Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Tree and forest effects on air quality and human health in the United David J. Nowak a, *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tree and forest effects on air quality and human health in the United States David J. Nowak a 26 May 2014 Available online xxx Keywords: Air pollution removal Air quality Ecosystem services Human and value of the effects of trees and forests on air quality and human health across the United States

2

EMSL - human health  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

human-health en Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsphysical-properties-ambient-and-labo...

3

Human exposure to mercury: A critical assessment of the evidence of adverse health effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ubiquitous nature of mercury in the environment, its global atmospheric cycling, and its toxicity to humans at levels that are uncomfortably close to exposures experienced by a proportion of the population are some of the current concerns associated with this pollutant. The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate the scientific quality of published reports involving human exposures to mercury and associated health outcomes as an aid in the risk evaluation of this chemical. A comprehensive review of the scientific literature involving human exposures to mercury was performed and each publication evaluated using a defined set of criteria that are considered standards in epidemiologic and toxicologic research. Severe, sometimes fatal, effects of mercury exposure at high levels were primarily reported as case studies. The disasters in Minamata, Japan, in the 1950s and in Iraq in 1971-1972 clearly demonstrated neurologic effects associated with ingestion of methylmercury both in adults and in infants exposed in utero. The effects were convincingly Associated with methylmercury ingestion, despite limitations of the study design. Several well-conducted studies have investigated the effects of methylmercury at levels below those in the Iraq incident but have not provided clear evidence of an effect. The lower end of the dose-response curve constructed from the Iraq data therefore still needs to be confirmed. The studies of mercury exposure in the workplace were mainly of elemental or inorganic mercury, and effects that were observed at relatively low exposure levels were primarily neurologic and renal. Several studies have investigated effects associated with dental amalgam but have been rated as inconclusive because of methodologic deficiencies. In our overall evaluation, 29 of 110 occupational studies and 20 of 54 studies where exposure occurred in the natural environment provided at least suggestive evidence of an exposure-related effect. 259 refs., 4 tabs.

Ratcliffe, H.E.; Swanson, G.M.; Fischer, L.J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

1996-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

4

Climate Change and Human Health National Center for Environmental Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change and Human Health National Center for Environmental Health Division of Environmental and Prevention October 17, 2012 #12;Coastal flooding Climate change effects: ·Temperature ·Sea level,civil conflict Anxiety,despair,depression Civil conflict Climate Change Health Effects Food & water Malnutrition

5

Link Climate Change and Human Health  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Make Our Science Accessible Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally Link Climate Change and Human Health Print E-mail Health News Check out the latest climate change and human health news and announcements in our Health News Feed. Climate change poses unique challenges to human health. Unlike health threats caused by a particular toxin or disease pathogen, there are many ways that climate change can lead to potentially harmful health effects. Direct health impacts may include increased illnesses and deaths from extreme heat events, injuries and deaths from extreme weather events, and respiratory illnesses due to changes in air quality Indirect health impacts include illnesses and deaths that may arise from

6

Solar radiation and human health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Sun has played a major role in the development of life on Earth. In Western culture, people are warned against Sun exposure because of its adverse effects: erythema, photoimmunosuppression, photoageing, photocarcinogenesis, cataracts and photokeratitis. However, Sun exposure is also beneficial, since moderate doses give beneficial physiological effects: vitamin D synthesis, reduction of blood pressure and mental health. Shortage of Sun exposure may be even more dangerous to human health than excessive exposure. Avoiding Sun exposure leads to vitamin D deficiency which is associated not only with rickets and osteomalacia, but also with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, influenza, many types of cancer and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Solar radiation induces nitric oxide release in tissue and immediate pigment darkening which certainly play important roles, although these are still unknown. Action spectra relevant for health are described. We will also review what is known about spectral and intensity variations of terrestrial solar radiation as well as its penetration through the atmosphere and into human skin and tissue.

Asta Juzeniene; Pl Brekke; Arne Dahlback; Stefan Andersson-Engels; Jrg Reichrath; Kristin Moan; Michael F Holick; William B Grant; Johan Moan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Health Effects  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers research programs and monitoring activities, both domestic and international, that support the protection and promotion of the health of DOE workers, their families, and residents of neighboring communities near DOE sites, affected by exposure to hazardous materials from DOE sites or a result of nuclear weapons testing, use or accident.

8

Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE Teaching Fellowship in Athletic of Science and Health, the School of Health and Human Performance at DCU is developing an international reputation in health and exercise science. As such, the School of Health and Human Performance is committed

Humphrys, Mark

9

Air Pollution and Health Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The quality of the air we breathe is still a major concern to human health. Notwithstanding the air pollution mitigation efforts that have been pursued since ... be attributed to the effects of urban outdoor air

Ana Isabel Miranda; Joana Valente

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

College of Health & Human Services 349 College of Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Health & Human Services 349 College of Health and Human Services www.health.uncc.edu Dean: Karen Schmaling Associate Dean: Jane Neese In the College of Health and Human Services at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, students and faculty help chart the course for health care

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

11

The potential human health effect(s) of the metal uranium in the environment. Report on the known human health effects associated with the exposure to the metal uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concern over the levels of the metal uranium in the environment as a result of industrial activities has been expressed by several Federal and State agencies. This concern is associated with potential human health effects of this metal on kidney function and bone formation. Although limits for the Metal uranium in the environment remain to be set, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently in the process of establishing guidance limits for this metal in water and soil. These limits will be established for both the metal and the associated radioactivity. The suggested limits currently being considered for water and soil are, 20 pCi/liter and 10 pCi/gram wet weight, respectively. For naturally occurring uranium EPA assumes that 1 ug of uranium metal equals 0.67 pCi at equilibrium (i.e. at equilibrium the mass ratio of {sup 234}uranium to {sup 238}uranium is small but their activities are equal). Thus the limits for water and soil on weight basis for the uranium metal would be 30 ug/liter and 15 ug/gram wet weight, respectively. These limits are being established based on the potential increase in cancer death in populations that exceed this limit. Since there does not appear to be a significant correlation between cancer deaths and.uranium metal exposure (see discussion below), these limits will probably be established based on the known association between radionuclides exposure and cancer deaths. The exposure limits for other health effects such as kidney damage and retardation in bone formation apparently are not being considered by EPA.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Power Generation and Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions from power generation are associated with adverse health and ecological effects. Fossil fuel-based power plants (such as coal, oil, and to a lesser extent, natural gas) are associated with emissions of particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and a variety of organic contaminants such as mercury and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Exposure to emissions from power plants has been associated with a variety of respiratory symptoms, typically based on short-term (e.g., from 510min to 24h) increases in ambient concentrations. In addition, exposure to constituents from emissions generated by fossil fuels has been associated with increases in premature mortality, particularly in the elderly, and a variety of respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses. Fossil fuels, particularly coal-fired power plants, are responsible for generating the majority of emissions to which humans are exposed.

K. von Stackelberg

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; and translating and disseminating research findings to health care providers, researchers, policymakersDCP - 1 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH Drug Control Programs ..................................................................................................................................2 #12;DCP - 2 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Resource Summary

Levin, Judith G.

14

Health effects of risk-assessment categories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental and occupational health effects associated with exposures to various chemicals are a subject of increasing concern. One recently developed methodology for assessing the health impacts of various chemical compounds involves the classification of similar chemicals into risk-assessment categories (RACs). This report reviews documented human health effects for a broad range of pollutants, classified by RACs. It complements other studies that have estimated human health effects by RAC based on analysis and extrapolation of data from animal research.

Kramer, C.F.; Rybicka, K.; Knutson, A.; Morris, S.C.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Health effects assessment of exposure to particles from wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health effects assessment of exposure to particles from wood smoke Elsa Nielsen, Marianne Dybdahl HUMAN EXPOSURE TO PARTICLES FROM WOOD SMOKE 7 HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS 8 Human non-cancer health effects from exposure to particles from wood smoke 8 Human carcinogenic effects from exposure to particles from

16

Depleted Uranium Health Effects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Discussion of health effects of external exposure, ingestion, and inhalation of depleted uranium. Depleted uranium is not a significant health hazard unless it is taken into the body. External exposure to radiation from depleted uranium is generally not a major concern because the alpha particles emitted by its isotopes travel only a few centimeters in air or can be stopped by a sheet of paper. Also, the uranium-235 that remains in depleted uranium emits only a small amount of low-energy gamma radiation. However, if allowed to enter the body, depleted uranium, like natural uranium, has the potential for both chemical and radiological toxicity with the two important target organs

17

Dose-Rate Dependence of High-Dose Health Effects in Humans from Photon Radiation with Application to Radiological Terrorism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1981, as part of a symposium entitled ''The Control of Exposure of the Public to Ionizing Radiation in the Event of Accident or Attack,'' Lushbaugh, H?bner, and Fry published a paper examining ''radiation tolerance'' of various human health endpoints as a function of dose rate. This paper may not have received the notice it warrants. The health endpoints examined by Lushbaugh et al. were the lethal dose that will kill 50% of people within 60 days of exposure without medical care (LD50/60); severe bone marrow damage in healthy men; severe bone marrow damage in leukemia patients; temporary sterility (azoospermia); reduced male fertility; and late effects such as cancer. Their analysis was grounded in extensive clinical experience and anchored to a few selected data points, and based on the 1968 dose-rate dependence theory of J.L. Bateman. The Lushbaugh et al. paper did not give predictive equations for the relationships, although they were implied in the text, and the relationships were presented in a non-intuitive way. This work derives the parameters needed in Bateman's equation for each health endpoint, tabulates the results, and plots them in a more conventional manner on logarithmic scales. The results give a quantitative indication of how the human organism can tolerate more radiation dose when it is delivered at lower dose rates. For example, the LD50/60 increases from about 3 grays (300 rads) when given at very high dose rates to over 10 grays (1,000 rads) when given at much lower dose rates over periods of several months. The latter figure is borne out by the case of an individual who survived for at least 19 years after receiving doses in the range of 9 to 17 grays (900-1700 rads) over 106 days. The Lushbaugh et al. work shows the importance of sheltering when confronted with long-term exposure to radiological contamination such as would be expected from a radiological dispersion event, reactor accident, or ground-level nuclear explosion.

Strom, Daniel J.

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

18

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute health effects Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; effects of context on health and health-related behavior; disparities in children's health care access... College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes May...

19

Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE Teaching Fellowship in Athletic Therapy (half time, 3 year contract) The School of Health and Human Performance invites applications from and assessment, have relevant qualifications and be experienced in emergency care training and be competent

Humphrys, Mark

20

Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HUMAN HEALTH SCIENCE BLDG GEO HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Principal Investigator Source Heat Pumps Demo Projects May 20, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Services Review Group Type Activity Grant the obligation to comply with Public Health Services terms and conditions if a grant is awarded as a result/PI SUBTOTALS CONSULTANT COSTS EQUIPMENT (Itemize) SUPPLIES (Itemize by category) TRAVEL INPATIENT CARE COSTS

Baker, Chris I.

22

College of Health and Human Sciences College of Health and Human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sciences Office in L.L. Gibbons Building, Room 217 (970) 491-6331 www.chhs.colostate.edu Professor Jeff McCollege of Health and Human Sciences _______________ 2.8 Page 1 College of Health and Human Management Family and Consumer Sciences Fermentation Science and Technology Health and Exercise Science Human

23

Climate Change and Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...stabilize the climate. The good news is that we may also be underestimating the economic benefits of the clean-energy transition. When the financial incentives are adequate, renewable energy, energy-efficient and hybrid technologies, "green buildings," and expanded public transportation systems can constitute... Extreme weather events reflect massive and ongoing changes in our climate to which biologic systems on all continents are reacting. Dr. Paul Epstein writes about some of the health effects that may lie ahead if the increase in very extreme weather events ...

Epstein P.R.

2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

24

Chapter 14 - Human Resources for Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A health system is an expensive knowledge-based industry made up of professionals, paraprofessionals, and administrative and support personnel. Human resources to provide and manage public health and clinical services are crucial to developing and sustaining national and global health systems. High-income countries are replete with highly trained and motivated personnel, but face issues such as increasing costs of care for aging populations and using new categories of health workers. Low-income countries face severe human resource shortages as training programs are underdeveloped. Health workforce issues include urbanrural differentiation, promoting standards and quality of care, specialization versus primary care, tensions between public and private health systems, and integrating new health professions. Migration of health professionals from low-income to high-income countries hampers the buildup of a critical mass of leaders, providers, and teachers to expand the capacity of health systems. Strategic policies are crucial to this field.

Theodore H. Tulchinsky; Elena A. Varavikova

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Radiation effects on humans  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

26

Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps Project objectives: Construct a ground sourced heat pump, heating,...

27

Environmental Health & Safety HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and patient supervisors a work accommodation plan for the patient. Manages each patient's transition through T 650.725.1175 F 650.725.3468 Case Management specialist­ Stanford University Occupational Health Center programs. SUMMARY The Occupational Health Medical Case Management of occupational injury/illness claims

28

College of Human and Health Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8988 College of Human and Health Sciences All research is delivered through discipline-focused research centres, which examine fields such as child research, ageing, psychology and social care, as well as midwifery, nursing and allied health professions. External funding from a number of prestigious bodies has

Harman, Neal.A.

29

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH &. HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH &. HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health of Intramural Research, OD Dr. James F. Taylor, Director Office ofAnimal Care and Use, OIR, OD Director, Division ofOccupational Health and Safety (DOHS) Scientific Resources, ORS Subject: Medical Surveillance of

Bandettini, Peter A.

30

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human Health Print E-mail National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human Health Print E-mail National Institutes of Health Research Portfolio Monday, April 22, 2013 Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program What are the potential effects of global climate change on human health? This is a question that a growing number of federally funded studies seek to answer. A new analysis recently published in the journal, Environmental Health Perspectives, looks at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) research portfolio on climate change and human health. Climate change is affecting human health through environmental consequences, such as sea-level rise, changes in precipitation, heat waves, changes in intensity of hurricanes and storms, and degraded air quality, according to the World Health Organization and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

31

Is climate change affecting human health?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

First principles suggest that climate change is affecting human health, based on what is understood about the relationships between the mean and variability of temperature, precipitation, and other weather variables and climate-sensitive health outcomes, and the magnitude of climate change that has occurred. However, the complexity of these relationships and the multiple drivers of climate-sensitive health outcomes makes the detection and attribution of changing disease patterns to climate change very challenging. Nevertheless, efforts to do so are vital for informing policy and for prioritizing adaptation and mitigation options.

Kristie L Ebi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Communication and Effectiveness in Primary Health Jean Carletta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication and Effectiveness in Primary Health Care Teams Jean Carletta Human Communication.Carletta@edinburgh.ac.uk ABSTRACT Primary health care team members need to communicate effectively with each other in order of cross-disciplinary team meetings, we describe communication in primary health care teams, explore

Carletta, Jean

33

DOE/FDA/EPA: Workshop on methylmercury and human health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the US the general population is exposed to methylmercury (MeHg) principally through the consumption of fish. There is continuing discussion about the sources of this form of mercury (Hg), the magnitudes and trends in exposures to consumers, and the significance of the sources and their contributions to human health. In response to these discussions, the US Department of Energy, the US Food and Drug Administration, and the US Environmental Protection Agency cosponsored a two-day workshop to discuss data and methods available for characterizing the risk to human health presented by MeHg. This workshop was attended by 45 individuals representing various Federal and state organizations and interested stakeholders. The agenda covered: Agency interests; probabilistic approach to risk assessment; emission sources; atmospheric transport; biogeochemical cycling; exposure assessment; health effects of MeHg; and research needs.

Moskowitz, P.D.; Saroff, L.; Bolger, M.; Cicmanec, J.; Durkee, S. [eds.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Clean Slate transportation and human health risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public concern regarding activities involving radioactive material generally focuses on the human health risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation. This report describes the results of a risk analysis conducted to evaluate risk for excavation, handling, and transport of soil contaminated with transuranics at the Clean Slate sites. Transportation risks were estimated for public transport routes from the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to the Envirocore disposal facility or to the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for both radiological risk and risk due to traffic accidents. Human health risks were evaluated for occupational and radiation-related health effects to workers. This report was generated to respond to this public concern, to provide an evaluation of the risk, and to assess feasibility of transport of the contaminated soil for disposal.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Estimated human health risks of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste in salt caverns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the contaminants` toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks.

Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

school youth, development of youth competencies, healthy lifestyle & democratic behavior through leisure. Elizabeth Farmer Associate Professor Health Policy & Administration Email Address: emf13@psu.edu Research Interests Children's mental health services, effectiveness of mental health interventions, mental health

Yener, Aylin

37

Indoor air and human health revisited: A recent IAQ symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indoor Air and Human Health Revisited was a speciality symposium examining the scientific underpinnings of sensory and sensitivity effects, allergy and respiratory disease, neurotoxicity and cancer. An organizing committee selected four persons to chain the sessions and invite experts to give state-of-the-art presentations that will be published as a book. A summary of the presentations is made and some critical issues identified.

Gammage, R.B.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

HEALTH & HUMANITYHEALTH & HUMANITYHEALTH & HUMANITY This major is intended for students interested in fields that inform the health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH & HUMANITYHEALTH & HUMANITYHEALTH & HUMANITY This major is intended for students interested in fields that inform the health profession and in related questions about health and human experience the how health issues relate to different fields. Ethnographics Lab: The Ethnographics Laboratory

Krylov, Anna I.

39

Human Health Risk & Environmental Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the interplay between human health and environmental risks associated with energy production, hazardous waste, national security and natural disasters. Research findings...

40

Health effects of smokeless tobacco  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pharmacologic and physiologic effects of snuff and chewing tobacco include the gamut of cardiovascular, endocrinologic, neurologic, and psychological effects that are associated with nicotine. A review of studies appearing in the scientific literature involving various populations and approaches indicates that the use of snuff or chewing tobacco is associated with a variety of serious adverse effects and especially with oral cancer. The studies suggest that snuff and chewing tobacco also may affect reproduction, longevity, the cardiovascular system, and oral health. The Council on Scientific Affairs concludes there is evidence demonstrating that use of snuff or chewing tobacco is associated with adverse health effects such as oral cancer, urges the implementation of well-planned and long-term studies that will further define the risks of using snuff and chewing tobacco, and recommends that the restrictions applying to the advertising of cigarettes also be applied to the advertising of snuff and chewing tobacco.

Not Available

1986-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Radon: An Overview of Health Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radon is one of the most comprehensively studied human carcinogens. It is a naturally occurring noble gas, and due to current construction methods, radon concentrations often become enhanced indoors. Radon is the largest single contributor to the natural radiation exposure to the general public. Two of its radioactive decay products, polonium-218 and polonium-214, impart the majority of radiation dose to the lungs, rather than the radon gas itself. In fact, protracted exposure to radon and its decay products is one of the greatest environmental health threats. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in North America and the leading cause of lung cancer for individuals who have never smoked. Overall, radon is also the leading environmental cause of cancer mortality in North America. In vitro studies, controlled studies of radon-exposed animals, a variety of radiobiological analyses, 15 retrospective cohort studies of radon-exposed underground miners, and analyses of 22 pooled residential epidemiologic studies from North America, China, and Europe convincingly demonstrate that radon is a human lung carcinogen even at concentrations commonly encountered in the residential setting. Because of the significant health risks related to residential radon exposure, the World Health Organization (WHO) instituted an international initiative in 2005, the International Radon Project, to reduce indoor radon risks. This article and the following articles on radon provide a general overview of its characteristics, sources, occurrence, and health effects, as well as guidance on both radon measurement and mitigation.

R.W. Field

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Effects of environmental change on wildlife health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Effects of environmental change on wildlife health Karina Acevedo-Whitehouse 1 * Amanda...Living organisms will strive to maintain health by recognizing and resolving abnormal...additional pressure on immunocompetence and health maintenance, which may seriously impact...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Health Policy and Administration University Park, College of Health and Human Development (H P A)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health Policy and Administration University Park, College of Health and Human Development (H P A positions or graduate study in the field of health care. Students in the major develop the skills and knowledge needed to understand the complex societal problem of providing access to quality health care

Yener, Aylin

44

Human Resource Services Health Insurance Informational Session  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will be defaulted to the Quality Care Health Plan Enrollment forms were mailed by Central Management Services February 1, 2013 Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) Quality Care Health Plan (D3) Open Access Plan (OAP) ­ Managed Care Coventry OAP (CH) HealthLink OAP (CF) Health Maintenance Organization (HMO

Karonis, Nicholas T.

45

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes May 2007 Page 23 of 58 Family and Contextual Influences on Development Rhonda Belue Assistant Professor Health Policy & Administration Email Address: RZB10@PSU.EDU Research Interests Health disparities in families and children, evaluation

Yener, Aylin

46

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.EDU Research Interests Health insurance; hospital care for children; use of medical care by the elderlyCollege of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes May 2007 Page 2 of 58 Behavior-Genetics in Health and Development Ingrid Blood Professor Communication Sciences & Disorders Email Address: i2b

Yener, Aylin

47

Human Resources hs_pro08 Page 1 of 12 Human Resources: Health, Safety & Wellbeing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Worksafe NZ , any restricted work as defined in regulation 2 and 26 of The Health and Safety in EmploymentHuman Resources ­ hs_pro08 Page 1 of 12 Human Resources: Health, Safety & Wellbeing Protocol & Safety Manager Contact: Health & Safety Team Table of Contents Introduction

Hickman, Mark

48

Putting climate change and human health science into practice  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Putting climate change and human health science into practice Print E-mail Putting climate change and human health science into practice Print E-mail Landsat Data Continuity Mission Tuesday, March 26, 2013 Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program For the first time, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) formally brought together their grantees working on climate change and human health, to share their research findings and discuss practical strategies for implementing this knowledge. "The goal of this meeting was for grantees to share latest advances, as well as for participants to network with each other to build new relationships and plant the seeds for future collaborations toward solving one of the most critical public health issues facing our world," said Caroline Dilworth, Ph.D., NIEHS health scientist administrator.

49

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-outcome relationships. Elizabeth Farmer Associate Professor Health Policy & Administration Email Address: emf13@psu.edu Research Interests Children's mental health services, effectiveness of mental health interventions, mental health in life course trajectories, community-based services for youth, role of schools in children

Yener, Aylin

50

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Elizabeth Farmer Associate Professor Health Policy & Administration Email Address: emf13@psu.edu Research Interests Children's mental health services, effectiveness of mental health interventions, mental health in life course trajectories, community-based services for youth, role of schools in children's mental

Yener, Aylin

51

Nutrition Can Modulate the Toxicity of Environmental Pollutants: Implications in Risk Assessment and Human Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Western diet: health implications for the 21st century.Pollutants: Implications in Risk Assessment and Human Healthand their implications in risk assessment and human health.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

{~.~ DEPARTMENT Of HEALTH & HUMAN ERVICES Public Health SaMea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~nt, (Fl.) Environmental Health Division's Swimming Pools and Spas Interactive Training CD-ROM_ A full Initiative: Swimming Pool Inspections". This comprehensive training program will enhance the knowledge Integrated Pest Mll1IIlgement Webcast · Morbidity MoTtality Weekly Repons - Surveillance Datafrom Swimming

53

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes May 2007 Page 16 of 58 Development and adults who stutter; curriculum reform in undergraduate education. J. Douglas Coatsworth Associate and to prevent mental health and behavioral problems in children and adolescents; resilience. Ann Crouter

Yener, Aylin

54

Depleted uranium human health risk assessment, Jefferson Proving Ground, Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The risk to human health from fragments of depleted uranium (DU) at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG) was estimated using two types of ecosystem pathway models. A steady-state, model of the JPG area was developed to examine the effects of DU in soils, water, and vegetation on deer that were hunted and consumed by humans. The RESRAD code was also used to estimate the effects of farming the impact area and consuming the products derived from the farm. The steady-state model showed that minimal doses to humans are expected from consumption of deer that inhabit the impact area. Median values for doses to humans range from about 1 mrem ({plus_minus}2.4) to 0.04 mrem ({plus_minus}0.13) and translate to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments (excess cancers) in the population. Monte Carlo simulation of the steady-state model was used to derive the probability distributions from which the median values were drawn. Sensitivity analyses of the steady-state model showed that the amount of DU in airborne dust and, therefore, the amount of DU on the vegetation surface, controlled the amount of DU ingested by deer and by humans. Human doses from the RESRAD estimates ranged from less than 1 mrem/y to about 6.5 mrem/y in a hunting scenario and subsistence fanning scenario, respectively. The human doses exceeded the 100 mrem/y dose limit when drinking water for the farming scenario was obtained from the on-site aquifer that was presumably contaminated with DU. The two farming scenarios were unrealistic land uses because the additional risk to humans due to unexploded ordnance in the impact area was not figured into the risk estimate. The doses estimated with RESRAD translated to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments to about 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} detriments. The higher risks were associated only with the farming scenario in which drinking water was obtained on-site.

Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

1994-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

55

Health effects of air pollution: some historical notes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that was his first air pollution health effects committeeand direction of air pollution health effects research inof community air pollution, including health ef- fects, has

Whittenberger, J L

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Human Capital: Education, Innovation and Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Table5.15...shows that, despite the gradual increase in educational expenditure (both in absolute terms and as a ... in the size of the investment in human capital production. Finally, a substantial increase in....

Prof. Panagiotis Petrakis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Components of plastic: experimental studies in animals and relevance for human health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Plastics, the environment and human health' compiled by R. C. Thompson, C. J...studies in animals and relevance for human health Chris E. Talsness 1 * Anderson J. M...Toxicology, National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Map Click on a Project Name to Get More Information Click to read a DOE TechLine [PDF-22KB] describing three new projects that will improve our current understanding of the link between power plant emissions, PM2.5, and human health. The Health Effects component of NETL's Air Quality Research Program is designed to enhance the body of scientific evidence relating stack emissions from coal plants to adverse health effects resulting from human exposures to air pollution. Despite the fact that coal plants emit significant amounts of PM2.5 and mercury to the atmosphere, there is currently a great deal of uncertainty regarding the actual amount of health damage resulting from these emissions. In order to devise cost-effective

59

Uranium: Environmental Pollution and Health Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium is found ubiquitously in nature in low concentrations in soil, rock, and water. Naturally occurring uranium contains three isotopes, namely 238U, 235U, and 234U. All uranium isotopes have the same chemical properties, but they have different radiological properties. The main civilian use of uranium is to fuel nuclear power plants, whereas high enriched (in 235U) uranium is used in the military sector as nuclear explosives and depleted uranium (DU) as penetrators or tank shielding. Exposure to uranium may cause health problems due to its radiological (uranium is predominantly emitting alpha-particles) and chemical actions (heavy metal toxicity). Uranium uptake may occur by ingestion, inhalation, contaminated wounds, and embedded fragments especially for soldiers. Inhalation of dust is considered the major pathway for uranium uptake in workplaces. Soluble uranium compounds tend to quickly pass through the body, whereas insoluble uranium compounds pose a more serious inhalation exposure hazard. The kidney is the most sensitive organ for uranium chemotoxicity. An important indirect radiological effect of uranium is the increased risk of lung cancers from inhalation of the daughter products of radon, a noble gas in the uranium decay chains that transports uranium-derived radioactivity from soil into the indoor environment. No direct evidence about the carcinogenic effect of DU in humans is available yet.

D. Melo; W. Burkart

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Impact evaluation of electrical equipments on human health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objectives of study: - Measure of the electric and magnetic field from electric power station: Darste - Brasov, Lacu Sarat-Braila, Bradu-Arges; - Evaluation of human health from electric power station: Darste - Brasov, Lacu Sarat-Braila, Bradu-Arges; ... Keywords: electric and megnetic field, electric power stations, melatonin

Alice Raducanu; Aurica Suvergel; Angela Stanca; Marin Stefan; Cornella Marcolt; Corneliu Neagu

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

('~ DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and communicate research findings to patients and their families, health care providers, and the general public care professionals access to important health and science information from taxpayer to reach patients, health care providers, and our other audiences. While these communication efforts

Baker, Chris I.

62

Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects of Diesel Emissions Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects of Diesel Emissions 2005...

63

Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine Emissions Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine Emissions Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel...

64

Illustrative assessment of human health issues arising from the potential release of  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many countries have a programme for developing an underground geological disposal facility for radioactive waste. A case study is provided herein on the illustrative assessment of human health issues arising from the potential release of chemotoxic and radioactive substances from a generic geological disposal facility (GDF) for radioactive waste. The illustrative assessment uses a sourcepathwayreceptor methodology and considers a number of human exposure pathways. Estimated exposures are compared with authoritative toxicological assessment criteria. The possibility of additive and synergistic effects resulting from exposures to mixtures of chemical contaminants or a combination of radiotoxic and chemotoxic substances is considered. The case study provides an illustration of how to assess human health issues arising from chemotoxic species released from a GDF for radioactive waste and highlights potential difficulties associated with a lack of data being available with which to assess synergistic effects. It also highlights how such difficulties can be addressed.

James C Wilson; Michael C Thorne; George Towler; Simon Norris

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The Social Cost of the Health Effects of Motor-Vehicle Air Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Selected Studies. Health Effects Institute, Cambridge,of Selected Stu&es. Health Effects Institute, Cambridge,and Health Effects. Health Effects Institute, Cambridge,

McCubbin, Donald R.; Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing human health Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

health Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: assessing human health Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Undergraduate Minor in Public Health A...

67

Assessing human health risk in the USDA forest service  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper identifies the kinds of risk assessments being done by or for the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service. Summaries of data sources currently in use and the pesticide risk assessments completed by the agency or its contractors are discussed. An overview is provided of the agency`s standard operating procedures for the conduct of toxicological, ecological, environmental fate, and human health risk assessments.

Hamel, D.R. [Department of Agriculture-Forest Service, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Depleted uranium exposure and health effects in Gulf War veterans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2006 research-article Depleted uranium exposure and health effects in Gulf War...Medicine) Gulf War and health. In Depleted uranium, pyridostigmine bromide...McDiarmid, M.A , Health effects of depleted uranium on exposed Gulf War...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

ARSENIC IN DRINKINGARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: HEALTH EFFECTS ANDWATER: HEALTH EFFECTS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARSENIC IN DRINKINGARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: HEALTH EFFECTS ANDWATER: HEALTH EFFECTS AND CURRENT;EPA. National Primary Drinking Water Regulations; Arsenic and Clarification to Compliance and New National Occurrence and Exposure to Arsenic in Public Drinking Water Supplies (Revised Draft). Washington

70

29 Towards Equity Effectiveness in Health Interventions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Côte d'Ivoire, environmental sanitation in Vietnam, and health and demographic surveillance of mobile; equity effectiveness; HIV/AIDS; environmental sanitation; drinking water; mobile pastoralists; Côte d in rich and poor countries. Where resources are lim- ited, priority in public budgetary allocation tends

Richner, Heinz

71

The health effects of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There has been a substantial amount of public discussion on the health effects of the use of depleted uranium (DU) munitions. In response to this concern the Royal Society set up an independent, expert working group to investigate the health effects of DU munitions. The Royal Society has now produced two reports, and this summary covering the key conclusions and recommendations from both reports. The part I report considered the increased risks of radiation-induced cancer from exposures to DU on the battlefield. Part II dealt with the risks from the chemical toxicity of uranium, non-malignant radiation effects from DU intakes, the long-term environmental consequences of the deployment of DU munitions and responses to part I including issues arising at a public meeting to discuss the part I report.

The Royal Society Working Group on the Health Hazards of

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Radioactivity levels in plant samples in Tulkarem district, Palestine and its impact on human health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Palestine and its impact on human health Kaleel M. Thabayneh * Mohannad...samples. The radiological health implication to the population...radiation research related to human health is to predict the biological...during their growth. These dangerous isotopes enter the cells and......

Kaleel M. Thabayneh; Mohannad M. Jazzar

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

PA-40-201 1 Department of Health and Human Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PA-40-201 1 Department of Health and Human Services Part 1. Overview Information Participating Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) National Institute on Aging (NIA) National Institute on Alcohol Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human

Baker, Chris I.

74

Health and Human Rights--PH 393 Professor Juliet S. Sorensen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; how to maximize access to health; the health implications of war crimes and atrocities1 Health and Human Rights--PH 393 Professor Juliet S. Sorensen Rubloff 8th Floor, Bluhm Legal ­ 3 p.m. or by appointment Course description: The course examines the intersection of health

Contractor, Anis

75

E-Print Network 3.0 - ancillary human health Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

102010 Printed 612011 Premier HMO 5 Summary: and clarification on the new health care reform laws from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services... , you may also...

76

HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occurred during the nuclear accident, and probably noHEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT MILE ISLAND JacobENG-48 HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT A T THREE MILE

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

HEALTH CARE REFORM AND ITS EFFECT ON STUDENT HEALTH PLANS INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOPIC: HEALTH CARE REFORM AND ITS EFFECT ON STUDENT HEALTH PLANS INTRODUCTION: The Patient the initial impact of the Act on college and university- sponsored employee health care plans [1]. This Note-sponsored student health plans ("SHPs"). After the Affordable Care Act was enacted, many within the higher education

Martinez, Tony R.

78

Abstract--Accurate recognition of air pollutants and estimation of their concentrations are critical for human health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exposure to air pollutions has a serious effect on the health of humans and has become the leading cause Abstract--Accurate recognition of air pollutants and estimation of their concentrations of relevant gases. However, because there are several air pollutants that need to be monitored simultaneously

Mason, Andrew

79

260 Volume 80THE QUARTERLY REVIEW OF BIOLOGY Climate Change and Human Health: Risks and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

negative impacts of global warming on human health by decreasing our use of fossil fuels. Specifically to the air by the burning of fossil fuels, and that such harm will only intensify in the future. How260 Volume 80THE QUARTERLY REVIEW OF BIOLOGY Climate Change and Human Health: Risks and Responses

Gotelli, Nicholas J.

80

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Dose Response · Building in vitro Models for Environmental Research · Early Life Determinants the life course and beyond, to future generations. Advancing our understanding of the environmental impacts of Air Pollution on Human Health · Water Pollution and Human Health · Multiple Exposures, Mixtures

Rau, Don C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing health effects Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; effects of context on health and health-related behavior; disparities in children's health care access... , personal and social costs of cancer, dynamics of health insurance...

82

Extreme weather-water-food linkage: Impact on human health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(poor sanitation and hygiene) SOURCE: WHO WORLD HEALTH REPORT 2002 J. Lee. Understanding Climate Change

Howat, Ian M.

83

U.S. Department of Health And Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is a dangerous situation that can bring on health emergencies in susceptible people, such as those withoutU.S. Department of Health And Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention #12;For more information on cold weather conditions and health, please contact: Centers for Disease Control

Khan, Javed I.

84

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. We receive many benefits from the oceans from seafood, recreation and transportation industriesNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative (OHHI) is taking a new look at how the health of our ocean impacts our own health and well- being, and in turn how

85

Assessing Uncertainty in Spatial Exposure Models for Air Pollution Health Effects Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Holgate S. 2002. Air pollution and health. Lancet Brunekreef2006. Bayesian modeling of air pollution health effects withExposure Models for Air Pollution Health Effects Assessment

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Appendix F Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Human Health Risk Assessment Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F This appendix presents the detailed calculations used to estimate risks to human health. It includes the exposure factors, equations, abbreviations, assumptions, and references. Separate spreadsheets for ground water ingestion for the near-term and 20-year assumptio~ls have also been provided. The following spreadsheets are included in this appendix: Overview (Exposure Factors, Equations, Abbreviations, and COPCs) .......................... F-3 * Contaminant Concentrations-Near-Tern1 Ground Water Concentrations .................... F-6 Toxicity Factors ...................................... .. ............................................................ F-8 * Lower Montezuma'creek Exposure Scenario-Reasonable Maximurn Exposure ...... F-10

87

Depleted Uranium: Exposure and Possible Health Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is a by-product of the enrichment process of 235U used for fission in nuclear reactors and nuclear weapons. It has both civilian and military applications. The military use of DU is of defensive as well as of offensive nature, being mainly employed as armor-piercing ammunition. So far, the usage of ammunitions containing DU has been officially confirmed in four military conflicts: Iraq (1991), Bosnia (1994), Kosovo (1999), and again Iraq (2003). During their deployment in the military actions, most penetrators are thought to have missed their intended targets. Therefore, a substantial amount of DU is still present in the environment and may act as a source of contamination for the environment and the population. The possible effects of this radioactive and chemically toxic material have attracted particular notice. To evaluate these consequences, it is important to have accurate methods to assess the exposure to DU in both environmental and biological samples. This article is therefore intended to point out the problematic nature of the experimental techniques and of the analytical methods so far used to quantify the exposure to DU in the light of possible health effects of DU.

U. Oeh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Economic and Health Effects of a State Cigarette Excise Tax Increase in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health Services May 26, 2006 Economic and Health Effects ofS.A. Glantz. Health and economic effects of two proposals toEconomic and Health Effects of a State Cigarette Excise Tax

California Department of Health Services, Tobacco Control Section

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Health and environmental effects document for direct coal liquefaction - 1981.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents initial estimates of potential human health effects from inhalation of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) that may be released from a future hypothetical industry producing about 600,000 bb1/day of synthetic fuel by direct liquefaction of coal. The assessment approach starts wth general assumptions that are then refined in a tiered sequence that considers available epidemiological, environmental and chemical data. The uncertainties involved in such an evaluation have been quantified where possible at this early stage of health risk analysis. Many surrogate data bases were considered for application to coal liquefaction including coke oven, British gas retort, roofing tar and asphalts, and cigarette smoke. The coke oven data base was selected for this assessment because the chemical and physical nature of coke oven emissions are judged to more closely approximate potential coal liquefaction emissions. Utilizing the extensive epidemiological data base for coke oven workers as a surrogate model, health effects from release of coal liquefaction NMHC may be quantified. This method results in estimates of about 1 x 10/sup -3/ excess cancer deaths/yr to an industrial work force of 7800 persons and 5 x 10/sup -2/ excess cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole from NMHC that boil above 600/sup 0/F. Sources of uncertainty in the estimates are listed. Using these uncertainties, it is estimated that from 2 x 10/sup -4/ to 5 x 10/sup -3/ lung cancer deaths/yr may occur in the industrial work force and from 1 x 10/sup -2/ to 2.5 x 10/sup -1/ lung cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole. On an individual basis, the excess lifetime risk to occupationally exposed workers is estimated to be 500 times greater than to members of the U.S. public.

Mellinger, P.J.; Wilson, B.W.; Mahlum, D.D.; Sever, L.E.; Olsen, A.R.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Human Reliability Program (HRP) - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program Medical Exam Scheduling Medical...

91

Comparative Effectiveness and Health Care Spending Implications for Reform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...correlation at the aggregate level between health spending and outcomes does not disprove the existence of a positive association within a hospital or other health care delivery organization. Moreover, a negative association does not imply that more spending is harmful. That said, there are undoubtedly... In this Sounding Board article, the authors argue that health care costs can be reduced without a negative effect on quality by reducing spending on interventions that are not cost-effective.

Weinstein M.C.; Skinner J.A.

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

92

Real and Theoretical Threats to Human Health Posed by the Epidemic of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter discusses the question of whether or not food, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics derived from animal tissues may pose a danger to human health. More specifically, can any of these products transmit C...

Richard T. Johnson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The coastal environment and human health: microbial indicators, pathogens, sentinels and reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Innovative research relating oceans and human health is advancing our understanding of disease-causing organisms in coastal ecosystems. Novel techniques are elucidating the loading, transport and fate of pathogens in coastal ...

Stewart, Jill R.

94

Human health-risk assessment for municipal-sludge disposal: benefits of alternative regulatory options. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses numerical criteria for the reuse and disposal of municipal sewage sludge and evaluates reductions in human health risks or benefits derived from controlling sludge-disposal practices. Quantitative aggregate risk estimates are projected for 31 contaminants for each of the key sludge-management practices: incineration; monofilling; land application (food chain and non-food chain); and distribution and marketing. The study utilizes state-of-the-art fate, transport, and exposure methodologies in predicting environmental concentrations. The analysis evaluates a number of human-exposure routes including dietary, drinking water, and inhalation pathways. The analysis couples this information with national and local populations exposed along with the Agency's most recent health-effects data in assessing risks. A methodology for quantitatively assessing non-carcinogenic effects from exposure to lead is introduced.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

How Can Research on Plants Contribute to Promoting Human Health?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...significantly, the World Health Organization...the increasing consumption of unhealthy foods...Recent increases in consumption of more energy-dense, nutrient-poor...clarithromycin. World J. Gastroenterol...Quercetin consumption delays, but does...

Cathie Martin; Eugenio Butelli; Katia Petroni; Chiara Tonelli

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

96

Occupational Health Nurse  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Occupational Health Nurse position is located in the Talent Sustainment group within the Human Capital Management (HCM) organization. The Talent Sustainment organization ensures that effective...

97

Deep Atomic Binding (DAB) Approach in Interpretation of Fission Products Behavior in Human Body, and Health Consequences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to models used to predict health effects of fission products enter the human body, a large number of fatalities, malignancies, thyroid cancer, born (genetic) defects,...etc.. But the actual data after Chernobyl and TMI accidents, and nuclear detonations in USA and Marshal Islands, were not consistent with these models. According to DAB, these data could be interpreted, and conflicts between former models predictions and actual field data explained. (author)

Ajlouni, Abdul-Wali M.S. [Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Amman 11814 (Jordan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Air quality standards: Role of the Health Effects Institute in conducting research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Health Effects Institute is an independently governed organization, jointly funded by the public and private sectors to conduct scientific research, for regulatory purposes, concerning the health effects on humans of motor vehicle emissions. The consensus is that research HEI is performing is credible and of high quality. GAO believes that future funding should still be considered and that more open dialogue between the Environmental Protection Agency and HEI could help ensure that an increasing number of mutually agreed upon relevant research projects are undertaken.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy August 28, 2010 August 2010 Memorandum of Understanding between HHS and DOE regarding the authorities, responsibilities and procedures to conduc mandated activities relating to the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000. This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) serves to set forth the authorities, responsibilities, and procedures by which the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct statutorily mandated activities required to assist with claims processing

100

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

To advance and share knowledge, discover solutions and promote opportunities in food and agriculture, bioenergy, health, the environment and human well-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and agriculture, bioenergy, health, the environment and human well- being. Vision: To lead in science, innovation

Sheridan, Jennifer

102

EFFECTIVE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING WITH ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, fatigue, intelligent structure INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D Printing or Rapid

Boyer, Edmond

103

Energy and Human Health Kirk R. Smith,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved Keywords coal, air pollution, biomass fuel, petroleum, nuclear energy accrue to the harvesting and burning of solid fuels, coal and biomass, mainly in the form of occupational health risks and household and general ambient air pollution. Lack of access to clean fuels

Mauzerall, Denise

104

Guidance on health effects of toxic chemicals. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES), and Martin Marietta Utility Services, Inc. (MMUS), are engaged in phased programs to update the safety documentation for the existing US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facilities. The safety analysis of potential toxic hazards requires a methodology for evaluating human health effects of predicted toxic exposures. This report provides a consistent set of health effects and documents toxicity estimates corresponding to these health effects for some of the more important chemicals found within MMES and MMUS. The estimates are based on published toxicity information and apply to acute exposures for an ``average`` individual. The health effects (toxicological endpoints) used in this report are (1) the detection threshold; (2) the no-observed adverse effect level; (3) the onset of irritation/reversible effects; (4) the onset of irreversible effects; and (5) a lethal exposure, defined to be the 50% lethal level. An irreversible effect is defined as a significant effect on a person`s quality of life, e.g., serious injury. Predicted consequences are evaluated on the basis of concentration and exposure time.

Foust, C.B.; Griffin, G.D.; Munro, N.B.; Socolof, M.L.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Geography and physical and social environments have important implications for human health and health care. This course will explore the intersections among geography, environments and public health, with an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geography and physical and social environments have important implications for human health and health care. This course will explore the intersections among geography, environments and public health, with an emphasis on geographical analysis approaches for health data, to address two key questions: (1) How can

106

Co-benefits of mitigating global greenhouse gas emissions for future air quality and human health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions also influences air quality. We simulate the co-benefits of global GHG reductions on air quality and human health via two mechanisms: a) reducing co-emitted air pollutants, and b) slowing climate change and its effect on air quality. Relative to a reference scenario, global GHG mitigation in the RCP4.5 scenario avoids 0.50.2, 1.30.6, and 2.21.6 million premature deaths in 2030, 2050, and 2100, from changes in fine particulate matter and ozone. Global average marginal co-benefits of avoided mortality are $40-400 (ton CO2)-1, exceeding marginal abatement costs in 2030 and 2050, and within the low range of costs in 2100. East Asian co-benefits are 10-80 times the marginal cost in 2030. These results indicate that transitioning to a low-carbon future might be justified by air quality and health co-benefits.

West, Jason; Smith, Steven J.; Silva, Raquel; Naik, Vaishali; Zhang, Yuqiang; Adelman, Zacariah; Fry, Meridith M.; Anenberg, Susan C.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

College of Health, Education, and Human Development Admission Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, technology, assessment, and instructional/leader- ship/counseling strategies to effect learning for diverse

Stuart, Steven J.

108

College of Health, Education, and Human Development ADMINISTRATION AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and instructional/leader- ship/counseling strategies to effect learning for diverse populations. Clemson University

Stuart, Steven J.

109

Health effects of synfuels technology: a review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains annotated synopses of available information pertinent to health impacts of synthetic fuel technologies under development, and identifies needs for further information. The report focuses on carcinogenesis, which appears to be a special problem with coal conversion technologies. This review is intended to serve as a reference for the NEPA Affairs Division of DOE in its evaluation of the overall synthetic fuel program and specific projects in the program. Updated versions of this document are expected to be prepared annually or semiannually as new information becomes available.

Sanathanan, L.P.; Reilly, C.A.; Marshall, S.A.; Wilzbach, K.E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Moving to Equity: Addressing Inequitable Effects of Transportation Policies on Minorities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental effects, including human health, economic, and social effects, on minority and low-income communities,

Sanchez, Thomas W.; Stolz, Rich; Ma, Jacinta S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Human health risk implications of multiple sources of faecal indicator bacteria in a recreational waterbody  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We simulate the influence of multiple sources of enterococci (ENT) as faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in recreational water bodies on potential human health risk by considering waters impacted by human and animal sources, human and non-pathogenic sources, and animal and non-pathogenic sources. We illustrate that risks vary with the proportion of culturable ENT in water bodies derived from these sources and estimate corresponding ENT densities that yield the same level of health protection that the recreational water quality criteria in the United States seeks (benchmark risk). The benchmark risk is based on epidemiological studies conducted in water bodies predominantly impacted by human faecal sources. The key result is that the risks from mixed sources are driven predominantly by the proportion of the contamination source with the greatest ability to cause human infection (potency), not necessarily the greatest source(s) of FIB. Predicted risks from exposures to mixtures comprised of approximately 30% ENT from human sources were up to 50% lower than the risks expected from purely human sources when contamination is recent and ENT levels are at the current water quality criteria levels (35CFU 100mL-1). For human/non-pathogenic, human/gull, human/pig, and human/chicken faecal mixtures with relatively low human contribution, the predicted culturable enterococci densities that correspond to the benchmark risk are substantially greater than the current water quality criteria values. These findings are important because they highlight the potential applicability of site specific water quality criteria for waters that are predominantly un-impacted by human sources.

Jeffrey A. Soller; Mary E. Schoen; Arun Varghese; Audrey M. Ichida; Alexandria B. Boehm; Sorina Eftim; Nicholas J. Ashbolt; John E. Ravenscroft

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or equivalent toxicological potency in which case they are not considered ?sufficiently? similar. Currently, this method is only useful for inhalation 4 routes of exposure because epidemiological data for human oral and dermal exposures are not yet... available. Consequently, it is only feasible to use in cases where inhalation risk will be the dominant contributor to the overall risk estimates. This method is not considered a viable option for mixtures that have originated from unknown sources...

Bruce, Erica Dawn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Regional Characterization of Freshwater Use in LCA: Modeling Direct Impacts on Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Regional Characterization of Freshwater Use in LCA: Modeling Direct Impacts on Human Health ... Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a methodology that quantifies potential environmental impacts for comparative purposes in a decision-making context. ... While potential environmental impacts from pollutant emissions into water are characterized in LCA, impacts from water unavailability are not yet fully quantified. ...

Anne-Marie Boulay; Ccile Bulle; Jean-Baptiste Bayart; Louise Deschnes; Manuele Margni

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

114

Essays on econometric modeling of subjective perceptions of risks in environment and human health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A large body of literature studies the issues of the option price and other ex-ante welfare measures under the microeconomic theory to valuate reductions of risks inherent in environment and human health. However, it does not offer a careful...

Nguyen, To Ngoc

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

SUSTAINABILITY PRINCIPLES Harvard University is committed to developing and maintaining an environment that enhances human health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;SUSTAINABILITY PRINCIPLES Harvard University is committed to developing and maintaining species. · · · Developing planning tools to enable comparative analysis of sustainability implications an environment that enhances human health and fosters a transition toward sustainability. Sustainability should

Paulsson, Johan

116

Benzo(C)fluorine, PAH with possible human health implications. (To BAP or  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Benzo(C)fluorine, PAH with possible human health implications. (To BAP or Benzo(C)fluorine, PAH with possible human health implications. (To BAP or not to BAP) Speaker(s): Larry Goldstein Date: November 7, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants with potential health consequences. Essentially all the cancer risk from exposure to coal tar, cigarette smoke and other products of incomplete combustion is thought to reflect the contributions of PAHs with 4 or more fused rings. In risk assessment as currently practiced the major contributor to overall risk is the 5-ring PAH benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P).However, recent studies using a lifetime feeding protocol indicate that B(a)P does not meet criteria for application to risk assessment since it does not induce lung tumors, the endpoint upon which risk assessments

117

Communications Assistant The College of Health and Human Sciences Dean's Office is seeking a dynamic individual to help us get  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communications Assistant The College of Health and Human Sciences Dean's Office is seeking for various College and unit publications. Photography: Take photos with the office camera at College events of Communications College of Health and Human Sciences 226 L. L. Gibbons Building (970) 491-5182 | gretchen

118

Health Risk Assessment: scale-dependent effects of urban air pollution on mortality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health Risk Assessment: scale-dependent effects of urban air pollution on mortality M. Valari(1), L (food, water etc.) -Population exposure: [c] x dt -Health data & air pollution health effects Health risk assessment #12;Pollutants concentrations [c] Population exposure [c] x dt Air pollution health

Menut, Laurent

119

Atmospheric Movement of Microorganisms in Clouds of Desert Dust and Implications for Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...A. Centeno. 2005. Health effects of natural dust-role of trace elements and compounds...enumeration of heterotrophic bacteria in natural mineral water. World J. Microbiol...coccidioidomycosis following a severe natural dust storm. An outbreak at the Naval...

Dale W. Griffin

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse health effects Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adverse health effects Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Regulation of Animal Health Products FDACVM:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Re-examining the health effects of radiation and its protection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The health effects of radiation from atomic explosions in Japan were completely different from those due to radiation from the Co-60 contaminated apartments in Taiwan. The sudden exposure to acute radiation in extremely high doses killed Japanese people, and harmed the survivors in lower doses as shown by increased cancer mortality, especially the leukemia based on the LNT model. The chronic radiation received by the residents unknowingly in the Co-60 contaminated apartments in Taiwan, even in higher doses, caused no excess cancer deaths; on the contrary their spontaneous cancer deaths were sharply reduced to only about 2.5% of that of the general population, and hereditary defects in their offspring were only 5%??7% of those of the normal population. Therefore, the residents in the Co-60 contamination apartments had coincidently accomplished a human experiment of the health effects to human beings. The chronic radiation received from the Co-60 contaminated houses is quite similar to the radiation exposure to the workers and public in the peaceful use of nuclear energy and medical radiation. Acute radiation from a nuclear accident could harm a limited number of people, but the chronic radiation might benefit people, such as in the case of the Chernobyl accident. People should not be fearful of chronic exposure to low radiation and the traditional radiation protection policy and practices used in past 60 years should be revised based on the health effects observed in Taiwan.

Y.C. Luan; M.C. Shieh; S.T. Chen; H.T. Kung; K.L. Soong; Y.C. Yeh; T.S. Chou; W.C. Fang; S.L. Yao; C.J. Pong; S.H. Mong; J.T. Wu; J.M. Wu; H.J. Jen; W.L. Chen; W.P. Deng; M.F. Wu; M.L. Shen; C.P. Sun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Radioactivity and X-rays Applications and health effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the release of radioactivity from reactor accidents and fallout from nuclear explosions in the atmosphereRadioactivity and X-rays Applications and health effects by Thormod Henriksen #12;Preface ­ 7 Chapter 2. What is radioactivity page 8 ­ 27 Chapter 3. Radioactive decay laws page 28 ­ 35

Sahay, Sundeep

123

Health effects of electromagnetic field generated by lightning current pulses near down conductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The lightning current generates a time varying magnetic field near down conductors, when lightning strikes the connected Franklin-rod. The down conductors are mounted on the wall of buildings, where residential places can be situated. It is well known that the rapidly changing magnetic fields could generate dangerous eddy currents in the human body. If the duration and the gradient of the magnetic field were high enough, the peripheral nerves are excited. In this study, the authors introduce an improved model of the interaction of electromagnetic fields of lighting current near a down conductor with the human body. The interaction model has two parts: estimation of the magnetic fields surrounding the down conductor and evaluation of health effects of rapid changing magnetic fields on the human body.

Z Tamus; B Novk; L Szcs; I Kiss

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Office of International Health Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

International Health Studies International Health Studies Home Mission and Functions Japan Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) Studies Marshall Islands Program Russian Health Studies Program Russian Radiobiology Human Tissue Repository Spain (Palomares) Program Health and Safety HSS Logo Office of International Health Studies Reports to the Office of Health and Safety Mission and Functions Mission The Office of International Health Studies engages in the conduct of international scientific studies that may provide new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation in the workplace or people exposed in communities as a result of nuclear accidents. The mission includes providing health and environmental monitoring services to populations specified by law.

126

The Social Cost of the Health Effects of Motor-Vehicle Air Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

so on. 11.1.2 Air pollution and health effects Weestimateavailabihty of air pollution and health data in a particularRelationships of Air Pollution Health: Results Prom the

McCubbin, Donald R.; Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Feeding the world healthily: the challenge of measuring the effects of agriculture on health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...measuring the effects of agriculture on health Sophie Hawkesworth 1 2 Alan D. Dangour...lshtm.ac.uk ). 1 Nutrition and Public Health Intervention Research Unit, London School...Intergrative Research in Agriculture and Health London International Development Centre...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume I: Human Health Evaluation Manual Supplemental Guidance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1-921314 1-921314 OSWER DIRECTIVE: 9285.6-03 March 25, 1991 RISK ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE FOR SUPERFUND VOLUME I: HUMAN HEALTH EVALUATION MANUAL SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE "STANDARD DEFAULT EXPOSURE FACTORS" INTERIM FINAL Office of Emergency and Remedial Response Toxics Integration Branch U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. 20460 (202)475-9486 REPRODUCED BY U.S.DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE SPRINGFIELD, VA 22161 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 MAR 25 1991 S O L I D W A S T E A N D E M E R G E N C Y R E S P O N S E O F F I C E O F OSWER Directive 9285.6-03 MEMORANDUM SUBJECT: FROM: Human Health Evaluation Manual, Supplemental Guidance: TO: Director, Waste Management Division, Regions I, IV, V, & VII Director, Emergency & Remedial Response Division,

129

Lead (Pb) in sheep exposed to mining pollution: Implications for animal and human health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Livestock from the ancient mining area of Sierra Madrona and Alcudia Valley (Spain) is exposed to elevated levels of lead (Pb), as previous studies based on blood monitoring have revealed. Here we have studied blood, liver and muscle Pb levels in sheep in order to know if Pb exposure could represent a risk for human consumers of the meat and offal of these animals. A cross-sectional study was conducted with ?4 years old (adults) ewes from the mining area (n=46) and a control area (n=21). Blood samples were taken before the sacrifice at the slaughterhouse, and liver and muscle samples were taken thereafter. At the same time, 23 year old rams (subadults, n=17) were blood sampled in the mining area. Blood, liver and muscle Pb levels were higher in the mining than in the control area. Blood Pb concentration in the mining area (n= 44, mean: 6.7?g/dl in ewes and 10.9?g/dl in rams) was above background levels (>6?g/dl) in 73.3 percent of animals. Liver Pb concentration in 68 percent of sheep from the mining area (n=32, mean: 6.16?g/g dry weight, d.w.) exceeded the minimum level associated with toxic exposure (5g/g d.w.) and 87.5 percent of liver samples were above European Union Maximum Residue Levels (MRL) established for offal destined for human consumption (0.5g/g w.w.~1.4g/g d.w.). On the contrary, none of the muscle samples in ewes exceeded the EU MRL (0.1g/g w.w.~0.34g/g d.w.) established for meat, which may be related to the decline of blood Pb levels with age observed in the present study. These results suggest a potential health effect for sheep exposed to Pb pollution in this area and implications for food safety, but further research with lamb meat may be necessary to refine the risk assessment for human consumers.

Jennifer Pareja-Carrera; Rafael Mateo; Jaime Rodrguez-Estival

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Long-term fate of depleted uranium at Aberdeen and Yuma Proving Grounds: Human health and ecological risk assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate and long-term consequences of depleted uranium (DU) in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) and Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) for the Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) of the US Army. Specifically, we examined the potential for adverse radiological and toxicological effects to humans and ecosystems caused by exposure to DU at both installations. We developed contaminant transport models of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at APG and terrestrial ecosystems at YPG to assess potential adverse effects from DU exposure. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of the initial models showed the portions of the models that most influenced predicted DU concentrations, and the results of the sensitivity analyses were fundamental tools in designing field sampling campaigns at both installations. Results of uranium (U) isotope analyses of field samples provided data to evaluate the source of U in the environment and the toxicological and radiological doses to different ecosystem components and to humans. Probabilistic doses were estimated from the field data, and DU was identified in several components of the food chain at APG and YPG. Dose estimates from APG data indicated that U or DU uptake was insufficient to cause adverse toxicological or radiological effects. Dose estimates from YPG data indicated that U or DU uptake is insufficient to cause radiological effects in ecosystem components or in humans, but toxicological effects in small mammals (e.g., kangaroo rats and pocket mice) may occur from U or DU ingestion. The results of this study were used to modify environmental radiation monitoring plans at APG and YPG to ensure collection of adequate data for ongoing ecological and human health risk assessments.

Ebinger, M.H.; Beckman, R.J.; Myers, O.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kennedy, P.L.; Clements, W.; Bestgen, H.T. [Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Human health risk assessment for off-shore media at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A human health risk assessment for off-shore media was performed at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Kittery, Maine. The purpose was to determine whether any potential human health risks could be posed by exposures to the estuary. Included in the study were the evaluations of potential risks existing from human exposures to surface water and sediment, as well as potential risks posed by ingestion of various species of fish and shellfish which are caught commercially and recreationally in the estuary. Three species were chosen for study. They were lobsters, mussels, and flounder. The USEPA prescribed protocols for performing human health risk assessments under CERCLA and RCRA were followed to estimate risks associated with ingestion of these species caught in the lower estuary, in the vicinity of the Shipyard. USEPA required the evaluation of two potential seafood ingestion scenarios recreational fishermen and subsistence fishermen. The results indicated that the USEPA risk target of 10{sup {minus}6} for carcinogens or the hazard index of one was exceeded in at least one species for the subsistence ingestion scenario for some inorganics and organic compounds. Based on these results, it was necessary to propose Media Protection Standards in the biota, which would represent the USEPA target risk level for carcinogens and noncarcinogens, as potential cleanup targets. In performing this task, a review of regional background levels for these chemicals found in biota throughout the Great Bay Estuarine System, at locations removed from the Shipyard, was performed. Also examined were regional Maine data from the NOAA Mussel Watch Program. Biota concentrations near the Shipyard were found to be within the range of biota concentrations for most of these chemicals throughout the region, suggesting possible multiple, non-point sources for the contaminants found in seafood throughout the region.

Mahoney, E. [Eileen Mahoney Associates, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

HEALTH EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST: AN HEI PERSPECTIVE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diesel engines have many advantages, including good fuel economy, power, durability, lower emissions of some pollutants (such as carbon monoxide) and of carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas). However, there are a number of concerns that need to be addressed: (1) emissions of nitrogen oxides (which contribute to ozone formation) and of particulate matter (PM); (2) questions about cancer and other health effects from exposure to diesel PM; and (3) as efforts to decrease emissions progress, a need to understand whether the nature and toxicity of the PM emitted has changed. This paper focuses on (1) carcinogenicity data, (2) noncancer effects, and (3) diesel as part of the complex ambient mixture of PM.

Warren, Jane

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

133

Risk assessment and toxicology databases for health effects assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific and technological developments bring unprecedented stress to our environment. Society has to predict the results of potential health risks from technologically based actions that may have serious, far-reaching consequences. The potential for error in making such predictions or assessment is great and multiplies with the increasing size and complexity of the problem being studied. Because of this, the availability and use of reliable data is the key to any successful forecasting effort. Scientific research and development generate new data and information. Much of the scientific data being produced daily is stored in computers for subsequent analysis. This situation provides both an invaluable resource and an enormous challenge. With large amounts of government funds being devoted to health and environmental research programs and with maintenance of our living environment at stake, we must make maximum use of the resulting data to forecast and avert catastrophic effects. Along with the readily available. The most efficient means of obtaining the data necessary for assessing the health effects of chemicals is to utilize applications include the toxicology databases and information files developed at ORNL. To make most efficient use of the data/information that has already been prepared, attention and resources should be directed toward projects that meticulously evaluate the available data/information and create specialized peer-reviewed value-added databases. Such projects include the National Library of Medicine`s Hazardous Substances Data Bank, and the U.S. Air Force Installation Restoration Toxicology Guide. These and similar value-added toxicology databases were developed at ORNL and are being maintained and updated. These databases and supporting information files, as well as some data evaluation techniques are discussed in this paper with special focus on how they are used to assess potential health effects of environmental agents. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

Lu, P.Y.; Wassom, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Human and animal health risk assessments of chemicals in the food chain: Comparative aspects and future perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemicals from anthropogenic and natural origins enter animal feed, human food and water either as undesirable contaminants or as part of the components of a diet. Over the last five decades, considerable efforts and progress to develop methodologies to protect humans and animals against potential risks associated with exposure to such potentially toxic chemicals have been made. This special issue presents relevant methodological developments and examples of risk assessments of undesirable substances in the food chain integrating the animal health and the human health perspective and refers to recent Opinions of the Scientific Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM) of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). This introductory review aims to give a comparative account of the risk assessment steps used in human health and animal health risk assessments for chemicals in the food chain and provides a critical view of the data gaps and future perspectives for this cross-disciplinary field. - Highlights: ? Principles of human and animal health risk assessment. ? Data gaps for each step of animal health risk assessment. ? Implications of animal risk assessment on human risk assessment. ? Future perspectives on chemical risk assessment.

Dorne, J.L.C.M., E-mail: jean-lou.dorne@efsa.europa.eu [Emerging Risk Unit, Via Carlo Magno 1A, 43126 Parma (Italy); Fink-Gremmels, J. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM Utrecht (Netherlands)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The functioning of natural ecosystems and the health of the human economy have been intrinsically linked since  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of its existence.With the development of the industrial revolution,massive increases in fossil-fuel use absolutely necessary for human existence (Costanza et al.1997,De Groot et al.2002), fossil-fuel use hasArticles The functioning of natural ecosystems and the health of the human economy have been

Hall, Charles A.S.

136

Increased European biofuel cultivation could harm human health1 by James Morgan for www.scienceomega.com2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Increased European biofuel cultivation could harm human health1 by James Morgan for www that the large-scale production of biofuels in4 Europe could result in increased human mortality and crop losses that many biofuel plant species, including poplar and willow, release more isoprene ­ an6 ozone precursor

South Bohemia, University of

137

A risk assessment software tool for evaluating potential risks to human health and the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecology and National Environmental Policy Act Division (END), is providing a sitewide evaluation of alternative strategies for the final disposition of the Rocky Flats Plant material inventory. This analysis is known as the Systems Engineering Analysis (SEA) for the Rocky Flats Plant. The primary intent of the SEA is to support the Rocky Flats Plant decision-making. As part of the SEA project, a risk assessment software tool has been developed which will assist in the analysis by providing an evaluation of potential risks to human health and the environment for the purpose of augmenting future decisions at the site.

Drendel, G. [ICF/Kaiser, Lakewood, CO (United States); Jones, M.; Shain, D. [EG & G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Allen, B.; Gentry, R.; Shipp, A.; Van Landingham, C. [ICF Kaiser, Ruston, LA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

ASA conference on radiation and health: Health effects of electric and magnetic fields: Statistical support for research strategies. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a collection of papers documenting presentations made at the VIII ASA (American Statistical Association) Conference on Radiation and Health entitled Health Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields: Statistical Support for Research Strategies. Individual papers are abstracted and indexed for the database.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Effects of Ecotourism on the Behavior and Health of Red Howler Monkeys (Alouatta seniculus) in Suriname.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Ecological changes and habitat degradation have measurable effects on nonhuman primate group size, but little is known about their effects on the behavior and health (more)

Westin, Jessica L.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Waste management programmatic environmental impact statement methodology for estimating human health risks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has produced large quantities of radioactive and hazardous waste during years of nuclear weapons production. As a result, a large number of sites across the DOE Complex have become chemically and/or radiologically contaminated. In 1990, the Secretary of Energy charged the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM) with the task of preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS should identify and assess the potential environmental impacts of implementing several integrated Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) alternatives. The determination and integration of appropriate remediation activities and sound waste management practices is vital for ensuring the diminution of adverse human health impacts during site cleanup and waste management programs. This report documents the PEIS risk assessment methodology used to evaluate human health risks posed by WM activities. The methodology presents a programmatic cradle to grave risk assessment for EM program activities. A unit dose approach is used to estimate risks posed by WM activities and is the subject of this document.

Bergenback, B. [Midwest Technical, Inc. (United States); Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

WORKING PAPER N 2007 -40 The distortionary effect of health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, health care, public/private, compulsory/voluntary insurance PARIS-JOURDAN SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES for modeling the impact of insurance on health- care demand extending some of the results of the two-risk model and still consume healthcare. Keywords: Health insurance, Adverse selection, Health care, Public

Boyer, Edmond

142

The effect of cobalt on the human eye  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of elevated serum cobalt on the human visual system has not yet been established. In light of recent reports of visual problems with elevated cobalt in association with hip prostheses, this review e...

Caroline Ann Lim; Jane Khan; Enid Chelva; Riaz Khan

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

WHAT GOOD IS WEALTH WITHOUT HEALTH? THE EFFECT OF HEALTH ON THE MARGINAL UTILITY OF CONSUMPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We estimate how the marginal utility of consumption varies with health. To do so, we develop a simple model in which the impact of health on the marginal utility of consumption can be estimated from data on permanent income, ...

Finkelstein, Amy

144

Identifying Requirements for Effective Human-Automation Teamwork  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies have shown that poorly designed human-automation collaboration, such as poorly designed communication protocols, often leads to problems for the human operators, such as: lack of vigilance, complacency, and loss of skills. These problems often lead to suboptimal system performance. To address this situation, a considerable amount of research has been conducted to improve human-automation collaboration and to make automation function better as a team player. Much of this research is based on an understanding of what it means to be a good team player from the perspective of a human team. However, the research is often based on a simplified view of human teams and teamwork. In this study, we sought to better understand the capabilities and limitations of automation from the standpoint of human teams. We first examined human teams to identify the principles for effective teamwork. We next reviewed the research on integrating automation agents and human agents into mixed agent teams to identify the limitations of automation agents to conform to teamwork principles. This research resulted in insights that can lead to more effective human-automation collaboration by enabling a more realistic set of requirements to be developed based on the strengths and limitations of all agents.

Jeffrey C. Joe; John O'Hara; Heather D. Medema; Johanna H. Oxstrand

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Wind Turbines and Health A Rapid Review of the Evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Wind Turbines and Health A Rapid Review of the Evidence July 2010 #12;2 Wind Turbines and Health of the evidence from current literature on the issue of wind turbines and potential impacts on human health regarding wind turbines and their potential effect on human health. It is important to note that these views

Firestone, Jeremy

146

National Center for Environmental Health Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

possible links between environmental problems like air pollution and chronic diseases like asthma part of CDC's Environmental Public Health Tracking Program since 2002. Massachusetts began building itsCS227358_A National Center for Environmental Health Division of Environmental Hazards and Health

147

NETL: Health Effects - Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Given that mercury emissions from coal power plants will almost certainly be limited by some form of national regulation or legislation, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is performing an assessment of the reduction in human health risk that may be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of mercury. The primary pathway for mercury exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to mercury exposure is the fetus. Therefore, the risk assessment focuses on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Preliminary Risk Assessment A preliminary risk assessment was conducted using a simplified approach based on three major topics: Hg emissions and deposition (emphasizing coal plants), Hg consumption through fish, and dose-response functions for Hg. Using information available from recent literature, dose response factors (DRFs) were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions.

148

Properties, use and health effects of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) has been claimed to contribute to health problems both in military personnel directly involved in war actions as well in military and civilian individuals who resided in areas where DU ammunition was expended. Due to the low specific radioactivity and the dominance of alpha-radiation, no acute health risk can be attributed to external exposure to DU. Internalised DU is both chemo- and radio-toxic. The major risk is from inhalation of DU dust or particles with less than 10 ?m aerodynamic-equivalent diameter, formed when DU ammunitions hit hard targets (aerosol formation) or during weathering of DU penetrators. One major conclusion is that for all post-conflict situations, the inhaled DU quantities (central estimates) produced radiation doses that would be only a fraction of those normally received by the lung from natural radiation. Hence no long term lung effects due to these DU amounts can be expected. These conclusions also hold for whole-body exposure from ingestion of DU in local food and water.

W. Burkart; P.R. Danesi; J.H. Hendry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

UCRL-JC-1197l5 PREPRINT HUMAN HEALTH RISKS FROM TNT, RDX, and HMX  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

197l5 197l5 PREPRINT HUMAN HEALTH RISKS FROM TNT, RDX, and HMX IN ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA AND CONSIDERATION OF THE U.S. REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT Jeffrey I. Daniels John P. Knezovich This paper was pre ared for submittal to the Luxembourg, Luxembourg November 14-16,1994 Procee ap ings Demil '94 December 1994 Thisis apreprintof apaperintendedfor publicationin a journal orproceedings. Since changes may be made before publication, this preprint is made available with the understanding that it will not be cited or reproduced without the permission of the author. ~ T WSTRIBUTION OF THIS DOCUMENT tS UNLlMfTEa

150

Lessons learned: Needs for improving human health risk assessment at USDOE Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Realistic health risk assessments were performed in a pilot study of three U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites. These assessments, covering a broad spectrum of data and methods, were used to identify needs for improving future health risk assessments at USDOE sites. Topics receiving specific recommendations for additional research include: choice of distributions for Monte Carlo simulation; estimation of risk reduction; analysis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Database on food and nutrient intakes; investigations on effects of food processing on contaminant levels; background food and environmental concentrations of contaminants; method for handling exposures to groundwater plumes, methods for analyzing less than lifetime exposure to carcinogens; and improvement of bioaccumulation factors.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment Work Plan Mud Pit Release Sites, Amchitka Island, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Work Plan describes the approach that will be used to conduct human health and ecological risk assessments for Amchitka Island, Alaska, which was utilized as an underground nuclear test site between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U.S. Department of Energy) conducted two nuclear tests (known as Long Shot and Milrow) and assisted the U.S. Department of Defense with a third test (known as Cannikin). Amchitka Island is approximately 42 miles long and located 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, in the western end of the Aleutian Island archipelago in a group of islands known as the Rat Islands. Historically including deep drilling operations required large volumes of drilling mud, a considerable amount of which was left on the island in exposed mud pits after testing was completed. Therefore, there is a need for drilling mud pit remediation and risk assessment of historical mud pit releases. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the constituents in soil, surface water, and sediment at these former testing sites. Its goal is the collection of data in sufficient quantity and quality to determine current site conditions, support a risk assessment for the site surfaces, and evaluate what further remedial action is required to achieve permanent closure of these three sites that will protect both human health and the environment. Suspected compounds of potential ecological concern for investigative analysis at these sites include diesel-range organics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, volatile organic compounds, and chromium. The results of these characterizations and risk assessments will be used to evaluate corrective action alternatives to include no further action, the implementation of institutional controls, capping on site, or off-sit e disposal of contaminated waste. The results of this evaluation will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

DOE /NV

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

152

Effects of low levels of radiation on humans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The state of knowledge on effects of low-level ionizing radiations on humans is reviewed. Several problems relating to dose thresholds or lack of thresholds for several types of cancer and high LET radiations and the effects of fractionation and dose protection are discussed. (ACR)

Auxier, J.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Arsenic species in raw and cooked rice: Implications for human health in rural Bengal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study compares the concentrations of total and different species of arsenic (As) in 29 pairs of raw and cooked rice samples collected from households in an area of West Bengal affected by endemic arsenicism. The aim is to investigate the effects of indigenous cooking practice of the rural villagers on As accumulation and speciation in cooked rice. It is found that inorganic As is the predominant species in both raw (93.8%) and cooked rice (88.1%). Cooking of rice with water low in As (health threat (in terms of chronic As toxicity) to the study population.

Dipti Halder; Ashis Biswas; Zdenka lejkovec; Debashis Chatterjee; Jerome Nriagu; Gunnar Jacks; Prosun Bhattacharya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Human health impacts for Renewable Energy scenarios from the EnerGEO Platform of Integrated Assessment (PIA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of renewable energy, affect concentrations of air pollutants and as a consequence affect human health. PM2.5 concentra- tions were estimated with the IIASA Greenhouse Gas and Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies). 1 Observation, Impacts, Energy Center, MINES ParisTech, Sophia Antipolis, France, mireille.lefevre@mines

Boyer, Edmond

155

Biomedical Optics Laser Laboratory The lab's objective is to improve human health through research and education in Biomedical Optics, a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomedical Optics Laser Laboratory The lab's objective is to improve human health through research and education in Biomedical Optics, a multidisciplinary field incorporating elements of the physical and life in Biomedical Optics involves developing and applying methods of optical science and engineering

Kamat, Vineet R.

156

Adverse Health Effects of Nighttime Lighting: Comments on American Medical Association Policy Statement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The American Medical Association House of Delegates in June of 2012 adopted a policy statement on nighttime lighting and human health. This major policy statement summarizes the scientific evidence that nighttime electric light can disrupt circadian rhythms in humans and documents the rapidly advancing understanding from basic science of how disruption of circadian rhythmicity affects aspects of physiology with direct links to human health, such as cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, and metabolism. The human evidence is also accumulating, with the strongest epidemiologic support for a link of circadian disruption from light at night to breast cancer. There are practical implications of the basic and epidemiologic science in the form of advancing lighting technologies that better accommodate human circadian rhythmicity.

Richard G. Stevens; George C. Brainard; David E. Blask; Steven W. Lockley; Mario E. Motta

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Exposures Review of phenomenon appears in Radiation Research Pamela Sykes and Benjamin Blyth One concern of radiobiologists is the effect radiation exposure might have on nearby unirradiated cells. For example, when only a small fraction of cells are directly hit by radiation energy, are the surrounding unirradiated cells also at an increased risk of cancer? The term "radiation-induced bystander effect" is used to describe radiation-induced biological changes that occur in unirradiated cells within an irradiated cell population. Radiation-induced bystander effects have become established in the vernacular and are considered as an authentic radiation response. However, there is still no consensus on a precise definition of the term, which

158

Combustion & Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH Winifred J. Hamilton, PhD, SM Clear Air Through Energy Efficiency (CATEE) Galveston, TX October 9?11, 2012 FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH FFCOMBUSTION: THE THREAT ? Biggest threat to world ecosystems (and to human health...) ? Combustion of fossil fuels for ? Electricity ? Industrial processes ? Vehicle propulsion ? Cooking and heat ? Other ? Munitions ? Fireworks ? Light ? Cigarettes, hookahs? FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH FFCOMBUSTION: THE THREAT ? SCALE (think health...

Hamilton, W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Wednesday, 28 July 2010 00:00 Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

160

Humanitys unsustainable environmental footprint  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biodiversity loss or effects on human health or...billion m 3 /year (average for 1996 to 2005...billion m 3 /year (average for 1996 to...emissions from fossil fuelspart of humanity...products in their pricefor example, by...The EF of the average global citizen...so-called rebound effect (44). Profound...

Arjen Y. Hoekstra; Thomas O. Wiedmann

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

New Health Insurance Marketplace Coverage Options and Your Health Coverage Key parts of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as the health care reform law, go into effect January 1, 2014. When this  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as the health care reform law, go into effect January 1, 2014 by the health care reform law (i.e., the plan's share of the total allowed benefit costs covered by the planNew Health Insurance Marketplace Coverage Options and Your Health Coverage Key parts of the Patient

162

The effects of health coaching on adult patients with chronic diseases: A systematic review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective The aim of this systematic review was to describe the effects of health coaching on adult patients with chronic diseases. Methods The reviewers searched electronic databases and performed a manual search for studies published from 2009 to 2013. The inclusion criteria covered health coaching for adults with chronic diseases by health care professionals. The studies were original, randomized controlled trials or quasi-experimental designs. Results Thirteen studies were selected using the inclusion criteria. The results indicate that health coaching produces positive effects on patients physiological, behavioral and psychological conditions and on their social life. In particular, statistically significant results revealed better weight management, increased physical activity and improved physical and mental health status. Conclusion Health coaching improves the management of chronic diseases. Further research into the cost-effectiveness of health coaching and its long-term effectiveness for chronic diseases is needed. Practice implications Health care professionals play key roles in promoting healthy behavior and motivating good care for adults with chronic diseases. Health coaching is an effective patient education method that can be used to motivate and take advantage of a patient's willingness to change their life style and to support the patient's home-based self-care.

Kirsi Kivel; Satu Elo; Helvi Kyngs; Maria Kriinen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

E-waste vis--vis human health and environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The social, economic and technological growth of a developing society has resulted in rapid product obsolescence which in turn has become a new environmental challenge - i.e., 'electronics waste' (e-waste). Electronic waste has not been a problem as long as there were a few computers or other electronic devices on earth. With the increasing use of computers/electronic devices, our planet has become a dump house for electronic wastes. Electronic products often contain hazardous materials that lead to environmental degradation when they are destroyed. It is an emerging problem given the volumes of e-waste being generated. E-waste, particularly, computer waste has complicated the immense task of solid waste management, with the developed countries dumping their outdated electronic products in developing countries as one of their e-waste management techniques. This paper highlights the damaging impact of e-waste on environment and human health as well as various approaches to deal with it, in the light of initiatives in developing countries. It broadly discusses the composition, criticality and control of e-waste in developing countries, particularly in India.

Adarsh Garg; Neena Singla

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The Health Effects of Exercising in Air Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The health benefits of exercise are well known. Many of the most accessible forms of exercise, such as walking, cycling, and running often occur outdoors. This means that exercising outdoors may increase exposure...

Luisa V. Giles; Michael S. Koehle

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Contact the College of Human and Health Sciences for more information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, doctors and other health and social care practitioners. This part-time provision extends to postgraduate be applied retrospectively to existing modules and programmes u Work closely with health and social care providers and professional bodies u Engage with employers across the health and social care, social policy

Martin, Ralph R.

166

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

167

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

168

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

169

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

170

Effects of Medicare payment reform: Evidence from the home health interim and prospective payment systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Medicare continues to implement payment reforms that shift reimbursement from fee-for-service toward episode-based payment, affecting average and marginal payment. We contrast the effects of two reforms for home health agencies. The home health interim payment system in 1997 lowered both types of payment; our conceptual model predicts a decline in the likelihood of use and costs, both of which we find. The home health prospective payment system in 2000 raised average but lowered marginal payment with theoretically ambiguous effects; we find a modest increase in use and costs. We find little substantive effect of either policy on readmissions or mortality.

Peter J. Huckfeldt; Neeraj Sood; Jos J. Escarce; David C. Grabowski; Joseph P. Newhouse

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

A Probabilistic Approach for Deriving Acceptable Human Intake Limits and Human Health Risks from Toxicological Studies: General Framework  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of uncertainty factors in the standard method for deriving acceptable intake or exposure limits for humans, such as the Reference Dose (RfD), may be viewed as a conservative method of taking various un...

W. Slob; M. N. Pieters

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

The causal effect of retirement on health: New evidence from Australian pension reform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The causal effect of retirement on health is studied using the Australian 1993 Age Pension reform to isolate exogenous variation in retirement status. Using instrumental variable methods we find that retirement has a positive impact on subjective and objective measures of health.

Kadir Atalay; Garry F. Barrett

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide levels inside and outside homes and the implications on health effects research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide levels inside and outside homes and the implications on health effects research ...

John D. Spengler; Benjamin G. Ferris Jr.; Douglas W. Dockery; Frank E. Speizer

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Nitrogen dioxide inside and outside 137 homes and implications for ambient air quality standards and health effects research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrogen dioxide inside and outside 137 homes and implications for ambient air quality standards and health effects research ...

John D. Spengler; Colin P. Duffy; Richard. Letz; Theodore W. Tibbitts; Benjamin G. Ferris

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Environmental Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are especially focused on issues of low- and moderate- income residents as well as residents who purchase homes of this effort is to better use faith-based and community-based organizations in providing effective community% of the 50 states. By 2010, educate 100% of the communities in high-risk counties on effective strategies

176

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Modification of models resulting from addition of effects of exposure to alpha-emitting radionuclides: Revision 1, Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models, Addendum 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify, through the use of models, the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The Reactor Safety Study provided the basis for most of the earlier estimates related to these health effects. Subsequent efforts by NRC-supported groups resulted in improved health effects models that were published in the report entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Consequence Analysis{close_quotes}, NUREG/CR-4214, 1985 and revised further in the 1989 report NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2. The health effects models presented in the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report were developed for exposure to low-linear energy transfer (LET) (beta and gamma) radiation based on the best scientific information available at that time. Since the 1989 report was published, two addenda to that report have been prepared to (1) incorporate other scientific information related to low-LET health effects models and (2) extend the models to consider the possible health consequences of the addition of alpha-emitting radionuclides to the exposure source term. The first addendum report, entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, Modifications of Models Resulting from Recent Reports on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Low LET Radiation, Part 2: Scientific Bases for Health Effects Models,{close_quotes} was published in 1991 as NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2, Addendum 1. This second addendum addresses the possibility that some fraction of the accident source term from an operating nuclear power plant comprises alpha-emitting radionuclides. Consideration of chronic high-LET exposure from alpha radiation as well as acute and chronic exposure to low-LET beta and gamma radiations is a reasonable extension of the health effects model.

Abrahamson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.; Gilbert, E.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The effect of European contact on the health of indigenous populations in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, however, that overall population health did not decline with European contact; there was, in fact, a slight decline in the frequency of dental disturbances. Several studies are currently being conducted on the effects of European contact on the Maya...THE EFFECT OF EUROPEAN CONTACT ON THE HEALTH OF INDIGENOUS POPULATIONS IN TEXAS A Thesis by ELIZABETH ANN MILLER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Miller, Elizabeth Ann

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Submitted to: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 The Department of Veterans'Affairs Persian Gulf Health Registry and the Department of Defense-2510 File Contains Data for PostScript Printers Only Background Document on Gulf War-Related Research for The Health Impact of Chemical Exposures During the Gulf War: A Research Planning Conference February 28

179

Effective CKD Care in European Countries: Challenges and Opportunities for Health Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important global public health problem that is associated with adverse health outcomes and high health care costs. Effective and cost-effective treatments are available for slowing the progression of CKD and preventing its complications, including cardiovascular disease. Although wealthy nations have highly structured schemes in place to support the care of people with kidney failure, less consideration has been given to health systems and policy for the much larger population of people with nondialysis-dependent CKD. Further, how to integrate such strategies with national and international initiatives for control of other chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) merits attention. We synthesized the various approaches to CKD control across 17 European countries and present our findings according to the key domains suggested by the World Health Organization framework for NCD control. This report identifies opportunities to strengthen CKD-relevant health systems and explores potential mechanisms to capitalize on these opportunities. Across the 17 countries studied, we found a number of common barriers to the care of people with nondialysis-dependent CKD: limited work force capacity, the nearly complete absence of mechanisms for disease surveillance, lack of a coordinated CKD care strategy, poor integration of CKD care with other NCD control initiatives, and low awareness of the significance of CKD. These common challenges faced by diverse health systems reflect the need for international cooperation to strengthen health systems and policies for CKD care.

Aminu K. Bello; Adeera Levin; Braden J. Manns; John Feehally; Tilman Drueke; Labib Faruque; Brenda R. Hemmelgarn; Charles Kernahan; Johannes Mann; Scott Klarenbach; Giuseppe Remuzzi; Marcello Tonelli

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Electric Power Lines : Questions and Answers on Research into Health Effects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most people know that electric power lines, like the wiring in our homes, can cause serious electric shocks if we`re not careful. Many people also want to know whether the electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by power lines and other electrical devices cause health effects. The purpose of this booklet is to answer some common questions that the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) receives about the possible effects of power lines on health. First, some basic electrical terms are defined, and electric and magnetic fields are debed. Next, answers are given to several questions about recent scientific studies. Some important information about electrical safety follows. We then describe how BPA is addressing public concerns about potential health effects of power lines. The last section tells you how to obtain more detailed information about the health and safety issues summarized in this booklet.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation at dose levels helow in rads lack reliable data bases and dose- effect information to derive quantitative estimation

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Health Insurance and Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article reviews the recent literature on the causal effect of health insurance on health outcomes. The focus is mainly on private health insurance in the US. The objective is to illustrate measurement issues for both health insurance and health outcomes, and to discuss the methodological challenges for researchers as they address endogeneity of insurance. Finally, a brief overview of methods and results found in the source studies is provided. Certain patterns emerge: in general, insurance is more pronounced for all-cause mortality and for generic health outcomes as compared with disease-specific outcomes. In addition, vulnerable and medically needy populations are more likely to benefit from health insurance than the general population. Finally, there is some support for the notion that continuous health insurance coverage benefits health more than intermittent insurance, suggesting that sporadic coverage offers limited value.

A. Dor; E. Umapathi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

MICROBES AND HUMAN HEALTH SCIENCE MEETS TROLLS FIGHTING SEPTIC SHOCK College of Agricultural & Life Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

food systems · environment · health · bioenergy grow Wisconsin cheesemakers get creative in meeting and grow that demand by developing varieties for specialized and global markets. By Bob MitchellBy Bob

Balser, Teri C.

184

Phthalates and other additives in plastics: human exposure and associated health outcomes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...medical applications, and can prevent electronics and other household items from starting or spreading fires (see Andrady Neal...were primarily Caucasian (77 per cent) with 13 per cent Hispanic/Latina, and 89 per cent reported having health insurance...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Health Benefits and Cost-Effectiveness of Primary Genetic Screening for Lynch Syndrome in the General Population  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2011 research-article Research Articles Health Benefits and Cost-Effectiveness of Primary...Whether this approach would improve health outcomes in a manner that is cost-effective...5-generation family history model to predict health and economic outcomes of 20 primary screening...

Tuan A. Dinh; Benjamin I. Rosner; James C. Atwood; C. Richard Boland; Sapna Syngal; Hans F. A. Vasen; Stephen B. Gruber; Randall W. Burt

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Overview of ozone human exposure and health risk analyses used in the U.S. EPA's review of the ozone air quality standard.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the ozone human exposure and health risk analyses developed under sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These analyses are being used in the current review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The analyses consist of three principal steps: (1) estimating short-term ozone exposure for particular populations (exposure model); (2) estimating population response to exposures or concentrations (exposure-response or concentration-response models); and (3) integrating concentrations or exposure with concentration-response or exposure-response models to produce overall risk estimates (risk model). The exposure model, called the probabilistic NAAQS exposure model for ozone (pNEM/03), incorporates the following factors: hourly ambient ozone concentrations; spatial distribution of concentrations; ventilation state of individuals at time of exposure; and movement of people through various microenvironments (e.g., outdoors, indoors, inside a vehicle) of varying air quality. Exposure estimates are represented by probability distributions. Exposure-response relationships have been developed for several respiratory symptom and lung function health effects, based on the results of controlled human exposure studies. These relationships also are probabilistic and reflect uncertainties associated with sample size and variability of response among subjects. The analyses also provide estimates of excess hospital admissions in the New York City area based on results from an epidemiology study. Overall risk results for selected health endpoints and recently analyzed air quality scenarios associated with alternative 8-hour NAAQS and the current 1-hour standard for outdoor children are used to illustrate application of the methodology.

Whitfield, R. G.

1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

187

Long-term effects of prenatal x-ray of human females: mortality and morbidity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental studies and long-term studies of humans exposed to ionizing radiation in utero and after birth show that these exposures increase the risk of cancer in childhood and in later life. A possible life-shortening effect has also been reported. This study followed to their mid-twenties 1458 women exposed in utero to diagnostic x-rays and 1458 matched, unexposed controls in Baltimore, Maryland, and obtained responses from over 100 women in each group. Information about general health and specific diseases was obtained from questionnaires. Deaths were ascertained through family members and death certificates. Mortality rates were slightly higher among exposure. Exposed women reported poor general health significantly more often than controls. Specific diseases occurred similarly in the two groups, although exposed women reported more epilepsy or fits, more ovarian tumors, and more high blood pressure. These strong correlation between weight and high blood pressure and the heavier weights of exposed women seemed to account for this difference. In summary, these matched exposed and control women, followed to their mid-twenties, experienced similar rates of morbidity and mortality. Radiation-induced cancers and life-shortening effects, if any, might not become evident until older ages.

Meyer, M.B.; Tonascia, J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Water chlorination: environmental impact and health effects. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The papers dealt with the major facets of chlorination and its associated effects. Each has been abstracted and indexed individually for ERA/EDB. (JGB)

Jolley, R.L.; Brungs, W.A.; Cumming, R.B. (eds.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Proceedings from the 5th International Symposium on Light and Human Health: November 3-5, 2002, Orlando, Florida--EPRI Lighting Research Office  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 5th EPRI/LRO Lighting Research Symposium (November, 2002) was organized to present and examine current research information on the subject of Light and Human Health in response to a growing sense that light--both electric lighting and daylighting--impacts human beings well beyond what has been traditionally studied as vision and visual performance. This Final Report of the Symposium is a collection of 23 presented and seven poster papers grouped under the following headings: (1) Medical Applications of Light; (2) Circadian Effects of Light; (3) Hazards of Optical Radiation; and (4) Environmental Applications and Human Factors. Research from the medical, measurement, elderly, lighting, psychological, and vision fields is included, as well as an extensive commentary and summary. The direction of the research, taken as a whole, indicates that the definition of ''good lighting'' should be expanded to include ''healthy lighting,'' and that ongoing research will require better measurement and specification tools such as a new system of circadian photometry. Enhanced interaction between the medical research and lighting design communities will be required to bring the benefits of what is being discovered into common lighting practice.

None

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The health effects of deployment frequency and duration in US military service members supporting the Global War on Terrorism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science Board Task Force on Persian Gulf War Health Effects.Ann Clin Psychiatry. The Iowa Persian Gulf Study Group.health status among Persian Gulf War veterans: a population-

Smith, Besa

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

UCRL-JC-1197l5 PREPRINT HUMAN HEALTH RISKS FROM TNT, RDX, and...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Protection Agency (USEPA) (1990), "40 CFR Part 300: National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan Final Rule," Fed Regist. 5 5 ( 4 6 ) , 8666-8865. 8 HUMAN...

192

Model of medical supply demand and astronaut health for long-duration human space flight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The medical care of space crews is the primary limiting factor in the achievement of long-duration space missions. (Nicogossian 2003) The goal of this thesis was to develop a model of long-duration human space flight ...

Assad, Albert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Phase separation in solutions of monoclonal antibodies and the effect of human serum albumin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the observation of liquid-liquid phase separation in a solution of human monoclonal antibody, IgG2, and the effects of human serum albumin, a major blood protein, on this phase separation. We find a significant ...

Wang, Ying

194

Environmental Health Perspectives volume 121 | number 1 | January 2013 23 Human variability underlies differences in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Schadt and Björkegren 2012). In addition to genetic differences, omics stud ies have examined the impact personalized medicine and environmental health protection (Khoury et al. 2011). In this review, we explore how The "sourcetooutcome continuum" [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 2007; NRC 2007] is a conceptual frame work

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

195

Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety, therefore generating high  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, electronics, and data analysis algorithms. Electrochemical sensors featuring ionic liquids were chosen can be found in underground coal mines [2]. To improve scientific understanding of the health impacts utilize ionic liquid interfaces for low-power room-temperature operation with low maintenance requirements

Mason, Andrew

196

LOW-LEVEL RADIATION HEALTH EFFECTS: PROGRAMS AND PANEL DISCUSSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

accident. The report of the Soviet Union to the International Atomic Energy Agency experts' meeting plutonium had been produced in reactors and separated for bomb production for -40 yr (Ref. 1. The reduction was presumably due to the reduced effects at low dose rate. THE DATA SETS In the former USSR

Shlyakhter, Ilya

197

Methodology for comparing the health effects of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology was developed for comparing the health risks of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels. The health effects attributable to the construction, operation, and decommissioning of each facility in the two fuel cycle were considered. The methodology is based on defining (1) requirement variables for the materials, energy, etc., (2) effluent variables associated with the requirement variables as well as with the fuel cycle facility operation, and (3) health impact variables for effluents and accidents. The materials, energy, etc., required for construction, operation, and decommissioning of each fuel cycle facility are defined as primary variables. The materials, energy, etc., needed to produce the primary variable are defined as secondary requirement variables. Each requirement variable (primary, secondary, etc.) has associated effluent variables and health impact variables. A diverging chain or tree is formed for each primary variable. Fortunately, most elements reoccur frequently to reduce the level of analysis complexity. 6 references, 11 figures, 6 tables.

Rhyne, W.R.; El-Bassioni, A.A.

1981-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

198

The Health Effects Institute assessment of refueling vapors; A case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1985, the Health Effects Institute (HEI) published an analysis it conducted of the informational basis for quantifying cancer risks from exposure to unleaded refueling vapors, an exposure that, for the general public, occurs most frequently at the self-service pump. Using the National Research Council's framework for risk assessment, the HEI analysis concluded that important information was lacking in the three areas that lead to the actual quantification of risk. The three are: hazard identification, dose-response assessment, and exposure assessment. The author presents details of the analysis, and a description of the Health Effects Institute.

Kavet, R. (Environmental Research Information, Inc., New York, NY (US))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Modulation of the human gut microbiome in order to promote host health and well-being .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Background. Numerous studies into the effect of probiotic supplementation in the infirm have been carried out. However, research into the effect of long-term probiotic supplementation (more)

Evans, James

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Electric Power Lines : Questions and Answers on Research into Health Effects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most people know that electric power lines, like the wiring in our homes, can cause serious electric shocks if we`re not careful. Many people also want to know whether the EMF (electric and magnetic fields) produced by power lines and other electrical devices affect our health. Although no adverse health effects of electric power EMF have been confirmed, there is continued scientific uncertainty about this issue. Research on EMF is ongoing throughout the world. The purpose of this booklet is to answer some common questions that the BPA (Bonneville Power Administration) receives about the possible effects of power lines on health. First, some basic electrical terms are defined, and electric and magnetic fields are debed. Next, answers are given to several questions about recent scientific studies. Some important information about electrical safety follows. We then describe how BPA is addressing public concerns about potential health effects of power lines. The last section tells you how to obtain more detailed information about the health and safety issues summarized in this booklet.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The effect of indoor office environment on the work performance, health and well-being of office workers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of indoor environment may have an influence on the performance, productivity health and well-being of office workers.

Komalanathan Vimalanathan

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Report on the Human Genome Initiative for the Office of Health and Environmental Research  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

The report urges DOE and the Nation to commit to a large, multi-year, multidisciplinary, technological undertaking to order and sequence the human genome. This effort will first require significant innovation in general capability to manipulate DNA, major new analytical methods for ordering and sequencing, theoretical developments in computer science and mathematical biology, and great expansions in our ability to store and manipulate the information and to interface it with other large and diverse genetic databases. The actual ordering and sequencing involves the coordinated processing of some 3 billion bases from a reference human genome. Science is poised on the rudimentary edge of being able to read and understand human genes. A concerted, broadly based, scientific effort to provide new methods of sufficient power and scale should transform this activity from an inefficient one-gene-at-a-time, single laboratory effort into a coordinated, worldwide, comprehensive reading of "the book of man". The effort will be extraordinary in scope and magnitude, but so will be the benefit to biological understanding, new technology and the diagnosis and treatment of human disease.

Tinoco, I.; Cahill, G.; Cantor, C.; Caskey, T.; Dulbecco, R.; Engelhardt, D. L.; Hood, L.; Lerman, L. S.; Mendelsohn, M. L.; Sinsheimer, R. L.; Smith, T.; Soll, D.; Stormo, G.; White, R. L.

1987-04-00T23:59:59.000Z

203

Memorandum of Understanding Between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES AND THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY I. INTRODUCTION This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) serves to set forth the authorities, responsibilities, and procedures by which the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct statutorily mandated activities required to assist with claims processing under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (EEOICP A). EEOICP A provides for timely, uniform, and adequate compensation of covered employees and, where applicable, survivors of such employees suffering from illnesses incurred by such employees in the performance of duty. HHS and DOE will make every effort to ensure that activities conducted under this MOU, as

204

Electric Power Lines : Questions and Answers on Research into Health Effects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most people know that electric power lines, like the wiring in our homes, can cause serious electric shocks if we`re not careful. Many people also want to know whether the electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by power lines and other electrical devices cause health effects. The purpose of this pamphlet is to answer some common questions that the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) receives about the possible effects of power lines on health. (BPA is the Pacific Northwest`s Federal electric power marketing agency.) First, some basic electrical terms are defined, and electric and magnetic fields are described. Next, answers are given to several questions about recent scientific studies. We then describe how BPA is addressing public concerns raised by these studies. Some important information about electrical safety follows. The last section tells you how to obtain more detailed information about the health and safety issues summarized in this pamphlet.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS LOCAL IMPACTS ON HUMAN HEALTH RISK.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thorough quantitative understanding of the processes of mercury emissions, deposition, and translocation through the food chain is currently not available. Complex atmospheric chemistry and dispersion models are required to predict concentration and deposition contributions, and aquatic process models are required to predict effects on fish. However, there are uncertainties in all of these predictions. Therefore, the most reliable method of understanding impacts of coal-fired power plants on Hg deposition is from empirical data. A review of the literature on mercury deposition around sources including coal-fired power plants found studies covering local mercury concentrations in soil, vegetation, and animals (fish and cows). There is strong evidence of enhanced local deposition within 3 km of the chlor-alkali plants, with elevated soil concentrations and estimated deposition rates of 10 times background. For coal-fired power plants, the data show that atmospheric deposition of Hg may be slightly enhanced. On the scale of a few km, modeling suggests that wet deposition may be increased by a factor of two or three over background. The measured data suggest lower increases of 15% or less. The effects of coal-fired plants seem to be less than 10% of total deposition on a national scale, based on emissions and global modeling. The following summarizes our findings from published reports on the impacts of local deposition. In terms of excesses over background the following increments have been observed within a few km of the plant: (1) local soil concentration Hg increments of 30%-60%, (2) sediment increments of 18-30%, (3) wet deposition increments of 11-12%, and (4) fish Hg increments of about 5-6%, based on an empirical finding that fish concentrations are proportional to the square root of deposition. Important uncertainties include possible reductions of RGM to Hg{sub 0} in power plant plumes and the role of water chemistry in the relationship between Hg deposition and fish content. Soil and vegetation sampling programs were performed around two mid-size coal fired power plants. The objectives were to determine if local mercury hot-spots exist, to determine if they could be attributed to deposition of coal-fired power plant emissions, and to determine if they correlated with model predictions. These programs found the following: (1) At both sites, there was no correlation between modeled mercury deposition and either soil concentrations or vegetation concentrations. At the Kincaid plant, there was excess soil Hg along heavily traveled roads. The spatial pattern of soil mercury concentrations did not match the pattern of vegetation Hg concentrations at either plant. (2) At both sites, the subsurface (5-10 cm) samples the Hg concentration correlated strongly with the surface samples (0-5 cm). Average subsurface sample concentrations were slightly less than the surface samples; however, the difference was not statistically significant. (3) An unequivocal definition of background Hg was not possible at either site. Using various assumed background soil mercury concentrations, the percentage of mercury deposited within 10 km of the plant ranged between 1.4 and 8.5% of the RGM emissions. Based on computer modeling, Hg deposition was primarily RGM with much lower deposition from elemental mercury. Estimates of the percentage of total Hg deposition ranged between 0.3 and 1.7%. These small percentages of deposition are consistent with the empirical findings of only minor perturbations in environmental levels, as opposed to ''hot spots'', near the plants. The major objective of this study was to determine if there was evidence for ''hot-spots'' of mercury deposition around coal-fired power plants. Although the term has been used extensively, it has never been defined. From a public health perspective, such a ''hot spot'' must be large enough to insure that it did not occur by chance, and it must affect water bodies large enough to support a population of subsistence fishers. The results of this study support the hypothesis that n

SULLIVAN, T.M.; BOWERMAN, B.; ADAMS, J.; LIPFERT, F.; MORRIS, S.M.; BANDO, A.; PENA, R.; BLAKE, R.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The effectiveness of health appraisal processes currently in addressing health and wellbeing during spatial plan appraisal: a systematic review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A systematic review to identify evaluation studies of appraisals or assessments of plans where health issues were considered from 1987...

Selena Gray; Laurence Carmichael; Hugh Barton; Julie Mytton

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Health Effects of Nanoparticles Nanotechnology research is producing remarkable advances for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, measures, and characterizes nanoparticles, including those with special bio-medical properties. For example time. #12;Yet another health application Zachariah examines is the effect of diesel soot on the environment. Diesel soot, a nanoparticle that appears to contribute significantly to global warming, contains

Hill, Wendell T.

208

Including Pathogen Risk in Life Cycle Assessment of Wastewater Management. 2. Quantitative Comparison of Pathogen Risk to Other Impacts on Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of the presented study was to include pathogen risks to human health in life cycle assessment (LCA) of wastewater and sludge management systems, as this is commonly omitted from LCAs due to methodological limitations. ... Part 1 of this article series estimated the overall pathogen risk for such a system with agricultural use of the sludge, in a way that enables the results to be integrated in LCA. ... This article (part 2) presents a full LCA for two model systems (with agricultural utilization or incineration of sludge) to reveal the relative importance of pathogen risk in relation to other potential impacts on human health. ...

Sara Heimersson; Robin Harder; Gregory M. Peters; Magdalena Svanstrm

2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

209

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I-Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

C, Risk C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/004 Publication 9285.7-01 C December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper NOTICE The policies set out in [his document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

210

Radiological accidents potentially important to human health risk in the U.S. Department of Energy waste management program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human health risks as a consequence of potential radiological releases resulting from plausible accident scenarios constitute an important consideration in the US Department of Energy (DOE) national program to manage the treatment, storage, and disposal of wastes. As part of this program, the Office of Environmental Management (EM) is currently preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) that evaluates the risks that could result from managing five different waste types. This paper (1) briefly reviews the overall approach used to assess process and facility accidents for the EM PEIS; (2) summarizes the key inventory, storage, and treatment characteristics of the various DOE waste types important to the selection of accidents; (3) discusses in detail the key assumptions in modeling risk-dominant accidents; and (4) relates comparative source term results and sensitivities.

Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Nabelssi, B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Jackson, R. [Science Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Depleted uranium contamination by inhalation exposure and its detection after ?20years: Implications for human health assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inhaled depleted uranium (DU) aerosols are recognised as a distinct human health hazard and DU has been suggested to be responsible in part for illness in both military and civilian populations that may have been exposed. This study aimed to develop and use a testing procedure capable of detecting an individual's historic milligram-quantity aerosol exposure to DU up to 20years after the event. This method was applied to individuals associated with or living proximal to a DU munitions plant in Colonie New York that were likely to have had a significant DU aerosol inhalation exposure, in order to improve DU-exposure screening reliability and gain insight into the residence time of DU in humans. We show using sensitive mass spectrometric techniques that when exposure to aerosol has been unambiguous and in sufficient quantity, urinary excretion of DU can be detected more than 20years after primary DU inhalation contamination ceased, even when DU constitutes only ?1% of the total excreted uranium. It seems reasonable to conclude that a chronically DU-exposed population exists within the contamination footprint of the munitions plant in Colonie, New York. The method allows even a modest DU exposure to be identified where other less sensitive methods would have failed entirely. This should allow better assessment of historical exposure incidence than currently exists.

Randall R. Parrish; Matthew Horstwood; John G. Arnason; Simon Chenery; Tim Brewer; Nicholas S. Lloyd; David O. Carpenter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Measuring the effects of online advertising on human behavior using natural and field experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates the effects of online advertising on human behavior: clicks, new-account sign-ups, and retail sales. Five chapters cover natural and field experiments used to measure these effects for both display ...

Lewis, Randall A. (Randall Aaron)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

A phenomenological muscle model to assess history dependent effects in human movement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A phenomenological muscle model to assess history dependent effects in human movement C.P. Mc of the history dependent effects. The phenomenological model of stretch-induced force enhancement was dependent

Ben-Yakar, Adela

214

Antiproliferative effect of memantine on human prostate, breast and colon cancer cell lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...45, 2004 Antiproliferative effect of memantine on human prostate, breast and colon...2004] 4382 We have tested the effect of memantine on ten human cancer cell lines, four...at approximately 20 ug/mL (91 uM) memantine. Ion-channels gated by the neurotransmitter...

Naseema M. Hoosein and Mansoor Abdul

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The mycoplasmal protein, p37 & its effects on human tumor invasion.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mycoplasmal protein, p37 its effects on human tumor invasion. Satoshi...to be a ligand for the human CD99 receptor. Preliminary...proposed to study the effects of p37 on prostate cancer...and overexpressed in E.coli. The protein was purified...

Satoshi Anai; Susan Boehlein; Catherine Ketcham; Shijie Sheng; and Charles J. Rosser

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States *Barbara L. Rowe1 , Patricia L. Toccalino2 , Michael J. Moran1 , John S. Zogorski1 , Curtis V. Price1 1 United States Geological Survey, Road, Rapid City, SD 57702 USA

217

Grant Writing Advice from the Experts Presented as part of the 2013 Education, Health & Human Development Grant Writing Training Boot Camp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grant Writing Advice from the Experts Presented as part of the 2013 Education, Health & Human Development Grant Writing Training Boot Camp st 1, 2013 ~ 9:0011:00 aThursday, Augu .m. ~ Reid 301 ~ Refreshments will be served ~ oin us for presentations from three national experts on research grant

Dyer, Bill

218

Air quality is a societal concern, since it has impacts on human health and environment. Laws have been established to protect citizens and ecosystems, through monitoring of harmful  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air quality is a societal concern, since it has impacts on human health and environment. Laws have and implementation of emissions reduction measures. Currently, air quality is monitored at the surface. However dense for additional information, to be assimilated in Air Quality forecast models that are used to take steps

219

Public Health-Related Impacts of Climate Change in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Report. Health Effects Institute: 125; discussionand health. Health Effects Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.and health. Health Effects Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Combined methodology for estimating dose rates and health effects from exposure to radioactive pollutants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work described in the report is basically a synthesis of two previously existing computer codes: INREM II, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and CAIRD, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The INREM II code uses contemporary dosimetric methods to estimate doses to specified reference organs due to inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. The CAIRD code employs actuarial life tables to account for competing risks in estimating numbers of health effects resulting from exposure of a cohort to some incremental risk. The combined computer code, referred to as RADRISK, estimates numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons due to continuous lifetime inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. Also briefly discussed in this report is a method of estimating numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort due to continuous lifetime exposure to external radiation. This method employs the CAIRD methodology together with dose conversion factors generated by the computer code DOSFACTER, developed at ORNL; these dose conversion factors are used to estimate dose rates to persons due to radionuclides in the air or on the ground surface. The combination of the life table and dosimetric guidelines for the release of radioactive pollutants to the atmosphere, as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977.

Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Yalcintas, M.G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health Department of Health and HumanNational Institute of Mental Health Division of Intramural Research Programs http://intramural.nimh.nih.gov/ [NIMH of Fellowship Training] National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health Department of Health

Baker, Chris I.

222

Public meetings on radiation and its health effects caused by the Fukushima nuclear accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has held public meetings on radiation and its health effects mainly for parents of students in kindergartens, elementary schools, and junior high schools in Fukushima and Ibaraki prefectures after the Fukushima nuclear accident. These meetings are held based on our experience of practicing risk communication activities for a decade in JAEA with local residents. By analyzing questionnaires collected after the meetings, we confirmed that interactive communication is effective in increasing participants' understanding and in decreasing their anxiety. Most of the participants answered that they understood the contents and that it eased their mind. (authors)

Sugiyama, K.; Ayame, J.; Takashita, H.; Yamamoto, R. [Risk Communication Study Office Japan Atomic Energy Agency 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, IBARAKI, 319-1194 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Language and Immigrant Status Effects on Disparities in Hispanic Childrens Health Status and Access to Health Care  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to estimate Hispanic/non-Hispanic (nH)-white health disparities and assess ... disparities can be explained by immigrant status and household primary language. The 2007 National Sur...

Rosa M. Avila; Matthew D. Bramlett

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

NDE measurements for understanding of performance: A few case studies on engineering components, human health and cultural heritage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life cycle management involves a seamless integration of materials design analysis production manufacturing and degradation plus a wide variety of disciplines relating to surveillance and characterisation with adequate feedback and control. Science and technology of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) links all these domains and disciplines together in a seamless and robust manner. A number of research programs on NDE science and technology have evolved during the last four decades world over including the one at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research Kalpakkam initiated and nurtured by the first author. Many engineering and technology challenges pertaining to fast spectrum reactors have been successfully solved by this Centre through development of innovative sensors procedures and coupled with strong basic science and modeling approaches. These technologies have also been selectively applied in gaining insights of human health and cultural heritage. This paper highlights some of the innovative NDE sensors and techniques developed in the field of electromagnetic NDE and their successful applications. A few interesting case studies pertaining to NDE in heritage and healthcare using acoustic and thermal methods are also presented.

Baldev Raj

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Pollution-Related Health Effects of Truck-to-Train Freight Modal Shifts in the Midwestern United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by reducing air pollution. Objective: This study sought to quantify the pollution-related health impactsPollution-Related Health Effects of Truck-to-Train Freight Modal Shifts in the Midwestern United Background: Outdoor air pollution causes increases in mortality, cardiovascular events, and respiratory

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

226

of Health Care National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Health Care National Institutes of Health Expanding Horizons Strategic Plan 2005-2009 UR nesmohsirh retir,ztnelinaoJ #12;of Health Care Expanding Horizons Strategic Plan 2005-2009 National Center.S Department of Health and Human Services National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine #12;A M mo

Bandettini, Peter A.

227

Effects of the NMDA antagonist memantine on human methamphetamine discrimination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objective....This study investigated the discriminative stimulus, subjective (e.g. "Good Drug Effect"), psychomotor performance, and cardiovascular effects (e.g. blood pressure) of oral methamphe...

Carl L. Hart; Margaret Haney; Richard W. Foltin; Marian W. Fischman

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Health Effects of SubChronic Inhalation of Simulated Downwind Coal Combustion Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sara M. Pletcher sara M. Pletcher Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4236 sara.pletcher@netl.doe.gov Joe L. Mauderly Principal Investigator Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute 2425 Ridgecrest Drive, SE Albuquerque, NM 87108-5129 505-348-9432 jmauderl@lrri.org Environmental and Water Resources HealtH effects of sub-cHronic inHalation of simulated downwind coal combustion emissions Background Emissions from coal-fired power plants and their associated atmospheric reaction products contribute to environmental air pollution and are often cited as a critical cause of pollution-related health risks. However, there have been few toxicological evaluations of the heath hazards resulting from the inhalation of coal combustion

229

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health PROFILE 2007DIRECTOR'S ANNUAL REPORT NIH CLINICAL CENTER There's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for conducting clinical research to improve the health of humankind. It will also serve as a national resource unannounced survey of the hospital. At the end of three days, we received an outstanding report.The surveyors

230

Protective effect of estrogen on E.coli invasion in primary human hepatocytes and HuH-7 carcinoma cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Protective effect of estrogen on E.coli invasion in primary human hepatocytes...estrogen may effect bacterial...uropathogenic Dr E.coli in hepatocarcinoma...and primary human hepatocytes...Also, the effect of pretreatment...anti-estrogen) on E.coli invasion was...and primary human hepatocytes...

Rashmi Kaul; Senait Assefa; Aunna Herbst; Stephen C. Strom; Mark G. Martens; Gary Watson; Harvey Sharp; and Anil K. Kaul

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Radiation therapy of pediatric brain tumors : comparison of long-term health effects and costs between proton therapy and IMRT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation therapy is an important component of pediatric brain tumor treatment. However, radiation-induced damage can lead to adverse long-term health effects. Proton therapy has the ability to reduce the dose delivered ...

Vu, An T. (An Thien)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Using Science to Improve the Nation's Health System: NIH's Commitment to Comparative Effectiveness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and reform the US health care system. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been--and will continue; Health Policy; Medical Practice, Other; Quality of Care; Quality of Subscribe Email Alerts http health interventions yield the greatest benefits. Health reform and economic concerns may have moved

Bandettini, Peter A.

233

Fashion Merchandising & Retail Studies, BS IPC: 2013 School of Human Ecology EFFECTIVE: 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fashion Merchandising & Retail Studies, BS IPC: 2013 School of Human Ecology EFFECTIVE: 2013 STUDENT: CWID#: DATE ENTERED: ADVISOR: GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: FASHION MERCHANDISING & RETAIL the following: Accounting, Art, Fashion Merchandising & Retail Studies. All must be approved by academic advisor

Selmic, Sandra

234

Ebola Virus Can Be Effectively Neutralized by Antibody Produced in Natural Human Infection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ARTICLE PATHOGENESIS AND IMMUNITY Ebola Virus Can Be Effectively Neutralized by...recombinant human monoclonal antibodies to Ebola virus antigens was isolated from phage...who recovered from infection in the 1995 Ebola virus outbreak in Kikwit, Democratic Republic...

Toshiaki Maruyama; Luis L. Rodriguez; Peter B. Jahrling; Anthony Sanchez; Ali S. Khan; Stuart T. Nichol; C. J. Peters; Paul W. H. I. Parren; Dennis R. Burton

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Trojan female technique: a novel, effective and humane approach for pest population control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effective and humane approach for pest population...and CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences, , Perth, Western...6009, Australia 4 Science and Risk Assessment...change. Conventional approaches to pest management usually involve lethal...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Early Developmental Conditions and Reproductive Success in Humans: Downstream Effects of Prenatal Famine,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Early Developmental Conditions and Reproductive Success in Humans: Downstream Effects of Prenatal, Cambridge, United Kingdom ABSTRACT Growth, survival, and breeding success of individuals in populations of wild mammals are influenced by the climatic and nutritional conditions that individuals experience

Lummaa, Virpi

237

Supplemental results of the human health risk analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy draft waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended as an information supplement to the human health risk analysis performed for the US Department of Energy`s Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste, hereinafter called the PEIS. This report provides the installation-by-installation human health risk analysis results from which the risk estimate summaries for the PEIS were drawn. Readers should bear in mind that the risk estimates presented here are the result of a program-wide (as opposed to site-specific) study. They are based on best available data; systematically applied assumptions; and professional judgment about DOE waste inventories, waste volumes generated annually, currently available treatment and disposal technologies, technical limitations of treatment, and facility capacities across the numerous installations in the DOE complex.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Environmental Health Dedicated to the advancement of the environmental health professional Volume 72, No. 10 June 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Turtles and Implications for Human Health..................................14 International PerspectivesJOURNAL OF Environmental Health Dedicated to the advancement of the environmental health........................................23 Glo Germ.....................................................6 Health

239

The relative effect of health literacy and patient activation on provider choice in the Netherlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Active provider choice by patients has become an important policy theme in western, countries over the last decades. However, not many patients and consumers exercise their right to, choose. Both health literacy and patient activation are likely to have an impact on the choice process. In, this article the relative effect of health literacy and patient activation on provider choice in the, Netherlands is studied. A questionnaire was sent to a representative sample of 2000 Dutch citizens. The questionnaire, included a measure of functional health literacy, the Dutch version of the Patient Activation Measure, and questions assessing active provider choice, reasons not to engage in it and other ways of provider, selection. The majority of respondents (59.6%) would not search for information on the basis of which they, could select the best provider or hospital. Most people rely on their general practitioner's advice. Both, low literacy and lower patient activation levels were negatively associated with active provider choice. In a regression analysis gender, education and patient activation proved the most important, predictors. The policy focus on active provider choice might result in inequity, with men, less educated, and less activated people being at a disadvantage.

Jany Rademakers; Jessica Nijman; Anne E.M. Brabers; Judith D. de Jong; Michelle Hendriks

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Wind Turbines and Ghost Stories: The Effects of Infrasound on the Human Auditory System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Climate change and fossil fuel depletion have pushed many countries to seek and invest in alternative clean energy sources such as wind energy. By converting kinetic energy from the wind into mechanical or electrical energy wind farms in California for example power nearly 850 000 households each year while producing negligible green house gases and contributing little to water pollution. Nevertheless several ecological and environmental concerns remain. High levels of infrasound and low frequency sounds generated by wind turbines pose a potentially serious threat to communities near wind farms. Wind energy companies remain largely dismissive claiming that wind turbine noise is subaudible undetectable by humans and therefore presents minimal risk to human health. However various cochlear microphonic distortion product otoacoustic emission and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have demonstrated the detection of infrasound by the human inner ear and auditory cortex. Additional psychosomatic stress and disorders including the wind turbine syndrome and paranormal experiences are also linked to infrasound exposures. With wind turbines generating substantial levels of infrasound and low frequency sound modifications and regulations to wind farm engineering plans and geographical placements are necessary to minimize community exposure and potential human health risks.

Hsuan?hsiu Annie Chen; Peter Narins

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Acute health effects in a community after a release of hydrofluoric acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

{approximately} 3,000 persons were evacuated from a Texas community after 24,036 kg (53,000 lb) of caustic hydrofluoric acid (HF) were released from a nearby petrochemical plant. Emergency room and hospital records of 939 persons who were seen at two area hospitals were reviewed. Most persons who presented at the emergency rooms were female (56%) or black (60%), and their mean age was 33.9 y. The most frequently reported symptoms were eye irritation (41.5%), burning throat (21%), headache (20.6%), and shortness of breath (19.4%). Physical examination results were normal for 49% of the cases; however, irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, skin, and lungs were noted on other exams. Decreased pulmonary function was demonstrated by pulmonary function tests (forced expiratory volume in the first second, less than 80% of predicted value, 42.3%); hypoxemia (pO2 less than 80 mm Hg, 17.4%) and hypocalcemia (less than 8.5 mg/dl, 16.3%) were also noted. Ninety-four (10%) of the cases were hospitalized, and more than 83% of all cases were discharged with a primary diagnosis of HF exposure. There are several reports of individuals who are acutely and chronically exposed to HF; however, we are unaware of other published reports that describe exposure of a community to HF. This incident represented a unique opportunity to study the immediate health impact on a community of residents who were exposed to a hazardous materials release. Results of this analysis suggest that (a) initial health problems should be followed up, (b) any long-term health effects of HF exposure must be assessed, and (c) the health impact on the population at risk should be determined.

Wing, J.S.; Brender, J.D.; Sanderson, L.M.; Perrotta, D.M.; Beauchamp, R.A. (Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

human health | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on the substrate. Because they flatten less upon impaction, particles with higher viscosity and surface tension can be identified by a steeper slope on a plot of TCA vs. size....

243

transforming human health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are in clinical trials: forodesine for treating leukemia and lymphoma, and BCX4208 for gout. Drugs to treat

Kenny, Paraic

244

Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies Health Services Bachelor of Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Six: [15 Credit Hours] NURS 45010 Health Care Policy and Delivery Systems or NURS 46000 Health CareRoadmap: Integrated Health Studies ­ Health Services ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-IHS-HLSV] College of Education, Health, and Human Services School of Health Sciences Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last

Sheridan, Scott

245

Maternal effects in cooperative breeders: from hymenopterans to humans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...above wherein the studies of maternal effects...effects in such systems, before describing...aphids (Stern Foster 1997); Polistinae...eusocial-type systems, in contrast...insect-type systems is the astonishing...characters (Wheeler 1986; Holldobler...1997; Stern Foster 1997; Jemielity...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A tiered approach for the human health risk assessment for consumption of vegetables from with cadmium-contaminated land in urban areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Consumption of vegetables that are grown in urban areas takes place worldwide. In developing countries, vegetables are traditionally grown in urban areas for cheap food supply. In developing and developed countries, urban gardening is gaining momentum. A problem that arises with urban gardening is the presence of contaminants in soil, which can be taken up by vegetables. In this study, a scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables from cadmium-contaminated land. Starting from a contaminated site, the procedure follows a tiered approach which is laid out as follows. In Tier 0, the plausibility of growing vegetables is investigated. In Tier 1 soil concentrations are compared with the human health-based Critical soil concentration. Tier 2 offers the possibility for a detailed site-specific human health risk assessment in which calculated exposure is compared to the toxicological reference dose. In Tier 3, vegetable concentrations are measured and tested following a standardized measurement protocol. To underpin the derivation of the Critical soil concentrations and to develop a tool for site-specific assessment the determination of the representative concentration in vegetables has been evaluated for a range of vegetables. The core of the procedure is based on Freundlich-type plantsoil relations, with the total soil concentration and the soil properties as variables. When a significant plantsoil relation is lacking for a specific vegetable a geometric mean of BioConcentrationFactors (BCF) is used, which is normalized according to soil properties. Subsequently, a conservative vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor is calculated as basis for the Critical soil concentration (Tier 1). The tool to perform site-specific human health risk assessment (Tier 2) includes the calculation of a realistic worst case site-specific vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. -- Highlights: A scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables. Uptake characteristics of cadmium in a series of vegetables is represented by a vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. Calculations and measurement steps are combined.

Swartjes, Frank A., E-mail: frank.swartjes@rivm.nl; Versluijs, Kees W.; Otte, Piet F.

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Early health effects uncertainty assessment. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA early health effects models. This volume contains appendices that include (1) a summary of the MACCS and COSYMA consequence codes, (2) the elicitation questionnaires and case structures, (3) the rationales and results for the panel on early health effects, (4) short biographies of the experts, and (5) the aggregated results of their responses.

Haskin, F.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Brown University is an Ivy League school that competes for today's brightest students and faculty. Biomedical Engineering at Brown creates new knowledge and improves human health through cross-disciplinary research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Biomedical Engineering at Brown creates new knowledge and improves human health through cross, Biomechanics/Motion Sciences, Biosensing and Biomolecular Engineering, Biomaterials, and Biomedical device, mentoring the new generation of leaders in biomedical engineering, strong interest in undergraduate

Adams, Mark

249

Patient and provider perspectives on quality and health system effectiveness in a transition economy: Evidence from Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Facing a severe population health crisis due to noncommunicable diseases, Ukraine and other former Soviet republics and Eastern European countries have a pressing need for more effective health systems. Policies to enhance health system effectiveness should consider the perspectives of different stakeholder groups, including providers as well as patients. In addition, policies that directly target the quality of clinical care should be based on objective performance measures. In 2009 and 2010 we conducted a coordinated series of household and facility-level surveys to capture the perspectives of Ukrainian household members, outpatient clinic patients, and physicians regarding the country's health system overall, as well as the quality, access, and affordability of health care. We objectively measured the quality of care for heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using CPV vignettes. There was broad agreement among household respondents (79%) and physicians (95%) that Ukraine's health system should be reformed. CPV results indicate that the quality of care for common noncommunicable diseases is poor in all regions of the country and in hospitals as well as polyclinics. However, perspectives about the quality of care differ, with household respondents seeing quality as a serious concern, clinic patients having more positive perceptions, and physicians not viewing quality as a reform priority. All stakeholder groups viewed affordability as a problem. These findings have several implications for policies to enhance health system effectiveness. The shared desire for health system reform among all stakeholder groups provides a basis for action in Ukraine. Improving quality, strengthening primary care, and enhancing affordability should be major goals of new health policies. Policies to improve quality directly, such as pay-for-performance, would be mutually reinforcing with purchasing reforms such as transparent payment mechanisms. Such policies would align the incentives of physicians with the desires of the population they serve.

J. Luck; J.W. Peabody; L.M. DeMaria; C.S. Alvarado; R. Menon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Neural Plasticity in Human Brain Connectivity: The Effects of Long Term Deep Brain Stimulation of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neural Plasticity in Human Brain Connectivity: The Effects of Long Term Deep Brain Stimulation of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom, 3 Center of Brain and Cognition, Theoretical and Computational are now well established for deep brain stimulation, but little is known about the effects of long

Deco, Gustavo

251

Effective sea-level rise and deltas: Causes of change and human dimension implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective sea-level rise and deltas: Causes of change and human dimension implications Jason P January 2006 Abstract An assessment is made of contemporary effective sea-level rise (ESLR) for a sample of eustatic sea-level rise, the natural gross rate of fluvial sediment deposition and subsidence

New Hampshire, University of

252

Properties, use and health effects of depleted uranium (DU): a general overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU), a waste product of uranium enrichment, has several civilian and military applications. It was used as armor-piercing ammunition in international military conflicts and was claimed to contribute to health problems, known as the Gulf War Syndrome and recently as the Balkan Syndrome. This led to renewed efforts to assess the environmental consequences and the health impact of the use of DU. The radiological and chemical properties of DU can be compared to those of natural uranium, which is ubiquitously present in soil at a typical concentration of 3 mg/kg. Natural uranium has the same chemotoxicity, but its radiotoxicity is 60% higher. Due to the low specific radioactivity and the dominance of alpha-radiation no acute risk is attributed to external exposure to DU. The major risk is DU dust, generated when DU ammunition hits hard targets. Depending on aerosol speciation, inhalation may lead to a protracted exposure of the lung and other organs. After deposition on the ground, resuspension can take place if the DU containing particle size is sufficiently small. However, transfer to drinking water or locally produced food has little potential to lead to significant exposures to DU. Since poor solubility of uranium compounds and lack of information on speciation precludes the use of radioecological models for exposure assessment, biomonitoring has to be used for assessing exposed persons. Urine, feces, hair and nails record recent exposures to DU. With the exception of crews of military vehicles having been hit by DU penetrators, no body burdens above the range of values for natural uranium have been found. Therefore, observable health effects are not expected and residual cancer risk estimates have to be based on theoretical considerations. They appear to be very minor for all post-conflict situations, i.e. a fraction of those expected from natural radiation.

A Bleise; P.R Danesi; W Burkart

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The impact and effectiveness of health impact assessment: A conceptual framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of health impact assessment (HIA) has expanded rapidly and there are increasing demands for it to demonstrate its effectiveness. This paper presents a conceptual framework for evaluating HIA and describes its development through (i) a review of the literature, (ii) a review of work undertaken as part of a major HIA capacity building project and (iii) an in-depth study of seven completed HIAs. The framework emphasises context, process and impacts as key domains in understanding and evaluating the effectiveness of an HIA. This new framework builds upon the existing approaches to evaluating HIA and extends them to reflect the broad range of factors that comprise and influence the effectiveness of HIAs. It may be of use in evaluating completed HIAs and in planning HIAs that are yet to be undertaken. -- Highlights: ? The first empirically-derived conceptual framework for evaluating HIA ? It may also be useful for planning and reporting on HIAs. ? The framework emphasises context, process and impacts as key domains. ? A broad range of factors influence the effectiveness of HIAs.

Harris-Roxas, Ben, E-mail: ben@harrisroxashealth.com; Harris, Elizabeth, E-mail: e.harris@unsw.edu.au

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Mountain Health Choices Beneficiary Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................................................ 42 I. Access to Health Care Mountain Health Choices Beneficiary Report A Report to the West Virginia Bureau for Medical of Health and Human Resources, Bureau for Medical Services. #12; 1 Table of Contents I. EXECUTIVE

Mohaghegh, Shahab

255

Health Impacts of the School Commute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are a number of health implications associated with theschool children: implications for public health. Health andconcurrent health effects in all areas has implications both

Lee, Murray; Orenstein, Marla; Richardson, Maxwell J.; Ragland, David R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Late health effects uncertainty assessment. Volume 1: Main report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA late health effects models.

Little, M.P.; Muirhead, C.R. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Early health effects uncertainty assessment. Volume 1: Main report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA early health effects models.

Haskin, F.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Grupa, J.B. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (Netherlands)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Information resources for assessing health effects from chemical exposure: Challenges, priorities, and future issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Issues related to developing information resources for assessing the health effects from chemical exposure include the question of how to address the individual political issues relevant to identifying and determining the timeliness, scientific credibility, and completeness of such kinds of information resources. One of the important ways for agencies to share information is through connection tables. This type of software is presently being used to build information products for some DHHS agencies. One of the challenges will be to convince vendors of data of the importance of trying to make data files available to communities that need them. In the future, information processing will be conducted with neural networks, object-oriented database management systems, and fuzzy-set technologies, and meta analysis techniques.

Seigel, S. [National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

What is the impact of systematically missing exposure data on air pollution health effect estimates?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Time-series studies reporting associations between daily air pollution and health use pollution data from monitoring stations that vary in the frequency of recording. Within the Air Pollution and Health: A Europe...

Evangelia Samoli; Roger D. Peng; Tim Ramsay

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

THE BEIR-III REPORT AND THE HEALTH EFFECTS OF LOW-LEVEL RADIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

called hypothetical nuclear reactor accident are thereforenuclear reactors, but rather on the probabilities and health consequences of a reactor accident

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The effects of indole-3-ethanol on the human B+ erythrocyte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF INOOLE-3-ETHANOL ON THE HUMAN B+ ERYTHROCYTE A Thesis by Robert Cary Lewis Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of Master of Science Oecember 1979... Major Subject: Microbiology THE EFFECTS OF INDOLE-3-ETHANOL ON THE HUMAN B+ ERYTHROCYTE A Thesis by Robert Cary Lewis Approved as to style and content by: Dr. J. R. Seed (Biol, ) - Chairman Dr. D. J. 0 heim (Biol. ) Dr. N. 'i R. Bottino (Bi. Ch...

Lewis, Robert Cary

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

Environmental assessment for the satellite power system-concept development and evaluation program-microwave health and ecological effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is concerned with the potential health and ecological effects of the microwave beam from the microwave power transmission system (MPTS) of the satellite power system (SPS). The report is written in the form of a detailed critical review of selected scientific articles from the published literature on the biological effects of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, followed by an assessment of the possible effects of the SPS, based on exposure values for the reference system (US DOE and NASA, 1978).

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

anthem.com/ca Anthem Blue Cross Life and Health Insurance Company (NP) M-LB2027 Effective 10/2010 Printed 6/1/2011 UCSD Medical Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

federal health care reform laws. As we receive additional guidance and clarification on the new health care reform laws from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Labor and the California Department of Managed Health Care. In addition to dollar and percentage copays, members

Gleeson, Joseph G.

264

Dose-dependent cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of antineoplastic alkylating agents on human lymphoblastoid cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The alkylating agents in clinical use as antineoplastics are strongly implicated as human carcinogens on the basis of animal studies and human epidemiologic studies. However, there is little quantitative information on the extent to which exposure to these drugs is mutagenic for normal (non-malignant) cells and the extent to which such mutagenicity correlates with cytotoxicity of these agents. Human lymphoblastoid cells (WIL2-NS) were exposed to graded doses of eight antineoplastic alkylating agents. Dose-dependent decreases in survival were used to calculate IC{sub 50}s for each of the drugs tested. The mutagenicity of these agents is correlated strongly with cytotoxicity. These results quantitate the dose-dependent cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of these bifunctional alkylating agents on human cells. All are cytotoxic and mutagenic, although their mutagenic efficiency varies.

Sanderson, B.J.S.; Johnson, K.J.; Henner, W.D. (Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Effective dose conversion coefficients for health care provider exposed to pediatric and adult victims in radiological dispersal device incident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After an incident of radiological dispersal devices (RDD), health care providers will be exposed to the contaminated patients in the extended medical treatments. Assessment of potential radiation dose to the health care providers will be crucial to minimize their health risk. In this study, we compiled a set of conversion coefficients (mSv?MBq?1?s?1) to readily estimate the effective dose from the time-integrated activity for the health care providers while they deal with internally contaminated patients at different ages. We selected Co-60, Ir-192, Am-241, Cs-137, and I-131 as the major radionuclides that may be used for RDD. We obtained the age-specific organ burdens after the inhalation of those radionuclides from the Dose and Risk Calculation Software (DCAL) program. A series of hybrid computational phantoms (1-, 5-, 10-, and 15?year-old, and adult males) were implemented in a general purpose Monte Carlo (MC) transport code, MCNPX v 2.7, to simulate an adult male health care provider exposed to contaminated patients at different ages. Two exposure scenarios were taken into account: a health care provider (a) standing at the side of patients lying in bed and (b) sitting face to face with patients. The conversion coefficients overall depended on radionuclides, the age of the patients, and the orientation of the patients. The conversion coefficient was greatest for Co-60 and smallest for Am-241. The dose from the 1?year-old patient phantom was up to three times greater than that from the adult patient phantom. The conversion coefficients were less dependent on the age of the patients in the scenario of a health care provider sitting face to face with patients. The dose conversion coefficients established in this study will be useful to readily estimate the effective dose to the health care providers in RDD events.

Eun Young Han; Wi-Ho Ha; Young-Woo Jin; Wesley E Bolch; Choonsik Lee

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Study downplays health concerns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A government-funded study has concluded that reformulated gasoline containing methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) does not increase short-term health risks when compared with gasoline that does not contain the additive. The study, performed by the Health Effects Institute (Cambridge, MA), compared data from dozens of animal, human, and epidemiological studies of health effects linked to oxygenates, including MTBE and ethanol, but did not find enough evidence to warrant an immediate reduction in oxygenate use. However, the study did recommend that additional research be conducted on possible health consequences associated with the gasoline additives, including neurotoxic effects, if oxygenates continue to be used long term. Oxygenates have been used in gasoline since 1992, when EPA mandated that several municipalities use MTBE or other oxygenates in reformulated gasoline to reduce carbon monoxide emissions and meet Clean Air Act requirements. Shortly after the program began, residents in areas where the oxygenates were used complained of nausea, headaches, and dizziness. The institute says the study--funded by EPA and the Centers for Disease Control--will be used for a broader review of gasoline oxygenates by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

Stringer, J.

1996-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

267

Health Information Systems for Primary Health Care: Thinking About Participation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health Information Systems for Primary Health Care: Thinking About Participation Elaine Byrne in supporting primary health care functioning, the design, development and implementation of these systems information systems, human rights 1. Introduction: Primary health care is a crucial element of national health

Sahay, Sundeep

268

Assessment of fish health effects resulting from exposure to oil sands wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine if oil sands wastewater had an effect on the general health and condition of hatchery raised rainbow trout (200 to 400 g). Effects were assessed based on a battery of physiological and biochemical indices and the physical condition of the fish. The trout were exposed to tailings water in the field and in a flow through system under laboratory conditions. The field tests were conducted in 1992 and 1993 in experimental ponds at Syncrude which contained fine tails covered with surface water, fine tails covered with tailings water, and a surface water control pond. The laboratory treatments included Mildred Lake tailings water, dyke drainage water, fractionated tailings pond water (acid fraction containing naphthenic acids), sodium naphthenate, recycle water from Suncor`s tailings pond, and a laboratory control. All body condition factors and blood parameters were normal in the field and laboratory exposed fish and there were no apparent differences between the fish exposed to the tailings water and controls.

Balch, G.C.; Goudey, J.S. [HydroQual Labs. Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Birkholtz, D. [EnviroTest Labs. Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Van Meer, T.; MacKinnon, M. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Fort McMurray, Alberta (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Biological effects in unirradiated human tissue induced by radiation damage up to 1 mm away  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in extrapolating radiation risk estimates from epidemi- ologically accessible doses down to very low doses where) and for assessing the risk from a low-dose exposure to a carcinogen such as ionizing radiation, where only a smallBiological effects in unirradiated human tissue induced by radiation damage up to 1 mm away Oleg V

270

The Effect of Temporal Context on the Sustained Pitch Response in Human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effect of Temporal Context on the Sustained Pitch Response in Human Auditory Cortex Alexander pitch. Pitch strength is important for the perceptual distinctive- ness of an acoustic event. In this magnetoencephalography study, we evaluate how temporal context influences the sustained pitch response (SPR) in lateral

Cambridge, University of

271

OFFICE: HardyTower 58 In the College of Health and Human Services TELEPHONE: (619) 594-5357  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Morris, Reed, Saarmann Assistant Professors: Bennett, Burt, Gilbert, Rapps Lecturers: Cervenka, introductory psychology, oral communication, general biology, human anatomy with lab- oratory, and microbiology (1 semester with laboratory) (anat- omy and microbiology must total 7 semester units with a minimum

Gallo, Linda C.

272

OIL EXPOSURE AND CHRONIC HEALTH EFFECTS ON INDIGENOUS POPULATIONS IN SOUTH AMERICA.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??There is an ongoing discussion on whether the activity of oil companies and its environmental impacts are a threat for the health of the populations (more)

Gascon Merlos, M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Neighborhood Disorder and Health: The Mediating Effects of Powerlessness and Psychological Distress.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? How does living in a dangerous community impact a persons physical health? Research shows that people living in neighborhoods that they perceive to be (more)

Hennessee, Kimberly K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal health effects Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Policy on the Occupational Health & Safety Program in the Care and Use of Animals in Research and Instruction...

275

Human-animal interactions, relationships and bonds: a review and analysis of the literature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

human-animal bond: health implications across the lifespan.H. (2012). Mental health implications of human attachment to

Hosey, Geoff; Melfi, Vicky

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

HEI/CDC/EPA Workshop on Tracking Air Pollution Health Effects A Report to the US Centers for Disease Prevention and Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEI/CDC/EPA Workshop on Tracking Air Pollution Health Effects 1 #12;2 A Report to the US Centers Tracking of Air Pollution Effects January 15-16, 2008 #12;HEI/CDC/EPA Workshop on Tracking Air Pollution ........................................................................................................................................... 13 AN INCREMENTAL APPROACH TO PUBLIC HEALTH TRACKING OF AIR POLLUTION

277

Quantifying the health and economic impacts of mercury : an integrated assessment approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury is a toxic pollutant that endangers human and ecosystem health. Especially potent in the form of methyl mercury, exposure is known to lead to adverse neurological effects, and, a growing body of evidence suggests, ...

Giang, Amanda (Amanda Chi Wen)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Idaho and Oregon; the scientific and academic communities; and the media. This communications plan............................................................................. 18 National Scientific and Academic Communities 12 years of scientific research on the human health effects of iodine-131 released in the 1940s

279

Chernobyl Studies Project - working group 7.0 environmental transport and health effects. Progress report, October 1993--January 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE-funded Chernobyl Studies Project was begun as part of a cooperative agreement between the US and the former USSR, (quote) To develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future reactor accident (quote). Most of the initial tasks for this project are completed or near completion. The focus has now turned primarily to the issue of health effects from the Chernobyl accident. Currently, we are extensively engaged in case-control and cohort studies of thyroid diseases among Belarussian children and in the Ukraine. A major part of the effort is providing methods and applications of dose reconstruction and providing support and equipment for the medical teams. This document contains reports on progress in the following task areas: Management; External Dose; Hydrological Transport; Chromosome Painting Dosimetry; Stochastic Effects; Thyroid Studies; and Leukemia Studies.

Hendrickson, S.M. [ed.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

OFFICE: Hardy Tower 58 In the College of Health and Human Services TELEPHONE: (619) 594-5357  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Morris, Reed, Saarmann Assistant Professors: Burt, Gilbert, Rapps Lecturers: Hall, Hanscom, Jurf, Katzman, introductory psychology, oral communication, general biology, human anatomy with lab- oratory, and microbiology (1 semester with laboratory) (anat- omy and microbiology must total 7 semester units with a minimum

Gallo, Linda C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

OFFICE: Hardy Tower 58 In the College of Health and Human Services TELEPHONE: (619) 594-5357  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Professors: Gilbert, McLeod, Rapps Lecturers: Gaines, Hall, Hanscom, Jurf, Katzman, Lischke, Long, Mc psychology, oral communication, general biology, human anatomy with lab- oratory, and microbiology (1 semester with laboratory) (anat- omy and microbiology must total 7 semester units with a minimum grade of B

Gallo, Linda C.

282

EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK OF AERIAL ULTRA-LOW VOLUME APPLICATIONS OF PYRETHRINS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,1 DAVID A. BROWN1 AND ROBERT K. D. PETERSON2 ABSTRACT. The Sacramento and Yolo Mosquito and Vector of mosquitoes in Sacramento and Yolo counties in California. Following an increase in numbers and West Nile-level transmission to humans and horses in Sacramento and Yolo counties that year (Armijos et al. 2005, Hom et al

Peterson, Robert K. D.

283

HEALTH & COUNSELLING Health Clinic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH & COUNSELLING SERVICES Health Clinic 778.783.4615 - Burnaby 778.782.5200 - Vancouver_counsellor@sfu.ca Health Promotion 778.782.4674 Health & Counselling Services, SFU - 8888 University Drive, MBC 0164 health can suffer if you're under stress for a long time, especially if you are not eating well. You may

284

The socioeconomic effects of uranium development in south Texas: a human ecological approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and organizational effects of such developments. Finally, through a combination of participant observation and inter- viewing of community leaders, an attempt will be made to determine the socioeconomic ramifications of uranium de- velopments on communities...THE SOCIOECONOMIC FFFECTS OF URANIUM DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTH TEXAS: A HUMAN ECOLOGICAL APPROACH A Thesis by PAMELA CHRIS HOPKINS Submitted to tne Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

Hopkins, Pamela Chris

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

Society's Nervous System: Building Effective Government, Energy, and Public Health Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drawing on a unique, multi-year collaboration with the heads of major IT, wireless, hardware, health, and financial firms, as well as the heads of American, EU, and other regulatory organizations, and a variety of NGOs ...

Pentland, Alex Paul

286

Broadcast news and abortion : the effects of conservative narratives on the reproductive health debate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How have changes in the elite discussion of reproductive health narratives affected the debate on abortion and influenced state legislation and popular opinion? Using analysis of broadcast transcripts from CNN and FOX News, ...

Jenssen, Mark (Mark Peter)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

B, B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/003 Publication 9285.7-01 B December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper N O T I C E The policies set out in this document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

288

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I. Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part D, Standardized Planning, Reporting, and Review of Superfund Risk Assessments)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Publication 9285.7-01D Publication 9285.7-01D January 1998 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part D, Standardized Planning, Reporting, and Review of Superfund Risk Assessments) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Revision No. 0 ii January 1998 NOTICE This document provides guidance to EPA staff. The guidance is designed to communicate National policy on the planning, reporting and review of Superfund risk assessments. The document does not, however, substitute for EPA's statutes or regulations, nor is it a regulation itself. Thus, it cannot impose legally-binding requirements on EPA, States, or the regulated community, and may not apply to a particular situation based upon

289

Research Using Human Subjects/Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Using Human SubjectsMaterials (taken in part from "Research on Human Specimens", National Institutes of Health) A 'human subject' is a living individual about whom an...

290

Health Behavior Health Promotion -Prevention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chronic disease complications Improve quality of life Reduce health care costs #12;ImpactHealth Behavior Health Promotion - Prevention Modification of Health Attitudes and Health Behavior #12;Health Promotion: An Overview Basic philosophy Good health = individual and collective goal

Meagher, Mary

291

@jaybernhardt mCollegeHealth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Health and Human Performance #12;@jaybernhardt Epidemiology of mHealth Access http://rememberitnow.com/blog/tag/mhealth://www.ctia.org/advocacy/research/index.cfm/AID/10378 #12;@jaybernhardt #12;@jaybernhardt Mobile-Only Household Health #12;@jaybernhardt mHealth Dynamic://healthpopuli.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Adoption-of-mHealth-Initiatives-and-Phases-Globally.jpg #12;@jaybernhardt mHealth > SMS http

Watson, Craig A.

292

Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies Health Services Bachelor of Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

requirement if not satisfied earlier Semester Six: [15 Credit Hours] NURS 45010 Health Care Policy and Delivery Systems or NURS 46000 Health Care Policy 3 NURS 46000 regional campuses only Human Development for the Health Professions 3 PHIL 40005 Health Care Ethics 3 General Electives (upper division) 9 Should

Sheridan, Scott

293

Assessment of ocean waste disposal. Task 5. Human-health impacts of waste constituents. 2. Pathogens and antibiotic- and heavy-metal-resistant bacteria. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of wastes in the ocean has been practiced by coastal nations for many decades. All areas of the ocean have been subject to disposal use, including estuaries, nearshore, open shelf, and deep ocean sites. Until recently, it was believed that pathogenic bacteria did not survive for any significant period of time in estuarine and marine environments. Scientists and public-health workers never bothered to ask the question could viable, virulent pathogens be present in water samples even though they could not be detected by conventional plating methods. This laboratory answered this question in the affirmative for several bacterial pathogens, and this is discussed in detail. What follows in the report is a description of potentially harmful constituents of wastes, ways in which those constituents could reach humans, known incidents of human disease contracted from wastes, detection of waste-borne disease agents, management technologies, and monitoring and predictive technologies. Since the report is not just a review of the literature, not all known literature has been discussed. However, every attempt is made to include very relevant material, regardless of its age. What follows then is both a literature review and a position paper.

Grimes, D.J.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

DEPARTMENTOFHEALTHANDHUMANSERVICES National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEPARTMENTOFHEALTHANDHUMANSERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Extramural Research 9000 Institutes of Health (NIH), part of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), is the principal health research agency of the U.S. Federal Government. The Office of Extramural Research (OER) provides

Baker, Chris I.

295

All mercury lamps contain small amounts of mercury. An electric current passes through the lamp and vaporizes the mercury to generate light. Recycling mercury containing lamps protects human health and our environment from heavy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All mercury lamps contain small amounts of mercury. An electric current passes through the lamp and vaporizes the mercury to generate light. Recycling mercury containing lamps protects human health and our the environment by recycling universal wastes, contact EH&S at (949) 824-6200 or visit: www.ehs.uci.edu Mercury

George, Steven C.

296

Inhibition of Human cAMP-Phosphodiesterase as a Mechanism of the Spasmolytic Effect of Matricaria recutita L.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inhibition of Human cAMP-Phosphodiesterase as a Mechanism of the Spasmolytic Effect of Matricaria recutita L. ... In conclusion, chamomile tea has been widely consumed as a pleasant drink or as a medicinal remedy for centuries. ...

Omar Maschi; Esther Dal Cero; Germana V. Galli; Donatella Caruso; Enrica Bosisio; Mario DellAgli

2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

297

Human Factors Process Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) Application in the Evaluation of Management Risks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.3.1. Mechanisms of Prevention ............................................................................................... 11 2.4. Human Factors Process Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) ....................... 11 2.5. FMEA Components... ........................................................................................... 15 2.5.5. Risk Priority Number ....................................................................................................... 17 2.6. FMEA Model...

Soguilon, Nenita M.

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

298

A framework for human microbiome research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A variety of microbial communities and their genes (the microbiome) exist throughout the human body, with fundamental roles in human health and disease. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Human Microbiome Project ...

Friedman, Jonathan

299

Effects of Calcium Depletion on Human Cells in Vitro and the Anomalous Behavior of the Human Melanoma Cell Line MM170  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't | 0 Ethylene Glycols 0 Nucleosides 50-89-5 Thymidine...biosynthesis Egtazic Acid pharmacology Ethylene Glycols pharmacology Humans Interphase...Freeman, E. A., Hollinger, S., Price, P. J., and Calisher, C. The effect...

Peter G. Parsons; Peter Musk; Patricia D. Goss; and John Leah

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Effects of Low-Dose Alpha-Particle Irradiation in Human Cells: The Role of Induced Genes and the Bystander Effect. Final Technical Report (9/15/1998-5/31/2005)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This grant was designed to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the bystander effect of radiation (initially described in this laboratory) whereby damage signals are passed from irradiated to non-irradiated cells in a population. These signals induce genetic effects including DNA damage, mutations and chromosomal aberrations in the nonirradiated cells. Experiments were carried out in cultured mammalian cells, primarily human diploid cells, irradiated with alpha particles. This research resulted in 17 publications in the refereed literature and is described in the Progress Report where it is keyed to the publication list. This project was initiated at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and continued in collaboration with students/fellows at Colorado State University (CSU) and the New Jersey Medical School (NJMS).

Little, John B.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Understanding the mHealth Needs of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the mHealth Needs of Kelly Caine1 Kay Connelly1 mHealth Needs of Patients in the mHealth space to help those suffering from depression · must consider human factors, perceived f

Connelly, Kay

302

HEARING AND LATERAL LINE | Effects of Human-Generated Sound on Fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fish depend on sound to communicate with one another, detect prey and predators, navigate from one place to another, avoid hazards, and analyze the world around them. The generation of noise in the ocean, lakes, and rivers by shipping, construction activities, seismic surveys, and sonar systems may affect fish adversely. In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the levels and incidence of human-generated underwater sound, and much of the technology contributing to ocean noise is new. Efforts are now underway to regulate activities that generate underwater sound with the aim of reducing noise levels and minimizing effects upon fish and other aquatic animals.

A.D. Hawkins

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Environmental lead: insidious health problem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental lead: insidious health problem ... Several federal programs aim to reduce human exposure to lead, but which source is most dangerous is subject of growing controversy ...

LOIS R. EMBER; C&EN; WASHINGTON

1980-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

304

Men's Health - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials > Men's Health Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Ergonomics Fitness & Exercise Men's Health Nutrition Women's Health Health & Productivity Health...

305

Health & Productivity - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Health & Productivity Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and Screenings...

306

Health Education & Wellness - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wellness Health Education & Wellness Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and...

307

Effect of non-aqueous drilling fluid and its synthetic base oil on soil health as indicated by its dehydrogenase activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Drilling fluids are used for drilling natural gas, oil and water wells. These spill over into the surrounding soil at the point of drilling, which may impair soil health. A ... out to determine the effect of non ...

Kanchan Wakadikar; Avik Sil; Niranjan Kolekar

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Global Health: Global Effects of Smoking, of Quitting, and of Taxing Tobacco  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...people this century, mostly in low- and middle-income countries. About half of these deaths will occur before 70 years of age. The 2013 World Health Assembly called on governments to reduce the prevalence of smoking by about a third by 2025, which would avoid more than 200 million deaths from tobacco... Cigarette smoking is a major cause of illness and death. This article reviews both the magnitude of the disease burden from cigarette smoking worldwide and strategies to limit smoking.

Jha P.; Peto R.

2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

309

Physiologic Effects of a New-Generation Conducted Electrical Weapon on Human Volunteers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractBackground Conducted electrical weapons (CEWs) are used by law enforcement to restrain or repel potentially violent persons. The TASER X2 CEW is a next-generation device with new technology, including new electrical waveform and output specifications. It has not previously been studied in humans. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the human physiologic effect of a new-generation CEW. Methods This was a prospective, observational human study. Volunteers received a 10-s exposure via deployed probes from an X2 CEW in the abdomen and upper thigh. Measured data included vital signs; 12-lead electrocardiograms; and blood serum biomarkers before, immediately after, and 24h post exposure. Biomarkers measured included pH, lactate, potassium, creatine kinase (CK), and troponin-I. Real-time spirometry and echocardiography were performed before, during, and after the exposure. Results Ten volunteers completed the study. There were no important changes in vital signs or potassium. Median increase in lactate as a consequence of the exposure was 1.2mg/dL (range 0.62.8mg/dL). Median change in pH was ?0.031 (range ?0.011 to ?0.067). No subject had a positive troponin. Median change in CK at 24h was 313ng/mL (range ?40 to 3418ng/mL). There was no evidence of respiratory impairment. Baseline median minute ventilation was 14.2L/min, increased to 21.6L/min intra-exposure (p=0.05), and remained elevated at 21.6L/min post exposure (p=0.01). Conclusions There was no evidence of dangerous physiology found in the measured parameters. The physiologic effects of the X2 CEW are similar to older-generation CEWs. We encourage further study to validate these results.

Jeffrey D. Ho; Donald M. Dawes; Richard J. Chang; Rebecca S. Nelson; James R. Miner

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Health Insurance Marketplace Notice New Health Insurance Marketplace...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Options and Your Health Coverage PART A: General Information When key parts of the health care law take effect in 2014, there will be a new way to buy health insurance: the...

311

Improving Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates in a Managed Care Health Plan: Recruitment of Provider Organizations for a Randomized Effectiveness Trial  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...model, the health plan delegates most responsibility for utilization review, coverage decisions...ability of the health plan to do chart review without requiring...rates through chart review and telephone interviews. The health plan, funded through...

Patricia A. Ganz; Melissa M. Farmer; Michael Belman; Jennifer L. Malin; Roshan Bastani; Katherine L. Kahn; Allen Dietrich; and Jonathan Fielding

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Toxic effects of low doses of Bisphenol-A on human placental cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Humans are exposed daily to a great number of xenobiotics and their metabolites present as pollutants. Bisphenol-A (BPA) is extensively used in a broad range of products including baby bottles, food-storage containers, medical equipment, and consumer electronics. Thus, BPA is the most common monomer for polycarbonates intended for food contact. Levels of this industrial product are found in maternal blood, amniotic fluid, follicular fluid, placental tissue, umbilical cord blood, and maternal urine. In this study, we investigated toxic effects of BPA concentrations close to levels found in serum of pregnant women on human cytotrophoblasts (CTB). These cells were isolated from fresh placentas and exposed to BPA for 24 h. Our results showed that very low doses of BPA induce apoptosis (2 to 3 times) as assessed using M30 antibody immunofluorescent detection, and necrosis (1.3 to 1.7 times) as assessed through the cytosolic Adenylate Kinase (AK) activity after cell membrane damage. We also showed that BPA increased significantly the tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gene expression and protein excretion as measured by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA luminescent test, respectively. Moreover, we observed that induction of AK activation and TNF-alpha gene expression require lower levels of BPA than apoptosis or TNF-alpha protein excretion. Our findings suggest that exposure of placental cells to low doses of BPA may cause detrimental effects, leading in vivo to adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, prematurity and pregnancy loss.

Benachour, Nora [Laboratory of Research in Reproductive and Gestational Health, Quebec (Canada); Aris, Aziz, E-mail: aziz.aris@usherbrooke.c [Laboratory of Research in Reproductive and Gestational Health, Quebec (Canada); Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology, University of Sherbrooke Hospital Centre, Quebec (Canada)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Community Health Map: A geospatial and multivariate data visualization tool for public health datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on health care. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services keeps track of a variety of health care that enables users to visualize health care data in multivariate space as well as geospatially. It is designed a compre- hensible and powerful interface for policy makers to visualize health care quality, public health

Shneiderman, Ben

314

Re-Visiting Health Informatics What is Health Informatics?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the quality of care Facilitate remote healthcare at a patient's home #12;What do Health Informaticians DoRe-Visiting Health Informatics HINF1100 Fall 2008 #12;What is Health Informatics? · Health the effective organization, analysis, management and use of health information to improve the delivery

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

315

Effect of the Transformation of the Veterans Affairs Health Care System on the Quality of Care  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Data from the External Peer Review Program are collected by abstracters trained by the West Virginia Medical Institute, a professional review organization with extensive experience and programs to ensure reliable and accurate data collection. Analyses of these data suggest high interrater reliability... To improve the efficiency and quality of care, in 1995, the Veterans Health Administration launched a program that included increased use of information technology, performance measurement and reporting, realigned payment policies, and integration of services. After the implementation of this program, the quality of preventive, acute, and long-term care substantially improved.

Jha A.K.Perlin J.B.Kizer K.W.Dudley R.A.

2003-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

316

Usage of XML technology in electronic health record for effective heterogeneous systems integration in healthcare  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A virtual patient record is an ideal electronic health record (EHR) that is decentralised and contains heterogeneous clinical data. Extensible markup language (XML) is a web standard that has become the major driver towards heterogeneous systems integration for any industry solution. This work focuses on creating an XML schema that operates as an interface between different heterogeneous patient record structures. The XML schema structure is based on standards such as HL7 and DICOM modelled with UML metadata techniques. The technological platform used to test this XML schema is by implementing various healthcare scenarios and XML-based technologies.

C. Sunil Kumar; A. Govardhan; C.V. Guru Rao

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Effects of oxysterols on cell viability, inflammatory cytokines, VEGF and reactive oxygen species production on human retinal cells: cytoprotective effects and prevention of VEGF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production on human retinal cells: cytoprotective effects and prevention of VEGF secretion by resveratrol B Recherche INSERM 866 (Lipides, Nutrition, Cancer) ­ Equipe Biochimie Métabolique et Nutritionnelle, and IL-8 secretion. 7-OH enhanced VEGF secretion. No cytotoxic effects were identified with 25-OH which

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

318

Oral Histories: Health Physicist William J. Bair, Ph.D.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 HUMAN RADIATION STUDIES: REMEMBERING THE EARLY YEARS Oral History of Health Physicist William J. Bair, Ph.D. Conducted October 14, 1994 United States Department of Energy Office of Human Radiation Experiments June 1995 CONTENTS Foreword Short Biography Graduate Studies at University of Rochester AEC-Funded Research at University of Rochester Use of Human Subjects at University of Rochester AEC Direction of University of Rochester Research Contacts With Researchers Into Radiation Effects No Knowledge of Uranium Injections at Rochester Beginning a Career at Hanford Radionuclide Inhalation Studies at Hanford Use of Animals in Radiation Studies Identifying Health Effects of Inhaled Radionuclides Expanded Customer Base for Inhalation Studies Limited Involvement With Human Studies

319

HIPAA NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES HEALTH CARE SERVICE CORPORATION HEALTH PLAN ("Health Plan")  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TO THIS INFORMATION. PLEASE REVIEW IT CAREFULLY. The Health Plan and the Flex Plan (collectively, the "Plans1 HIPAA NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES HEALTH CARE SERVICE CORPORATION HEALTH PLAN ("Health Plan") & HEALTH CARE SERVICE CORPORATION MASTER FLEXIBLE BENEFIT PLAN ("Flex Plan") EFFECTIVE APRIL 14, 2003

Shahriar, Selim

320

Health-related effects reproted by electronic cigarette users in online forums  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effects were sometimes opposites, eg, improved cough andworsened cough were reported by different individuals. Somereports, such as developed cough or cough worsened,

Talbot, Prue

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Mobile health: beyond consumer apps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The explosion of apps for the medical and wellness sectors has been noted by many. Consumer apps, which provide innovative solutions for self management for a range of health problems have flooded the market, due to high consumer demand. More recently ... Keywords: health, human computer interaction, human factors, mobile, wellbeing, wellness

Jill Freyne

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Strategies for assessing the implications of malformed frogs for environmental health.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

whether there are human health implications in the malformedHealth Perspectives Workshop Summary * Implications ofHealth Perspectives Workshop Summary * Implications of

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult health outcomes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Social support, health outcomes, cardiologycritically ill, qualitative methodology, health care... College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes May 2007...

324

Women's Health - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials > Women's Health Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Ergonomics Fitness & Exercise Men's Health Nutrition Women's Health Health & Productivity...

325

GIS in Human Health Studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Elucidating the causes of fluorosis in the Peoples Republic of China offers another example of how GIS can be used to address the relationship ... to fumes from residential combustion of high-fluorine coal or br...

Joseph E. Bunnell; Alexander W. Karlsen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Measuring the effects of acoustical environments on nurses in health?care facilities: A pilot study.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the methods and results of a pilot ecological study conducted in four health?care facilities (acute?care community?care and long?term?care). The objective was to consolidate and test tools for exposure assessment and the investigation of study outcomes in particular stress. Area and personal monitoring was performed. Nurse noise exposures were monitored. Full?shift monitoring of sound levels was performed and conventional acoustical parameters derived; new acoustical descriptors including occurrence rate and peakiness were also determined. Two questionnaire scales were developed: a study questionnaire to assess perception of the acoustical environment and of work? and noise?related stresses and a daily diary to capture variations in the perceived stress and document aggressive events. The study questionnaire was found to measure disturbance impaired communication and mental fatigue. Biological markers of noise?related stress (salivary cortisol and heart?rate variability) were collected. Exposure measures were correlated with outcomes; while the results were often not statistically significant due to small sample sizes they identified interesting relationships and validated the measurement tools for future use. Long?term?care was identified as the most acoustically?critical environment both from a physical?acoustical perspective and from the perspective of workers.

Hind Sbihi; Murray Hodgson; George Astrakianakis; Pamela Ratner

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

The King's College London HEI project Health, Environment and Reducing air pollution in London, combating cardio-respiratory illness,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The King's College London HEI project ­ Health, Environment and Innovation Reducing air pollution & partners London suffers with the worst air pollution in the UK and some of poorest in Europe. Poor air effective way of quickly reducing pollutants that are amongst the most harmful to human health, ERG played

Applebaum, David

328

Differential effects of triclosan on the activation of mouse and human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Triclosan is an anti-bacterial agent used in many personal care products, household items, medical devices, and clinical settings. Liver tumors occur in mice exposed to triclosan, a response attributed to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR?) activation; however, the effects of triclosan on mouse and human PPAR? have not been fully evaluated. We compared the effects of triclosan on mouse and human PPAR? using PPAR? reporter assays and on downstream events of PPAR? activation using mouse hepatoma Hepa1c1c7 cells and human hepatoma HepG2 cells. PPAR? transcriptional activity was increased by triclosan in a mouse PPAR? reporter assay and decreased in a human PPAR? reporter assay. Concentrations of triclosan inhibiting 50% cell growth were similar in both human and mouse hepatoma cells. Western blotting analysis showed that triclosan increased acyl-coenzyme A oxidase (ACOX1), a PPAR? target, in Hepa1c1c7 cells but decreased the level in HepG2 cells. Treatment of Hepa1c1c7 cells with triclosan enhanced DNA synthesis and suppressed transforming growth factor beta-mediated apoptosis. This did not occur in HepG2 cells. These data demonstrate that triclosan had similar cytotoxicity in Hepa1c1c7 and HepG2 cells, but differential effects on the activation of PPAR?, the expression of ACOX1, and downstream events including DNA synthesis and apoptosis.

Yuanfeng Wu; Qiangen Wu; Frederick A. Beland; Peter Ge; Mugimane G. Manjanatha; Jia-Long Fang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Applying Human Factors and the Resident Assessment Instrument - Home Care: An Examination of Failure Modes, Causes, Effects and Recommendations in the Home Care Environment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Several analytical techniques including use case diagrams, process flow diagrams (PFDs), hierarchical task analysis (HTA), failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA), systematic human error reduction (more)

Griffin, Melissa Corinne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

THE EFFECTS OF HIV INFECTION ON THE EXPRESSION OF THE DRUG EFFLUX PROTEINS P-GLYCOPROTEIN AND BREAST CANCER RESISTANCE PROTEIN IN A HUMAN INTESTINE MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Emerging evidence suggests poor antiretroviral penetration within human gastrointestinal (GI) tissues may contribute to HIV persistence within reservoirs despite effective therapy. We hypothesize that HIV ...

Ellis, Kelstan Lynch

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Health technology : design of bandage-sized wireless sensors and effect of ambient displays on social support and diabetes management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health-Zero refers to health technology design that focus on interaction with an individual as a whole to promote well-being. This thesis presents two explorations in the discipline. The first exploration involves the ...

Mohan, Akshay, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Characterization, decontamination and health effects of fly ash from waste incinerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aims of the present work are (a) to investigate the physical and chemical properties of incinerator ash which are of importance for its utilization and environmental impact; (b) to evaluate the occupational exposure of incinerator workers to trace metals; and (c) to develop a novel technology for the conversion of contaminated fly-ash from incinerators into a material which can be disposed of cheaply or used in the construction industry. The discussion is illustrated by results obtained through experiments. Morphologically, fly-ash consists of irregularly shaped material, of widely varying sizes. Some minerals are identified using powder X-ray diffraction, i.e., calcite, pyrite, halite and maghemite. The chemical composition of ash samples examined consist of Ca, Al, Si, K, Ti, Mg, Fe, K, Na and Mn as the major and minor elements. Trace elements such as Pb, Co, Cr, Ni, Cu, Se, Mo and Cd are also found. The samples tested are rich in Cl, Cr, Zn, Sn, and Pb, as compared to the earth`s crust values. About 50% of the fly-ash particles are smaller than 5.5 {micro}m. These particles can play an important role in transferring toxic metals into the human blood stream by inhalation, deposition and absorption.

Lee, P.H.; Delay, I.; Nasserzadeh, V.; Swithenbank, J.; McLeod, C.; Argent, B.B. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom); Goodfellow, J. [Dyson-Hotwork Limited, Dewsbury (United Kingdom)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

The evolutionary biology of child health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...70 87 The evolutionary biology of child health Bernard Crespi * * crespi@sfu.ca Department...analyse central issues underlying child health, with emphases on the roles of human-specific...and human disorders indicates that child health risks have evolved in the context of evolutionary...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICINE AT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICINE AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE CENTER FOR PATIENT- CENTERED FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICINE AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE CENTER FOR PATIENT-CENTERED OUTCOMES "Our work often seeks to understand human behavior and its interface with pressing health issues. We focus on the human

Engman, David M.

335

International Health Global Health Policy--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

50 International Health Global Health Policy-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www.ghp.m.u-tokyo.ac.jp Our mission is to improve population health by enhancing accountability and improving evidence base of global (both domestic and international) health programmes through the provision

Miyashita, Yasushi

336

Johns Hopkins individualized Health Initiative Hopkins inHealth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;$2,593,644,000,000 #12;#12;#12;Why is U.S. health care so much more "expensive" but not more effective than in most OECD disease? #12;Older? #12;McKinsey Global Institute. 2008. Accounting for the costs of US health care: A newJohns Hopkins individualized Health Initiative Hopkins inHealth Scott L. Zeger Professor

Niebur, Ernst

337

Domestic Health Studies and Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

energy-policy decision-makers about actual human experience of negligible risk to human health from well-regulated occupational and environmental exposures to plutonium and other...

338

Physiological acoustics and health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reviews work on the assessment of the damaging effect of noise on mans auditory system the degree to which the auditory system interacts directly with the autonomic system of the body noise as the sole or contributory cause of general (nonauditory) physiological and psychological ill health in communities and the effect of noise on general health in industry.

Karl D. Kryter

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Careers/ Human Resources | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Employment Opportunities Environment, Safety & Health Procurement Division Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library Contact Us Lab Leadership Directory Careers Human...

340

Continuous training versus interval training in deep water running: health effects for obese women  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objectives To search intermittent and continous trainning (IT and CT, respectively) effects through deep water running for the control and prevention of excessive body fat accumulation and improvement of quality of life. Methods Experimental study composed by 30 women, aged between 34 to 58 years old, during 12 weeks, three sessions per week, 47 minutes each. Body composition, cardiorespiratory condition and Quality of Life by WHOQOL-Brief were considered. Student's and Wilcoxon's non parametric tests were applied at 5% significance level. Results With the only exception for social domain of quality of life, all investigated variables revealed improvement in both groups for IT in comparison to CT. Conclusion Deep water running contributes to body fat reduction, physical fitness evolution and improvement of WHOQOL-Brief domains, regardless of the trainning type conducted.

S.R. Pasetti; A. Gonalves; C.R. Padovani

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Health and Environmental Research. Summary of Accomplishments  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

This is a short account of a 40-year-old health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Under the sponsorship of the federal agencies that were consecutively responsible for the national energy mission, this research program has contributed to the understanding of the human health and environmental effects of emergining energy technologies. In so doing, it has also evolved several nuclear techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of human ills. The form of this presentation is through examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of these areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

1984-04-00T23:59:59.000Z

342

Anti-angiogenic effect of an insertional fusion protein of human basic fibroblast growth factor and ribonuclease-1 by three-dimensional tube formation assay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2005 Anti-angiogenic effect of an insertional fusion protein of human basic fibroblast growth...interaction site The effect of CL-RFN89 on the...Material Method) Human umbilical vein endothelial...bFGF were purified from E.Coli. Fluorescein-labled...

Masakazu Ueda; Tetsu Hayashida; Koichi Aiura; Hiroko Tada; Masayuki Onizuka; Masaharu Seno; Hidenori Yamsada; Masaki Kitajima; and Masaki Kitajima

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Master of Public Health (MPH) and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Human Services 2010 1 Master of Public Health (MPH) and Certificate Program University of New Hampshire) and Public Health Certificate Program (PHC) University of New Hampshire Manchester Campus 286 Commercial StMaster of Public Health (MPH) and Public Health Certificate Program (PHC) University of New

New Hampshire, University of

344

Synergistic Effect of Combination Topotecan and Chronomodulated Radiation Therapy on Xenografted Human Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the in vivo chronomodulated radiosensitizing effect of topotecan (TPT) on human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and its possible mechanisms. Methods and Materials: Xenografted BALB/c (nu/nu) NPC mice were synchronized with an alternation of 12 hours of light from 0 to 12 hours after light onset (HALO) and 12 hours of darkness to establish a unified biological rhythm. Chronomodulated radiosensitization of TPT was investigated by analysis of tumor regrowth delay (TGD), pimonidazole hydrochloride, histone H2AX phosphorylation, (?-H2AX) topoisomerase I (Top I), cell cycle, and apoptosis after treatment with (1) TPT (10 mg/kg) alone; (2) radiation therapy alone (RT); and (3) TPT+RT at 3, 9, 15, and 21 HALO. The tumor-loaded mice without any treatment were used as controls. Results: The TPT+RT combination was more effective than TPT or RT as single agents. The TPT+RT combination at 15 HALO was best (TGD = 58.0 3.6 days), and TPT+RT at 3 HALO was worst (TGD = 35.0 1.5 days) among the 4 TPT+RT groups (P<.05). Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed a significantly increased histone H2AX phosphorylation expression and decreased pimonidazole hydrochloride expression in the TPT+RT group at the same time point. The results suggested that the level of tumor hypoxia and DNA damage varied in a time-dependent manner. The expression of Top I in the TPT+RT group was also significantly different from the control tumors at 15 HALO (P<.05). Cell apoptosis index was increased and the proportion of cells in S phase was decreased (P<.05) with the highest value in 15 HALO and the lowest in 3 HALO. Conclusions: This study suggested that TPT combined with chronoradiotherapy could enhance the radiosensitivity of xenografted NPC. The TPT+RT group at 15 HALO had the best therapeutic effect. The chronomodulated radiosensitization mechanisms of TPT might be related to circadian rhythm of tumor hypoxia, cell cycle redistribution, DNA damage, and expression of Top I.

Zhang, YanLing; Chen, Xin; Ren, PeiRong; Su, Zhou; Cao, HongYing; Zhou, Jie; Zou, XiaoYan; Fu, ShaoZhi; Lin, Sheng; Fan, Juan; Yang, Bo; Sun, XiaoYang [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Zhou, Yan; Chen, Yue [Department of Medical Imaging, Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Yang, LingLin, E-mail: yanglinglin2003@tom.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Wu, JingBo, E-mail: wjb6147@163.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Human Genetics Portfolio Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in providing the assessments of the Wellcome Trust's role in supporting human genetics and have informed `our to maximise the health benefits of research into the human genome remains a core component of the WellcomeHuman Genetics 1990­2009 June 2010 Portfolio Review #12;The Wellcome Trust is a charity registered

Rambaut, Andrew

346

EXHALE Exploration of Health and Lungs in the Environment Exposure to poor air quality is recognised to have a detrimental effect on children's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is recognised to have a detrimental effect on children's respiratory health and air pollution is London, the air pollutants which damage lungs and are linked to respiratory problems such as asthma. A Low symptoms, inflammation in the lung, exposure to traffic-related air pollution, and genetic susceptibility

Applebaum, David

347

The Costs, Air Quality, and Human Health Effects of Meeting Peak Electricity Demand with Installed Backup Generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

E.G. thanks John Dawson, Rob Pinder, and Pavan Racherla for assistance with the PMCAMx model, and Janet Joseph, Peter Savio, and Gunnar Walmet from NYSERDA for useful information about backup generators and emergency demand response programs in New York City. ...

Elisabeth A. Gilmore; Lester B. Lave; Peter J. Adams

2006-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

348

Characterization of information requirements for studies of CO/sub 2/ effects: water resources, agriculture, fisheries, forests and human health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report discusses how climate change and vegetative response will affect selected areas of our way of life as a result of increased carbon dioxide concentrations. Needs for future research are identified. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual chapters. (ACR)

White, M R [ed.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Regional variations in the health, environmental, and climate benefits of wind and solar generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...dominant marginal fuel and, as a...electricity. The average solar panel...allowance prices, which reflect...CSAPR takes effect. For the eastern...delivering fuels. Plant locations...and primary fuel types are from...human-health effects (e.g...using market prices for lost commodities...model give the average, dollar-per-ton...

Kyle Siler-Evans; Ins Lima Azevedo; M. Granger Morgan; Jay Apt

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

"Sometimes they used to whisper in our ears": health care workers' perceptions of the effects of abortion legalization in Nepal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Population and Government of Nepal. Kathmandu: Ministry ofand Macro International Inc: Nepal Demographic Health SurveyCREHPA): Unsafe Abortion Nepal Country Profile. Kathmandu:

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Analysis of Senate Bill 572: Mental Health Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing Mental Health Parity: Implications for Patientsof mental health parity laws and implications for SB 572,Mental health carve-outs: effects and implications. Medical

California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Potential Health and Environmental Impact from Emerging Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Health and Environmental Impact from Emerging Technologies and Fuels: A report from the Health Effects Insitute Potential Health and Environmental Impact from Emerging Technologies...

353

Cytotoxicity and inhibitory effects of low-concentration triclosan on adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Humans at all ages are continually exposed to triclosan (TCS), a widely used antimicrobial agent that can be found in many daily hygiene products, such as toothpastes and shampoos; however, the toxicological and biological effects of TCS in the human body after long-term and low-concentration exposure are far from being well understood. In the current study, we investigated the effects of TCS on the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) by measuring the cytotoxicity, morphological changes, lipid accumulation, and the expression of adipocyte differentiation biomarkers during 21-day adipogenesis. Significant cytotoxicity was observed in un-induced hMSCs treated with high-concentration TCS (? 5.0 ?M TCS), but not with low-concentration treatments (? 2.5 ?M TCS). TCS inhibited adipocyte differentiation of hMSCs in a concentration-dependent manner in the 0.156 to 2.5 ?M range as indicated by morphological changes with Oil Red O staining, which is an index of lipid accumulation. The inhibitory effect was confirmed by a decrease in gene expression of specific adipocyte differentiation biomarkers including adipocyte protein 2, lipoprotein lipase, and adiponectin. Our study demonstrates that TCS inhibits adipocyte differentiation of hMSCs under concentrations that are not cytotoxic and in the range observed in human blood. -- Highlights: ? TCS is cytotoxic to un-induced hMSCs at concentrations ? 5.0 ?M. ? TCS at concentrations ? 2.5 ?M is not cytotoxic to induced hMSCs. ? TCS at non-cytotoxic concentrations inhibits lipid formation in induced hMSCs. ? TCS decreases the expression of specific biomarkers of adipocyte differentiation. ? TCS at concentrations observed in human blood inhibits adipogenesis of hMSCs.

Guo, Li-Wu [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)] [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Wu, Qiangen [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)] [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Green, Bridgett; Nolen, Greg [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)] [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Shi, Leming [Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)] [Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); LoSurdo, Jessica [Division of Cellular and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)] [Division of Cellular and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Deng, Helen [Arkansas Department of Health, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)] [Arkansas Department of Health, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Bauer, Steven [Division of Cellular and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)] [Division of Cellular and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Fang, Jia-Long, E-mail: jia-long.fang@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)] [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Ning, Baitang, E-mail: baitang.ning@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)] [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Learning from Lister: antisepsis, safer surgery and global health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Centre for the Humanities and Health, 2 the conference attracted...historians of medicine and health care safety, infectious disease experts, health services researchers and...authority on the side of rational reform. It is indeed so excellent...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

USGS National Wildlife Health Center Diagnostic Case Submission Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USGS National Wildlife Health Center Diagnostic Case Submission Guidelines The following guidelines broadly outline the framework used by the National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC to the submitting agency, its wildlife populations, or domestic animal and human health. Type of Specimens

356

Effects of oil drops containing Lactobacillus salivarius WB21 on periodontal health and oral microbiota producing volatile sulfur compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to evaluate the effects of oil drops containing Lactobacillus salivarius WB21 on periodontal health and oral microbiota producing volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs). For this study, 42 subjects were randomly assigned to receive oil samples containing L. salivarius WB21 or a placebo for two weeks. Oral assessment and saliva collection were performed on days 1 and 15. Bacterial analysis was performed using the real-time polymerase chain reaction and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). In both the experimental and placebo groups, the average probing depth, number of periodontal pockets, and the percentage of bleeding on probing (BOP) decreased while stimulated salivary flow increased on day 15. BOP was reduced in the experimental group compared with the placebo group (P = 0.010). In the experimental group, total bacterial numbers decreased, and the number of L. salivarius increased. The number of Prevotella intermedia, which is correlated with hydrogen sulfide concentration in mouth air, increased in the placebo group and did not change in the experimental group. T-RFLP analysis found that the peak area proportions representing Porphyromonas gingivalis, P. intermedia, Tannerella forsythensis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum decreased in the experimental group, although there was no significant change in the bacterial composition. Thus we observed oil drops containing L. salivarius WB21 improved BOP and inhibited the reproduction of total and VSC-producing periodontopathic bacteria compared with the placebo group, but also showed the limit of its efficacy in controlling VSCs producing and periodontal pathogens.

Nao Suzuki; Kazunari Tanabe; Toru Takeshita; Masahiro Yoneda; Tomoyuki Iwamoto; Sueko Oshiro; Yoshihisa Yamashita; Takao Hirofuji

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Urban health and health inequalities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urban health and health inequalities and the role of urban forestry in Britain: A review Liz O'Brien Kathryn Williams Amy Stewart 2010 #12;Urban health and woodlands Contents Executive Summary 4 1.1.3 Definition of terms 9 3. The policy context: health and forestry policies 11 3.1 Health policies 11 3

358

Evaluation of an exposure setup for studying effects of diesel exhaust in humans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diesel exhaust is a common air pollutant and work ... and lung function in humans exposed to diluted diesel exhaust. Diluted diesel exhaust was fed from an idling lorry through ... found the size and the shape of...

B. Rudell; T. Sandstrm; U. Hammarstrm

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Professional Human Capital Flows: Temporal Structure of Loss, Replacement and Contingent Bundling Effects on Firm Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diversification, but the opposite is true of prior performance and the manager-subordinate ratio. Implications for RBT, the attraction-selection-attrition (ASA) model, and strategic human capital theory are discussed....

Brymer, Rhett

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

360

Radon programmes and health marketing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......possible way is to employ health marketing that draws...INTRODUCTION Being aware of health effects of the exposure...people that radon is dangerous. Generally, people...radon could not be so dangerous. Table-1. Risk perception...stronger evidence of radon health effects(4) WHO draws......

Ivana Fojtikova; Katerina Rovenska

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

School health services, health promotion and health outcomes: an investigation of the Health Promoting Schools approach as supported by school nurses.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Health promotion interventions in schools have grown in popularity and have demonstrated varying degrees of effectiveness on the health of the school and its individuals. (more)

Carlsson, Dru

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Assessing health impacts of CO2 leakage from a geological storage site into buildings: role of attenuation in the unsaturated zone and building foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a) Title Assessing health impacts of CO2 leakage from a geological storage site into buildings of the greenhouse gas CO2 has the potential to be a widespread and effective option to mitigate climate change. As any industrial activity, CO2 storage may lead to adverse impact on human health and the environment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

363

Arsenic and selenium toxicity and their interactive effects in humans Hong-Jie Sun a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210046, China b Horticultural Sciences Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, United States c Suzhou Health College, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215000, China d Soil and Water Science Department, University

Ma, Lena

364

The Human Genome From human genome to other  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

genome to health Structural Genomics initiative #12;What is the Human Genome Project? · U.S. govtThe Human Genome Project From human genome to other genomes and to gene function June 2000 From that arise from genome research #12;The Human Genome Project Project began in 1990 as a $3 billion, 15-year

Linial, Michal

365

Center for Occupational and Environmental Health School of Public Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Occupational and Environmental Health School of Public Health University economy" (FTC 1967). 2. It serves to prevent harm by protecting users from dangerous products (FDA 1991). The dangers posed by most products are the risk of human exposure to harmful chemical ingredients

366

A Qualitative Exploration of the Effect of Age at Migration on the Acculturative Processes of Filipino Immigrants: Implications for Public Health Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health Implications ..that includes public health implications of this research,this topic and the health implications of migrating at later

Molina, Lourdes Cricel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

ONE HEALTH ILLINOIS SUMMIT The purpose of the One Health Illinois Summit was  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ONE HEALTH ILLINOIS SUMMIT The purpose of the One Health Illinois Summit was: o To provide an update on the health of Illinois' human, animal and ecosystem communities o To encourage communication and food producers o To consider policy options designed to improve the health of Illinois communities

Gilbert, Matthew

368

Reproductive health of Gulf War veterans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...B2005Teratogenicity of depleted uranium aerosols...Environ. Health. 4, 17...Surveillance of depleted uranium exposed Gulf...veterans: health effects observed...exposed to depleted uranium. Int. Arch...Environ. Health. 79, 11-21...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Community-Based Research: Environmental Conditions, Human Health and the Quality of Life Residents of the Homedale neighborhood in west Phoenix are concerned about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ASU researchers, and in November 2001 audited 170 households or approximately half of all the households in the neighborhood. Results of Community Audit Health Problems (by household) · 50.4% Coughing Diploma Hispanic/Latino White Under Age 18 Tract 1146 Maricopa County The Circle K Truck Stop at 35th

Hall, Sharon J.

370

EAT SMART Sources: Heart Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1- EAT SMART Sources: Heart Health American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide and Promotion; Home and Garden Bulletin Number 252; August 1992. Heart Attach Signs, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH Publication No. 01

371

International Health Studies and Activities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of international health studies and activities is to support the health and safety mission of DOE by providing new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation and other industrial exposures encountered in the workplace or within nearby communities; and as a result of nuclear weapons testing, use and accidents.

372

An assessment of health educators' likelihood of adopting genomic competencies for the public health workforce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although the completion of the Human Genome Project helps develop efficient treatment/prevention programs, it will raise new and non-trivial public health issues. Many of these issues fall under the professional purview of health educators. Yet...

Chen, Lei-Shih

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Biological Effects of Space Radiation on Human Cells: History, Advances and Outcomes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......XIV crossed intense solar flares explaining...and clo- nogenic cell survival assays that...Although the onboard technology available did not...were likely due to solar flares. From all...time variation of solar cosmic rays during...double-strand breaks in human cells: history, progress......

Mira Maalouf; Marco Durante; Nicolas Foray

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

In Vitro Photodynamic Therapy of Human Lung Cancer: Investigation of Dose-Rate Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...observed at equal light energies (225 mj/ cm2). The...X-ray view box (General Electric, Milwaukee, WI; daylight...exposed to the highest energies using a thermister probe...therapy of a human lung car cinoma line. Although...of time and treatment energy, however, was not addressed...

Wilbert Matthews; John Cook; James B. Mitchell; Roger R. Perry; Steven Evans; and Harvey I. Pass

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Application of Causal Inference Methods to Estimate Single Pollutant and Multi-Pollutant Health Effects in Asthmatic Children in Fresno, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry, in Air Pollution and Health, S.T. Holgate, etHealth History, in Air Pollution and Health, S.T. Holgate,and Standards, in Air Pollution and Health, S.T. Holgate, et

Snowden, Jonathan Maclean

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

The Health and Visibility Cost of Air Pollution: A Comparison of Estimation Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economics, air pollution, health effects, visibility,Cost of Health Effects of Motor Vehicle Air Pollution. UCD-of the health costs of air pollution (because individuals

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James; McCubbin, Donald

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Effect of Transplantation of Human Fetal Tissues on Prooxidant-Antioxidant Equilibrium in the Liver and Blood Rats after Partial Hepatectomy in Rats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the effect of transplantation of fetal liver cells and postnuclear cytoplasmic fraction from human fetal soft tissues on the prooxidant-antioxidant equilibrium in the liver and blood of rats after part...

V. I. Grishchenko; Yu. V. Nikitchenko

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Effect of Age on HumanComputer Interface Control Via Neck Electromyography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......O., Kern M., Shaker R. Effect of ageing on the upper and lower...E., Sosnoff J. J. Aging effects on sensorimotor integration...251-258. Crow H. C. , Ship J. A. Tongue strength and...Saltin B., Bottinelli R. The effect of ageing and immobilization......

Gabrielle L. Hands; Cara E. Stepp

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

University of Florida College of Public Health & Health Professions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.ufl.edu). COURSE DESCRIPTION: On a day to day basis, health care managers are charged with improving costs and financial outcomes while simultaneously improving clinical and service quality. Health care organizations required to make effective tactical and operational decisions in a health care environment. The course

Kane, Andrew S.

380

New Health Insurance Marketplace Coverage Options and Your Health Coverage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When key parts of the health care reform law (the Affordable Care Act or ACA) take effect in 2014 your employer, you may qualify for Medicaid depending on your household income. Please visit www.HealthCare coverage options, including your eligibility for coverage through the Marketplace and its cost. Visit http://www.HealthCare

Ziurys, Lucy M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Effects of an Advanced Reactors Design, Use of Automation, and Mission on Human Operators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The roles, functions, and tasks of the human operator in existing light water nuclear power plants (NPPs) are based on sound nuclear and human factors engineering (HFE) principles, are well defined by the plants conduct of operations, and have been validated by years of operating experience. However, advanced NPPs whose engineering designs differ from existing light-water reactors (LWRs) will impose changes on the roles, functions, and tasks of the human operators. The plans to increase the use of automation, reduce staffing levels, and add to the mission of these advanced NPPs will also affect the operators roles, functions, and tasks. We assert that these factors, which do not appear to have received a lot of attention by the design engineers of advanced NPPs relative to the attention given to conceptual design of these reactors, can have significant risk implications for the operators and overall plant safety if not mitigated appropriately. This paper presents a high-level analysis of a specific advanced NPP and how its engineered design, its plan to use greater levels of automation, and its expanded mission have risk significant implications on operator performance and overall plant safety.

Jeffrey C. Joe; Johanna H. Oxstrand

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Paraho environmental data. Part IV. Land reclamation and revegetation. Part V. Biological effects. Part VI. Occupational health and safety. Part VII. End use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characteristics of the environment and ecosystems at Anvil Points, reclamation of retorted shale, revegetation of retorted shale, and ecological effects of retorted shale are reported in the first section of this report. Methods used in screening shale oil and retort water for mutagens and carcinogens as well as toxicity studies are reported in the second section of this report. The third section contains information concerning the industrial hygiene and medical studies made at Anvil Points during Paraho research operations. The last section discusses the end uses of shale crude oil and possible health effects associated with end use. (DMC)

Limbach, L.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Projection models for health-effects assessment in populations exposed to radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants. Volume II. SPAHR introductory guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Simulation Package for the Analysis of Health Risk (SPAHR) is a computer software package based upon a demographic model for health risk projections. The model extends several health risk projection models by making realistic assumptions about the population at risk, and thus represents a distinct improvement over previous models. Complete documentation for use of SPAHR is contained in this five-volume publication. The demographic model in SPAHR estimates population response to environmental toxic exposures. Latency of responses, changing dose level over time, competing risks from other causes of death, and population structure can be incorporated into SPAHR to project health risks. Risks are measured by morbid years, number of deaths, and loss of life expectancy. Comparisons of estimates of excess deaths demonstrate that previous health risk projection models may have underestimated excess deaths by a factor of from 2 to 10, depending on the pollutant and the exposure scenario. The software supporting the use of the demographic model is designed to be user oriented. Complex risk projects are made by responding to a series of prompts generated by the package. The flexibility and ease of use of SPAHR make it an important contribution to existing models and software packages. This volume gives the user of the SPAHR program the information required to operate the program when it is up and running on the computer. It assumes that the user is familiar with the concepts and terms relating to demography and health risk assessment. It contains a brief description of all commands and options available in SPAHR, as well as a user-oriented description of the structure and operation of the control system and language processor.

Collins, J.J.; Lundy, R.T.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Disability-Adjusted Life Years in the Assessment of Health Effects of Traffic-Related Air Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Road transport plays a vital role in air pollution emissions, especially in large cities. According...10...and 32% of nitrogen oxides in the European Union. An adverse influence of high air pollution on human he...

?. Adamkiewicz; A. J. Badyda; A. Gayer; D. Mucha

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Trust, situation awareness and automation use: exploring the effect of visual information degradations on human perception and performance in human-telerobot.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Today's military and industry increasingly uses human-robot system to perform complex tasks, such as firefighting. Automated systems that support or even make important decisions require (more)

Wang, Minglu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

MMU Health and Safety Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and effective management control plays in establishing a positive safety culture and preventing incidents, work · believing that the development of a positive health and safety culture is necessary to achieve adequateMMU Health and Safety Policy Manchester Metropolitan University Health and Safety Unit Tel 0161 247

387

Health and Safety Training Reciprocity  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes a policy for reciprocity of employee health and safety training among DOE entities responsible for employee health and safety at DOE sites and facilities to increase efficiency and effectiveness of Departmental operations while meeting established health and safety requirements. Does not cancel other directives.

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

388

Instructions for use JICA's Assistance in Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and clinical care eg, strengthen health systems including the development of human resources, facilitiesInstructions for use #12;1 JICA's Assistance in Health Ryuji MATSUNAGA International Cooperation's Assistance in Health Example of JICA Programme/Projects 2 #12;An Overview of Japan's ODA 3 #12;Japan's ODA

Tsunogai, Urumu

389

Acute Respiratory Health Effects in Asthmatic and Nonasthmatic Children Associated with Short-Term Exposure to Air Pollutants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Environ.Health Perspect.,63, 39-44. Whittemore,A.S., and Korn,E.L. (1980). Asthmaand air pollution-Term Exposure to Air Pollutants Author(s): Lisa Kan, Barry Wiggs, Mark Irwin, Irene Yee Source: The CanadianMemorandumof Intenton TransboundaryAir Pollution(1983). Impactassessment-Work Group I. Final Report,Section 4, pp. 1

Irwin, Mark E.

390

State of Maryland Employees and Retirees Health and Welfare Benefits Program Medical Plan Changes Effective July 1, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

care that is currently covered in full in network under healthcare reform remains covered in fullState of Maryland Employees and Retirees Health and Welfare Benefits Program Medical Plan Changes Copay In-Network Per Visit Copay Specialist Office Visit $25 $30 Urgent Care Facility $20 $30 Emergency

Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

391

Research Abstract, Wireless Health 2013 Wireless Health 2013, Nov 1-3 2013, Baltimore, MD, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health (mHealth) interventions such as text messaging or SMS can deliver frequent patient contact. To be more effective, mHealth services need to adapt to each patient's unique needs over the long

Baveja, Satinder Singh

392

Mercury, cadmium, lead and arsenic levels in three pelagic fish species from the Atlantic Ocean: Intra- and inter-specific variability and human health risks for consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three commonly consumed and commercially valuable fish species (sardine, chub and horse mackerel) were collected from the Northeast and Eastern Central Atlantic Ocean in Portuguese waters during one year. Mercury, cadmium, lead and arsenic amounts were determined in muscles using graphite furnace and cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry. Maximum mean levels of mercury (0.17150.0857mg/kg, ww) and arsenic (1.1390.350mg/kg, ww) were detected in horse mackerel. The higher mean amounts of cadmium (0.00840.0036mg/kg, ww) and lead (0.03790.0303mg/kg, ww) were determined in chub mackerel and in sardine, respectively. Intra- and inter-specific variability of metals bioaccumulation was statistically assessed and species and length revealed to be the major influencing biometric factors, in particular for mercury and arsenic. Muscles present metal concentrations below the tolerable limits considered by European Commission Regulation and Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO). However, estimation of non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic health risks by the target hazard quotient and target carcinogenic risk, established by the US Environmental Protection Agency, suggests that these species must be eaten in moderation due to possible hazard and carcinogenic risks derived from arsenic (in all analyzed species) and mercury ingestion (in horse and chub mackerel species).

C. Vieira; S. Morais; S. Ramos; C. Delerue-Matos; M.B.P.P. Oliveira

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal health network Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Products Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 3 SAVE THE DATE Saskatchewan Epidemiology Association Summary: health: bridging animal and human health in...

394

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute mental health Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Human Development Faculty Research Themes Summary: and use of long-term care, mental health care, physician services and prescription drugs among older... College of Health...

395

The effects of cooking, storage, and ionizing irradiation on carotenoids, antioxidant activity, and phenolics in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Past research conducted by our lab demonstrated that potatoes contain significant levels of phytochemicals important to human health. However, since potatoes are not consumed raw, it is important to determine the effects of processing...

Blessington, Tyann

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Exploring the Effect of mHealth Technologies on Communication and Information Sharing in a Pediatric Critical Care Unit: A Case Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Communication and information sharing is an important aspect of healthcare information technology and mHealth management. A main requirement in the quality of patient care is the ability of all health care participants to communicate. Research illustrates ... Keywords: Health Care Technology, Information Technology, Management of Technology, Professional Communication, Technology Assessment, eHealth, mHealth

Rocci Luppicini; Victoria Aceti

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Health and Safety Policy Version 2012, Page 1 of 8 Health and Safety Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health and Safety Policy Version 2012, Page 1 of 8 Health and Safety Policy #12;Health and Safety Policy Version 2012, Page 2 of 8 Coventry University Health and Safety Policy 1. Introduction, Purpose and Scope The objective of our Health and Safety Policy is to enable the University to operate effectively

Low, Robert

398

MSc in Environmental Health The Place of Useful Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Environmental Health is the assessment & management of environmental influences on human health, including study of: · Environmental protection (including control of air, water and land pollution) · Food safety engineering approaches to manage risks to human health from contaminated water, air, and land

Mottram, Nigel

399

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER HUMAN STEM CELL RESEARCH COST.....................................................................................12 #12;University of Connecticut and the University of Connecticut Health Center Human Stem Cell that is ineligible for federal support. The University of Connecticut and the University of Connecticut Health Center

Kim, Duck O.

400

Human Genetics Portfolio Review Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the past 20 years, from our contribution to the Human Genome Project at the Sanger Institute to our role during this time. The drive to maximise the health benefits of human genome research remains a core to build research capacity and infrastructure to support human genetics and genomics · providing generous

Rambaut, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Global Health: Disease Eradication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...have been considered as potential candidates for eradication, but the World Health Organization (WHO) has targeted only two other diseases for global eradication after smallpox. In 1986, WHO's policymaking body, the World Health Assembly, adopted the elimination of dracunculiasis (guinea worm disease)... The most cost-effective intervention for certain infectious diseases is to eliminate them entirely. This article reviews the characteristics of potentially eradicable diseases and surveys current eradication methods.

Hopkins D.R.

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

402

Cyclin D1 Downregulation Contributes to Anticancer Effect of Isorhapontigenin on Human Bladder Cancer Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...used for treatment of bladder cancers for centuries (12). To determine the anticancer activity...used for treatment of bladder cancers for centuries. There are reports of side effects from...through glycogen synthase kinase 3beta and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein-dependent...

Yong Fang; Zipeng Cao; Qi Hou; Chen Ma; Chunsuo Yao; Jingxia Li; Xue-Ru Wu; and Chuanshu Huang

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Health Economics College of Public Health and Health Professions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of health, the demand for health care, health insurance theory, the demand for health insurance, the health insurance market and managed care, the market for physicians' services, production and cost of health care care environment. #12;2 Apply general and health economics concepts and show demonstrated competence

Kane, Andrew S.

404

Health Sciences and Nursing Health Sociology ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

related to health problems and health care systems, through developing and applying theories, concepts44 Health Sciences and Nursing Health Sociology in interdisciplinary academic fields, involving health, medicine and nursing as well as the field of sociology

Miyashita, Yasushi

405

Race and gender differences in the effect of informal social supports on the use of health services by the elderly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of physician visits, and the number of days spent in the hospital. Although the increases in the R's were minimal, they were statistically significant. In addition, several interactive effects were found. The effects of a number of the social support... variables on physician contact, the number of physician visits and the number of days spent in the hospital differed according to race and gender. However, these effects were inconsistent. The effect that a particular support variable had on one...

Nelson, Martha Alice

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

406

Global Health: Surviving Torture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and AIDS, and sexual dysfunction, must be identified and treated. Until very recently, the psychological effects of torture have remained largely invisible the combined effect of the difficulty of assessing mental symptoms in culturally diverse populations, the unsuccessful search by human rights... Dr. Richard F. Mollica and his colleagues have cared for many torture survivors. He explains that medical professionals must take the lead in healing the wounds inflicted by the most extreme acts of human aggression.

Mollica R.F.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Vasoconstrictor effects of 8-iso-prostaglandin E2 and 8-iso-prostaglandin F2? on human umbilical vein  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study was undertaken to determine whether 8-iso-prostaglandin E2 and 8-iso-prostaglandin F2? posses contractile action on human umbilical vein and to evaluate the possible involvement of prostanoid TP receptors in this effect. Human umbilical vein rings were mounted in organ baths and concentrationresponse curves to 8-iso-prostaglandin E2 or 8-iso-prostaglandin F2? were constructed. Both isoprostanes evoked concentration-dependent contraction. 8-iso-prostaglandin E2 (pEC50=6.900.03) was significantly more potent than 8-iso-prostaglandin F2? (pEC50=6.100.04). However, both isoprostanes were equieffective. The prostanoid TP receptor antagonists, ICI-192,605 (4-(Z)-6-(2-o-Chlorophenyl-4-o-hydroxyphenyl-1,3-dioxan-cis-5-yl)hexenoic acid) and SQ-29548 (7-[3-[[2-[(phenylamino)carbonyl]hydrazino]methyl]-7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-yl]-[1S(1?,2?(Z),3?,4?)]-5-Heptenoic acid) produced a competitive rightward shift of 8-iso-prostaglandin E2 concentrationresponse curves with pKB values of 8.910.04 and 8.070.07, respectively. When ICI-192,605 (1 nM) and SQ-29548 (10 nM) were evaluated against 8-iso-prostaglandin F2? they produced a parallel rightward displacement of 8-iso-prostaglandin F2? concentrationresponse curves without affecting the maximum responses giving pA2 values of 9.020.12 and 8.260.13, respectively. In conclusion, the present study describes for the first time the vasoconstrictor action of 8-iso-prostaglandin E2 and 8-iso-prostaglandin F2? in human umbilical vein. Furthermore, the affinity values obtained with ICI-192,605 and SQ-29548 provide strong pharmacological evidence of prostanoid TP receptors involvement in this effect.

Federico M. Daray; Ana I. Minvielle; Soledad Puppo; Rodolfo P. Rothlin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

UNO Student Health Services Patient's Bill of Rights and Responsibilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

health care program. UNO Student Health Services Human Performance Center Rm. 109 (504) 280-6387 wwwUNO Student Health Services Patient's Bill of Rights and Responsibilities Patient's Bill of Rights to the Health Service regarding its operations and the right to change caregivers for any reason. #12;Patient

Kulp, Mark

409

Effects of the flavonoids kaempferol and fisetin on thermotolerance, oxidative stress and FoxO transcription factor DAF-16 in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flavonoids present in many herbal edibles possess a remarkable spectrum of biochemical and pharmacological actions and they are assumed to exert beneficial effects to human health. Although the precise biologi...

Andreas Kampktter; Christiane Gombitang Nkwonkam

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Immune Reconstitution Syndromes in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Following Effective Antiretroviral Therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effective antiretroviral therapy leads to rapid decrease in plasma HIV-1 RNA, frequently followed by an increase in CD4 T-helper cell counts. The improvement of immune function during highly active antiretroviral therapy has important impact on natural history of AIDS-related opportunistic disorders. Here we describe cases of unusual clinical inflammatory syndromes in CMV retinitis, hepatitis C, and atypical mycobacteriosis in HIV-1 infected patients associated with the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Pathogenetic implications and therapeutic management of these new immunopathologic syndromes are discussed.

Georg M.N. Behrens; Dirk Meyer; Matthias Stoll; Reinhold E. Schmidt

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Human adaptation of avian influenza viruses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human adaptation of avian influenza viruses pose an enormous public health challenge as the human population is predominantly naive to avian influenza antigens. As such, constant surveillance is needed to monitor the ...

Srinivasan, Karunya

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Health Insurance After Graduation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health Insurance After Graduation: Individual Health Insurance in California University of California, Berkeley Student Health Insurance Office Tang Center Fall Semester 2013 #12;Health Care vs. Health Insurance Health Care is... Provision of Medical Services by ­ Private Physicians & Hospitals

Kammen, Daniel M.

413

Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Background Improving health in our nation requires strengthening four major domains of the health care system: personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and health-related research. Many avoidable shortcomings...

Detmer, Don E

2003-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

414

environmental health The Local Board of Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental health The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer Second Edition #12;The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer Second Edition Author Carrie Hribar, MA Project Director � Public Health Policy National Association of Local Boards of Health Editor Mark Schultz, MEd

415

Effect of human-biometric sensor interaction on fingerprint matching performance, image quality and minutiae count  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigated the effect of force levels (3, 5, 7, 9 and 11N) on fingerprint matching performance, image quality scores and minutiae count between optical and capacitance sensors. Three images were collected from the right index fingers of 75 participants for each sensing technology. Descriptive statistics analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric tests were conducted to assess significant differences in minutiae counts and image quality scores, by force level. The results reveal a significant difference in image quality score by force level and sensor technology in contrast to minutiae count for the capacitance sensor. The image quality score is one of the many factors that influence the system matching performance, yet the removal of low quality images does not improve the system performance at each force level. Further research is needed to identify other manipulatable factors to improve the interaction between a user and device and the subsequent matching performance.

Eric P. Kukula; Christine R. Blomeke; Shimon K. Modi; Stephen J. Elliott

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Human Memory.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Training a person in a new knowledge base or skill set is extremely time consuming and costly, particularly in highly specialized domains such as the military and the intelligence community. Recent research in cognitive neuroscience has suggested that a technique called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has the potential to revolutionize training by enabling learners to acquire new skills faster, more efficiently, and more robustly (Bullard et al., 2011). In this project, we tested the effects of tDCS on two types of memory performance that are critical for learning new skills: associative memory and working memory. Associative memory is memory for the relationship between two items or events. It forms the foundation of all episodic memories, so enhancing associative memory could provide substantial benefits to the speed and robustness of learning new information. We tested the effects of tDCS on associative memory, using a real-world associative memory task: remembering the links between faces and names. Working memory refers to the amount of information that can be held in mind and processed at one time, and it forms the basis for all higher-level cognitive processing. We investigated the degree of transfer between various working memory tasks (the N-back task as a measure of verbal working memory, the rotation-span task as a measure of visuospatial working memory, and Raven's progressive matrices as a measure of fluid intelligence) in order to determine if tDCS-induced facilitation of performance is task-specific or general.

Matzen, Laura E.; Trumbo, Michael Christopher Stefan

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - administration health care Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

health care Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: administration health care Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 College of Health and Human...

418

BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH Assessing the Environmental, Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH Assessing the Environmental, Health and Safety Impact of Nanoparticles- proaching the sensitivity limit for most instruments. #12;BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH A colloidal nanoparticle

Magee, Joseph W.

419

Structural Stability of Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 Is Essential for Protective Effects Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Human fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF1) has radioprotective effects on the intestine, although its structural instability limits its potential for practical use. Several stable FGF1 mutants were created increasing stability in the order, wild-type FGF1, single mutants (Q40P, S47I, and H93G), Q40P/S47I, and Q40P/S47I/H93G. This study evaluated the contribution of the structural stability of FGF1 to its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Each FGF1 mutant was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 h before or after total body irradiation (TBI) with {gamma}-rays at 8-12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Q40P/S47I/H93G could activate all subtypes of FGF receptors in vitro much more strongly than the wild-type without endogenous or exogenous heparin. Preirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G significantly increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1 after TBI at 10 or 12 Gy, and postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G was effective in promoting crypt survival after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. In addition, crypt cell proliferation, crypt depth, and epithelial differentiation were significantly promoted by postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G. The level of stability of FGF1 mutants correlated with their mitogenic activities in vitro in the absence of heparin; however, preirradiation treatment with the mutants increased the crypt number to almost the same level as Q40P/S47I/H93G. When given 24 h after TBI at 10 Gy, all FGF1 mutants increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1, and Q40P/S47I/H93G had the strongest mitogenic effects in intestinal epithelial cells after radiation damage. Moreover, Q40P/S47I/H93G prolonged mouse survival after TBI because of the repair of intestinal damage. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the structural stability of FGF1 can contribute to the enhancement of protective effects against radiation-induced intestinal damage. Therefore, Q40P/S47I/H93G is pharmacologically one of the most promising candidates for clinical applications for radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome.

Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.jp [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Umeda, Sachiko [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Yasuda, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro; Motomura, Kaori; Suzuki, Masashi [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)] [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Zakrzewska, Malgorzata [Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw (Poland)] [Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw (Poland); Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)] [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Imai, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Hypersensitivity of human and rodent Fanconianemia (FA) cells to bystander effect-induced DNA damage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hypersensitivity Hypersensitivity o f h uman a nd r odent F anconi a nemia ( FA) c ells t o b ystander effect---induced D NA d amage P.F. Wilson 1,2 , H. Nagasawa 3 , A .C. K ohlgruber 2 , S .S. U rbin 2 , F .A. Bourguet 2 , J .R. Brogan 3 , J .S. Bedford 3 , M .A. Coleman 2 , J.M. Hinz 4 , and J.B. Little 5 1 B iology D epartment/NASA S pace R adiation L aboratory, B rookhaven N ational L aboratory, U pton, N Y 1 1733 2 Biosciences a nd B iotechnology D ivision, L awrence L ivermore N ational L aboratory, L ivermore, C A 9 4551 3 Department o f E nvironmental a nd R adiological H ealth S ciences, C olorado S tate U niversity, F ort C ollins, C O 8 0523 4 School o f M olecular B iosciences, W ashington S tate U niversity, P ullman, W A 9 9164 5 D epartment o f G enetics a nd C omplex D iseases, H arvard S chool o f P ublic H ealth, B oston, M A 0 2115 Fanconi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/{mu}m) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows {approx} 28% reduction of {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post box-10502, New Delhi-110067 (India)

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

422

Adapting to health impacts of climate change: a study of UNFCCC Annex I  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adapting to the health effects of climate change is one of the key challenges facing public health this century. Our knowledge of progress on adaptation, however, remains in its infancy. Using the Fifth National Communications of Annex I parties to the UNFCCC, 1912 initiatives are systematically identified and analyzed. 80% of the actions identified consist of groundwork (i.e.preparatory) action, with only 20% constituting tangible adaptations. No health vulnerability was recognized by all 38 Annex I countries. Furthermore, while all initiatives affect at least one health vulnerability, only 15% had an explicit human health component. Consideration for the special needs of vulnerable groups is uneven and underdeveloped. Climate change is directly motivating 71% of groundwork actions, and 61% of adaptation initiatives are being mainstreamed into existing institutions or programs. We conclude that the adaptation responses to the health risks of climate change remain piecemeal. Policymakers in the health sector must engage with stakeholders to implement adaptation that considers how climate change will impact the health of each segment of the population, particularly within those groups already considered most vulnerable to poor health outcomes.

A C Lesnikowski; J D Ford; L Berrang-Ford; J A Paterson; M Barrera; S J Heymann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Journal of Health & Pollution Vol. 3, No. 5 --June 2013 It is now evident that much more  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

apparent following the 2005 publication of the influential Chernobyl Forum report, in which a large body of literature from Eastern Europe was ignored and an Perspectives on Chernobyl and Fukushima Health Effects outcomes for human populations living downwind from the Chernobyl disaster.1-5 The Chernobyl Forum report

Mousseau, Timothy A.

424

Eighth Annual National Conference on Health Disparities | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Truly healthy communities and their citizen leaders recognize the roles that human health, environmental quality, environmental justice, and economic development play in...

425

Effectiveness of Adult Day Care Programs on Health Outcomes of Thai Family Caregivers of Persons with Dementia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adult day care (ADC) is recognized as a supportive intervention for persons with dementia (PWD) and family caregivers during the day time. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Thai ADC programs ...

Noimuenwai, Premruetai

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Int. J. Cancer: 92, 63-69 (2001) Author Version Cytostatic effect of polyethylene-glycol on human colonic adenocarcinoma cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Int. J. Cancer: 92, 63-69 (2001) Author Version Cytostatic effect of polyethylene-glycol on human Sécurité des Aliments, INRA, ENVT, 23 Ch. des Capelles, 31076 Toulouse, France Polyethylene glycol (PEG agent, polyethylene- glycol, against rat colonic carcinogenesis (Corpet and Parnaud, 1999, Parnaud et al

Boyer, Edmond

427

About the Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program The Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program of the National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

About the Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program The Air Pollution and Respiratory Health public health agencies. For example, CDC staff are currently studying the effect of outdoor air pollution for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, the Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program supports

428

Introducing the journal of compassionate health care  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The inspiration for this new open access journal, Journal of Compassionate Health Care emerged from the apparent need to restore humanity to healthcare, particularly within a period of austerity that has been aff...

Sue Shea; Christos Lionis

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Putting mHealth in Public Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in mobile technologies have the potential to transform public health today and for the future. However, the potential and promise of mHealth in public health initiatives are not guaranteed. ... Health an...

Donna Malvey; Donna J. Slovensky

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Association of asthma symptoms with peak particulate air pollution and effect modification by anti-inflammatory medication use.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

respirable aerosol. Health Effects Institute Research Report38. Cambridge, MA:Health Effects Institute, 1990. Spektor

Delfino, Ralph J; Zeiger, Robert S; Seltzer, James M; Street, Donald H; McLaren, Christine E

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

The inverse agonist effect of rimonabant on G protein activation is not mediated by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor: Evidence from postmortem human brain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rimonabant (SR141716) was the first potent and selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist synthesized. Several data support that rimonabant behaves as an inverse agonist. Moreover, there is evidence suggesting that this inverse agonism may be CB1 receptor-independent. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether the effect of rimonabant over G protein activation in postmortem human brain is CB1 dependent or independent. [35S]GTP?S binding assays and antibody-capture [35S]GTP?S scintillation proximity assays (SPA) were performed in human and mice brain. [3H]SR141716 binding characteristics were also studied. Rimonabant concentration-dependently decreased basal [35S]GTP?S binding to human cortical membranes. This effect did not change in the presence of either the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2, the CB1 receptor neutral antagonist O-2050, or the CB1 allosteric modulator Org 27569. [35S]GTP?S binding assays performed in CB1 knockout mice brains revealed that rimonabant inhibited the [35S]GTP?S binding in the same manner as it did in wild-type mice. The SPA combined with the use of specific antibody-capture of G? specific subunits showed that rimonabant produces its inverse agonist effect through Gi3, Go and Gz subtypes. This effect was not inhibited by the CB1 receptor antagonist O-2050. Finally, [3H]SR141716 binding assays in human cortical membranes demonstrated that rimonabant recognizes an additional binding site other than the CB1 receptor orthosteric binding site recognized by O-2050. This study provides new data demonstrating that at least the inverse agonist effect observed with >1?M concentrations of rimonabant in [35S]GTP?S binding assays is not mediated by the CB1 receptor in human brain.

A.M. Erdozain; R. Diez-Alarcia; J.J. Meana; L.F. Callado

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Health Fairs and Screenings - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wellness > Health Fairs and Screenings Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and...

433

Portable room-temperature self-powered/active H2 sensor driven by human motion through piezoelectric screening effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Room-temperature high H2 sensing has been realized from SnO2/ZnO nanoarray nanogenerator. Without any external electricity power source, the portable device can be self-powered under the driving of human motion, in which the piezoelectric output can actively act as both the power source and H2 sensing signal. Upon exposure to 800ppm H2 at room temperature, the piezoelectric output voltage of the device under the same applied deformation decreases from 0.80V (in dry air) to 0.14V, and the sensitivity is up to 471.4. The detection limit is ~10ppm H2, and the selectivity against H2 at room temperature is very high. The excellent room-temperature H2 sensing performance can be attributed to the coupling of the piezoelectric screening effect of ZnO nanowires and the conversion of SnO2/ZnO heterojunctions. This study can stimulate a research trend for the development of the next generation of portable room-temperature H2 sensors.

Yongming Fu; Weili Zang; Penglei Wang; Lili Xing; Xinyu Xue; Yan Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a variety of topics including substance abuse, worksite health promotion, health care cost containment the importance of health care as well as the promotion, protection and maintenance of health. Without a doubt things in the area of health promotion and health care. As the COHS look to the future, we need to take

Barrash, Warren

435

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle-income countries to carry out health- related research within their own countries. Gl bal Health #12;3 | Global Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated

Rambaut, Andrew

436

HEALTH ECONOMICS Health Econ. (in press)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

health services/economics; costs and cost analysis; health services/utilization; quality of health careHEALTH ECONOMICS Health Econ. (in press) Published online in Wiley InterScience (www and ROBERT BLACKb a Department of Population and Family Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School

Scharfstein, Daniel

437

Application of Causal Inference Methods to Estimate Single Pollutant and Multi-Pollutant Health Effects in Asthmatic Children in Fresno, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

health with the rise of populous cities and the advent of industrialization[1]. The rise of fossil fuel-

Snowden, Jonathan Maclean

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

CDC's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network MAINE Keeping Track, Promoting Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

health and environment data in one easy to find location. Policy makers and public health officials can Center for Environmental Health Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects #12;The Problem childhood lead poisoning data. This fresh look at an old problem shed light on some previously unknown

439

Aging: Health at Advanced Ages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article examines how health and mortality at advanced ages evolves from conditions early in life. The authors summarize the findings, examine econometric strategies to identify causal effects, and discuss the implications of the findings for public policies aimed at improving population health.

G.J. van den Berg; M. Lindeboom

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

REPORT NO. 3 health implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT NO. 3 health implications of fallout from nuclear weapons testing through 1961 May 1962 on radiation doses and possible health effects of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. Before discussing from nuclear tests. Any possible manifestations resulting from fallout radiation will not be unique

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Office of Domestic and International Health Studies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Domestic and International Health Studies engages in the conduct of international scientific studies that may provide new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation in the workplace or people exposed in communities as a result of nuclear accidents, including providing health and environmental monitoring services to populations specified by law.

442

Brief synopsis of EPA Office of Research and Development and the Health Effects Institute mobile source work  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work in progress by ORD, the pertinent results, and future work planned by ORD are discussed. Some of the important areas mentioned are chemical characterization work, development of method to collect gas-phase hydrocarbons in diesel exhaust, effect of NO2 in mutagen artifact generation, study of filter efficiency, and identification of types of compounds responsible for Ames test activity in diesel particles.

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Modeling personal particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pb-pah) exposure in human subjects in Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R21ES016379), the Health Effect Institute (HEI 4787-RFA09-Research Report 143. Health Effects Institute: Boston, MA;

Wu, Jun; Tjoa, Thomas; Li, Lianfa; Jaimes, Guillermo; Delfino, Ralph J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control: Mobilizing the world for global public health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on SHS exposures dangerous health effects has developed,$ 156 million. 53 health from the dangerous effects of SHS.health effects of SHS exposure and even claim that WHO has concluded that SHS is not dangerous.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Genomic medicine: genetic variation and its impact on the future of health care  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sequence of the human genome. Science. 291...metabolomic assessments of human health and nutrition...for Biotechnology Information. Nucleic Acids Res...care. | Advances in genome technology and other fruits of the Human Genome Project are playing a growing...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

CAM: Cloud-Assisted Privacy Preserving Mobile Health Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Yuguang Fang, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Cloud-assisted mobile health (mHealth) monitoring, which applies and intellectual property of monitoring service providers, which could deter the wide adoption of mHealth the effectiveness of our proposed design. Index Terms--Mobile health (mHealth), Healthcare, Privacy, Outsourcing

Latchman, Haniph A.

447

Isoproterenol effects evaluated in heart slices of human and rat in comparison to rat heart in vivo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury was evaluated by gene and protein pathway changes in human heart slices, and compared to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Isoproterenol (10 and 100 ?M) altered human and rat heart slice markers of oxidative stress (ATP and GSH) at 24 h. In this in vivo rat study (0.5 mg/kg), serum troponin concentrations increased with lesion severity, minimal to mild necrosis at 24 and 48 h. In the rat and the human heart, isoproterenol altered pathways for apoptosis/necrosis, stress/energy, inflammation, and remodeling/fibrosis. The rat and human heart slices were in an apoptotic phase, while the in vivo rat heart exhibited necrosis histologically and further progression of tissue remodeling. In human heart slices genes for several heat shock 70 kD members were altered, indicative of stress to mitigate apoptosis. The stress response included alterations in energy utilization, fatty acid processing, and the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a marker of increased oxidative stress in both species. Inflammation markers linked with remodeling included IL-1?, Il-1?, IL-6 and TNF? in both species. Tissue remodeling changes in both species included increases in the TIMP proteins, inhibitors of matrix degradation, the gene/protein of IL-4 linked with cardiac fibrosis, and the gene Ccl7 a chemokine that induces collagen synthesis, and Reg3b a growth factor for cardiac repair. This study demonstrates that the initial human heart slice response to isoproterenol cardiac injury results in apoptosis, stress/energy status, inflammation and tissue remodeling at concentrations similar to that in rat heart slices. - Highlights: Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury evaluated in heart slices. Isoproterenol altered apoptosis, energy, inflammation and remodeling pathways. Human model verified by comparison to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Human and rat respond to isoproterenol at similar concentrations in vitro.

Herrmann, Julia E.; Heale, Jason; Bieraugel, Mike; Ramos, Meg [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States); Fisher, Robyn L. [Vitron Inc., Tucson, AZ (United States); Vickers, Alison E.M., E-mail: vickers_alison@allergan.com [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Yahoo! Health News: Rat Whiskers Give Clues to Blinking Disorder Yahoo! My Yahoo! Mail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yahoo! Health News: Rat Whiskers Give Clues to Blinking Disorder Yahoo! My Yahoo! Mail Search · Encyclopedia A-Z · Health News via RSS · Recipes HealthDay All HealthDay News Rat Whiskers Give Clues, Feb. 2 (HealthDayNews) -- A rat's whiskers may hold vital clues to a debilitating human disorder

Kleinfeld, David

449

Health Primers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE proverb that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing is especially true in regard to matters connected with ... thing is especially true in regard to matters connected with health, and it might therefore be supposed that the issue of a series of ...

T. L. B.

1879-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

450

MiR-145 regulates PAK4 via the MAPK pathway and exhibits an antitumor effect in human colon cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-145 targets a putative binding site in the 3 Prime UTR of PAK4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-145 played an important role in inhibiting cell growth by directly targeting PAK4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-145 may function as tumor suppressors. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are regulators of numerous cellular events; accumulating evidence indicates that miRNAs play a key role in a wide range of biological functions, such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in cancer. Down-regulated expression of miR-145 has been reported in colon cancer tissues and cell lines. The molecular mechanisms underlying miR-145 and the regulation of colon carcinogenesis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the levels of miR-145 in human colon cancer cells using qRT-PCR and found markedly decreased levels compared to normal epithelial cells. We identified PAK4 as a novel target of miR-145 using informatics screening. Additionally, we demonstrated that miR-145 targets a putative binding site in the 3 Prime UTR of PAK4 and that its abundance is inversely associated with miR-145 expression in colon cancer cells; we confirmed this relationship using the luciferase reporter assay. Furthermore, restoration of miR-145 by mimics in SW620 cells significantly attenuated cell growth in vitro, in accordance with the inhibitory effects induced by siRNA mediated knockdown of PAK4. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that miR-145 downregulates P-ERK expression by targeting PAK4 and leads to inhibition of tumor growth.

Wang, Zhigang [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai (China)] [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Xiaoping [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine (China)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine (China); Yang, Zhili; Du, Hangxiang; Wu, Zhenqian; Gong, Jianfeng; Yan, Jun [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai (China)] [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zheng, Qi, E-mail: zhengqi1957@yahoo.com.cn [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai (China)] [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai (China)

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

451

Human viruses: discovery and emergence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...whether or not it poses a risk to humans, would be...will pose a serious risk to public health but...situation will require both political will and considerable investment in infrastructure...Woolhouse, M. E. J. 2001 Risk factors for human disease...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Can you recognize victims of human trafficking among the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

health provider, you can help liberate victims of human trafficking. Health Problems Common in Victims because they are often forced to live and work in dangerous conditions, putting them at greater risk for, phobias and panic attacks Preventive health care for victims of human trafficking is virtually non

Kay, Mark A.

453

Nanoparticles, human health hazard and regulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...testing is necessary before they enter the market. Whether this situation continues remains...the materials being developed for the market. Both are complex, and some of the issues...241-247. Lucking, A. J. , 2008 Diesel exhaust inhalation increases thrombus...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Communities: Human Health and Community Development Webinar ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

goals of strengthening our economy, creating good jobs now while providing a foundation for lasting prosperity, using energy more efficiently to secure energy independence,...

455

Medi, Human Robot Interaction in Pediatric Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Social Robots. ACM Classification Keywords H.5.m. Information interfaces and presentation (e.g., HCI

Greenberg, Saul

456

Seafood Safety and Human Health Implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current projections for the twenty-first century show that global warming will accelerate, with stronger storms, extreme precipitation, dry spells and rising sea levels as the primary symptoms. Such changes will ...

Antnio Marques; Rui Rosa; Maria Leonor Nunes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Western Human Resources Occupational Health and Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wavelength (nm) Power/Energy Open Enclosed Embedded Note: For each laser/laser system, a Laser Beam. Training/Experience Regarding Lasers/Laser Systems and Western Laser Safety Training Date of the Applicant or Contact Person before operating lasers/laser systems. 3 Western Laser workers who will use an open laser

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

458

First Evaluation of the Biologic Effectiveness Factors of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in a Human Colon Carcinoma Cell Line  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: DNA lesions produced by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and those produced by gamma radiation in a colon carcinoma cell line were analyzed. We have also derived the relative biologic effectiveness factor (RBE) of the neutron beam of the RA-3- Argentine nuclear reactor, and the compound biologic effectiveness (CBE) values for p-boronophenylalanine ({sup 10}BPA) and for 2,4-bis ({alpha},{beta}-dihydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX ({sup 10}BOPP). Methods and Materials: Exponentially growing human colon carcinoma cells (ARO81-1) were distributed into the following groups: (1) BPA (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (2) BOPP (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (3) neutrons alone, and (4) gamma rays ({sup 60}Co source at 1 Gy/min dose-rate). Different irradiation times were used to obtain total absorbed doses between 0.3 and 5 Gy ({+-}10%) (thermal neutrons flux = 7.5 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} sec). Results: The frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells and the number of micronuclei per micronucleated binucleated cells showed a dose-dependent increase until approximately 2 Gy. The response to gamma rays was significantly lower than the response to the other treatments (p < 0.05). The irradiations with neutrons alone and neutrons + BOPP showed curves that did not differ significantly from, and showed less DNA damage than, irradiation with neutrons + BPA. A decrease in the surviving fraction measured by 3-(4,5-dimetiltiazol-2-il)-2,5-difeniltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay as a function of the absorbed dose was observed for all the treatments. The RBE and CBE factors calculated from cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) and MTT assays were, respectively, the following: beam RBE: 4.4 {+-} 1.1 and 2.4 {+-} 0.6; CBE for BOPP: 8.0 {+-} 2.2 and 2.0 {+-} 1; CBE for BPA: 19.6 {+-} 3.7 and 3.5 {+-} 1.3. Conclusions: BNCT and gamma irradiations showed different genotoxic patterns. To our knowledge, these values represent the first experimental ones obtained for the RA-3 in a biologic model and could be useful for future experimental studies for the application of BNCT to colon carcinoma.

Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra, E-mail: dagrosa@cnea.gov.a [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); National Research Council (Argentina); Crivello, Martin [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires(Argentina); Perona, Marina [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); National Research Council (Argentina); Thorp, Silvia; Santa Cruz, Gustavo Alberto [Department of Instrumentation and Control, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pozzi, Emiliano [Argentina Reactor, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Casal, Mariana [Institute of Oncology 'Angel H. Roffo', University of Buenos Aires (Argentina); Thomasz, Lisa; Cabrini, Romulo [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kahl, Steven [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Juvenal, Guillermo Juan [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); National Research Council (Argentina); Pisarev, Mario Alberto [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); National Research Council (Argentina); Department of Human Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Health and Health Care, Macroeconomics of  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Macroeconomics can have a measurable impact on health and health care. The aim of this article is to introduce the macroeconomics of health and health care. The article will outline the core features and terms related to macroeconomics, as distinct from microeconomics, and then give an overview of the relationship between the macroeconomy and health and health care. It will thus consider, for example, the relationship between health care expenditure and national income, and provide an overview of the routes through which greater macroeconomic integration at the global level may impact on health and health care via international trade.

R. Smith

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Status of health and environmental research relative to direct coal liquefaction: 1976 to the present  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the status of health and environmental research efforts, supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to assist in the development of environmentally acceptable coal liquefaction processes. Four major direct coal liquefaction processes are currently in (or have been investigated at) the pilot plant stage of development. Two solvent refined coal processes (SRC-I and -II), H-coal (a catalytic liquefaction process) and Exxon donor solvent (EDS). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was assigned responsibility for evaluating SRC process materials and prepared comprehensive health and environmental effects research program plans for SRC-I and -II. A similar program plan was prepared for H-coal process materials by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A program has been developed for EDS process materials by Exxon Research and Engineering Co. The program includes short-term screening of coal-derived materials for potential health and ecological effects. Longer-term assays are used to evaluate materials considered most representative of potential commercial practice and with greatest potential for human exposure or release to the environment. Effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential health and ecological effects are also being evaluated. These assessments are being conducted to assist in formulating cost-effective environmental research programs and to estimate health and environmental risks associated with a large-scale coal liquefaction industry. Significant results of DOE's health and environmental research efforts relative to coal liquefaction include the following: chemical characterization, health effects, ecological fate and effects, amelioration and risk assessment.

Gray, R.H.; Cowser, K.E. (eds.)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The challenges of exposure assessment in health studies of Gulf War veterans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...veterans with health outcomes in military...as pesticide or depleted uranium (DU) exposure...preventing ill health arising from war...2004Health effects of depleted uranium on exposed Gulf...Toxicol. Environ. Health A. 67, 277-296...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

today. In politics, in education, in health care, in society in general we are so turned inwardCollege of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection April/May 2010 Volume VIII (8) WOW! Spring semester of 2010 is almost

Barrash, Warren

463

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection April 2011 Volume IX (4) The end of the spring semester is quickly approaching accreditation review. Similarly, the Environmental and Occupational Health program also had a very positive

Barrash, Warren

464

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, College of Health Sciences. · "Innovative Ways to Address Idaho's Healthcare Needs: Long-Term CareCollege of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection February 2011 Volume IX (3) Since the last COHS newsletter, the faculty

Barrash, Warren

465

Students' Health Service Hampton House Health Centre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.bristol.ac.uk/infectious-diseases/meningitis www.bristol.ac.uk/infectious-diseases/mumps www.bristol.ac.uk/infectious-diseases/measles. Health care / Health care Student support Health care Registering with a doctor It is important that you register' Health Service The Students' Health Service (SHS) offers full general practice care, including: ·travel

Bristol, University of

466

Public Health Conferences GENERAL PUBLIC HEALTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Health Conferences GENERAL PUBLIC HEALTH Michigan's Premier Public Health Conference.sph.umich.edu/scr/news_events/event.cfm?ID=2631 American Public Health Association (APHA) 140th Annual Meeting & Exposition: October 27-31, 2012 in San Francisco, CA o http://www.apha.org/meetings/AnnualMeeting/ Global Health & Innovation 2013

Kamat, Vineet R.

467

Health Research National Institute for Health Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Embedding Health Research National Institute for Health Research Annual Report 2009/10 #12;Contents National Institute for Health Research Annual Report 2009/10 1 Foreword 2 The National Institute for Health to the NHS 40 Section 4: Strengthening health policy 54 Section 5: Changing NHS practice 64 Financial summary

Diggle, Peter J.

468

Data Smoothing: Prediction of Human Behavior, Detection of Behavioral Patterns, and Monitoring Treatment Effectiveness in Single-Subject Behavioral Studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data-smoothing can be particularly useful in predicting human ... literature, the use of moving-average and exponential data-smoothing aided the detection of the unique behavioral ... treatments....

Georgios D. Sideridis

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Targeted and Nontargeted Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on Delayed Genomic Instability in Human Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...humans receive some radiation exposure, mostly...risks associated with radiation exposure come from populations exposed to ionizing radiation, primarily from epidemiologic...However, those doses, in the range of 0.2 to 2.5...

Lei Huang; Perry M. Kim; Jac A. Nickoloff; and William F. Morgan

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Effects of oncogenic Ras and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase on the adhesion of normal human cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Activating mutations in RAS oncogenes commonly arise in human cancers. However, in experimental settings, oncogenic RAS has most often been studied at supraphysiological levels of expression. Importantly, work by others ...

Waldman, Lynne K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

counselling health promotion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

health and counselling services health promotion 10 Ways to get active Most people find that huff and puff stuff a few times a week and make it last for 15 minutes or more each time. students.sfu.ca/health counselling health promotion physiotherapy health clinic #12;health and counselling services health promotion

472

Exposure information in environmental health research: Current opportunities and future directions for particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

urban analysis of air pollution health effects, remainsderived from community air pollution health studies. Recentused to link them, in air pollution health studies including

McKone, Thomas E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

An Analysis of the health impacts from PM and NOx emissions resulting from train operations in the Alameda Corridor, CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5. Ballester, F. Air Pollution and Health: An Overview WithAir Pollution and Mortality, Special Report, Health Effectsrespiratory Health Effects of Air Pollution on Children with

Sangkapichai, Mana; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M; Ogunseitan, Oladele; Ritchie, Stephen G.; You, Soyoung Iris; Lee, Gunwoo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

The Health Component of Head Start: Potential Impacts on Childhood Obesity, Immunizations, and Dental Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Head Start, an early intervention program administered by the Administration for Children and Families of the Department of Health and Human Services, offers children of low-income families comprehensive services in an effort to even the playing...

Banda, Tanya Y.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

475

CERTIFICATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDER FOR EMPLOYEE'S PREGNANCY DISABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CERTIFICATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDER FOR EMPLOYEE'S PREGNANCY DISABILITY HUMAN RESOURCES Employee this form to your medical provider. Section II must be fully completed by the health care provider Department/College name: Campus Phone: I authorize my health care provider to complete this form and provide

Eirinaki, Magdalini

476

ORISE: Health Literacy Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Literacy Development While health disparities may be attributed to a number of factors, health literacy development and access to health information can help special populations...

477

Mental health in schools and public health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corporation; 1989. Public Health Reports / MayJune 2006 /comes in part from the Of?ce of Adolescent Health, Maternaland Child Health Bureau (Title V, Social Security Act),

Adelman, Howard S; Taylor, Linda

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Optimization of automation: I. Estimation method of cognitive automation rates reflecting the effects of automation on human operators in nuclear power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Since automation was introduced in various industrial fields, the concept of the automation rate has been used to indicate the inclusion proportion of automation among all work processes or facilities. Expressions of the inclusion proportion of automation are predictable, as is the ability to express the degree of the enhancement of human performance. However, many researchers have found that a high automation rate does not guarantee high performance. Therefore, to reflect the effects of automation on human performance, this paper proposes a new estimation method of the automation rate that considers the effects of automation on human operators in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Automation in \\{NPPs\\} can be divided into two types: system automation and cognitive automation. Some general descriptions and characteristics of each type of automation are provided, and the advantages of automation are investigated. The advantages of each type of automation are used as measures of the estimation method of the automation rate. One advantage was found to be a reduction in the number of tasks, and another was a reduction in human cognitive task loads. The system and the cognitive automation rate were proposed as quantitative measures by taking advantage of the aforementioned benefits. To quantify the required human cognitive task loads and thus suggest the cognitive automation rate, Conants information-theory-based model was applied. The validity of the suggested method, especially as regards the cognitive automation rate, was proven by conducting experiments. The result showed that a decreased rate of the operator working time was significantly related to the cognitive automation rate and that the calculation of the cognitive task load was useful as a measure of the cognitive automation rate.

Seung Min Lee; Jong Hyun Kim; Poong Hyun Seong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Virtual Health Square: a new Health Promotion Setting?.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Health Square is a new health promotion setting in Sweden. Health Squares are meeting places for health; offering activities such as information on health management, (more)

Mahmud, Amina; Olander, Ewy; Haglund, Bo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Health assessment for Bunker Hill Mining and Metallurgical Complex, Kellogg, Shoshone County, Idaho, Region 10. CERCLIS No. IDD048340921. Addenda. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bunker Hill site is listed, by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), on the National Priorities List (NPL). The 21 square-mile site includes the Bunker Hill mining and smelting complexes and the communities of Pinehurst, Page, Smelterville, Kellog, and Wardner, Idaho. Mining and smelting operations have occurred in the area (Silver Valley) since the 1880's. The Bunker Hill smelter discontinued operation in 1982. The former milling and smelting operation at the Bunker Hill Complex has left behind contaminated soils and deposits of slag, mine tailings, and other process residuals. Based upon the information reviewed, ATSDR has concluded that this site is of public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the probable human exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. Human exposure to heavy metals is probably occurring via ingestion, dermal, or inhalation exposure to contaminated surface soils, mine wastes and tailings, surface waters, or contaminated foodstuffs.

Not Available

1989-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Comparison of the Effects of Carbon Ion and Photon Irradiation on the Angiogenic Response in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiotherapy resistance is a commonly encountered problem in cancer treatment. In this regard, stabilization of endothelial cells and release of angiogenic factors by cancer cells contribute to this problem. In this study, we used human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells to compare the effects of carbon ion and X-ray irradiation on the cells' angiogenic response. Methods and Materials: A549 cells were irradiated with biologically equivalent doses for cell survival of either carbon ions (linear energy transfer, 170 keV/{mu}m; energy of 9.8 MeV/u on target) or X-rays and injected with basement membrane matrix into BALB/c nu/nu mice to generate a plug, allowing quantification of angiogenesis by blood vessel enumeration. The expression of angiogenic factors (VEGF, PlGF, SDF-1, and SCF) was assessed at the mRNA and secreted protein levels by using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Signal transduction mediated by stem cell factor (SCF) was assessed by phosphorylation of its receptor c-Kit. For inhibition of SCF/c-Kit signaling, a specific SCF/c-Kit inhibitor (ISCK03) was used. Results: Irradiation of A549 cells with X-rays (6 Gy) but not carbon ions (2 Gy) resulted in a significant increase in blood vessel density (control, 20.71 {+-} 1.55; X-ray, 36.44 {+-} 3.44; carbon ion, 16.33 {+-} 1.03; number per microscopic field). Concordantly, irradiation with X-rays but not with carbon ions increased the expression of SCF and subsequently caused phosphorylation of c-Kit in endothelial cells. ISCK03 treatment of A549 cells irradiated with X-rays (6 Gy) resulted in a significant decrease in blood vessel density (X-ray, 36.44 {+-} 3.44; X-ray and ISCK03, 4.33 {+-} 0.71; number of microscopic field). These data indicate that irradiation of A549 cells with X-rays but not with carbon ions promotes angiogenesis. Conclusions: The present study provides evidence that SCF is an X-ray-induced mediator of angiogenesis in A549 cells, a phenomenon that could not be observed with carbon ion irradiation. Thus, in this model system evaluating angiogenesis, carbon ion irradiation may have a therapeutic advantage. This observation should be confirmed in orthotopic lung tumor models.

Kamlah, Florentine, E-mail: Kamlah@staff.uni-marburg.de [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Haenze, Joerg [Department of Urology and Pediatric Urology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Arenz, Andrea [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Seay, Ulrike; Hasan, Diya [Department of Internal Medicine II/V, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen (Germany); Juricko, Janko; Bischoff, Birgit [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Gottschald, Oana R. [Department of Internal Medicine II/V, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen (Germany); Fournier, Claudia; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Scholz, Michael [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Seeger, Werner [Department of Internal Medicine II/V, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Department of Radiotherapy, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen (Germany); Rose, Frank [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Somatomedin-C Receptors and Growth Effects in Human Breast Cells Maintained in Long-Term Tissue Culture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and the maximum biological effect (as measured by [3H]thymidine...pronounced, but maximum biological effect occurred at less than 50...occupancy. Such a relation ship between receptor occupancy and biological effect has been observed in other...

Richard W. Furlanetto and Joseph N. DiCarlo

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Department of Occupational Health and Safety Revised December 2009 #12;Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Management System 1. Introduction.............................................................................................................. 3 2.2 Management of Health and Safety

484

Fact Sheet HEALTH SCIENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Long Term Care Administrator · Training Coordinator · Clinical Health Education Specialist · Health Media Director · Long Term Care Facilities Manager Fact Sheet HEALTH SCIENCE Highlights · Health Science

Su, Xiao

485

Transforming Health Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transforming Health Research the first two years National Institute for Health Research Progress For Information R OCR R ef: 0 Gateway R ef: 9298 Title Transforming Health Research the first two years. Health Institute for Health Research Progress Report i Transforming Health Research the first two years National

Diggle, Peter J.

486

Global Health Seminar Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in global health: The challenges of investing in health and universal health coverage Although targets can help to focus global health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in global health

Klein, Ophir

487

Health benefits of particle filtration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Health benefits of particle filtration Health benefits of particle filtration Title Health benefits of particle filtration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Fisk, William J. Journal Indoor Air Date Published 02/12/2013 Abstract The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7% to 25%. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

488

Synergistic Effect of 4-Hydroperoxycyclophosphamide and Etoposide on a Human Promyelocytic Leukemia Cell Line (HL-60) Demonstrated by Computer Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effect is indicated. Interaction of effects of these 2 drugs is quanti tatively...dose that is required to produce x% effect. The relation ship between D and x% can be determined by the median-effect plot parameters, m, Dm, and Equation...

T. T. Chang; S. C. Gulati; T-C. Chou; R. Vega; L. Gandola; S. M. Ezzat Ibrahim; J. Yopp; M. Colvin; and B. D. Clarkson

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection December 2009 January 2010 Volume VIII (5) Moving from the Superficial the superficial level so that the result is the formation of deep relationships, caring, compassion, justice, love

Barrash, Warren

490

Center for Health & Counseling Services Health Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College How is West Nile diagnosed? If a health care provider suspects WNV, samples of the patient's bloodCenter for Health & Counseling Services Health Services 505 Ramapo Valley Road, Mahwah, NJ 07430 Nile Virus outbreak is the biggest since the virus was first identified in the United States, health

Rainforth, Emma C.

491

Macroeconomics and Health: Investing in Health for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macroeconomics and Health: Investing in Health for Economic Development #12;Information concerning be obtained from: World Health Organization Marketing and Dissemination 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland tel: (41 clear and strong on the central task of raising the health of the poor. I can be `realistic

492

UNIVERSITY HEALTH CENTER UGA OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY HEALTH CENTER UGA OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH APPROVAL FOR PHYSICAL EXAMS, EYE EXAMS, LAB WORK No Faculty/Staff: Yes No UGA Employment: Full-Time Part-Time New to Occupational Health Program? Yes No E: Release of Information: I authorize the University Health Center ("UHC") at The University of Georgia

Arnold, Jonathan

493

Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5th Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health Hosted by The Stanford WSDM* Center May 21;3 Welcome to the 5th Annual Women's Health Forum - hosted by the Stanford WSDM Center, also known as the Stanford Center for Health Research on Women and Sex Differences in Medicine. The Stanford WSDM Center

Kay, Mark A.

494

Students' Health Service Hampton House Health Centre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.ac.uk/infectious-diseases. Health care / Student support Other NHS services NHS 111 NHS 111 is a telephone service, giving in an emergency. Student support / Health care Student support Health care Registering with a doctor practice care, including: · travel immunisation and advice · contraceptive advice · sexual health testing

Bristol, University of

495

Health Benefits of Particle Filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

Fisk, William J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Health and Health Care, Need for  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this article the authors critically examine what it means to be in need of either health or health care. The authors start by considering different definitions of health and reasons for valuing health. In light of their answers to these questions the authors consider the notion of a baseline of health against which health need should be measured, and suggest that this baseline should be specified in terms of a sufficient rather than a maximally attainable level of health achievement. The authors then look at three different concepts of health care need and how needs would be ranked for the purpose of health care rationing on each of these three conceptions. It is concluded that distribution according to need names a general approach to health policy rather than a specific principle of distribution.

G. Wester; J. Wolff

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

The Association Between Exposure to Traffic-Related Air Pollution During Pregnancy and Children's Health Outcomes in the San Joaquin Valley of California: An Example of Causal Inference Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boston, MA, Health Effects Institute. Hernan, M. A. (I refer you to the Health Effects Institute Monograph on

Padula, Amy Michelle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Effect of residence on mothers health care seeking behavior for common childhood illness in Northwest Ethiopia: a community based comparative cross sectional study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Children are at higher risk of acquiring infections and developing severe disease. This study assessed the health care seeking behavior and associated factors of urban and rural mothers for common childhood il...

Yalemzewod Assefa Gelaw; Gashaw Andargie Biks; Kefyalew Addis Alene

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Design and evaluation of a quasi-passive robotic knee brace : on the effects of parallel elasticity on human running  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While the effects of series compliance on running biomechanics are documented, the effects of parallel compliance are known only for the simpler case of hopping. As many practical exoskeleton and orthosis designs act in ...

Elliott, Grant (Grant Andrew)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

SURGICAL HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY | UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN Spring 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURGICAL HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY | UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN Spring 2014 Journal, COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING Department of Surgery University of Saskatchewan COVER PAGE Primal (96" x 60 Humanities Program Department of Surgery University of Saskatchewan Health Sciences Building 107 Wiggins Road

Peak, Derek