most significant cause of illness has been exposure to the chemicals and wastes associated with hydrogen sulfide abatement.

Anspaugh, L.R.; Hahn, J.L.

1979-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

11

(. 4 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH &..HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~..""~ "+" ~. (. 4 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH &..HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service ~,~..Health Bethesda, Maryland 20892 January 18, 1995 TO: Addressees FROM: Deputy Director for Intramural Research SUBJECT: Disposition of Laboratory Animals There was an incident over

Bandettini, Peter A.

12

Fish, Omega 3 and Human Health, 2nd Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second edition of Fish, Omega-3 and Human Health reaffirms that the essential fatty acids in the foods we eat form hormones that have powerful effects on human life. While many find it hard to believe that a simple change of diet can affect so many asp

13

Contaminants, Water and Human Health: New Lessons from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminants, Water and Human Health: New Lessons from Alligators. Purpose: Many chemicals introduced into the environment ...

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human Health Print E-mail National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human Health Print E-mail National Institutes of Health Research Portfolio Monday, April 22, 2013 Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program What are the potential effects of global climate change on human health? This is a question that a growing number of federally funded studies seek to answer. A new analysis recently published in the journal, Environmental Health Perspectives, looks at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) research portfolio on climate change and human health. Climate change is affecting human health through environmental consequences, such as sea-level rise, changes in precipitation, heat waves, changes in intensity of hurricanes and storms, and degraded air quality, according to the World Health Organization and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

15

Health Information Technology (IT), Human Factor Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on a research program aimed at developing human factors guidelines for ... technical guidelines will help support safe, effective, error-free EHR use ...

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

16

NETL: Health Effects - Source Contributions to PM Health Effects...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Contributions to PM Health Effects: DOE Office of Fossil Energy Analysis DOE's Division of Planning and Environmental Analysis, within its Office of Fossil Energy, Office of...

17

CO2 Health Effects in Wildlife Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impetus for this project is the possible development of large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, transport, and storage (CCS) sites that have the potential to release CO2 into the environment and cause adverse health effects. The purpose of this project is to obtain information from the scientific literature on the effects of CO2 exposure in wildlife animal species. This report, along with previously documented information on the effects of CO2 in humans, laboratory animals, and domesticated animals...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

18

College of Health, Education, and Human Development DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; and the Outdoor Laboratory. Collaboration within the col- lege between academics and community outreach services98 College of Health, Education, and Human Development 98 COLLEGE OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT The College of Health, Education, and Human Development provides students the means by which

Stuart, Steven J.

19

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health examination, order laboratory tests (primarily blood tests), and recommend any other tests that seem

20

Clean Slate transportation and human health risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

Public concern regarding activities involving radioactive material generally focuses on the human health risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation. This report describes the results of a risk analysis conducted to evaluate risk for excavation, handling, and transport of soil contaminated with transuranics at the Clean Slate sites. Transportation risks were estimated for public transport routes from the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to the Envirocore disposal facility or to the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for both radiological risk and risk due to traffic accidents. Human health risks were evaluated for occupational and radiation-related health effects to workers. This report was generated to respond to this public concern, to provide an evaluation of the risk, and to assess feasibility of transport of the contaminated soil for disposal.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Influence of the greenhouse effect on human health through stratospheric cooling: Possible increase in acquired immunodeficient syndrome  

SciTech Connect

The greenhouse effect cools the stratosphere and increases formation of PSC (polar stratospheric cloud) in polar regions and enhances ozone depletion. If the enhanced ozone depletion diffused to lower latitudes, it could increase ultraviolet radiation (UV), which might increase acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Epidemiological studies are made to test this hypothesis. The relation between AIDS prevalence R and latitude {theta}. Comparison of analyses shows that R of Caucasians would be higher than Non-Caucasians at the same {theta}. These trends are similar to those of skin cancers known to be caused by UV. In developing countries poverty, malnutrition, etc., could cause high R, and since most developing countries are located at low {theta}, the low {theta} increase may be due to these factors. However if so in Africa they are about the same and the low {theta} increase would disappear, but data on African countries also show the low {theta} increase and the significant correlation. Some countries at low {theta} have low R, probably because HIV is not prevalent for them. Then the upper envelope of the distribution of R would be cases when HIV is prevalent and UV is most effective. Therefore analyses are repeated using maxima of R within intervals of {theta} of 1, 3 and 5{degree}. In all cases the low {theta} increase and the correlation becomes more significant. These results support the hypothesis that AIDS is promoted by UV.

Okamoto, Kazuto; Tsushima, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Shin [Toyo Gakuen Univ. Chiba (Japan)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

~+.,..;.. '1I.Ylcrl.~ (!DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INSTITUTES OF HEALTH ......SERVICE DELIVERY: Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare in compliance with the Public Health Service (PHS) Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (Policy~+.,..;.. '1I.Ylcrl.~ (!DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE NATIONAL

Oliver, Douglas L.

23

Health Effects for Boron and Borates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boron occurs in varying concentrations in coal fly ash and is typically found in fly ash leachates. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is in the process of performing a risk assessment to determine safe levels of boron for human ingestion. This report describes existing information on the health effects of boron and how that information is being used to calculate a reference dose (RfD) and acceptable concentration in drinking water.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

24

Human Health Risk & Environmental Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to examine the interplay between human health and environmental risks associated with energy production, hazardous waste, national security and natural disasters. Research...

25

Oakland University Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Oakland University Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pump Systems Project Type Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal...

26

( / ....V'(II.', DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERViCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERViCE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH' SERVICE DELIVERY: FOR EXPRESS MAIL Office of Laboratory Anim~1 Welfare Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare Service (PHS) Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (Policy), as revised August 2002. Your

Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

27

Healthful LipidsChapter 12 CLA Sources and Human Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthful Lipids Chapter 12 CLA Sources and Human Studies Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press BE8A2AF8640552A5AF80E9DF60E25D15 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf ...

28

Health Effects of CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents results of a project to identify and quantify toxic effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) in living organisms. The overall goal is to develop concentration and time-dependent profiles of CO2 toxicity in a variety of organisms. This project phase was designed to develop exposure-effect profiles for humans and nonhuman mammals and to identify the availability of information for other species.

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Putting climate change and human health science into practice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Putting climate change and human health science into practice Print E-mail Putting climate change and human health science into practice Print E-mail Landsat Data Continuity Mission Tuesday, March 26, 2013 Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program For the first time, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) formally brought together their grantees working on climate change and human health, to share their research findings and discuss practical strategies for implementing this knowledge. "The goal of this meeting was for grantees to share latest advances, as well as for participants to network with each other to build new relationships and plant the seeds for future collaborations toward solving one of the most critical public health issues facing our world," said Caroline Dilworth, Ph.D., NIEHS health scientist administrator.

30

Bioscience & Health Homeland Security/Forensics/Human ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... vehicle Experts Recommend Measures to Reduce Human Error in Fingerprint Analysis. 13DO003_oles_fingerprintmap_CS ...

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

31

Putting climate change and human health science into practice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Putting climate change and human health science into practice Print E-mail Landsat Data Continuity Mission Tuesday, March 26, 2013 Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global...

32

Impacts of Particulate Matter on Human Health: An Updated Summary of EPRI Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hundreds of toxicological and epidemiological studies have been conducted over the past 20 years to better understand the effects of particulate matter (PM), and air pollution in general, on human health. Examples of environmental regulations and policies driven by these health concerns include the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), as well as State Implementation Plans (SIPs) and multi-pollutant control legislation. EPRI's PM/Health Research Program...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

33

other hospital U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There's no other hospital like it U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES · National the laboratory into better health and health care has been the Clinical Center's focus since the facility Institutes of Health 2008D I R E C T O R ' S A N N U A L R E P O R T · N I H C L I N I C A L C E N T E R P R

34

Human health issues for plutonium inhalation: Perspectives from laboratory animal studies  

SciTech Connect

Since the first production of plutonium in the 1940s, potential health effects from plutonium have been a concern for humans. The few people exposed to plutonium and the relatively small intakes that have occurred, at least in the Western world, have resulted in very little direct information from human population studies. The Manhattan Project workers have been followed for decades, and few health effects have been observed. The situation is similar for the population of workers at the Rocky Flats facility. Some information is now being released from the former Soviet Union on selected worker populations who show biological effects, primarily pulmonary fibrosis and some increase in lung cancers.

Muggenburg, B.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Guilmette, R.A. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Indoor air and human health: major indoor air pollutants and their health implications  

SciTech Connect

This publication is a collection of abstracts of papers presented at the Indoor Air and Human Health symposium. Session titles include: Radon, Microorganisms, Passive Cigarette Smoke, Combustion Products, Organics, and Panel and Audience Discussion.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Solid waste management and health effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This report investigates possible health effects due to improper disposal of waste and the awareness within a community. The aim was also to investigate… (more)

Selin, Emma

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 7 Nutritional and Hematological Effects of Flaxseed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 7 Nutritional and Hematological Effects of Flaxseed Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

38

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 24 Effects of Feeding Flaxseed to Pigs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 24 Effects of Feeding Flaxseed to Pigs Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadabl

39

The Environmental Science and Health Effects Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Environmental Science and Health Effect Program is to conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources.

Michael Gurevich; Doug Lawson; Joe Mauderly

2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

40

Impact evaluation of electrical equipments on human health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectives of study: - Measure of the electric and magnetic field from electric power station: Darste - Brasov, Lacu Sarat-Braila, Bradu-Arges; - Evaluation of human health from electric power station: Darste - Brasov, Lacu Sarat-Braila, Bradu-Arges; ... Keywords: electric and megnetic field, electric power stations, melatonin

Alice Raducanu; Aurica Suvergel; Angela Stanca; Marin Stefan; Cornella Marcolt; Corneliu Neagu

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Health Effects of Inhalation of Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the potential human health effects of inhaled coal combustion products (CCPs), which consist of fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) products. The focus is on as-managed CCPs, with evaluation of the potential effects of exposure through fugitive emissions from storage facilities. Because the literature pertaining to bottom ash, boiler slag, and FGD solids is scarce, this review draws almost entirely from studies of fly ash as a surrogate particulate ma...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

42

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Map Click on a Project Name to Get More Information Click to read a DOE TechLine [PDF-22KB] describing three new projects that will improve our current understanding of the link between power plant emissions, PM2.5, and human health. The Health Effects component of NETL's Air Quality Research Program is designed to enhance the body of scientific evidence relating stack emissions from coal plants to adverse health effects resulting from human exposures to air pollution. Despite the fact that coal plants emit significant amounts of PM2.5 and mercury to the atmosphere, there is currently a great deal of uncertainty regarding the actual amount of health damage resulting from these emissions. In order to devise cost-effective

43

Potential Health Effects of Marcellus Shale Activities: The Need for Public  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. #12;Implications of the Gulf Oil Spill to Marcellus Shale Activities - Environmental and human health salt (Proprietary) 10.0 - 30.0% #12;Implications of the Gulf Oil Spill to Marcellus Shale ActivitiesPotential Health Effects of Marcellus Shale Activities: The Need for Public Health Surveillance

Sibille, Etienne

44

Health Effects Review of Asbestos Substitutes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concern about the possible health effects of asbestos on the general population and the workplace has stimulated interest in the manufacture and use of other natural and man-made fibers. This report summarizes information available through July 21, 1993, on the health effects--carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic--of exposure to these fibers, including glass fibers, rockwool and slagwool, refractory ceramic fibers, calcium silicate, and perlite.

1994-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

45

Human Resources for Health BioMed Central Commentary Public health workforce: challenges and policy issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL. This paper reviews the challenges facing the public health workforce in developing countries and the main policy issues that must be addressed in order to strengthen the public health workforce. The public health workforce is diverse and includes all those whose prime responsibility is the provision of core public health activities, irrespective of their organizational base. Although the public health workforce is central to the performance of health systems, very little is known about its composition, training or performance. The key policy question is: Should governments invest more in building and supporting the public health workforce and infrastructure to ensure the more effective functioning of health systems? Other questions concern: the nature of the public health workforce, including its size, composition, skills, training needs, current functions and performance; the appropriate roles of the workforce; and how the workforce can be strengthened to support new approaches to priority health problems. The available evidence to shed light on these policy issues is limited. The World Health Organization is supporting the development of evidence to inform discussion on the best

Robert Beaglehole; Mario R Dal Poz; Robert Beaglehole; Mario R Dal Poz

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Health Effects Associated with Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hexafluoride (UF6) UF6 Health Effects Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) line line Properties of UF6 UF6 Health Effects Health Effects Associated with Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) Uranium...

47

Fish, Omega 3 and Human Health, 2nd EditionChapter 12 Maps and the Unknown  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish, Omega 3 and Human Health, 2nd Edition Chapter 12 Maps and the Unknown Health Omega 3 eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Nutrition Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 12 Maps and the Unknown from the

48

Healthful LipidsChapter 25 Lipids in Infant Formulas and Human Milk Fat Substitutes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthful Lipids Chapter 25 Lipids in Infant Formulas and Human Milk Fat Substitutes Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 25 Lipids in

49

Fish, Omega 3 and Human Health, 2nd EditionChapter 16 Pathways to Leukotrienes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish, Omega 3 and Human Health, 2nd Edition Chapter 16 Pathways to Leukotrienes Health Omega 3 eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Nutrition Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 15 Prostaglandin Formation F

50

Some proves of integrated influence of geomagnetic activity and weather changes on human health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our environment includes many factors, and each person on the Earth is permanently influenced by two of them: weather and magnetic field. It was found in the works of many investigators that the weather changes correlate with human health state. In the same time, disturbances of geomagnetic field (as one of the space weather manifestations) may influence bioobjects, including people. In this work we demonstrate the cumulative effect of different external factors (space weather and meteorological weather parameters) on human health on the base of medical experimental data (blood pressure and heart rate data rows for 86 people). It is shown that inclusion both solar-geomagnetic and weather parameters in simulation process give adjusting mixed parameter, which correlates with health state significantly better, than separated environmental parameters do.

Khabarova, O V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Health effects of coal technologies: research needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this 1977 Environmental Message, President Carter directed the establishment of a joint program to identify the health and environmental problems associated with advanced energy technologies and to review the adequacy of present research programs. In response to the President's directive, representatives of three agencies formed the Federal Interagency Committee on the Health and Environmental Effects of Energy Technologies. This report was prepared by the Health Effects Working Group on Coal Technologies for the Committee. In this report, the major health-related problems associated with conventional coal mining, storage, transportation, and combustion, and with chemical coal cleaning, in situ gasification, fluidized bed combustion, magnetohydrodynamic combustion, cocombustion of coal-oil mixtures, and cocombustion of coal with municipal solid waste are identified. The report also contains recommended research required to address the identified problems.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Health and Ecological Effects of Selenium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selenium is a naturally occurring element that can be found at background levels in food, soil, and water. It is also present in coal combustion products (CCPs) and CCP leachate. While selenium is essential to human and animal life, it has the potential to cause toxicity to humans and other organisms above a certain threshold level. This report summarizes the adverse human and ecological effects that can potentially occur from overexposure to selenium and the levels at which the effects can occur, with p...

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

Health Effects of CO2 in Animals of Economic Importance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impetus for this project is the possible development of large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, transport, and storage (CT&S) sites that have the potential to release CO2 into the environment and cause adverse health effects. The purpose of this project is to obtain information from the scientific literature on the effects of CO2 exposure in animals of economic importance. This report, along with previously documented information on the effects of CO2 in humans and selected animals, primarily labor...

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

54

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 19 Blood Response to Caroten Supplemenataion in Humans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 19 Blood Response to Caroten Supplemenataion in Humans Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   D

55

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 6 Raman Detection of Carotenoids in Human Tissue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 6 Raman Detection of Carotenoids in Human Tissue Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   Downloa

56

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd Edition Chapter 5 The Effect of Diacylglycerols on Energy Expenditure and Substrate Utilization in Humans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd Edition Chapter 5 The Effect of Diacylglycerols on Energy Expenditure and Substrate Utilization in Humans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bioc

57

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 6 Effects of Flaxseed on Sex Hormone Metabolism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 6 Effects of Flaxseed on Sex Hormone Metabolism Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Do

58

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 17 Effect of Flaxseed on Bone Metabolism and Menopauseolism and Menopause  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 17 Effect of Flaxseed on Bone Metabolism and Menopause olism and Menopause Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

59

State of California Health and Human Services Agency California Department of Public Health APPLICATION FOR CERTIFIED COPY OF MARRIAGE RECORD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State of California ­ Health and Human Services Agency enforcement or local or state governmental agency.) I would like a Certified Informational Copy. This document will be printed with a legend on the face of the document that states

60

Evaluation of the Science in Support of Human Health Ambient Water Criteria Values for Boron Compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the available human health water quality criteria for boron and boron compounds and critically reviewed the science that results in different water quality criteria recommended by different regulatory bodies. Currently, water quality criteria for boron and boron compounds are recommended by several regulatory bodies, including EPA, the World Health Organization, Health Canada, the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, California Department of Public Health, ...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A system dynamics model for the screening-level long-term assessment of human health risks at contaminated sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the design of sustainable and cost-effective management strategies for contaminated sites, decision makers need appropriate tools, i.e. environmental decision support systems to assist them in the planning, assessment, selection and optimisation ... Keywords: Contaminated sites, EDSS, Human health risk assessment, Monitored natural attenuation, Risk-based land management, System dynamics, Uncertainty, Vensim

Ursula S. Mcknight; Michael Finkel

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk assessment procedures for mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present a problem due to the lack of available potency and toxicity data on mixtures and individual compounds. This study examines the toxicity of parent compound PAHs and binary mixtures of PAHs in order to bridge the gap between component assessment and mixture assessment. Seven pure parent compound PAHs and four binary mixtures of PAHs were examined in the Salmonella/Microsome Mutagenicity Assay, a Gap Junction Intercellular Communication (GJIC) assay and the 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase assay (EROD). These assays were chosen for their ability to measure specific toxic endpoints related to the carcinogenic process (i.e. initiation, promotion, progression). Data from these assays was used in further studies to build Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) to estimate toxic endpoints and to test the additive assumption in PAH mixtures. These QSAR models will allow for the development of bioassay based potential potencies (PPB) or toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) that are derived not only from bioassay data, but also from structure, activity, and physical/chemical properties. These models can be extended to any environmental media to evaluate risk to human health from exposures to PAHs.

Bruce, Erica Dawn

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Deputy Secretary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

name of Marine Hospital Service to the Public Health and Marine Hospital Service. Hygienic Laboratory and Marine Hospital Service renamed Public Health Service. 1921 Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever LaboratoryU.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Deputy Secretary Chief of Staff Office

Bandettini, Peter A.

64

Appendix F Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Human Health Risk Assessment Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F This appendix presents the detailed calculations used to estimate risks to human health. It includes the exposure factors, equations, abbreviations, assumptions, and references. Separate spreadsheets for ground water ingestion for the near-term and 20-year assumptio~ls have also been provided. The following spreadsheets are included in this appendix: Overview (Exposure Factors, Equations, Abbreviations, and COPCs) .......................... F-3 * Contaminant Concentrations-Near-Tern1 Ground Water Concentrations .................... F-6 Toxicity Factors ...................................... .. ............................................................ F-8 * Lower Montezuma'creek Exposure Scenario-Reasonable Maximurn Exposure ...... F-10

65

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 1 Seeking Better Dietary Fats for Human Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 1 Seeking Better Dietary Fats for Human Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 1 Seeki

66

Human effects on the global atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

This review considers whether human activities can significantly change important functions of the global atmosphere by altering the amount or distribution of certain trace species. It deals with three specific topics: stratopheric ozone, the role of species other than carbon dioxide on the greenhouse effect, and certain recently recognized atmospheric consequences of a large scale nuclear war. 64 references, 10 figures, 2 tables.

Johnston, H.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic...

68

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 16 The Effect of Antioxidants on Nicotine and Caffeine InducedChanges in Human Sperm? An in Vitro Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 16 The Effect of Antioxidants on Nicotine and Caffeine InducedChanges in Human Sperm? An in Vitro Study Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

69

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 19 Effect of Flaxseed Consumption on Male and Female Reproductive Function and Fetal Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 19 Effect of Flaxseed Consumption on Male and Female Reproductive Function and Fetal Development Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - N

70

Using Constraint Satisfaction Problem approach to solve human resource allocation problems in cooperative health services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In developing countries, the increasing utilization of health services, due to a great life expectancy, is followed by a reduction in incomes from the public health system and from private insurance companies, to the payment of medical procedures. Beyond ... Keywords: Backtracking search algorithm, Constraint Satisfaction Problem, Cooperative services, Heuristics, Human resource allocation

Cicero Ferreira Fernandes Costa Filho; Dayse Aparecida Rivera Rocha; Marly Guimarães Fernandes Costa; Wagner Coelho de Albuquerque Pereira

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Deep Atomic Binding (DAB) Approach in Interpretation of Fission Products Behavior in Human Body, and Health Consequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to models used to predict health effects of fission products enter the human body, a large number of fatalities, malignancies, thyroid cancer, born (genetic) defects,...etc.. But the actual data after Chernobyl and TMI accidents, and nuclear detonations in USA and Marshal Islands, were not consistent with these models. According to DAB, these data could be interpreted, and conflicts between former models predictions and actual field data explained. (author)

Ajlouni, Abdul-Wali M.S. [Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Amman 11814 (Jordan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy August 28, 2010 August 2010 Memorandum of Understanding between HHS and DOE regarding the authorities, responsibilities and procedures to conduc mandated activities relating to the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000. This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) serves to set forth the authorities, responsibilities, and procedures by which the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct statutorily mandated activities required to assist with claims processing

73

Worldwide health effects of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident†  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study quantifies worldwide health effects of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident on 11 March 2011. Effects are quantified with a 3-D global atmospheric model driven by emission estimates and evaluated against daily worldwide Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) measurements and observed deposition rates. Inhalation exposure, ground-level external exposure, and atmospheric external exposure pathways of radioactive iodine-131, cesium-137, and cesium-134 released from Fukushima are accounted for using a linear no-threshold (LNT) model of human exposure. Exposure due to ingestion of contaminated food and water is estimated by extrapolation. We estimate an additional 130 (15–1100) cancer-related mortalities and 180 (24–1800) cancer-related morbidities incorporating uncertainties associated with the exposure–dose and dose–response models used in the study. We also discuss the LNT model’s uncertainty at low doses. Sensitivities to emission rates, gas to particulate I-131 partitioning, and the mandatory evacuation radius around the plant are also explored, and may increase upper bound mortalities and morbidities in the ranges above to 1300 and 2500, respectively. Radiation exposure to workers at the plant is projected to result in 2 to 12 morbidities. An additional 600 mortalities have been reported due to non-radiological causes such as mandatory evacuations. Lastly, a hypothetical accident at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant in

John E. Ten Hoeve A; Mark Z. Jacobson B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Human Health Risk Assessment for Petroleum Refining Industry of the Remaining Air Toxics after MACT I Emissions Reductions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Inhalation risks on human health for hazardous air pollutants emitted from MACT I petroleum refining industry were determined using EPA HEM-3 Program. Methodology included compiling… (more)

Roa, Nadia C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Human Health Risk Assessment of Chemicals Encountered in Vegetation Management on Electric Utility Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the human health risk assessment of chemicals encountered in vegetation management on electric utility rights-of-way (ROWs).

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

76

Shift Work and Potential Health Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to inform the electric power industry of current scientific knowledge on worker health and safety risks associated with shift work in order to support future research planning. Shift work has been found to be associated with increased cancer risks8212primarily of breast cancer and (to a lesser extent) prostate and colon cancer. Risk of occupational injuries increases with several common characteristics of shift work8212particularly rotating shifts and longer shift lengths....

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Guidance on health effects of toxic chemicals. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES), and Martin Marietta Utility Services, Inc. (MMUS), are engaged in phased programs to update the safety documentation for the existing US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facilities. The safety analysis of potential toxic hazards requires a methodology for evaluating human health effects of predicted toxic exposures. This report provides a consistent set of health effects and documents toxicity estimates corresponding to these health effects for some of the more important chemicals found within MMES and MMUS. The estimates are based on published toxicity information and apply to acute exposures for an ``average`` individual. The health effects (toxicological endpoints) used in this report are (1) the detection threshold; (2) the no-observed adverse effect level; (3) the onset of irritation/reversible effects; (4) the onset of irreversible effects; and (5) a lethal exposure, defined to be the 50% lethal level. An irreversible effect is defined as a significant effect on a person`s quality of life, e.g., serious injury. Predicted consequences are evaluated on the basis of concentration and exposure time.

Foust, C.B.; Griffin, G.D.; Munro, N.B.; Socolof, M.L.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Estimated long-term health effects  

SciTech Connect

Apart from the dramatic increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed as children, there is no evidence to date of a major public health impact of the radiation exposure from the Chernobyl accident in the three most affected countries. Although some increases in the frequency of cancer in exposed populations have been reported, these results are difficult to interpret, mainly because of differences in the intensity and method of follow-up between exposed populations and the general population to which they are compared. If the experience of atomic bomb survivors and of other exposed populations is applicable, the major radiological impact of the accident will be cancer and the total lifetime numbers of excess cancers will be greatest among the liquidators and among the residents of contaminated territories, of the order of 2,000 to 2,500. These increases would be difficult to detect epidemiologically against an expected background number of 41,500 and 433,000 respectively (size of the exposed populations: 200,000 and 3,700,000, respectively). It is noted, however, that the exposures received by populations exposed as a result of Chernobyl are different (in type and pattern) from those of atomic bomb survivors. Predictions derived from these populations are therefore uncertain. Indeed, the extent of the increase in thyroid cancer incidence in persons exposed as children was not foreseen. In addition, only ten years have passed since the accident. It is essential therefore that monitoring of the health of the population be continued in order to assess the public health impact of the accident, even if, apart from leukemia among liquidators, little detectable increase of cancers due to radiation from the Chernobyl accident is expected.

Cardis, F. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France); Okeanov, A.E. [AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk (Belarus); Likthariev, I.; Prisyazhniuk [All-Union Scientific Centre of Radiation Medicine, Kiev (Ukraine); Anspaugh, L.R. [California Univ., Livermore, CA (United States) Lawrence Livermore Lab.; Mabuchi, K. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Ivanov, V.K. [MRRC of RAMS, Obninsk (Russia)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fabrication of a Miniaturized Room Temperature Ionic Liquid Gas Sensor for Human Health and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fabrication of a Miniaturized Room Temperature Ionic Liquid Gas Sensor for Human Health and Safety temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) gas sensors utilizing electrochemical instrumentation demonstrate promising that enables miniaturized, rapid response, gas sensors to be realized using RTIL interfaces on a permeable

Mason, Andrew

80

Electromagnetic field of the large power cables and impact on the human health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we survey our research on domain decomposition and related algorithms for large power electric cables and the impact on the human health. The equations that describe the behaviour of the fields in electromagnetic devices are coupled because ... Keywords: bioheat equation, coupled fields, electrical cables, finite element method

Daniela Cârstea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Benzo(C)fluorine, PAH with possible human health implications. (To BAP or  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benzo(C)fluorine, PAH with possible human health implications. (To BAP or Benzo(C)fluorine, PAH with possible human health implications. (To BAP or not to BAP) Speaker(s): Larry Goldstein Date: November 7, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants with potential health consequences. Essentially all the cancer risk from exposure to coal tar, cigarette smoke and other products of incomplete combustion is thought to reflect the contributions of PAHs with 4 or more fused rings. In risk assessment as currently practiced the major contributor to overall risk is the 5-ring PAH benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P).However, recent studies using a lifetime feeding protocol indicate that B(a)P does not meet criteria for application to risk assessment since it does not induce lung tumors, the endpoint upon which risk assessments

82

BEIR-III report and the health effects of low-level radiation  

SciTech Connect

The present BEIR-III Committee has not highlighted any controversy over the health effects of low-level radiation. In its evaluation of the experimental data and epidemiological surveys, the Committee has carefully reviewed and assessed the value of all the available scientific evidence for estimating numerical risk coefficients for the health hazards to human populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. Responsible public awareness of the possible health effects of ionizing radiations from medical and industrial radiation exposure, centers on three important matters of societal concern: (1) to place into perspective the extent of harm to the health of man and his descendants to be expected in the present and in the future from those societal activities involving ionizing radiation; (2) to develop quantitative indices of harm based on dose-effect relationships; such indices could then be used with prudent caution to introduce concepts of the regulation of population doses on the basis of somatic and genetic risks; and (3) to identify the magnitude and extent of radiation activities which could cause harm, to assess their relative significance, and to provide a framework for recommendations on how to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure to human populations. The main difference of the BEIR Committee Report is not so much from new data or new interpretations of existing data, but rather from a philosophical approach and appraisal of existing and future radiation protection resulting from an atmosphere of constantly changing societal conditions and public attitudes. (PCS)

Fabrikant, J.I.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Evaluation of means used to access the impacts of energy production on human health. LASL third life sciences symposium, Los Alamos, New Mexico, October 15--17, 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The symposium explored the various techniques and methods available to study the potential effects that various energy-producing industries may have on human health. Three papers presented at Session I dealt with national energy needs, resources, and future developments; responsibilities and capabilities in ERDA as related to the health and environmental impacts of energy productions; and health hazards associated with alternate energy sources. Four papers presented at Session II reviewed standards setting for the worker and for the public; the radiation experience; and developing health policies and standards as the responsibility of the scientist. Eight papers in Sessions III and IV, Sources of Information, dealt with developing a health standard from epidemiological and clinical data and from laboratory animal data; carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, teratogenesis, and behavior changes as end points in health impact assessments; new methods and approaches to health impact assessment; problems in sampling for health impact; and the application of scientific data to worker/workplace health decision making. Two papers at Session V covered bases for the application of scientific data to health standards and health and environmental standards from a legal viewpoint. A final discussion, Room for Controversy, was conducted by four panelists. (MCW)

Anderson, E.C.; Sullivan, E.M. (eds.) [eds.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Metropolitan New York in the greenhouse: Air quality and health effects  

SciTech Connect

A variety of potential effects on human health resulting from climate change have been identified in several assessments. According to an international panel{sup 1} they include direct effects of extreme temperatures on cardiovascular deaths, secondary effects due to vector-borne diseases or crop yields, and tertiary effects such as those that might arise from conflicts over freshwater supplies. To this fist we add the secondary effects of increased air pollution, which may result either directly from climate change or indirectly from increased air conditioning loads and the corresponding pollutant emissions from electric utilities. Higher ozone concentrations have been linked to increased ambient temperatures by both theory and observations of monitoring data. A similar association with particulate matter has been limited to observations, thus far. The pollution-heat linkage has been recognized before` but health effects have not been evaluated in terms of predictions of the joint effects of both agents. This paper has been prepared in two sections. First, we discuss the ozone situation with special reference to the Northeast Corridor and New York. In the second section, we present estimates of the health effects of climate change on New York and discuss some mitigation options.

Kleinman, L.I.; Lipfert, F.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume I: Human Health Evaluation Manual Supplemental Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-921314 1-921314 OSWER DIRECTIVE: 9285.6-03 March 25, 1991 RISK ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE FOR SUPERFUND VOLUME I: HUMAN HEALTH EVALUATION MANUAL SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE "STANDARD DEFAULT EXPOSURE FACTORS" INTERIM FINAL Office of Emergency and Remedial Response Toxics Integration Branch U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. 20460 (202)475-9486 REPRODUCED BY U.S.DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE SPRINGFIELD, VA 22161 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 MAR 25 1991 S O L I D W A S T E A N D E M E R G E N C Y R E S P O N S E O F F I C E O F OSWER Directive 9285.6-03 MEMORANDUM SUBJECT: FROM: Human Health Evaluation Manual, Supplemental Guidance: TO: Director, Waste Management Division, Regions I, IV, V, & VII Director, Emergency & Remedial Response Division,

86

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 6 Dairy Products: Role in the Diet and Effects on Cardiovascular Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 6 Dairy Products: Role in the Diet and Effects on Cardiovascular Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downlo

87

Multi-Pathway Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for a Model Coal-Fired Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a multimedia human health and ecosystem risk study of a model coal-fired power plant in a model setting, using data on an actual power plant transposed to a lakeside setting in the same state.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Form Approved Through 9/30/2007 OMB No. 0925-0001 Department of Health and Human Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Form Approved Through 9/30/2007 OMB No. 0925-0001 Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Services Review Group Type Activity Grant Number Total Project Period From: Through: Requested, SERVICE, LABORATORY, OR EQUIVALENT 5. TITLE AND ADDRESS OF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICIAL 2d. MAJOR SUBDIVISION E

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

89

Form Approved Through 6/30/2012 OMB No. 0925-0001 Department of Health and Human Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Form Approved Through 6/30/2012 OMB No. 0925-0001 Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Services Grant Application Do not exceed character length restrictions indicated. LEAVE BLANK) E-MAIL ADDRESS: 3e. DEPARTMENT, SERVICE, LABORATORY, OR EQUIVALENT 3f. MAJOR SUBDIVISION 3g

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

90

Office of International Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Health Studies International Health Studies Home Mission and Functions Japan Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) Studies Marshall Islands Program Russian Health Studies Program Russian Radiobiology Human Tissue Repository Spain (Palomares) Program Health and Safety HSS Logo Office of International Health Studies Reports to the Office of Health and Safety Mission and Functions Mission The Office of International Health Studies engages in the conduct of international scientific studies that may provide new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation in the workplace or people exposed in communities as a result of nuclear accidents. The mission includes providing health and environmental monitoring services to populations specified by law.

91

Making the Case for Investments in Human Effectiveness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investments to enhance human effectiveness in complex systems are rife with several types of uncertainties, intangible benefits, multiple stakeholders, and inherent unpredictability.ï¾ ï¾ These characteristics make cost/benefit analyses for such systems ...

William B. Rouse; Kenneth R. Boff

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 26 The Opposing Effects of Dietary Omega-3 and trans Fatty Acids on Health: A Yin-Yang Effect at the Molecular Level?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 26 The Opposing Effects of Dietary Omega-3 and trans Fatty Acids on Health: A Yin-Yang Effect at the Molecular Level? Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutritio

93

HEALTH EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST: AN HEI PERSPECTIVE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel engines have many advantages, including good fuel economy, power, durability, lower emissions of some pollutants (such as carbon monoxide) and of carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas). However, there are a number of concerns that need to be addressed: (1) emissions of nitrogen oxides (which contribute to ozone formation) and of particulate matter (PM); (2) questions about cancer and other health effects from exposure to diesel PM; and (3) as efforts to decrease emissions progress, a need to understand whether the nature and toxicity of the PM emitted has changed. This paper focuses on (1) carcinogenicity data, (2) noncancer effects, and (3) diesel as part of the complex ambient mixture of PM.

Warren, Jane

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

94

Waste management programmatic environmental impact statement methodology for estimating human health risks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has produced large quantities of radioactive and hazardous waste during years of nuclear weapons production. As a result, a large number of sites across the DOE Complex have become chemically and/or radiologically contaminated. In 1990, the Secretary of Energy charged the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM) with the task of preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS should identify and assess the potential environmental impacts of implementing several integrated Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) alternatives. The determination and integration of appropriate remediation activities and sound waste management practices is vital for ensuring the diminution of adverse human health impacts during site cleanup and waste management programs. This report documents the PEIS risk assessment methodology used to evaluate human health risks posed by WM activities. The methodology presents a programmatic cradle to grave risk assessment for EM program activities. A unit dose approach is used to estimate risks posed by WM activities and is the subject of this document.

Bergenback, B. [Midwest Technical, Inc. (United States); Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Health effects associated with energy conservation measures in commercial buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indoor air quality can conceivably be impacted by hundreds of different chemicals. More than 900 different organic compounds alone have been identified in indoor air. The health effects that could potentially arise from exposure to individual pollutants or mixtures of pollutants cover the full range of acute and chronic effects, including largely reversible responses, such as rashes and irritations, as well as irreversible toxic and carcinogenic effects. These indoor contaminants are emitted from a large variety of materials and substances that are widespread components of everyday life. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a search of the peer-reviewed literature on health effects associated with indoor air contaminants for the Bonneville Power Administration to aid the agency in the preparation of environmental documents. The results of this search are reported in two volumes. Volume 1 is a summary of the results of the literature search; Volume 2 is the complete results of the literature search and contains all references to the material reviewed. 16 tabs.

Stenner, R.D.; Baechler, M.C.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Health and environmental effects document on geothermal energy: 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several of the important health and environmental risks associated with a reference geothermal industry that produces 21,000 MW/sub e/ for 30 y (equivalent to 20 x 10/sup 18/ J) are assessed. The analyses of health effects focus on the risks associated with exposure to hydrogen sulfide, particulate sulfate, benzene, mercury, and radon in air and arsenic in water. Results indicate that emissions of hydrogen sulfide are likely to cause odor-related problems in geothermal resources areas, assuming that no pollution controls are employed. For individuals living within an 80 km radius of the geothermal resources, chronic exposure to particulate sulfate could result in between 0 to 95 premature deaths per 10/sup 18/ J of electricity generated. The mean population risk of leukemia from the inhalation of benzene was calculated to be 3 x 10/sup -2/ cases per 10/sup 18/ J. Exposure to elemental mercury in the atmosphere could produce between 0 and 8.2 cases of tremors per 10/sup 18/ J of electricity. Inhalation of radon and its short-lived daughters poses a mean population risk of 4.2 x 10/sup -1/ lung cancers per 10/sup 18/ J. Analysis of skin cancer risk from the ingestion of surface water contaminated with geothermally derived arsenic suggests that a dose-response model is inconsistent with data showing that arsenic is an essential element and that excessive body burdens do not appear even when arsenic reaches 100 ..mu..g/liter in drinking water. Estimates of occupational health effects were based on rates of accidental deaths and occupational diseases in surrogate industries. According to calculations, there would be 14 accidental deaths per 10/sup 18/ J of electricity and 340 cases of occupational diseases per 10/sup 18/ J. The analysis of the effects of noncondensing gases on vegetation showed that ambient concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide are more likely to enhance rather than inhibit the growth of plants.

Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.; O'Banion, K.D.

1981-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

97

Health effects of the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island  

SciTech Connect

Between March 28 and April 15, 1979 the collective dose resulting from the radioactivity released to the population living within a 50-mile radius of the Three Mile Island nuclear plant was about 2000 person-rems, less than 1% of the annual natural background level. The average dose to a person living within 5 miles of the nuclear plant was less than 10% of annual background radiation. The maximum estimated radiation dose received by any one individual in the general population (excluding the nuclear plant workers) during the accident was 70 mrem. The doses received by the general population as a result of the accident were so small that there will be no detectable additional cases of cancer, developmental abnormalities, or genetic ill-health. Three Three Mile Island nuclear workers received radiation doses of about 3 to 4 rem, exceeding maximum permissible quarterly dose of 3 rem. The major health effect of the accident at Three Mile Island was that of a pronounced demoralizing effect on the general population in the Three Mile Island area, including teenagers and mothers of preschool children and the nuclear plant workers. However, this effect proved transient in all groups studied except the nuclear workers.

Fabrikant, J.I.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Health and Environmental Effects Document on Geothermal Energy -- 1982 update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We assess several of the important health and environmental risks associated with a reference geothermal industry that produces 21,000 MWe for 30 y (equivalent to 20 x 10{sup 18} J). The analyses of health effects focus on the risks associated with exposure to hydrogen sulfide, particulate sulfate, benzene, mercury, and radon in air and arsenic in food. Results indicate that emissions of hydrogen sulfide are likely to cause odor-related problems in 29 of 51 geothermal resources areas, assuming that no pollution controls are employed. Our best estimates and ranges of uncertainty for the health risks of chronic population exposures to atmospheric pollutants are as follows (risks expressed per 10{sup 18} J of electricity): particulate sulfate, 44 premature deaths (uncertainty range of 0 to 360); benzene, 0.15 leukemias (range of 0 to 0.51); elemental mercury, 14 muscle tremors (range of 0 to 39); and radon, 0.68 lung cancers (range of 0 to 1.8). The ultimate risk of fatal skin cancers as the result of the transfer of waste arsenic to the general population over geologic time ({approx} 100,000 y) was calculated as 41 per 10{sup 18} J. We based our estimates of occupational health effects on rates of accidental deaths together with data on occupational diseases and injuries in surrogate industries. According to our best estimates, there would be 8 accidental deaths per 10{sup 18} J of electricity, 300 cases of occupational diseases per 10{sup 18} J, and 3400 occupational injuries per 10{sup 18}J. The analysis of the effects of noncondensing gases on vegetation showed that ambient concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide are more likely to enhance rather than inhibit the growth of plants. We also studied the possible consequences of accidental releases of geothermal fluids and concluded that probably less than 5 ha of land would be affected by such releases during the production of 20 x 10{sup 18} J of electricity. Boron emitted from cooling towers in the Imperial Valley was identified as a potential source of crop damage. Our analyses, however, showed that such damage is unlikely. Finally, we examined the nonpollutant effects of land subsidence and induced seismicity. Land subsidence is possible around some facilities, but surface-related damage is not expected to be great. Induced seismic events that have occurred to date at geothermal resource areas have been nondestructive. It is not possible to predict accurately the risk of potentially destructive events, and more research is needed in this area.

Layton, David W.; Daniels, Jeffrey I.; Anspaugh, Lynn R.; O'Banion, Kerry D.

1983-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

99

UCRL-JC-1197l5 PREPRINT HUMAN HEALTH RISKS FROM TNT, RDX, and HMX  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

197l5 197l5 PREPRINT HUMAN HEALTH RISKS FROM TNT, RDX, and HMX IN ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA AND CONSIDERATION OF THE U.S. REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT Jeffrey I. Daniels John P. Knezovich This paper was pre ared for submittal to the Luxembourg, Luxembourg November 14-16,1994 Procee ap ings Demil '94 December 1994 Thisis apreprintof apaperintendedfor publicationin a journal orproceedings. Since changes may be made before publication, this preprint is made available with the understanding that it will not be cited or reproduced without the permission of the author. ~ T WSTRIBUTION OF THIS DOCUMENT tS UNLlMfTEa

100

Static magnetic fields: A summary of biological interactions, potential health effects, and exposure guidelines  

SciTech Connect

Interest in the mechanisms of interaction and the biological effects of static magnetic fields has increased significantly during the past two decades as a result of the growing number of applications of these fields in research, industry and medicine. A major stimulus for research on the bioeffects of static magnetic fields has been the effort to develop new technologies for energy production and storage that utilize intense magnetic fields (e.g., thermonuclear fusion reactors and superconducting magnet energy storage devices). Interest in the possible biological interactions and health effects of static magnetic fields has also been increased as a result of recent developments in magnetic levitation as a mode of public transportation. In addition, the rapid emergence of magnetic resonance imaging as a new clinical diagnostic procedure has, in recent years, provided a strong rationale for defining the possible biological effects of magnetic fields with high flux densities. In this review, the principal interaction mechanisms of static magnetic fields will be described, and a summary will be given of the present state of knowledge of the biological, environmental, and human health effects of these fields.

Tenforde, T.S.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment Work Plan Mud Pit Release Sites, Amchitka Island, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

This Work Plan describes the approach that will be used to conduct human health and ecological risk assessments for Amchitka Island, Alaska, which was utilized as an underground nuclear test site between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U.S. Department of Energy) conducted two nuclear tests (known as Long Shot and Milrow) and assisted the U.S. Department of Defense with a third test (known as Cannikin). Amchitka Island is approximately 42 miles long and located 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, in the western end of the Aleutian Island archipelago in a group of islands known as the Rat Islands. Historically including deep drilling operations required large volumes of drilling mud, a considerable amount of which was left on the island in exposed mud pits after testing was completed. Therefore, there is a need for drilling mud pit remediation and risk assessment of historical mud pit releases. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the constituents in soil, surface water, and sediment at these former testing sites. Its goal is the collection of data in sufficient quantity and quality to determine current site conditions, support a risk assessment for the site surfaces, and evaluate what further remedial action is required to achieve permanent closure of these three sites that will protect both human health and the environment. Suspected compounds of potential ecological concern for investigative analysis at these sites include diesel-range organics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, volatile organic compounds, and chromium. The results of these characterizations and risk assessments will be used to evaluate corrective action alternatives to include no further action, the implementation of institutional controls, capping on site, or off-sit e disposal of contaminated waste. The results of this evaluation will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

DOE /NV

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

102

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Exposures Review of phenomenon appears in Radiation Research Pamela Sykes and Benjamin Blyth One concern of radiobiologists is the effect radiation exposure might have on nearby unirradiated cells. For example, when only a small fraction of cells are directly hit by radiation energy, are the surrounding unirradiated cells also at an increased risk of cancer? The term "radiation-induced bystander effect" is used to describe radiation-induced biological changes that occur in unirradiated cells within an irradiated cell population. Radiation-induced bystander effects have become established in the vernacular and are considered as an authentic radiation response. However, there is still no consensus on a precise definition of the term, which

103

Lessons learned: Needs for improving human health risk assessment at USDOE Sites  

SciTech Connect

Realistic health risk assessments were performed in a pilot study of three U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites. These assessments, covering a broad spectrum of data and methods, were used to identify needs for improving future health risk assessments at USDOE sites. Topics receiving specific recommendations for additional research include: choice of distributions for Monte Carlo simulation; estimation of risk reduction; analysis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Database on food and nutrient intakes; investigations on effects of food processing on contaminant levels; background food and environmental concentrations of contaminants; method for handling exposures to groundwater plumes, methods for analyzing less than lifetime exposure to carcinogens; and improvement of bioaccumulation factors.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Wednesday, 28 July 2010 00:00 Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

105

WHAT GOOD IS WEALTH WITHOUT HEALTH? THE EFFECT OF HEALTH ON THE MARGINAL UTILITY OF CONSUMPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate how the marginal utility of consumption varies with health. To do so, we develop a simple model in which the impact of health on the marginal utility of consumption can be estimated from data on permanent income, ...

Finkelstein, Amy

106

NETL: Health Effects - Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Given that mercury emissions from coal power plants will almost certainly be limited by some form of national regulation or legislation, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is performing an assessment of the reduction in human health risk that may be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of mercury. The primary pathway for mercury exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to mercury exposure is the fetus. Therefore, the risk assessment focuses on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Preliminary Risk Assessment A preliminary risk assessment was conducted using a simplified approach based on three major topics: Hg emissions and deposition (emphasizing coal plants), Hg consumption through fish, and dose-response functions for Hg. Using information available from recent literature, dose response factors (DRFs) were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions.

107

Health and environmental effects of oil and gas technologies: research needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses health and environmental issues associated with oil and gas technologies as they are currently perceived - both those that exist and those that are expected to emerge over the next two decades. The various sections of this report contain discussions of specific problem areas and relevant new research activities which should be pursued. This is not an exhaustive investigation of all problem areas, but the report explores a wide range of issues to provide a comprehensive picture of existing uncertainties, trends, and other factors that should serve as the focus of future research. The problem areas of major concern include: effects of drilling fluids, offshore accidents, refineries and worker health, and biota and petroleum spills, indoor air pollution, information transfer, and unconventional resources. These are highlighted in the Executive Summary because they pose serious threats to human health and the environment, and because of the sparcity of accumulated knowledge related to their definition. Separate abstracts have been prepared for selected sections of this report for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

Brown, R. D.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Modifications of models resulting from recent reports on health effects of ionizing radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The most recent health effects models resulting from these efforts were published in two reports, NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990) and Part 2 (1989). Several major health effects reports have been published recently that may impact the health effects models presented in these reports. This addendum to the Part 2 (1989) report, provides a review of the 1986 and 1988 reports by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council BEAR 5 Committee report and Publication 60 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection as they relate to this report. The three main sections of this addendum discuss early occurring and continuing effects, late somatic effects, and genetic effects. The major changes to the NUREG/CR-4214 health effects models recommended in this addendum are for late somatic effects. These changes reflect recent changes in cancer risk factors that have come from longer followup and revised dosimetry in major studies like that on the Japanese A-bomb survivors. The results presented in this addendum should be used with the basic NUREG/CR-4214 reports listed above to obtain the most recent views on the potential health effects of radionuclides released accidentally from nuclear power plants. 48 refs., 4 figs., 24 tabs.

Abrahamson, S. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States)); Bender, M.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. (Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Gilbert, E.S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Indirect health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments  

SciTech Connect

A review of the health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments suggests that relative humidity can affect the incidence of respiratory infections and allergies. Experimental studies on airborne-transmitted infectious bacteria and viruses have shown that the survival or infectivity of these organisms is minimized by exposure to relative humidities between 40 and 70%. Nine epidemiological studies examined the relationship between the number of respiratory infections or absenteeism and the relative humidity of the office, residence, or school. The incidence of absenteeism or respiratory infections was found to be lower among people working or living in environments with mid-range versus low or high relative humidities. The indoor size of allergenic mite and fungal populations is directly dependent upon the relative humidity. Mite populations are minimized when the relative humidity is below 50% and reach a maximum size at 80% relative humidity. Most species of fungi cannot grow unless the relative humidity exceeds 60%. Relative humidity also affects the rate of offgassing of formaldehyde from indoor building materials, the rate of formation of acids and salts from sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and the rate of formation of ozone. The influence of relative humidity on the abundance of allergens, pathogens, and noxious chemicals suggests that indoor relative humidity levels should be considered as a factor of indoor air quality. The majority of adverse health effects caused by relative humidity would be minimized by maintaining indoor levels between 40 and 60%. This would require humidification during winter in areas with cold winter climates. Humidification should preferably use evaporative or steam humidifiers, as cool mist humidifiers can disseminate aerosols contaminated with allergens.

Arundel, A.V.; Sterling, E.M.; Biggin, J.H.; Sterling, T.D.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

OMB No. 0990-0115 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PHS 2013-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2013-1, Solicitation for SBIR Contract Proposals 5 1.5 REPORT FRAUD, WASTE AND ABUSE The OfficeOMB No. 0990-0115 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PHS 2013-1 SOLICITATION #12;PHS 2013-1, Solicitation for SBIR Contract Proposals ii TABLE OF CONTENTS PART I INSTRUCTIONS

Martin, Alex

111

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PHS 2013-2 OMNIBUS SOLICITATION OF THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PHS 2013-2 OMNIBUS SOLICITATION OF THE NATIONAL SUBMISSION DATES APRIL 5, AUGUST 5, AND DECEMBER 5, 2013 (MAY 7, SEPTEMBER 7, 2013 AND JANUARY 7, 2014 2013-2, Omnibus Solicitation for SBIR/STTR Grant Applications January 2013 NIH, CDC, FDA, and ACF

Baker, Chris I.

112

Health effects model for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part I. Introduction, integration, and summary. Part II. Scientific basis for health effects models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents requires models for predicting early health effects, cancers and benign thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Since the publication of the Reactor Safety Study, additional information on radiological health effects has become available. This report summarizes the efforts of a program designed to provide revised health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence modeling. The new models for early effects address four causes of mortality and nine categories of morbidity. The models for early effects are based upon two parameter Weibull functions. They permit evaluation of the influence of dose protraction and address the issue of variation in radiosensitivity among the population. The piecewise-linear dose-response models used in the Reactor Safety Study to predict cancers and thyroid nodules have been replaced by linear and linear-quadratic models. The new models reflect the most recently reported results of the follow-up of the survivors of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and permit analysis of both morbidity and mortality. The new models for genetic effects allow prediction of genetic risks in each of the first five generations after an accident and include information on the relative severity of various classes of genetic effects. The uncertainty in modeloling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of risks. An approach is outlined for summarizing the health consequences of nuclear power plant accidents. 298 refs., 9 figs., 49 tabs.

Evans, J.S.; Moeller, D.W.; Cooper, D.W.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

114

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

115

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

116

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

117

University Health Services -Routine Fees and Charges Effective July 1, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University Health Services - Routine Fees and Charges Effective July 1, 2012 Visit Fees STUDENT's Health Annual/Wellness Exam New Patient $40.00 99385 $90.00 Women's Health Annual/Wellness Exam $116.00 Yellow Fever - 0.5cc $113.00 90717 $122.00 Laboratory Fees HIV 1 + 2 $28.00 86703 $28.00 Pap

118

Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

members) Subject: Technical evaluation of “EPA’s analysis of Florida drywall samples 1 and review of analytical results from the Florida Department of Health, ” from the EPA’s National Air

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

On cost-effectiveness of human-centered and socially acceptable robot and automation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers human-centered and socially appropriate robots as well as automation systems within the context of their cost-effectiveness. Usually, the objection of system designers is that approaches for human-centered and socio-technical design ... Keywords: Cost-effective automation, Human factors, Human-centered systems, Robots, Socially appropriate automation, Socio-technical systems

Janko Cernetic

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies appropriations for 1994. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

These hearings of the HR Subcommittee on the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Services, include appropriation considerations and testimony for the National Center for Human Genome Research under the National Institutes of Health appropriation.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 3 Soy Isoflavones: Chemistry, Processing Effects, Health Benefits, and Commercial Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 3 Soy Isoflavones: Chemistry, Processing Effects, Health Benefits, and Commercial Production Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - N

122

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 27 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Effects on Steroid-hormone Biosynthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 27 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Effects on Steroid-hormone Biosynthesis Health eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Ch

123

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 1 Trans and Other Fatty Acids: Effects on Endothelial Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 1 Trans and Other Fatty Acids: Effects on Endothelial Functions Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable p

124

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 4 Soybean Saponins: Chemistry, Analysis, and Potential Health Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 4 Soybean Saponins: Chemistry, Analysis, and Potential Health Effects Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

125

Biopersistence of man-made vitreous silicate fibers in the human lung. Environ Health Perspect 102(Suppl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is now a substantial body of experimental data on the pulmonary biopersistence of man-made vitreous silicate fibers (MMVSF), but human data are seriously lacking. Our knowledge in this field is essentially limited to a few reports of measurements of fibers retained in lung tissue samples taken at autopsy from workers manufacturing these products. Three types of exposure were studied: fibrous glass, mineral wool, and refractory ceramic fibers. Overall, the available data do not provide evidence for substantial long-term retention of fibers in the human lung after occupational exposure to MMVSF dusts. A word of caution, however; the amount of data supporting the previous statement is much greater for fibrous glass than for either mineral wool or refractory ceramic fibers. There is no human data on the key question of the kinetics of pulmonary clearance of inhaled MMVSF.- Environ Health Perspect 102(Suppl 5):225-228 (1994)

R Sebastien

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Establishing Economic Effectiveness through Software Health-Management  

SciTech Connect

More than two thirds of the annual software budget of large-scale organizations dealing with complex software systems is spent on the perfection, correction, and operation of existing software systems. A significant part of these running costs could be saved if the software systems that need to be constantly extende, maintained and operated were in a better technical condition. This paper proposes Software Health-Checks as a method to assess the technical condition of existing software systems and to deduce measures for improving the health of software in a structured manner. Since 2006 numerous commercial software systems with a total of 30 MLOC, implemented in various technologies, were already checked with this method. The actions suggested as a result of these Software 'Health-Checks', repeatedly yielded dramatic performance improvements, risk reductions and cost savings between 30% and 80%.

Pizka, M; Panas, T

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

127

Clinical solid waste management practices and its impact on human health and environment - A review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research highlights: > Appropriate waste management technology for safe handling and disposal of clinical solid waste. > Infectious risk assessment on unsafe handling of clinical solid waste. > Recycling-reuse program of clinical solid waste materials. > Effective sterilization technology to reduce exposure of infectious risk. - Abstract: The management of clinical solid waste (CSW) continues to be a major challenge, particularly, in most healthcare facilities of the developing world. Poor conduct and inappropriate disposal methods exercised during handling and disposal of CSW is increasing significant health hazards and environmental pollution due to the infectious nature of the waste. This article summarises a literature review into existing CSW management practices in the healthcare centers. The information gathered in this paper has been derived from the desk study of open literature survey. Numerous researches have been conducted on the management of CSW. Although, significant steps have been taken on matters related to safe handling and disposal of the clinical waste, but improper management practice is evident from the point of initial collection to the final disposal. In most cases, the main reasons of the mismanagement of CSW are the lack of appropriate legislation, lack of specialized clinical staffs, lack of awareness and effective control. Furthermore, most of the healthcare centers of the developing world have faced financial difficulties and therefore looking for cost effective disposal methods of clinical waste. This paper emphasizes to continue the recycle-reuse program of CSW materials after sterilization by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SF-CO2) sterilization technology at the point of initial collection. Emphasis is on the priority to inactivate the infectious micro-organisms in CSW. In that case, waste would not pose any threat to healthcare workers. The recycling-reuse program would be carried out successfully with the non-specialized clinical staffs. Therefore, the adoption of SF-CO2 sterilization technology in management of clinical solid waste can reduce exposure to infectious waste, decrease labor, lower costs, and yield better compliance with regulatory. Thus healthcare facilities can both save money and provide a safe environment for patients, healthcare staffs and clinical staffs.

Hossain, Md. Sohrab [Department of Environmental Technology, School of Industrial Technology, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Santhanam, Amutha [Institute for Research in Molecular Medicine, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Nik Norulaini, N.A. [School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Omar, A.K. Mohd, E-mail: akmomar@usm.my [Department of Environmental Technology, School of Industrial Technology, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Multi-Pathway Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for a Model Coal-Fired Power Plant Using a Revised Arsenic Bioconcentratio n Factor for Edible Fish  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a multimedia human health and ecosystem risk study of a model coal-fired power plant in a model setting, using data from an actual power plant that have been transposed to a lakeside setting in the same state. Values of arsenic concentrations in similar ecosystem settings were applied to calculate its contributions to risk.BackgroundThere is increased scientific and regulatory interest in the suite of risks to human health and ecosystems ...

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

129

University of Virginia Health Plan Effective Date: 1/1/2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Laboratory Services and XRay Procedures (Non-Urgent Only) Paid in Full2 Paid in Full2 Available In% Coinsurance #12;University of Virginia Health Plan Effective Date: 1/1/2013 2 SERVICES PROVIDED UVa PROVIDER HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES A. Inpatient Acute Care for Non-Biologically Based Mental Illnesses

Acton, Scott

130

The Impact of Recent Heat Waves on Human Health in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the health impacts of recent heat waves statewide and for six subregions of California: the north and south coasts, Central Valley, Mojave, southern deserts, and northern forests. Using Canonical Correlation Analysis applied to ...

Kristen Guirguis; Alexander Gershunov; Alexander Tardy; Rupa Basu

131

Global Health and Economic Impacts of Future Ozone Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We assess the human health and economic impacts of projected 2000-2050 changes in ozone pollution using the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis-Health Effects (EPPA-HE) model, in combination with results from the ...

Webster, Mort D.

132

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Low LET radiation: Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides dose-response models intended to be used in estimating the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents. Models of early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects are provided. Two-parameter Weibull hazard functions are recommended for estimating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary and gastrointestinal syndromes -- are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating cancer risks. Parameters are given for analyzing the risks of seven types of cancer in adults -- leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid and ''other''. The category, ''other'' cancers, is intended to reflect the combined risks of multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and cancers of the bladder, kidney, brain, ovary, uterus and cervix. Models of childhood cancers due to in utero exposure are also provided. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Linear and linear-quadratic models are also recommended for assessing genetic risks. Five classes of genetic disease -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocation and multifactorial diseases --are considered. In addition, the impact of radiation-induced genetic damage on the incidence of peri-implantation embryo losses is discussed. The uncertainty in modeling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of all model parameters. Data are provided which should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk. 22 refs., 14 figs., 51 tabs.

Abrahamson, S.; Bender, M.; Book, S.; Buncher, C.; Denniston, C.; Gilbert, E.; Hahn, F.; Hertzberg, V.; Maxon, H.; Scott, B.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Occupational Noise Exposure and its Potential Health Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This issue brief provides the electric power industry with a snapshot of the current scientific knowledge on worker health and safety risks associated with noise exposure. Noise exposure types are varied and include continuous, intermittent and/or impulse noise. Prolonged occupational exposure to continuous noise or acoustic trauma can cause noise-induced hearing loss. Recent scientific data from the aluminum industry suggest that those exposed below levels requiring hearing protective devices may ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Modification of models resulting from addition of effects of exposure to alpha-emitting radionuclides: Revision 1, Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models, Addendum 2  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify, through the use of models, the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The Reactor Safety Study provided the basis for most of the earlier estimates related to these health effects. Subsequent efforts by NRC-supported groups resulted in improved health effects models that were published in the report entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Consequence Analysis{close_quotes}, NUREG/CR-4214, 1985 and revised further in the 1989 report NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2. The health effects models presented in the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report were developed for exposure to low-linear energy transfer (LET) (beta and gamma) radiation based on the best scientific information available at that time. Since the 1989 report was published, two addenda to that report have been prepared to (1) incorporate other scientific information related to low-LET health effects models and (2) extend the models to consider the possible health consequences of the addition of alpha-emitting radionuclides to the exposure source term. The first addendum report, entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, Modifications of Models Resulting from Recent Reports on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Low LET Radiation, Part 2: Scientific Bases for Health Effects Models,{close_quotes} was published in 1991 as NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2, Addendum 1. This second addendum addresses the possibility that some fraction of the accident source term from an operating nuclear power plant comprises alpha-emitting radionuclides. Consideration of chronic high-LET exposure from alpha radiation as well as acute and chronic exposure to low-LET beta and gamma radiations is a reasonable extension of the health effects model.

Abrahamson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.; Gilbert, E.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The DOE/NREL Environmental Science and Health Effects Program - An Overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes current work in the Environmental Science and Health Effects (ES and HE) Program being sponsored by DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The program is regulatory-driven, and focuses on ozone, airborne particles, visibility and regional haze, air toxics, and health effects of air pollutants. The goal of the ES and HE Program is to understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based and alternative transportation fuels. Each project in the program is designed to address policy-relevant objectives. Studies in the ES and HE Program have four areas of focus: improving technology for emissions measurements; vehicle emissions measurements, emission inventory development/improvement; and ambient impacts, including health effects.

Douglas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Environmental Science & Health Effects Program at the at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources.

Lawson, Douglas R.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

138

Model of medical supply demand and astronaut health for long-duration human space flight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The medical care of space crews is the primary limiting factor in the achievement of long-duration space missions. (Nicogossian 2003) The goal of this thesis was to develop a model of long-duration human space flight ...

Assad, Albert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Direct and indirect effects of alpha-particle irradiations of human prostate tumor cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to establish a model system to study the direct effect, the bystander effect and the combinational effect of alpha-particle irradiations of human prostate tumor cells, toward the goal of ...

Wang, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Health IT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fewer errors and redundant tests. ... Since 2004, NIST has worked closely with the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of the National ...

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NETL: Health Effects - Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the potential for adverse cardiopulmonary effects of airborne...

142

HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In) Symposium on Nuclear Reactor Safety: Perspective. Ahealth effects of the nuclear reactor accident at Three Mile50-mile radius of the nuclear reactor site, approximately

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Ozone effects on inhibitors of human neutrophil proteinases  

SciTech Connect

The effects of ozone on human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (A-1-PI), alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (A-1-Achy), bronchial leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (BLPI), and Eglin C were studied using in vitro exposures in phosphate-buffered solutions. Following ozone exposure, inhibitory activities against human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and/or cathepsin G (Cat G) were measured. Exposure of A-1-PI to 50 mol O3/mol protein resulted in a complete loss of HNE inhibitory activity, whereas A-1-Achy lost only 50% of its Cat G inhibitory activity and remained half active even after exposure to 250 mol of O3. At 40 mol O3/mol protein, BLPI lost 79% of its activity against HNE and 87% of its Cat G inhibitory activity. Eglin C, a leech-derived inhibitor, lost 81% of its HNE inhibitory activity and 92% of its ability to inhibit Cat G when exposed to 40 mol O3/mol. Amino acid analyses of ozone-exposed inhibitors showed destruction of Trp, Met, Tyr, and His with as little as 10 mol O3/mol protein, and higher levels of O3 resulted in more extensive oxidation of susceptible residues. The variable ozone susceptibility of the different amino acid residues in the four proteins indicated that oxidation was a function of protein structure, as well as the inherent susceptibility of particular amino acids. Exposure of A-1-PI and BLPI in the presence of the antioxidants, Trolox C (water soluble vitamin E) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C), showed that antioxidant vitamins may protect proteins from oxidative inactivation by ozone. Methionine-specific modification of BLPI reduced its HNE and Cat G inhibitory activities. Two moles of N-chlorosuccinimide per mole of BLPI methionine caused an 80% reduction in activity against Cat G, but only a 40% reduction in HNE inhibitory activity.

Smith, C.E.; Stack, M.S.; Johnson, D.A.

1987-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences NAME:_______________________________________ (Administration Concentration or Human Services minor) UIN:_________________________________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:_______________________________________ Students must have an associate degree in a health-related area or license or certification to practice with CHP 400) The Nature of Science ________8___________________ BIO 108N-109N, CHEM 105N/106N-107N/108NS; PSYC 201S, 203S; SOC201S; WMST 201S Impact of Technology (satisfied in major with CHP 485) Choose

145

Effectiveness of Intrinsically Motivated Adaptive Agent for Sustainable Human-Agent Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To achieve sustainable human-agent interaction (HAI), we proposed a new model of intrinsically motivated adaptive agent, which learns about the human partner and behaves to satisfy its intrinsic motivation. To investigate the model's effectiveness, ... Keywords: Human-agent interaction (HAI), adaptive agent, intrinsic motivation, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), reinforcement learning

Takayuki Nozawa; Toshiyuki Kondo

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS LOCAL IMPACTS ON HUMAN HEALTH RISK.  

SciTech Connect

A thorough quantitative understanding of the processes of mercury emissions, deposition, and translocation through the food chain is currently not available. Complex atmospheric chemistry and dispersion models are required to predict concentration and deposition contributions, and aquatic process models are required to predict effects on fish. However, there are uncertainties in all of these predictions. Therefore, the most reliable method of understanding impacts of coal-fired power plants on Hg deposition is from empirical data. A review of the literature on mercury deposition around sources including coal-fired power plants found studies covering local mercury concentrations in soil, vegetation, and animals (fish and cows). There is strong evidence of enhanced local deposition within 3 km of the chlor-alkali plants, with elevated soil concentrations and estimated deposition rates of 10 times background. For coal-fired power plants, the data show that atmospheric deposition of Hg may be slightly enhanced. On the scale of a few km, modeling suggests that wet deposition may be increased by a factor of two or three over background. The measured data suggest lower increases of 15% or less. The effects of coal-fired plants seem to be less than 10% of total deposition on a national scale, based on emissions and global modeling. The following summarizes our findings from published reports on the impacts of local deposition. In terms of excesses over background the following increments have been observed within a few km of the plant: (1) local soil concentration Hg increments of 30%-60%, (2) sediment increments of 18-30%, (3) wet deposition increments of 11-12%, and (4) fish Hg increments of about 5-6%, based on an empirical finding that fish concentrations are proportional to the square root of deposition. Important uncertainties include possible reductions of RGM to Hg{sub 0} in power plant plumes and the role of water chemistry in the relationship between Hg deposition and fish content. Soil and vegetation sampling programs were performed around two mid-size coal fired power plants. The objectives were to determine if local mercury hot-spots exist, to determine if they could be attributed to deposition of coal-fired power plant emissions, and to determine if they correlated with model predictions. These programs found the following: (1) At both sites, there was no correlation between modeled mercury deposition and either soil concentrations or vegetation concentrations. At the Kincaid plant, there was excess soil Hg along heavily traveled roads. The spatial pattern of soil mercury concentrations did not match the pattern of vegetation Hg concentrations at either plant. (2) At both sites, the subsurface (5-10 cm) samples the Hg concentration correlated strongly with the surface samples (0-5 cm). Average subsurface sample concentrations were slightly less than the surface samples; however, the difference was not statistically significant. (3) An unequivocal definition of background Hg was not possible at either site. Using various assumed background soil mercury concentrations, the percentage of mercury deposited within 10 km of the plant ranged between 1.4 and 8.5% of the RGM emissions. Based on computer modeling, Hg deposition was primarily RGM with much lower deposition from elemental mercury. Estimates of the percentage of total Hg deposition ranged between 0.3 and 1.7%. These small percentages of deposition are consistent with the empirical findings of only minor perturbations in environmental levels, as opposed to ''hot spots'', near the plants. The major objective of this study was to determine if there was evidence for ''hot-spots'' of mercury deposition around coal-fired power plants. Although the term has been used extensively, it has never been defined. From a public health perspective, such a ''hot spot'' must be large enough to insure that it did not occur by chance, and it must affect water bodies large enough to support a population of subsistence fishers. The results of this study support the hypothesis that n

SULLIVAN, T.M.; BOWERMAN, B.; ADAMS, J.; LIPFERT, F.; MORRIS, S.M.; BANDO, A.; PENA, R.; BLAKE, R.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Memorandum of Understanding Between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES AND THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY I. INTRODUCTION This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) serves to set forth the authorities, responsibilities, and procedures by which the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct statutorily mandated activities required to assist with claims processing under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (EEOICP A). EEOICP A provides for timely, uniform, and adequate compensation of covered employees and, where applicable, survivors of such employees suffering from illnesses incurred by such employees in the performance of duty. HHS and DOE will make every effort to ensure that activities conducted under this MOU, as

148

Measuring the effects of online advertising on human behavior using natural and field experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the effects of online advertising on human behavior: clicks, new-account sign-ups, and retail sales. Five chapters cover natural and field experiments used to measure these effects for both display ...

Lewis, Randall A. (Randall Aaron)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I-Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C, Risk C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/004 Publication 9285.7-01 C December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper NOTICE The policies set out in [his document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

150

Proceedings from the 5th International Symposium on Light and Human Health: November 3-5, 2002, Orlando, Florida--EPRI Lighting Rese arch Office  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 5th EPRI/LRO Lighting Research Symposium (November, 2002) was organized to present and examine current research information on the subject of Light and Human Health in response to a growing sense that light -- both electric lighting and daylighting -- impacts human beings well beyond what has been traditionally studied as vision and visual performance. This Final Report of the Symposium is a collection of 23 presented and seven poster papers grouped under the following headings: I – Medical App...

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

151

Manage the Margins: Three Essays on Effective Policymaking for Social Inequality in Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation includes three studies, devoted to trying to understand inequality in health between people from different social groups in a democratic society. In the U.S., social inequality in health takes various forms and the key to understanding how democracy solves the problem of inequality lies in a complex set of political and social factors. I take an institutional approach and focus on examining how political and policy institutions, their administrative processes, and the policy implementation environment are linked to social inequality in health. The first essay, Whose Baby Matters More, uses a theoretical framework for evaluating heterogeneous group responses to public health policies and depicts how racial disparities in health are rooted in group heterogeneity in policy responses. The second essay, Anxious Girls and Inactive Boys, focuses on how state-level policy interventions and social capital interactively affect gender differences in health. The third essay, Responsibility for Equity, explores the link between publicness of state healthcare systems and social equity in healthcare access. In the first essay, I focus on racial disparities in infant mortality rates and pool state-level data from 1990 to 2006. The empirical analysis suggests that enhancing the capacity of state healthcare systems is critical to improving population health. Blacks and whites, nevertheless, exhibit different responses to the same policy. Racial disparities could be reduced only when policy interventions generate more relative benefits for Blacks. In the second essay, I find that social capital conditions the effect of public health policies with regard to managing childhood obesity. There are gender differences, moreover, in health outcomes and behavioral responses to state and local-level obesity policies. In the third essay, I find that different institutional factors exhibit different impact on inequality in healthcare access. While public finance resources may reduce inequality in healthcare access, public ownership and the public healthcare workforce do not have significant association with inequality in healthcare access. State Medicaid eligibility rules exhibit moderate impact on inequality in healthcare access.

Zhu, Ling

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Electric Power Lines : Questions and Answers on Research into Health Effects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most people know that electric power lines, like the wiring in our homes, can cause serious electric shocks if we`re not careful. Many people also want to know whether the electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by power lines and other electrical devices cause health effects. The purpose of this pamphlet is to answer some common questions that the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) receives about the possible effects of power lines on health. (BPA is the Pacific Northwest`s Federal electric power marketing agency.) First, some basic electrical terms are defined, and electric and magnetic fields are described. Next, answers are given to several questions about recent scientific studies. We then describe how BPA is addressing public concerns raised by these studies. Some important information about electrical safety follows. The last section tells you how to obtain more detailed information about the health and safety issues summarized in this pamphlet.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Real estate's market value and a pollution and health effects analysis decision support system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors of this paper participated in the project Framework 6 intelligent Cities and the Lincoln institute of Land Policy Fellowship. One of the above project's goals was to develop and improve a Real Estate's Market Value, and the Pollution and ... Keywords: air pollution, cooperative decision making, health effects, market value, multiple-user, premises microclimate, voice stress analysis

E. Zavadskas; A. Kaklauskas; E. Maciunas; P. Vainiunas; A. Marsalka

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Health and environmental effects of oil shale technology. A workshop summary and panel reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the result of a workshop which addressed the health and environmental effects of oil shale technology. The purpose of this workshop were: to assemble biomedical and environmental scientists, representative of a broad range of disciplines, to address current developments in oil shale technology; to review and identify specific health and environmental issues and problems associated with the development and commercialization of oil shale technology; and to consider the research strategies required to address them and to identify the requisite research information needs, expressed via detailed task statements, for resolving the uncertainties of assessing the relevant impacts of oil shale technology. Throughout the workshop, attendees participated in six panels: health effects; air quality; water quantity, quality, and aquatic ecology; terrestrial effects; ambient measuring and monitoring; and source characterization. This report contains a presentation of the highlights of the issues considered by the panels and the panel reports which contain specific information on environmental and health effects, information requirements, and detailed research statements.

Brown, R. (ed.)

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Health Risks Associated with Low Doses of Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite a wealth of information, there remains uncertainty concerning human radiation effects at low dose levels. This report provides background information and a literature review of research on the potential health hazards associated with exposure to low-level ionizing radiation. Topics include radiation characteristics, protection standards, epidemiologic data and risk models, the nature of human health exposure-related effects, important radiation health studies to date, and the scientific method fo...

1994-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

156

C. J. Li et al. (Eds), Plant nutrition for food security, human health and environmental protection. 44-45, 2005 2005 Tsinghua University Press. Printed in Beijing, China.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. J. Li et al. (Eds), Plant nutrition for food security, human health and environmental protection of Na+ through K+ transporters or channels (Blumwald et al. 2000). This Na+ entry disrupts the normally cytosolic K+ /Na+ concentration is a key requirement for plant salt tolerance (Glenn et al. 1999

Zhu, Jian-Kang

157

User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a user's guide to EPRI's RIVRISK framework, Version 5.0, which can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. The report also documents RIVRISK's theoretical foundation and graphical user interface. Industrial and government staff concerned with chemical and thermal releases will find this report useful.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

158

An analysis of uranium dispersal and health effects using a Gulf War case study.  

SciTech Connect

The study described in this report used mathematical modeling to estimate health risks from exposure to depleted uranium (DU) during the 1991 Gulf War for both U.S. troops and nearby Iraqi civilians. The analysis found that the risks of DU-induced leukemia or birth defects are far too small to result in an observable increase in these health effects among exposed veterans or Iraqi civilians. Only a few veterans in vehicles accidentally struck by U.S. DU munitions are predicted to have inhaled sufficient quantities of DU particulate to incur any significant health risk (i.e., the possibility of temporary kidney damage from the chemical toxicity of uranium and about a 1% chance of fatal lung cancer). The health risk to all downwind civilians is predicted to be extremely small. Recommendations for monitoring are made for certain exposed groups. Although the study found fairly large calculational uncertainties, the models developed and used are generally valid. The analysis was also used to assess potential uranium health hazards for workers in the weapons complex. No illnesses are projected for uranium workers following standard guidelines; nonetheless, some research suggests that more conservative guidelines should be considered.

Marshall, Albert Christian

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Omega-3 Oils: Applications in Functional FoodsChapter 8 Synergistic/Additive Health Effects of Fish Oil and Bio-Active Agents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Omega-3 Oils: Applications in Functional Foods Chapter 8 Synergistic/Additive Health Effects of Fish Oil and Bio-Active Agents Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Downloadable pdf...

160

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 14 Effect of Dietary Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Infancy on Both Visual and Neural Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 14 Effect of Dietary Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Infancy on Both Visual and Neural Development Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Bioch

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical ApplicationsChapter 7 Formation, Analysis, and Health Effects of Oxidized Sterols in Frying Fat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical Applications Chapter 7 Formation, Analysis, and Health Effects of Oxidized Sterols in Frying Fat Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - N

162

Critical review of the reactor-safety study radiological health effects model. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This review of the radiological health effects models originally presented in the Reactor Safety Study (RSS) and currently used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was undertaken to assist the NRC in determining whether or not to revise the models and to aid in the revision, if undertaken. The models as presented in the RSS and as implemented in the CRAC (Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences) Code are described and critiqued. The major elements analyzed are those concerning dosimetry, early effects, and late effects. The published comments on the models are summarized, as are the important findings since the publication of the RSS.

Cooper, D.W.; Evans, J.S.; Jacob, N.; Kase, K.R.; Maletskos, C.J.; Robertson, J.B.; Smith, D.G.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Health IT Workshop Notice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... among NVLAP, the NIST Information Technology Laboratory, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), laboratories interested in ...

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

164

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Low LET radiation  

SciTech Connect

This report describes dose-response models intended to be used in estimating the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents. Models of early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects are provided. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes -- are considered. In addition, models are included for assessing the risks of several nonlethal early and continuing effects -- including prodromal vomiting and diarrhea, hypothyroidism and radiation thyroiditis, skin burns, reproductive effects, and pregnancy losses. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating cancer risks. Parameters are given for analyzing the risks of seven types of cancer in adults -- leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and other.'' The category, other'' cancers, is intended to reflect the combined risks of multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and cancers of the bladder, kidney, brain, ovary, uterus and cervix. Models of childhood cancers due to in utero exposure are also developed. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. The models of cancer risk are derived largely from information summarized in BEIR III -- with some adjustment to reflect more recent studies. 64 refs., 18 figs., 46 tabs.

Evans, J.S. (Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (USA). School of Public Health)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Research Programs on Low-Level Radiation Health Effects Supported by FEPCO  

SciTech Connect

The federation of Electric Power Companies (FEPCO) of Japan has been supporting several research projects on low-level radiation health effects for the purpose of the following: 1. to assist in the establishment of a reasonable system of radiation protection; 2. to release the public from unnecessary fear of ionizing radiation. We present some of the findings and current research programs funded or supported by FEPCO.

Kaneko, Masahito

1999-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

166

Program on Technology Innovation: Health Effects of Organic Aerosols: An EPRI/NARSTO Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI-NARSTO Health Effects of Organic Aerosols Workshop was held in Palo Alto, California on October 24-25, 2006. The workshop was intended to further our understanding of the organic fraction of ambient particulate matter (PM) and associated organic gases. The composition of organic aerosol is very complex, varying in accordance with physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere and comprising numerous organic compounds of both anthropogenic and natural origin. The workshop focused on organic ae...

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

167

Health Effects of Subchronic Inhalation of Simulated Downwind Coal Combustion Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to conduct a comprehensive laboratory-based evaluation of selected respiratory and cardiac health hazards of subchronic (up to 6 months) inhalation of simulated key components of 'downwind plume' emissions of coal combustion. This project was performed as an integral part of a joint government-industry program termed the 'National Environmental Respiratory Center' (NERC), which is aimed at disentangling the roles of different physical-chemical air pollutants and their sources in the health effects associated statistically with air pollution. The characterization of the exposure atmosphere and the health assays were identical to those employed in the NERC protocols used to evaluate other pollution source emissions, such as diesel, gasoline, and wood combustion. The project had two phases, each encompassing multiple tasks. Guidelines for the composition of the exposure atmosphere were set by consensus of an expert workshop. Development of the capability to generate the exposure atmosphere and pilot studies of the comparative exposure composition using two coal types were accomplished in Phase 1. In Phase 2, the toxicological study was conducted using Powder River Basin Sub-bituminous coal. NETL provided 50% support for the work in Phase 1 and had intended to provide 20% support for the work in Phase 2. Phase 1 is completed and Phase 2 is in the final stages. All animal exposures were completed without incident, and the composition of the exposure atmospheres met the targets. All of the health sample collections are completed, but some samples remain to be analyzed. Data summaries and final statistical analysis of results remain to be completed. The goal is to submit all publications before the end of FY-08. Repeated exposure to simulated downwind coal emissions caused some significant health effects, but the number of effects tended to be fewer than those caused by the other NERC exposures (diesel and gasoline emissions and hardwood smoke). the lowest concentration, a dilution containing approximately 100 {micro}g particulate matter (PM)/m{sup 3}, was a no-effects level for nearly all measured variables. One of the most interesting findings was that few, if indeed any, health outcomes appeared to be caused by the PM component of the exposure. This finding strongly suggests that PM simulating the major contributions of coal combustion to environmental PM is of very low toxicity.

Joe Mauderly

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

168

Tailoring persuasive health games to gamer type  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Persuasive games are an effective approach for motivating health behavior, and recent years have seen an increase in games designed for changing human behaviors or attitudes. However, these games are limited in two major ways: first, they are not based ... Keywords: behavior theory, hbm, player typology, gamer types, games design, health, persuasive game, serious games

Rita Orji; Regan L. Mandryk; Julita Vassileva; Kathrin M. Gerling

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Health and environmental effects of synthetic fuel technologies: research priorities. Report to the Federal Interagency Committee on the health and environmental effects of energy technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an assessment of the health and environmental effects research priorities related to coal gasification and liquefaction and oil shale development. It reflects the subjective judgments of well chosen research scientists in relevant disciplines. These scientists reviewed the results of workshops conducted in 1978 on coal gasification and liquefaction and oil shale, background information on related federal research, and comments by relevant federal agencies. The scientists prepared a listing of current research needs according to major areas of concern. These were categorized as to generic, region-specific, or process specific research. For the latter category, various scales of development were addressed for two exemplary processes: SRC (solvent refined coal) II and above ground oil shale retorting. Subjective judgments were used to prioritize the research tasks and assess the adequacy of current research.

Brown, R.D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The NIEHS supports a wide variety of research programs directed toward preventing health problems caused by our environment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Unlike the other NIH institutes, the NIEHS is locatedThe NIEHS supports a wide variety of research programs directed toward preventing health problems that may affect human health. Current NTP initiatives are examining the effects of cell phone radiation

Bandettini, Peter A.

171

Indoor Humidity and Human Health--Part I: Literature Review of Health Effects of Humidity-Influenced Indoor Pollutants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

when samples of timber, plywood, gypsumboard, fiberboard,materials, is including plywood, particleboard, and other

Baughman, A.; Arens, Edward A

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Health Effects of SubChronic Inhalation of Simulated Downwind Coal Combustion Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sara M. Pletcher sara M. Pletcher Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4236 sara.pletcher@netl.doe.gov Joe L. Mauderly Principal Investigator Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute 2425 Ridgecrest Drive, SE Albuquerque, NM 87108-5129 505-348-9432 jmauderl@lrri.org Environmental and Water Resources HealtH effects of sub-cHronic inHalation of simulated downwind coal combustion emissions Background Emissions from coal-fired power plants and their associated atmospheric reaction products contribute to environmental air pollution and are often cited as a critical cause of pollution-related health risks. However, there have been few toxicological evaluations of the heath hazards resulting from the inhalation of coal combustion

173

Assessment of zero gravity effects on space worker health and safety  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One objective of the study is to assess the effects of all currently known deviations from normal of medical, physiological, and biochemical parameters which appear to be due to zero gravity (zero-g) environment and to acceleration and deceleration to be experienced, as outlined in the reference Solar Power Satellite (SPS) design, by space worker. Study results include identification of possible health or safety effects on space workers - either immediate or delayed - due to the zero gravity environment and acceleration and deceleration; estimation of the probability that an individual will be adversely affected; description of the possible consequence to work efficiently in persons adversely affected; and description of the possible/probable consequences to immediate and future health of individuals exposed to this environment. A research plan, which addresses the uncertainties in current knowledge regarding the health and safety hazards to exposed SPS space workers, is presented. Although most adverse affects experienced during space flight soon disappeared upon return to the Earth's environment, there remains a definite concern for the long-term effects to SPS space workers who might spend as much as half their time in space during a possible five-year career period. The proposed 90-day up/90 day down cycle, coupled with the fact that most of the effects of weightlessness may persist throughout the flight along with the realization that recovery may occupy much of the terrestrial stay, may keep the SPS workers in a deviant physical condition or state of flux for 60 to 100% of their five-year career. (JGB)

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Radiation therapy of pediatric brain tumors : comparison of long-term health effects and costs between proton therapy and IMRT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation therapy is an important component of pediatric brain tumor treatment. However, radiation-induced damage can lead to adverse long-term health effects. Proton therapy has the ability to reduce the dose delivered ...

Vu, An T. (An Thien)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Emergency Response Health Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health. Topics of discussion included in this manuscript are related to responding to a radiation emergency, and the necessary balance between desired high accuracy laboratory results and rapid turnaround requirements. Considerations are addressed for methodology with which to provide the most competent solutions despite challenges presented from incomplete datasets and, at times, limited methodology. An emphasis is placed on error and uncertainty of sample analysis results, how error affects products, and what is communicated in the final product.

Mena, R., Pemberton, W., Beal, W.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Space, light, and time : prospective analysis of Circadian illumination for health-based daylighting with applications to healthcare architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light in architecture can be studied for its objective or perceptual effects. This thesis describes an objective link between human health and architectural design. Specifically, the link between daylight and human circadian ...

Pechacek, Christopher S. (Christopher Scott)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Photographer: Unknown Prepared by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

serves the public by using the best science, taking responsive public health actions, and providing trusted health information to prevent harmful exposures and diseases related to toxic substances. You may contact ATSDR toll free at 800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

The effects of human disturbance on birds in Bastrop State Park  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With rapidly disappearing natural areas due to development and fragmentation, public lands provide important habitat for birds. However, the increasing use of public lands for recreation may decrease the value of these areas for bird use. Human disturbance can damage birds in many ways, including disrupting foraging or social behavior, increasing nest predation, interfering with parent-offspring and pair bonds, increasing nesting failures, and reducing the viability of fledglings. Additionally, birds may perceive humans as predators and leave an area, and the resulting decline in species abundance resembles the effects of habitat loss. Increased human outdoor activity has created the need for information regarding the effects of human disturbance on birds. I investigated the effects of human disturbance on birds in Bastrop State Park (BSP) in central Texas in 1998 and 1999. A wide variety of people use much of BSP, and many areas within the park experience significant amounts of disturbance from people and vehicles, particularly in campgrounds. I evaluated the effects of various types of human disturbance on the presence of 20 avian species, including seven neotropical migratory species. Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater), Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura), Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus), and Summer Tanager (Piranga rubra), were sensitive to human presence, and Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata), and Downy Woodpeckers (Picoides pubescens) occurred in lower abundances in sites with higher numbers of vehicles. However, other species (e.g., American Crow [Corvus brachyrhynchos], Black-and-white Warbler [Mniotilta varia], Pileated Woodpecker [Dryocopus pileatus], Red-eyed Vireo [Vireo olivaceus], Ruby-throated Hummingbird [Archilochus colubris], White-eyed Vireo [Vireo griseus], and Yellow-billed Cuckoo [Coccyzus americanus]) tolerated humans, vehicles, or both. Neotropical migratory species did not show higher sensitivity to disturbance when compared to resident species, and forest interior species were not more sensitive than edge species. My results indicate that some species, including migrants, can become habituated to human presence in protected areas with low harassment and low-intensity, predictable disturbances. Management recommendations for BSP include protecting habitat, minimizing human disturbance in some areas, providing buffer zones between humandominated zones and sites containing vulnerable species, and softening edges in campgrounds.

Marcum, Heidi Ann

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Economic and Health Effects of a State Cigarette Excise Tax Increase in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tobacco Control Section California Department of HealthExcise Tax Increase in California Table 1 – Tax increase= Tobacco Control Section California Department of Health

California Department of Health Services; Tobacco Control Section

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Economic and Health Effects of a State Cigarette Excise Tax Increase in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tobacco Control Section California Department of HealthExcise Tax Increase in California Table 1 – Tax increase= Tobacco Control Section California Department of Health

California Department of Health Services

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Environmental and health management in small and medium size enterprises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workers and employees are increasingly exposed in the workplace to chemical compounds and substances that are potentially toxic; for most of these compounds, no information exist regarding effects on human health. As one ...

Arredondo, Juan C. (Juan Carlos Arredondo Brun), 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

LAND AND WATER USE CHARACTERISTICS AND HUMAN HEALTH INPUT PARAMETERS FOR USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DOSIMETRY AND RISK ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters but the use of site-specific values by the applicant is encouraged. A detailed survey of land and water use parameters was conducted in 1991 and is being updated here. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk and vegetable consumption rates as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS are documented. Based on comparisons to the 2009 SRS environmental compliance doses, the following effects are expected in future SRS compliance dose calculations: (1) Aquatic all-pathway maximally exposed individual doses may go up about 10 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors; (2) Aquatic all-pathway collective doses may go up about 5 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors that offset the reduction in average individual water consumption rates; (3) Irrigation pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go up about 40 percent due to increases in the element-specific transfer factors; (4) Irrigation pathway collective doses may go down about 50 percent due to changes in food productivity and production within the 50-mile radius of SRS; (5) Air pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go down about 10 percent due to the changes in food productivity in the SRS area and to the changes in element-specific transfer factors; and (6) Air pathway collective doses may go down about 30 percent mainly due to the decrease in the inhalation rate assumed for the average individual.

Jannik, T.; Karapatakis, D.; Lee, P.; Farfan, E.

2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

183

Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 8. Health effects of oil shale development  

SciTech Connect

Information on the potential health effects of a developing oil shale industry can be derived from two major sources: (1) the historical experience in foreign countries that have had major industries; and (2) the health effects research that has been conducted in the US in recent years. The information presented here is divided into two major sections: one dealing with the experience in foreign countries and the second dealing with the more recent work associated with current oil shale development in the US. As a result of the study, several observations can be made: (1) most of the current and historical data from foreign countries relate to occupational hazards rather than to impacts on regional populations; (2) neither the historical evidence from other countries nor the results of current research have shown pulmonary neoplasia to be a major concern, however, certain types of exposure, particularly such mixed source exposures as dust/diesel or dust/organic-vapor have not been adequately studied and the lung cancer question is not closed; (3) the industry should be alert to the incidence of skin disease in the industrial setting, however, automated techniques, modern industrial hygiene practices and realistic personal hygiene should greatly reduce the hazards associated with skin contact; and (4) the entire question of regional water contamination and any resultant health hazard has not been adequately addressed. The industrial practice of hydrotreating the crude shale oil will diminish the carcinogenic hazard of the product, however, the quantitative reduction of biological activity is dependent on the degree of hydrotreatment. Both Soviet and American experimentalists have demonstrated a correlation betweed carcinogenicity/toxicity and retorting temperature; the higher temperatures producing the more carcinogenic or toxic products.

Rotariu, G.J.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Production of thin-film photovoltaic cells: health and environmental effects  

SciTech Connect

Health and safety hazards in production of major thin-film photovoltaic cells are identified and characterized for their potential to cause health effects. These hazards are identified by examining process data, control technology availability, biomedical effects, and environmental standards. Quantitative estimates of material inputs and outputs and control costs were made on the basis of preliminary engineering designs of hypothetical facilities capable of manufacturing 10 MWp photovoltaic cells a year. The most significant potential hazards are associated with toxic and explosive gases. Emissions of toxic gases during normal operation can be controlled using available control technology. Accidental release of stored gases, however, will pose significant risks to both workers and the public, as atmospheric dispersion computer studies indicate. Possible release preventing options and release control options are examined. Explosive and flammable gases may present significant occupational safety hazards; gas handling systems will need to be carefully designed. High voltages and radio frequency equipment also require close attention for their potential to present occupational hazards. 10 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Fthenakis, V.M.; Moskowitz, P.D.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Late health effects uncertain assessment. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA late health effects models. This volume contains appendices that include (1) a summary of the MACCS and COSYMA consequence codes, (2) the elicitation questionnaires and case structures, (3) the rationales and results for the expert panel on late health effects, (4) short biographies of the experts, and (5) the aggregated results of their responses.

Little, M.P.; Muirhead, C.R. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Early health effects uncertainty assessment. Volume 2: Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA early health effects models. This volume contains appendices that include (1) a summary of the MACCS and COSYMA consequence codes, (2) the elicitation questionnaires and case structures, (3) the rationales and results for the panel on early health effects, (4) short biographies of the experts, and (5) the aggregated results of their responses.

Haskin, F.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part 1, Introduction, integration, and summary: Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This report is a revision of NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990), Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis. This revision has been made to incorporate changes to the Health Effects Models recommended in two addenda to the NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 11, 1989 report. The first of these addenda provided recommended changes to the health effects models for low-LET radiations based on recent reports from UNSCEAR, ICRP and NAS/NRC (BEIR V). The second addendum presented changes needed to incorporate alpha-emitting radionuclides into the accident exposure source term. As in the earlier version of this report, models are provided for early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating the risks of seven types of cancer in adults - leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and ``other``. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Five classes of genetic diseases -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocations, and multifactorial diseases are also considered. Data are provided that should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk.

Evans, J.S. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Abrahmson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gilbert, E.S. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Effect of aging on the toughness of human cortical bone: evaluation by R-curves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of aging on the toughness of human cortical bone: evaluation by R-curves R.K. Nallaa,b , J online 27 October 2004 Abstract Age-related deterioration of the fracture properties of bone, coupled, and hence, an understanding of how its fracture properties degrade with age is essential. The present study

Ritchie, Robert

189

Approach on the high frequency electromagnetic field effects on human blood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applications of microwave have been increased in the last years due to radars and police communication systems, high power satellite and TV transmitters, mobile phones, microwave ovens and medical devices. Exposure to microwave emissions has a negative ... Keywords: biological effects, exposure to microwave emissions, microscope analysis, modeling, simulation, ultrastructure of the human blood

Marius A. Silaghi; Ulrich L. Rohde; Ovidiu C. Fratila; Helga Silaghi; Tiberia Ioana Ilias

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

A Framework for Evaluating the Effects of Degraded Digital I and C Systems on Human Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New and advanced reactors will use integrated digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems to support operators in their monitoring and control functions. Even though digital systems are typically highly reliable, their potential for degradation or failure could significantly affect operator situation awareness and performance and, consequently, impact plant safety. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a research project to investigate the effects of degraded I&C systems on human performance and plant operations. The ultimate objective of this project is to develop the technical basis for human factors review guidance for conditions of degraded I&C, including complete failure. Based on the results of this effort, NRC will determine the need for developing new guidance or revising NUREG-0800, NUREG-0711, NUREG-0700 and other pertinent NRC review guidance. This paper reports on the first phase of the research, the development of a framework for linking degraded I&C system conditions to human performance. The framework consists of three levels: I&C subsystems, human-system interfaces, and human performance. Each level is composed of a number of discrete elements. This paper will describe the elements at each level and their integration. In the next phase of the research, the framework will be used to systematically investigate the human performance consequences of various classes of failures.

OHara,J.; Gunther, B.; Hughes, N.; Barnes, V.

2009-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

191

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of health physicist Karl Z. Morgan, Ph.D., conducted January 7, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report provided a transcript of an interview of Dr. Karl. Z. Morgan by representatives of the DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Morgan was selected for this interview because of his research for the Manhattan Project at the Metallurgical Laboratory in Chicago and his work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The oral history covers Dr. Morgan`s work as a pioneer in the field of Health Physics, his research at ORNL and his work since he retired from ORNL.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Health and environmental effects of synthetic fuel technologies: research priorities. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an assessment of the health and environmental effects research priorities related to coal gasification and liquefaction and oil shale development. It reflects the subjective judgements of well chosen research scientists in relevant disciplines. These scientists reviewed the results of workshops conducted in 1978 on coal gasification and liquefaction and oil shale (see PB-296 708, PB-297 096, and PB-297 618), background information on related Federal research, and comments by relevant Federal agencies. The scientists prepared a listing of current research needs according to major areas of concern. These were categorized as to generic, region-specific, or process specific research. For the latter category, various scales of development were addressed for two exemplary processes: SRC (solvent refined coal) II and above ground oil shale retorting. Subjective judgements were used to prioritize the research tasks and assess the adequacy of current research.

Brown, R.D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Balancing health effects and economics in the management of radioactive materials  

SciTech Connect

The public perception of the benefits offered by nuclear energy and the risks to health and safety from ionizing radiation has dramatically altered over the fifty years since the advent of nuclear fission. The {open_quotes}Atomic Age{close_quotes} is seldom mentioned anymore. The attitudinal change from the acceptance of nuclear energy as an essential component of national defense, {open_quotes}Atoms for Peace,{close_quotes} and a new, abundant, and clean energy source for mankind to the perception of it as an object of protest and fear has resulted from events that included nuclear fallout from atmospheric weapons testing, Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, classified radiation experiments, and a generally hostile news media. As a reflection of public concerns over radiation, federal, state, and local regulations have greatly multiplied in both the types of radioactive materials addressed and the threshold activity levels at which these regulations become effective.

Sandquist, G.M.; Slaughter, D.M.; Rogers, V.C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Health effects of residential wood combustion: survey of knowledge and research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Health and safety issues related to residential wood burning are examined. Current research and findings are also described, and research status is assessed in terms of future health and safety requirements. (MHR)

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Evaluation of Potential Human Health Inhalation Risks from Mercury in Building and Construction Materials Containing Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns have been raised regarding the potential public health risks from mercury that is associated with the use of coal combustion products in building materials and construction applications. This report presents the results of a risk assessment that evaluated mercury inhalation under several exposure scenarios, including concrete and wallboard in residential and classroom settings.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

196

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FY 2002 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS VOLUME 1 Foreword of an Interdisciplinary Approach.................................17 Section III: Department of Health and Human ServicesNATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH National Institutes of Health Strategic Research Plan and Budget

Bandettini, Peter A.

197

Environmental assessment for the satellite power system-concept development and evaluation program-microwave health and ecological effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is concerned with the potential health and ecological effects of the microwave beam from the microwave power transmission system (MPTS) of the satellite power system (SPS). The report is written in the form of a detailed critical review of selected scientific articles from the published literature on the biological effects of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, followed by an assessment of the possible effects of the SPS, based on exposure values for the reference system (US DOE and NASA, 1978).

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

-----_ _111 _ _ _ __ HEALTH STATU~S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- - - - -_ _111 _ _ _ __ HEALTH STATU~S OF VIETNAM VETER~I~NS SUPPLEMENT A LABORATORY METHOD~3 AND QUALITY CONTROL U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SEIIVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE Control Vietnam Experience Study January 1989 t t U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

199

THE HUMAN FACTOR* By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*I gratefully acknowledge the advice, encouragement, and inspiration of Nuria Chinchilla from IESE who encouraged me to think about the issue of human sustainability in both societies and companies. The helpful comments of the editor and the reviewers substantially clarified the arguments. ACADEMY OF MANAGEMENT PERSPECTIVES, (in press) Although most of the research and public pressure concerning sustainability has been focused on the effects of business and organizational activity on the physical environment, companies and their management practices profoundly affect the human and social environment as well. This article briefly reviews the literature on the direct and indirect effects of organizations and their decisions about people on human health and mortality. It then considers some possible explanations for why social sustainability has received relatively short shrift in management writing, and outlines a research agenda for investigating the links between social sustainability and organizational effectiveness as well as the role

Jeffrey Pfeffer; R Esearch; P Aper; S Eries; Building Sustainable Organizations; Jeffrey Pfeffer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Can tailoring increase elaboration of health messages delivered via an adaptive educational site on adolescent sexual health and decision making?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tailoring, the development of health messages based on assessment of key psychosocial variables that influence a prescribed behavior, has been gaining ground as an effective health education approach. The efficacy of this approach is based on the assumption ... Keywords: human computer interaction, information processing

Juliann Cortese; Mia Liza A. Lustria

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Health physicist William J. Bair, Ph.D., October 14, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is a transcript of an interview of William J. Blair by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Blair was selected for this interview because of of his participation in the University of Rochester Atomic Energy Project and for his radiological inhalation research at Hanford Site. After a brief biographical sketch Dr. Blair discusses his remembrances on a wide rage of topics. Discussions include his graduate studies at Rochester University, use of human subjects at Rochester, his inhalation studies, his limited involvement with human studies, differing biological effects of plutonium 238 and 239, emissions from proposed nuclear-propelled aircraft, cancer research, cleanup at Nevada Test Site and Marshall Islands, impact of Langham studies to understand Plutonium exposure, and AEC controversies and colleagues.

Harrell, D.; Shindledecker, C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI HEALTH SYSTEM NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES Effective Date: December 1, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for intelligence, counter-intelligence, and other national security activities authorized by law. v) Protective Security and Intelligence Activities. We may release Health Information to authorized federal officials

Miami, University of

203

The Effect of Placement Change on Foster Children's Utilization of Emergency Mental Health Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. R. (2008). Children's mental health emergencies- part2: Emergency department evaluation and treatment of childrenhealth disorders. Pediatric Emergency Care, 24(7), Barth, R.

Fawley-King, Kya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Environmental assessment for the satellite power system concept development and evaluation program: nonmicrowave health and ecological effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Concept Development and Evaluation Program is being carried out for a proposed Satellite Power System (SPS). For purposes of this evaluation, a preliminary reference system has been developed. SPS, as described in the reference system, would collect solar energy on satellites in geosychronous orbit in space. The energy would be converted to microwaves and beamed to an earth-receiving antenna (rectenna). One task in the environmental part of the program is the assessment of the nonmicrowave effects on health and the environment. These effects would result from all phases of SPS development and operation. This report covers the current knowledge regarding these effects, and is based on the reference system. The assessment is summarized as to scope, methodology, impacts of terrestrial development, launch and recovery of spacecraft, space activities (including health effects of the space environment, ionizing radiation, electromagnetic exposure, spacecraft charging and environmental interactions, occupational hazards, etc.) and construction and operation of rectenna (ground receiving station).

White, M.R.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

ITL Bulletin The Exchange of Health Care Information ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... HIPAA requires the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HSS) to adopt, among other standards, security standards for certain health ...

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

206

NIST, Partners Develop Testing Infrastructure for Health IT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Health and Human Services (HHS) identified ... The health IT testing infrastructure does ... NIST's National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program ...

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

207

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B, B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/003 Publication 9285.7-01 B December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper N O T I C E The policies set out in this document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

208

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I. Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part D, Standardized Planning, Reporting, and Review of Superfund Risk Assessments)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publication 9285.7-01D Publication 9285.7-01D January 1998 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part D, Standardized Planning, Reporting, and Review of Superfund Risk Assessments) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Revision No. 0 ii January 1998 NOTICE This document provides guidance to EPA staff. The guidance is designed to communicate National policy on the planning, reporting and review of Superfund risk assessments. The document does not, however, substitute for EPA's statutes or regulations, nor is it a regulation itself. Thus, it cannot impose legally-binding requirements on EPA, States, or the regulated community, and may not apply to a particular situation based upon

209

Programs director`s report for the Office of Health and Environmental Research  

SciTech Connect

Since its establishment, the Department of Energy`s Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has had responsibility for conducting biological research to develop the knowledge needed to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy use and development, including the potential health impacts of radiation. The Health Effects Research Program has established the basis for understanding the health consequences of radiation for humans, developed radiation dosimetry methodology, characterized and evaluated the health impacts of fossil fuels, and developed and conducted research to determine the health impacts of inhaled toxicants. The results of this research have provided input for setting genetic standards for radiation and chemical exposure.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Virtual impact: visualizing the potential effects of cosmic impact in human history  

SciTech Connect

Current models indicate that catastrophic impacts by asteroids and comets capable of killing more than one quarter of Earth's human population have occurred on average once every million years; smaller impacts, such the 1908 Tunguska impact that leveled more than 2,000 square km of Siberian forest, occur every 200-300 years. Therefore, cosmic impact likely significantly affected hominine evolution and conceivably played a role in Holocene period human culture history. Regrettably, few archaeologists are trained to appreciate the nature and potential effects of cosmic impact. We have developed a conceptual model for an extensible set of educational and research tools based on virtual reality collaborative environments to engage archaeologists and the general public on the topic of the role of cosmic impact in human history. Our initial focus is on two documented asteroid impacts in Argentina during the period of 4000 to 1000 B.C. Campo del Cicio resulted in an energy release of around 2-3 megatons (100-150 times the Hiroshima atomic weapon), and left several craters and a strewn field covering 493 km{sup 2} in northeastern Argentina. Rio Cuarto was likely more than 1000 megatons and may have devastated an area greater than 50,000 km{sup 2} in central Argentina. We are focusing on reconstructions of these events and their potential effects on contemporary hunter and gatherers. Our vinual reality tools also introduce interactive variables (e.g., impactor physical properties, climate, vegetation, topography, and social complexity) to allow researchers and students to better investigate and evaluate the factors that significantly influence cosmic impact effects.

Masse, W Bruce [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Janecky, David R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Forte, Maurizio [UC MERCED; Barrientos, Gustavo [UNIV OF LA PLATA, ARG.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Emergency Response Health Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health; however, there are major differences between health physics for research or occupational safety and health physics during a large-scale radiological emergency. The deployment of a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) monitoring and assessment team to Japan in the wake of the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant yielded a wealth of lessons on these difference. Critical teams (CMOC (Consequence Management Outside the Continental U.S.) and CMHT (Consequence Management Home Team) ) worked together to collect, compile, review, and analyze radiological data from Japan to support the response needs of and answer questions from the Government of Japan, the U.S. military in Japan, the U.S. Embassy and U.S. citizens in Japan, and U.S. citizens in America. This paper addresses the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. A key lesson learned was that public perception and the availability of technology with social media requires a diligent effort to keep the public informed of the science behind the decisions in a manner that is meaningful to them.

Mena, RaJah [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis; Pemberton, Wendy [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis; Beal, William [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Andrews

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Chernobyl Studies Project - working group 7.0 environmental transport and health effects. Progress report, October 1993--January 1994  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-funded Chernobyl Studies Project was begun as part of a cooperative agreement between the US and the former USSR, (quote) To develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future reactor accident (quote). Most of the initial tasks for this project are completed or near completion. The focus has now turned primarily to the issue of health effects from the Chernobyl accident. Currently, we are extensively engaged in case-control and cohort studies of thyroid diseases among Belarussian children and in the Ukraine. A major part of the effort is providing methods and applications of dose reconstruction and providing support and equipment for the medical teams. This document contains reports on progress in the following task areas: Management; External Dose; Hydrological Transport; Chromosome Painting Dosimetry; Stochastic Effects; Thyroid Studies; and Leukemia Studies.

Hendrickson, S.M. [ed.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Comparative Inter-Species Pharmacokinetics of Phenoxyacetic Acid Herbicides and Related Organic Acids. Evidence that the Dog is Not a Relevant Species for Evaluation of Human Health Risk.  

SciTech Connect

Phenoxyacetic acids including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) are widely utilized organic acid herbicides that have undergone extensive toxicity and pharmacokinetic analyses. The dog is particularly susceptible to the toxicity of phenoxyacetic acids and related organic acids relative to other species. Active renal clearance mechanisms for organic acids are ubiquitous in mammalian species, and thus a likely mechanism responsible for the increased sensitivity of the dog to these agents is linked to a lower capacity to secrete organic acids from the kidney. Using published data describing the pharmacokinetics of phenoxyacetic and structurally related organic acids in a variety of species including humans, inter-species comparative pharmacokinetics were evaluated using allometic parameter scaling. For both 2,4-D and MCPA the dog plasma half-life (t1/2) and renal clearance (Clr; ml hr-1) rates did not scale as a function of body weight across species; whereas for all other species evaluated, including humans, these pharmacokinetic parameters reasonably scaled. This exceptional response in the dog is clearly illustrated by comparing the plasma t1/2 at comparable doses of 2,4-D and MCPA, across several species. At a dosage of 5 mg/kg, in dogs the plasma t1/2 for 2,4-D and MCPA were {approx}92 - 106 hr and 63 hr, respectively, which is substantially longer than in the rat ({approx}1 and 6 hr, respectively) or in humans (12 and 11 hr, respectively). This longer t1/2, and slower elimination in the dog, results in substantially higher body burdens of these organic acids, at comparable doses, relative to other species. Although these results indicate the important role of renal transport clearance mechanisms as determinants of the clearance and potential toxicity outcomes of phenoxyacetic acid herbicides across several species, other contributing mechanisms such as reabsorption from the renal tubules is highly likely. These findings suggest that for new structurally similar organic acids, a limited comparative species (rat vs. dog) pharmacokinetic analysis early in the toxicology evaluation process may provide important insight into the relevance of the dog. In summary, the substantial difference between the pharmacokinetics of phenoxyacetic acids and related organic acids in dogs relative to other species, including humans, questions the relevance of using dog toxicity data for the extrapolation of human health risk.

Timchalk, Chuck

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Review A New Tool for Epidemiology: The Usefulness of Dynamic-Agent Models in Understanding Place Effects on Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major focus of recent work on the spatial patterning of health has been the study of how features of residential environments or neighborhoods may affect health. Place effects on health emerge from complex interdependent processes in which individuals interact with each other and their environment and in which both individuals and environments adapt and change over time. Traditional epidemiologic study designs and statistical regression approaches are unable to examine these dynamic processes. These limitations have constrained the types of questions asked, the answers received, and the hypotheses and theoretical explanations that are developed. Agent-based models and other systems-dynamics models may help to address some of these challenges. Agent-based models are computer representations of systems consisting of heterogeneous microentities that can interact and change/adapt over time in response to other agents and features of the environment. Using these models, one can observe how macroscale dynamics emerge from microscale interactions and adaptations. A number of challenges and limitations exist for agent-based modeling. Nevertheless, use of these dynamic models may complement traditional epidemiologic analyses and yield additional insights into the processes involved and the interventions that may be most useful. computer simulation; environment and public health; epidemiologic methods; health behavior; models, theoretical; residence characteristics; systems theory

Amy H. Auchincloss; Ana V. Diez Roux

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 12 Effects of Fatty Acids Containing a trans Double Bond on Body Composition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 12 Effects of Fatty Acids Containing a trans Double Bond on Body Composition eChapters Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 12 Effects of Fatty Acids Contai

216

Solar energy research at Sandia Laboratories and its effects on health and safety  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various solar energy research and development projects at Sandia Laboratories are discussed with emphasis on the primary health and safety hazard associated with solar concentration systems. This limiting hazard is chorioretinal damage. The unique safety and health hazards associated with solar energy collector and receiver systems cannot be measured yet, but progress is being made rapidly. Research is continuing, especially for eye hazards, with more extensive work planned.

Young, L.L. III

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

U.S. Environmental Health Effects and Treatment of Mercury Exposure IAP 2006, 12.091 Medical Geology/Geochemistry Term Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The various methods of treatment to mercury toxicity in the human body have been studied and investigated with somewhat mixed conclusions. This paper discusses the various types of mercury, the cycle of mercury in the environment, human exposure to mercury and treatment, and methods of reducing mercury pollution and its effect in the human population in the U.S.

Sergio Navarro

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human Health Print E-mail National Institutes of Health Research Portfolio Monday, April 22, 2013 Featured by...

219

Quantifying the health and economic impacts of mercury : an integrated assessment approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury is a toxic pollutant that endangers human and ecosystem health. Especially potent in the form of methyl mercury, exposure is known to lead to adverse neurological effects, and, a growing body of evidence suggests, ...

Giang, Amanda (Amanda Chi Wen)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

A framework for human microbiome research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of microbial communities and their genes (the microbiome) exist throughout the human body, with fundamental roles in human health and disease. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Human Microbiome Project ...

Friedman, Jonathan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

THE HEALTH EFFECTS IN WOMEN EXPOSED TO LOW-LEVELS OF IONIZING RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Effects of Ionizing Radiation. New York, United Nations,Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR III). The EffectsLevels of Ionizing Radiation. Washington, D.C. , National

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Chernobyl Studies Project: Working group 7.0, Environmental transport and health effects. Progress report, March--September 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April 1988, the US and the former-USSR signed a Memorandum of Cooperation (MOC) for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety; this MOC was a direct result of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4 and the following efforts by the two countries to implement a joint program to improve the safety of nuclear power plants and to understand the implications of environmental releases. A Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS) was formed to implement the MOC. The JCCCNRS established many working groups; most of these were the responsibility of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, as far as the US participation was concerned. The lone exception was Working Group 7 on Environmental Transport and Health Effects, for which the US participation was the responsibility of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of Working Group 7 was succintly stated to be, ``To develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future nuclear reactor accident.`` To implement the work DOE then formed two subworking groups: 7.1 to address Environmental Transport and 7.2 to address Health Effects. Thus, the DOE-funded Chernobyl Studies Project began. The majority of the initial tasks for this project are completed or near completion. The focus is now turned to the issue of health effects from the Chernobyl accident. Currently, we are involved in and making progress on the case-control and co-hort studies of thyroid diseases among Belarussian children. Dosimetric aspects are a fundamental part of these studies. We are currently working to implement similar studies in Ukraine. A major part of the effort of these projects is supporting these studies, both by providing methods and applications of dose reconstruction and by providing support and equipment for the medical teams.

Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M. [eds.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

368 Health Science 1997/98 CSULB Catalog HEALTH SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

368 · Health Science · 1997/98 CSULB Catalog HEALTH SCIENCE College of Health and Human Services Champlin Director, Radiation Therapy Stephanie Eatmon Director, School Health Education Susan C. Giarratano Coordinator, Student Affairs/Radiation Therapy Robert Pfister Advisor, Single Subject Credential Dale W. Evans

Sorin, Eric J.

224

Review and Evaluation of Updated Research on the Health Effects Associated with Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential health effects of low levels of radiation have predominantly been based on those effects observed at high levels of radiation. The authors have reviewed more than 200 percent publications in radiobiology and epidermiology related to low dose radiation and concluded that recent radiobiological studies at low-doses; that doses low dose radiation research should to holistic, systems-based approaches to develop models that define the shape of the dose-response relationships at low doses; and that these results should be combined with the latest epidermiology to produce a comprehensive understanding of radiation effects that addresses both damage, likely with a linear effect, and response, possibly with non-linear consequences.

Dauer, Lawrence T.; Brooks, Antone L.; Hoel, David G.; Morgan, William F.; Stram, Daniel; Tran, Phung

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Effects of atomic radiation  

SciTech Connect

This book focuses on the lifelong effects of atomic radiation exposure in language understandable by the concerned layperson or the specialist in another field. The base of knowledge used is the work of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor since 1975 the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Within the range of Chronic effects on human health the book provides a thorough review, although effects of nonionizing radiation, effects on structures, effects on other living species, and acute effects are not discussed.

Schull, W.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Your Environment.Your Health. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services #12;Your Environment.Your Health. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH),a part of the U.S.Department of Health and Human

Bandettini, Peter A.

227

Effects of anticipatory perceptual simulation on practiced human-robot tasks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the aim of attaining increased fluency and efficiency in human-robot teams, we have developed a cognitive architecture for robotic teammates based on the neuro-psychological principles of anticipation and perceptual simulation through top-down biasing. ... Keywords: Anticipation, Cognitive models, Human-robot interaction, Human-robot teamwork, Human-subject studies, Joint practice, Perceptual simulation, Priming, Top-down bias

Guy Hoffman; Cynthia Breazeal

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Human infrastructure as process and effect: its impact on individual scientists' participation in international collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We adopt the concept of human infrastructure as our analytic lens to examine two high energy physics collaborations. Our analysis goes beyond the macro level of virtual organizations to include the human infrastructures in scientists' home institutions ... Keywords: collaboration between differently resourced nations, high energy physics, human infrastructure, international collaboration

Airong Luo; Margaret Ann Murphy; Ted Hanss

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Potential Health Effects of Crystalline Silica Exposures from Coal Fly Ash: A Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of crystalline silica in coal fly ash (CFA) depends on a variety of factors, including the amount of silica in the pre-combustion coal, the combustion process, and emission control technologies among others. Occupational exposures to crystalline silica in CFA are related to these factors as well as activities associated with exposures and durations of exposure. This review summarizes the occupational and environmental health literature relevant to the presence of crystalline silica in CFA from...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

230

Trust in health infomediaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health infomediaries play an increasingly critical role in providing support for people's health and wellness decisions. Effectiveness of health infomediaries depends on people's trust in them. In this paper, we conceptualize a comprehensive synthesis ... Keywords: Health infomediary, Information quality, Risk belief, System quality, Trust, Trust beliefs, Trust signs

Jaeki Song; Fatemeh "Mariam" Zahedi

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Cannabidiol induced a contrasting pro-apoptotic effect between freshly isolated and precultured human monocytes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been documented that cannabidiol (CBD) induced apoptosis in a variety of transformed cells, including lymphocytic and monocytic leukemias. In contrast, a differential sensitivity between normal lymphocytes and monocytes to CBD-mediated apoptosis has been reported. The present study investigated the pro-apoptotic effect of CBD on human peripheral monocytes that were either freshly isolated or precultured for 72 h. CBD markedly enhanced apoptosis of freshly isolated monocytes in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, whereas precultured monocytes were insensitive. By comparison, both cells were sensitive to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. CBD significantly diminished the cellular thiols and glutathione in freshly isolated monocytes. The apoptosis induced by CBD was abrogated in the presence of N-acetyl-{sub L}-cysteine, a precursor of glutathione. In addition, precultured monocytes contained a significantly greater level of glutathione and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) compared to the freshly isolated cells. The HO-1 competitive inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin partially but significantly restored the sensitivity of precultured monocytes to CBD-mediated apoptosis. Collectively, our results demonstrated a contrasting pro-apoptotic effect of CBD between precultured and freshly isolated monocytes, which was closely associated with the cellular level of glutathione and the antioxidative capability of the cells.

Wu, Hsin-Ying; Chang, An-Chi; Wang, Chia-Chi; Kuo, Fu-Hua; Lee, Chi-Ya [Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Der-Zen [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jan, Tong-Rong, E-mail: tonyjan@ntu.edu.t [Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Effect of Recombinant Human Endostatin on Radiosensitivity in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To observe the effects of recombinant human endostatin (RHES) on the radiosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: First, 10 hypoxia-positive cases of pathology-diagnosed NSCLC selected from 15 patients were used to determine the normalization window, a period during which RHES improves NSCLC hypoxia. Second, 50 hypoxia-positive cases of pathology-diagnosed NSCLC (Stages I-III) were randomly divided into a RHES plus radiotherapy group (25 cases) and a radiotherapy-alone group (25 cases). Intensity = modulated radiotherapy with a total dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions for 6 weeks was adopted in the two groups. The target area included primary foci and metastatic lymph nodes. In the RHES plus radiotherapy group, RHES (15 mg/day) was intravenously given during the normalization window. Results: After RHES administration, the tumor-to=normal tissue radioactivity ratio and capillary permeability surface were first decreased and then increased, with their lowest points on the fifth day compared with the first day (all p window is within about 1 week after administration. RHES combined with radiotherapy within the normalization window has better short-term therapeutic effects and local control rates and no severe adverse reactions in the treatment of NSCLC, but it failed to significantly improve the 1-year and 3-year overall survival rates.

Jiang Xiaodong; Dai Peng; Wu Jin; Song Daan [Department of Oncology, Lianyungang First People's Hospital, Lianyungang (China); Yu Jinming, E-mail: jxdysy@sohu.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Nutritionally Enhanced Edible Oil and Oilseed ProcessingChapter 1 Oil and Oilseed-Based Bioactive Compounds and Their Health Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutritionally Enhanced Edible Oil and Oilseed Processing Chapter 1 Oil and Oilseed-Based Bioactive Compounds and Their Health Effects Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 1 Oil and Oil

234

An evaluation of theories concerning the health effects of low-dose radiation exposures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The danger of high, acute doses of radiation is well documented, but the effects of low-dose radiation below 100 mSv is still heavily debated. Four theories concerning the effects of lowdose radiation are presented here: ...

Wei, Elizabeth J. (Elizabeth Jay)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Environment, pollution and human health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This could be the result of a greater mobility of uranium, leading to a depleted content of this element their natural intrinsic content in uranium and thorium. A black shale collected from Timahdit (Morocco, 230 Th, 228 Th have multiples modes of occurrence in the Moroccan's black shale. Uranium

Brierley, Andrew

236

Health effects and related standards for fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants. Volume 6 of health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. [In California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews health effects and related standards for fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants, emphasizing impacts which may occur through emissions into the atmosphere, and treating other impacts briefly. Federal regulations as well as California state and local regulations are reviewed. Emissions are characterized by power plant type, including: coal-fired, oil-fired, gas-fired, combined cycle and advanced fossil-fuel plants; and liquid and vapor geothermal systems. Dispersion and transformation of emissions are treated. The state of knowledge of health effects, based on epidemiological, physiological, and biomedical studies, is reviewed.

Case, G.D.; Bertolli, T.A.; Bodington, J.C.; Choy, T.A.; Nero, A.V.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Addendum to the User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an addendum to the User's Guide for EPRI's RIVRISK analytic framework, Version 5.0. RIVRISK can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. Some minor inconsistencies between the original User's Guide (EPRI Report 1000733) and the model examples were discovered during model applications. This addendum provides modified pages of the User's Guide that correct those inconsistencies. Those planning to use RIVR...

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

238

Biological and Health Effects of EM and Acoustic - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 27, 2009... ago suggested that simple plants – grasses, beans, and corn-exhibited varying effects in simulated geomagnetic fields and in electric fields.

239

Medicaid Expansions and Welfare Contractions: Offsetting Effects on Prenatal Care and Infant Health?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ruggles. "When Do Women Use AFDC & Food Stamps? The Dynamicsthe Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program.Thus, the loss of AFDC effectively raised the administrative

Currie, Janet; Grogger, Jeffrey

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

A Comparison of hospitality human resources practices in Greece and the United States: An analysis of human resources practices and the potential effects on service quality.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Proper approaches to managing an organization’s human resources are becoming more and more scientific. Most human resource managers would agree that the selection, training, and… (more)

Philippakos, John

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Medicaid Expansions and Welfare Contractions: Offsetting Effects on Prenatal Care and Infant Health?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ruggles. "When Do Women Use AFDC & Food Stamps? The DynamicsA i d to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program.Thus, the loss of AFDC effectively raised the administrative

Currie, Janet; Grogger, Jeffrey T.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Oral Histories: Health Physicist William J. Bair, Ph.D.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 HUMAN RADIATION STUDIES: REMEMBERING THE EARLY YEARS Oral History of Health Physicist William J. Bair, Ph.D. Conducted October 14, 1994 United States Department of Energy Office of Human Radiation Experiments June 1995 CONTENTS Foreword Short Biography Graduate Studies at University of Rochester AEC-Funded Research at University of Rochester Use of Human Subjects at University of Rochester AEC Direction of University of Rochester Research Contacts With Researchers Into Radiation Effects No Knowledge of Uranium Injections at Rochester Beginning a Career at Hanford Radionuclide Inhalation Studies at Hanford Use of Animals in Radiation Studies Identifying Health Effects of Inhaled Radionuclides Expanded Customer Base for Inhalation Studies Limited Involvement With Human Studies

243

Environmental and Potential Health Effects of High Voltage Direct Current Transmission Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-voltage direct current (HVDC) technology plays an important but highly selective role in the U.S. power delivery system. It is a cost-effective technology for transferring bulk power over long distances, a critical technology for asynchronous grid interconnection, and the preferred technology for long-distance underwater cable transmission. Current interest in renovating the national grid for greater loads and higher reliability as well as unique applications for renewable energy projects, including...

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

The Effect of Degraded Digital Instrumentation and Control systems on Human-system Interfaces and Operator Performance  

SciTech Connect

Integrated digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in new and advanced nuclear power plants (NPPs) will support operators in monitoring and controlling the plants. Even though digital systems typically are expected to be reliable, their potential for degradation or failure significantly could affect the operators performance and, consequently, jeopardize plant safety. This U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) research investigated the effects of degraded I&C systems on human performance and on plant operations. The objective was to develop technical basis and guidance for human factors engineering (HFE) reviews addressing the operator's ability to detect and manage degraded digital I&C conditions. We reviewed pertinent standards and guidelines, empirical studies, and plant operating experience. In addition, we evaluated the potential effects of selected failure modes of the digital feedwater control system of a currently operating pressurized water reactor (PWR) on human-system interfaces (HSIs) and the operators performance. Our findings indicated that I&C degradations are prevalent in plants employing digital systems, and the overall effects on the plant's behavior can be significant, such as causing a reactor trip or equipment to operate unexpectedly. I&C degradations may affect the HSIs used by operators to monitor and control the plant. For example, deterioration of the sensors can complicate the operators interpretation of displays, and sometimes may mislead them by making it appear that a process disturbance has occurred. We used the findings as the technical basis upon which to develop HFE review guidance.

OHara, J.M.; Gunther, B.; Martinez-Guridi, G. (BNL); Xing, J.; Barnes, V. (NRC)

2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

245

Africa's Changing Markets for Health and Veterinary Services: The New Institutional Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

delivery to the organizational structure of health services.of the organizational structure of the health services (pre-crisis organizational structure of human health care has

Leonard, David K.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Effects of chlorophyll and chlorophyllin on low-dose aflatoxin B1 pharmacokinetics in human volunteers: A pilot study  

SciTech Connect

Chlorophyll (Chla) and chlorophyllin (CHL) were shown previously to reduce carcinogen bioavailability, biomarker damage, and tumorigenicity in trout and rats. These findings were partially extended to humans (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98, 14601-14606 (2001)), where CHL reduced excretion of aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1})-DNA repair products in Chinese unavoidably exposed to dietary AFB{sub 1}. However, neither AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetics nor Chla effects were examined. We conducted a small unblinded crossover study to establish AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetic parameters in human volunteers, and to explore possible effects of CHL or Chla co-treatment on those parameters. For protocol 1, fasted subjects received an IRB-approved dose of 14C-AFB{sub 1} (30 ng, 5 nCi) by capsule with 100 ml water, followed by normal eating and drinking after hr 2. Blood and cumulative urine samples were collected over 72 hr, and {sup 14}C-AFB{sub 1} equivalents were determined by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Protocols 2 and 3 were similar except capsules also contained 150 mg of purified Chla, or CHL, respectively. All protocols were repeated 3 times for each of three volunteers. The study revealed rapid human AFB{sub 1} uptake (plasma ka 5.05 {+-} 1.10 hr-1, Tmax 1.0 hr) and urinary elimination (95% complete by 24 hr) kinetics. Chla and CHL treatment each significantly impeded AFB{sub 1} absorption and reduced Cmax and AUC's (plasma and urine) in one or more subjects. These initial results provide AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetic parameters previously unavailable for humans, and suggest that Chla or CHL co-consumption may limit the bioavailability of ingested aflatoxin in humans, as they do in animal models.

Jubert, C; Mata, J; Bench, G; Dashwood, R; Pereira, C; Tracewell, W; Turteltaub, K; Williams, D; Bailey, G

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

247

Workshop on short-term health effects of reactor accidents: Chernobyl  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high-dose early-effects research that has been continued has been done in the context of infrequent accidents with large radiation sources and the use of bone marrow transfusions for treating malignancies, especially leukemia. It thus seemed appropriate to bring together those who have done research on and have had experience with massive whole-body radiation. The objectives were to review what is known about the acute effects of whole-body irradiation, to review the current knowledge of therapy, and particularly of the diagnostic and immunologic problems encountered in bone marrow therapy, and to compare this knowledge with observations made to date on the Chernobyl accident radiation casualties. Dr. Robert Gale, who had helped to care for these casualties, was present at the Workshop. It was hoped that such a review would help those making continuing clinical and pathological observations on the Chernobyl casualties, and that these observations would provide a basis for recommendations for additional research that might result in improved ability to manage successfully this type of severe injury.

Not Available

1986-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

248

Catalogue of OSD and HID Offshore Research by Key Human Factor Elements – 2002 Revision. Prepared by AEA Technology Environment for the Health and Safety Executive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The catalogue of OSD and HID Offshore human factors research was conceived by HSE OSD OD6 as an aid to OSD Inspectors and the offshore Industry. It was originally published in 1999 under Project 3696. This catalogue has now been updated by AEA Technology Environment. OSD Offshore has been renamed HID Offshore and hence the catalogue contains both OSD and HID Offshore human factors research, although the majority of the projects included date from the HSE Offshore Safety Division era. The catalogue provides: • description of the human factor elements as derived by AEA Technology from the Revision

Angela Crosbie; Fiona Davies

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Distribution Principles in Health Care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that "the organizational model for the health care system wehealth care system functioned effectively to implement central plans ("the organizational

Bringedal, Berit

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A metabolomic investigation of the effects of vitamin E supplementation in humans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Gelatine capsules containing 400 mg of natural (RRR) alpha- tocopheryl acetate (purity 98.9%) in vitamin E-stripped corn oil were purchased from Eurocaps Ltd. (Gwent, UK). Human study For this study 10 male subjects were recruited from within the University... in nutrition: a metabolomics case study. Br J Nutr 2007, 98:1–14. 28. Han X, Gross RW: Shotgun lipidomics: electrospray ionization mass spectrometric analysis and quantitation of cellular lipidomes directly from crude extracts of biological samples. Mass...

Wong, Max; Lodge, John K

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

251

PUBLIC HEALTH STATEMENT MERCURY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Public Health Statement is the summary chapter from the Toxicological Profile for Mercury. It is one in a series of Public Health Statements about hazardous substances and their health effects. A shorter version, the ToxFAQs™, is also available. This information is important because this substance may harm you. The effects of exposure to any hazardous substance depend on the dose, the duration, how you are exposed, personal traits and habits, and whether other chemicals are

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Health and Environmental Research. Summary of Accomplishments  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This is a short account of a 40-year-old health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Under the sponsorship of the federal agencies that were consecutively responsible for the national energy mission, this research program has contributed to the understanding of the human health and environmental effects of emergining energy technologies. In so doing, it has also evolved several nuclear techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of human ills. The form of this presentation is through examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of these areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

1984-04-00T23:59:59.000Z

253

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3Chapter 11 An Overview of the Effects of Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Body Weight and Body Composition in Humans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3 Chapter 11 An Overview of the Effects of Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Body Weight and Body Composition in Humans   Downloadable pdf of Chapter 11 An Ove

254

Energy Systems and Population Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well-documented that energy and energy systems have a central role in social and economic development and human welfare at all scales, from household and community to regional and national (41). Among its various welfare effects, energy is closely linked with people s health. Some of the effects of energy on health and welfare are direct. With abundant energy, more food or more frequent meals can be prepared; food can be refrigerated, increasing the types of food items that are consumed and reducing food contamination; water pumps can provide more water and eliminate the need for water storage leading to contamination or increased exposure to disease vectors such as mosquitoes or snails; water can be disinfected by boiling or using other technologies such as radiation. Other effects of energy on public health are mediated through more proximal determinants of health and disease. Abundant energy can lead to increased irrigation, agricultural productivity, and access to food and nutrition; access to energy can also increase small-scale income generation such as processing of agricultural commodities (e.g., producing refined oil from oil seeds, roasting coffee, drying and preserving fruits and meats) and production of crafts; ability to control lighting and heating allows education or economic activities to be shielded from daily or seasonal environmental constraints such as light, temperature, rainfall, or wind; time and other economic resources spent on collecting and/or transporting fuels can be used for other household needs if access to energy is facilitated; energy availability for transportation increases access to health and education facilities and allow increased economic activity by facilitating the transportation of goods and services to and from markets; energy for telecommunication technology (radio, television, telephone, or internet) provides increased access to information useful for health, education, or economic purposes; provision of energy to rural and urban health facilities allows increased delivery and coverage of 3 various health services and interventions such as tests and treatments, better storage of medicine and vaccines, disinfection of medical equipment by boiling or radiation, and more frequent and efficient health system encounters through mobile clinics or longer working hours; and so on. In fact, while the dominant view of development-energy-health linkages has been that improvements in energy and health are outcomes of the socioeconomic development process (e.g., the ''energy ladder'' framework discussed below), it has even been argued that access to higher quality energy sources and technologies can initiate a chain of demographic, health, and development outcomes by changing the household structure and socioeconomic relationships. For example, in addition to increased opportunities for food and income production, reduced infant mortality as a result of transition to cleaner fuels or increased coverage of vaccination with availability of refrigerators in rural clinics may initiate a process of ''demographic transition'' to low-mortality and low-fertility populations (14). Such a transition has historically been followed with further improvements in maternal and child health and increased female participation in the labor markets and other economic activities.

Ezzati, Majid; Bailis, Rob; Kammen, Daniel M.; Holloway, Tracey; Price, Lynn; Cifuentes, Luis A.; Barnes, Brendon; Chaurey, Akanksha; Dhanapala, Kiran N.

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

255

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Laboratory Reporting Level MCL, Maximum Contaminant Level MRL, Maximum Reporting Level MTBE, Methyl tert Figures 3 #12;Abstract BACKGROUND: As the population and demand for safe drinking water from domestic concentrations to U.S. EPA Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) and Health-Based Screening Levels. RESULTS: VOCs

256

Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 5: Appendix F -- Baseline human health risk assessment report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix F documents potential risks and provides information necessary for making remediation decisions. A quantitative analysis of the inorganic, organic, and radiological site-related contaminants found in various media is used to characterize the potential risks to human health associated with exposure to these contaminants.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

health effects Flow cytometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Geothermal Energy Engineered Geothermal Systems Nonproliferation and Verificatio n Seismic Modeling

Kurien, Susan

258

Uranium Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For inhalation or ingestion of soluble or moderately soluble compounds such as uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) or uranium tetrafluoride (UF4), the uranium enters the bloodstream and...

259

Healthful Lipids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthful Lipids addresses critical and current regulatory issues and emerging technologies, as well as the efforts made toward the production of healthier lipids. Healthful Lipids Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants d

260

Vice President for Student Affairs Executive Director, CSU Health Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Director of Medical Services Pharmacy Dental Services Laboratory Services Women's Clinic Assistant Director Behavioral Health Director of Specialty Counseling Services Drugs, Alcohol, & You (DAY) Programs i Behavioral Health Director of Business Services Accounting Student Health Insurance Human Resources Manager

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Juanita's Money Order: Income Effects on Human Capital Investment in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desarrollo Social Juanita’s Money Order: Income Effects onAvellaneda, 2005. Juanita’s Money Order: Income E?ects on13 Vice expenditures include money spent on alcohol and

Suarez, Juan Carlos; Avellaneda, Zenide

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of health physicist Constantine J. Maletskos, Ph.D., conducted January 20, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report is a transcript of an interview with Dr. Constatine J. Maletskos by representatives of the DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Maletskos was selected for this interview because of his research at the Radioactivity Center of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), at the Harvard Medical School, and at the New England Deaconess Hospital. After a brief biographical sketches Dr. Maletskos discusses at length about his work at the Center on research that used subjects from the Walter E. Fernald State School in Waverly, Massachusetts and the New England Center for Aging, as well as blood volume work involving pregnant women. He further discusses his work with radium Dial Painters, his work with Dr. Robley Evans, and various other subjects concerning experiments with human subjects under the auspices of the AEC.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of Updated Research on the Health Effects and Risks Associated with Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has performed a systematic review of recently published, peer-reviewed scientific studies in the fields of epidemiology and radiobiology that discuss health risks associated with exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. As a result of this study, the EPRI team concludes that there is a need to re-evaluate the magnitude of dose and dose-rate effectiveness factors (DDREF), including the significant body of radiobiology data that suggests non-linear risks at...

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

264

PM, Mercury, and Health Effects: A Workshop for Technical and Communications Staff: Proceedings of Air Quality Workshop Held on Octo ber 2, 2002, Atlanta, GA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An EPRI-sponsored workshop, entitled "PM, Mercury, and Health Effects: A Workshop for Technical and Communications Staff," was held in Atlanta, Georgia on October 2, 2002. Members of the Air Quality and Media Relations Groups conducted the workshop. Attendees were all utility-associated, although several attendees were from non-utility companies. In all, there were 69 attendees, of whom 39 had technical positions and 30 were involved with communications. The workshop was intended to serve as a primer for...

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

265

Comparison of leukotriene B4 and D4 effects on human eosinophil and neutrophil motility in vitro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The motility of isolated normal human peripheral blood eosinophils and neutrophils in response to exogenous leukotrienes B4 and D4 was examined by means of a modified under-agarose technique and a novel quantitative sampling strategy. Leukotriene D4 was a potent chemoattractant for eosinophils, with a significant threshold chemotactic effect evident at 10’#{176}M. The abolition of eosinophil chemotaxis by the potent and selective peptide-leukotriene-antagonist SK&F 104353 mdicated the pharmacological specificity of the leukotriene D4-induced response. The chemokinetic response of eosinophils to leukotriene D4 generally did not differ significantly from spontaneous migratory activity of unstimulated cells. Leukotriene D4 did not, however, alter directed neutrophil motility until a very high concentration (1O M) was achieved, although significant neutrophil chemokinesis relative to unstimulated movement was observed over the tested concentration range. Directional emigration of both eosinophils and neutrophils was induced by leukotriene B4 at concentrations as low as 108 M. Analysis of leukocyte orientations provided evidence that chemokinetic responses were not being interpreted as indications of chemotactic behavior. These studies suggest that leukotriene D4 may behave as a potent and selective chemoattractant for human eosinophils at physiologically

C. S. Spada; A. L. Nieves; A. H-p. Krauss; D. F. Woodward

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Effects of a 60 Hz Magnetic Field of up to 50 mT on Human Neuromotor Control: An EEG/EMG/Tremor Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High voltage power lines, industrial processes, and domestic electric appliances are among the numerous sources of daily exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF, below 300 Hz) magnetic fields (MF). ELF MF effects on humans have been studied over the past few decades, and these fields have been reported to affect human movement, brain electrical activity, and high-level brain information processing (cognition). Different strategies have been used to tackle this question using various physiological, ...

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

267

Paraho environmental data. Part IV. Land reclamation and revegetation. Part V. Biological effects. Part VI. Occupational health and safety. Part VII. End use  

SciTech Connect

Characteristics of the environment and ecosystems at Anvil Points, reclamation of retorted shale, revegetation of retorted shale, and ecological effects of retorted shale are reported in the first section of this report. Methods used in screening shale oil and retort water for mutagens and carcinogens as well as toxicity studies are reported in the second section of this report. The third section contains information concerning the industrial hygiene and medical studies made at Anvil Points during Paraho research operations. The last section discusses the end uses of shale crude oil and possible health effects associated with end use. (DMC)

Limbach, L.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Human Performance - Fossil Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All humans make errors. Industrial human errors can result in a loss of life and can significantly impact the productivity and cost effectiveness of any facility or company. Several industries in which human error has had a significant impact (for example, airline, medical, military, nuclear power, aviation, and chemical) have implemented human performance programs with excellent results. Human errors by fossil plant operators can easily challenge plant safety and production. In the fossil operations are...

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

269

202-328-5000 www.rff.orgThe Health Effects of Coal Electricity Generation in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To help inform pollution control policies in the Indian electricity sector we estimate the health damages associated with particulate matter, sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from individual coal-fired power plants. We calculate the damages per ton of pollutant for each of 89 plants and compute total damages in 2008, by pollutant, for 63 plants. We estimate health damages by combining data on power plant emissions of particulate matter, SO2 and NOx with reduced-form intake fraction models that link emissions to changes in population-weighted ambient concentrations of fine particles. Concentration-response functions for fine particles from Pope et al. (2002) are used to estimate premature cardiopulmonary deaths associated with air emissions for persons 30 and older. Our results suggest that 75 percent of premature deaths are associated with fine particles that result from SO2 emissions. After characterizing the distribution of premature mortality across plants we calculate the health benefits and cost-per-life saved of the flue-gas desulfurization unit installed at the Dahanu power plant in Maharashtra and the health benefits of coal washing at the Rihand power plant in Uttar Pradesh.

Shama Gamkhar; Kabir Malik; Alex Limonov; Ian Partridge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Data driven health system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective use of data is believed to be the key to address systemic inefficiencies in health innovation and delivery, and to significantly enhance value creation for patients and all stakeholders. However, there is no ...

Rosen Ceruolo, Melissa Beth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Hypersensitivity of human and rodent Fanconianemia (FA) cells to bystander effect-induced DNA damage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hypersensitivity Hypersensitivity o f h uman a nd r odent F anconi a nemia ( FA) c ells t o b ystander effect---induced D NA d amage P.F. Wilson 1,2 , H. Nagasawa 3 , A .C. K ohlgruber 2 , S .S. U rbin 2 , F .A. Bourguet 2 , J .R. Brogan 3 , J .S. Bedford 3 , M .A. Coleman 2 , J.M. Hinz 4 , and J.B. Little 5 1 B iology D epartment/NASA S pace R adiation L aboratory, B rookhaven N ational L aboratory, U pton, N Y 1 1733 2 Biosciences a nd B iotechnology D ivision, L awrence L ivermore N ational L aboratory, L ivermore, C A 9 4551 3 Department o f E nvironmental a nd R adiological H ealth S ciences, C olorado S tate U niversity, F ort C ollins, C O 8 0523 4 School o f M olecular B iosciences, W ashington S tate U niversity, P ullman, W A 9 9164 5 D epartment o f G enetics a nd C omplex D iseases, H arvard S chool o f P ublic H ealth, B oston, M A 0 2115 Fanconi

272

Health News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Open Data for Climate and Health Insights Print E-mail Metadata Access Tool for Climate and Health (MATCH) Website Thursday, May 9, 2013 Posted by Tom Armstrong, Executive...

273

Structural Stability of Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 Is Essential for Protective Effects Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Human fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF1) has radioprotective effects on the intestine, although its structural instability limits its potential for practical use. Several stable FGF1 mutants were created increasing stability in the order, wild-type FGF1, single mutants (Q40P, S47I, and H93G), Q40P/S47I, and Q40P/S47I/H93G. This study evaluated the contribution of the structural stability of FGF1 to its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Each FGF1 mutant was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 h before or after total body irradiation (TBI) with {gamma}-rays at 8-12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Q40P/S47I/H93G could activate all subtypes of FGF receptors in vitro much more strongly than the wild-type without endogenous or exogenous heparin. Preirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G significantly increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1 after TBI at 10 or 12 Gy, and postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G was effective in promoting crypt survival after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. In addition, crypt cell proliferation, crypt depth, and epithelial differentiation were significantly promoted by postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G. The level of stability of FGF1 mutants correlated with their mitogenic activities in vitro in the absence of heparin; however, preirradiation treatment with the mutants increased the crypt number to almost the same level as Q40P/S47I/H93G. When given 24 h after TBI at 10 Gy, all FGF1 mutants increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1, and Q40P/S47I/H93G had the strongest mitogenic effects in intestinal epithelial cells after radiation damage. Moreover, Q40P/S47I/H93G prolonged mouse survival after TBI because of the repair of intestinal damage. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the structural stability of FGF1 can contribute to the enhancement of protective effects against radiation-induced intestinal damage. Therefore, Q40P/S47I/H93G is pharmacologically one of the most promising candidates for clinical applications for radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome.

Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.jp [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Umeda, Sachiko [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Yasuda, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro; Motomura, Kaori; Suzuki, Masashi [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)] [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Zakrzewska, Malgorzata [Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw (Poland)] [Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw (Poland); Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)] [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Imai, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Exploring the Effect of mHealth Technologies on Communication and Information Sharing in a Pediatric Critical Care Unit: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Communication and information sharing is an important aspect of healthcare information technology and mHealth management. A main requirement in the quality of patient care is the ability of all health care participants to communicate. Research illustrates ... Keywords: Health Care Technology, Information Technology, Management of Technology, Professional Communication, Technology Assessment, eHealth, mHealth

Rocci Luppicini; Victoria Aceti

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Wind Turbines and Health A Rapid Review of the Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to present findings from a rapid review of the evidence from current literature on the issue of wind turbines and potential impacts on human health. In particular the paper seeks to ascertain if the following statement can be supported by the evidence: There are no direct pathological effects from wind farms and that any potential impact on humans can be minimised by following existing planning guidelines. This statement is supported by the 2009 expert review commissioned by the American and

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

California's Public Health Laboratories: Inter-organizational cooperation models to bolster laboratory capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The organizational and administrative structure of healthin inter-organizational relationships in health and humanPublic Health Laboratories: Inter-organizational cooperation

Hsieh, Kristina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

College of Medicine Department of Environmental Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical IRB review of graduate student activities that involve Human Subjects Research. Thesis Activities that involve Human Subjects Research in the Department of Environmental Health. a. The UC IRB of a graduate degree" that involve human subjects research. b. The UC IRB may accept CCHMC as the IRB

Papautsky, Ian

278

Trace-element geochemistry of coal resource development related to environmental quality and health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses for decision makers and those involved in coal resource development the environmental and health impacts of trace-element effects arising from significant increases in the use of coal, unless unusual precautions are invoked. Increasing demands for energy and the pressing need for decreased dependence of the United States on imported oil require greater use of coal to meet the nation's energy needs during the next decade. If coal production and consumption are increased at a greatly accelerated rate, concern arises over the release, mobilization, transportation, distribution, and assimilation of certain trace elements, with possible adverse effects on the environment and human health. It is, therefore, important to understand their geochemical pathways from coal and rocks via air, water, and soil to plants, animals, and ultimately humans, and their relation to health and disease. To address this problem, the Panel on Trace Element Geochemistry of Coal Resource Development Related to Health (PECH) was established. Certain assumptions were made by the Panel to highlight the central issues of trace elements and health and to avoid unwarranted duplication of other studies. Based on the charge to the Panel and these assumptions, this report describes the amounts and distribution of trace elements related to the coal source; the various methods of coal extraction, preparation, transportation, and use; and the disposal or recycling of the remaining residues or wastes. The known or projected health effects are discussed at the end of each section.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

First Evaluation of the Biologic Effectiveness Factors of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in a Human Colon Carcinoma Cell Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: DNA lesions produced by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and those produced by gamma radiation in a colon carcinoma cell line were analyzed. We have also derived the relative biologic effectiveness factor (RBE) of the neutron beam of the RA-3- Argentine nuclear reactor, and the compound biologic effectiveness (CBE) values for p-boronophenylalanine ({sup 10}BPA) and for 2,4-bis ({alpha},{beta}-dihydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX ({sup 10}BOPP). Methods and Materials: Exponentially growing human colon carcinoma cells (ARO81-1) were distributed into the following groups: (1) BPA (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (2) BOPP (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (3) neutrons alone, and (4) gamma rays ({sup 60}Co source at 1 Gy/min dose-rate). Different irradiation times were used to obtain total absorbed doses between 0.3 and 5 Gy ({+-}10%) (thermal neutrons flux = 7.5 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} sec). Results: The frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells and the number of micronuclei per micronucleated binucleated cells showed a dose-dependent increase until approximately 2 Gy. The response to gamma rays was significantly lower than the response to the other treatments (p < 0.05). The irradiations with neutrons alone and neutrons + BOPP showed curves that did not differ significantly from, and showed less DNA damage than, irradiation with neutrons + BPA. A decrease in the surviving fraction measured by 3-(4,5-dimetiltiazol-2-il)-2,5-difeniltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay as a function of the absorbed dose was observed for all the treatments. The RBE and CBE factors calculated from cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) and MTT assays were, respectively, the following: beam RBE: 4.4 {+-} 1.1 and 2.4 {+-} 0.6; CBE for BOPP: 8.0 {+-} 2.2 and 2.0 {+-} 1; CBE for BPA: 19.6 {+-} 3.7 and 3.5 {+-} 1.3. Conclusions: BNCT and gamma irradiations showed different genotoxic patterns. To our knowledge, these values represent the first experimental ones obtained for the RA-3 in a biologic model and could be useful for future experimental studies for the application of BNCT to colon carcinoma.

Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra, E-mail: dagrosa@cnea.gov.a [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); National Research Council (Argentina); Crivello, Martin [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires(Argentina); Perona, Marina [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); National Research Council (Argentina); Thorp, Silvia; Santa Cruz, Gustavo Alberto [Department of Instrumentation and Control, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pozzi, Emiliano [Argentina Reactor, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Casal, Mariana [Institute of Oncology 'Angel H. Roffo', University of Buenos Aires (Argentina); Thomasz, Lisa; Cabrini, Romulo [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kahl, Steven [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Juvenal, Guillermo Juan [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); National Research Council (Argentina); Pisarev, Mario Alberto [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); National Research Council (Argentina); Department of Human Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Alternative Exposure Metrics and Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure assessments are critical components of human health studies. These assessments may be geared toward defining where an environmental agent might be present, its levels or concentrations, the conditions under which exposure occurs, those exposed, and additional details of possible exposure scenarios. The assessments may also be used by epidemiologists to address potential linkages between the exposure and health outcomes.Electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure science has evolved due ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Cost Effectiveness of Cleaning Techniques for Controlling Human-based Transport of Invasive Exotic Plants on Electric Transmission Line Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update provides a broad overview of accomplishments over the first full year of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) project to investigate the cost effectiveness of cleaning techniques to control human-based transport of invasive exotic plants on electric transmission line rights-of-way. One-half of the intended field work for the whole project (2012-2015) was completed, with attendant greenhouse and office work ongoing. EPRI expects the project to be completed in ...

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

282

Cellular and molecular research to reduce uncertainties in estimates of health effects from low-level radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was undertaken by five radiation scientists to examine the feasibility of reducing the uncertainties in the estimation of risk due to protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. In addressing the question of feasibility, a review was made by the study group: of the cellular, molecular, and mammalian radiation data that are available; of the way in which altered oncogene properties could be involved in the loss of growth control that culminates in tumorigenesis; and of the progress that had been made in the genetic characterizations of several human and animal neoplasms. On the basis of this analysis, the study group concluded that, at the present time, it is feasible to mount a program of radiation research directed at the mechanism(s) of radiation-induced cancer with special reference to risk of neoplasia due to protracted, low doses of sparsely ionizing radiation. To implement a program of research, a review was made of the methods, techniques, and instruments that would be needed. This review was followed by a survey of the laboratories and institutions where scientific personnel and facilities are known to be available. A research agenda of the principal and broad objectives of the program is also discussed. 489 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

Elkind, M.M.; Bedford, J.; Benjamin, S.A.; Waldren, C.A. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (USA)); Gotchy, R.L. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Ozone depletion and health  

SciTech Connect

This book presents the state of knowledge of the ozone layer and the greenhouse effect. Deleterious effects of ultra-violet radiation on humans, animals, and plants are discussed. Alternatives to chloro-fluoro-carbons and political responses to the scientific discoveries are also addressed.

Russell-Jones, R.; Wigley, T.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Interagency Oceans and Human Health Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

does not constitute an endorsement. Acknowledgements This is Contribution 72 of the National Fire plants to increased nutrient cycling in the forest ecosystem, the herbaceous plant community does compete

285

1 HUMAN HEALTH SAFETY EVALUATION OF HALON ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is the establishment of cardiac response of each individual dog to ... 10,000** 7 days** ... test atmosphere the bag should be stored in the dark or under ...

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Office of Health & Safety - Health Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search System Public Health Activities Agenda for Public Health Activities Access Handbook - Guidelines for Researchers Conducting Health Studies at DOE HHS Communication...

287

Role of prostaglandin-H synthase in mediating genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of estrogens. Environ. Health Perspect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diethylstilbestrol (DES) has been found to be oxidized in Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells by prostaglandin-H synthase (PGH synthase). It is hypothesized that PGH synthase mediates adverse effects of DES and other carcinogenic estrogens such as induction of neoplastic transformation and genotoxicity. Interest in PGH synthase-catalyzed reactions focuses on two aspects: oxidation and metabolic activation of stilbene and steroid estrogens by PGH synthase, and modulation of prostaglandin biosynthesis via effects of these compounds on PGH synthase. Studies of the former aspect of PGH synthase-catalyzed in vitro metabolism have revealed that cooxidation of DES, DES analogues, and steroid estrogens gives rise to reactive intermediates; DES and DES analogues known to transform SHE cells are metabolized by PGH synthase in vitro; PGH synthase catalyzes both the formation and oxidation of catechol metabolites from steroid estrogens, and reactive intermediates from DES and from steroid estrogens are stable enough to bind both to the catalytic enzyme PGH synthase and to other proteins. The data support the contention that PGH synthase-catalyzed metabolic activation plays a role in the induction of neoplastic transformation by stilbene and steroid estrogens but is not conclusive evidence for a cause-effect relationship. More recently, two closely related DES indanyl analogues have been found to differ in their interaction with PGH synthase: indenestrol A is cooxidized and activated like DES, whereas indenestrol B inhibits the enzyme. They provide useful tools to test the above hypothesis from a new perspective. The interaction between estrogens and PGH synthase is also viewed with respect to its potential role in tumor promotion and progression, processes in which prostaglandins have been implicated as important mediators. Cooxidation of estrogens in vitro is accompanied by a stoichiometric increase in prostaglandin production. Useful approaches to study this and other effects of estrogens on PGH synthase that could result in a modulation of prostaglandin biosynthesis are discussed.

Gisela H. Degen

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Allergy arising from exposure to airborne contaminants in an insect rearing facility: Health effects and exposure control  

SciTech Connect

In agricultural crop improvement, yield under various stress conditions and limiting factors is assessed experimentally. Of the stresses on plants which affect yield are those due to insects. Ostrinia nubilalis, the European corn borer (corn borer) is a major pest in sweet and field corn in the U.S. There are many ways to fight crop pests such as the corn borer, including (1) application of chemical insecticides, (2) application of natural predators and, (3) improving crop resistance through plant genetics programs. Randomized field trials are used to determine the effectiveness of pest management programs. These trials frequently consist of randomly selected crop plots to which well-defined input regimes are instituted. For example, corn borers might be released onto crop plots in several densities at various stages of crop development, then sprayed with different levels of pesticide. These experiments are duplicated across regions and, in some cases across the country, to determine, in this instance for example, the best pesticide application rate for a given pest density and crop development stage. In order to release these pests onto crop plots, one must have an adequate supply of the insect pest. In winter months studies are carried out in the laboratory to examine chemical and natural pesticide effectiveness, as well as such things as the role of pheromones in moth behavior. The advantage in field trials is that yield data can be garnered directly. In this country, insects are raised for crop research primarily through the US Department of Agriculture, in cooperation with public Land Grant Universities and, by the private sector agricultural concerns - seed companies and others. This study quantifies the airborne allergen exposure of persons working in a Land Grant University entomology lab were allergy to European corn borer was suspected.

Wolff, D.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Continued on page 2 IMPLEMENTING THE HEALTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rule, were published by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) on February 20, 2003. PurposeApril 2005 Continued on page 2 IMPLEMENTING THE HEALTH INSURANCE PORTABILITY AND ACCOUNTABILITY ACT (HIPAA) SECURITY RULE By Joan S. Hash, Computer Security Division, Information Technology Laboratory

290

The Effects of Degraded Digital Instrumentation and Control Systems on Human-system Interfaces and Operator Performance: HFE Review Guidance and Technical Basis  

SciTech Connect

New and advanced reactors will use integrated digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems to support operators in their monitoring and control functions. Even though digital systems are typically highly reliable, their potential for degradation or failure could significantly affect operator performance and, consequently, impact plant safety. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) supported this research project to investigate the effects of degraded I&C systems on human performance and plant operations. The objective was to develop human factors engineering (HFE) review guidance addressing the detection and management of degraded digital I&C conditions by plant operators. We reviewed pertinent standards and guidelines, empirical studies, and plant operating experience. In addition, we conducted an evaluation of the potential effects of selected failure modes of the digital feedwater system on human-system interfaces (HSIs) and operator performance. The results indicated that I&C degradations are prevalent in plants employing digital systems and the overall effects on plant behavior can be significant, such as causing a reactor trip or causing equipment to operate unexpectedly. I&C degradations can impact the HSIs used by operators to monitor and control the plant. For example, sensor degradations can make displays difficult to interpret and can sometimes mislead operators by making it appear that a process disturbance has occurred. We used the information obtained as the technical basis upon which to develop HFE review guidance. The guidance addresses the treatment of degraded I&C conditions as part of the design process and the HSI features and functions that support operators to monitor I&C performance and manage I&C degradations when they occur. In addition, we identified topics for future research.

O'Hara, J.M.; W. Gunther, G. Martinez-Guridi

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

291

Superfund Cleanups and Infant Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are the first to examine the effect of Superfund cleanups on infant health rather than focusing on proximity to a site. We study singleton births to mothers residing within 5km of a Superfund site between 1989 and 2003 ...

Currie, Janet

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

292

SAR/QSAR methods in public health practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods of (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationship ((Q)SAR) modeling play an important and active role in ATSDR programs in support of the Agency mission to protect human populations from exposure to environmental contaminants. They are used for cross-chemical extrapolation to complement the traditional toxicological approach when chemical-specific information is unavailable. SAR and QSAR methods are used to investigate adverse health effects and exposure levels, bioavailability, and pharmacokinetic properties of hazardous chemical compounds. They are applied as a part of an integrated systematic approach in the development of Health Guidance Values (HGVs), such as ATSDR Minimal Risk Levels, which are used to protect populations exposed to toxic chemicals at hazardous waste sites. (Q)SAR analyses are incorporated into ATSDR documents (such as the toxicological profiles and chemical-specific health consultations) to support environmental health assessments, prioritization of environmental chemical hazards, and to improve study design, when filling the priority data needs (PDNs) as mandated by Congress, in instances when experimental information is insufficient. These cases are illustrated by several examples, which explain how ATSDR applies (Q)SAR methods in public health practice.

Demchuk, Eugene, E-mail: edemchuk@cdc.gov; Ruiz, Patricia; Chou, Selene; Fowler, Bruce A.

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on Inflammatory Response Proteins in a 3D Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Skin responses to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation include the induction of DNA repair, apoptosis, and stress response pathways. Additionally, numerous studies indicate that radiation exposure leads to inflammatory responses in skin cells and tissue. However, the inflammatory response of skin tissue to low dose radiation (<10 cGy) is poorly understood. In order to address this, we have utilized a reconstituted human skin tissue model (MatTek EpiDerm FT) and assessed changes in 23 cytokines twenty-four and forty eight hours following treatment of skin with either 3 or 10 cGy low-dose of radiation. Three cytokines, IFN-?, IL-2, MIP-1?, were significantly altered in response to low dose radiation. In contrast, seven cytokines were significantly altered in response to a high radiation dose of 200 cGy (IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-?, MIP-1?, TNF ?, and VEGF) or the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1?, IL-8, MIP-1?, MIP-1?, RANTES). Additionally, radiation induced inflammation appears to have a distinct cytokine response relative to the non-radiation induced stressor, TPA. Overall, these results indicate that there are subtle changes in the inflammatory protein levels following exposure to low dose radiation and this response is a sub-set of what is seen following a high dose in a human skin tissue model.

Varnum, Susan M.; Springer, David L.; Chaffee, Mary E.; Lien, Katie A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sacksteder, Colette A.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center)'s Environmental Health Laboratory at bisphenolAandtriclosan; the National Center for Environmental Health for Environmental Health #12;1 Background The National Report on Human Exposure to For the National Exposure Report

295

Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1990--September 30, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a brief progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology including Measurement Applications and Development, Pollutant Assessments, Measurement Systems Research, Dosimetry Applications Research, Metabolism and Dosimetry Research and Nuclear Medicine. Biological and Radiation Physics including Atomic, Molecular, and High Voltage Physics, Physics of Solids and Macromolecules, Liquid and Submicron Physics, Analytic Dosimetry and Surface Physics and Health Effects. Chemical Physics including Molecular Physics, Photophysics and Advanced Monitoring Development. Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis including Human Genome and Toxicology, Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication, Environmental Regulations and Remediation and Information Management Technology. Risk Analysis including Hazardous Waste.

Kaye, S.V.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Status of health and environmental research relative to direct coal liquefaction: 1976 to the present  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the status of health and environmental research efforts, supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to assist in the development of environmentally acceptable coal liquefaction processes. Four major direct coal liquefaction processes are currently in (or have been investigated at) the pilot plant stage of development. Two solvent refined coal processes (SRC-I and -II), H-coal (a catalytic liquefaction process) and Exxon donor solvent (EDS). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was assigned responsibility for evaluating SRC process materials and prepared comprehensive health and environmental effects research program plans for SRC-I and -II. A similar program plan was prepared for H-coal process materials by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A program has been developed for EDS process materials by Exxon Research and Engineering Co. The program includes short-term screening of coal-derived materials for potential health and ecological effects. Longer-term assays are used to evaluate materials considered most representative of potential commercial practice and with greatest potential for human exposure or release to the environment. Effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential health and ecological effects are also being evaluated. These assessments are being conducted to assist in formulating cost-effective environmental research programs and to estimate health and environmental risks associated with a large-scale coal liquefaction industry. Significant results of DOE's health and environmental research efforts relative to coal liquefaction include the following: chemical characterization, health effects, ecological fate and effects, amelioration and risk assessment.

Gray, R.H.; Cowser, K.E. (eds.)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

World Health Through Collaboration World Health Through Collaboration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as Lyme disease orWest Nile virus (WNV) in humans (LoGiudice et al.2003,Ezenwa et al.2006).At the same or manipulation of the snail community. Lyme disease Recent studies have demonstrated that variation in host species diversity has a strong effect on the level of human risk from Lyme disease, the most frequently

Sheridan, Jennifer

298

Office of Student Services Health Science Campus MS 1026  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Student Services Health Science Campus MS 1026 Collier Building 4405 3000 Arlington Avenue Toledo, OH 43614-2598 419-383-5810 BSN Consortium Planning Guide Bowling Green State University College of Health & Human Services Nursing Advisor - Health Center Rm. 102 Bowling Green, OH 43403 419

Moore, Paul A.

299

February 29, 2012 National Institutes of Health Genetic Testing Registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tests would be beneficial for several groups such as health care providers, researchers, laboratories to the Charge of the Secretary of Health and Human Services. 2008. See http://oba.odFebruary 29, 2012 National Institutes of Health Genetic Testing Registry Scientific advances over

Levin, Judith G.

300

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH | National Cancer Institute LABORATORY OF PATHOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH | National Cancer Institute LABORATORY OF PATHOLOGY National Cancer Institute (NCI) The Laboratory of Pathology, based in the NCI, provides clinical service in anatomic-scientists DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute, Center

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Health Care Reform, What’s in It? Rural Communities and Rural Medical Care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A critical component of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), the federal health care reform law, is the expansion of health insurance coverage and a resulting improvement in health outcomes through access to affordable and timely medical care. One notable concern expressed in the wake of passage of the law is the ability of the health care system to effectively serve over 30 million newly insured, plus deliver effective services to the currently insured in order to meet the goals of the new law. (McMorrow) We have long said the ultimate goal of health care reform is to help make people healthier. Access to health services is a crucial need to meet that goal, and constraints on access will make the health care reform law less meaningful than it should. (McMorrow) Access issues are even more acute in rural communities. As we have shown, many rural communities have severe medical professional shortages, few of the nation’s medical professionals practice in rural areas, rural health professionals are aging, fewer professionals are being trained in primary care and fewer new professionals are being educated and trained. (Top 10 paper) Medicare and Medicaid—major components of rural medical care—pay rural medical providers and facilities less than do private insurers and less than providers in urban areas. All of these exist at a time when, in general, rural people have greater medical care needs than do nonrural people. (National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, Center on an Aging Society) Access provisions turned out to be a major part of the health reform law, but an unsung part that received little

Jon M. Bailey

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

ORNL Health Services Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Page ORNL Home | ESH&Q Home | Health Services Internal A division in the Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Directorate The Health Services Division at Oak Ridge...

303

The NIH Almanac -National Institutes of Health (NIH) Page 1 of 1 Begun as a one-room Laboratory of Hygiene in 1887, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) today is one of the world's foremost medical research centers. An  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NIH Almanac - National Institutes of Health (NIH) Page 1 of 1 Begun as a one-room Laboratory research centers. An agency of the Department of Health and Human Services, the NIH is the Federal focal...Turning Discovery into Health" is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The NIH Almanac

Levin, Judith G.

304

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forms Beryllium Health Surveillance Program Summary Beryllium-Associated Workers: Medical Surveillance Beryllium Health Surveillance Program Forms Appendix B to the Preamble...

305

Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbine Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbine Blades. Author(s) ... is mandatory for the cost-effective operation of an offshore wind power plant.

306

The human genome initiative of the Department of Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative. 34 refs.

none,

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Modelling postures of human movements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this paper is to present a novel modelling of postures of human activities such us walk, run... Effectively, human action is, in general, characterized by a sequence of specific body postures. So, from an incoming sequence video, we determine ... Keywords: human activities, modelling, shape matching, skeleton, thinning

Djamila Medjahed Gamaz; Houssem Eddine Gueziri; Nazim Haouchine

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Do heavy ions induce the bystander effect? : study to determine the induction of the bystander effect from Fe ion beam compared to X-rays in human keratinocytes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bystander effect is the observation that non-irradiated cells near a cell traversed by radiation express biological responses such as micronuclei formation and genomic instability. Most published studies of the bystander ...

Anzenberg, Vered

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Arsenic Health Research Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) research program investigating the health effects of inorganic arsenic continues to focus on understanding the biological significance of low-level inorganic arsenic exposure. The major component of ongoing work is the development of an alternative, nonlinear approach to revising the inorganic arsenic cancer potency value (or cancer slope factor). Current, default linear approaches for establishing a cancer slope factor do not account for the biological mode o...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Human factors assessments of D and D technologies  

SciTech Connect

On April 2, 1997, the US Secretary of Energy directed the US Assistant Secretary of Environmental Management and of Safety and Health to require field input of appropriate data to ensure that safety and health considerations were properly addressed in the Accelerating Cleanup: Focus on 2006 Plan. The US Department of Energy (DOE) field managers have committed to the Secretary that they will fully implement integrated safety management systems (ISMSs) at their respective sites by the end of fiscal year 1999. The Secretary has further directed that headquarters safety and health guidance be developed to support consistent and comprehensive project baseline summaries from the field. The Secretary has committed to institutionalizing ISMS as an integral component of the way the DOE conducts its business. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board continues to oversee and closely monitor the DOE's commitment to the safety and health of its workers. The DOE is committed to a management system approach to ensure that work is performed in a manner that protects the worker, public, and environment. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) is actively addressing the need to incorporate environmental safety and health (ES and H) considerations in developing technologies. The DDFA is partnered with the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) to evaluate the ES and H considerations of the innovative and improved decontamination and decommissioning technologies. Part of the implementation of the ES and H work practices in the field is through a cooperative agreement between the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the OENHP. The objective of this program is to establish an International Environmental Technology and Training Center to conduct human factors assessments and protocols on environmental technologies. The intent of the human factors assessments is to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of the technologies and to enhance desirable human values, including job satisfaction and improved quality of worker life. An important part of the effort is to develop ES and H training tools for each evaluated technology.

Carpenter, C.P.; Evans, T.T.; McCabe, B.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Effects of Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of the Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene in Experimental Radiation-Induced Heart Disease  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Irradiation to the heart may lead to late cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor gene could reduce post-irradiation damage of the rat heart and improve heart function. Methods and Materials: Twenty rats received single-dose irradiation of 20 Gy gamma ray locally to the heart and were randomized into two groups. Two weeks after irradiation, these two groups of rats received Ad-HGF or mock adenovirus vector intramyocardial injection, respectively. Another 10 rats served as sham-irradiated controls. At post-irradiation Day 120, myocardial perfusion was tested by myocardial contrast echocardiography with contrast agent injected intravenously. At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was assessed using the Langendorff technique with an isolated working heart model, after which heart samples were collected for histological evaluation. Results: Myocardial blood flow was significantly improved in HGF-treated animals as measured by myocardial contrast echocardiography at post-irradiation Day 120 . At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was significantly improved in the HGF group compared with mock vector group, as measured by left ventricular peak systolic pressure (58.80 +- 9.01 vs. 41.94 +- 6.65 mm Hg, p < 0.05), the maximum dP/dt (5634 +- 1303 vs. 1667 +- 304 mm Hg/s, p < 0.01), and the minimum dP/dt (3477 +- 1084 vs. 1566 +- 499 mm Hg/s, p < 0.05). Picrosirius red staining analysis also revealed a significant reduction of fibrosis in the HGF group. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer can attenuate radiation-induced cardiac injury and can preserve cardiac function.

Hu Shunying; Chen Yundai [Department of Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Li Libing [Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Chen Jinlong; Wu Bin [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Zhou, Xiao; Zhi Guang [Department of Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Li Qingfang; Wang Rongliang; Duan Haifeng; Guo Zikuan; Yang Yuefeng; Xiao Fengjun [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang Hua, E-mail: wanghua@nic.bmi.ac.c [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang Lisheng [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Health benefits of particle filtration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health benefits of particle filtration Health benefits of particle filtration Title Health benefits of particle filtration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Fisk, William J. Journal Indoor Air Date Published 02/12/2013 Abstract The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7% to 25%. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

313

Millersville University Health Services Health Form Instructions Millersville University Health Services is dedicated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

laboratories as ordered by a medical provider. Health Services works cooperatively with Quest, ACM, and CDDMillersville University Health Services Health Form Instructions Millersville University Health, and health education. Health Services Information Millersville University Health Services is centrally

Hardy, Christopher R.

314

LDRD final report for improving human effectiveness for extreme-scale problem solving : assessing the effectiveness of electronic brainstorming in an industrial setting.  

SciTech Connect

An experiment was conducted comparing the effectiveness of individual versus group electronic brainstorming in order to address difficult, real world challenges. While industrial reliance on electronic communications has become ubiquitous, empirical and theoretical understanding of the bounds of its effectiveness have been limited. Previous research using short-term, laboratory experiments have engaged small groups of students in answering questions irrelevant to an industrial setting. The present experiment extends current findings beyond the laboratory to larger groups of real-world employees addressing organization-relevant challenges over the course of four days. Employees and contractors at a national security laboratory participated, either in a group setting or individually, in an electronic brainstorm to pose solutions to a 'wickedly' difficult problem. The data demonstrate that (for this design) individuals perform at least as well as groups in producing quantity of electronic ideas, regardless of brainstorming duration. However, when judged with respect to quality along three dimensions (originality, feasibility, and effectiveness), the individuals significantly (p<0.05) out-performed the group working together. When idea quality is used as the benchmark of success, these data indicate that work-relevant challenges are better solved by aggregating electronic individual responses, rather than electronically convening a group. This research suggests that industrial reliance upon electronic problem solving groups should be tempered, and large nominal groups might be the more appropriate vehicle for solving wicked corporate issues.

Dornburg, Courtney C.; Stevens, Susan Marie; Davidson, George S.; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

316

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Resources with Additional Information Charles DeLisi As head of DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research, Charles DeLisi played a pivotal role in proposing and initiating the Human Genome Program in 1986. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has historically been active in supporting human genome research. On September 10, 2003, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham presented the Secretary's Gold Award to Aristides Patrinos and Francis Collins for their leadership of the government's Human Genome Project. At DOE's Office of Science, Dr. Patrinos is the Associate Director for Biological and Environmental Research. He has been a researcher at the department's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory.

317

Basis for Changing Chromium Regulatory Health Values  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), acts as a chemical driver for many human health risk assessments under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and other regulatory programs across a range of industrial sectors, including the electric power sector. To characterize and manage the health and environmental risk related to toxics, agencies and the regulated sectors must rely on the development of scientific estimates of the exposure-to-response relationship to understand and quantify the potential hazard ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Selection of a discount rate for use in NRC regulatory analyses and application of discount rates to future averted health effects  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this report is to provide background information and recommendations on the use of discount rates in the regulatory analysis process. The report focuses on two issues selecting the appropriate discount rate or rates to use when conducting a regulatory analysis, and applying the selected discount rate to future health-related benefits estimated to result from alternative regulatory actions.

Paananen, O.H.; Hendrickson, P.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Lack of effects of atomic bomb radiation on genetic instability of tandem-repetitive elements in human germ cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a pilot study to detect the potential effects of atomic bomb radiation on germ-line instability, we screened 64 children from 50 exposed families and 60 from 50 control families for mutations at six minisatellite loci by using Southern blot analysis with Pc-1, {lambda}TM-18, ChdTC-15, p{lambda}g3, {lambda}MS-1, and CEB-1 probes. In the exposed families, one or both parents received a radiation dose >0.01 Sv. Among the 64 children, only one child had parents who were both exposed. Thus, of a total of 128 gametes that produced the 64 children, 65 gametes were derived from exposed parents and 63 were from unexposed parents, the latter being included in a group of 183 unexposed gametes used for calculating mutation rates. The average parental gonadal dose for the 65 gametes was 1.9 Sv. We detected a total of 28 mutations at the p{lambda}g3, {lambda}MS-1, and CEB-1 loci, but no mutations at the Pc-1, {lambda}TM-18, and ChdTC-15 loci. We detected 6 mutations in 390 alleles of the 65 exposed gametes and 22 mutations in 1098 alleles of the 183 gametes from the unexposed parents. The mean mutation rate per locus per gamete in these six minisatellite loci was 1.5% in the exposed parents and 2.0% in the unexposed parents. We observed no significant difference in mutation rates in the children of the exposed and the unexposed parents (P = .37, Fisher`s exact probability test). 38 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Kodaira, Mieko; Satoh, Chiyoko [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiyama, Keiko [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)]|[Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)] [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Developing Human Performance Measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the reactor oversight process (ROP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors the performance of utilities licensed to operate nuclear power plants. The process is designed to assure public health and safety by providing reasonable assurance that licensees are meeting the cornerstones of safety and designated crosscutting elements. The reactor inspection program, together with performance indicators (PIs), and enforcement activities form the basis for the NRC’s risk-informed, performance based regulatory framework. While human performance is a key component in the safe operation of nuclear power plants and is a designated cross-cutting element of the ROP, there is currently no direct inspection or performance indicator for assessing human performance. Rather, when human performance is identified as a substantive cross cutting element in any 1 of 3 categories (resources, organizational or personnel), it is then evaluated for common themes to determine if follow-up actions are warranted. However, variability in human performance occurs from day to day, across activities that vary in complexity, and workgroups, contributing to the uncertainty in the outcomes of performance. While some variability in human performance may be random, much of the variability may be attributed to factors that are not currently assessed. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assure licensee performance and indicate when additional investigation may be required. This paper presents research that establishes a technical basis for developing human performance measures. In particular, we discuss: 1) how historical data already gives some indication of connection between human performance and overall plant performance, 2) how industry led efforts to measure and model human performance and organizational factors could serve as a data source and basis for a framework, 3) how our use of modeling and simulation techniques could be used to develop and validate measures of human performance, and 4) what the possible outcomes are from this research as the modeling and simulation efforts generate results.

Jeffrey Joe; Bruce Hallbert; Larry Blackwood; Donald Dudehoeffer; Kent Hansen

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities January 8, 2013 - 1:55pm Addthis Speaker Dr. Daniel Rahn at the Health Disparaties Conference. Speaker Dr. Daniel Rahn at the Health Disparaties Conference. What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment The Sixth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities, Reducing Health Disparities through Sustaining and Strengthening Healthy Communities, was held in Little Rock, Arkansas, November 28 through December 1, 2012, at The Peabody Little Rock. Like its five predecessors, the 2012 conference focused on policies and programs to reduce health disparities among minority and low-income populations. Presenters emphasized the role of

322

Operational health physics training  

SciTech Connect

The initial four sections treat basic information concerning atomic structure and other useful physical quantities, natural radioactivity, the properties of {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, x rays and neutrons, and the concepts and units of radiation dosimetry (including SI units). Section 5 deals with biological effects and the risks associated with radiation exposure. Background radiation and man-made sources are discussed next. The basic recommendations of the ICRP concerning dose limitations: justification, optimization (ALARA concepts and applications) and dose limits are covered in Section seven. Section eight is an expanded version of shielding, and the internal dosimetry discussion has been extensively revised to reflect the concepts contained in the MIRD methodology and ICRP 30. The remaining sections discuss the operational health physics approach to monitoring radiation. Individual sections include radiation detection principles, instrument operation and counting statistics, health physics instruments and personnel monitoring devices. The last five sections deal with the nature of, operation principles of, health physics aspects of, and monitoring approaches to air sampling, reactors, nuclear safety, gloveboxes and hot cells, accelerators and x ray sources. Decontamination, waste disposal and transportation of radionuclides are added topics. Several appendices containing constants, symbols, selected mathematical topics, and the Chart of the Nuclides, and an index have been included.

NONE

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

TOXNET and Beyond-Using the National Library of Medicine's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this training is to familiarize participants with reliable online environmental health and toxicology information, from the National Library of Medicine and other reliable sources. Skills and knowledge acquired in this training class will enable participants to access, utilize, and refer others to environmental health and toxicology information. After completing this course, participants will be able to: (1) Identify quality, accurate, and authoritative online resources pertaining to environmental health, toxicology, and related medical information; (2) Demonstrate the ability to perform strategic search techniques to find relevant online information; and (3) Apply the skills and knowledge obtained in this class to their organization's health information needs. NLMs TOXNET (Toxicology Data Network) is a free, Web-based system of databases on toxicology, environmental health, hazardous chemicals, toxic releases, chemical nomenclatures, and specialty areas such as occupational health and consumer products. Types of information in the TOXNET databases include: (1) Specific chemicals, mixtures, and products; (2) Unknown chemicals; and (3) Special toxic effects of chemicals in humans and/or animals.

Templin-Branner, Wilma

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

ORISE: Health physics services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health physics services Nuclear power plant The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers comprehensive health physics services in a number of technical areas...

325

ORISE: Worker Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Worker Health Studies Capabilities Overview Illness and Injury Surveillance Worker Health Research Medical Data Management Beryllium Exposure Studies and Testing Radiation Exposure...

326

ORISE: Health physics training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surveys Health physics services Radiochemical analyses Health physics training How ORISE is Making a Difference Overview Environmental characterization at ORNL a...

327

Health Impacts Research - Emissions & Emission Controls - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Impacts Research Health Impacts Research Another aspect of the emissions research at ORNL focuses on Health Impacts. This effort concentrates on analyzing exhaust for Mobile Source Air Toxics (MSATs) or other unregulated exhaust species that have the potential to harm human health. MSATs are a group of chemical species defined by the U.S. EPA that may pose risk to humans; formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, 1,3-butadiene, benzene, and toluene are some example species. Engines operated with new combustion modes and alternative fuels are studied for MSAT emissions to determine insure that the advanced technologies being developed pose no additional risk to humans. A large part of the Health Impacts research effort at ORNL focuses on particulate matter (PM) which is also defined as an MSAT by the U.S. EPA.

328

Linking public health and the health of the Chesapeake Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chesapeake Bay has a profound impact on the lives of all who reside in the 64,000 square miles of its watershed. From crab cakes to sailboats, drinking water to naval ships, the Bay touches virtually every aspect of life in the region. The Bay has inspired literature, driven the regional economy, and shaped political decision making and development patterns for homes, industry, agriculture, and transportation. As population demands increase and urban boundaries expand into pristine landscapes, the sustainability of the Chesapeake Bay and its resources face unprecedented pressures. Consequently, the public's health also is vulnerable to Bay pollution and other stresses stemming from development activities and widespread growth occurring throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed. This paper will examine the linkages between the environmental quality of the Bay and the population health status, recommend ways to bridge ecological and human health concerns in the context of the Bay, and finally present a framework for developing a public health report card for the Bay.

Burke, T.A.; Litt, J.S.; Fox, M.A.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Medical Surveillance in Occupational Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Occupational in Occupational Health Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-S/CM The Johns Hopkins UniversHy Bloomberg School of Public Health + Compliance with legal requirements + Early detection (preclinical) and therapy - many established occupational diseases are not curable + Prevention of disease in co-worleffects . l e s of Suroeilltmce + Condition of interest should be an important heaHh problem * Accepted treatment available when adverse health effect or disease diagnosed (may be cessation of exposure in occupational disease) * Suitable & acceptable test available + Early or latent stage to screen for

330

Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrialized societies which continue to use fossil fuel energy sources are considering adoption of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology to meet carbon emission reduction targets. Deep geological storage of CO2 onshore faces opposition regarding potential health effects of CO2 leakage from storage sites. There is no experience of commercial scale CCS with which to verify predicted risks of engineered storage failure. Studying risk from natural CO2 seeps can guide assessment of potential health risks from leaking onshore CO2 stores. Italy and Sicily are regions of intense natural CO2 degassing from surface seeps. These seeps exhibit a variety of expressions, characteristics (e.g., temperature/ flux), and location environments. Here we quantify historical fatalities from CO2 poisoning using a database of 286 natural CO2 seeps in Italy and Sicily. We find that risk of human death is strongly influenced by seep surface expression, local conditions (e.g., topography and wind speed), CO2 flux, and human behavior. Risk of accidental human death from these CO2 seeps is calculated to be 10-8 year-1 to the exposed population. This value is significantly lower than that of many socially accepted risks. Seepage from future storage sites is modeled to be less than Italian natural flux rates. With appropriate hazard management, health risks from unplanned seepage at onshore storage sites can be adequately minimized.

Roberts, J.J.; Wood, R.A.; Haszeldine, R.S. [Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage, School of GeoSciences, Grant Institute, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JW, Scotland (United Kingdom)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

331

Climate Instability and Public Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Instability and Public Health Climate Instability and Public Health Speaker(s): Paul Epstein Date: August 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Evan Mills Climate restricts the range of infectious diseases, while weather affects the timing and intensity of outbreaks. The ranges of several key diseases or their vectors are changing, along with shifts in plant communities and the retreat of alpine glaciers. In addition, extreme weather events associated with warming create conditions conducive to "clusters" of disease outbreaks. The rapid spread of West Nile virus in the Americas is related, paradoxically, to drought and its impact on wildlife (230 species of animals, 138 species of birds) could alter the ratios of predator birds to their prey (including rodents) and thus have implications for human

332

Henry Ford Health System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Serving Southeast Michigan with More than Health Care. The HFHS workforce supports southeast Michigan with annually ...

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

333

Superfund Cleanups and Infant Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are the first to examine the effect of Superfund cleanups on infant health rather than focusing on proximity to a site. We study singleton births to mothers residing within 5km of a Superfund site between 1989-2003 in ...

Currie, Janet

334

Health Care Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Health Care Health Care Characteristics by Activity... Health Care Health care buildings are those used as diagnostic and treatment facilities for both inpatient and outpatient care. Doctor's and dentist's offices are considered health care if they use any type of diagnostic medical equipment and office if they do not. Skilled nursing or other residential care buildings are categorized as lodging. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Health Care Buildings... Health care buildings in the South tended to be smaller and were more numerous than those in other regions of the country. Buildings on health care complexes tended to be newer than those not on multibuilding facilities. The median age for buildings on health care complexes was 9.5 years, compared to 29.5 years for health care buildings not on a multibuilding facility.

335

Essays on health care consumption and household finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores how health insurance affects the decisions that individuals make. The first chapter studies the effect of insurance on health care consumption. Nearly 10 percent of teenagers become ineligible for their ...

Gross, Tal (Tal A.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Characterization of energy production and health impact in Romanian context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main aim of the paper is to establish appropriate approaches for assessing the impact of power generation plants on human health, considering the Romanian situation. As a consequence of the technology used in energy production and of the type of ... Keywords: air pollution, assessment, health impact, power plants

Diana Mariana Cocarta; Adrian Badea; Tiberiu Apostol

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Cost-effective facility disposition planning with safety and health lessons learned and good practices from the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning Program  

SciTech Connect

An emphasis on transition and safe disposition of DOE excess facilities has brought about significant challenges to managing worker, public, and environmental risks. The transition and disposition activities involve a diverse range of hazardous facilities that are old, poorly maintained, and contain radioactive and hazardous substances, the extent of which may be unknown. In addition, many excess facilities do not have historical facility documents such as operating records, plant and instrumentation diagrams, and incident records. The purpose of this report is to present an overview of the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program, its safety performance, and associated safety and health lessons learned and good practices. Illustrative examples of these lessons learned and good practices are also provided. The primary focus of this report is on the safety and health activities and implications associated with the planning phase of Oak Ridge facility disposition projects. Section 1.0 of this report provides the background and purpose of the report. Section 2.0 presents an overview of the facility disposition activities from which the lessons learned and good practices discussed in Section 3.0 were derived.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & EChapter 10 Bioavailability and Biopotency of Vitamin E in Humans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & E Chapter 10 Bioavailability and Biopotency of Vitamin E in Humans Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 10 Bio

339

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 4 Analysis and Bioavailability of Lignans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 4 Analysis and Bioavailability of Lignans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Download

340

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 9 Flaxseed, Lignans, and Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 9 Flaxseed, Lignans, and Cancer Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 5 Oxidative Metabolism of Lignans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 5 Oxidative Metabolism of Lignans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf

342

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 11 a-Linolenic Acid and Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 11 a-Linolenic Acid and Cancer Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

343

Soy Protein ProductsChapter 3 Protein Quality and Human Nutrition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soy Protein Products Chapter 3 Protein Quality and Human Nutrition Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry EB488804B9D11995A2463507F5B3CE67 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Ch

344

doi:10.1093/alcalc/agh065, available online at www.alcalc.oupjournals.org DUAL EFFECT OF ETHANOL ON CELL DEATH IN PRIMARY CULTURE OF HUMAN AND RAT HEPATOCYTES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — Aims: In-vivo and in-vitro studies have shown that ethanol induces hepatocyte damage. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a broad range of ethanol concentrations on apoptosis and necrosis in primary culture of human and rat hepatocytes. Methods: Human and rat hepatocytes were isolated from human hepatectomies and male Wistar rats (200–250 g) using the classical collagenase perfusion method. After stabilization of cell culture, ethanol (0–10 mmol/l) was administered and the parameters were measured 24 h after ethanol addition. Apoptosis was studied by DNA fragmentation, iodide propidium–DNA staining, caspase-3 activity and annexin V binding in hepatocytes. Necrosis was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and GSH/GSSG were used as parameters of oxidative stress. Results: Ethanol enhanced dose-dependently all the parameters associated with apoptosis in human and rat hepatocytes. Low or high ethanol concentrations induced an opposite action against cell necrosis in cultured hepatocytes. Low concentrations of ethanol (1–2 mmol/l) reduced LDH release from human and rat hepatocytes. However, the highest ethanol concentration (10 mmol/l) induced a sharp increase in cell necrosis. The effect of ethanol on cell necrosis was related to lipid peroxidation in hepatocytes. Conclusions: Ethanol differentially regulates apoptosis or necrosis in cultured hepatocytes. Although ethanol exerted a dose-dependent induction of apoptosis, low ethanol concentrations were able to reduce basal lipid peroxidation and necrosis in hepatocytes. The highest ethanol concentration (10 mmol/l) induced apoptosis and necrosis in human and rat cultured hepatocytes.

Rafael Castilla; Raúl González; Dalia Fouad; Enrique Fraga; Jordi Muntané

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

THE EFFECTS OF NEW MEDIA ON ALUMNI ENGAGEMENT AMONG MILLENNIALS: A CASE STUDY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES ALUMNI.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores the effects of new media, specifically the Internet and the popular social networking site Facebook, on alumni engagement among Millennials in the… (more)

Horseman, Allison M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Human-robot cross-training: Computational formulation, modeling and evaluation of a human team training strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We design and evaluate human-robot cross-training, a strategy widely used and validated for effective human team training. Cross-training is an interactive planning method in which a human and a robot iteratively switch ...

Nikolaidis, Stefanos

347

Ozone, Air Pollution, and Respiratory Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of the outdoor air pollutants regulated by the Clean Air Act of 1970 (and recently revised in 1990), ozone has been the one pollutant most difficult to control within the federal standards. The known human health effects are all on the respiratory system. At concentrations of ozone which occur during summer air-pollution episodes in many urban metropolitan areas of the United States, a portion of the healthy population is likely to experience symptoms and reversible effects on lung function, particularly if exercising heavily outdoors. More prolonged increase in airway responsiveness and the presence of inflammatory cells and mediators in the airway lining fluid may also result from these naturally occurring exposures. Serial exposures to peak levels of ozone on several consecutive days are more characteristic of pollution episodes in the Northeast United States and may be associated with recurrent symptoms. No "high-risk " or more sensitive group has been found, in contrast to the case of sulfur dioxide, to which asthmatics are more susceptible than normals. The occurrence of multiple exposure episodes within a single year over many years in some areas of California has led to studies looking for chronic effects of ozone exposure on the lung. To date, no conclusive studies have been reported, although further work is under way. Much of what we know about the effects of this gas on the lung are based on controlled exposures to pure gas within an environmental exposure laboratory. Interactions between substances which commonly co-occur in air-pollution episodes are also under investigation.

William S

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

ORISE: Health Literacy Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Literacy Development Literacy Development While health disparities may be attributed to a number of factors, health literacy development and access to health information can help special populations gain a better understanding of wellness and prevention. The Internet and other means of electronic communication have become popular tools that are allowing people to take control of their health. According to Healthy People 2010, nearly half of American adults (90 million people) are deemed "health illiterate"-an increasing problem among special populations that appears to contribute to health disparities. Health literacy refers to the ability to read and understand materials related to personal health, as well as navigate the health system. To assist government agencies and organizations educate populations facing

349

Page 4, Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 of 11 4 of 11 Previous Page Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Initial Election Period As a new employee, you have 60 days from your date of appointment to make an election for the health benefits program. Your completed Health Benefits Election Form, SF-2809, must be submitted to your servicing Human Resources Office in a timely manner. If you fail to make an election within the required deadline, you are considered to have declined coverage. You will not have another opportunity to enroll until the annual open season (conducted November/December) or unless you experience a qualifying life event (see http://www.opm.gov/insure/health/planinfo/qle.asp) that would allow you to enroll. Please note that the SF-2809 should be completed and submitted even if you are declining coverage.

350

Synthetic fossil fuel technologies: health problems and intersociety cooperation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential health impacts of synthetic fossil fuel products are considered mainly in terms of complex and potentially carcinogenic mixtures of polynuclear aromatic (PNA) compounds. These components of oils and tars present an especially perplexing range of problems to those concerned with health protection. The nature of these problems, such as multifactorial exposure, are discussed within a framework of current and future standards to regulate human exposure. Some activities of government agencies, national laboratories, and professional societies are described. A case can be made for pooling the resources of these groups to achieve better solutions for assessing the acceptability of the various technologies and safeguarding human health.

Gammage, R B; Turner, J E

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

ORISE: Public Health Communication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Communication Communication Public Health Communication The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) assists government agencies and organizations in addressing public health challenges by developing evidence-based communication programs and social marketing initiatives that resonate with target populations. Because approximately half of American adults do not understand basic health information, ORISE develops the types of messages that will attract attention and motivate people to address their personal and family health. ORISE also develops and executes evidence-based and culturally-competent public health communication programs that help change behaviors and result in healthier lifestyles. Communication Planning and Products Public health organizations are faced with increasing demands for

352

Computer simulation of the activity of the elderly person living independently in a Health Smart Home  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a simulator of human activities collected with presence sensors in our experimental Health Smart Home ''Habitat Intelligent pour la Sante (HIS)''. We recorded 1492 days of data on several experimental HIS during the French national project ... Keywords: Correlation, Distance, Health Smart Homes, Hidden Markov Machine, Human activity, Polya Urn, Similarity, Simulator

N. Noury; T. Hadidi

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Environmental assessment for construction and operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) proposes to construct and operate a new laboratory for consolidation of current and future activities of the Human Genome Center (HGC). This document addresses the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental and human-health effects from the proposed facility construction and operation. This document was prepared in accordance the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (United States Codes 42 USC 4321-4347) (NEPA) and the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Final Rule for NEPA Implementing Procedures [Code of Federal Regulations 10CFR 1021].

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

An Evolutionary Genomic Approach to Identify Genes Involved in Human Birth Timing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coordination of fetal maturation with birth timing is essential for mammalian reproduction. In humans, preterm birth is a disorder of profound global health significance. The signals initiating parturition in humans have ...

Plunkett, Jevon

355

Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP)  

SciTech Connect

The Environment, Safety and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) models human safety and health risk resulting from waste management and environmental restoration activities. Human safety and health risks include those associated with storing, handling, processing, transporting, and disposing of radionuclides and chemicals. Exposures to these materials, resulting from both accidents and normal, incident-free operation, are modeled. In addition, standard industrial risks (falls, explosions, transportation accidents, etc.) are evaluated. Finally, human safety and health impacts from cleanup of accidental releases of radionuclides and chemicals to the environment are estimated. Unlike environmental impact statements and safety analysis reports, ESHRAP risk predictions are meant to be best estimate, rather than bounding or conservatively high. Typically, ESHRAP studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management or environmental restoration program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, processing, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal. ESHRAP can be used to support complex environmental decision-making processes and to track risk reduction as activities progress.

Eide, Steven Arvid; Thomas Wierman

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Health and Nutrition Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Health and Nutrition Division promotes and facilitates communication and cooperation among professionals whose interests in lipid biochemistry and physiology relate to all aspects of dietary fats and health; encompasses the technical areas of dietary f

357

ORISE: Worker Health Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Worker Health Research Worker Health Research Worker Health Research The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides technical assistance to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other government agencies by performing specialized worker health research to assess the health of workers and other populations. Statistical methods, epidemiologic research and hazard assessments are core ORISE worker health research competencies. Because information technology is an integral part of the epidemiologic research process, ORISE also capitalizes on its benefits by organizing worker health research data into manageable databases. By providing DOE and the scientific community with accessible information on the long-term health outcomes of occupational exposures, ORISE is helping improve the

358

Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and decisions and, on a limited but growing scale, improving communication between clinicians and patients. [10] Some health care delivery organizations have already suc- edge for clinicians improves the quality and/or safety and efficiency of health care... by the individual or family, plus non-clinical information such as self-care trackers and directories of health care providers. The health care delivery dimension includes information such as pro- vider notes, clinical orders, decision-support programs, digital...

Detmer, Don E

2003-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

359

Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP) is an online program which serves as the vehicle for identifying and measuring these three factors, effectiveness, efficiency, and timeliness...

360

Wellness, Health & Counseling Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness, Health & Counseling Services Dr. Marcelle Holmes Assistant Vice Chancellor CARE Career Student Health Center #12;The mission of the Wellness, Health & Counseling Services cluster is to support · Dedicated to promoting principles of wellness, prevention and healthy life-style choices for students

Stanford, Kyle

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Environmental Public Health at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requiring special laboratory expertise · The Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services, which, environmental sanitation, and laboratory sciences----to protect public health · Responding and sharing solutions to environmental public health problems worldwide "We" are---- · The Division of Laboratory Sciences, which

362

Health IT at NIST NIST research and development in standards, testing,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and leadership. Since 2004, NIST has worked closely with the Department of Health and Human Services' Office Senior Advisor and Program Coordinator, Health IT Information Technology Laboratory bjlide@nist.gov (301Health IT at NIST NIST research and development in standards, testing, security and privacy

363

Environment, Safety, Health, & Security | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable PPPL Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety Procurement Division Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library Contact Us Lab Leadership Directory Careers/ Human Resources Environment, Safety & Health Sustainable PPPL Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety Procurement Division Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library Environment, Safety, Health, & Security About PPPL ESH&S The Environment, Safety, Health, & Security Department provides safety oversight and assistance for the wide variety of plasma and fusion research projects undertaken at the Laboratory as well as stewardship for the environment and our property and assets. The department is comprised of four divisions: Environmental Services, Safety, Health Physics, and Site

364

Three fold system (3FS) for mental health domain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Along with an increase in the number of mentally ill people, research into all aspects of mental health has increased in recent years. In all disciplines information is the key to success but major problems adversely affect the efficiency and effectiveness ... Keywords: data mining, health information systems, intelligent information retrieval, mental health research, ontology-based multi-agent systems

Maja Hadzic; Roberta Ann Cowan

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Asset Health Workshop Fundamentals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report represents the initial findings and expectations from member asset managers with regard to asset health. Principal objectives were expressed at an asset health workshop hosted by BC Hydro July 7th, 2007. Participants shared experiences in asset health and aligned on an approach to capture and use asset health information. Asset health will be a key component of EPRI's asset and risk management program. The notes of the meeting will be utilized as a starting point for framing out the asset hea...

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

366

Audit Report Westinghouse Savannah River Company's Health Benefit...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

with Aetna Insurance expired on December 31, 1996. Westinghouse chose Blue CrossBlue Shield of South Carolina (BCBS) to administer its health plan, effective January 1, 1997....

367

Effects of Heat Stress and Increased Protein Fed in Milk Replacers on the Health and Growth Parameters of Neonatal Holstein Bull Calves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objectives of the study were to evaluate if calves fed 6 L of high protein milk replacer (HPMR; 1135 g/d, 28% crude protein (CP), 20% fat) had improved performance and health as compared to calves fed 4 L of a conventional milk replacer (CMR; 454 g/d, 20% CP, 20% fat) in heat stress and non heat stress environments. Holstein bull calves (n=52) Water consumption (WC) in mL and starter intake (SI) in grams was measured daily. Feed conversion (FC) was also calculated for each nutritional treatment and environment. Fecal scores (FS) of 1 to 4 (1=hard, firm, 2=soft, firm, 3=no form, and 4=watery) were recorded daily. Calves with a FS of >3 were considered to have diarrhea and required treatment. Respiration rates (RR) were recorded at 0630 (AM) and 1830 (PM) to monitor respiratory challenges while rectal temperatures (RT) were also measured using a digital thermometer daily in AM and PM to monitor febrile events. If RT was greater than 39.2 degrees C for NHS calves and 39.7 degrees C for HS calves, they were treated for febrile events (FE). Data was analyzed using PROC MIXED (SAS 9.2). HPMR had a greater (P < 0.01) WH, HG, BL, HH, ADG, WC, and FS than the CMR (0.15 vs. 0.11, 0.37 vs. 0.28, 0.27 vs. 0.22, 0.21 vs. 0.14, 0.82 vs. 0.58, 4235 vs. 2656, and 2.05 vs. 1.73, respectively). HS had a greater (P < 0.01) WC than NHS (4365 vs. 2526, respectively). CMR had a greater SI and FC (P < 0.05) than HPMR (0.942 vs. 0.437, and 1.99 vs. 1.78, respectively). HS had a higher RT AM, RT PM, RR AM, and RR PM (P<0.01) than NHS (38.87 vs. 38.77, 39.03 vs. 38.79, 35.79 vs. 32.77, and 55.73 vs. 38.57, respectively. Calves in NHS had a higher FE (P<0.01) than the HS calves (6.24 vs. 2.33). There was no significant difference in growth parameters in HS or NHS in calves of like feeding strategies. The results show calves in HS experienced higher RT AM, RT PM, RR AM, and RR PM. The increased protein and energy fed to the HPMR calves resulted in greater FS and increased growth.

Krenek, Andrew

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Provides leadership for a national program to increase knowledge and advance effective strategies to deal with problems and issues in the promotion of mental health and the prevention and treatment of mental illness;  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and supports mental health services research concerned with the impact of the organization, financing, and management of health services on the quality, cost, access to, and outcomes of care; · Provides assistance to to deal with problems and issues in the promotion of mental health and the prevention and treatment

Bandettini, Peter A.

369

Environmental assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS) Concept Development and Evaluation Program (CDEP). [Microwave and non-microwave health and ecological assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the satellite power system (SPS), satellites in geosynchronous earth orbit would collect solar energy in space, convert it to microwaves, and transmit the microwaves to receiving antennas (rectennas) on earth. At the rectennas, the microwave energy would be converted to electricity. This SPS environmental assessment considers the microwave and nonmicrowave effects on the terrestrial environment and human health, atmospheric effects, and effects on electromagnetic systems. No environmental problem has been identified that would preclude the continued study of SPS technology. To increase the certainty of the assessment, some research has been initiated and long-term research is being planned.

Valentino, A.R.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Solid health care waste management status at health care centers in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory  

SciTech Connect

Health care waste is considered a major public health hazard. The objective of this study was to assess health care waste management (HCWM) practices currently employed at health care centers (HCCs) in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory. Survey data on solid health care waste (SHCW) were analyzed for generated quantities, collection, separation, treatment, transportation, and final disposal. Estimated 4720.7 m{sup 3} (288.1 tons) of SHCW are generated monthly by the HCCs in the West Bank. This study concluded that: (i) current HCWM practices do not meet HCWM standards recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or adapted by developed countries, and (ii) immediate attention should be directed towards improvement of HCWM facilities and development of effective legislation. To improve the HCWM in the West Bank, a national policy should be implemented, comprising a comprehensive plan of action and providing environmentally sound and reliable technological measures.

Al-Khatib, Issam A. [Institute of Environmental and Water Studies, Birzeit University, P.O. Box 14, Birzeit, Ramallah, West Bank (Palestinian Territory, Occupied)], E-mail: ikhatib@birzeit.edu; Sato, Chikashi [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

ORISE: Health physics services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health physics services Health physics services Nuclear power plant The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers comprehensive health physics services in a number of technical areas for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as well as other federal and state agencies. From radiological facility audits and reviews to dose modeling and technical evaluations, ORISE is nationally-recognized for its health physics support to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects across the United States. Our health physics services include: Environmental survey Applied health physics projects We work with government agencies and organizations to identify, measure and assess the presence of radiological materials during the D&D process. ORISE

372

Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employees Health Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Initial Election Period As a new employee, you have 60 days from your date of appointment to make an election for the health benefits program. Your completed Health Benefits Election Form, SF-2809, must be submitted to your servicing Human Resources Office in a timely manner. If you fail to make an election within the required deadline, you are considered to have declined coverage. You will not have another opportunity to enroll until the annual open season (conducted in late Fall) or unless you experience a qualifying life event (see http://www.opm.gov/insure/health/planinfo/qle.asp) that would allow you to enroll. Please note that the SF-2809 should be completed and submitted even if you are declining coverage.

373

Medical Examination Office of Human Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Examination 4.40 Office of Human Resources Applies to: Faculty, staff, graduate associates-292-2800 ohrc@hr.osu.edu hr.osu.edu/elr Policy clarification for medical center employees Medical Center Employee Relations 614-293-4988 Medical exam arrangements Employee Health Services 614-293-8146 #12;

Howat, Ian M.

374

Human Error in Airway Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report examines human errors in Airway Facilities (AF) with the intent of preventing these errors from being passed on to the new Operations Control Centers. To effectively manage errors, they first have to be identified. Human factors engineers researched human error literature, analyzed human errors recorded in AF databases, and conducted structured interviews with AF representatives. This study enabled them to categorize the types of human errors, identify potential causal factors, and recommend strategies for their mitigation. The results provide preventative measures that designers, developers, and users can take to reduce human error. 17. Key Words Human Error Error Mitigation Operations Control Centers Error Mitigation Strategies 18. Distribution Statement This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, Virginia, 22161. 19. Security Classif. (of this report) 20. Security Classif. (of this page) 21. No. of Pages 23 22. Price Form DOT F 1700.7 (8-72) Reproduction of completed page authorized iii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This research was accomplished under the sponsorship of the Office of Chief Scientist for Human Factors, AAR-100. The research team greatly appreciates the support supplied by Beverly Clark of AOP-30 and our subject matter expert, Kermit Grayson of Grayson Consulting. We also wish to extend our thanks to the people interviewed at the facilities who gave their valuable time in helping us to achieve the goals of our project. iv v Table of Contents Page Acknowledgments..........................................................................................................................iii Executive Summary......................................................................................

Vicki Ahlstrom; Vicki Ahlstrom Act; Donald G. Hartman

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Human factoring administrative procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In nonnuclear business, administrative procedures bring to mind such mundane topics as filing correspondence and scheduling vacation time. In the nuclear industry, on the other hand, administrative procedures play a vital role in assuring the safe operation of a facility. For some time now, industry focus has been on improving technical procedures. Significant efforts are under way to produce technical procedure requires that a validated technical, regulatory, and administrative basis be developed and that the technical process be established for each procedure. Producing usable technical procedures requires that procedure presentation be engineered to the same human factors principles used in control room design. The vital safety role of administrative procedures requires that they be just as sound, just a rigorously formulated, and documented as technical procedures. Procedure programs at the Tennessee Valley Authority and at Boston Edison's Pilgrim Station demonstrate that human factors engineering techniques can be applied effectively to technical procedures. With a few modifications, those same techniques can be used to produce more effective administrative procedures. Efforts are under way at the US Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and at some utilities (Boston Edison, for instance) to apply human factors engineering to administrative procedures: The techniques being adapted include the following.

Grider, D.A.; Sturdivant, M.H.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3Chapter 12 Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Healthy and Cancerous Human Tissues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3 Chapter 12 Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Healthy and Cancerous Human Tissues Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS 2526793B0420777596C5A5

377

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 20 Human Nutrition Value of Soybean Oil and Soy Protein  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 20 Human Nutrition Value of Soybean Oil and Soy Protein Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health -

378

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 21 Flaxseed Proteins: Potential Food Applications and Process-Induced Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 21 Flaxseed Proteins: Potential Food Applications and Process-Induced Changes Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemi

379

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 13 Flaxseed and Prevention of Experimental Hypercholesterolemic Atherosclerosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 13 Flaxseed and Prevention of Experimental Hypercholesterolemic Atherosclerosis Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bioche

380

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 5 Phospholipid Composition of Human Sperm and Seminal Plasmain Relation to Sperm Fertility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 5 Phospholipid Composition of Human Sperm and Seminal Plasmain Relation to Sperm Fertility Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downl

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 12 a-Linolenic Acid and Heart Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 12 a-Linolenic Acid and Heart Disease Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable

382

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 22 Availability and Labeling of Flaxseed Food Products and Supplements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 22 Availability and Labeling of Flaxseed Food Products and Supplements Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry P

383

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 23 Flaxseed in Poultry Diets: Meat and Eggs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 23 Flaxseed in Poultry Diets: Meat and Eggs Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downlo

384

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 3 Dietary Sources and Metabolism of a-Linolenic Acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 3 Dietary Sources and Metabolism of a-Linolenic Acid Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

385

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 16 Flaxseed and Flaxseed Products in Kidney Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 16 Flaxseed and Flaxseed Products in Kidney Disease Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

386

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 1 Structure, Composition, and Variety Development of Flaxseed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 1 Structure, Composition, and Variety Development of Flaxseed Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

387

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 8 a-Linolenic Acid in Brain Function and Infant Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 8 a-Linolenic Acid in Brain Function and Infant Development Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

388

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 15 Flaxseed, Fiber and Coronary Heart Disease: Clinical Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 15 Flaxseed, Fiber and Coronary Heart Disease: Clinical Studies Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

389

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 20 Processing of Flaxseed Fiber, Oil, Protein, and Lignan Fractions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 20 Processing of Flaxseed Fiber, Oil, Protein, and Lignan Fractions Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pres

390

Worker and Public Health Activities Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health and Safety Programs Health and Safety Programs Home About HS-13 What's New HS-13 Staff Pandemic Influenza Beryllium-Associated Worker Registry CEDR Illness and Injury Surveillance Program Epi Moratorium United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries Occupational Medicine Worker and Community Public Health Activities Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) Program Chronic Beryllium Disease Bio-repository Initiative Articles Links HSS Logo Worker and Public Health Activities Program The aim of the Worker and Public Health Activities Program is to improve our understanding of the consequences of exposures to ionizing radiation and other hazardous materials to workers and to the public. One of the program's strategic objectives is to support studies related to current and past operations of DOE facilities that ascribe to the highest scientific standards and policies and to communicate the health effects into impact-driven practices for improving worker and public health. This objective strives to ensure that the studies and public health activities address the most relevant research pertaining to DOE operations and provide a framework for intervention. Periodic evaluation of the research via independent external peer review enhances this objective. DOE encourages publication in scientific peer-reviewed journals and presentations at scientific meetings.

391

History of the DOE Human Genome Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

History of the DOE Human Genome Program History of the DOE Human Genome Program The following history is taken from the U.S. Department of Energy 1991-91 Human Genome Program Report (June 1992). This is an archived item. A brief history of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Human Genome Program will be useful in a discussion of the objectives of the DOE program as well as those of the collaborative U.S. Human Genome Project. The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of DOE and its predecessor agencies--the Atomic Energy Commission and the Energy Research and Development Administration--have long sponsored research into genetics, both in microbial systems and in mammals, including basic studies on genome structure, replication, damage, and repair and the consequences of genetic

392

ORISE: Environmental Assessment and Health Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessments and Health Physics Environmental Assessments and Health Physics Performing environmental assessments and independent verification is essential to building public trust and confidence in radiological cleanup. As the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other government agencies target contaminated sites across the country for decontamination and decommissioning, strict guidelines must be followed to ensure that property is effectively remediated before being released for public or private use. Through a combination of environmental assessments, health physics services, and radiochemistry analyses, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs independent environmental assessment and verification at DOE cleanup sites across the country. ORISE applies its

393

Importance of physical interaction between human and robot for therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mental health care of the elderly people is a common problem in advanced countries. Recently, high technology has developed robots for use not only in factories but also for our living environment. In particular, human interactive robots for psychological ... Keywords: elderly care, human-robot interaction, mental commitment robot, robot therapy

Takanori Shibata

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System  

SciTech Connect

Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System  

SciTech Connect

Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Evironmental health policy in ukraine after the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

The 1986 accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine produced severe environmental health problems. This paper reports on the environmental health conditions in Ukraine after the accident and the health policy approaches employed to respond to the environmental conditions and health problems. Crisis conditions and a period of rapid change in Ukraine contributed to the difficulties of developing and implementing policy to address serious environmental health problems. Despite these difficulties, Ukraine is taking effective action. The paper describes the primary environmental health problem areas and the efforts taken to solve them. The effect of intense public fear of radiation on policymaking is described. The paper discusses the ability of public fear to distort health policy towards certain problems, leaving problems of greater importance with fewer resources. 35 refs., 1 fig.

Page, G.W.; Bobyleva, O.A.; Naboka, M.V. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Office of Health and Safety | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Health and Safety Health and Safety Office of Health and Safety Mission The Office of Health and Safety establishes worker safety and health requirements and expectations for the Department to ensure protection of workers from the hazards associated with Department operations. The Office conducts health studies to determine worker and public health effects from exposure to hazardous materials associated with Department operations and supports international health studies and programs. The Office implements medical surveillance and screening programs for current and former workers and support the Department of Labor in the implementation of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA). Additionally, the office provides assistance to Headquarters and field elements in implementation of policy and resolving

398

Health and Nutrition News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US National Institutes of Health (NIH)used modern statistics to review data that were not included in the original 1978 publication of results from the Sydney Diet Heart Study (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology 109:317–330). Health and Nutritio

399

Technology in mental health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mental illness has been identified as one of the greatest challenges facing society in the coming decades. However, there are significant barriers to access for many people suffering from mental illness, including overburdened public health care systems, ... Keywords: cognitive rehabilitation, computer based treatment, engagement, ethics, exposure therapy, mental health, psychotherapy, stigma, universal design, user centered design

Gavin Doherty; John Sharry; Magnus Bang; Mariano Alcañiz; Rosa Baños

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Testing systems for biologic markers of genotoxic exposure and effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Societal interest in genotoxicity stems from two concerns: the fear of carcinogenesis secondary to somatic mutation; and the fear of birth defects and decreasing genetic fitness secondary to heritable mutation. There is a pressing need to identify agents that can cause these effects, to understand the underlying dose-response relationships, to identify exposed populations, and to estimate both the magnitude of exposure and the risk of adverse health effects in such populations. Biologic markers refer either to evidence in surrogate organisms, or to the expressions of exposure and effect in human populations. 21 refs.

Mendelsohn, M.L.

1986-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Open Data for Climate and Health Insights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Open Data for Climate and Health Insights Print E-mail Open Data for Climate and Health Insights Print E-mail Metadata Access Tool for Climate and Health (MATCH) Website Thursday, May 9, 2013 Posted by Tom Armstrong, Executive Director, U.S. Global Change Research Program Today, in conjunction with a series of landmark steps announced by the Obama Administration to unleash troves of useful data from the vaults of government, the interagency US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) launched a new online tool that promises to accelerate research relating to climate change and human health-the Metadata Access Tool for Climate and Health, or "MATCH." The Administration announcements made today include an Executive Order signed by the President declaring that information is a valuable national resource and strategic asset, and a new government-wide Open Data Policy requiring that, going forward, data generated by the government shall be made available in open, machine-readable formats. The move will make troves of previously inaccessible or unmanageable data more readily available to entrepreneurs, researchers, and others who can use open data as fuel for innovation, businesses and new services and tools.

402

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume I Human Health...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies of the Mortality of A-Bomb Survivors. Report 7 Part 1, Cancer Mortality Among Atomic Bomb Survivors, 1950-78. Radiation Research 90:395-432. Kocher, D. 1981. Radioactive...

403

Evaluating Potential Human Health Risks Associated with the Developmen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To obtain the value for MF d , the EPA screening model for evaluating air quality impact, SCREEN3, was used. SCREEN3 (EPA 1995a) is a single-source Gaussian plume model that...

404

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adolescence, with a current focus on the emergence of dieting and problems of energy balance in girls during: DSD11@PSU.EDU Research Interests Psychosocial determinants of exercise (age, gender, race

Yener, Aylin

405

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, with a current focus on the emergence of dieting and problems of energy balance in girls during middle childhood.EDU Research Interests Psychosocial determinants of exercise (age, gender, race), application of theoretical

Yener, Aylin

406

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

focus on the emergence of dieting and problems of energy balance in girls during middle childhood determinants of exercise (age, gender, race), application of theoretical models to exercise (theory of planned self- regulation of energy intake and body weight in young children. George Graham Professor

Yener, Aylin

407

Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global warming Non-renewable energy Mineral extraction9-4) and primary non-renewable energy (resource) (upperMJ of primary non-renewable energy). Results are presented

Humbert, Sebastien

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stack (e.g. , residential wood combustion), and ground-levelvehicles (T) Residential wood combustion (L) Road dust b (T)based on residential wood combustion and solvent emissions a

Humbert, Sebastien

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Probabilistic human health risk assessment from offshore produced water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Offshore oil and gas facilities are producing huge amounts of produced water during the production. The produced water contains formation water, injected water, small volumes… (more)

Chowdhury, Mohammad Khaled H., 1979-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shipped from a regional coal fired plant (i.e. , no fartherimpacts from the coal-fired power plant to the fly ash wouldby combustion in coal-fired power plants. In 2006, more than

Humbert, Sebastien

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Section A -1 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND HUMAN HEALTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interdomain Communication in Hsp104 The lack of density for most of the coiled-coil domain in the TClpB EM

Lu, Guoiqng

412

Office of Human Resources and Administration - Mission and Functions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Resources and Administration Human Resources and Administration Home Sub Offices › Business Operations › Human Resources and Administration › Information Management Mission & Functions › Information Management › Human Resources and Adminstration › Business Operations HSS Logo Office of Human Resources and Administration Reports to the Office of Resource Management Mission and Functions Mission The Office of Human Resources and Administration provides a broad range of human resource and administrative management activities in support of the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS). Functions Integrates, synchronizes, and concentrates human resource management activities in support of HSS, Departmental leadership, and other customers. Assists HSS managers in recruiting and hiring qualified, talented and capable candidates. Advises and informs HSS managers on hiring requirements, capabilities, and limitations. Assists managers, candidates, and new employees through the employment process. Manages special hiring programs such as interns, disadvantaged and minorities.

413

A Heart Health Alaska Natives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Honoring the Gift of Heart Health A Heart Health Educator's Manual for Alaska Natives U . S . D E Health Service Office of Prevention, Education, and Control #12;Honoring the Gift of Heart Health A Heart National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Indian Health Service NIH Publication No. 06-5218 Revised

Bandettini, Peter A.

414

Virtual Environments for Health Care  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... condition and state of consciousness" (Kahaner, 1994 ... reality] stimulations to the human" (Nakajima, Nomura ... of virtual reality simulations to humans. ...

1996-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

415

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Health Services: Clinical Services...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clinical Services: Occupational Health Mission Statement In support of the pursuit of world class science at the Berkeley Laboratory, Health Services promotes the highest level of...

416

Effects of mutant human Ki-ras{sup G12C} gene dosage on murine lung tumorigenesis and signaling to its downstream effectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies in cell culture have suggested that the level of RAS expression can influence the transformation of cells and the signaling pathways stimulated by mutant RAS expression. However, the levels of RAS expression in vivo appear to be subject to feedback regulation, limiting the total amount of RAS protein that can be expressed. We utilized a bitransgenic mouse lung tumor model that expressed the human Ki-ras{sup G12C} allele in a tetracycline-inducible, lung-specific manner. Treatment for 12 months with 500 {mu}g/ml of doxycycline (DOX) allowed for maximal expression of the human Ki-ras{sup G12C} allele in the lung, and resulted in the development of focal hyperplasia and adenomas. We determined if different levels of mutant RAS expression would influence the phenotype of the lung lesions. Treatment with 25, 100 and 500 {mu}g/ml of DOX resulted in dose-dependent increases in transgene expression and tumor multiplicity. Microscopic analysis of the lungs of mice treated with the 25 {mu}g/ml dose of DOX revealed infrequent foci of hyperplasia, whereas mice treated with the 100 and 500 {mu}g/ml doses exhibited numerous hyperplastic foci and also adenomas. Immunohistochemical and RNA analysis of the downstream effector pathways demonstrated that different levels of mutant RAS transgene expression resulted in differences in the expression and/or phosphorylation of specific signaling molecules. Our results suggest that the molecular alterations driving tumorigenesis may differ at different levels of mutant Ki-ras{sup G12C} expression, and this should be taken into consideration when inducible transgene systems are utilized to promote tumorigenesis in mouse models.

Dance-Barnes, Stephanie T. [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Kock, Nancy D. [Section on Comparative Medicine, Department of Pathology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Floyd, Heather S. [Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, North Carolina State College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Moore, Joseph E.; Mosley, Libyadda J. [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); D'Agostino, Ralph B. [Section on Biostatistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Pettenati, Mark J. [Department of Medical Genetics, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Miller, Mark Steven [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States)], E-mail: msmiller@wfubmc.edu

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Evaluation of the contamination of marine algae (seaweed) from the St. Lawrence River and likely to be consumed by humans  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the study was to assess the contamination of marine algae (seaweeds) growing in the St. Lawrence River estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence and to evaluate the risks to human health from the consumption of these algae. Algae were collected by hand at low tide. A total of 10 sites on the north and south shores of the St. Lawrence as well as in Baie des Chaleurs were sampled. The most frequently collected species of algae were Fucus vesiculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, Laminaria Longicruris, Palmaria palmata, Ulva lactuca, and Fucus distichus. Alga samples were analyzed for metals iodine, and organochlorines. A risk assessment was performed using risk factors. In general, concentrations in St. Lawrence algae were not very high. Consequently, health risks associated with these compounds in St. Lawrence algae were very low. Iodine concentration, on the other hand, could be of concern with regard to human health. Regular consumption of algae, especially of Laminaria sp., could result in levels of iodine sufficient to cause thyroid problems. For regular consumers, it would be preferable to choose species with low iodine concentrations, such as U. lactuca and P. palmata, in order to prevent potential problems. Furthermore, it would also be important to assess whether preparation for consumption or cooking affects the iodine content of algae. Algae consumption may also have beneficial health effects. Scientific literature has shown that it is a good source of fiber and vitamins, especially vitamin B{sub 12}.

Phaneuf, D.; Cote, I.; Dumas, P.; Ferron, L.A.; LeBlanc, A. [CHUQ, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada). Centre de Toxicologie du Quebec

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Health & Safety Plan Last Updated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................ 4 Organizational Health and Safety Committees corrective measures, and obtain the participation of all personnel. a. Organizational Health and Safety Committees Department employees are represented on the University's Organizational Health and Safety

Anderson, Richard

419

Health Satisfaction and Energy Spending  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the direct link between energy spending and health satisfaction and control for impacts of other determinants such as access to gas, age, income, and satisfaction levels in other domains of life such as social life or leisure. Indirect effects are assumed... in the context with energy affordability. Rising energy prices and the realization of climate change objectives will have impacts on energy usage and spending of households. At least for some households it will for example be more difficult to warm their homes...

Meier, Helena

420

Cost Effectiveness of Cleaning Techniques for Controlling Human-based Transport of Invasive Exotic Plants on Electric Transmission L ine Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a broad overview of accomplishments over the first 3 months of a project to define the cost effectiveness of cleaning techniques on electric transmission rights of way aimed at controlling the spread of invasive exotic (IE) vegetation. It includes the results of a brief literature search of cleaning techniques.BackgroundA science basis for process and procedure to cost effectively clean personnel and equipment so as to reduce the ...

2012-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

PNNL: About PNNL: Environment, Health, Safety & Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, Safety and Security Environment, Health, Safety and Security The success of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is, in part, dependent upon operational excellence. At PNNL, "operational excellence" means harnessing the energy and passion of every staff member to accomplish our mission: delivering outstanding research results in science and technology while cost effectively managing the Laboratory with the highest standards of good citizenship, safety, health, and environmental stewardship. The Environment, Health, Safety and Security business unit of PNNL contributes to operational success by providing efficient and effective systems, processes, tools and services that enable staff to conduct their work in a safe, compliant and environmentally sound manner.

422

California Health eQuality Advisory Committee Kenneth W. Kizer, M.D., M.P.H. -Chair  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Health eQuality Advisory Committee Kenneth W. Kizer, M.D., M.P.H. - Chair Distinguished Association (IHA) Ellen Wu, M.P.H. Executive Director California Pan-Ethnic Health Network Pamela L. Lane, M.S., RHIA, CPHIMS, Ex officio Deputy Secretary, HIE California Health & Human Services Agency Linette T

California at Davis, University of

423

Human-machine interactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM); Abbott, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Brannon, Nathan G. (Albuquerque, NM); Bernard, Michael L. (Tijeras, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

424

Health.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAY 2000 MAY 2000 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES FOLLOW-UP AUDIT OF HEALTH BENEFIT COSTS AT THE DEPARTMENT'S MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTORS AUDIT REPORT DOE/IG-0470 May 11, 2000 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Follow-up Audit of Health Benefit Costs at the Department's Management and Operating Contractors" BACKGROUND In Calendar Year (CY) 1998, the Department of Energy (Department) spent about $480 million to provide health benefits for employees of its contractors. In 1994, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) evaluated the system in place at that time to determine if contractor employee health benefit

425

Health & Nutrition News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sperm quality and dietary fat Health & Nutrition News Inform Magazine Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Analytical Chemistry Biochemistry Biotechnology Soybeans Industrial Oil Products The type and amount of fat men eat may affect their se

426

Russian Health Studies Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

427

ORISE: Protecting Human Subjects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subjects Protecting Human Subjects The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Human Subjects Research Program exists to ensure that all research conducted at DOE institutions, whether...

428

Human Measure and Architecting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This book bundles the human measure and architecting articles. The articles address the relationship between product creation and humans and the role of the system architect.

Gerrit Muller

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Safety and Health Services Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Safety & Health Services Division (SHSD) provides subject matter expertise and services in industrial hygiene, safety engineering, and safety & health programs for the Lab....

430

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Safety and Health Standards Set for LBNL Environment, Safety and Health Standards Set for LBNL Due to a recent Contract 31 action, the Necessary and Sufficient process...

431

Energy Systems and Population Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

infrastructure Energy, gender, and health While much of theof energy and health linkages: poverty and gender. We thengender-based priorities, community and cultural factors, energy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Health effects of radon in air  

SciTech Connect

Widely accepted risk estimates for exposure to radon in homes are derived largely from studies of miners. These include large groups of US Czechoslovakian, and Canadian uranium miners, Newfoundland fluorspar miners, and Swedish iron, lead, and zinc miners, all of which give roughly consistent results, with the excess risk of lung cancer increasing linearly with the exposure to radon. The authors have studied correlations between average radon levels and lung cancer rates in counties of the US. One study based on 50,000 purchased measurements in the main living areas of houses in which there have been no previous measurements involves 310 counties. It gives a weak but statistically significant negative correlation between mean radon levels and lung cancer rates for both females and males, whereas the usual risk estimates predict a large positive correlation.

Cohen, B.L. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Linking Environmental Exposures to Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

studies conducted by his group, including occupational and environmental exposures to benzene and other VOCs and air levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons following the World...

434

NETL: Health Effects - Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sub-chronic Inhalation of Simulated Downwind Coal Combustion Emissions The objective of this project is to conduct a laboratory study providing a comprehensive, contemporary...

435

NETL: Health Effects - Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TERESA: Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic Emissions of Source Aerosols The overall objective of the TERESA program is to investigate and clarify the impact of the sources and...

436

NETL: Health Effects - Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design and Feasibility Assessment of a Retrospective Epidemiologic Study of Coal-Fired Power Plant Emissions in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Region The overall objective of this...

437

SOIL HEALTH AND SOIL QUALITY: A REVIEW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil health is defined as the continued capacity of soil to function as a vital living system, by recognizing that it contains biological elements that are key to ecosystem function within land-use boundaries (Doran and Zeiss, 2000; Karlen et al., 2001). These functions are able to sustain biological productivity of soil, maintain the quality of surrounding air and water environments, as well as promote plant, animal, and human health (Doran et al., 1996). The concept of soil quality emerged in the literature in the early 1990s (Doran and Safely, 1997; Wienhold et al., 2004), and the first official application of the term was approved by the Soil Science Society of America Ad Hoc Committee on Soil Quality (S-581) and discussed by Karlen et al., (1997). Soil quality was been defined as ‘‘the capacity of a reference soil to function, within natural or managed ecosystem boundaries, to sustain plant and animal productivity, maintain or enhance water and air quality, and support human health and habitation.’ ’ Subsequently the two terms are used interchangeably (Karlen et al., 2001) although it is important to distinguish that, soil quality is related to soil function (Karlen et al., 2003; Letey et al, 2003), whereas soil

James Kinyangi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

MERCURY & DIMETHYLMERCURY EXPOSURE & EFFECTS  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies the dose response data available for several toxic mercury compounds and summarizes the symptoms and health effects associated with each of them.

HONEYMAN, J.O.

2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

439

Influence of air quality model resolution on uncertainty associated with health impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use regional air quality modeling to evaluate the impact of model resolution on uncertainty associated with the human health benefits resulting from proposed air quality regulations. Using a regional photochemical model ...

Thompson, Tammy M.

440

Health assessment for Ossineke ground water (Ossineke Residential Wells), Ossineke, Michigan, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MID980794440. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Ossineke Residential Wells are listed on the National Priorities List. The site is located in Alpena County, Michigan. In 1977, several residential wells were determined to be contaminated with components of gasoline, benzene, toluene, xylene, phenol, and tetrachloroethylene. Possible contamination sources include leaking underground gas storage tanks, a lagoon used for waste disposal by a commercial laundromat, or an auto rustproofing operation. Ground water samples showed maximum concentrations detected in parts per billion (ppb): benzene, 21,000; toluene, 53,000; xylene, 11,000; and PCE, 7 ppb. Sampling of the residential wells in 1988 showed the following maximum concentrations in ppb: benzene, 6,590; toluene, 726; xylene, 2,500; tetrachloroethylene, 16; and phenol, 26. The site is of potential public-health concern because of the risk to human health that could result from possible exposure to hazardous substances at levels that may result in adverse health effects over time. Human exposure to benzene, tetrachloroethylene, toluene, xylene, and phenol may occur via the exposure pathways of ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact.

Not Available

1989-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Human Resource Management on Social Capital  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past years, several researchers have analysed the relational dynamics that takes place inside and between organizations concept, mediating and moderating variables, effects, etc. considering it as a resource capable of contributing to the orientation ... Keywords: Human Resource Policy, Human Resources Management, Information Technology, Proposed a Model, Social Capital

Macarena López-Fernández; Fernando Martín-Alcázar; Pedro Miguel Romero-Fernández

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Data, health, and algorithmics: computational challenges for biomedicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the decade following the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2000, the cost of sequencing DNA fell by a factor of around a million, and continues to fall. Applications of sequencing in health include precise diagnosis of infection and disease, ... Keywords: DNA, bioinformatics, sequencing

Justin Zobel

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: PI, Univ. of Utah) Screening performed via a contract mechanism using a battery of seizure models/year direct costs plus indirect for up to 5 years · Can enter at any preclinical stage for example at for U01 program. Funding of $500,000 direct costs per year for 2 years: 1. Examples of "exploratory

444

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance Title Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6196E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Satish, Usha, Mark J. Mendell, Krishnamurthy Shekhar, Toshifumi Hotchi, Douglas P. Sullivan, Siegfried Streufert, and William J. Fisk Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 120 Issue 12 Pagination 1671-1677 Date Published 09/20/2012 Keywords carbon dioxide, cognition, Decision Making, human performance, indoor environmental quality, ventilation Abstract Background - Associations of higher indoor carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations with impaired

445

Physically-proximal human-robot collaboration for air and space applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Aerospace applications, human safety is of paramount importance given harsh environmental conditions that require persistent electromechanical life support. The resulting inherent proximity between humans and "robotic support" requires effective communication ... Keywords: airspace management, human-robot interaction, space robotics

Ella M. Atkins

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 14 Flaxseed Components in the Prevention of Experimental Diabetesention of Experimental Diabetes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 14 Flaxseed Components in the Prevention of Experimental Diabetes ention of Experimental Diabetes Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - N

447

Environment, Safety & Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Links ESSH Policy Site Environmental Reports Environmental Regulators Upton Ecological and Research Reserve Pollution Prevention Organizations ES&H Directorate Environmental Protection Division Environmental Restoration Division Safety & Health Services Other BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Environment, Safety & Health Brookhaven National Lab is committed to continual improvement in environmental, safety, security, and health (ESSH) performance. Full policy description. Restoration Projects Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor decommissioning, High Flux Beam Reactor decommissioning Groundwater Projects Peconic River Cleanup Peconic River Working Group Environmental Restoration Projects green tech ISB-inspired Greening Strategies for Your Home or Office Being green isn't rocket science. Several strategies that earned the ISB its LEED Gold certification can help reduce energy usage and make any building more environmentally friendly.

448

Independent Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Health Studies Independent Health Studies A study of cancer rates within a 15-mile radius of Brookhaven National Laboratory found no relationship between Brookhaven Lab and cancer. Suffolk County Task Force Report (PDF) New York State Department of Health Cancer Registry Report (PDF) Report of the Rhabdomyosarcoma Task Force (PDF) According to a 1998 report by the Suffolk County Environmental Task Force on the Laboratory, "cancer rates of all types of cancers [the task force] studied are not elevated near BNL" for the years 1979-93. Task Force Chair Roger Grimson, a biostatistician and an associate professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, concluded in a Newsday article at that time, "There is no link between Brookhaven National Lab and

449

Wind Turbines and Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power has been gaining prominence as a viable sustainable alternative to other forms of energy production. Studies have found that there is increasing population demand for ‘green’ energy 1,2. In Australia, this has been encouraged by the introduction of the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Act in 2000 and the Renewable Energy Target Scheme in 2009. As with any new technology, wind turbines are not without controversy. Those who oppose the development of wind farms contend that wind turbines can adversely impact the health of individuals living in close proximity. Do wind turbines impact on health? Concerns regarding the adverse health impacts of wind turbines focus on infrasound noise, electromagnetic interference, shadow flicker and blade glint produced

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Wind Turbines and Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power has been gaining prominence as a viable sustainable alternative to other forms of energy production. Studies have found that there is increasing population demand for ‘green’ energy1,2. In Australia, this has been encouraged by the introduction of the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Act in 2000 and the Renewable Energy Target Scheme in 2009. As with any new technology, wind turbines are not without controversy. Those who oppose the development of wind farms contend that wind turbines can adversely impact the health of individuals living in close proximity. Do wind turbines impact on health? Concerns regarding the adverse health impacts of wind turbines focus on infrasound noise, electromagnetic interference, shadow flicker and blade glint produced

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Aging and Fracture of Human Cortical Bone and Tooth Dentin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. , The effect of aging on crack-growth resistance andR.K. Reprogel, Effects of aging on the mechanical behaviorNalla et al. , Effect of aging on the toughness of human

Ager III, Joel W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Visual information seeking in multiple electronic health records: design recommendations and a process model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current electronic health record (EHR) systems facilitate the storage, retrieval, persistence, and sharing of patient data. However, the way physicians interact with EHRs has not changed much. More specifically, support for temporal analysis of a large ... Keywords: design requriements, electronic health records, human-computer interaction (hci), information visualization

Taowei David Wang; Krist Wongsuphasawat; Catherine Plaisant; Ben Shneiderman

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Program director`s report for the Office of Health and Environmental Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LBNL performs basic and applied research and develops technologies in support of the Department of Energy Office of Health and Environmental Research`s mission to explore and mitigate the long-term health and environmental consequences of energy use and to advance solutions to major medical challenges. The ability of the Laboratory to engage in this mission depends upon the strength of its core competencies. In addition, there are several key capabilities that are crosscutting, or underlie, many of the core competencies. They are: bioscience and biotechnology; environmental assessment and remediation; advanced detector systems; materials characterization and synthesis; chemical dynamics, catalysis, and surface science; advanced technologies for energy supply and energy efficiency; particle and photon beams; national research facilities; computation and information management; engineering design and fabrication technologies; and education of future scientists and engineers. Research in progress and major accomplishments are summarized for projects in analytical technology; environmental research; health effects; molecular carcinogenesis; general life sciences; human genome project; medical applications; and imaging of E-binding proteins.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Nanotech/Environment, Health & Safety Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Nanotech/Environment, Health & Safety Portal. Nanotech/Environment, Health & Safety Portal. Programs and ...

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

455

Magnetite-Based Biological Effects in Animals: Biophysical, Contamination, and Sensory Aspects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of its mission to understand potential effects of electric and magnetic fields (EMF) on human health, EPRI conducts research on biophysical mechanisms of interaction. This report provides evidence supporting the existence of a magnetic field sensory system in animals based on the magnetic iron compound, magnetite. The investigators also identify iron particle contamination as a potentially important uncontrolled factor in current in vitro EMF biological experiments.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Human Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration Human Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Human Resources Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Human Resources Human Resources The Human Resources function in NNSA is a vital partnership between all levels of NNSA management. It requires effective collaboration with the

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Human Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Human Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration Human Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Human Resources Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Human Resources Human Resources The Human Resources function in NNSA is a vital partnership between all levels of NNSA management. It requires effective collaboration with the

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Evaluating the applicability of current models of workload to peer-based human-robot teams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human-Robot peer-based teams are evolving from a far-off possibility into a reality. Human Performance Moderator Functions (HPMFs) can be used to predict human behavior by incorporating the effects of internal and external influences such as fatigue ... Keywords: human performance modeling, human-robot peer-based teams

Caroline E. Harriott; Tao Zhang; Julie A. Adams

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Let's keep in touch online: a Facebook aware virtual human interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A virtual human is an effective interface for interacting with users and plays an important role in carrying out certain tasks. As social networking sites are getting more and more popular, we propose a Facebook aware virtual human. The social networking ... Keywords: Dialogue, Human-virtual human interaction, Social networking sites, Virtual humans

Gengdai Liu; Shantanu Choudhary; Juzheng Zhang; Nadia Magenenat-Thalmann

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Collaborative Worker Health and Safety Improvement Activities | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Collaborative Worker Health and Safety Improvement Activities Collaborative Worker Health and Safety Improvement Activities Collaborative Worker Health and Safety Improvement Activities Worker health and safety programs at DOE are most effective when they reflect the knowledge and experience of the Department's frontline workers. "Our workers are the lifeblood of accomplishing the Department's mission at DOE sites, and as such, ensuring their safety is foremost," explains Glenn Podonsky, Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer. "It is imperative that we communicate and establish relationships with those elements that train, manage and represent our workforce to improve the safety culture at DOE sites." Meeting Documents Available for Download November 30, 2012 Health and Productivity Questionnaire (HPQ) Survey Report

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Modeling human risk: Cell & molecular biology in context  

SciTech Connect

It is anticipated that early in the next century manned missions into outer space will occur, with a mission to Mars scheduled between 2015 and 2020. However, before such missions can be undertaken, a realistic estimation of the potential risks to the flight crews is required. One of the uncertainties remaining in this risk estimation is that posed by the effects of exposure to the radiation environment of outer space. Although the composition of this environment is fairly well understood, the biological effects arising from exposure to it are not. The reasons for this are three-fold: (1) A small but highly significant component of the radiation spectrum in outer space consists of highly charged, high energy (HZE) particles which are not routinely experienced on earth, and for which there are insufficient data on biological effects; (2) Most studies on the biological effects of radiation to date have been high-dose, high dose-rate, whereas in space, with the exception of solar particle events, radiation exposures will be low-dose, low dose-rate; (3) Although it has been established that the virtual absence of gravity in space has a profound effect on human physiology, it is not clear whether these effects will act synergistically with those of radiation exposure. A select panel will evaluate the utilizing experiments and models to accurately predict the risks associated with exposure to HZE particles. Topics of research include cellular and tissue response, health effects associated with radiation damage, model animal systems, and critical markers of Radiation response.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Services, Mark Buchanan MD_______________________________________ Title: CDOC Director Health Services orders for laboratory, radiology, or pharmacy services prior to the next routine OBIS feed (around 2: CDOC Director Health Services, Daniel Bannish PsyD _________________________________________ #12

Oliver, Douglas L.

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY, HEALTH PHYSICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contamination and internal exposures to radiation? Disposable gloves __X__ Disposable booties_____ Lab coat __XRUA # 1384 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY, HEALTH PHYSICS Radiation radioactive contamination and/or radiation fields? Wipes and liquid scintillation counting C. At what

Singer, Mitchell

464

Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies Speaker(s): Carol Rao Date: July 9, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mark Mendell Exposures to fungi have been linked with asthma, toxicoses, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and a range of non-specific symptoms. Definitive associations between indoor fungal exposure and health effects in population-based exposure-response studies, however, have not been well established. Issues in exposure assessment methods, both in collection and analysis, are major limitations. Classic methods for assessing airborne fungi rely upon collecting and analyzing whole fungal spores by culture. However, quantifying whole fungal spores may not fully describe fungal exposures, especially for purposes of investigating adverse respiratory

465

Learning and Applying Health Disparity Education through Texas TEKS Curriculum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the US population grows in diversity, so has the number of health disparities. Health disparities continue to affect a large portion of the minority population resulting in negative health outcomes. Education remains a key element in the prevention of these adverse health conditions, especially among the ethnically diverse youth. Health education presently fails to be effectively implemented in the activities and instruction in classrooms, which is greatly impacted by the lack of knowledge and training of educators. Through the development and implementation of a new Texas health-science curriculum, educators can acquire the skills and framework necessary to approach a diverse classroom on good health practices. This program will identify the concepts of cultural competency and cultural influences to allow instructors the capacity to adapt a curriculum that suits all students. The analysis and reconstruction of current TEKS curricula is the purpose of this research study. Through studying these sets of data, an increased understanding in health education can be formulated and relayed to grade school level students. Thus, by the increase in health education students of minority can develop good behavioral norms; reducing the risks associated with rising health disparities.

Mazac, Taylor T

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Automotive Battery State-of-Health Monitoring Methods.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Effective vehicular power management requires accurate knowledge of battery state, including state-of-charge (SOC) and state-of-health (SOH). An essential functionality of automotive batteries is delivering high… (more)

Grube, Ryan J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

A healthy and salubrious place : public health and city form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As cities grew larger and more complex at the end of the eighteenth century, they suffered new and more pressing public health problems. The responses to these problems had, in time, an effect on the environment that ...

Ozonoff, Victoria Vespe

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

The Oregon Health Insurance Experiment: Evidence from the First Year  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2008, a group of uninsured low-income adults in Oregon was selected by lottery to be given the chance to apply for Medicaid. This lottery provides an opportunity to gauge the effects of expanding access to public health ...

Taubman, Sarah

469

An assessment of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exploration of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations is made by assessing the results of a study of aviation's effects on United States air quality mandated by the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The ...

Sequeira, Christopher J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

(Created 12/07; Revised 11/08, 12/08) UNL Environmental Health and Safety (402) 472-4925 http://ehs.unl.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and toxins may be exempt from United States Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Health and Human Services and Human Services (HSS). In summary: · The reference laboratory (the laboratory providing the confirmatory(Created 12/07; Revised 11/08, 12/08) UNL Environmental Health and Safety · (402) 472-4925 · http

Farritor, Shane

471

Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Lactational Transfer of PCB 153 with Consideration of Worldwide Human Biomonitoring Results Title Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Lactational Transfer of PCB 153 with Consideration of Worldwide Human Biomonitoring Results Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2008 Authors Redding, Laurel E., Michael D. Sohn, Thomas E. McKone, Shu-Li Wang, Dennis P. H. Hsieh, and Raymond S. H. Yang Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 116 Issue 12 Pagination 1629-1634 Keywords bayesian inference, body burden, environmental chemistry, exposure & risk group, human milk biomonitoring, indoor environment department, lactational transfer, pcb 153, physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling, pollutant fate and transport modeling, poly-chlorinated biphenyls, reverse dosimetry

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Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 7 Macular Carotenoids in Eye Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 7 Macular Carotenoids in Eye Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   Downloadable pdf...

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