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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

The human genome project  

SciTech Connect

The Human Genome Project will obtain high-resolution genetic and physical maps of each human chromosome and, somewhat later, of the complete nucleotide sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a human cell. The talk will begin with an extended introduction to explain the Project to nonbiologists and to show that map construction and sequence determination require extensive computation in order to determine the correct order of the mapped entities and to provide estimates of uncertainty. Computational analysis of the sequence data will become an increasingly important part of the project, and some computational challenges are described. 5 refs.

Bell, G.I.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Justice and the Human Genome Project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Justice and the Human Genome Project is a concise book, easily read on a late night or weekend. It will be of interest to all medical practitioners who care for patients who require genetic testing. In a broader sense, the issues of social equity and individual liberties are relevant to everyone. For... Justice and the Human Genome Project is a collection of essays based on presentations at a conference with the same title sponsored by the Department of Energy and the University of Illinois at Chicago in November 1991. The Ethical, Legal, and Social ...

Lee G.

1995-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

3

Justice and the Human Genome Project  

SciTech Connect

Most of the essays gathered in this volume were first presented at a conference, Justice and the Human Genome, in Chicago in early November, 1991. The goal of the, conference was to consider questions of justice as they are and will be raised by the Human Genome Project. To achieve its goal of identifying and elucidating the challenges of justice inherent in genomic research and its social applications the conference drew together in one forum members from academia, medicine, and industry with interests divergent as rate-setting for insurance, the care of newborns, and the history of ethics. The essays in this volume address a number of theoretical and practical concerns relative to the meaning of genomic research.

Murphy, T.F.; Lappe, M. [eds.] [eds.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Justice and the Human Genome Project  

SciTech Connect

Most of the essays gathered in this volume were first presented at a conference, Justice and the Human Genome, in Chicago in early November, 1991. The goal of the, conference was to consider questions of justice as they are and will be raised by the Human Genome Project. To achieve its goal of identifying and elucidating the challenges of justice inherent in genomic research and its social applications the conference drew together in one forum members from academia, medicine, and industry with interests divergent as rate-setting for insurance, the care of newborns, and the history of ethics. The essays in this volume address a number of theoretical and practical concerns relative to the meaning of genomic research.

Murphy, T.F.; Lappe, M. (eds.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Facilitating Transformations in a Human Genome Project Database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facilitating Transformations in a Human Genome Project Database S. B. Davidson, A. S. Kosky Dept: Susan B. Davidson, Phone (215) 898-3490, Fax (215) 898-0587 Abstract Human Genome Project databases common to laboratory notebook databases, within the Human Genome Project as well as within the broader

Pennsylvania, University of

6

Facilitating Transformations in a Human Genome Project Database *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facilitating Transformations in a Human Genome Project Database * S. B. Davidson, A. S. Kosky B common to laboratory notebook databases, within the Human Genome Project as well as within the broader and constraints. The goal of the Human Genome Project (HGP) is to sequence the 24 distiuct chromosomes comprising

Madiraju, Praveen

7

The Human Genome Project, a 13-year international collaborative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Human Genome Project, a 13- year international collaborative effort, reached a major milestone in April 2003 with the release of the first reference sequence for the human genome. This finished sequence access by the research community to the most com- plete genome draft. Now, the finished refer- ence human

Levin, Judith G.

8

To Know Ourselves: The U.S. Department of Energy and The Human Genome Project  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The Genome Project and its various aspects: why the DOE?; introducing the human genome; exploring the genomic landscape; beyond biology; and ethical, legal, and social implications.

1996-07-00T23:59:59.000Z

9

The human genome project has revealed the DNA sequence that governs all biological processes in humans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The human genome project has revealed the DNA sequence that governs all biological processes step in the process of characterizing the human genome is the identification of genes. This prob- lem IN THE HUMAN GENOME We have been mapping transcribed regions using genomic tiling arrays. Tiling arrays enable

Gerstein, Mark

10

Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This document provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

Cooper, N. G.; Shea, N. [eds.

1992-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

11

The Human Genome From human genome to other  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

genome to health Structural Genomics initiative #12;What is the Human Genome Project? · U.S. govtThe Human Genome Project From human genome to other genomes and to gene function June 2000 From that arise from genome research #12;The Human Genome Project Project began in 1990 as a $3 billion, 15-year

Linial, Michal

12

The successful completion of the Human Genome Project depended crucially on the integration of genetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The successful completion of the Human Genome Project depended crucially on the integration). As for genomics, large-scale genetic and physical interaction mapping projects release enormous amounts of raw, automated DNA sequencing6 . Genome assembly involved a multi-step procedure in which DNA fragments were

13

The resounding success of the Human Genome Project (HGP) is largely the result of early investments in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVIEWS The resounding success of the Human Genome Project (HGP) is largely the result of early and the rapid release of human genome sequence information. `COMM and prognostics, risk assessment and disease prevention. Here, we use the phrase`personal genome project

Church, George M.

14

The resounding success of the Human Genome Project (HGP) is largely the result of early investments in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVIEWS The resounding success of the Human Genome Project (HGP) is largely the result of early and the rapid release of human genome sequence information. and prognostics, risk assessment and disease prevention. Here, we use the phrase`personal genome project

Braslavsky, Ido

15

When the debate over whether to fund a human genome project flowered in the late 1980s, one of the scientific  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When the debate over whether to fund a human genome project flowered in the late 1980s, one with genotyping were rapidly swept aside, and the Human Genome Project was realized in a few years. Over the past approach to a genome project was molecular genetics as usual: first identify a region of the genome

Sinha, Himanshu

16

Entrepreneurial experiments in science policy: Analyzing the Human Genome Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We re-conceptualize the role of science policy makers, envisioning and illustrating their move from being simple investors in scientific projects to entrepreneurs who create the conditions for entrepreneurial experiments ...

Huang, Kenneth G.

17

Getting the Word Out on the Human Genome Project: A Course for Physicians  

SciTech Connect

Our project, ''Getting the Word Out on the Human Genome Project: A Course for Physicians,'' presented educational goals to convey the power and promise of the Human Genome Program to a variety of professional, educational, and public audiences. Our initial goal was to provide practicing physicians with a comprehensive multimedia tool to update their skills in the genomic era. We therefore created the multimedia courseware, ''The New Genetics: Courseware for Physicians. Molecular Concepts, Applications, and Ramifications.'' However, as the project moved forward, several unanticipated audiences found the courseware to be useful for instruction and for self-education, so an additional edition of the courseware ''The New Genetics: Medicine and the Human Genome. Molecular Concepts, Applications, and Ramifications'' was published simultaneously with the physician version. At the time that both versions of the courseware were being completed, Stanford's Office of Technology Licensing opted not to commercialize the courseware and offered a license-back agreement if the authors founded a commercial business. The authors thus became closely involved in marketing and sales, and several thousand copies of the courseware have been sold. Surprisingly, the non-physician version has turned out to be more in demand, and this has led us in several new directions, most of which involve undergraduate education. These are discussed in detail in the Report.

Sara L. Tobin

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

18

Shotgun coverage of human genome computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

take about 1.5 million pages. The Human Genome Project would not be possible if our revolution were-author collection of chapters on the various uses of computing in the Human Genome Project. Peculiarly absent fromShotgun coverage of human genome computing Human Genome Computing, Second Edition edited by Martin

Eddy, Sean

19

Human Genome Program  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Human Genome program has grown tremendously, as shown by the marked increase in the number of genome-funded projects since the last workshop held in 1991. The abstracts in this book describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors and invited guests, and all projects are represented at the workshop by posters. The 3-day meeting includes plenary sessions on ethical, legal, and social issues pertaining to the availability of genetic data; sequencing techniques, informatics support; and chromosome and cDNA mapping and sequencing.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Understanding our Genetic Inheritance: The U.S. Human Genome Project, The First Five Years FY 1991--1995  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The Human Genome Initiative is a worldwide research effort with the goal of analyzing the structure of human DNA and determining the location of the estimated 100,000 human genes. In parallel with this effort, the DNA of a set of model organisms will be studied to provide the comparative information necessary for understanding the functioning of the human genome. The information generated by the human genome project is expected to be the source book for biomedical science in the 21st century and will by of immense benefit to the field of medicine. It will help us to understand and eventually treat many of the more than 4000 genetic diseases that affect mankind, as well as the many multifactorial diseases in which genetic predisposition plays an important role. A centrally coordinated project focused on specific objectives is believed to be the most efficient and least expensive way of obtaining this information. The basic data produced will be collected in electronic databases that will make the information readily accessible on convenient form to all who need it. This report describes the plans for the U.S. human genome project and updates those originally prepared by the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) and the National Research Council (NRC) in 1988. In the intervening two years, improvements in technology for almost every aspect of genomics research have taken place. As a result, more specific goals can now be set for the project.

1990-04-00T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

GDB - Human Genome Database final report  

SciTech Connect

This is the DOE final report for the GDB, Human Genome Database, project at the Johns Hopkins University.

Talbot, C. Conover, Jr.

2002-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

22

A Possible Genome To Architecture Project (GenToA) [The Meta-Genome Project?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concern about the Human Genome project, comparing it with buying a book written in a language nobodyA Possible Genome To Architecture Project (GenToA) [The Meta-Genome Project?] Installed: 2 Aug 2010 can a genome specify an information-processing architecture that grows itself guided by interaction

Sloman, Aaron

23

The human genome project and novel aspects of cytochrome P450 research  

SciTech Connect

Currently, 57 active cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes and 58 pseudogenes are known to be present in the human genome. Among the genes discovered by initiatives in the human genome project are CYP2R1, CYP2W1, CYP2S1, CYP2U1 and CYP3A43, the latter apparently encoding a pseudoenzyme. The function, polymorphism and regulation of these genes are still to be discovered to a great extent. The polymorphism of drug metabolizing CYPs is extensive and influences the outcome of drug therapy causing lack of response or adverse drug reactions. The basis for the differences in the global distribution of the polymorphic variants is inactivating gene mutations and subsequent genetic drift. However, polymorphic alleles carrying multiple active gene copies also exist and are suggested in case of CYP2D6 to be caused by positive selection due to development of alkaloid resistance in North East Africa about 10,000-5000 BC. The knowledge about the CYP genes and their polymorphisms is of fundamental importance for effective drug therapy and for drug development as well as for understanding metabolic activation of carcinogens and other xenobiotics. Here, a short review of the current knowledge is given.

Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus [Division of Molecular Toxicology, IMM, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: maging@ki.se

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Annotating individual human genomes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in DNA sequencing technologies have made it possible to rapidly, accurately and affordably sequence entire individual human genomes. As impressive as this ability seems, however, it will not likely amount to much if one cannot extract meaningful information from individual sequence data. Annotating variations within individual genomes and providing information about their biological or phenotypic impact will thus be crucially important in moving individual sequencing projects forward, especially in the context of the clinical use of sequence information. In this paper we consider the various ways in which one might annotate individual sequence variations and point out limitations in the available methods for doing so. It is arguable that, in the foreseeable future, DNA sequencing of individual genomes will become routine for clinical, research, forensic, and personal purposes. We therefore also consider directions and areas for further research in annotating genomic variants.

Ali Torkamani; Ashley A. Scott-Van Zeeland; Eric J. Topol; Nicholas J. Schork

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Human genome. 1993 Program report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to update the Human Genome 1991-92 Program Report and provide new information on the DOE genome program to researchers, program managers, other government agencies, and the interested public. This FY 1993 supplement includes abstracts of 60 new or renewed projects and listings of 112 continuing and 28 completed projects. These two reports, taken together, present the most complete published view of the DOE Human Genome Program through FY 1993. Research is progressing rapidly toward 15-year goals of mapping and sequencing the DNA of each of the 24 different human chromosomes.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

SCIENCE, POLITICS. AND THE HUMAN GENOM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/ Robert Cook-Deegan. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references. 1. Human Genome Project. 2. Human geneSCIENCE, POLITICS. AND THE HUMAN GENOM A scrupulous . . . narrative of the genesis and opening- DEEGAN #12;#12;#12;#12;The GENE WARS Science, Politics, and theHuman Genome ROBERT COOK-DEEGAN W - W

Richardson, David

27

ELSI Bibliography: Ethical, legal and social implications of the Human Genome Project. 1994 Supplement  

SciTech Connect

This report updates and expands the second edition of the ELSI Bibliography, published in 1993. The Bibliography and Supplement provides a comprehensive resource for identifying publications on the major topics related to the ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. The Bibliography and Supplement are extracted from a database compiled at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the support of the Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy. The second edition of the ELSI Bibliography was dated May 1993 but included publications added to the database until fall 1993. This Supplement reflects approximately 1,000 entries added to the database during the past year, bringing the total to approximately 7,000 entries. More than half of the new entries were published in the last year, and the remainder are earlier publications not previously included in the database. Most of the new entries were published in the academic and professional literature. The remainder are press reports from newspapers of record and scientific journals. The topical listing of the second edition has been followed in the Supplement, with a few changes. The topics of Cystic Fibrosis, Huntington`s Disease, and Sickle Cell Anemia have been combined in a single topic, Disorders. Also, all the entries published in the past year are included in a new topic, Publications: September 1993--September 1994, which provides a comprehensive view of recent reporting and commentary on the science and ELSI of genetics.

Yesley, M.S.; Ossorio, P.N. [comps.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Resources with Additional Information Charles DeLisi As head of DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research, Charles DeLisi played a pivotal role in proposing and initiating the Human Genome Program in 1986. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has historically been active in supporting human genome research. On September 10, 2003, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham presented the Secretary's Gold Award to Aristides Patrinos and Francis Collins for their leadership of the government's Human Genome Project. At DOE's Office of Science, Dr. Patrinos is the Associate Director for Biological and Environmental Research. He has been a researcher at the department's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory.

29

Genomics of human longevity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the original work is properly cited. Genomics of human longevity P. E. Slagboom 1...progress. human longevity|longevity genomics|epigenetics and ageing| 1. Introduction...Innovation Oriented Research Programme on Genomics (SenterNovem; IGE01014 and IGE5007...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Assembly and Analysis of Extended Human Genomic Contig Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@ibc.wustl.edu; states@ibc.wustl.edu Abstract The Human Genome Project (HGP) has led to the deposit of human genomic The U.S. Human Genome Project, coordinated by the United States Department of Energy (DOEAssembly and Analysis of Extended Human Genomic Contig Regions Eric C. Rouchka and David J. States

Rouchka, Eric

31

On the sequencing of the human genome Robert H. Waterston*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The international Human Ge- nome Project (HGP) used the hierarchical shotgun approach, whereas Celera Genomics. One was the product of the international Human Genome Project (HGP), and the other was the productOn the sequencing of the human genome Robert H. Waterston* , Eric S. Lander , and John E. Sulston

Batzoglou, Serafim

32

THE HUMAN GENOME & GENETIC DISEASES MED263: Bioinformatic Applications to Human Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

you will learn. History of the human genome project Structure and content of the human genome HapTHE HUMAN GENOME & GENETIC DISEASES MED263: Bioinformatic Applications to Human Disease #12;WhatMap project Categories of Human Disease: Monogenic (Single gene disorders) Multigenic (Complex disorders

Gleeson, Joseph G.

33

The Consensus Coding Sequence (Ccds) Project: Identifying a Common Protein-Coding Gene Set for the Human and Mouse Genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective use of the human and mouse genomes requires reliable identification of genes and their products. Although multiple public resources provide annotation, different methods are used that can result in similar but ...

Kellis, Manolis

34

History of the DOE Human Genome Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

History of the DOE Human Genome Program History of the DOE Human Genome Program The following history is taken from the U.S. Department of Energy 1991-91 Human Genome Program Report (June 1992). This is an archived item. A brief history of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Human Genome Program will be useful in a discussion of the objectives of the DOE program as well as those of the collaborative U.S. Human Genome Project. The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of DOE and its predecessor agencies--the Atomic Energy Commission and the Energy Research and Development Administration--have long sponsored research into genetics, both in microbial systems and in mammals, including basic studies on genome structure, replication, damage, and repair and the consequences of genetic

35

The rice genome project in?Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The rice genome project in Japan Takuji Sasaki Rice Genome Research Program, National...Kannondai 2-chome, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305, Japan Since 1991, the Rice Genome Research Program in Japan has carried out rice genomics, such as large-scale...

Takuji Sasaki

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Update on human genome completion and annotations: Protein information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Update on human genome completion and annotations: Protein information resource Cathy Wu1 The high-throughput genome projects have resulted in a rapid accumulation of genome sequences for a large-PSD, SwissProt and TrEMBL) proteins--organised into more than 36,290 PIR superfamilies, Human Genomics 95760

37

Human Genome Education Program  

SciTech Connect

The funds from the DOE Human Genome Program, for the project period 2/1/96 through 1/31/98, have provided major support for the curriculum development and field testing efforts for two high school level instructional units: Unit 1, ''Exploring Genetic Conditions: Genes, Culture and Choices''; and Unit 2, ''DNA Snapshots: Peaking at Your DNA''. In the original proposal, they requested DOE support for the partial salary and benefits of a Field Test Coordinator position to: (1) complete the field testing and revision of two high school curriculum units, and (2) initiate the education of teachers using these units. During the project period of this two-year DOE grant, a part-time Field-Test Coordinator was hired (Ms. Geraldine Horsma) and significant progress has been made in both of the original proposal objectives. Field testing for Unit 1 has occurred in over 12 schools (local and non-local sites with diverse student populations). Field testing for Unit 2 has occurred in over 15 schools (local and non-local sites) and will continue in 12-15 schools during the 96-97 school year. For both curricula, field-test sites and site teachers were selected for their interest in genetics education and in hands-on science education. Many of the site teachers had no previous experience with HGEP or the unit under development. Both of these first-year biology curriculum units, which contain genetics, biotechnology, societal, ethical and cultural issues related to HGP, are being implemented in many local and non-local schools (SF Bay Area, Southern California, Nebraska, Hawaii, and Texas) and in programs for teachers. These units will reach over 10,000 students in the SF Bay Area and continues to receive support from local corporate and private philanthropic organizations. Although HGEP unit development is nearing completion for both units, data is still being gathered and analyzed on unit effectiveness and student learning. The final field testing result from this analysis will contribute to the final revisions of each unit during the second-year of this grant.

Richard Myers; Lane Conn

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Prediction of Complete Gene Structures in Human Genomic DNA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and RNA splicing. On the other hand, with the recent shift in the emphasis of the Human Genome ProjectPrediction of Complete Gene Structures in Human Genomic DNA Chris Burge* and Samuel Karlin model of the gene structure of human genomic sequences which incorporates descriptions of the basic

Shatkay, Hagit

39

Update on the Maize Genome Sequencing Project The Maize Genome Sequencing Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Update on the Maize Genome Sequencing Project The Maize Genome Sequencing Project Vicki L. Chandler Genome Sequencing Project. The momentum for this endeavor has been building within the maize (Zea mays- sion. This Update reviews the project goals and the expected deliverables deriving from the two funded

Brendel, Volker

40

Using Aggregate Human Genome Data for Individual Identification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Aggregate Human Genome Data for Individual Identification Yue Wang, Xintao Wu, Xinghua Shi. For example, 1000 genome project [2] provides the public with free services like browsing and downloading DNA,x.shi}@uncc.edu Abstract--Data privacy in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) is a critical yet under-exploited research

Wu, Xintao

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Gene Map of the Human Genome  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sanger.ac.uk/ Stanford Human Genome Center http://www-shgc.stanford.edu/ Wellcome Trust Centre for Human...sanger.ac.ukl Stanford Human Genome Center http://www-shgc.stanford.edu/ Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics http...

G. D. Schuler; M. S. Boguski; E. A. Stewart; L. D. Stein; G. Gyapay; K. Rice; R. E. White; P. Rodriguez-Tomé; A. Aggarwal; E. Bajorek; S. Bentolila; B. B. Birren; A. Butler; A. B. Castle; N. Chiannilkulchai; A. Chu; C. Clee; S. Cowles; P. J. R. Day; T. Dibling; N. Drouot; I. Dunham; S. Duprat; C. East; C. Edwards; J.-B. Fan; N. Fang; C. Fizames; C. Garrett; L. Green; D. Hadley; M. Harris; P. Harrison; S. Brady; A. Hicks; E. Holloway; L. Hui; S. Hussain; C. Louis-Dit-Sully; J. Ma; A. MacGilvery; C. Mader; A. Maratukulam; T. C. Matise; K. B. McKusick; J. Morissette; A. Mungall; D. Muselet; H. C. Nusbaum; D. C. Page; A. Peck; S. Perkins; M. Piercy; F. Qin; J. Quackenbush; S. Ranby; T. Reif; S. Rozen; C. Sanders; X. She; J. Silva; D. K. Slonim; C. Soderlund; W.-L. Sun; P. Tabar; T. Thangarajah; N. Vega-Czarny; D. Vollrath; S. Voyticky; T. Wilmer; X. Wu; M. D. Adams; C. Auffray; N. A. R. Walter; R. Brandon; A. Dehejia; P. N. Goodfellow; R. Houlgatte; J. R. Hudson Jr.; S. E. Ide; K. R. Iorio; W. Y. Lee; N. Seki; T. Nagase; K. Ishikawa; N. Nomura; C. Phillips; M. H. Polymeropoulos; M. Sandusky; K. Schmitt; R. Berry; K. Swanson; R. Torres; J. C. Venter; J. M. Sikela; J. S. Beckmann; J. Weissenbach; R. M. Myers; D. R. Cox; M. R. James; D. Bentley; P. Deloukas; E. S. Lander; T. J. Hudson

1996-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

42

Course Information IB 364: Human Genome and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Course Information IB 364: Human Genome and Bioinformatics On this page: � Course Description � Technical Support Course Description Highlights advances in understanding the human genome, utilizing the human genome, applying bioinformatics to the genome, and realizing its potential to understand human

Kent, Angela

43

ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature09534 A map of human genome variation from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature09534 A map of human genome variation from population-scale sequencing The 1000 Genomes Project Consortium* The 1000 Genomes Project aims to provide a deep characterization of human genome sequence variation as a foundation for investigating the relationship between genotype

Abecasis, Goncalo

44

Sequence variations in the public human genome data reflect a bottlenecked population history  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Redundant coverage in overlaps of large-insert genomic clones, sequenced as part of the Human Genome ProjectSequence variations in the public human genome data reflect a bottlenecked population history Gabor-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) constitute the great ma- jority of variations in the human genome, and as heritable

Hahn, Mark E.

45

Lifeasweknowit To understand the human genome, researchers must spread their wings to all branches of life.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a worm to its ENCODE project, which aims to catalogue all the functional parts of the human genome is moving more forcefully into purely human genomics. The biggest new projects recently announcedLifeasweknowit To understand the human genome, researchers must spread their wings to all branches

Pratt, Vaughan

46

An integrated encyclopedia of DNA elements in the human genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The human genome encodes the blueprint of life, but the function of the vast majority of its nearly three billion bases is unknown. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has systematically mapped regions of ...

Altshuler, Robert Charles

47

Distinguishing protein-coding and noncoding genes in the human genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Although the Human Genome Project was completed 4 years ago, the catalog of human protein-coding genesDistinguishing protein-coding and noncoding genes in the human genome Michele Clamp* , Ben Fry An accurate catalog of the protein-coding genes encoded in the human genome is fundamental to the study

Kellis, Manolis

48

Genomic Comparisons of Humans and Chimpanzees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genomic Comparisons of Humans and Chimpanzees Ajit Varki1 and David L. Nelson2 1 Glycobiology to human evolution, development, and disease. Sequence differences from the human genome were confirmed in the sidebar Online Sources of Information Regarding the Chimpanzee Genome. At the outset, we also emphasize

49

Mapping Our Genes: The Genome Projects: How Big, How Fast  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

For the past 2 years, scientific and technical journals in biology and medicine have extensively covered a debate about whether and how to determine the function and order of human genes on human chromosomes and when to determine the sequence of molecular building blocks that comprise DNA in those chromosomes. In 1987, these issues rose to become part of the public agenda. The debate involves science, technology, and politics. Congress is responsible for ?writing the rules? of what various federal agencies do and for funding their work. This report surveys the points made so far in the debate, focusing on those that most directly influence the policy options facing the US Congress. Congressional interest focused on how to assess the rationales for conducting human genome projects, how to fund human genome projects (at what level and through which mechanisms), how to coordinate the scientific and technical programs of the several federal agencies and private interests already supporting various genome projects, and how to strike a balance regarding the impact of genome projects on international scientific cooperation and international economic competition in biotechnology. The Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) prepared this report with the assistance of several hundred experts throughout the world.

1988-04-00T23:59:59.000Z

50

Identification and analysis of functional elements in 1% of the human genome by the ENCODE pilot project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... project: G. Weinstock, M. Cherry, G. Churchill, M. Eisen, S. Elgin, J. Lis, J. Rine, M. Vidal and P. Zamore. Reprints and ...

2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Human Microbiome Project: A Community Resource for the Healthy Human Microbiome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Human Microbiome Project (HMP) [1],[2] is a concept that was long in the making. After the Human Genome Project, interest grew in sequencing the “other genome" of microbes carried in and on the human body [3],[4]. ...

Gevers, Dirk

52

Computational Approaches Towards Human Genome Annotation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational Approaches Towards Human Genome Annotation Mark Gerstein Molecular Biophysics of the human genome. My talk will be concerned with topics within this area, in particular annotating pseudogenes (protein fossils) in the genome. I will discuss a comprehensive pseudogene identification pipeline

Singh, Jaswinder Pal

53

RESEARCH Open Access Classification of human genomic regions based  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH Open Access Classification of human genomic regions based on experimentally determined by binding different classes of regulatory elements. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has overwhelmingly complex and simultaneously incomplete since it covers only a small fraction of all human

Nachman, Michael

54

HAGR: the Human Ageing Genomic Resources Joa~o Pedro de Magalha~es*, Joana Costa1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in several species. In the wake of the human genome, high-throughput projects in functional genomicsHAGR: the Human Ageing Genomic Resources Joa~o Pedro de Magalha~es*, Joana Costa1 and Olivier September 17, 2004 ABSTRACT The Human Ageing Genomic Resources (HAGR

de Magalhães, João Pedro

55

A worldwide survey of haplotype variation and linkage disequilibrium in the human genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from 52 populations in the Human Genome Diversity Project (HGDP)-Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme HumainA worldwide survey of haplotype variation and linkage disequilibrium in the human genome Donald F & Jonathan K Pritchard1 Recent genomic surveys have produced high-resolution haplotype information, but only

Jakobsson, Mattias

56

The Genome Database Organism-centered listing of available genomic sequence records and projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Genome Database Organism-centered listing of available genomic sequence records and projects http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome National Center for Biotechnology Information · National Library | NCBI Genome | Last Update August 19, 2013 Contact: info@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Scope Since 2011, the Genome

Levin, Judith G.

57

Human-mouse comparative genomics: successes and failures to reveal functional regions of the human genome  

SciTech Connect

Deciphering the genetic code embedded within the human genome remains a significant challenge despite the human genome consortium's recent success at defining its linear sequence (Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001). While useful strategies exist to identify a large percentage of protein encoding regions, efforts to accurately define functional sequences in the remaining {approx}97 percent of the genome lag. Our primary interest has been to utilize the evolutionary relationship and the universal nature of genomic sequence information in vertebrates to reveal functional elements in the human genome. This has been achieved through the combined use of vertebrate comparative genomics to pinpoint highly conserved sequences as candidates for biological activity and transgenic mouse studies to address the functionality of defined human DNA fragments. Accordingly, we describe strategies and insights into functional sequences in the human genome through the use of comparative genomics coupled wit h functional studies in the mouse.

Pennacchio, Len A.; Baroukh, Nadine; Rubin, Edward M.

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 296 12 APRIL 2002 261 A Human Genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

various laboratories by the Human Genome Diversity Project (HGDP) (3) and CEPH to provide unlimited.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 296 12 APRIL 2002 261 A Human Genome Diversity Cell Line Panel A RESOURCE OF 1064 CULTURED supplies of DNA for studies of sequence diversity and history of modern human populations. Information

Kidd, Kenneth

59

Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome International Human Genome Sequencing. ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ The human genome holds an extraordinary trove of information about human development, physiology, medicine a draft sequence of the human genome. We also present an initial analysis of the data, describing some

Eddy, Sean

60

Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

Pennacchio, Len A.

2003-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

nGASP - the nematode genome annotation assessment project  

SciTech Connect

While the C. elegans genome is extensively annotated, relatively little information is available for other Caenorhabditis species. The nematode genome annotation assessment project (nGASP) was launched to objectively assess the accuracy of protein-coding gene prediction software in C. elegans, and to apply this knowledge to the annotation of the genomes of four additional Caenorhabditis species and other nematodes. Seventeen groups worldwide participated in nGASP, and submitted 47 prediction sets for 10 Mb of the C. elegans genome. Predictions were compared to reference gene sets consisting of confirmed or manually curated gene models from WormBase. The most accurate gene-finders were 'combiner' algorithms, which made use of transcript- and protein-alignments and multi-genome alignments, as well as gene predictions from other gene-finders. Gene-finders that used alignments of ESTs, mRNAs and proteins came in second place. There was a tie for third place between gene-finders that used multi-genome alignments and ab initio gene-finders. The median gene level sensitivity of combiners was 78% and their specificity was 42%, which is nearly the same accuracy as reported for combiners in the human genome. C. elegans genes with exons of unusual hexamer content, as well as those with many exons, short exons, long introns, a weak translation start signal, weak splice sites, or poorly conserved orthologs were the most challenging for gene-finders. While the C. elegans genome is extensively annotated, relatively little information is available for other Caenorhabditis species. The nematode genome annotation assessment project (nGASP) was launched to objectively assess the accuracy of protein-coding gene prediction software in C. elegans, and to apply this knowledge to the annotation of the genomes of four additional Caenorhabditis species and other nematodes. Seventeen groups worldwide participated in nGASP, and submitted 47 prediction sets for 10 Mb of the C. elegans genome. Predictions were compared to reference gene sets consisting of confirmed or manually curated gene models from WormBase. The most accurate gene-finders were 'combiner' algorithms, which made use of transcript- and protein-alignments and multi-genome alignments, as well as gene predictions from other gene-finders. Gene-finders that used alignments of ESTs, mRNAs and proteins came in second place. There was a tie for third place between gene-finders that used multi-genome alignments and ab initio gene-finders. The median gene level sensitivity of combiners was 78% and their specificity was 42%, which is nearly the same accuracy as reported for combiners in the human genome. C. elegans genes with exons of unusual hexamer content, as well as those with many exons, short exons, long introns, a weak translation start signal, weak splice sites, or poorly conserved orthologs were the most challenging for gene-finders.

Coghlan, A; Fiedler, T J; McKay, S J; Flicek, P; Harris, T W; Blasiar, D; Allen, J; Stein, L D

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

62

In silico screening for tumour-specic expressed sequences in human genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In silico screening for tumour-speci¢c expressed sequences in human genome A.V. Baranovaa , A such as UNIGENE and Cancer Genome Anat- omy Project (CGAP). These tools have built-in limitations that allow set of human ESTs compiled in dbEST database as archived £at-text ¢les and UNIGENE information

Baranova, Ancha

63

The HapMap project has raised high hopes for mapping genetic determinants of complex human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The HapMap project has raised high hopes for mapping genetic determinants of complex human disease for mapping studies in human populations around the world. The HapMap project has characterized haplotype structures across the genome for four human populations with the goal of enabling genome-wide sets of SNPs

Rosenberg, Noah

64

Whole-genome shotgun assembly and comparison of human genome assemblies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whole-genome shotgun assembly and comparison of human genome assemblies Sorin Istraila , Granger G a whole-genome shotgun assembly (called WGSA) of the human genome generated at Celera in 2001. The Celera. With the nearly complete human DNA sequence [National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Build 34] now

Shatkay, Hagit

65

From genome to proteome: developing expression clone resources for the human genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From genome to proteome: developing expression clone resources for the human genome Gary Temple1 Mammalian Gene Collection, National Human Genome Research Institute and 2 National Center for Biotechnology human genome sequence, it has become possible and highly productive to compare the sequences of m

66

Cancer genomics and the TCGA project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research September 15, 2011 meeting-abstract Cancer Genomics Cancer Genomics: Poster Presentations - Proffered Abstracts Abstracts...San Francisco, CA Abstract A39: The UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser Brian Craft 1 Kyle Ellrott 1 Mary Goldman...

David Haussler

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

A Threading-Based Method for the Prediction of DNA-Binding Proteins with Application to the Human Genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the human genome; 1,654 proteins are predicted to have DNA-binding function. Comparison with existing Gene) A Threading-Based Method for the Prediction of DNA-Binding Proteins with Application to the Human Genome. PLo have been released, and about 5,000 active genome sequencing projects are on the way [6

Skolnick, Jeff

68

As a consequence of the sequencing and mapping of the human genome,pharmacogenetics (PGx) --the use of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to recognize the rare successes. It was hoped that the Human Genome Project would provide a flood of newREVIEWS As a consequence of the sequencing and mapping of the human genome,pharmacogenetics (PGx prospective use of genome information to enhance success in finding new medicines. An example of a prospective

Cai, Long

69

FCTO Projects and the Materials Genome Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Download presentation slides from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Materials Genome Initiative, held on December 2, 2014.

70

A physical map of the human genome  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... fingerprinted clones (primarily radiation hybrid chromosomal localization data from the Stanford Human Genome Center (SHGC)). The parameters finally used (overlap statistic of 3?×?10-12 or about ... http://carbon.wi.mit.edu:8000/cgi-bin/contig/phys_map), GeneMap’99, SHGC G3 radiation hybrid map (http://www- ...

2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

A Map of Recent Positive Selection in the Human Genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information about the adaptation of modern humans to local conditions. We report here on a genome-wide scanA Map of Recent Positive Selection in the Human Genome Benjamin F. Voight[ , Sridhar Kudaravalli BF, Kudaravalli S, Wen X, Pritchard JK (2006) A map of recent positive selection in the human genome

Nachman, Michael

72

Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP): Chromosome 12  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Following the completion of the Human Genome Project, the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) has established several initiatives aiming to utilize recent advanced proteomic technologies to complement genomic information to better understand human biology and diseases through protein information. ... One of the major objectives of the C-HPP Ch12 Project (and also other chromosome projects) is to define associations of Ch12-encoded proteins with human diseases. ... The current version of the PANTHER database includes training sequences from all organisms in the GenBank non-redundant protein database, and the HMMs have been used to classify gene products across the entire genomes of human, and Drosophila melanogaster. ...

Sakdithep Chaiyarit; Nilubon Singhto; Yi-Ju Chen; Chia-Ying Cheng; Wararat Chiangjong; Rattiyaporn Kanlaya; Henry H. N. Lam; Paleerath Peerapen; Ting-Yi Sung; Phornpimon Tipthara; Akhilesh Pandey; Terence C. W. Poon; Yu-Ju Chen; Ravi Sirdeshmukh; Maxey C. M. Chung; Visith Thongboonkerd

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Postdoctoral Positions in Computational Human Microbiome Research (The Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Postdoctoral Positions in Computational Human Microbiome Research (The Department of Genome funded projects: 1) Computational modeling of the human microbiome using a combination of in://elbo.gs.washington.edu) at the University of Washington. Borenstein's group focuses on computational systems biology research of the human

Borenstein, Elhanan

74

Using Genomics to Study Human Biology and Disease  

SciTech Connect

The Human Genome Project culminated in April 2003 with the finished DNA sequence of all of the human chromosomes. This book of information, particularly in conjunction with the genome sequences of many other organisms, has already begun to revolutionize the way that biomedical scientists study our species. The identification of essentially all of our genes has provided a template upon which researchers can discover basic processes that govern cells, organs, and the whole organism, and to understand the fundamental causes of the diseases that occur when something goes wrong with a gene or a set of genes. The Genome Project has already made it possible to identify the genes that are defective in more than 1,000 rare inherited diseases, and these discoveries have helped to understand the mechanisms of the more common forms of these disorders. This understanding of primary defects in diseases - which is translated as mutations in genes that encode proteins that serve specific functions - is transforming the way that biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies identify drug targets, and a few notable cases have already had a striking impact on specific diseases. In addition, it has become clear that the differential response to drugs in human populations is heavily influenced by genes, and a whole field called pharmacogenetics has begun to identify these genetic factors. Such knowledge will allow physicians to prescribe drugs targeted to each individual, with the potential to increase efficacy and decrease side-effects. Determining the DNA sequence of the human genome and identifying the genes has been an exciting endeavor, but we are only just beginning to understand the treasures present in all of our DNA. My presentation will briefly describe the road we took to get the sequence, as well as the tools that we are developing to unlock its secrets.

Myers, Ricard M. (Stanford University School of Medicine) [Stanford University School of Medicine

2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

75

USDA and DOE Fund Genomics Projects For Bioenergy Fuels Research |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fund Genomics Projects For Bioenergy Fuels Research Fund Genomics Projects For Bioenergy Fuels Research USDA and DOE Fund Genomics Projects For Bioenergy Fuels Research August 9, 2006 - 8:43am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Aug. 9, 2006 - Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman and Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns today announced that the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy (DOE) have jointly awarded nine grants totaling $5.7 million for biobased fuels research that will accelerate the development of alternative fuel resources. Bodman commented, "These research projects build upon DOE's strategic investments in genomics, to accelerate scientific discovery and promote the development of alternative energy sources vital to America's energy and economic security." "To be a reliable renewable energy source, farmers and ranchers will need

76

Life Sciences Division and Center for Human Genome Studies 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the research and development activities of the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Life Sciences Division and the biological aspects of the Center for Human Genome Studies for the calendar year 1994. The technical portion of the report is divided into two parts, (1) selected research highlights and (2) research projects and accomplishments. The research highlights provide a more detailed description of a select set of projects. A technical description of all projects is presented in sufficient detail so that the informed reader will be able to assess the scope and significance of each project. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the group leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information.

Cram, L.S.; Stafford, C. [comp.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Approximate Bayesian Computations Done Exactly: Towards a Thousand Human Genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approximate Bayesian Computations Done Exactly: Towards a Thousand Human Genomes Principal of California, Irvine, USA January 28, 2011 Abstract Currently, 1000 whole human genomes are being sequenced. It is becoming exceedingly difficult to extract critical information from such extensive population-level genomic

Sainudiin, Raazesh

78

Joint Genome Institute (JGI) Projects at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joint Genome Institute Joint Genome Institute (JGI) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) nicole-illumina-flowcell.jpg Key Challenges: Ensuring that there is a robust computational infrastructure for managing, storing and gleaning scientific insights from the torrent of data that constantly flows from the advanced sequencing platforms at the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). JGI sequencing capacity exceeds 40 billion DNA base pairs per year and is growing at a rate that exceeds computer hardware improvements, with exponential increases in computation and storage needed. JGI will generate about 1 petabyte of data in their first year as a NERSC partner; this is expected to double each year. Why it Matters: JGI is the primary production sequencing facility for the DOE. By revealing the genetic blueprint and fundamental principles that

79

The Cancer Genome Atlas Pan-Cancer analysis project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network has profiled and analyzed large numbers of human tumors to discover molecular aberrations at the DNA, RNA, protein and epigenetic levels. The resulting rich data provide a ...

Lander, Eric S.

80

Defining functional DNA elements in the human genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the completion of the human genome sequence, attention turned to identifying and annotating its functional DNA elements. As a complement to genetic and comparative genomics approaches, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements ...

Kellis, Manolis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative.

1988-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

82

SCIENCE & IDEAS: LANGUAGE: THE HUMAN SPEECHOME PROJECT Someone to watch over me  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

speechome project, a reference to the broad implications of mapping a single unit. And like the human genomeSCIENCE & IDEAS: LANGUAGE: THE HUMAN SPEECHOME PROJECT Someone to watch over me Every move, every study how humans learn to speak - and whether robots can be taught the same way. Susan Pinker reports

Roy, Deb

83

Reconstructing the Genomic Architecture of Ancestral Mammals: Lessons From Human,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reconstructing the Genomic Architecture of Ancestral Mammals: Lessons From Human, Mouse, and Rat Genomes Guillaume Bourque,1 Pavel A. Pevzner,2 and Glenn Tesler3,4 1 Centre de Recherches Mathe of Mathematics, University of California­San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA Recent analysis of genome

Batzoglou, Serafim

84

Finishing The Euchromatic Sequence Of The Human Genome  

SciTech Connect

The sequence of the human genome encodes the genetic instructions for human physiology, as well as rich information about human evolution. In 2001, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium reported a draft sequence of the euchromatic portion of the human genome. Since then, the international collaboration has worked to convert this draft into a genome sequence with high accuracy and nearly complete coverage. Here, we report the result of this finishing process.The current genome sequence (Build 35) contains 2.85 billion nucleotides interrupted by only 341 gaps. It covers {approx}99% of the euchromatic genome and is accurate to an error rate of {approx}1 event per 100,000 bases. Many of the remaining euchromatic gaps are associated with segmental duplications and will require focused work with new methods. The near-complete sequence, the first for a vertebrate, greatly improves the precision of biological analyses of the human genome including studies of gene number,birth and death. Notably, the human genome seems to encode only20,000-25,000 protein-coding genes. The genome sequence reported here should serve as a firm foundation for biomedical research in the decades ahead.

Rubin, Edward M.; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, Paul; Rokhsar, Daniel; Pennacchio, Len

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

Mapping the Human Reference Genome's Missing Sequence by Three-Way Admixture in Latino Genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARTICLE Mapping the Human Reference Genome's Missing Sequence by Three-Way Admixture in Latino Genomes Giulio Genovese,1,2,3,* Robert E. Handsaker,2,3 Heng Li,2,3 Eimear E. Kenny,4,5,6,7,8 and Steven A. McCarroll1,2,3,* A principal obstacle to completing maps and analyses of the human genome involves

McCarroll, Steve

86

Genome and proteome annotation: organization, interpretation and integration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...In addition, the Human Genome Variation Society aims...of genomic variation information. With this in mind...variation within the human genome. The elucidation of...beginning of the 1000 genomes project (Siva 2008) aims to...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Abstract 3967: The Cancer Genome Project high throughput analysis pipeline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Genome Project high throughput analysis pipeline Adam P. Butler 1 Jon W. Teague 1 Keiran...somatic changes. We have built an analysis pipeline to track and analyse large numbers of...externally available tools. The analysis pipeline is built around a 2,000 node compute...

Adam P. Butler; Jon W. Teague; Keiran M. Raine; Andrew Menzies; David Jones; John Marshall; Jon Hinton; Serge Dronov; John Gamble; Lucy Stebbings; Alagu Jayakumar; Catherine Leroy; Ultan McDermott; Michael R. Stratton; Peter Campbell; Andy Futreal

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

88

Systematic identification of human mitochondrial disease genes through integrative genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

encoding proteins targeted to this organelle. Elucidation of the molecular basis for these disorders of all 33,860 Ensembl human proteins. The genome-wide false discovery rate was estimated from large gold disorders are due to mutations not in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) but rather in the nuclear genes

89

Predicting Tissue-Specific Enhancers in the Human Genome  

SciTech Connect

Determining how transcriptional regulatory signals areencoded in vertebrate genomes is essential for understanding the originsof multi-cellular complexity; yet the genetic code of vertebrate generegulation remains poorly understood. In an attempt to elucidate thiscode, we synergistically combined genome-wide gene expression profiling,vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding siteanalysis to define sequence signatures characteristic of candidatetissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this strategyto microarray-based gene expression profiles from 79 human tissues andidentified 7,187 candidate enhancers that defined their flanking geneexpression, the majority of which were located outside of knownpromoters. We cross-validated this method for its ability to de novopredict tissue-specific gene expression and confirmed its reliability in57 of the 79 available human tissues, with an average precision inenhancer recognition ranging from 32 percent to 63 percent, and asensitivity of 47 percent. We used the sequence signatures identified bythis approach to assign tissue-specific predictions to ~;328,000human-mouse conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. Byoverlapping these genome-wide predictions with a large in vivo dataset ofenhancers validated in transgenic mice, we confirmed our results with a28 percent sensitivity and 50 percent precision. These results indicatethe power of combining complementary genomic datasets as an initialcomputational foray into the global view of tissue-specific generegulation in vertebrates.

Pennacchio, Len A.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Ovcharenko, Ivan

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Closing gaps in the human genome using sequencing by synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The most recent release of the finished human genome contains 260 euchromatic gaps (excluding chromosome Y). Recent work has helped explain a large number of these unresolved regions as 'structural' in nature. Another class ...

Arachchi, Harindra M.

91

The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2009: status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata  

SciTech Connect

The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) is a comprehensive resource for centralized monitoring of genome and metagenome projects worldwide. Both complete and ongoing projects, along with their associated metadata, can be accessed in GOLD through precomputed tables and a search page. As of September 2009, GOLD contains information for more than 5800 sequencing projects, of which 1100 have been completed and their sequence data deposited in a public repository. GOLD continues to expand, moving toward the goal of providing the most comprehensive repository of metadata information related to the projects and their organisms/environments in accordance with the Minimum Information about a (Meta)Genome Sequence (MIGS/MIMS) specification.

Liolios, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Hugenholtz, Phil; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2007: status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata  

SciTech Connect

The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) is a comprehensive resource of information for genome and metagenome projects world-wide. GOLD provides access to complete and ongoing projects and their associated metadata through pre-computed lists and a search page. The database currently incorporates information for more than 2900 sequencing projects, of which 639 have been completed and the data deposited in the public databases. GOLD is constantly expanding to provide metadata information related to the project and the organism and is compliant with the Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence (MIGS) specifications.

Fenner, Marsha W; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Feb 4, 2014 Postdoctoral positions in human population genomics and association studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 4, 2014 Postdoctoral positions in human population genomics and association studies Two methods in human population genomics and genome-wide association studies, and apply them to large a strong track record in either statistical genetics, population genomics, or human genetics, as well

Keinan, Alon

94

Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus hominis Strain CRBIP 24.179T, Isolated from Human Intestine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus hominis Strain CRBIP 24.179T, Isolated from Human Intestine genome sequence of the strain Lactobacillus hominis CRBIP 24.179T, isolated from a human clinical sample 24.179T, isolated from human intestine. Genome Announc. 1(4):e00662-13. doi:10.1128/genomeA.00662

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

95

nature genetics volume 32 september 2002 135 Human genome sequence variation and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

article nature genetics · volume 32 · september 2002 135 Human genome sequence variation.1038/ng947 Variation in the human genome sequence is key to understanding susceptibility to disease-genetic framework to two genome-wide poly- morphism surveys , we find that the human genome contains sizeable

Reich, David

96

COMPUTATIONAL GENOMICS: MAPPING, COMPARISON, AND ANNOTATION OF GENOMES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

address key issues in the different stages of genome research: planning of a genome sequencing project areas: (1) In relation to the early stages of a genome project, we address physical mapping, and we structure and sequence analysis of orthologous human and mouse genomic regions, and develop ROSETTA

Batzoglou, Serafim

97

Ten Years On — The Human Genome and Medicine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...heritable risk. Clearly, more than one decade of genomics will be required to understand the inborn risks of most common disorders, such as diabetes and hypertension. Second, readers will enjoy learning from these articles how rapidly the engines of genomics and other "-omics" are turning. These engines... On a June day nearly 10 years ago, the leaders of the United States and the United Kingdom, accompanied by the leaders of the public and private teams deciphering the human genome, announced that a draft sequence had been completed. That occasion was rich ...

Varmus H.

2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

98

Beyond The Human Genome: What's Next? (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

UC Berkeley's Daniel Rokhsar and his colleagues were instrumental in contributing the sequences for three of the human body's chromosomes in the effort to decipher the blueprint of life- the completion of the DNA sequencing of the human genome. Now he is turning to the structure and function of genes in other organisms, some of them no less important to the planet's future than the human map. Hear the latest in this lecture from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Rokhsar, Daniel

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Evolution of the Anopheles 16 Genomes Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the imminent completion of a set of reference genome assemblies for 16 species of Anopheles mosquitoes. In addition to providing a generally useful resource for comparative genomic analyses, these genome sequences ...

Waterhouse, Robert

100

Genomic medicine: genetic variation and its impact on the future of health care  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sequence of the human genome. Science. 291...metabolomic assessments of human health and nutrition...for Biotechnology Information. Nucleic Acids Res...care. | Advances in genome technology and other fruits of the Human Genome Project are playing a growing...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The function of genomes in bioenergetic organelles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1998 The organelle genome database project (GOBASE). Nucleic...The mito- chondrial genome of Arabidopsis is composed...native and immigrant information. Trends Plant Sci...Microbial genes in the human genome: lateral transfer...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Developing Grid-based Systems for Microbial Genome Comparisons: The Microbase Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing Grid-based Systems for Microbial Genome Comparisons: The Microbase Project Anil Wipat, University of Newcastle upon Tyne Abstract Comparative analysis of genomes allows the rich source of biological genome sequence data to be most efficiently exploited. However, the rate at which microbial

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

103

Genomes to life project quarterly report June 2004.  

SciTech Connect

This SAND report provides the technical progress through June 2004 of the Sandia-led project, ''Carbon Sequestration in Synechococcus Sp.: From Molecular Machines to Hierarchical Modeling'', funded by the DOE Office of Science Genomes to Life Program. Understanding, predicting, and perhaps manipulating carbon fixation in the oceans has long been a major focus of biological oceanography and has more recently been of interest to a broader audience of scientists and policy makers. It is clear that the oceanic sinks and sources of CO{sub 2} are important terms in the global environmental response to anthropogenic atmospheric inputs of CO{sub 2} and that oceanic microorganisms play a key role in this response. However, the relationship between this global phenomenon and the biochemical mechanisms of carbon fixation in these microorganisms is poorly understood. In this project, we will investigate the carbon sequestration behavior of Synechococcus Sp., an abundant marine cyanobacteria known to be important to environmental responses to carbon dioxide levels, through experimental and computational methods. This project is a combined experimental and computational effort with emphasis on developing and applying new computational tools and methods. Our experimental effort will provide the biology and data to drive the computational efforts and include significant investment in developing new experimental methods for uncovering protein partners, characterizing protein complexes, identifying new binding domains. We will also develop and apply new data measurement and statistical methods for analyzing microarray experiments. Computational tools will be essential to our efforts to discover and characterize the function of the molecular machines of Synechococcus. To this end, molecular simulation methods will be coupled with knowledge discovery from diverse biological data sets for high-throughput discovery and characterization of protein-protein complexes. In addition, we will develop a set of novel capabilities for inference of regulatory pathways in microbial genomes across multiple sources of information through the integration of computational and experimental technologies. These capabilities will be applied to Synechococcus regulatory pathways to characterize their interaction map and identify component proteins in these pathways. We will also investigate methods for combining experimental and computational results with visualization and natural language tools to accelerate discovery of regulatory pathways. The ultimate goal of this effort is develop and apply new experimental and computational methods needed to generate a new level of understanding of how the Synechococcus genome affects carbon fixation at the global scale. Anticipated experimental and computational methods will provide ever-increasing insight about the individual elements and steps in the carbon fixation process, however relating an organism's genome to its cellular response in the presence of varying environments will require systems biology approaches. Thus a primary goal for this effort is to integrate the genomic data generated from experiments and lower level simulations with data from the existing body of literature into a whole cell model. We plan to accomplish this by developing and applying a set of tools for capturing the carbon fixation behavior of complex of Synechococcus at different levels of resolution. Finally, the explosion of data being produced by high-throughput experiments requires data analysis and models which are more computationally complex, more heterogeneous, and require coupling to ever increasing amounts of experimentally obtained data in varying formats. These challenges are unprecedented in high performance scientific computing and necessitate the development of a companion computational infrastructure to support this effort.

Heffelfinger, Grant S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Information on a Major New Initiative: Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome (1986 DOE Memorandum)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

In the history of the Human Genome Program, Dr. Charles DeLisi and Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece of the Department of Energy (DOE) were instrumental in moving the seeds of the program forward. This May 1986 memo from DeLisi to Trivelpiece, Director of DOE's Office of Energy Research, documents this fact. Following the March 1986 Santa Fe workshop on the subject of mapping and sequencing the human genome, DeLisi's memo outlines workshop conclusions, explains the relevance of this project to DOE and the importance of the Department's laboratories and capabilities, notes the critical experience of DOE in managing projects of this scale and potential magnitude, and recognizes the fact that the project will impact biomedical science in ways which could not be fully anticipated at the time. Subsequently, program guidance was further sought from the DOE Health Effects Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) and the April 1987 HERAC report recommended that DOE and the nation commit to a large, multidisciplinary, scientific and technological undertaking to map and sequence the human genome.

DeLisi, Charles (Associate Director, Health and Environmental Research, DOE Office of Energy Research)

1986-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

105

Human genome program report. Part 1, overview and progress  

SciTech Connect

This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Human Genome Program Report. Part 2, 1996 Research Abstracts  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This report contains Part 2 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the US Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 2 consists of 1996 research abstracts. Attention is focused on the following: sequencing; mapping; informatics; ethical, legal, and social issues; infrastructure; and small business innovation research.

1997-11-00T23:59:59.000Z

107

INTRODUCTION With the sequencing of the human genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION With the sequencing of the human genome near completion, the next challenges that one of these forms part of the interaction surface with other proteins. Index Entries a complete set of representatives from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) is matched against the set of queries

Weston, Ken

108

Identification and analysis of functional elements in 1% of the human genome by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARTICLES Identification and analysis of functional elements in 1% of the human genome by the ENCODE frommultiple,diverseexperimentsperformedonatargeted 1%ofthe human genome as part of the pilot phase and computational analyses. Together, our results advance the collective knowledge about human genome function

Lieb, Jason

109

Mutational data loading routines for human genome databases: the BRCA1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mutational data loading routines for human genome databases: the BRCA1 case. Matthijs van der Kroon.089 3508 TB Utrecht The Netherlands MUTATIONAL DATA LOADING ROUTINES FOR HUMAN GENOME DATABASES: THE BRCA1 CASE #12;3 MUTATIONAL DATA LOADING ROUTINES FOR HUMAN GENOME DATABASES: THE BRCA1 CASE. Matthijs van

Utrecht, Universiteit

110

Identification and analysis of functional elements in 1% of the human genome by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The human genome is an elegant but cryptic store of information. The roughly three billion bases encodeARTICLES Identification and analysis of functional elements in 1% of the human genome by the ENCODE frommultiple,diverseexperimentsperformedon atargeted 1%ofthe human genome as part of the pilot phase

Iyer, Vishy

111

Unlocking the Secrets of the Genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Human Genome Project was to produce high-quality sequences not just for the human genome but also for those of the chief model organisms: Escherichia coli, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), ...

Celniker, Susan E.

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - amino acid projections Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ribonucleic acid: RNA central dogma of biology human genome... expression splicing human genome project splice donor ... Source: Khuri, Sami - Department of Computer Science, San...

113

Genomics: Encyclopaedia of humble DNA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ENCODE Project Consortium shows through the analysis of 1% of the human genome that the humble, unpretentious non-gene sequences have essential regulatory roles (Fig. 1). ...

John M. Greally

2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Mastermind Attack on Genomic Data Michael T. Goodrich  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]. Moreover, a project to fully sequence 1,000 human genomes in the next few years is already under way [24 diploid human genomes will be economically affordable. The milestone of the first human genome sequence draft in 2001 [12], [39] has recently been followed by the first diploid human genome sequence [26

Goodrich, Michael T.

115

Inverted Repeat Structure of the Human Genome: The X-Chromosome Contains a Preponderance of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inverted Repeat Structure of the Human Genome: The X-Chromosome Contains a Preponderance of Large, Highly Homologous Inverted Repeats That Contain Testes Genes Peter E. Warburton,1,4 Joti Giordano,1 Fanny performed the first genome-wide analysis of the Inverted Repeat (IR) structure in the human genome, using

Warburton, Peter E.

116

Deadline: April 9, 2010 Human genome sequencing has marked the beginning of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deadline: April 9, 2010 Background Human genome sequencing has marked the beginning of the post-genome and molecular charac- terization of human diseases, the search for new and more ef- fective preventive, diagnostic and therapeutic practices. In fact, the knowledge of the genome sequence achieved in man

De Cindio, Fiorella

117

Deadline: March 30, 2011 human genome sequencing has marked the beginning of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deadline: March 30, 2011 Background human genome sequencing has marked the beginning of the post-genome and molecular charac- terization of human diseases, the search for new and more ef- fective preventive, diagnostic and therapeutic practices. In fact, the knowledge of the genome sequence achieved in man

De Cindio, Fiorella

118

Identifying a High Fraction of the Human Genome to be under Selective Constraint Using GERP++  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identifying a High Fraction of the Human Genome to be under Selective Constraint Using GERP genomes leverage comparative sequence information by looking for regions that exhibit evidence identify over 1.3 million constrained elements spanning over 7% of the human genome. We predict a higher

Sidow, Arend

119

Genomic Signal Processing: From Matrix Algebra to Genetic Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Scale Molecular Biological Data The Human Genome Project, and the resulting sequencing of complete genomes, fueled (GSVD); pseudoinverse projection; blind source separation (BSS) algorithms; genome-scale RNA expression now be measured on genomic scales (e.g., refs. 3 and 4). For the first time in human history

Utah, University of

120

Forensic Genomics: Kin Privacy, Driftnets and Other Open Questions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Human Genome Project, Cold and hot hits, Data protection, Informational privacy. 1. INTRODUCTIONForensic Genomics: Kin Privacy, Driftnets and Other Open Questions Frank Stajano University sequencing the entire genome of a person becomes sufficiently cheap as to become a routine operation

Cambridge, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Human genome sequencing with direct x-ray holographic imaging  

SciTech Connect

Direct holographic imaging of biological materials is widely applicable to the study of the structure, properties and action of genetic material. This particular application involves the sequencing of the human genome where prospective genomic imaging technology is composed of three subtechnologies, name an x-ray holographic camera, suitable chemistry and enzymology for the preparation of tagged DNA samples, and the illuminator in the form of an x-ray laser. We report appropriate x-ray camera, embodied by the instrument developed by MCR, is available and that suitable chemical and enzymatic procedures exist for the preparation of the necessary tagged DNA strands. Concerning the future development of the x-ray illuminator. We find that a practical small scale x-ray light source is indeed feasible. This outcome requires the use of unconventional physical processes in order to achieve the necessary power-compression in the amplifying medium. The understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly. Importantly, although the x-ray source does not currently exist, the understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly and the research has established the basic scaling laws that will determine the properties of the x-ray illuminator. When this x-ray source becomes available, an extremely rapid and cost effective instrument for 3-D imaging of biological materials can be applied to a wide range of biological structural assays, including the base-pair sequencing of the human genome and many questions regarding its higher levels of organization.

Rhodes, C.K.

1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

122

Independence) PROJECT TITLE: Clinton Community Human Service Campus Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Area Substance Abuse Council, Inc (a SEP subrecipient of the Iowa Office of Energy STATE: IA Area Substance Abuse Council, Inc (a SEP subrecipient of the Iowa Office of Energy STATE: IA Independence) PROJECT TITLE: Clinton Community Human Service Campus Project Page 1 of2 Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE FOA 000052 EE0000162 GFO-0000162-015 EE162 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

123

Antibody library project could unlock mysteries of human gene...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mysteries of human gene function Antibody library project could unlock mysteries of human gene function By looking at antibodies, researchers can identify where, in a cell, genes...

124

Human Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequencing James L. Weber1,3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

different human donors would be sheared, size-selected, and cloned into E. coli. Insert sizes would fallHuman Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequencing James L. Weber1,3 and Eugene W. Myers2 1 Center for Medical Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 Large-scale sequencing of the human genome is now

Batzoglou, Serafim

125

Optimized Multiplex PCR: Efficiently Closing a Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequencing Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimized Multiplex PCR: Efficiently Closing a Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequencing Project Herve sequencing project. The method employs multiplex PCR and a novel pooling strategy to minimize the number of laboratory procedures required to se- quence the unknown DNA that falls in between con- tiguous sequences

126

Comparative Genomics of Transcriptional Control in the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparative Genomics of Transcriptional Control in the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum Richard M.R. Coulson,1,3 Neil Hall,2 and Christos A. Ouzounis1 1 Computational Genomics Group10 1SD, United Kingdom; 2 The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, The Wellcome Trust Genome Campus

Arnold, Jonathan

127

Representing Genomic Knowledge in the UMLS Semantic Network , Carol Friedman, Ph.D.2,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of human hereditary diseases, and biomedical literature concerning the genome project is becoming more by adding six new se- mantic types and sixteen new semantic relations. Introduction The Human Genome Project produced by the genome project will be ultimately essential for the under- standing of human hereditary

Yu, Hong

128

A computational genomics pipeline for prokaryotic sequencing projects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......used to perform tasks in the pipeline. In the Discussion section...objectives of our work on the pipeline and how these relate to larger...end-polishing, adaptor ligation, nick repair and single-stranded library...passed to the first stage of the pipeline-genome assembly. Table 1......

Andrey O. Kislyuk; Lee S. Katz; Sonia Agrawal; Matthew S. Hagen; Andrew B. Conley; Pushkala Jayaraman; Viswateja Nelakuditi; Jay C. Humphrey; Scott A. Sammons; Dhwani Govil; Raydel D. Mair; Kathleen M. Tatti; Maria L. Tondella; Brian H. Harcourt; Leonard W. Mayer; I. King Jordan

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Project title: Phylogenetic Analysis of "New" Homeobox in the lineage leading to Humans Thehomebox genes are extremely interesting and central in the mechanisms establishing form in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project title: Phylogenetic Analysis of "New" Homeobox in the lineage leading to Humans Thehomebox and challenging questions in case of fast initial progress. The core project will involve comparative genome these genes evolutionary. Peter Holland group has found 4 new genes in humans, by comparison to the mouse

Goldschmidt, Christina

130

EA-0856: Construction and Operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

56: Construction and Operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at 56: Construction and Operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Berkeley, California EA-0856: Construction and Operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Berkeley, California SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a new laboratory for consolidation of current and future activities of the Human Genome Center at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 19, 1994 EA-0856: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Berkeley, California April 19, 1994 EA-0856: Final Environmental Assessment

131

Enhancing a Genome Database Using the XSB Tabled Logic Programming System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

goal of the Human Genome Project 1] is to construct detailed physical maps of the human genome implementationof laboratory information systems developed at the Center for Genome Research in the Whitehead Research at the Whitehead Institute in MIT is engaged in several large-scale genome mapping projects

Davulcu, Hasan

132

ANTH 376: GENOMICS & ANTHROPOLOGY 4 credit hours (satisfies an SC requirement)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 ANTH 376: GENOMICS & ANTHROPOLOGY 4 credit hours (satisfies an SC variation, health and evolution. Extended Course Description The Human Genome Project and recent advances in genome sequencing techniques have made it possible

133

On the immortality of television sets: "function" in the human genome according to the evolution-free gospel of ENCODE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 On the immortality of television sets: "function" in the human genome according to the evolution the idea that more than 80% of the human genome is functional. This claim flies in the face of current transgressions involved in assigning functionality to almost every nucleotide in the human genome. The ENCODE

Dean, Matthew D.

134

The Human Microbiome Project (HMP) and the Data Analysis and Coordination Center (DAAC) portal to the HMP (GSC8 Meeting)  

SciTech Connect

The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. George Weinstock from Washington University School of Medicine talks about the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) followed briefly by Jennifer Wortman from the University of Maryland School of Medicine on the Data Analysis and Coordination Center (DACC) portal to the HMP at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

Weinstock, George [Washington University School of Medicine] [Washington University School of Medicine; Wortman, Jennifer [University of Maryland School of Medicine] [University of Maryland School of Medicine

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

135

A Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) to Characterize the Sets of Proteins Encoded in Chromosome 17  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

All sites share the common resource of Ensembl for the genome modeling information. ... Paik, Y. K.; Jeong, S. K.; Omenn, G. S.; Uhlen, M.; Hanash, S.; Cho, S. Y.; Lee, H. J.; Na, K.; Choi, E. Y.; Yan, F. F.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, Y.; Snyder, M.; Cheng, Y.; Chen, R.; Marko-Varga, G.; Deutsch, E. W.; Kim, H.; Kwon, J. Y.; Aebersold, R.; Bairoch, A.; Taylor, A. D.; Kim, K. Y.; Lee, E. Y.; Hochstrasser, D.; Legrain, P.; Hancock, W. S.The Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project for cataloging proteins encoded in the genome Nat. ... To understand the origin of these clusters and to quantify the impact of this phenomenon on genome organization, we analyzed clusters of coexpressed genes in the human and mouse genomes. ...

Suli Liu; Hogune Im; Amos Bairoch; Massimo Cristofanilli; Rui Chen; Eric W. Deutsch; Stephen Dalton; David Fenyo; Susan Fanayan; Chris Gates; Pascale Gaudet; Marina Hincapie; Samir Hanash; Hoguen Kim; Seul-Ki Jeong; Emma Lundberg; George Mias; Rajasree Menon; Zhaomei Mu; Edouard Nice; Young-Ki Paik; Mathias Uhlen; Lance Wells; Shiaw-Lin Wu; Fangfei Yan; Fan Zhang; Yue Zhang; Michael Snyder; Gilbert S. Omenn; Ronald C. Beavis; William S. Hancock

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

136

DOE Human Genome Program: Contractor-Grantee Workshop IV, November 13--17, 1994, Santa Fe, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the proceedings of the fourth Contractor-Grantee Workshop for the Department of Energy (DOE) Human Genome Program. Of the 204 abstracts in this book, some 200 describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors located at the multidisciplinary centers at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory; other DOE-supported laboratories; and more than 54 universities, research organizations, and companies in the United States and abroad. Included are 16 abstracts from ongoing projects in the Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues (ELSI) component, an area that continues to attract considerable attention from a wide variety of interested parties. Three abstracts summarize work in the new Microbial Genome Initiative launched this year by the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) to provide genome sequence and mapping data on industrially important microorganisms and those that live under extreme conditions. Many of the projects will be discussed at plenary sessions held throughout the workshop, and all are represented in the poster sessions.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

On the Immortality of Television Sets: "Function" in the Human Genome According to the Evolution-Free Gospel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that designed the E. coli genome. There is, however, no way that I would admit to serving on a committeeOn the Immortality of Television Sets: "Function" in the Human Genome According to the Evolution that more than 80% of the human genome is functional. This claim flies in the face of current

Durand, Dannie

138

The genomic complexity of primary human prostate cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of male cancer deaths in the United States. However, the full range of prostate cancer genomic alterations is incompletely characterized. Here we present the complete sequence ...

Carter, Scott Lambert

139

Demographic history and rare allele sharing among human populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Thousand Genomes Project (1000G) is the most extensive study to date of human genomic diversity (1. Gibbse , The 1000 Genomes Projecte , and Carlos D. Bustamantea,1 a Department of Genetics, Stanford Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853; and e Human Genome

Keinan, Alon

140

MSc Human-Computer Interaction with Ergonomics MSc Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MSc Human-Computer Interaction with Ergonomics MSc Project Web analytics and think aloud studies-Computer Interaction with Ergonomics) in the Faculty of Life Sciences, University College London, [2007]. NOTE

Blandford, Ann

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Discovery of functional elements in 12 Drosophila genomes using evolutionary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genome Project{, Emily Hodges12 , Angie S. Hinrichs4 , Anat Caspi13 , Benedict Paten4,5,14 , Seung for comparative studies. The sequencing of the human genome and the genomes of dozens of other metazoan speciesARTICLES ; genomes using evolutionary

Kellis, Manolis

142

Automated whole-genome multiple alignment of rat, mouse, and human  

SciTech Connect

We have built a whole genome multiple alignment of the three currently available mammalian genomes using a fully automated pipeline which combines the local/global approach of the Berkeley Genome Pipeline and the LAGAN program. The strategy is based on progressive alignment, and consists of two main steps: (1) alignment of the mouse and rat genomes; and (2) alignment of human to either the mouse-rat alignments from step 1, or the remaining unaligned mouse and rat sequences. The resulting alignments demonstrate high sensitivity, with 87% of all human gene-coding areas aligned in both mouse and rat. The specificity is also high: <7% of the rat contigs are aligned to multiple places in human and 97% of all alignments with human sequence > 100kb agree with a three-way synteny map built independently using predicted exons in the three genomes. At the nucleotide level <1% of the rat nucleotides are mapped to multiple places in the human sequence in the alignment; and 96.5% of human nucleotides within all alignments agree with the synteny map. The alignments are publicly available online, with visualization through the novel Multi-VISTA browser that we also present.

Brudno, Michael; Poliakov, Alexander; Salamov, Asaf; Cooper, Gregory M.; Sidow, Arend; Rubin, Edward M.; Solovyev, Victor; Batzoglou, Serafim; Dubchak, Inna

2004-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

143

Project 3 Integrative Genomics (IG) Objective: To give a presentation of about 40-90 minutes duration at the end of the week covering the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project 3 ­ Integrative Genomics (IG) Objective: To give a presentation of about 40-90 minutes duration at the end of the week covering the key aspects of the integrative genomics, which is the combined) "Integrative Genomics and Functional Explanation" downloadable from http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/research/genome

Goldschmidt, Christina

144

Pairwise Comparison Between Genomic Sequences and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COM­ BAT is applied to comparative analysis between yeast genomes, and between the human genomePairwise Comparison Between Genomic Sequences and Optical­maps by Bing Sun A dissertation submitted a research problem and the need of persistence to accomplish a goal. He introduced the CAPO project to me

Mohri, Mehryar

145

Pairwise Comparison Between Genomic Sequences and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In experiments COM- BAT is applied to comparative analysis between yeast genomes, and between the human genomePairwise Comparison Between Genomic Sequences and Optical-maps by Bing Sun A dissertation submitted a research problem and the need of persistence to accomplish a goal. He introduced the CAPO project to me

Mohri, Mehryar

146

Human Genetics Portfolio Review Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the past 20 years, from our contribution to the Human Genome Project at the Sanger Institute to our role during this time. The drive to maximise the health benefits of human genome research remains a core to build research capacity and infrastructure to support human genetics and genomics · providing generous

Rambaut, Andrew

147

CAMB 630 Topics in Human Genetics and Disease Course Directors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the foundations of the Human Genome Project and parallel efforts in model organisms, research in human genetics in Human Genetics and Disease: I. Genome architecture and instability (Spinner) Chromosome specific variation II. Human genomic variation and disease (Devoto) History and substructure of the human population

Plotkin, Joshua B.

148

Adaptations to new environments in humans: the role of subtle allele frequency shifts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...One landmark was the Human Genome Project, which led to tremendous...variation data available for humans and other species has...contained within the human genome-combined with environmental...providing a wealth of information. By integrating information...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Accelerated Evolution of Conserved Noncoding Sequences in theHuman Genome  

SciTech Connect

Genomic comparisons between human and distant, non-primatemammals are commonly used to identify cis-regulatory elements based onconstrained sequence evolution. However, these methods fail to detect"cryptic" functional elements, which are too weakly conserved amongmammals to distinguish from nonfunctional DNA. To address this problem,we explored the potential of deep intra-primate sequence comparisons. Wesequenced the orthologs of 558 kb of human genomic sequence, coveringmultiple loci involved in cholesterol homeostasis, in 6 nonhumanprimates. Our analysis identified 6 noncoding DNA elements displayingsignificant conservation among primates, but undetectable in more distantcomparisons. In vitro and in vivo tests revealed that at least three ofthese 6 elements have regulatory function. Notably, the mouse orthologsof these three functional human sequences had regulatory activity despitetheir lack of significant sequence conservation, indicating that they arecryptic ancestral cis-regulatory elements. These regulatory elementscould still be detected in a smaller set of three primate speciesincluding human, rhesus and marmoset. Since the human and rhesus genomesequences are already available, and the marmoset genome is activelybeing sequenced, the primate-specific conservation analysis describedhere can be applied in the near future on a whole-genome scale, tocomplement the annotation provided by more distant speciescomparisons.

Prambhakar, Shyam; Noonan, James P.; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, EdwardM.

2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

150

Worldwide Human Relationships Inferred from Genome-Wide Patterns of Variation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Genet. 3 , e90 ( 2007 ). 11 H. M. Cann et al., Science 296 , 261 ( 2002 ). 12 Human Genome Diversity Panel, http://shgc.stanford.edu/hgdp or ftp://ftp.cephb.fr/hgdp_supp1. 13 H. Tang et al., Genet. Epidemiol. 28 , 289 ( 2005...

Jun Z. Li; Devin M. Absher; Hua Tang; Audrey M. Southwick; Amanda M. Casto; Sohini Ramachandran; Howard M. Cann; Gregory S. Barsh; Marcus Feldman; Luigi L. Cavalli-Sforza; Richard M. Myers

2008-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

151

A High-Resolution Radiation Hybrid Map of the Human Genome Draft Sequence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...constructed at the Stanford Human Genome Center (SHGC) with 50,000 rad of x-rays (the...accessed at Web table 1 and http://shgc.stanford.edu(23). Next, we used...accessed at Web table 2 and http://shgc.stanford.edu. Table 1 Summary of TNG...

Michael Olivier; Amita Aggarwal; Jennifer Allen; Annalisa A. Almendras; Eva S. Bajorek; Ellen M. Beasley; Shannon D. Brady; Jannette M. Bushard; Valerie I. Bustos; Angela Chu; Tisha R. Chung; Anniek De Witte; Mirian E. Denys; Rakly Dominguez; Nicole Y. Fang; Brian D. Foster; Robert W. Freudenberg; David Hadley; Libby R. Hamilton; Tonya J. Jeffrey; Libusha Kelly; Laura Lazzeroni; Michelle R. Levy; Saskia C. Lewis; Xia Liu; Frederick J. Lopez; Brent Louie; Joseph P. Marquis; Robert A. Martinez; Margaret K. Matsuura; Nedda S. Misherghi; Jolanna A. Norton; Adam Olshen; Shanti M. Perkins; Amy J. Perou; Chris Piercy; Mark Piercy; Fawn Qin; Tim Reif; Kelly Sheppard; Vida Shokoohi; Geoff A. Smick; Wei-Lin Sun; Elizabeth A. Stewart; J. Fernando; Tejeda; Nguyet M. Tran; Tonatiuh Trejo; Nu T. Vo; Simon C. M. Yan; Deborah L. Zierten; Shaying Zhao; Ravi Sachidanandam; Barbara J. Trask; Richard M. Myers; David R. Cox

2001-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

152

Project funded under the Socio-economic Sciences and Humanities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Project funded under the Socio-economic Sciences and Humanities Can home ownership contribute real increases everywhere. What this translates into, in terms of an exact amount of housing wealth. Over the EU25 as a whole, housing equity is some 40 per cent higher than total GDP, the figure being

Birmingham, University of

153

Genomic and Genetic Definition of a Functional Human Centromere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Artificial, Human Computer Simulation Contig...1 and 3) (32). Computer modeling of unequal crossover as a mechanism...multimeric repeat units and the rapid fall in sequence...analysis of signature sites was automated using a perl script, modifying...

Mary G. Schueler; Anne W. Higgins; M. Katharine Rudd; Karen Gustashaw; Huntington F. Willard

2001-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

154

CAMB 630 Topics in Human Genetics and Disease Course Directors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the foundations of the Human Genome Project and parallel efforts in model organisms, research in human genetics in Human Genetics and Disease: I. Genome architecture and instability (Spinner) Chromosome specific of Mendelian disease Developmental pathways and genetic disease III. Human genomic variation and disease

Plotkin, Joshua B.

155

Genomic medicine in primary care: Texas physicians' adoption of an innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New applications of genomic medicine stemming from the Human Genome Project are predicted to become routine components of primary care. Primary care physicians (PCPs) will increasingly become responsible for screening patients for inherited...

Suther, Sandra Gayle

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

A Population-Genetic Perspective on the Similarities and Differences Among Worldwide Human Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the genome-wide microsatellites of the Human Genome Diver- sity Project/Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme individuals in one group from those in other groups? 3. Of the genetic variants that exist in the human genome using the alleles in his or her genome? 6. What events in human evolutionary history are responsible

Rosenberg, Noah

157

Footprints of nonsentient design inside the human genome  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mutations disproportionately involve high-energy tissues and organs (46, 47): brain...Considering the critical role of cellular energy production in human health and metabolic...Genet 90 : 41 – 54 . 35 Lopez-Bigas N Audit B Ouzounis C Parra G Guigo R ( 2005...

John C. Avise

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Population Genomics Objective: To give a presentation of about 40-90 minutes duration at the end of the week covering the key aspects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population Genomics Objective: To give a presentation of about 40-90 minutes duration at the end of the week covering the key aspects of the population genomics of humans. This 1000 genomes project is devoted to the exciting project, where the genomes of a 1000 individuals are to be sequenced in the next

Goldschmidt, Christina

159

Integrating common and rare genetic variation in diverse human populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in global populations supports deeper interrogation of genomic variation and its role in human disease Genome Project1 , the SNP Consortium2 and the International HapMap Project3 collectively identified ,10 identified hundreds of novel genomic loci that influence human diseases4 . Nonetheless, our knowledge

Keinan, Alon

160

Mapping cis-Regulatory Domains in the Human Genome UsingMulti-Species Conservation of Synteny  

SciTech Connect

Our inability to associate distant regulatory elements with the genes that they regulate has largely precluded their examination for sequence alterations contributing to human disease. One major obstacle is the large genomic space surrounding targeted genes in which such elements could potentially reside. In order to delineate gene regulatory boundaries we used whole-genome human-mouse-chicken (HMC) and human-mouse-frog (HMF) multiple alignments to compile conserved blocks of synteny (CBS), under the hypothesis that these blocks have been kept intact throughout evolution at least in part by the requirement of regulatory elements to stay linked to the genes that they regulate. A total of 2,116 and 1,942 CBS>200 kb were assembled for HMC and HMF respectively, encompassing 1.53 and 0.86 Gb of human sequence. To support the existence of complex long-range regulatory domains within these CBS we analyzed the prevalence and distribution of chromosomal aberrations leading to position effects (disruption of a genes regulatory environment), observing a clear bias not only for mapping onto CBS but also for longer CBS size. Our results provide a genome wide data set characterizing the regulatory domains of genes and the conserved regulatory elements within them.

Ahituv, Nadav; Prabhakar, Shyam; Poulin, Francis; Rubin, EdwardM.; Couronne, Olivier

2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Establishing Standard Definitions for Genome  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 8, 2009 October 8, 2009 Establishing Standard Definitions for Genome Sequences Download a podcast of this release! WALNUT CREEK, CA-In 1996, researchers from major genome sequencing centers around the world convened on the island of Bermuda and defined a finished genome as a gapless sequence with a nucleotide error rate of one or less in 10,000 bases. This effectively set the quality target for the human genome effort and was quickly applied to other genome projects. If a genome sequence didn't meet this stringent criterion, it was simply considered a "draft." More than a decade later, researchers are finding that with the advent of the latest sequencing technologies the terms "draft" and "finished" are no longer sufficient to describe the varying levels of genome sequence

162

Using Multi-Objective Value Estimation to Support Predictive Analytics for Human Service Project Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Human service organizations need outcome measurement approaches that support project management for efficiency and effectiveness. While, in recent years, human services have increased their… (more)

Wingard, David D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Defining Genome Project Standards in a New Era of Sequencing (GSC8 Meeting)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego.

Chain, Patrick [DOE JGI

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

164

Collaborative Science Reveals Genome Secrets Sharing knowledge and bridging disciplines is the story of the University of Washington's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was alive with excitement. The Human Genome Project, which had begun a decade before, was about to complete a new department that could best tackle the gold mine of data that the Human Genome Project had the DNA sequence of human hereditary information. It would soon identify the approximately 20,000 genes

Queitsch, Christine

165

Personal Genomics, Personalized Medicine,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Personal Genomics, Personalized Medicine, & YOU Carrie Iwema, PhD, MLS 21st May 2012 AAAS/Science Translational Medicine panel discussion; MLA 2012 #12;Timeline: Human Genome Sequence HSLS, U.Pitt 1995 2014 2000 2003 2007 2007 2010 Human Genome Draft Sequence Complete Human Reference Genome Individual Human

Napp, Nils

166

Human genome sequencing with direct x-ray holographic imaging. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Direct holographic imaging of biological materials is widely applicable to the study of the structure, properties and action of genetic material. This particular application involves the sequencing of the human genome where prospective genomic imaging technology is composed of three subtechnologies, name an x-ray holographic camera, suitable chemistry and enzymology for the preparation of tagged DNA samples, and the illuminator in the form of an x-ray laser. We report appropriate x-ray camera, embodied by the instrument developed by MCR, is available and that suitable chemical and enzymatic procedures exist for the preparation of the necessary tagged DNA strands. Concerning the future development of the x-ray illuminator. We find that a practical small scale x-ray light source is indeed feasible. This outcome requires the use of unconventional physical processes in order to achieve the necessary power-compression in the amplifying medium. The understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly. Importantly, although the x-ray source does not currently exist, the understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly and the research has established the basic scaling laws that will determine the properties of the x-ray illuminator. When this x-ray source becomes available, an extremely rapid and cost effective instrument for 3-D imaging of biological materials can be applied to a wide range of biological structural assays, including the base-pair sequencing of the human genome and many questions regarding its higher levels of organization.

Rhodes, C.K.

1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

167

Report on the Human Genome Initiative for the Office of Health and Environmental Research  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The report urges DOE and the Nation to commit to a large, multi-year, multidisciplinary, technological undertaking to order and sequence the human genome. This effort will first require significant innovation in general capability to manipulate DNA, major new analytical methods for ordering and sequencing, theoretical developments in computer science and mathematical biology, and great expansions in our ability to store and manipulate the information and to interface it with other large and diverse genetic databases. The actual ordering and sequencing involves the coordinated processing of some 3 billion bases from a reference human genome. Science is poised on the rudimentary edge of being able to read and understand human genes. A concerted, broadly based, scientific effort to provide new methods of sufficient power and scale should transform this activity from an inefficient one-gene-at-a-time, single laboratory effort into a coordinated, worldwide, comprehensive reading of "the book of man". The effort will be extraordinary in scope and magnitude, but so will be the benefit to biological understanding, new technology and the diagnosis and treatment of human disease.

Tinoco, I.; Cahill, G.; Cantor, C.; Caskey, T.; Dulbecco, R.; Engelhardt, D. L.; Hood, L.; Lerman, L. S.; Mendelsohn, M. L.; Sinsheimer, R. L.; Smith, T.; Soll, D.; Stormo, G.; White, R. L.

1987-04-00T23:59:59.000Z

168

Funding needed for private enterprise in genome sequencing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Sciences advisory committee on the human genome project and announcing his intention to start a private company that would push ahead rapidly with both mapping and sequencing the human genome. ... near term, there also seems to be far less disagreement over the role of the private sector."While everyone else is fussing, I might as well go do it ...

Seth Shulman

1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

ProSOM: human core promoter prediction Thomas Abeel, Yvan Saeys and Yves Van de Peer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

additional information for genome annotation projects. Short abstract · 30,000 promoters, 60,000 other.abeel@psb.ugent.be web: http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be · Human genome assembly · CAGE TSS tags for human (~120 core promoter (50 bp) · Many genomes (350 projects) · Little sequence preservation in core promoter

Gent, Universiteit

170

Genome Biology 2009, 10:R134 Open Access2009Langmeadet al.Volume 10, Issue 11, Article R134Software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a human genome in three. Abstract As DNA sequencing outpaces improvements in computer speed, Crossbow analyzes data comprising 38-fold coverage of the human genome in three hours using a 320-CPU projects have leveraged parallelism for whole- genome assembly with short reads. Simpson et al. [12] use

Shafran, Izhak

171

Human Microbiome Project's DACC Aims to Keep Order in a Complex Collaborative Effort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human Microbiome Project's DACC Aims to Keep Order in a Complex Collaborative Effort December 17 of Medicine to establish a data-analysis and -coordination center for the Human Microbiome Project. Now, just are really a bunch of pipelines and dataflows associated with this project, not just one," Giglio told BioInform

Weber, David J.

172

Genomic analysis of mouse tumorigenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The availability of the human and mouse genome sequences has spurred a growing interest in analyzing mouse models of human cancer using genomic techniques. Comparative genomic studies on mouse and human tumors can be ...

Tam, Mandy Chi-Mun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

GEOECODYNAMICS AND THE KALAHARI EPEIROGENY: LINKING ITS GENOMIC RECORD, TREE OF LIFE AND PALIMPSEST INTO A UNIFIED NARRATIVE OF LANDSCAPE EVOLUTION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sequences of organismsa genomes archives signatures...reproduction of this information a as DNA sequences -effectively...and read evolutionary information. The predictions of...inauguration of the human genome project (NRC, 1988) that...

F.P.D. COTTERILL; M.J. DE WIT

174

Genomics and Clinical MedicineTranslational Research in Genetics and Genomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...important identity to a new scientific discipline — genomics — when he and Frank Ruddle launched a new journal by that name 3 years before the 1990 launch of the Human Genome Project. When McKusick asked me to succeed him as the editor-in-chief of Genomics in 2003, the year in which the "finished" human... The death in July 2008 of Victor A. McKusick marked the end of an era. McKusick, widely considered to be the founding father of medical genetics, gave both a name and an important identity to a new scientific discipline — genomics — when he and Frank ...

Boguski M.S.

2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

175

Integrative Annotation of Variants from 1092 Humans: Application to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrative Annotation of Variants from 1092 Humans: Application to Cancer Genomics Ekta Khurana, Michael Wilson, Yali Xue, Fuli Yu, 1000 Genomes Project Consortium, Emmanouil T. Dermitzakis, Haiyuan Yu in the 1000 Genomes Project (Phase 1), includ- ing single-nucleotide variants (SNVs), short insertions

Yu, Haiyuan

176

Semantics of the Integrated BioMedical Database Project -A Japanese National Project -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

whole molecular information in a human. It includes genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and so on. In this post genomic era, researchers are trying to connect all omics information to phenomicsSemantics of the Integrated BioMedical Database Project - A Japanese National Project - Jun Nakaya1

Mizoguchi, Riichiro

177

Repetitive DNA elements, nucleosome binding and human gene expression Ahsan Huda a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 1968). The completion of the human genome projects at the turn of the millennium further underscored Promoter architecture Human genome We evaluated the epigenetic contributions of repetitive DNA elements the extent to which the human genome sequence is made up of repetitive DNA elements (Lander et al., 2001

Jordan, King

178

HUMAN MUTATION 28(6), 554^562, 2007 PhenCode: Connecting ENCODE Data With  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of human mutations in the context of sequence and functional data from genome projects. Currently of the Life Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania; 2 National Human Genome, it connects human phenotype and clinical data in various locus-specific databases (LSDBs) with data on genome

Miller, Webb

179

Genome metabolome integrated network analysis to uncover connections between genetic variants and complex traits: an application to obesity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...22] reach the genome-wide significance...to influence human serum metabolite...metabolic and genetic information. Initially...of Finland (project grants nos...02), ENGAGE project and grant agreement...Bouchard. 2006 The human obesity gene...Lindgren, C , 2009 Genome-wide association...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

MCP Submitted Targeting the Human Cancer Pathway Protein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MCP Submitted Targeting the Human Cancer Pathway Protein Interaction Network by Structural Genomics for targeting co-functioning proteins by structural genomics projects. 2 byonMay28,2008www of the human genome sequence (4-6), the use of automated sequencing technology, and the development

Gerstein, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Genome-Wide siRNA-Based Functional Genomics of Pigmentation Identifies Novel Genes and Pathways That Impact Melanogenesis in Human Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

siRNA-Based Functional Genomics of Pigmentation Identifiespoorly understood. Functional genomics based on RNA-mediatedof RNAi-based functional genomics to identify novel genes,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Fraud strikes top genome lab  

SciTech Connect

Francis Collins, head of NIH`s Human Genome Project has informed colleagues that a junior researcher in his lab facke data in five papers co-authored by Collins. This article describes the whole scenario, how it was discovered, and what the reprocussions are.

Marshall, E.

1996-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

183

JGI - 2009 Genome Sequencing Targets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 2, 2008 July 2, 2008 Pine Tree, Boat-Boring Bivalve "Bugs", Duck Weed, Oil-Producing Microalgae, Stinkbird Gut, 40 Others Top DOE Joint Genome Institute 2009 Genome Sequencing Targets WALNUT CREEK, CA-In the continuing effort to tap the vast, unexplored reaches of the earth's microbial and plant domains for bioenergy and environmental applications, the DOE Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) has announced its latest portfolio of DNA sequencing projects that it will undertake in the coming year. The 44 projects, culled from nearly 150 proposals received through the Community Sequencing Program (CSP), represent over 60 billion nucleotides of data to be generated through this biodiversity sampling campaign-roughly the equivalent of 20 human genomes. "The scientific and technological advances enabled by the information

184

HUMAN MUTATION 0,1^9, 2007 PhenCode: Connecting ENCODE Data With  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and functional data from genome projects. Currently, it connects human phenotype and clinical data in various Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania; 2 National Human Genome Research.bx.psu.edu/phencode) is a collaborative, exploratory project to help understand phenotypes of human mutations in the context of sequence

Hardison, Ross C.

185

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access An iterative workflow for mining the human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in characterizing the genomes of around 200 intestinal species in the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) [7], the vast times more genes than the human genome and it has been estimated that this ecosystem contains over 5000 reported MetaHIT project, have indicated that the human gut microbiome contains a gene repository

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

186

FLTC Sponsored Research and Development Project Wins NEH Digital Humanities Start-up Grant!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FLTC Sponsored Research and Development Project Wins NEH Digital Humanities Start-up Grant! A six technology has been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Digital Humanities Start-up Grant (German) 6. Krysta Ryzewski, Department of Anthropology (Anthropology) The official list of 2014 NEH Grant

Cinabro, David

187

Complete genome sequence of Gordonia bronchialis type strain (3410T)  

SciTech Connect

Gordonia bronchialis Tsukamura 1971 is the type species of the genus. G. bronchialis is a human-pathogenic organism that has been isolated from a large variety of human tissues. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Gordoniaceae. The 5,290,012 bp long genome with its 4,944 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Jando, Marlen [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

of yeast was wrong,how much of the human counterpartmightbeeliminatedbyasimilar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­511 (2002). 12.International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium Nature 409, 860­921 (2001). 13.www- servedamongcloselyrelatedspecies(seeFig. 1). Because the Génolevures project covered only 20­40% of each genome, the possibility a genome fits together. Whether we are comparing human and mouse, or yeast and yeast, we still have

Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

189

ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature11233 Landscape of transcription in human cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the functional elements present in the human genome sequence2 . The five-year pilot phase of the ENCODE project3 of the genetic information encoded by genomes and a significant proportion of a cell's regulatory capabilities-quarters of the human genome is capable of being transcribed, as well as observations about the range and levels

Dean, Matthew D.

190

The consensus coding sequence (CCDS) project: Identifying a common protein-coding gene set  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the human and mouse genomes Kim D. Pruitt,1,9 Jennifer Harrow,2 Rachel A. Harte,3 Craig Wallin,1 Mark, United Kingdom Effective use of the human and mouse genomes requires reliable identification of genes coding sequence (CCDS) project tracks identical protein annotations on the reference mouse and human

Kellis, Manolis

191

MEETING REPORT Open Access The human proteome a scientific opportunity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enhance overall biomedical research and future healthcare. The Human Genome Project and its many follow Reaction Monitoring (SRM) Atlas, and the Human Proteome Project organized by the Human ProteomeMEETING REPORT Open Access The human proteome ­ a scientific opportunity for transforming

192

Functional genomics studies of human brain development and implications for autism spectrum disorder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the genetic and molecular basis of higher cognition. However, the underlying pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorders has long been a mystery. Various hypothesis ranging from psychosocial abnormalities to environmental insults have been purported... that the genomic architecture of ASD is incredibly heterogeneous and complex, necessitating a functional integration in order to decipher common molecular mechanisms underlying ASD. Genomic Architecture of ASD The identification of genomic loci and individual...

Ziats, Mark

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Environmental assessment for construction and operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) proposes to construct and operate a new laboratory for consolidation of current and future activities of the Human Genome Center (HGC). This document addresses the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental and human-health effects from the proposed facility construction and operation. This document was prepared in accordance the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (United States Codes 42 USC 4321-4347) (NEPA) and the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Final Rule for NEPA Implementing Procedures [Code of Federal Regulations 10CFR 1021].

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

An assessment of health educators' likelihood of adopting genomic competencies for the public health workforce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the completion of the Human Genome Project helps develop efficient treatment/prevention programs, it will raise new and non-trivial public health issues. Many of these issues fall under the professional purview of health educators. Yet...

Chen, Lei-Shih

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Human Radiation Experiments: Roadmap to the Project: ACHRE Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments - Executive Summary Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments - Executive Summary Publication Information The Creation of the Advisory Committee The President's Charge The Committee's Approach The Historical Context Key Findings Key Recommendations What's Next: The Advisory Committee's Legacy PUBLICATION INFORMATION The Final Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (stock number 061-000-00-848-9), the supplemental volumes to the Final Report (stock numbers 061-000-00850-1, 061-000-00851-9, and 061-000-00852-7), and additional copies of this Executive Summary (stock number 061-000-00849-7) may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. All telephone orders should be directed to: Superintendent of Documents

196

Human Radiation Experiments: Roadmap to the Project: ACHRE Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part IV: Overview Part IV: Overview In part IV we present the overall findings of the Advisory Committee's inquiry and deliberations and the recommendations that follow from these findings. In chapter 17, findings are presented in two parts, first for the period 1944 through 1974 and then for the contemporary period. These parts, in turn, are divided into findings regarding biomedical experiments and those regarding population exposures. We begin our presentation of findings for the period 1944 through 1974 with a summation of what we have learned about human radiation experiments: their number and purpose, the likelihood that they produced harm, and how human radiation experimentation contributed to advances in medicine. We then summarize what we have found concerning the nature of federal rules and policies governing research involving human subjects during this period, and the implementation of these rules in the conduct of human radiation experiments. Findings about the nature and implementation of federal rules cover issues of consent, risk, the selection of subjects, and the role of national security considerations.

197

Genome-Scale Identification of Membrane-Associated Human mRNAs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States of America, 5 of medicine. Plasma membrane proteins and secreted signaling proteins are candidate targets for monoclonal

Botstein, David

198

Phylogenetic Inference Using Whole Genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phylogenetic Inference Using Whole Genomes Bruce Rannala1 and Ziheng Yang2 1 Genome Center.yang@ucl.ac.uk Annu. Rev. Genomics Hum. Genet. 2008. 9:217­31 First published online as a Review in Advance on June 3, 2008 The Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics is online at genom.annualreviews.org This article

199

DOE Humanities Projects Announced | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Humanities Projects Announced DOE Humanities Projects Announced Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources ASCR Discovery Monthly News Roundup News Archives ASCR Program Documents ASCR Workshops and Conferences ASCR Presentations 100Gbps Science Network Related Links Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: sc.ascr@science.doe.gov More Information » Miscellaneous DOE Humanities Projects Announced Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Last year, the Department of Energy announced a partnership with the

200

Digital RNA allelotyping reveals tissue-specific and allele-specific gene expression in human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characterized four cell lines established from two human subjects in the Personal Genome Project. Approximately the comprehensive mapping of linkage disequilibrium in the human genome. The block-like distribution of linkageDigital RNA allelotyping reveals tissue-specific and allele-specific gene expression in human Kun

Cai, Long

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Digital RNA allelotyping reveals tissue-specific and allele-specific gene expression in human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characterized four cell lines established from two human subjects in the Personal Genome Project. Approximately the comprehensive mapping of linkage disequilibrium in the human genome. The block like distribution of linkageDigital RNA allelotyping reveals tissue-specific and allele-specific gene expression in human Kun

Church, George M.

202

A Consensus Tree Approach for Reconstructing Human Evolutionary History and Detecting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

genome over time implicitly encodes a history of how human populations have arisen, dispersed of the method on two large-scale genetic variation data sets: the HapMap Phase II and the Human Genome Diversity Project. Qualitative comparison to a consensus model of the evolution of mod- ern human population groups

Ravi, R.

203

Genotype-Imputation Accuracy across Worldwide Human Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

human populations has facilitated the mapping of complex-disease loci in genome-wide association (GWA) studies. These databases, such as The International HapMap Project (2.5 to 4 million SNPs genome-wide1 as ``reference panels,'' useful for diverse purposes in human genetics. Information in reference panels can

Rosenberg, Noah

204

Proceedings of the relevance of mass spectrometry to DNA sequence determination: Research needs for the Human Genome Program  

SciTech Connect

A workshop was sponsored for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Health and Environmental Research by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, April 4--5, 1990, in Seattle, Washington, to examine the potential role of mass spectrometry in the joint DOE/National Institutes of Health (NIH) Human Genome Program. The workshop was occasioned by recent developments in mass spectrometry that are providing new levels for selectivity, sensitivity, and, in particular, new methods of ionization appropriate for large biopolymers such as DNA. During discussions, three general mass spectrometric approaches to the determination of DNA sequence were considered: (1) the mass spectrometric detection of isotopic labels from DNA sequencing mixtures separated using gel electrophoresis, (2) the direct mass spectrometric analysis from direct ionization of unfractionated sequencing mixtures where the measured mass of the constituents functions to identify and order the base sequence (replacing separation by gel electrophoresis), and (3) an approach in which a single highly charged molecular ion of a large DNA segment produced is rapidly sequenced in an ion cyclotron resonance ion trap. The consensus of the workshop was that, on the basis of the new developments, mass spectrometry has the potential to provide the substantial increases in sequencing speed required for the Human Genome Program. 66 refs., 3 tabs.

Edmonds, C.G.; Smith, R.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Smith, L.M. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

GUIDELINES ON PUBLIC ADVERTISING FOR RECRUITMENT OF HUMAN SUBJECTS IN RESEARCH PROJECTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GUIDELINES ON PUBLIC ADVERTISING FOR RECRUITMENT OF HUMAN SUBJECTS IN RESEARCH PROJECTS Public Advertising: newspapers, radio, television, posters, letters, cards, electronic postings, etc. Recruitment] It is understood that a public advertisement is intended to capture the attention of any eligible individual

Shoubridge, Eric

206

Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology GENOMICS AND BIOTECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology GENOMICS AND BIOTECHNOLOGY A multidisciplinary organization, the Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology is a composed of faculty members representing projects at the Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology include the development of transgenic plants

207

Genomic Encyclopedia of Fungi  

SciTech Connect

Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 150 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

Grigoriev, Igor

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

208

Department Human Resources Bulletin, #027, FY06, dated August 1,2006 DOC Demonstration Project Operating Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Operating Procedures Purpose This issuance provides NOAA managers with pay setting flexibilitywhen Demonstration Project OperatingProcedures. . . . , . . Background On August 1,2006, the Department issued Human setting pay for Presidential Management Fellows (PMF) who are covered by the DOC Demonstration Project

209

INVESTIGATION Inferring Admixture Histories of Human Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and apply to test for admixture among all populations from the Human Genome Diversity Project (HGDPINVESTIGATION Inferring Admixture Histories of Human Populations Using Linkage Disequilibrium Po-range migrations and the resulting admixtures between populations have been important forces shaping human genetic

Reich, David

210

A compendium of gene expression in normal human tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gene Expression Index, the HuGE In- dex, http://www.hugeindex.org) for future studies of patho completion of the human genome project (8, 37a), greater attention is now focused on defining the biological

Weng, Zhiping

211

Human Diversity: Our Genes Tell Where we Live  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Human Polymorphism (CEPH) in the framework of the Human Genome Diversity Project initiated by LucaHuman Diversity: Our Genes Tell Where we Live Dispatch Laurent Excoffier A detailed genetic analysis of more than a thousand human subjects clusters them into five groups corresponding to major

Rosenberg, Noah

212

Gray, W. D. (2003). Cognitive factors in homeland defense: The role of human factors in the novel intelligence from massive data (NIMD) project, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (pp. 1017-1018). Santa Monica, CA: Human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intelligence from massive data (NIMD) project, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (pp. 1017-1018). Santa Monica, CA: Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. COGNITIVE FACTORS IN HOMELAND DEFENSE: THE ROLE

Gray, Wayne

213

Comparative Analysis of the -Like Globin Clusters in Mouse, Rat, and Human Chromosomes Indicates a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to GenBank/EMBL under accession no. AY016022.] Genome sequencing projects and comparative genome analysesComparative Analysis of the -Like Globin Clusters in Mouse, Rat, and Human Chromosomes Indicates -globin pseudogene. Comparative sequence analysis with the functional -globin loci at human Chromosome 16p

Miller, Webb

214

VectorBase: a home for invertebrate vectors of human pathogens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of laboratories initiated projects to sequence the genomes of important human pathogens: Plasmodium, Trypanosome://www.vectorbase.org/) is a web- accessible data repository for information about invertebrate vectors of human pathogens. Vector. Currently, VectorBase contains genome information for two organisms: Anopheles gambiae, a vector

Severson, David

215

I N N O V A T I O N The Human Genome Pro-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,shortcomings or defects in a building's envelope can be responsible for as much as half of its energy consumption was a composite map of the DNA from sev- eral people--a sort of averaged genetic picture of a human. But a growing of credit--every month.That's the future of homes and other build- ings,as seen by the U

Church, George M.

216

Mammalian comparative genomics and epigenomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The human genome sequence can be thought of as an instruction manual for our species, written and rewritten over more than a billion of years of evolution. Taking a complete inventory of our genome, dissecting its genes ...

Mikkelsen, Tarjei Sigurd, 1978-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

August 4, 2009 Berkeley Lab lecture: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks ? particularly with regard to breast cancer.

Joe Gray

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

218

Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment  

SciTech Connect

August 4, 2009 Berkeley Lab lecture: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks — particularly with regard to breast cancer.

Joe Gray

2009-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

219

Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment  

SciTech Connect

Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks — particularly with regard to breast cancer.

Gray, Joe

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

220

Evolutionary Genomics of Life in (and from) the Sea  

SciTech Connect

High throughput genome sequencing centers that were originally built for the Human Genome Project (Lander et al., 2001; Venter et al., 2001) have now become an engine for comparative genomics. The six largest centers alone are now producing over 150 billion nucleotides per year, more than 50 times the amount of DNA in the human genome, and nearly all of this is directed at projects that promise great insights into the pattern and processes of evolution. Unfortunately, this data is being produced at a pace far exceeding the capacity of the scientific community to provide insightful analysis, and few scientists with training and experience in evolutionary biology have played prominent roles to date. One of the consequences is that poor quality analyses are typical; for example, orthology among genes is generally determined by simple measures of sequence similarity, when this has been discredited by molecular evolutionary biologists decades ago. Here we discuss the how genomes are chosen for sequencing and how the scientific community can have input. We describe the PhIGs database and web tools (Dehal and Boore 2005a; http://PhIGs.org), which provide phylogenetic analysis of all gene families for all completely sequenced genomes and the associated 'Synteny Viewer', which allows comparisons of the relative positions of orthologous genes. This is the best tool available for inferring gene function across multiple genomes. We also describe how we have used the PhIGs methods with the whole genome sequences of a tunicate, fish, mouse, and human to conclusively demonstrate that two rounds of whole genome duplication occurred at the base of vertebrates (Dehal and Boore 2005b). This evidence is found in the large scale structure of the positions of paralogous genes that arose from duplications inferred by evolutionary analysis to have occurred at the base of vertebrates.

Boore, Jeffrey L.; Dehal, Paramvir; Fuerstenberg, Susan I.

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

JGI - Intro to Genomics 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Introduction to Genomics: The Human Genome and Beyond An Introduction to Genomics: The Human Genome and Beyond 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next>> What is genomics? THE HUMAN BODY consists of trillions of cells. Almost all contain an entire genome--the complete set of inherited genetic information encoded in our DNA. When humans reproduce, the parents' sperm and egg DNA combine to contribute a genome's worth of genetic information to the fertilized embryo. That same information is in each of the cells that eventually make up an organism. cell, DNA helix, and protein structure Some segments of DNA, called genes or "coding" DNA, contain the chemical recipe that determines particular traits; genetics is the study of the inheritance and function of these genes. Scientists now estimate that humans have about 30,000 genes, located along threadlike, tightly coiled

222

Computational genomics on the grid.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The post-genomic era is characterized by large amount of data available from sequencing projects. The large size of biological datasets, inherent complexity of biological problems… (more)

Chen, Chunxi.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

From DNA Sequence Analysis to Modeling Replication in the Human Genome  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We explore the large-scale behavior of nucleotide compositional strand asymmetries along human chromosomes. As we observe for 7 of 9 origins of replication experimentally identified so far, the (TA+GC) skew displays rather sharp upward jumps, with a linear decreasing profile in between two successive jumps. We present a model of replication with well positioned replication origins and random terminations that accounts for the observed characteristic serrated skew profiles. We succeed in identifying 287 pairs of putative adjacent replication origins with an origin spacing ?1–2??Mbp that are likely to correspond to replication foci observed in interphase nuclei and recognized as stable structures that persist throughout subsequent cell generations.

E. B. Brodie of Brodie; S. Nicolay; M. Touchon; B. Audit; Y. d’Aubenton-Carafa; C. Thermes; A. Arneodo

2005-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

224

DOE Joint Genome Institute 2008 Progress Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stanford Human Genome Center (SHGC) began collaborating withscientific goals, and the JGI SHGC kept pace, focusing on

Gilbert, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Clustering and Registration of Functional Data with Applications in Time Course Genomics Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Clustering Methods for Time Course Genomics Data . .Methods for Time Course Genomics Data. To be submitted S.human subjects. BMC Genomics, 13, 2012. 636. Kongming Wang

Zhang, Yafeng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Harnessing Human Capital in Large Scale Projects - Towards an Elaborated Model of Organizational Climate for Project Organizations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of the present study was to uncover the important dimensions of organizational climate for project organizations, and to explore which organizational levels are… (more)

Hannevik, Martine Berg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Regionally Specific and Genome-Wide Analyses Conclusively Demonstrate the Absence of CpG Methylation in Human Mitochondrial DNA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...genome-wide in vertebrate nuclear DNA, the state of methylation...cytosines at non-CpG sites in the nuclear DNA in these studies ranged...Table 6 Analysis of published datasets of genome-wide sodium bisulfite...Cs in mtDNA At non-CpGs in nuclear DNA Akalin et al. (10) a...

Elizabeth E. Hong; Cindy Y. Okitsu; Andrew D. Smith; Chih-Lin Hsieh

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

228

Extreme Genomics By Scouring the Genomes of 50 HIV-Resistant People, Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extreme Genomics By Scouring the Genomes of 50 HIV-Resistant People, Study Takes Aim at Rare Gene Genome Variation, and his colleagues think that the complete genome sequences of those fortunate few against the viral strain that usually infects humans. That's because the CCR5 protein is Extreme Genomics

Dolbow, John

229

Complete genome sequence of Anaerococcus prevotii type strain (PC1T)  

SciTech Connect

Anaerococcus prevotii (Foubert and Douglas 1948) Ezaki et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its arguable assignment to the provisionally arranged family Peptostreptococcaceae . A. prevotii is an obligate anaerobic coccus, usually arranged in clumps or tetrads. The strain, whose genome is described here, was originally isolated from human plasma; other strains of the species were also isolated from clinical specimen. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus. Next to Finegoldia magna, A. prevotii is only the second species from the family Peptostreptococcaceae for which a complete genome sequence is described. The 1,998,633 bp long genome (chromosome and one plasmid) with its 1852 protein-coding and 61 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

LaButti, Kurt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pukall, Rudiger [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Steenblock, Katja [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring the Standard Model Exploring the Standard Model       You've heard a lot about the Standard Model and the pieces are hopefully beginning to fall into place. However, even a thorough understanding of the Standard Model is not the end of the story but the beginning. By exploring the structure and details of the Standard Model we encounter new questions. Why do the most fundamental particles have the particular masses we observe? Why aren't they all symmetric? How is the mass of a particle related to the masses of its constituents? Is there any other way of organizing the Standard Model? The activities in this project will elucidate but not answer our questions. The Standard Model tells us how particles behave but not necessarily why they do so. The conversation is only beginning. . . .

231

Fungal Genomics Program  

SciTech Connect

The JGI Fungal Genomics Program aims to scale up sequencing and analysis of fungal genomes to explore the diversity of fungi important for energy and the environment, and to promote functional studies on a system level. Combining new sequencing technologies and comparative genomics tools, JGI is now leading the world in fungal genome sequencing and analysis. Over 120 sequenced fungal genomes with analytical tools are available via MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a web-portal for fungal biologists. Our model of interacting with user communities, unique among other sequencing centers, helps organize these communities, improves genome annotation and analysis work, and facilitates new larger-scale genomic projects. This resulted in 20 high-profile papers published in 2011 alone and contributing to the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, which targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts). Our next grand challenges include larger scale exploration of fungal diversity (1000 fungal genomes), developing molecular tools for DOE-relevant model organisms, and analysis of complex systems and metagenomes.

Grigoriev, Igor

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

232

E-Print Network 3.0 - accurate genome alignment Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; Biology and Medicine 3 Automated Whole-Genome Multiple Alignment of Rat, Mouse, and Human Summary: Automated Whole-Genome Multiple Alignment of Rat, Mouse, and Human Michael...

233

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated whole-genome multiple Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pare ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 16 Human Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequencing James L. Weber1,3 Summary: Human Whole-Genome...

234

IMPEE PhD Opportunity Project title: Cyber-physical Systems (CPS) for knowledge discovery, data exploration and human factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMPEE PhD Opportunity Project title: Cyber-physical Systems (CPS) for knowledge discovery, data exploration and human factors research Supervisor(s): T. Lim, J.M. Ritchie Abstract CPS is an engineering/augmented/mixed reality spaces. R&D interests include (but not limited to): Aural or narrative guidance for product design

Greenaway, Alan

235

Aspergillus Niger Genomics: Past, Present and into the Future  

SciTech Connect

Aspergillus niger is a filamentous ascomycete fungus that is ubiquitous in the environment and has been implicated in opportunistic infections of humans. In addition to its role as an opportunistic human pathogen, A. niger is economically important as a fermentation organism used for the production of citric acid. Industrial citric acid production by A. niger represents one of the most efficient, highest yield bioprocesses in use currently by industry. The genome size of A. niger is estimated to be between 35.5 and 38.5 megabases (Mb) divided among eight chromosomes/linkage groups that vary in size from 3.5 - 6.6 Mb. Currently, there are three independent A. niger genome projects, an indication of the economic importance of this organism. The rich amount of data resulting from these multiple A. niger genome sequences will be used for basic and applied research programs applicable to fermentation process development, morphology and pathogenicity.

Baker, Scott E.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Chlamydomonas reinhardtii at the Crossroads of Genomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...55108 4 Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute...with light as a sole energy source (photoautotrophic...production of clean, solar-generated energy in the form of H2, and...59). Ongoing genome projects offer the scientific...

Arthur R. Grossman; Elizabeth E. Harris; Charles Hauser; Paul A. Lefebvre; Diego Martinez; Dan Rokhsar; Jeff Shrager; Carolyn D. Silflow; David Stern; Olivier Vallon; Zhaoduo Zhang

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Report on {open_quotes}inspection of human subject research in intelligence and intelligence-related projects{close_quotes}  

SciTech Connect

Executive Order 12333, {open_quotes}United States Intelligence Activities,{close_quotes} (1) designates the Department`s intelligence element as a member of the Intelligence Community, and (2) states that no agency within the Intelligence community shall sponsor, contract for or conduct research on human subjects except in accordance with guidelines issued by the Department of Health and Human Services. The Federal policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, which was based on Department of Health and Human Services regulations, was promulgated in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 745 by the Department of Energy. The purpose of this inspection was to review the internal control procedures used by the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security to manage selected intelligence and intelligence-related projects that involve human subject research.

NONE

1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

238

ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature11245 Architecture of the human regulatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the principles of the human transcriptional regulatory network, we determined the genomic binding information project now begins to enable such analyses20 . Moreover, with the vast amount of human polymorphism dataARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature11245 Architecture of the human regulatory network derived from ENCODE

Nachman, Michael

239

Locating Protein Coding Regions in Human DNA using a Decision Tree Algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NTRODUCT I ON The Human Genome Project and the many major sequencing efforts that fall under its demesneLocating Protein Coding Regions in Human DNA using a Decision Tree Algorithm Steven Salzberg would be extremely valuable. Human DNA sequence presents the most important challenge for automated gene

Salzberg, Steven

240

RESEARCH PAPER Modelling the Human Immune System by Combining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"virtual organism" simulation projects are currently underway in the US, Japan and Europe: Visible Human of immune system-related diseases where both timing and genomic information are of importance. Key wordsRESEARCH PAPER Modelling the Human Immune System by Combining Bioinformatics and Systems Biology

Utrecht, Universiteit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute HUMAN GENETICS DATA SECURITY POLICY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

procedures 1. Data category - All projects involving human genetics data must be assigned to one of the four. Level 2: Standard (genomic data with relatively limited demographic/phenotypic information) We expect1 Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute HUMAN GENETICS DATA SECURITY POLICY February 2011 Although almost

Maizels, Rick

242

SUBGROUPS FOR BIOMASS PROJECT Hon222c Energy & Environment: Humans & Nature P.B.Rhines, Alex Cypro. Bob Koon 10 April 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUBGROUPS FOR BIOMASS PROJECT Hon222c Energy & Environment: Humans & Nature P.B.Rhines, Alex Cypro, and are there other biomass projects competing for it? 2. Air quality, including particulates and winds and human Statement) should be carried out before approval: why? 3. Ownership, economic aspects, green energy

243

Population genomics20-02-2009 Antnio Rodrigues; Bruno Santos / 59 Population Genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population genomics20-02-2009 António Rodrigues; Bruno Santos / 59 Population Genomics 1 António Rodrigues (PDBC 2008) Bruno Santos (PDBC 2008) #12;Population genomics20-02-2009 António Rodrigues; Bruno Santos / 59 Contents 2 2 1000 genome project 1 Motivation and Introduction New generation sequencing

Goldschmidt, Christina

244

Structural Genomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Structural Genomics ... Structural genomics is the field of science focused on the systematic determination of the three-dimensional structure of the proteins encoded into genomes. ... Structural genomics is spreading the philosophy of high throughput in all fields of science and making available new tools to speed up research procedures. ...

Ivano Bertini

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Characterization of Evolutionary Rates and Constraints in Three Mammalian Genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of microevolutionary phenomena that have shaped the human, mouse, and rat genomes since their last common ancestor. We are distinct. Finally, we have identified those regions in the human genome that are evolving slowly, which are likely to include functional elements important to human biology. At least 5% of the human genome

Batzoglou, Serafim

246

Complete genome sequence of Leptotrichia buccalis type strain (C-1013-bT)  

SciTech Connect

Leptotrichia buccalis (Robin 1853) Trevisan 1879 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated location in the sparsely populated and neither taxonomically nor genomically adequately accessed family 'Leptotrichiaceae' within the phylum 'Fusobacteria'. Species of Leptotrichia are large fusiform non-motile, non-sporulating rods, which often populate the human oral flora. L. buccalis is anaerobic to aerotolerant, and saccharolytic. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order 'Fusobacteriales' and no more than the second sequence from the phylum 'Fusobacteria'. The 2,465,610 bp long single replicon genome with its 2306 protein-coding and 61 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Ivanova, Natalia; Gronow, Sabine; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Saunders, Liz; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Pitluck, Sam; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Chain, Patrick; Rohde, Christine; Goker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

247

Complete genome sequence of Leptotrichia buccalis type strain (C-1013-bT)  

SciTech Connect

Leptotrichia buccalis (Robin 1853) Trevisan 1879 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated location in the sparsely populated and neither taxonomically nor genomically adequately accessed family 'Leptotrichiaceae' within the phylum 'Fusobacteria'. Species of Leptotrichia are large, fusiform, non-motile, non-sporulating rods, which often populate the human oral flora. L. buccalis is anaerobic to aerotolerant, and saccharolytic. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order 'Fusobacteriales' and no more than the second sequence from the phylum 'Fusobacteria'. The 2,465,610 bp long single replicon genome with its 2306 protein-coding and 61 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Rohde, Christine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Genomics and Malaria Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...-targeted and human-targeted approaches — but in reality, malaria results from three intimately interacting organisms (Figure 1). Fortunately, genomics-based approaches to malaria offer the strategic advantage of considering all three participants through integrative data sets, allowing us to identify... The genomic sequences of the malarial vector, parasite, and host — the three components of the malarial transmission system — have been known for at least two years. It may be possible to counter the disease by harnessing this genomic information to launch a strategic attack on the parasite during vulnerable stages of its life cycle.

Vernick K.D.; Waters A.P.

2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

249

Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

SciTech Connect

Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks — particularly with regard to breast cancer.

Gray, Joe

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

250

Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome Mouse Genome Sequencing Consortium ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... The sequence of the mouse genome is a key informational tool for understanding the contents of the human genome collaboration to produce a high-quality draft sequence of the mouse genome. We also present an initial

Eddy, Sean

251

Hybrid Human Powered Vehicle (Phase 3) The Zero EMission (ZEM) Vehicle Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Construction of ZEM Car ­ a hybrid human/electric/solar powered vehicle (P-2) (2007-2008) Principal) Hybrid human pedaling/ electric powered vehicle- Designed and constructed P-1 prototype Sponsor: SJSU) Hybrid human pedaling/ Electric/solar powered vehicle (HPV-ZEM)-Designed P-2 Sponsor: SJSU-COE 16 ME + 3

Su, Xiao

252

Strategies and tools for whole genome alignments  

SciTech Connect

The availability of the assembled mouse genome makespossible, for the first time, an alignment and comparison of two largevertebrate genomes. We have investigated different strategies ofalignment for the subsequent analysis of conservation of genomes that areeffective for different quality assemblies. These strategies were appliedto the comparison of the working draft of the human genome with the MouseGenome Sequencing Consortium assembly, as well as other intermediatemouse assemblies. Our methods are fast and the resulting alignmentsexhibit a high degree of sensitivity, covering more than 90 percent ofknown coding exons in the human genome. We have obtained such coveragewhile preserving specificity. With a view towards the end user, we havedeveloped a suite of tools and websites for automatically aligning, andsubsequently browsing and working with whole genome comparisons. Wedescribe the use of these tools to identify conserved non-coding regionsbetween the human and mouse genomes, some of which have not beenidentified by other methods.

Couronne, Olivier; Poliakov, Alexander; Bray, Nicolas; Ishkhanov,Tigran; Ryaboy, Dmitriy; Rubin, Edward; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna

2002-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

253

Genomics ace quits Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... end he was preparing to leave for the University of Chicago in Illinois, frustrated by Japan's lack of support for genomics and doubtful that the country would ever take a ... He is one of the country's best-funded researchers and has led some of Japan's biggest science projects. In addition, he is a successful biotechnology entrepreneur, having ...

David Cyranoski

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - arabinosylcytosin pharmacogenomics genome...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

We illustrate Source: Imoto, Seiya - Laboratory of DNA Information Analysis, Human Genome Center, University of Tokyo. Collection: Computer Technologies and...

255

Ancient genomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2015 review-article PART IV: ANCIENT GENOMICS 1001 70 198 Discussion meeting issue...author and source are credited. Ancient genomics Clio Der Sarkissian Morten E. Allentoft...field of aDNA has entered the new era of genomics and has provided valuable information...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Culminating applications of human factors to the academic affairs web team projects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The demand for Human Factors specialists in the private sector has grown significantly in the past decade. One reason for this demand is attributed to… (more)

Atachagua, Juan Antonio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Reconstructing large regions of an ancestral mammalian genome in silico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA; 2 National Human Genome Research Institute, National.ucsc.edu/ancestors.] Following completion of the human genome sequence, there is now considerable interest in obtaining a more comprehensive understanding of its evolution (International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium [IHGSC] 2001

Miller, Webb

258

Targeted and Nontargeted Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on Delayed Genomic Instability in Human Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...humans receive some radiation exposure, mostly...risks associated with radiation exposure come from populations exposed to ionizing radiation, primarily from epidemiologic...However, those doses, in the range of 0.2 to 2.5...

Lei Huang; Perry M. Kim; Jac A. Nickoloff; and William F. Morgan

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Genome Biology 2005, 6:312 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genome Biology 2005, 6:312 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch Meeting report Large-scale discovery and validation of functional elements in the human genome-mail: bbernst@fas.harvard.edu. Manolis Kellis. E-mail: manoli@mit.edu Published: 1 March 2005 Genome Biology

Kellis, Manolis

260

Meeting report The changing face of genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this technology into studying transcriptional regulator binding in the human genome, with applicationsMeeting report The changing face of genomics Manolis Kellis Address: The Broad Institute AGBT / AMS meeting on Advances in Genome Biology & Technology Marco Island, Florida, USA, February 4

Kellis, Manolis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Genomics-based drug discovery venture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Genomics-based drug discovery venture ... The Cambridge, Mass.-based company calls its DiscoverEase program "functional genomics"—designed to isolate and rapidly determine not only genes but also the related functions of critical proteins. ... Other genomics programs sequence vast amounts of human genetic information. ...

ANN THAYER

1996-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

Genome duplications (polyploidy) / ancientGenome duplications (polyploidy) / ancient genome duplications (genome duplications (paleopolyploidypaleopolyploidy))  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genome duplications (polyploidy) / ancientGenome duplications (polyploidy) / ancient genome duplications (genome duplications (paleopolyploidypaleopolyploidy)) Mechanism? e.g. a diploid cell undergoes;Paramecium genome duplicationsParamecium genome duplications #12;Comparison of two scaffolds originating from

Utrecht, Universiteit

263

Considerations Related To Human Intrusion In The Context Of Disposal Of Radioactive Waste-The IAEA HIDRA Project  

SciTech Connect

The principal approaches for management of radioactive waste are commonly termed ‘delay and decay’, ‘concentrate and contain’ and ‘dilute and disperse’. Containing the waste and isolating it from the human environment, by burying it, is considered to increase safety and is generally accepted as the preferred approach for managing radioactive waste. However, this approach results in concentrated sources of radioactive waste contained in one location, which can pose hazards should the facility be disrupted by human action in the future. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) agree that some form of inadvertent human intrusion (HI) needs to be considered to address the potential consequences in the case of loss of institutional control and loss of memory of the disposal facility. Requirements are reflected in national regulations governing radioactive waste disposal. However, in practice, these requirements are often different from country to country, which is then reflected in the actual implementation of HI as part of a safety case. The IAEA project on HI in the context of Disposal of RadioActive waste (HIDRA) has been started to identify potential areas for improved consistency in consideration of HI. The expected outcome is to provide recommendations on how to address human actions in the safety case in the future, and how the safety case may be used to demonstrate robustness and optimize siting, design and waste acceptance criteria within the context of a safety case.

Seitz, Roger; Kumano, Yumiko; Bailey, Lucy; Markley, Chris; Andersson, Eva; Beuth, Thomas

2014-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

264

Complete genome sequence of Nocardiopsis dassonvillei type strain (IMRU 509T)  

SciTech Connect

Nocardiopsis dassonvillei (Brocq-Rousseau 1904) Meyer 1976 is the type species of the genus Nocardiopsis, which in turn is the type genus of the family Nocardiopsaceae. This species is of interest because of its ecological versatility. Members of N. dassonvillei have been isolated from a large variety of natural habitats such as soil and marine sediments, from different plant and animal materials as well as from human patients. Moreover, representatives of the genus Nocardiopsis participate actively in biopolymer degradation. This is the first complete genome sequence in the family Nocardiopsaceae. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 6,543,312 bp long genome consist of a 5.77 Mbp chromosome and a 0.78 Mbp plasmid and with its 5,570 protein-coding and 77 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Sun, Hui [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Djao, Olivier Duplex [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Complete genome sequence of Segniliparus rotundus type strain (CDC 1076T)  

SciTech Connect

Segniliparus rotundus Butler 2005 is the type species of the genus Segniliparus, which is cur-rently the only genus in the corynebacterial family Segniliparaceae. This family is of large in-terest because of a novel late-emerging genus-specific mycolate pattern. The type strain has been isolated from human sputum and is probably an opportunistic pathogen. Here we de-scribe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and anno-tation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Segniliparaceae. The 3,157,527 bp long genome with its 3,081 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Misra, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Jando, Marlen [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Schneider, Susan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Genome Engineering  

SciTech Connect

Dan Voytas, University of Minnesota, at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 20, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif

Voytas, Dan [University of Minnesota

2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

Algorithms for genomics and genetics : compression-accelerated search and admixture analysis .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Rapid advances in next-generation sequencing technologies are revolutionizing genomics, with data sets at the scale of thousands of human genomes fast becoming the norm. These… (more)

Loh, Po-Ru

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Humanities and Social Relevance for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Students: The Leonardo Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humanities and Social Relevance for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Students: The Leonardo chemistry and chemical-engineering education. Its goal is to prepare educational materials on the interface between chemical technology and society for use by chemical-engineering or chemistry professors

Doudna, Jennifer A.

269

A Taste of Algal Genomes from the Joint Genome Institute  

SciTech Connect

Algae play profound roles in aquatic food chains and the carbon cycle, can impose health and economic costs through toxic blooms, provide models for the study of symbiosis, photosynthesis, and eukaryotic evolution, and are candidate sources for bio-fuels; all of these research areas are part of the mission of DOE's Joint Genome Institute (JGI). To date JGI has sequenced, assembled, annotated, and released to the public the genomes of 18 species and strains of algae, sampling almost all of the major clades of photosynthetic eukaryotes. With more algal genomes currently undergoing analysis, JGI continues its commitment to driving forward basic and applied algal science. Among these ongoing projects are the pan-genome of the dominant coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, the interrelationships between the 4 genomes in the nucleomorph-containing Bigelowiella natans and Guillardia theta, and the search for symbiosis genes of lichens.

Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

2012-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

270

Comparative genomics and genome evolution in yeasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Sternberg and Janet Thornton Comparative genomics and genome evolution in yeasts Kenneth...powerful model system for comparative genomics research. The availability of multiple...cerevisiae |evolution|bioinformatics|genomics| 1. Introduction The rationale put...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

ATHLATES: accurate typing of human leukocyte antigen through exome sequencing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project, should already contain adequate information for allelic HLA typing. However, this is challengingATHLATES: accurate typing of human leukocyte antigen through exome sequencing Chang Liu1 , Xiao, MO 63110, USA, 2 Genome Sequencing and Analysis Program, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Mitra, Rob

272

Applying Logic Programming to Derive Novel Functional Information of Genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applying Logic Programming to Derive Novel Functional Information of Genomes Arvind K. Bansal1, and to enhance the effects of useful bacteria. It is anticipated that the complete human genome will be fully to develop tools to understand human genome components: the functionality of genes and an understanding

Bansal, Arvind K.

273

Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007;318:1108–1113.   8.  Cancer Genome Atlas Network.  somatic mutation in human cancer genomes.   Nature 2007;446:153–158.   11.  Katoh M.  Cancer genomics and genetics of 

Spellman, Paul T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Evolution and comparative genomics of subcellular specializations: EST sequencing of Torpedo electric organ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolution and comparative genomics of subcellular specializations: EST sequencing of Torpedo discovery Open reading frame (ORF) Uncharacterized open reading frames (ORFs) in human genomic sequence Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The availability of complete genomic sequences

Vertes, Akos

275

The mechanism and function of pervasive noncoding transcription in the mammalian genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vast majority of the mammalian genome does not encode proteins. Only 2% of the genome is exonic, yet recent deep survey of human transcripitome suggested that 75% of the genome is transcribed, including half of the ...

Wu, Xuebing, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

12 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 1, NO. 1, MARCH 2002 Scanning the Controls: Genomics and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 1, NO. 1, MARCH 2002 Scanning the Controls: Genomics and topological complexity is the complexity of the genome itself, consisting of about one billion basepairs. The Human Genome Proj

277

Fueling Future with Algal Genomics  

SciTech Connect

Algae constitute a major component of fundamental eukaryotic diversity, play profound roles in the carbon cycle, and are prominent candidates for biofuel production. The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is leading the world in algal genome sequencing (http://jgi.doe.gov/Algae) and contributes of the algal genome projects worldwide (GOLD database, 2012). The sequenced algal genomes offer catalogs of genes, networks, and pathways. The sequenced first of its kind genomes of a haptophyte E.huxleyii, chlorarachniophyte B.natans, and cryptophyte G.theta fill the gaps in the eukaryotic tree of life and carry unique genes and pathways as well as molecular fossils of secondary endosymbiosis. Natural adaptation to conditions critical for industrial production is encoded in algal genomes, for example, growth of A.anophagefferens at very high cell densities during the harmful algae blooms or a global distribution across diverse environments of E.huxleyii, able to live on sparse nutrients due to its expanded pan-genome. Communications and signaling pathways can be derived from simple symbiotic systems like lichens or complex marine algae metagenomes. Collectively these datasets derived from algal genomics contribute to building a comprehensive parts list essential for algal biofuel development.

Grigoriev, Igor

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

278

Identifying Recent Adaptations in Large-Scale Genomic Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although several hundred regions of the human genome harbor signals of positive natural selection, few of the relevant adaptive traits and variants have been elucidated. Using full-genome sequence variation from the 1000 ...

Andersen, Kristian G.

279

2006, UCSC Center for Biomolecular Science & Engineering--Page 1 of 4 UCSC GENOME RESEARCH PRIMER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All of the functions of a human cell are implicitly coded in the human genome. Now that the molecular sequence of the human genome is known, researchers have begun to mine it for clues as to how the body works in health and in disease. Besides being the blueprint for life, the human genome constitutes a record

California at Santa Cruz, University of

280

Functional genomics as a window on radiation stress signaling Sally A Amundson*,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Functional genomics as a window on radiation stress signaling Sally A Amundson*,1 , Michael Bittner 20892, USA; 2 National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD before the completion of the human genome draft sequence, a number of techniques for genomic expression

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fungal Genomics Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strains Comparative genomics and transcriptomics of xyloseFungal Genomics Program Igor Grigoriev 1 * (complex communities Fungal Genomics Program Igor Grigoriev

Grigoriev, Igor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

NMR and Structural Genomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NMR and Structural Genomics ... The role of NMR in structural genomics is outlined, with particular emphasis on using protein domains as targets. ... Targets in Structural Genomics ...

David Staunton; Jo Owen; Iain D. Campbell

2002-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

283

Complete genome sequence of the bile-resistant pigment- producing anaerobe Alistipes finegoldii type strain (AHN2437T)  

SciTech Connect

Alistipes finegoldii Rautio et al. 2003 is one of five species of Alistipes with a validly pub- lished name: family Rikenellaceae, order Bacteroidetes, class Bacteroidia, phylum Bacteroidetes. This rod-shaped and strictly anaerobic organism has been isolated mostly from human tissues. Here we describe the features of the type strain of this species, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. A. finegoldii is the first member of the genus Alistipes for which the complete genome sequence of its type strain is now available. The 3,734,239 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,302 protein-coding and 68 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Stackebrandt, Erko [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Munk, Christine [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of the opportunistic oral pathogen Prevotella multisaccharivorax type strain (PPPA20T)  

SciTech Connect

Prevotella multisaccharivorax Sakamoto et al. 2005 is a species of the large genus Prevotella, which belongs to the family Prevotellaceae. The species is of medical interest because its members are able to cause diseases in the human oral cavity such as periodontitis, root caries and others. Although 77 Prevotella genomes have already been sequenced or are targeted for sequencing, this is only the second completed genome sequence of a type strain of a species within the genus Prevotella to be published. The 3,388,644 bp long genome is assembled in three non-contiguous contigs, harbors 2,876 protein-coding and 75 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lu, Megan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

GWR PhD Studentship in Human Robot Interaction This project is a partnership between the Bristol Robotics Laboratory (www.brl.ac.uk) and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GWR PhD Studentship in Human Robot Interaction This project is a partnership between the Bristol when industrial corporations seek to market such products. Three major tasks are envisaged to form the overall work of the PhD programme: Task 1: Theories and techniques The basic theories and techniques

Winfield, Alan FT

286

Integrated genomic analyses of ovarian carcinoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A catalogue of molecular aberrations that cause ovarian cancer is critical for developing and deploying therapies that will improve patients’ lives. The Cancer Genome Atlas project has analysed messenger RNA expression, ...

Lander, Eric S.

287

Evolutionary conservation and genomic organization of XAP-4, an Xq28 located gene coding for a human rab GDP-dissociation inhibitor (GDI)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After the development of efficient methods for the construction of transcription maps of defined genomic regions, the rate-limiting step in the analysis of the coding potentials of these regions is the elucida...

Z. Sedlacek; D. S. Konecki; B. Korn; S. M. Klauck; A. Poustka

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

A computational framework for the identification, cataloging, and classification of evolutionary conserved genomic DNA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolutionarily conserved genomic regions (ecores) are understudied, and yet comprise a very large percentage of the Human Genome. Highly conserved human-mouse non-coding ecores, for example, are more abundant within the ...

Saluja, Sunil K. (Sunil Kumar), 1968-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Complete genome sequence of Tsukamurella paurometabola type strain (no. 33T)  

SciTech Connect

Tsukamurella paurometabola corrig. (Steinhaus 1941) Collins et al. 1988 is the type species of the genus Tsukamurella, which is the type genus to the family Tsukamurellaceae. The spe- cies is not only of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location, but also because it is a human opportunistic pathogen with some strains of the species reported to cause lung in- fection, lethal meningitis, and necrotizing tenosynovitis. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Tsukamurella and the first genome sequence of a member of the family Tsukamurellaceae. The 4,479,724 bp long genome contains a 99,806 bp long plasmid and a total of 4,335 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes, and is a part of the Ge- nomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Munk, Christine [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Yasawong, Montri [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Genomics Division Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PIs PIs Mark Biggin Jim Bristow Jan-Fang Cheng Inna Dubchak Suzanna Lewis Chris Mungall Len Pennacchio Eddy Rubin Axel Visel Divisional Information Support Staff Seminars Diversity Directory Contact Us The characterization and analysis of genome sequences from such diverse organisms as humans to the most primitive soil microbe represent a watershed opportunity for biology. The Genomics Division is taking advantage of this wealth of new information. While it is well known that DNA encodes the basic blue print of life, it is not known how best to interpret most of this information. To address this question, laboratories within the division are developing computational, biochemical, genetic, and imaging methods to decipher the complex sequence motifs that control RNA transcription, DNA replication, and chromosome structure. The Division is

291

Toward an Integrated BAC Library Resource for Genome Sequencing and Analysis  

SciTech Connect

We developed a great deal of expertise in building large BAC libraries from a variety of DNA sources including humans, mice, corn, microorganisms, worms, and Arabidopsis. We greatly improved the technology for screening these libraries rapidly and for selecting appropriate BACs and mapping BACs to develop large overlapping contigs. We became involved in supplying BACs and BAC contigs to a variety of sequencing and mapping projects and we began to collaborate with Drs. Adams and Venter at TIGR and with Dr. Leroy Hood and his group at University of Washington to provide BACs for end sequencing and for mapping and sequencing of large fragments of chromosome 16. Together with Dr. Ian Dunham and his co-workers at the Sanger Center we completed the mapping and they completed the sequencing of the first human chromosome, chromosome 22. This was published in Nature in 1999 and our BAC contigs made a major contribution to this sequencing effort. Drs. Shizuya and Ding invented an automated highly accurate BAC mapping technique. We also developed long-term collaborations with Dr. Uli Weier at UCSF in the design of BAC probes for characterization of human tumors and specific chromosome deletions and breakpoints. Finally the contribution of our work to the human genome project has been recognized in the publication both by the international consortium and the NIH of a draft sequence of the human genome in Nature last year. Dr. Shizuya was acknowledged in the authorship of that landmark paper. Dr. Simon was also an author on the Venter/Adams Celera project sequencing the human genome that was published in Science last year.

Simon, M. I.; Kim, U.-J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

292

Gene recognition in eukaryotic DNA by comparison of genomic sequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......especially in the context of genome projects generating long multigene fragments...However, we will allow ourselves some liberty of speech using phrases like 'alignment...taken from the Berkeley Drosophila Project sample (Reese et al. , 2000......

P. S. Novichkov; M. S. Gelfand; A. A. Mironov

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

An Experimentally-Supported Genome-Scale Metabolic Network Reconstruct...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

requirements characteristic of this strain. Conclusions: Y. pestis continues to be a dangerous threat to human health during modern times. The Y. pestis genome-scale metabolic...

294

Genomic Sequence Comparisons, 1987-2003 Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This project was to develop new DNA sequencing and RNA and protein quantitation methods and related genome annotation tools. The project began in 1987 with the development of multiplex sequencing (published in Science in 1988), and one of the first automated sequencing methods. This lead to the first commercial genome sequence in 1994 and to the establishment of the main commercial participants (GTC then Agencourt) in the public DOE/NIH genome project. In collaboration with GTC we contributed to one of the first complete DOE genome sequences, in 1997, that of Methanobacterium thermoautotropicum, a species of great relevance to energy-rich gas production.

George M. Church

2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

295

Current developments in genomics challenge the established framework of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current developments in genomics challenge the established framework of biomedical ethics because the empirical facts of the genomic science change too fast for the reflections of ethics to keep pace with for pragmatic moral guidance1 . Recent revelations about the human genome, such as the abundance of copy

Church, George M.

296

Microbial Dynamics of Dissolved Organic Matter Turnover (Project 1) and Linking Genomes to Biomes: Microorganisms in the Sea (Project 2): Data from the DeLong Research Group at MIT  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The DeLong Research Group at MIT focuses on microbes and microbial processes in a variety of natural marine habitats. The Group, led by Dr. Edward DeLong also participates in studies with the Center of Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education, a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center. The two projects noted in the title of this citation include DOE funding, along with funding from a variety of other sponsors.

DeLong, Edward [MIT

297

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Making up the gut microbiome is a host-driven  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 16, 2010 November 16, 2010 Making up the gut microbiome is a host-driven project Baking sourdough bread requires a starter, and so do mammalian guts, which are first colonized by microbial communities from the mother and then acquire more microbes over time. These gut microbial communities are important for maintaining health and combating disease, and it's why the Human Microbiome Project launched by the National Institutes of Health in 2008 is studying the microbial communities that populate the human body by sequencing them and assembling a reference catalog, a project that involves researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI). G. beringei Photo: G. beringei by rbleib While the HMP was getting off the ground, DOE JGI collaborator Howard

298

JGI - A Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Genomic Encyclopedia A Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) The GEBA project is aimed at systematically filling in the gaps in sequencing along the bacterial and archaeal branches of the tree of life. Though the wide variety of microbial sequencing projects undertaken throughout the world has created a rich, diverse collection of microbial genomes, strong biases in what has been sequenced thus far are evident. This project represents the first systematic attempt to use the tree of life itself as a guide to sequencing target selection. JGI is beginning by collaborating on a pilot project with DSMZ. Why GEBA? The GEBA Pilot Project GEBA Sequencing Plans Interpret a Genome for Education Home > User Programs > A Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA)

299

UCSC cancer genomics browser.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Chicago, IL Abstract 5087: UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser 2.0 Jingchun Zhu 1 Brian Craft...and analyze that data. The UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser (https://genome-cancer...enhances the interpretability of the cancer genomics information. UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser...

J Zhu; JZ Sanborn; T Wang; F Hsu; S Benz; C Szeto; L Esserman; D Haussler

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Genome Analyses and Supplement Data from the International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The sequencing of the first tree genome, that of Populus, was a project initiated by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE’s Office of Science. The International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC) was formed to help develop and guide post-sequence activities. The IPGC website, hosted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides draft sequence data as it is made available from DOE Joint Genome Institute, genome analyses for Populus, lists of related publications and resources, and the science plan. The data are available at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ipgc/ssr_resource.htm.

International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Project title:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project title: Roseville Elverta (RSC-ELV) OPGW Replacement Project Project title: Roseville Elverta (RSC-ELV) OPGW Replacement Project Requested By: David Young Mail Code : N1410 Phone: 916-353-4542 Date Submitted: 5/4/2011 Date Required: 5/7/2011 Description of the Project: Purpose and Need The Western Area Power Administration (Western), Sierra Nevada Region (SNR), is responsible for the operation and maintenance (O&M) of federally owned and operated transmission lines, Switchyards, and facilities throughout California. Western and Reclamation must comply with the National Electric Safety Code, Western States Coordinating Council (WECC), and internal directives for protecting human safety, the physical environment, and maintaining the reliable operation of the transmission system. There is an existing OPGW communications fiber on the transmission towers between Roseville and Elverta

302

Landscape evolutionary genomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1001 60 70 129 Landscape evolutionary genomics David B. Lowry * * davidbryantlowry...com University Program in Genetics and Genomics, , Box 3565 Duke University Medical...genetics|adaptation|landscape ecology|genomics|natural selection|GIS| 1. Introduction...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

SeqEntropy: Genome-Wide Assessment of Repeats for Short Read Sequencing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Information Management, Kainan University, Taoyuan, Taiwan Abstract Background: Recent studies on genome of information theory to evaluate the effect of repeats on short-read genome assembly using idealized (error analysis of human genome [1] and for rapid full genome sequencing and typing of various organisms. The 1000

Chen, Chaur-Chin

304

Complete genome sequence of Capnocytophaga ochracea type strain (VPI 2845T)  

SciTech Connect

Capnocytophaga ochracea (Pr vot et al. 1956) Leadbetter et al. 1982 is the type species of the genus Capnocytophaga. It is of interest because of its location in the Flavobacteriaceae, a genomically not yet charted family within the order Flavobacteriales. The species grows as fusiform to rod shaped cells which tend to form clumps and are able to move by gliding. C. ochracea is known as a capnophilic (CO2-requiring) organism with the ability to grow under anaerobic as well as aerobic conditions (oxygen concentration larger than 15%), here only in the presence of 5% CO2. Strain VPI 2845T, the type strain of the species, is portrayed in this report as a gliding, Gram-negative bacterium, originally isolated from a human oral cavity. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome se-quence, and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence from the flavobacterial genus Capnocytophaga, and the 2,612,925 bp long single replicon genome with its 2193 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Genome complexity reduction for genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Millions of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified in the human genome, and more are cataloged every day. The challenge now is to use these SNPs to discover the genetic risk factors underlying common ...

Jordan, Barbara M. (Barbara Marie), 1975-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Maintaining funding in large-scale international science projects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

International partnerships have become increasingly necessary to achieve scientific breakthroughs. They have been used in the human genome project, space exploration, the development of fusion energy as a source of power, and most recently to identify the SARS virus. In these projects, partners contribute funds, equipment and staff in the pursuit of a common goal. But in recent years the sustainability of funding for some of these projects has become an issue of concern. Two examples include the termination of the Super Conducting Super Collider in 1993 and the withdrawal of the USA from the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in 1998. Both suggest the need for better management of the funding process. This paper explores the management of this funding process, supported by a case study, and concludes with several lessons that should prove useful to those who manage these projects.

Barry Shore; Benjamin J. Cross

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Complete genome sequence of Veillonella parvula type strain (Te3T)  

SciTech Connect

Veillonella parvula (Veillon and Zuber 1898) Pr vot 1933 is the type species of the genus Veillonella in the family Veillonellaceae within the order Clostridiales. The species V. parvula is of interest because it is frequently isolated from dental plaque in the human oral cavity and can cause opportunistic infections. The species is strictly anaerobic and grows as small cocci which usually occur in pairs. Veillonellae are characterized by their unusual metabolism which is centered on the activity of the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase. Strain Te3T, the type strain of the species, was isolated from the human intestinal tract. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the large clostridial family Veillonellaceae, and the 2,132,142 bp long single replicon genome with its 1859 protein-coding and 61 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Welnitz, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

JGI Genomics and Bioinformatics for Undergraduate Educators Workshop |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JGI Genomics and Bioinformatics for Undergraduate Educators JGI Genomics and Bioinformatics for Undergraduate Educators Workshop JGI Genomics and Bioinformatics for Undergraduate Educators Workshop March 23, 2013 3:00PM EDT to March 26, 2013 6:00PM EDT University of California The JGI will be holding the JGI Genomics and Bioinformatics for Undergraduate Educators Workshop in conjunction with the JGI User Meeting. The workshop will take place March 23-26, 2013 at the JGI. The DOE Joint Genome Institute's Education Program is providing opportunities for colleges and universities across the country to "interpret" bacterial genomes, such as those sequenced as part of the GEBA project, for analysis. This "Interpret a GEBA Genome" Education Program makes available a selection of recently sequenced genomes

309

Complete genome sequence of Methanocorpusculum labreanum type strain Z  

SciTech Connect

Methanocorpusculum labreanum is a methanogen belonging to the order Methanomicrobiales within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain Z was isolated from surface sediments of Tar Pit Lake in the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles, California. M. labreanum is of phylogenetic interest because at the time the sequencing project began only one genome had previously been sequenced from the order Methanomicrobiales. We report here the complete genome sequence of M. labreanum type strain Z and its annotation. This is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Goltsman, Eugene [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Whitman, W. B. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Cloning, expression and genomic structure of a novel human GNB2L1 gene, which encodes a receptor of activated protein kinase C (RACK)*  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During a large-scale screen of a human fetal brain cDNA library, a novel human gene GNB2L1 encoding a novel RACK (receptor of activated protein kinase C) ... shows higher similarity to rat RACK1 and many RACK pro...

Shu Wang; Jin-zhong Chen; Zhen Zhang; Shaohua Gu; Chaoneng Ji…

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Performance Evaluations of Prototype Houses: Minimum 40% Residential Building Energy Savings Level Habitat for Humanity of Greater Newburgh Liberty Street Project: April 2003--September 2004  

SciTech Connect

Habitat for Humanity International (HfHI) is a nonprofit organization that engages volunteers and would-be homebuyers in programs that emphasize sweat-equity and self-help. Habitat is among the top-ten housing producers in the United States. In collaboration with the HfHI Department of Construction & Environmental Resources, Steven Winter Associates, Inc., (SWA) began working with the Habitat for Humanity of Greater Newburgh (HfHGN) affiliate in Newburgh, New York, in April 2003. Since October 1999, HfHGN has acquired and renovated abandoned houses for an average cost of $45,000 per home. The affiliate serves area families living in overcrowded, substandard housing and spending 50% to 80% of their income on housing. In August 2003, HfHGN began their first new construction project, six row houses located on Liberty Street in Newburgh.

Guilbert, R.; Magee, A.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

FY10 LDRD Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 LDRD Projects 0 LDRD Projects 2010 Projects Page 1 LDRD Proj. No. Project Title P.I. Dept./Bldg. 07-005 Sensitive Searches for CP-Violation in Hadronic Systems Semertzidis, Y. PHYS/510A 08-002 Strongly Correlated Systems: From Graphene to Quark-Gluon Plasma Kharzeev, D. & Tsvelik, A. PHYS/CMP 08-004 Getting to Know Your Constituents: Studies of Partonic Matter at the EIC Vogelsang, W. PHYS/510A 08-005 Development of the Deuteron EDM Proposal Semertzidis, Y. PHYS/510A 08-008 Development of a Small Gap Magnets and Vacuum Chamber for eRHIC Litvinenko, V. C-AD/817 08-022 Novel Methods for Microcrystal Structure Determination at NSLS and NSLS-II Orville, A. M. BIO/463 08-025 Combined PET/MRI Multimodality Imaging Probe Schlyer, D. Med/490 08-028 Genomic DNA Methylation: The Epigenetic Response of Arabidopsis Thaliana Genome

313

HumanMouse Gene Identification by Comparative Evidence Integration and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The identification of genes in the human genome remains a challenge, as the actual predictions appear to disagree of genes in the human genome by using a reference, such as mouse genome. However, this comparative genome. In particular, it is not clear whether the mouse is at the correct evolutionary distance from

Pavlovic, Vladimir

314

Comparative genomics of Helicobacter pylori isolates recovered from ulcer disease patients in England  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Genomic diversity of H. pylori from many different human populations is largely unknown. We compared genomes of 65 H. pylori strains from Nottingham, England. Molecular analysis was carried out to identify rearra...

Farhana Kauser; M Abid Hussain; Irshad Ahmed; Sriramula Srinivas…

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cost of the project to labor only. The efficacy of the examples will be assessed through their useProject Year 2012-2013 Project Title Sight-Reading at the Piano Project Team Ken Johansen, Peabody) Faculty Statement The goal of this project is to create a bank of practice exercises that student pianists

Gray, Jeffrey J.

316

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design goals for this project include low cost (less than $30 per paddle) and robustness. The projectProject Year 2001 Project Team Faculty: Allison Okamura, Mechanical Engineering, Whiting School Project Title Haptic Display of Dynamic Systems Audience 30 to 40 students per year, enrolled

Gray, Jeffrey J.

317

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-year section of the summer project will cost $1344.) This project will be measured by the CER surveys conductedProject Year 2005 Project Team Sean Greenberg, Faculty, Philosophy Department, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences; Kevin Clark, Student, Philosophy Department, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences Project

Gray, Jeffrey J.

318

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Louise Pasternack, Chemistry Department, Krieger School, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences Project Title Introductory Chemistry Lab Demonstrations Audience an interactive virtual lab manual that will facilitate understanding of the procedures and techniques required

Gray, Jeffrey J.

319

The transcriptional activity of human Chromosome 22  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information of the human genome is to obtain a detailed knowledge of human transcriptional coding sequences greatly increased our understanding of the biological information encoded on a human chromosome://array.mbb.yale.edu/chr22. [Keywords: Microarray; Chromosome 22; human genome; transcriptome; placental RNA; mouse homology

Gerstein, Mark

320

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Karl) Zhang, Undergraduate Student, Biomedical Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering; Cheryl Kim Audio, Digital Video Project Abstract The goal of this project is to develop online modular units

Gray, Jeffrey J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Line Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(PDCI) Upgrade Project Whistling Ridge Energy Project Line Rebuild, Relocation and Substation Projects Wind Projects Line Projects BPA identifies critical infrastructure and...

322

Towards Practical Privacy for Genomic Computation Louis Kruger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

genome sequences of the entire population of Iceland [8], while the non-profit HapMap ProjectTowards Practical Privacy for Genomic Computation Somesh Jha Louis Kruger Vitaly Shmatikov Abstract- tive information about individuals. We present a relatively efficient, privacy

Liblit, Ben

323

Office of Sponsored Projects Annual Report: Fiscal year 2012-2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,921,924, from National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). · The top

California at Santa Cruz, University of

324

Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the Shewanella Federation project, we have used integrated genomic, proteomic and computational technologies to study various aspects of energy metabolism of two Shewanella strains from a systems-level perspective.

Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

325

Genome sequencing and analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genome Genome sequencing and analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon The International Brachypodium Initiative* Three subfamilies of grasses, the Ehrhartoideae, Panicoideae and Pooideae, provide the bulk of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), which is, to our knowledge, the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes shows a precise history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grasses, and establishes a template for analysis of the large genomes of economically important pooid grasses such as wheat. The high-quality genome sequence, coupled with ease of cultivation and transformation, small size and rapid life cycle, will help Brachypodium reach its

326

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that incorporate video taped procedures for student preview. Solution This project will create videos for more to study the procedure and techniques before coming to class. Our previous fellowship project addressedProject Year 2009 Project Title Enhancing Biology Laboratory Preparation through Video

Gray, Jeffrey J.

327

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, there is no resource available to view the procedure before class. Solution The purpose of this project is to capture available to view the procedure before class. The purpose #12;of this project is to capture variousProject Year 2007 Project Team Kristina Obom, Faculty, Advanced Academic Programs, Krieger School

Gray, Jeffrey J.

328

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Year 2013-2014 Project Title German Online Placement Exam Project Team Deborah Mifflin to increased cost. As well, it lacked listening comprehension, writing and speaking components providing support, we will use Blackboard for this project. The creation will require numerous steps

Gray, Jeffrey J.

329

Microsoft PowerPoint - Microbial Genome and Metagenome Analysis Case Study (NERSC Workshop - May 7-8, 2009).ppt [Compatibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genome & Genome & Metagenome Analysis: Computational Challenges Natalia N. Ivanova * Nikos C. Kyrpides * Victor M. Markowitz ** * Genome Biology Program, Joint Genome Institute ** Lawrence Berkeley National Lab Microbial genome & metagenome analysis General aims Understand microbial life Apply to agriculture, bioremediation, biofuels, human health Specific aims include Specific aims include Predict biochemistry & physiology of organisms based on genome sequence Explain known biochemical & physiological properties Metabolic reconstruction * Ivanova & Lykidis (2009) Metabolic reconstruction. Encyclopedia of Microbiology, Elsevier: 607-621. 2 Genome sequence data size Now ~1,400 microbial genomes = 5.5 mil genes ~ 100 metagenomes samples

330

Genome sequence analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon: insights into grass genome evolution  

SciTech Connect

Three subfamilies of grasses, the Erhardtoideae (rice), the Panicoideae (maize, sorghum, sugar cane and millet), and the Pooideae (wheat, barley and cool season forage grasses) provide the basis of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the complete genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be completely sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes reveals a precise sequence- based history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grass family and identifies nested insertions of whole chromosomes into centromeric regions as a predominant mechanism driving chromosome evolution in the grasses. The relatively compact genome of Brachypodium is maintained by a balance of retroelement replication and loss. The complete genome sequence of Brachypodium, coupled to its exceptional promise as a model system for grass research, will support the development of new energy and food crops

Schulman, Al

2009-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

331

Bionimbus: a cloud for managing, analyzing and sharing large genomics datasets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the software infrastructure required. Results Bionimbus is used by a variety of projects to process genomicsBionimbus: a cloud for managing, analyzing and sharing large genomics datasets Allison P Heath,1 Megan E McNerney,1,2 Kevin P White,1,3,4 Robert L Grossman1,3,5 1 Institute for Genomics and Systems

Grossman, Robert

332

The genomics of adaptation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...introduction Special feature 1001 70 197 198 The genomics of adaptation Jacek Radwan 1 * Wieslaw...One contribution to a Special Feature Genomics of adaptation. The amount and nature...aspects of the broad field of adaptation genomics. This introductory article sets up a...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Complete genome sequence of Spirosoma linguale type strain (1T)  

SciTech Connect

Spirosoma linguale Migula 1894 is the type species of the genus. S. linguale is a free-living and non-pathogenic organism, known for its peculiar ringlike and horseshoe-shaped cell morphology. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete ge-nome sequence and annotation. This is only the third completed genome sequence of a member of the family Cytophagaceae. The 8,491,258 bp long genome with its eight plas-mids, 7,069 protein-coding and 60 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacte-ria and Archaea project.

Lail, Kathleen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Schutze, Andrea [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Complete genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum deleyianum type strain (5175T)  

SciTech Connect

Sulfurospirillum deleyianum Schumacher et al. 1993 is the type species of the genus Sulfurospirillum. S. deleyianum is a model organism for studying sulfur reduction and dissimilatory nitrate reduction as energy source for growth. Also, it is a prominent model organism for studying the structural and functional characteristics of the cytochrome c nitrite reductase. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the genus Sulfurospirillum. The 2,306,351 bp long genome with its 2291 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Lang, Elke [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Complete genome sequence of Methanoculleus marisnigri type strain JR1  

SciTech Connect

Methanoculleus marisnigri Romesser et al. 1981 is a methanogen belonging to the order Methanomicrobiales within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain, JR1, was isolated from anoxic sediments of the Black Sea. M. marisnigri is of phylogenetic interest because at the time the sequencing project began only one genome had previously been sequenced from the order Methanomicrobiales. We report here the complete genome sequence of M. marisnigri type strain JR1 and its annotation. This is part of a Joint Genome Institute 2006 Community Sequencing Program to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Goltsman, Eugene [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Whitman, W. B. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Complete genome sequence of Thermomonospora curvata type strain (B9)  

SciTech Connect

Thermomonospora curvata Henssen 1957 is the type species of the genus Thermomonospora. This genus is of interest because members of this clade are sources of new antibiotics, enzymes, and products with pharmacological activity. In addition, members of this genus participate in the active degradation of cellulose. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Thermomonosporaceae. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 5,639,016 bp long genome with its 4,985 protein-coding and 76 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Nolan, Matt [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Lapidus, Alla L. [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Lucas, Susan [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Tice, Hope [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Cheng, Jan-Fang [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Liolios, Konstantinos [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Palaniappan, Krishna [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Bristow, James [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Eisen, Jonathan [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Markowitz, Victor [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)  

SciTech Connect

Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (Clark and Norris 1996) is the sole and type species of the genus, which until recently was the only genus within the actinobacterial family Acidimicrobiaceae and in the order Acidomicrobiales. Rapid oxidation of iron pyrite during autotrophic growth in the absence of an enhanced CO2 concentration is characteristic for A. ferrooxidans. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order Acidomicrobiales, and the 2,158,157 bp long single replicon genome with its 2038 protein coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Clum, Alicia; Nolan, Matt; Lang, Elke; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Goker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

338

Adaptation of a commercial robot for genome library replication  

SciTech Connect

This report describes tools and fixtures developed at the Human Genome Center at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for the Hewlett-Packard ORCA{trademark} (Optimized Robot for Chemical Analysis) to replicate large genome libraries. Photographs and engineering drawings of the various custom-designed components are included.

Uber, D.C.; Searles, W.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Interaction of Genome and Cellular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Genome and Cellular Micronenvioronment of Genome and Cellular Micronenvioronment Mina Bissell Life Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Why this Project While normal stoma can delay or prevent tumorigenesis, abnormal stromal components can promote tumor growth. Acquired or inherited mutations that alter stromal cell function can release the context-suppressed malignant cells. Literature spanning more than a century has shown that inflammation associated with tissue wounding can produce tunors. Radiation produces changes in reactive oxygen that are similar to inflammation and may represent a mechanism for radiation-induced damage. Project Goals To determine the underlying role of stromal alterations in controling genomic instability accompanying epithelial-mesenchyumal transformation.

340

Human Genetics Portfolio Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in providing the assessments of the Wellcome Trust's role in supporting human genetics and have informed `our to maximise the health benefits of research into the human genome remains a core component of the WellcomeHuman Genetics 1990­2009 June 2010 Portfolio Review #12;The Wellcome Trust is a charity registered

Rambaut, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Projectivities and Projective Embeddings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, we aim to prove some of the main achievements in the theory of generalized polygons. First, we want to show what the little projective group and the groups of projectivities of some Moufang po...

Hendrik van Maldeghem

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Instructions for use Genome Biology 2008, 9:R152  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Biology, McGill University, 3801 University St, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2B4, Canada. #McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, and Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H

Tachizawa, Kazuya

343

An Investigation of Insulator Proteins in Mosquito Genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of transgenes in mosquito species. The use of insulator sequences to flank transgenes may have the ability to overcome position effects caused by the genomic environment surrounding the insertion site. CTCF is a multifunctional protein, conserved from humans...

Johanson, Michael

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

344

Project Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Questions Keeler-Pennwalt Wood Pole Removal Line Projects Line Rebuild, Relocation and Substation Projects Spacer Damper Replacement Program Wind Projects Project Overview BPA...

345

Complete genome sequence of Vulcanisaeta distributa type strain (IC-017T)  

SciTech Connect

Vulcanisaeta distributa Itoh et al. 2002 belongs to the family Thermoproteaceae in the phylum Crenarchaeota. The genus Vulcanisaeta is characterized by a global distribution in hot and acidic springs. This is the first genome sequence from a member of the genus Vulcanisaeta and seventh genome sequence in the family Thermoproteaceae. The 2,374,137 bp long genome with its 2,544 protein-coding and 49 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteriaand Archaea project.

Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Pabst, Elke [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Wirth, Reinhard [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operators, matrix indexing, vector computations, loops, functions, and plotting graphs, among others basic arithmetic operators, matrix indexing, and vector computations in MATLAB. After creatingProject Year 2011-2012 Project Title Online Tutorial for MATLAB Project Team Eileen Haase, Whiting

Gray, Jeffrey J.

347

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Year 2005 Project Team Krysia Hudson, Faculty, School of Nursing, Undergraduate Instruction for Educational Resources Project Title Enhanced Web-based Learning Environments for Beginning Nursing Students (e.g., demonstrations of procedures or tasks) into the WBL systems, it will be possible to increase

Gray, Jeffrey J.

348

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Michael McCloskey, Cognitive Science/Neuroscience, Krieger of Arts & Sciences Project Title Cognitive Neuropsychology Audience The initial audience to access. The current procedure calls for individual students or researchers to contact the faculty member

Gray, Jeffrey J.

349

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Year 2011-2012 Project Title Using M-Health and GIS Technology in the Field to Improve into teams and having each team use a different m-health data collection tool (e.g., cellular phones, smart health patterns. The Tech Fellow, Jacqueline Ferguson, will assist in creating an m-health project

Gray, Jeffrey J.

350

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Gregory Hager, Computer Science, Whiting School of Engineering Fellow: Alan Chen, Biomedical Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering Project Title Robotics is complicated, time-consuming, and costly, making a robot for an introductory-level class is not practical

Gray, Jeffrey J.

351

Project Proposal Project Logistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Proposal · Project Logistics: ­ 2-3 person teams ­ Significant implementation, worth 55 and anticipated cost of copying to/from host memory. IV. Intellectual Challenges - Generally, what makes this computation worthy of a project? - Point to any difficulties you anticipate at present in achieving high

Hall, Mary W.

352

The Genome of the Western Clawed Frog Xenopus tropicalis  

SciTech Connect

The western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis is an important model for vertebrate development that combines experimental advantages of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis with more tractable genetics. Here we present a draft genome sequence assembly of X. tropicalis. This genome encodes over 20,000 protein-coding genes, including orthologs of at least 1,700 human disease genes. Over a million expressed sequence tags validated the annotation. More than one-third of the genome consists of transposable elements, with unusually prevalent DNA transposons. Like other tetrapods, the genome contains gene deserts enriched for conserved non-coding elements. The genome exhibits remarkable shared synteny with human and chicken over major parts of large chromosomes, broken by lineage-specific chromosome fusions and fissions, mainly in the mammalian lineage.

Hellsten, Uffe; Harland, Richard M.; Gilchrist, Michael J.; Hendrix, David; Jurka, Jerzy; Kapitonov, Vladimir; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Shu, Shengqiang; Taher, Leila; Blitz, Ira L.; Blumberg, Bruce; Dichmann, Darwin S.; Dubchak, Inna; Amaya, Enrique; Detter, John C.; Fletcher, Russell; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Goodstein, David; Graves, Tina; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Grimwood, Jane; Kawashima, Takeshi; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan M.; Mead, Paul E.; Mitros, Therese; Ogino, Hajime; Ohta, Yuko; Poliakov, Alexander V.; Pollet, Nicolas; Robert, Jacques; Salamov, Asaf; Sater, Amy K.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Terry, Astrid; Vize, Peter D.; Warren, Wesley C.; Wells, Dan; Wills, Andrea; Wilson, Richard K.; Zimmerman, Lyle B.; Zorn, Aaron M.; Grainger, Robert; Grammer, Timothy; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Richardson, Paul M.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Genomics and Systems Biology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Los Alamos scientists perform research in functional genomics and structural genomics, and applications for such work cover diverse fields such as energy, agriculture, and environmental cleanup. Get Expertise Babetta Marrone Biofuels Program Manager Email Cheryl Kuske DOE BER Biological System Science Division Program Manager Email Chris Detter Emerging Threats Program Manager: Email Rebecca McDonald Bioscience Communications Email "We were asked to build a rocket ship," said developer Joel Berendzen, "but instead we built a 10,000 mph motorcycle." - Sequedex team LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial genomes Protein research Read caption + In 2013, Los Alamos scientist Richard Sayre and his team genetically

354

Querying genomic databases  

SciTech Connect

A natural-language interface has been developed that retrieves genomic information by using a simple subset of English. The interface spares the biologist from the task of learning database-specific query languages and computer programming. Currently, the interface deals with the E. coli genome. It can, however, be readily extended and shows promise as a means of easy access to other sequenced genomic databases as well.

Baehr, A.; Hagstrom, R.; Joerg, D.; Overbeek, R.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

A comprehensive crop genome research project: the Superhybrid Rice Genome Project in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...identifications and others are still in the pipeline to be analysed and published. At the second...Hashimoto, J, Sakaguchi, K2004DNA repair in higher plants; photoreactivation is the major DNA repair pathway in non-proliferating cells while...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Genome Science/Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science & Innovation » Science & Innovation » Science & Engineering Capabilities » Bioscience: Bioenergy, Biosecurity, and Health » Environmental Microbiology » Genome Genome Science/Technologies Los Alamos using cutting-edge sequencing, finishing, and analysis, impact valuable genomic data. Get Expertise Cheryl Kuske DOE BER Biological System Science Division Program Manager Email Srinivas Iyer Bioscience Group Leader Email Momchilo Vuyisich Bioenergy and Biomedical Sciences Email Rebecca McDonald Bioscience Communications Email State-of-the art technology and extensive genomics expertise Protein research Read caption + Los Alamos National Laboratory graduate student, Patricia Langan, changes the properties of a green fluorescent protein in order to create new fluorescent protein variants.

357

Webinar: Materials Genome Initative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Audio recording and text version of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar titled "Materials Genome Initiative," originally presented on December 2, 2014.

358

JGI CSP Delivers First Moss Genome  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13, 2007 13, 2007 DOE JGI Community Sequencing Program Delivers First Moss Genome WALNUT CREEK, CA--Messages from nearly a half-billion years ago, conveyed via the inventory of genes sequenced from a present-day moss, provide clues about the earliest colonization of dry land by plants. The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) was among the leaders of an international effort uniting more than 40 institutions to complete the first genome sequencing project of a nonvascular land plant, the moss Physcomitrella patens. The team's insights into the code that enabled this seminal emergence and dominance of land by plants are published December 13 online in Science Express. Scanning electron micrograph of Physcomitrella patens gametophores (moss shoots).

359

Abstract IA37: Clinical genomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research. 15 October 2014 meeting-abstract Clinical Genomics Clinical Genomics: Oral Presentations - Invited Abstracts Abstracts...2013; San Diego, CA Abstract IA37: Clinical genomics Katherine A. Janeway Dana-Farber Cancer Institute...

Katherine A. Janeway

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

Genomics of isolation in hybrids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...edited by Patrik Nosil and Jeffrey L. Feder Genomics of isolation in hybrids Zachariah Gompert...limitations to the study of the speciation genomics. Further progress in understanding the genomics of speciation will require large-scale...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS Program of Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS Program of Study Research Areas Students Applying Correspondence Graduate Genomics. Students receive training in the biological, physical and computational sciences through of primary institutional affiliation. The Functional Genomics program is administered through the Graduate

Thomas, Andrew

362

Sequence modelling and an extensible data model for genomic database  

SciTech Connect

The Human Genome Project (HGP) plans to sequence the human genome by the beginning of the next century. It will generate DNA sequences of more than 10 billion bases and complex marker sequences (maps) of more than 100 million markers. All of these information will be stored in database management systems (DBMSs). However, existing data models do not have the abstraction mechanism for modelling sequences and existing DBMS's do not have operations for complex sequences. This work addresses the problem of sequence modelling in the context of the HGP and the more general problem of an extensible object data model that can incorporate the sequence model as well as existing and future data constructs and operators. First, we proposed a general sequence model that is application and implementation independent. This model is used to capture the sequence information found in the HGP at the conceptual level. In addition, abstract and biological sequence operators are defined for manipulating the modelled sequences. Second, we combined many features of semantic and object oriented data models into an extensible framework, which we called the Extensible Object Model'', to address the need of a modelling framework for incorporating the sequence data model with other types of data constructs and operators. This framework is based on the conceptual separation between constructors and constraints. We then used this modelling framework to integrate the constructs for the conceptual sequence model. The Extensible Object Model is also defined with a graphical representation, which is useful as a tool for database designers. Finally, we defined a query language to support this model and implement the query processor to demonstrate the feasibility of the extensible framework and the usefulness of the conceptual sequence model.

Li, Peter Wei-Der (California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Sequence modelling and an extensible data model for genomic database  

SciTech Connect

The Human Genome Project (HGP) plans to sequence the human genome by the beginning of the next century. It will generate DNA sequences of more than 10 billion bases and complex marker sequences (maps) of more than 100 million markers. All of these information will be stored in database management systems (DBMSs). However, existing data models do not have the abstraction mechanism for modelling sequences and existing DBMS`s do not have operations for complex sequences. This work addresses the problem of sequence modelling in the context of the HGP and the more general problem of an extensible object data model that can incorporate the sequence model as well as existing and future data constructs and operators. First, we proposed a general sequence model that is application and implementation independent. This model is used to capture the sequence information found in the HGP at the conceptual level. In addition, abstract and biological sequence operators are defined for manipulating the modelled sequences. Second, we combined many features of semantic and object oriented data models into an extensible framework, which we called the ``Extensible Object Model``, to address the need of a modelling framework for incorporating the sequence data model with other types of data constructs and operators. This framework is based on the conceptual separation between constructors and constraints. We then used this modelling framework to integrate the constructs for the conceptual sequence model. The Extensible Object Model is also defined with a graphical representation, which is useful as a tool for database designers. Finally, we defined a query language to support this model and implement the query processor to demonstrate the feasibility of the extensible framework and the usefulness of the conceptual sequence model.

Li, Peter Wei-Der [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States); [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

The Expression of Human Endogenous Retroviruses is modulated by the Tat protein of HIV-1.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Human Endogenous Retroviruses (HERVs) make up 8% of the human genome. Expression of HERV-K (HML-2), the family of HERVs that most recently entered the genome,… (more)

Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta Jeannette

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

FY11 Approved LDRD Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Approved LDRD Projects Approved LDRD Projects 2011 Projects Page 1 LDRD Proj. No. Project Title P.I. Dept./Bldg. Directorate 08-002 Strongly Correlated Systems: From Graphene to Quark-Gluon Plasma Kharzeev, D. & Tsvelik, A. PHYS/CMP NPP/BES 08-028 Genomic DNA Methylation: The Epigenetic Response of Arabidopsis Thaliana Genome to Long-term Elevated Atmospheric Temperature and CO 2 in Global Warming Liu, Q. MED/490 & BIO/463 ELS 09-001 Nanoscale Anode Materials for Lithium Batteries Graetz, J. ES&T/ERD GARS 09-002 Bioconversion of Lignocellulose to Ethanol and Butanol Facilitated by Ionic Liquid Preprocessing Francis, A. J./Wishart, J.F./Dunn, J. ES/Chem./Biol ogy ELS 09-003 Organic Photovoltaics: Nanostructure, Solvent Annealing and Performance Ocko, B. PM/510B BES 09-004 Surface Chemisty and

366

Communicating Genomics:GTL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Annual DOE Joint Genome Institute User Meeting Sponsored By U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science March 29-April 1, 2006 Embassy Suites Hotel and DOE Joint Genome Institute Walnut Creek, California iii Contents Agenda .................................................................................................................. iv Speaker Presentations . .........................................................................................1 Abtracts in order of presentation according to agenda (p. iv) Poster Presentations ..............................................................................................9 Posters alphabetical by first author. *Presenting author. Attendees...............................................................................................................75

367

Human Gene-Centric Databases at the Weizmann Institute of Science: GeneCards, UDB, CroW 21 and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, with software that retrieves, consolidates, searches, and displays human genome information, has enjoyed. These include the Unified Database (UDB) (http://bioinfo.weizmann.ac.il/udb) for human genome mapping, the human://bioinfo.weizmann.ac.il/ cards/, an automated, integrated database of human genes, genomic maps, proteins, and diseases

Groner, Yoram

368

Chapter 2 - Genomics-Based Cancer Theranostics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cancer cells have advantages over normal cells of selective growth and survival, and genetic mutations are the root of those advantages. Over the past decade, especially since the advent of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, also known as second generation, in the mid-2000s, genomic landscapes for the most common forms of human cancer have been revealed, and such discoveries are benefiting early tumor diagnosis, prognosis, and treatments. Today, third generation sequencing platforms are entering the markets and bringing a new wave of discoveries as they allow a much longer sequencing read than the second generation platforms. This chapter reviews the advanced biotechnology and computational biology efforts necessary to make sense of the astronomical amount of cancer genomics data to identify novel biomarkers for developing targeted imaging probes and therapeutics, and clarify the achievements, opportunities, and challenges for genomics-based cancer theranostics.

Zheng Yin; James J. Mancuso; Fuhai Li; Stephen T.C. Wong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Biofuel-Producing Bacteria, Insect Gut  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 29, 2009 June 29, 2009 Biofuel-Producing Bacteria, Insect Gut Microbes, ~ 70 other Projects Fill DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Pipeline WALNUT CREEK, CA-The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) has selected 71 new genomic sequencing projects for its 2010 Community Sequencing Program (CSP)-a targeted sampling of the planet's biodiversity-to be characterized for bioenergy, climate, and environmental applications. JGI's Community Sequencing Program is the largest genomic sequencing effort in the world focused on nonmedical organisms, enabling scientists from universities and national laboratories to probe the hidden world of microbes and plants to tap nature's ingenuity for innovative solutions to the nation's major challenges in energy, climate, and environment. The

370

JGI - FY2002 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Sequencing for the 2 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program For status information, see the Genome Projects section. For more information about the DOE Office of Science's Microbial Genome Program, see http://microbialgenomics.energy.gov/. For more information about microbial sequencing at JGI, contact David Bruce. Eukaryotes Organism Genome Size Thalassiosira pseudonana CCMP 1335 (diatom) 32 Mb Lactic Acid Bacteria Organism Genome Size Bifidobacterium longum DJO10A 2.4 Mb Brevibacterium linens BL2 4.5 Mb Lactobacillus brevis ATCC 367 1.8 Mb Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 2.8 Mb Lactobacillus delbrueckii ATCC BAA-365 1.6 Mb Lactobacillus gasseri ATCC 33323 1.9 Mb Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris SK11 2.6 Mb Leuconostoc mesenteroides ATCC 8293 2 Mb Oenococcus oeni PSU-1 1.8 Mb

371

The Role of Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability Susan M. Bailey, Eli S. Williams and Robert L. Ullrich The mechanistic role of radiation-induced genomic instability in radiation carcinogenesis is an attractive hypothesis that remains to be rigorously tested. There are few in vivo studies on which to base judgments, but work in our laboratory with mouse models of radiogenic mammary neoplasia provided the first indications that certain inductive forms of genetically predisposed genomic instability may contribute to tumor development. The central goal of this research project is to more firmly establish the mechanistic basis of this radiation-associated genomic instability and, from this, to assess whether such induced instability might play a major role in tumorigenesis at low doses of low LET radiation. In the case of

372

Complete genome sequence of Haliscomenobacter hydrossis type strain (OT)  

SciTech Connect

Haliscomenobacter hydrossis van Veen et al. 1973 is the type species of the genus Halisco- menobacter, which belongs to order 'Sphingobacteriales'. The species is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the tree of life, especially the so far genomically un- charted part of it, and because the organism grows in a thin, hardly visible hyaline sheath. Members of the species were isolated from fresh water of lakes and from ditch water. The genome of H. hydrossis is the first completed genome sequence reported from a member of the family 'Saprospiraceae'. The 8,771,651 bp long genome with its three plasmids of 92 kbp, 144 kbp and 164 kbp length contains 6,848 protein-coding and 60 RNA genes, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Daligault, Hajnalka E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Zeytun, Ahmet [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Verbarg, Susanne [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

JGI - FY2003 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Sequencing for the 3 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program For status information, see the Genome Projects section. For more information about the DOE Office of Science's Microbial Genome Program, see http://microbialgenomics.energy.gov/. For more information about microbial sequencing at JGI, contact David Bruce. Eukaryotes Organism Genome Size Emiliania huxleyi 220 Mb Ostreococcus lucimarinus 9.3 Mb Monosiga brevicollis Bacteria Organism Genome Size Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 7 Mb Burkholderia sp. 383 8.80 Mb Burkholderia vietnamiensis G4 8.40 Mb Chlorobium aggregatum Chlorobium chlorochromatii CaD3 2.6 Mb Chlorochromatium aggregatum Lake Dagow Crocosphaera watsonii WH 8501 6.40 Mb Kineococcus radiotolerans SRS30216 4.90 Mb Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1 4.60 Mb

374

JGI - FY2005 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Sequencing for the 5 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program For status information, see the Genome Projects section. For more information about the DOE Office of Science's Microbial Genome Program, see http://microbialgenomics.energy.gov/. For more information about microbial sequencing at JGI, contact David Bruce. Strains of Shewanella Organism Est. Genome Size Shewanella baltica OS195 5 Mb Shewanella sp. ANA-3 5 Mb Shewanella sp. MR-4 5 Mb Shewanella sp. MR-7 5 Mb Shewanella sp. W3-18-1 5 Mb Shewanella baltica OS223 5 Mb Strains of Chloroflexi Organism Est. Genome Size Chloroflexus aggregans DSM 9485 5 Mb Chloroflexus sp. Y-396-1 5 Mb Chlorothrix halophila (Candidatus) 5 Mb Herpetosiphon aurantiacus DSM 785 5 Mb Roseiflexus castenholzii HLO8 5 Mb Roseiflexus sp. strain RS-1 5 Mb

375

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Ian Sims, Student, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering Project Title and Jazz Theory/Keyboard I & II. Technologies Used Digital Audio, Digital Video, Graphic Design, HTML

Gray, Jeffrey J.

376

Predicting site-specific human selective pressure using evolutionary signatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Motivation: The identification of non-coding functional regions of the human genome remains one of the main challenges of genomics. By observing how a given region evolved over time, one can detect signs of negative or positive selection hinting ...

Javad Sadri; Abdoulaye Banire Diallo; Mathieu Blanchette

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Genome Analysis Toolkit: A MapReduce framework for analyzing next-generation DNA sequencing data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) projects, such as the 1000 Genomes Project, are already revolutionizing our understanding of genetic variation among individuals. However, the massive data sets generated by NGS—the ...

McKenna, Aaron

378

Fuzzy Genome Sequence Assembly for Single and Environmental Genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuzzy Genome Sequence Assembly for Single and Environmental Genomes Sara Nasser, Adrienne Breland. Traditional methods obtain a microorganism's DNA by culturing it in- dividually. Recent advances in genomics microbial commu- nities are often very complex with tens and hundreds of species. Assembling these genomes

Nicolescu, Monica

379

Eukaryotic Genomics Data from the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

From the JGI webportal users can choose Eukaryotic genomes from a photo list, access the JGI FTP directories to download data files, use the Tree of Life navigation tool, or choose a genome and go directly to a website specific to that one genome. The individual sites include direct access to download sequence files, BLAST, search, view and navigate the genomic annotations.

380

Update on Genomic Studies of Algae Paths toward Algal Genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Update on Genomic Studies of Algae Paths toward Algal Genomics Arthur R. Grossman* The Carnegie of genomic information that is being used to help researchers understand the gene content of organisms, how the expression of genes. In this introductory manuscript, I discuss select algae and how genomics is impacting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Genome sequencing and analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy and food crops. Grasses provide the bulk of human nutrition, and highly productive grasses, provide the bulk of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we. The high-quality genome sequence, coupled with ease of cultivation and transformation, small size and rapid

Green, Pamela

382

VISTA - computational tools for comparative genomics  

SciTech Connect

Comparison of DNA sequences from different species is a fundamental method for identifying functional elements in genomes. Here we describe the VISTA family of tools created to assist biologists in carrying out this task. Our first VISTA server at http://www-gsd.lbl.gov/VISTA/ was launched in the summer of 2000 and was designed to align long genomic sequences and visualize these alignments with associated functional annotations. Currently the VISTA site includes multiple comparative genomics tools and provides users with rich capabilities to browse pre-computed whole-genome alignments of large vertebrate genomes and other groups of organisms with VISTA Browser, submit their own sequences of interest to several VISTA servers for various types of comparative analysis, and obtain detailed comparative analysis results for a set of cardiovascular genes. We illustrate capabilities of the VISTA site by the analysis of a 180 kilobase (kb) interval on human chromosome 5 that encodes for the kinesin family member3A (KIF3A) protein.

Frazer, Kelly A.; Pachter, Lior; Poliakov, Alexander; Rubin,Edward M.; Dubchak, Inna

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Complete genome sequence of Ferroglobus placidus AEDII12DO  

SciTech Connect

Ferroglobus placidus belongs to the order Archaeoglobales within the archaeal phylum Euryar- chaeota. Strain AEDII12DO is the type strain of the species and was isolated from a shallow marine hydrothermal system at Vulcano, Italy. It is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic chemoli- thoautotroph, but it can also use a variety of aromatic compounds as electron donors. Here we describe the features of this organism together with the complete genome sequence and anno- tation. The 2,196,266 bp genome with its 2,567 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes was se- quenced as part of a DOE Joint Genome Institute Laboratory Sequencing Program (LSP) project.

Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Risso, Carla [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Holmes, Dawn [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lovley, Derek [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Complete genome sequence of Serratia plymuthica strain AS12  

SciTech Connect

A plant associated member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Serratia plymuthica strain AS12 was isolated from rapeseed roots. It is of scientific interest due to its plant growth promoting and plant pathogen inhibiting ability. The genome of S. plymuthica AS12 comprises a 5,443,009 bp long circular chromosome, which consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome was sequenced within the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010) as part of the project entitled 'Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens'.

Neupane, Saraswoti [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Finlay, Roger D. [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Alstrom, Sadhna [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hogberg, Nils [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Workshop Reports Understanding Paleoclimate and Human Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, involving research in anthropology, archaeology, human genetics and genomics, and the earth sciences resolved paleoenvironmental information. This concept is not new. Almost thirty years ago, the U.SWorkshop Reports Understanding Paleoclimate and Human Evolution Through the Hominin Sites

Reiners, Peter W.

386

The Trichoplax Genome and the Nature of Placozoans  

SciTech Connect

Placozoans are arguably the simplest free-living animals, possibly evoking an early stage in metazoan evolution, yet their biology is poorly understood. Here we report the sequencing and analysis of the {approx}98 million base pair nuclear genome of the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens. Whole genome phylogenetic analysis suggests that placozoans belong to a 'eumetazoan' clade that includes cnidarians and bilaterians, with sponges as the earliest diverging animals. The compact genome exhibits conserved gene content, gene structure, and synteny relative to the human and other complex eumetazoan genomes. Despite the apparent cellular and organismal simplicity of Trichoplax, its genome encodes a rich array of transcription factor and signaling pathway genes that are typically associated with diverse cell types and developmental processes in eumetazoans, motivating further searches for cryptic cellular complexity and/or as yet unobserved life history stages.

Srivastava, Mansi; Begovic, Emina; Chapman, Jarrod; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Hellsten, Uffe; Kawashima, Takeshi; Kuo, Alan; Mitros, Therese; Salamov, Asaf; Carpenter, Meredith L.; Signorovitch, Ana Y.; Moreno, Maria A.; Kamm, Kai; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Shapiro, Harris; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Buss, Leo W.; Schierwater, Bernd; Dellaporta, Stephen L.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

The Center for integrative genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Center for integrative genomics Report 2005­2006 #12;Presentation Director's message 4 Scientific advisory committee 6 Organigram of the CIG 7 research The structure and function of genomes and their evolution alexandrereymond ­ Genome structure and expression 10 henrikKaessmann ­ Evolutionary genomics 12

Kaessmann, Henrik

388

Recombination initiation maps of individual human genomes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and searching . Nucleic Acids Res. 37 ( Web Server ), W202 – W208 ( 2009 ). 10.1093/nar...80 Mahony S. Benos P. V. , STAMP: A web tool for exploring DNA-binding motif similarities . Nucleic Acids Res. 35 ( Web Server ), W253 – W258 ( 2007 ). 10...

Florencia Pratto; Kevin Brick; Pavel Khil; Fatima Smagulova; Galina V. Petukhova; R. Daniel Camerini-Otero

2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

389

Human evolutionary genomics: ethical and interpretive issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Biomedical Ethics, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA 4 Departments of Genetics and Biology, University Bottleneck: an event in the history of a population when the population size decreases sharply, resulting the population as competing variants are wiped out. Directional selection: a form of natural selection in which

390

The Sequence of the Human Genome  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Flow diagram for sequencing pipeline. Samples are received, selected...guidelines. Manufacturing pipeline processes, products, quality...DNA sequencing was modular by design and automated. Intermodule...automated trace-processing pipeline has been developed to process each sequence...

J. Craig Venter; Mark D. Adams; Eugene W. Myers; Peter W. Li; Richard J. Mural; Granger G. Sutton; Hamilton O. Smith; Mark Yandell; Cheryl A. Evans; Robert A. Holt; Jeannine D. Gocayne; Peter Amanatides; Richard M. Ballew; Daniel H. Huson; Jennifer Russo Wortman; Qing Zhang; Chinnappa D. Kodira; Xiangqun H. Zheng; Lin Chen; Marian Skupski; Gangadharan Subramanian; Paul D. Thomas; Jinghui Zhang; George L. Gabor Miklos; Catherine Nelson; Samuel Broder; Andrew G. Clark; Joe Nadeau; Victor A. McKusick; Norton Zinder; Arnold J. Levine; Richard J. Roberts; Mel Simon; Carolyn Slayman; Michael Hunkapiller; Randall Bolanos; Arthur Delcher; Ian Dew; Daniel Fasulo; Michael Flanigan; Liliana Florea; Aaron Halpern; Sridhar Hannenhalli; Saul Kravitz; Samuel Levy; Clark Mobarry; Knut Reinert; Karin Remington; Jane Abu-Threideh; Ellen Beasley; Kendra Biddick; Vivien Bonazzi; Rhonda Brandon; Michele Cargill; Ishwar Chandramouliswaran; Rosane Charlab; Kabir Chaturvedi; Zuoming Deng; Valentina Di Francesco; Patrick Dunn; Karen Eilbeck; Carlos Evangelista; Andrei E. Gabrielian; Weiniu Gan; Wangmao Ge; Fangcheng Gong; Zhiping Gu; Ping Guan; Thomas J. Heiman; Maureen E. Higgins; Rui-Ru Ji; Zhaoxi Ke; Karen A. Ketchum; Zhongwu Lai; Yiding Lei; Zhenya Li; Jiayin Li; Yong Liang; Xiaoying Lin; Fu Lu; Gennady V. Merkulov; Natalia Milshina; Helen M. Moore; Ashwinikumar K Naik; Vaibhav A. Narayan; Beena Neelam; Deborah Nusskern; Douglas B. Rusch; Steven Salzberg; Wei Shao; Bixiong Shue; Jingtao Sun; Zhen Yuan Wang; Aihui Wang; Xin Wang; Jian Wang; Ming-Hui Wei; Ron Wides; Chunlin Xiao; Chunhua Yan; Alison Yao; Jane Ye; Ming Zhan; Weiqing Zhang; Hongyu Zhang; Qi Zhao; Liansheng Zheng; Fei Zhong; Wenyan Zhong; Shiaoping C. Zhu; Shaying Zhao; Dennis Gilbert; Suzanna Baumhueter; Gene Spier; Christine Carter; Anibal Cravchik; Trevor Woodage; Feroze Ali; Huijin An; Aderonke Awe; Danita Baldwin; Holly Baden; Mary Barnstead; Ian Barrow; Karen Beeson; Dana Busam; Amy Carver; Angela Center; Ming Lai Cheng; Liz Curry; Steve Danaher; Lionel Davenport; Raymond Desilets; Susanne Dietz; Kristina Dodson; Lisa Doup; Steven Ferriera; Neha Garg; Andres Gluecksmann; Brit Hart; Jason Haynes; Charles Haynes; Cheryl Heiner; Suzanne Hladun; Damon Hostin; Jarrett Houck; Timothy Howland; Chinyere Ibegwam; Jeffery Johnson; Francis Kalush; Lesley Kline; Shashi Koduru; Amy Love; Felecia Mann; David May; Steven McCawley; Tina McIntosh; Ivy McMullen; Mee Moy; Linda Moy; Brian Murphy; Keith Nelson; Cynthia Pfannkoch; Eric Pratts; Vinita Puri; Hina Qureshi; Matthew Reardon; Robert Rodriguez; Yu-Hui Rogers; Deanna Romblad; Bob Ruhfel; Richard Scott; Cynthia Sitter; Michelle Smallwood; Erin Stewart; Renee Strong; Ellen Suh; Reginald Thomas; Ni Ni Tint; Sukyee Tse; Claire Vech; Gary Wang; Jeremy Wetter; Sherita Williams; Monica Williams; Sandra Windsor; Emily Winn-Deen; Keriellen Wolfe; Jayshree Zaveri; Karena Zaveri; Josep F. Abril; Roderic Guigó; Michael J. Campbell; Kimmen V. Sjolander; Brian Karlak; Anish Kejariwal; Huaiyu Mi; Betty Lazareva; Thomas Hatton; Apurva Narechania; Karen Diemer; Anushya Muruganujan; Nan Guo; Shinji Sato; Vineet Bafna; Sorin Istrail; Ross Lippert; Russell Schwartz; Brian Walenz; Shibu Yooseph; David Allen; Anand Basu; James Baxendale; Louis Blick; Marcelo Caminha; John Carnes-Stine; Parris Caulk; Yen-Hui Chiang; My Coyne; Carl Dahlke; Anne Deslattes Mays; Maria Dombroski; Michael Donnelly; Dale Ely; Shiva Esparham; Carl Fosler; Harold Gire; Stephen Glanowski; Kenneth Glasser; Anna Glodek; Mark Gorokhov; Ken Graham; Barry Gropman; Michael Harris; Jeremy Heil; Scott Henderson; Jeffrey Hoover; Donald Jennings; Catherine Jordan; James Jordan; John Kasha; Leonid Kagan; Cheryl Kraft; Alexander Levitsky; Mark Lewis; Xiangjun Liu; John Lopez; Daniel Ma; William Majoros; Joe McDaniel; Sean Murphy; Matthew Newman; Trung Nguyen; Ngoc Nguyen; Marc Nodell; Sue Pan; Jim Peck; Marshall Peterson; William Rowe; Robert Sanders; John Scott; Michael Simpson; Thomas Smith; Arlan Sprague; Timothy Stockwell; Russell Turner; Eli Venter; Mei Wang; Meiyuan Wen; David Wu; Mitchell Wu; Ashley Xia; Ali Zandieh; Xiaohong Zhu

2001-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

391

The Sequence of the Human Genome  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...zinc finger 11 (17) 5(6) 8 (10) 9 26 PF01585 G-patch G-patch domain 18 16 13 4 14 (15) PF00010 HLH ** Helix-loop-helix DNA-binding...critical role in host defense, morphogenesis, and tissue repair (131). Consistent with the well-defined role of heparan...

J. Craig Venter; Mark D. Adams; Eugene W. Myers; Peter W. Li; Richard J. Mural; Granger G. Sutton; Hamilton O. Smith; Mark Yandell; Cheryl A. Evans; Robert A. Holt; Jeannine D. Gocayne; Peter Amanatides; Richard M. Ballew; Daniel H. Huson; Jennifer Russo Wortman; Qing Zhang; Chinnappa D. Kodira; Xiangqun H. Zheng; Lin Chen; Marian Skupski; Gangadharan Subramanian; Paul D. Thomas; Jinghui Zhang; George L. Gabor Miklos; Catherine Nelson; Samuel Broder; Andrew G. Clark; Joe Nadeau; Victor A. McKusick; Norton Zinder; Arnold J. Levine; Richard J. Roberts; Mel Simon; Carolyn Slayman; Michael Hunkapiller; Randall Bolanos; Arthur Delcher; Ian Dew; Daniel Fasulo; Michael Flanigan; Liliana Florea; Aaron Halpern; Sridhar Hannenhalli; Saul Kravitz; Samuel Levy; Clark Mobarry; Knut Reinert; Karin Remington; Jane Abu-Threideh; Ellen Beasley; Kendra Biddick; Vivien Bonazzi; Rhonda Brandon; Michele Cargill; Ishwar Chandramouliswaran; Rosane Charlab; Kabir Chaturvedi; Zuoming Deng; Valentina Di Francesco; Patrick Dunn; Karen Eilbeck; Carlos Evangelista; Andrei E. Gabrielian; Weiniu Gan; Wangmao Ge; Fangcheng Gong; Zhiping Gu; Ping Guan; Thomas J. Heiman; Maureen E. Higgins; Rui-Ru Ji; Zhaoxi Ke; Karen A. Ketchum; Zhongwu Lai; Yiding Lei; Zhenya Li; Jiayin Li; Yong Liang; Xiaoying Lin; Fu Lu; Gennady V. Merkulov; Natalia Milshina; Helen M. Moore; Ashwinikumar K Naik; Vaibhav A. Narayan; Beena Neelam; Deborah Nusskern; Douglas B. Rusch; Steven Salzberg; Wei Shao; Bixiong Shue; Jingtao Sun; Zhen Yuan Wang; Aihui Wang; Xin Wang; Jian Wang; Ming-Hui Wei; Ron Wides; Chunlin Xiao; Chunhua Yan; Alison Yao; Jane Ye; Ming Zhan; Weiqing Zhang; Hongyu Zhang; Qi Zhao; Liansheng Zheng; Fei Zhong; Wenyan Zhong; Shiaoping C. Zhu; Shaying Zhao; Dennis Gilbert; Suzanna Baumhueter; Gene Spier; Christine Carter; Anibal Cravchik; Trevor Woodage; Feroze Ali; Huijin An; Aderonke Awe; Danita Baldwin; Holly Baden; Mary Barnstead; Ian Barrow; Karen Beeson; Dana Busam; Amy Carver; Angela Center; Ming Lai Cheng; Liz Curry; Steve Danaher; Lionel Davenport; Raymond Desilets; Susanne Dietz; Kristina Dodson; Lisa Doup; Steven Ferriera; Neha Garg; Andres Gluecksmann; Brit Hart; Jason Haynes; Charles Haynes; Cheryl Heiner; Suzanne Hladun; Damon Hostin; Jarrett Houck; Timothy Howland; Chinyere Ibegwam; Jeffery Johnson; Francis Kalush; Lesley Kline; Shashi Koduru; Amy Love; Felecia Mann; David May; Steven McCawley; Tina McIntosh; Ivy McMullen; Mee Moy; Linda Moy; Brian Murphy; Keith Nelson; Cynthia Pfannkoch; Eric Pratts; Vinita Puri; Hina Qureshi; Matthew Reardon; Robert Rodriguez; Yu-Hui Rogers; Deanna Romblad; Bob Ruhfel; Richard Scott; Cynthia Sitter; Michelle Smallwood; Erin Stewart; Renee Strong; Ellen Suh; Reginald Thomas; Ni Ni Tint; Sukyee Tse; Claire Vech; Gary Wang; Jeremy Wetter; Sherita Williams; Monica Williams; Sandra Windsor; Emily Winn-Deen; Keriellen Wolfe; Jayshree Zaveri; Karena Zaveri; Josep F. Abril; Roderic Guigó; Michael J. Campbell; Kimmen V. Sjolander; Brian Karlak; Anish Kejariwal; Huaiyu Mi; Betty Lazareva; Thomas Hatton; Apurva Narechania; Karen Diemer; Anushya Muruganujan; Nan Guo; Shinji Sato; Vineet Bafna; Sorin Istrail; Ross Lippert; Russell Schwartz; Brian Walenz; Shibu Yooseph; David Allen; Anand Basu; James Baxendale; Louis Blick; Marcelo Caminha; John Carnes-Stine; Parris Caulk; Yen-Hui Chiang; My Coyne; Carl Dahlke; Anne Deslattes Mays; Maria Dombroski; Michael Donnelly; Dale Ely; Shiva Esparham; Carl Fosler; Harold Gire; Stephen Glanowski; Kenneth Glasser; Anna Glodek; Mark Gorokhov; Ken Graham; Barry Gropman; Michael Harris; Jeremy Heil; Scott Henderson; Jeffrey Hoover; Donald Jennings; Catherine Jordan; James Jordan; John Kasha; Leonid Kagan; Cheryl Kraft; Alexander Levitsky; Mark Lewis; Xiangjun Liu; John Lopez; Daniel Ma; William Majoros; Joe McDaniel; Sean Murphy; Matthew Newman; Trung Nguyen; Ngoc Nguyen; Marc Nodell; Sue Pan; Jim Peck; Marshall Peterson; William Rowe; Robert Sanders; John Scott; Michael Simpson; Thomas Smith; Arlan Sprague; Timothy Stockwell; Russell Turner; Eli Venter; Mei Wang; Meiyuan Wen; David Wu; Mitchell Wu; Ashley Xia; Ali Zandieh; Xiaohong Zhu

2001-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

392

FY 2004 funded projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 LDRD PROJECTS 4 LDRD PROJECTS LDRD Proj. Project Title P.I. Dept/Bldg. 02-02 Crystallization and X-ray Analysis of Membrane Proteins D. Fu BIO/463 02-08 Creating a MicroMRI Facility for Research and Development H. Benveniste MED/490 02-09 Targeting Tin-117m to Estrogen Receptors for Breast Cancer Therapy K. Kolsky MED/801 02-22 Electrical Systems Reliability R. Bari ES&T/475B 02-45 Combined Use of Radiotracers and Positron Emission Imaging in Understanding the Integrated Response of Plants to Environmental Stress R. Ferrieri CHEM/901 02-70 Theory of Electronic Transport in Nanostructures and Low-Dimensional Systems A. Tsvelik CMP/510A 02-71 Pressure in Nanopores T. Vogt CMP/510B 02-84a Genomic SELEX to Study Protein DNA/RNA Interactions in Ralstonia metallidurans CH34

393

E-Print Network 3.0 - atypical human kinase Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the protein kinome Summary: of protein kinases encoded in the draft version of the human genome: atypical variations and uncommon domain... half the size of the human...

394

Since the early 1990s a large amount of effort has focused on determining the complete genomic DNA sequence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the early 1990s a large amount of effort has focused on determining the complete genomic DNA sequencing. From the determination of the first complete genome sequence of an organism, the bacteriophage X174 (Ref. 2), to the completion of 95% of the human genome sequence3,4, many technical advances

Botstein, David

395

Divergence time of the two regional medaka populations in Japan as a new time scale for comparative genomics of vertebrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Japan as a new time scale for comparative genomics of vertebrates Davin H. E. Setiamarga...to gain insights into the comparative genomics and speciation of vertebrates, because...those of human-chimpanzee. Comparative genomics analysis has suggested that such large...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief: Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £1.1M Funding Source: Departmental Construction Project Programme: Start on Site: November 2010 End Date : March 2011 Occupation Date: March 2011 For further information contact Project Manager as listed above

397

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: The works cover the refurbishment of floors 4, 5 operating theatre. The Bionanotechnology Centre is one of the projects funded from the UK Government's £20.imperial.ac.uk/biomedeng Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £13,095,963 Funding Source: SRIF II and Capital

398

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief: This project refurbished half of the 5th and 7th floors on the Faculty of Medicine, please visit: http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/ Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £3,500,000 Funding Source: SRIF III Construction Project Programme: Start

399

Sequencing the Rice Genome  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...University of Delhi and Nagendra Singh of the Indian Agricultural Research Institute) and...representing a single contig. On this point, Sasaki presented evidence from the RGP...ncgr.ac.cn/index.html Indian Rice Genome Program (University of Delhi...

Nancy A. Eckardt

400

Genome mining for methanobactins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methanotrophic bacteria have potential as a biological methane sink, and methanobactins are a set of peptides important in regulating this activity. A genome mining study highlights genes involved in methanobactin production, but also suggests that not all methanotrophs have them.

Grace E Kenney; Amy C Rosenzweig

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Genomic library construction  

SciTech Connect

Compositions and methods for amplifying nucleic acid sequences from a single cell are provided. Compositions and methods for constructing a genomic library from a single cell are also provided.

Church, George M. (Brookline, MA); Zhang, Kun (San Diego, CA)

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

402

Genomic Science | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) » Genomic Science Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Genomic Science DOE Bioenergy Research Centers Radiochemistry & Imaging Instrumentation Radiobiology: Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Human Subjects Protection Program Structural Biology DOE Joint Genome Institute Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building

403

USDA and DOE to Coordinate Research of Plant and Microbial Genomics |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Coordinate Research of Plant and Microbial Genomics to Coordinate Research of Plant and Microbial Genomics USDA and DOE to Coordinate Research of Plant and Microbial Genomics January 17, 2006 - 10:39am Addthis -- Soybean DNA to be Decoded -- WASHINGTON - The U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy announced Monday they will share resources and coordinate the study of plant and microbial genomics, and the Department of Energy will tackle the sequencing of the soybean genome as the first project resulting from the agreement. "This agreement demonstrates a joint commitment to support high-quality genomics research and integrated projects to meet the nation's agriculture and energy challenges," said Dr. Colien Hefferan, administrator of USDA's Cooperative State Research, Extension and Economics Service (CSREES), who

404

v2: web-based selection of oligonucleotide primer trios for genotyping of human and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(NCBI) dbSNP database, genomic DNA sequences fromhumanandmouse,andLocusLinkgeneattribute information warehousing of publicly available information (e.g. genome sequence, the location of genomic polymorphisms for the development of genotyping assays was built using warehoused data from existing genome projects, utilizing

Benos, Takis

405

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Engineer's Guide to the Structures of Baltimore Audience Students from the Krieger School of Arts City, interfaced through a course website, the team will integrate descriptions of structural behavior format. Technologies Used HTML/Web Design, MySQL Project Abstract Structural analysis is typically taught

Gray, Jeffrey J.

406

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information systems (GIS) tools to design maps that integrate data for visualizing geographic concepts School of Engineering Project Title GIS & Introductory Geography Audience Undergraduate students on how to use the Internet for geographic research, and an interactive introduction to GIS through online

Gray, Jeffrey J.

407

Project Management Project Managment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Inspired by agile methods #12;Background · Large-scale software development & IT projects, plagued relations #12;One Agile Approach to Scheduling · The creative nature of game development resist heavy up Problems ­incompatible platforms, 3rd party etc. #12;Is Games Development Similar? · Yes & No

Stephenson, Ben

408

Nucleomorph genomes: structure, function, origin and evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nucleomorph genomes: structure, function, origin and evolution John M. Archibald Summary and four genomes--two nuclear genomes, an endosymbiont- derived plastid genome and a mitochondrial genome derived from the host cell. Like mitochondrial and plastid genomes, the genome of the endosymbiont nucleus

Archibald, John

409

Final Report: Latent Expression of Genetic Damage in Human Lung Cells  

SciTech Connect

This project was aimed at furthering understanding of the latent effects of ionizing radiation. The underlying premise was that such latent (i.e., delayed) effects stemmed from radiation-induced genetic instability. As model system to investigate certain aspects of genomic instability, they proposed to look at chromosomal instability involving quasi-targeted radiation-induced breakpoints in the vicinity of the HPRT gene in EJ30 human epithelial cells. Using whole chromosome painting of the X chromosome, the authors were able to show that about 15% of randomly selected 6-thioguanine resistant (6TG{prime}) mutants involved translocations in the terminal portion of Xq. Subsequent analysis, using human genomic YAC probes confirmed that all the translocations were either within (or near Xq26.1), the cytogenetic location of HPRT, whereas none were found elsewhere involving the X chromosome.

Cornforth, Michael N.

1999-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

410

Permanent draft genome sequence of the gliding predator Saprospira grandis strain Sa g1 (= HR1)  

SciTech Connect

Saprospira grandis Gross et al. 1911 is a member of the Saprospiraceae, a family in the class 'Sphingobacteria' that remains poorly characterized at the genomic level. The species is known for preying on other marine bacteria via 'ixotrophy'. S. grandis strain Sa g1 was isolated from decaying crab carapace in France and was selected for genome sequencing because of its isolated location in the tree of life. Only one type strain genome has been published so far from the Saprospiraceae, while the sequence of strain Sa g1 represents the second genome to be published from a non-type strain of S. grandis. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 4,495,250 bp long Improved-High-Quality draft of the genome with its 3,536 protein-coding and 62 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Bioinformatics and Genomics Degree Requirements Booklet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioinformatics and Genomics Degree Requirements Booklet Fall 2010 #12;Contents Course Requirements Bioinformatics and Genomics Curriculum -------------------------------------------------------8 General #12;Bioinformatics and Genomics Option (BG

dePamphilis, Claude

412

Project Accounts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» Project Accounts » Project Accounts Project Accounts Overview Project accounts are designed to facilitate collaborative computing by allowing multiple users to use the same account. All actions performed by the project account are traceable back to the individual who used the project account to perform those actions via gsisshd accounting logs. Requesting a Project Account PI's, PI proxies and project managers are allowed to request a project account. In NIM do "Actions->Request a Project Account" and fill in the form. Select the repository that the Project Account is to use from the drop-down menu, "Sponsoring Repository". Enter the name you want for the account (8 characters maximum) and a description of what you will use the account for and then click on the "Request Project Account" button. You

413

DATABASE Open Access DFLAT: functional annotation for human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provides valuable information about developmental genomics. A collection of gene sets (genes implicated ability to interpret genomic studies of human fetal and neonatal development. Keywords: Human developmentDATABASE Open Access DFLAT: functional annotation for human development Heather C Wick1* , Harold

Kaski, Samuel

414

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: A state of the art facility, at Hammersmith information visit the Faculty of Medicine web pages http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/ Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £60 000 000 Funding Source: SRIF II (Imperial College), GSK, MRC

415

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: The refurbishment of the instrumentation equipment. This project encompasses refurbishment work on over 1,150m2 of laboratory space across four, the completed project will allow researchers to expand their work in satellite instrumentation, the fabrication

416

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief: In the first phase of the Union Building re.union.ic.ac.uk/marketing/building Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £1,400,000 Funding Source: Capital Plan and Imperial College Union reserves Construction Project Programme: Start on Site: August 2006 End Date: March

417

Volume Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Math 13900. Volume Project. For the following project, you may use any materials. This must be your own original creation. Construct a right pyramid with a base ...

rroames

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

418

Characterization of evolutionary rates and constraints in three mammalian genomes  

SciTech Connect

We present an analysis of rates and patterns of microevolutionary phenomena that have shaped the human, mouse, and rat genomes since their last common ancestor. We find evidence for a shift in the mutational spectrum between the mouse and rat lineages, with the net effect being a relative increase in GC content in the rat genome. Our estimate for the neutral point substitution rate separating the two rodents is 0.196 substitutions per site, and 0.65 substitutions per site for the tree relating all three mammals. Small insertions and deletions of 1-10 bp in length (''microindels'') occur at approximately 5 percent of the point substitution rate. Inferred regional correlations in evolutionary rates between lineages and between types of sites support the idea that rates of evolution are influenced by local genomic or cell biological context. No substantial correlations between rates of point substitutions and rates of microindels are found, however, implying that the influences that affect these processes are distinct. Finally, we have identified those regions in the human genome that are evolving slowly, which are likely to include functional elements important to human biology. At least 5 percent of the human genome is under substantial constraint, most of which is noncoding.

Cooper, Gregory M.; Brudno, Michael; Stone, Eric A.; Dubchak, Inna; Batzoglou, Serafim; Sidow, Arend

2004-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Towards Practical Privacy for Genomic Computation Somesh Jha # Louis Kruger # Vitaly Shmatikov +  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

genome sequences of the entire population of Iceland [8], while the non­profit HapMap ProjectTowards Practical Privacy for Genomic Computation Somesh Jha # Louis Kruger # Vitaly Shmatikov highly sensi­ tive information about individuals. We present a relatively efficient, privacy

Shmatikov, Vitaly

420

Genomics and plant cells: application of genomics strategies to Arabidopsis cell biology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

29 June 2002 research-article Genomics and plant cells: application of genomics strategies to Arabidopsis cell biology Michael...the way we conduct plant science. Arabidopsis Genomics Functional Genomics Cell Biology| Genomics and...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Impact of Spatial Structure on Viral Genomic Diversity Generated during Adaptation to Thermal Stress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Seeds, Genomics, Biofuels) for a portion of this study. There are no patents, products in development: This project was supported by grants from the National Center for Research Resources (5P20RR016448 or marketed products to decl

Krone, Steve

422

Development of an endocrine genomics virtual research environment for Australia: building on success .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The $47m Australian National eResearch Collaboration Tools and Resources (NeCTAR - www.nectar.org.au) project has recently funded an initiative to establish an Australia-wide endocrine genomics virtual… (more)

Sinnott, Richard O.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

JGI - Structural Genomics Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structural Genomics Program Structural Genomics Program The structural characterization of proteins of unknown function can be described as structural genomics, an approach in which structure determination by X-ray crystallography supplies key functional information. This is exemplified by studies of the carboxysome. The structures of the first carboxysome shell proteins (Kerfeld et al., Science 2005) confirmed earlier hypotheses that they are indeed the basic building blocks of the carboxysome shell; the quaternary structure and the higher order assemblies of the proteins in the crystals provided insight into how they assemble into shell facets. Likewise, our structure of the carboxysome component CsoS3 revealed that it was a member of the beta-carbonic family, despite having no detectable sequence homology at the level of primary structure

424

Genomics of cellulolytic bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The heterogeneous plant biomass is efficiently decomposed by the interplay of a great number of different enzymes. The enzyme systems in cellulolytic bacteria have been investigated by sequencing and bioinformatic analysis of genomes from plant biomass degrading microorganisms with valuable insights into the variety of the involved enzymes. This broadened our understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of plant polymer degradation and made the enzymes applicable for modern biotechnology. A list of the truly cellulolytic bacteria described and the available genomic information was examined for proteins with cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic capability. The importance of the isolation, characterization and genomic sequencing of cellulolytic microorganisms and their usage for sustainable energy production from biomass and other residues, is emphasized.

Daniela E Koeck; Alexander Pechtl; Vladimir V Zverlov; Wolfgang H Schwarz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Microbial Genomics Data from the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

As of March 2008, The Joint Genome Institute has released 296 Prokaryotic microbial sites, with 216 in finished status.

426

Private Appropriation, Public Dissemination and Commercial Product Development in Genomics (DOE)  

SciTech Connect

With DOE funding, I have conducted research on the topic of patents and technology transfer in the Human Genome Project since 1994. My research has proceeded along the following tracks: (1) research and monitoring of legal developments relating to (a) the patenting of DNA sequences and (b) the role of patents in technology transfer; (2) investigating and monitoring the strategies of different institutions in the public and private sector that are involved in DNA sequencing with respect to patenting and disseminating sequence information; (3) investigating and monitoring the impact of these strategies on those who use sequence information in research and product development. I have published commentary as my research proceeds in a variety of forums directed at scientists, lawyers, and science policy-makers.

Rebecca S. Eisenberg

2003-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

427

JGI - FY2004 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Sequencing for the 4 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program For status information, see the Genome Projects section. For more information about the DOE Office of Science's Microbial Genome Program, see http://microbialgenomics.energy.gov/. For more information about microbial sequencing at JGI, contact David Bruce. Chlorobia (avg:~2.4Mb) Organism Genome Size Chlorobium ferrooxidans DSM 13031 2.40 Mb Chlorobium limicola DSMZ 245 2.4 Mb Chlorobium phaeobacteroides BS1 2.4 Mb Chlorobium phaeobacteroides DSM 266 2.3 Mb Pelodictyon luteolum DSMZ 273 2.3 Mb Pelodictyon phaeoclathratiforme BU-1 (DSM 5477) 2.4 Mb Prosthecochloris aestuarii DSM 271 2.4 Mb Prosthecochloris vibrioformis DSM 265 2.4 Mb Chlorobaculum parvum n/a Chloroherpeton thalassium n/a Model Syntrophic Consortium

428

JGI - FY2001 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Sequencing for the 1 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program For status information, see the Genome Projects section. For more information about the DOE Office of Science's Microbial Genome Program, see http://microbialgenomics.energy.gov/. For more information about microbial sequencing at JGI, contact David Bruce. Organism Genome Size Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 8 Mb Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl 3 Mb Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 6.8 Mb Cytophaga hutchinsonii ATCC 33406 4.4 Mb Desulfitobacterium halfniense DCB-2 4.7 Mb Enterococcus faecium DO 2.8 Mb Ferroplasma acidarmanus fer1 1.8 Mb Magnetococcus sp. MC-1 4.7 Mb Methanosarcina barkerii fusaro 4.8 Mb Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC 19718 2.8 Mb Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 9.2 Mb Novosphingobium aromaticivorans DSM 12444 4.2 Mb

429

JGI - FY2007 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Sequencing for the 7 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program For status information, see the Genome Projects section. For more information about the DOE Office of Science's Microbial Genome Program, see http://microbialgenomics.energy.gov/. For more information about microbial sequencing at JGI, contact David Bruce. Organism(s) Est. Genome Size Acremonium alcalophilum ATCC90507 40 MB Azolla Cyanobacterium, Arthrospira maxima, and Cyanobacterium JSC-1 NA bacterioplankton pool cDNA day, night, night + DOC1, night + DOC2 NA Clostridum carboxidivorans, Clostridium sp. strains, Clostridium straminisolvens, Clostridum thermocellum LQR1 DSM2360 , Clostridium thermocellum JW20 DSM 4150 Thermoanaerobacter italicus Ab9 DSM9252, T. ethanolicus X513, T. ethanoloicus X561, T. mathrani, Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharaolyticum, Thermoanaerobacterium xylanolyticum LX11 DSM7097 3.5-4.0 MB

430

Complete genome sequence of Treponema succinifaciens type strain (6091T)  

SciTech Connect

Treponema succinifaciens Cwyk and Canale-Parola 1981 is of interest because this strictly anaerobic, apathogenic member of the genus Treponema oxidizes carbohydrates and couples the Embden-Meyerhof pathway via activity of a pyruvate-formate lyase to the production of acetyl-coenzyme A and formate. This feature separates this species from most other anaerob- ic spirochetes. The genome of T. succinifaciens 6091T is only the second completed and pub- lished type strain genome from the genus Treponema in the family Spirochaetaceae. The 2,897,425 bp long genome with one plasmid harbors 2,723 protein-coding and 63 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Zeytun, Ahmet [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Saltcreek Project Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Summary Project Summary HELP Index Summary Scenario References Student Pages Subject/Content Area: Environmental Science Target Audience: Middle school level - all students, including gifted, learning-disabled, behavior-disordered and limited English proficient Project Goals: As a result of their participation in the Salt Creek Investigation, the students will develop the abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry. They will increase their understanding of factors affecting environmental quality, including the interdependence of organisms, and human-induced hazards. Students will learn how science and technology can help people solve local, national and global environmental problems. Learner Outcomes: Students will: be able to carry out six types of stream monitoring tests.

432

Project Controls  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Project controls are systems used to plan, schedule, budget, and measure the performance of a project/program. The cost estimation package is one of the documents that is used to establish the baseline for project controls. This chapter gives a brief description of project controls and the role the cost estimation package plays.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

433

Genomic Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the fundamental principles that control complex biological systems important to clean energy and environmental applications. Multidisciplinary genomic science research and...

434

Challenges in global genomics education  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In spite of high expectations for the integration of genomics into medicine, it is not clear that health providers are competent to appropriately use new genomic approaches. The issue is further complicated by differences across the globe in terms of educational systems, access to genomic technologies, and priorities in health care. In this commentary we will review some of the major challenges in educating the health provider workforce about genomic medicine.

Ashwini de Abrew; Vajira H.W. Dissanayake; Bruce R. Korf

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Refining Restriction Enzyme Genome Maps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A genome map is an ordering of a set of clones according to their believed position on a DNA string. Simple heuristics for genome map assembly based on single restriction enzyme with complete digestion data can lead to inaccuracies and ambiguities. This ... Keywords: constraint query languages, genome mapping, set constraints

Peter Z. Revesz

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

SHORT REVIEW Butterfly genomics eclosing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SHORT REVIEW Butterfly genomics eclosing P Beldade1 , WO McMillan2 and A Papanicolaou3 1 Section to an explosion of genomic data and the emergence of new research avenues. Evolutionary and ecological functional genomics, with its focus on the genes that affect ecological success and adaptation in natural populations

Beldade, Patrícia

437

Genomics in the ecological arena  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...meeting-report Meeting reports 1001 60 69 70 129 Genomics in the ecological arena Luisa Orsini...Dame, IN 46556, USA 4 The Center for Genomics and Bioinformatics, Indiana University...emerging model system in environmental genomics. Daphnia has been a model species in...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Communicating Genomics:GTL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Joint Genome Institute User Meeting Sponsored By U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science March 24-26, 2010 Walnut Creek Marriott Walnut Creek, California iii Contents Speaker Presentations ......................................................................................... 1 Poster Presentations........................................................................................... 11 Attendees............................................................................................................. 67 Author Index ...................................................................................................... 75 iv Posters alphabetical by first author. *Presenting author 1 Speaker Presentations Abstracts alphabetical by speaker

439

International milk genomics consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University, Wooster, OH 44691, USA c University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844, USA d University of Colorado. The general goals of the Milk Genomics Consortium are to link the scientific community through milk and geno value of milk's components is known (German, Dillard, & Ward, 2002). The scientific challenge, therefore

Rocke, David M.

440

The linked human imprintome v1.0: over 120 genes confirmed as imprinted impose a major review on previous censuses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The whole set of human imprinted genes, termed imprintome, is here analysed by means of a reasonable, valid application of the Semantic Web and Linked Data approaches to a few structured datasets in order to provide a comprehensive collection of imprinted genes in the human genome. Thus, we have stored, organised, filtered, and analysed massive amounts of existing data on human imprinted genes towards compiling, structuring and linking data to comprise a sharing resource for genome and epigenome interrogated studies. Our datasets of linked data are the actual research outcome of this human imprintome analysis because as genomics become more and more data intensive, due to huge amounts of biological data, so does our needs for more structured data to be easier mined and shared. We present the resulting first version of the Linked Human Imprintome as a project within Linked Open Data (LOD) initiative (http://lod-cloud.net/) through Data Hub (http://thedatahub.org/en/dataset/a-draft-version-of-the-linked-human-imprintome).

Samara Cardoso Da Silva-Santiago; Christina Pacheco; Tereza Cristina Lima Rocha; Samyra Maria Vieira Brasil; Ana Carolina Landim Pacheco; Mônica Moraes Silva; Fabiana Freire Araújo; Elton José Rosas D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Complete genome sequence of Thermosediminibacter oceani type strain (JW/IW-1228PT)  

SciTech Connect

Thermosediminibacter oceani (Lee et al. 2006) is the type species of the genus Thermosediminibacter in the family Thermoanaerobacteraceae. The anaerobic, barophilic, chemoorganotrophic thermophile is characterized by straight to curved Gram-negative rods. The strain described in this study has been isolated from a core sample of deep sea sediments of the Peruvian high productivity upwelling system. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Thermosediminibacter and the seventh genome sequence in the family Thermoanaerobacteraceae. The 2,280,035 bp long genome with its 2,285 protein-coding and 63 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Yasawong, Montri [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Munk, Christine [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Complete genome sequence of Calditerrivibrio nitroreducens type strain (Yu37-1T)  

SciTech Connect

Calditerrivibrio nitroreducens Iino et al. 2008 is the type species of the genus Calditerrivibrio. The species is of interest because of its important role in the nitrate cycle as nitrate reducer and for its isolated phylogenetic position in the Tree of Life. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the third complete genome sequence of a member of the family Deferribacteraceae. The 2,216,552 bp long genome with its 2,128 protein-coding and 50 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Pitluck, Sam [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Zeytun, Ahmet [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Nolan, Matt [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Lucas, Susan [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Hammon, Nancy [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Deshpande, Shweta [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Cheng, Jan-Fang [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Liolios, Konstantinos [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Pagani, Ioanna [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Palaniappan, Krishna [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Detter, J. Chris [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Bristow, James [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Eisen, Jonathan [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Markowitz, Victor [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Land, Miriam L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Complete genome sequence of Halopiger xanaduensis type strain (SH6T)  

SciTech Connect

Halopiger xanaduensis is the type species of the genus Halopiger and belongs to the euryarchaeal family Halobacteriaceae. H. xanaduensis strain SH-6, which is designated as the type strain, was isolated from the sediment of a salt lake in Inner Mongolia, Lake Shangmatala. Like other members of the family Halobacteriaceae, it is an extreme halophile requiring at least 2.5 M salt for growth. We report here the sequencing and annotation of the 4,355,268 bp genome, which includes one chromosome and three plasmids. This genome is part of a Joint Genome Institute (JGI) Community Sequencing Program (CSP) project to sequence diverse haloarchaeal genomes.

Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Complete genome sequence of the facultatively anaerobic, appendaged bacterium Muricauda ruestringensis type strain (B1T)  

SciTech Connect

Muricauda ruestringensis Bruns et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus Muricauda, which belongs to the family Flavobacteriaceae in the phylum Bacteroidetes. The species is of interest because of its isolated position in the genomically unexplored genus Muricauda, which is located in a part of the tree of life containing not many organisms with sequenced genomes. The genome, which consists of a circular chromosome of 3,842,422 bp length with a total of 3,478 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes, is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Genome sequence of the Antarctic rhodopsins- containing flavobacterium Gillisia limnaea type strain (R- 8282T)  

SciTech Connect

Gillisia limnaea Van Trappen et al. 2004 is the type species of the genus Gillisia, which is a mem- ber of the well characterized family Flavobacteriaceae. The genome of G. limnea R-8282T is the first sequenced genome (permanent draft) from a type strain of the genus Gillisia. Here we de- scribe the features of this organism, together with the permanent-draft genome sequence and an- notation. The 3,966,857 bp long chromosome (two scaffolds) with its 3,569 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Riedel, Thomas [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Complete genome sequence of Sanguibacter keddieii type strain (ST-74T)  

SciTech Connect

Sanguibacter keddieii is the type species of the genus Sanguibacter, the only described genus within the family of Sanguibacteraceae. Phylogenetically, this family is located in the neighbourhood of the genus Oerskovia and the family Cellulomonadaceae within the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. The strain described in this report was isolated from blood of apparently healthy cows. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the family Sanguibacteraceae, and the 4,253,413 bp long single replicon genome with its 3735 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Ivanova, Natalia; Sikorski, Johannes; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Goker, Markus; Pukall, Rudiger; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

447

New culturing tool reveals a full genome from single cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New culturing tool reveals New culturing tool reveals New culturing tool reveals a full genome from single cells A new technique for genetic analysis, "gel microdroplets," helps scientists generate complete genomes from a single cell. March 15, 2013 Two GMD containing gut-community microcolonies are shown, with green fluorescence marking the DNA. Two GMD containing gut-community microcolonies are shown, with green fluorescence marking the DNA. Photo credit A. Dichosa, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email We have demonstrated a novel approach for fully sequencing genomes of microorganisms found in complex communities. Gel microdroplet culturing reveals intraspecies genomic diversity within the human microbiome LOS ALAMOS, N. M., March 15, 2013-A new technique for genetic analysis,

448

Building Energy Modeling Projects | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Scalable Support and Training Services Platform Center-Led Projects CERC: Human Behavior, Standards and Tools to Improve Design & Operation CBERD: Building Energy Simulation &...

449

TIES Project back to basics Roberto Escarr  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Outputs and Outcomes · Innovation Through Observation · Human Resources Development · Capacity Building and Action Plans · Networking and Sustainability (Network) · Dissemination Sustainability (project) · Quality

450

Mining data from 1000 genomes to identify the causal variant in regions under positive selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The human genome contains hundreds of regions in which the patterns of genetic variation indicate recent positive natural selection, yet for most of these the underlying gene and the advantageous mutation remain unknown. ...

Grossman, Sharon Rachel

451

GeneJax: A Prototype CAD tool in support of Genome Refactoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refactoring is a technique used by computer scientists for improving program design. The Endy Laboratory has adapted this process to make the genomes of biological organisms more amenable to human understanding and design ...

Anand, Ishan

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

452

Science Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne Argonne Science Project Ideas! Our Science Project section provides you with sample classroom projects and experiments, online aids for learning about science, as well as ideas for Science Fair Projects. Please select any project below to continue. Also, if you have an idea for a great project or experiment that we could share, please click our Ideas page. We would love to hear from you! Science Fair Ideas Science Fair Ideas! The best ideas for science projects are learning about and investigating something in science that interests you. NEWTON has a list of Science Fair linkd that can help you find the right topic. Toothpick Bridge Web Sites Toothpick Bridge Sites! Building a toothpick bridge is a great class project for physics and engineering students. Here are some sites that we recommend to get you started!

453

Projection Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a general rule, broad-band sources which employ projection optics are the most difficult to evaluate. In addition to the problems encountered in evaluating exposed lamps, one must characterize the projected...

David Sliney; Myron Wolbarsht

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Circle Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project asks students to decide if a collection of points in space do or do not lie on a ... The project is accessible to linear algebra students who have studied ...

455

Hydropower Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's hydropower project funding from fiscal years 2008 to 2014.

456

Navigating protected genomics data with UCSC Genome Browser in a Box.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. et al. (2013) Integrative Genomics Viewer (IGV):High-performance genomics data visualization andbrowsers for comparative genomics. Bioinformatics. In press.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

DOE Joint Genome Institute | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Joint Genome Institute DOE Joint Genome Institute Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Genomic Science DOE Bioenergy Research Centers Radiochemistry & Imaging Instrumentation Radiobiology: Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Human Subjects Protection Program Structural Biology DOE Joint Genome Institute Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301)

458

Modeling genome coverage in single-cell sequencing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......1292-1294. Evrony GD , et al. Single-neuron sequencing analysis of L1 retrotransposition and somatic mutation in the human brain. Cell (2012) 151:483-496. Geigl JB , et al. Identification of small gains and losses in single cells after whole genome......

Timothy Daley; Andrew D. Smith

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Modeling genome coverage in single-cell sequencing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......1292-1294. Evrony GD , et al. Single-neuron sequencing analysis of L1 retrotransposition and somatic mutation in the human brain. Cell (2012) 151:483-496. Geigl JB , et al. Identification of small gains and losses in single cells after whole genome......

Timothy Daley; Andrew D. Smith

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Using bioinformatics and genome analysis for new therapeutic interventions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...small features set algorithm searches for patterns of small numbers...www.biorag.org using the search option. . Extraction of biological...Sachidanandam R, Weissman D, Schmidt SC, et al. A map of human genome...Stein LD. The SNP Consortium website: past, present and future...

David W. Mount and Ritu Pandey

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

JGI Visiting Scientist Program The DOE Joint Genome Institute Visiting Scientist Program (VSP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visiting Scientist Program Visiting Scientist Program The DOE Joint Genome Institute Visiting Scientist Program (VSP) provides an opportunity for researchers who are seeking to build upon their line of scientific inquiry by leveraging JGI experimental, computational, and personnel resources for genomic research and sequence-based science. Projects include de novo generation of genome data, assistance in interpreting and/or building on an existing data set, or the refining of new technology (e.g., single-cell genomics; metagenomics, etc.). Length of stay depends on complexity of the project being considered and availability of data and other resources. Investigators, post docs, and graduate students participating in approved JGI User Projects are also invited to apply for on-site access to JGI

462

EMP: Earth Microbiome Project | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EMP: Earth Microbiome Project EMP: Earth Microbiome Project EMP: Earth Microbiome Project The Earth Microbiome Project is a proposed massively multidisciplinary effort to analyze microbial communities across the globe. The general premise is to examine microbial communities from their own perspective. We propose to characterize the Earth by environmental parameter space into different biomes and then explore these using samples currently available from researchers across the globe. We will analyze 200,000 samples from these communities using metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and amplicon sequencing to produce a global Gene Atlas describing protein space, environmental metabolic models for each biome, approximately 500,000 reconstructed microbial genomes, a global metabolic model, and a

463

Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Projects Power Projects Contact SN Customers Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > About SNR Power Projects Central Valley: In California's Central Valley, 18 dams create reservoirs that can store 13 million acre-feet of water. The project's 615 miles of canals irrigate an area 400 miles long and 45 miles wide--almost one third of California. Powerplants at the dams have an installed capacity of 2,099 megawatts and provide enough energy for 650,000 people. Transmission lines total about 865 circuit-miles. Washoe: This project in west-central Nevada and east-central California was designed to improve the regulation of runoff from the Truckee and Carson river systems and to provide supplemental irrigation water and drainage, as well as water for municipal, industrial and fishery use. The project's Stampede Powerplant has a maximum capacity of 4 MW.

464

Biomedical Ethics & Medical Humanities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

List Sample Elective Courses Arts & Humanities Medical Scholars: Student Projects #12;2 What is BEMHBEMH Biomedical Ethics & Medical Humanities Scholarly Concentration Stanford University School? The Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities Scholarly Concentration is part of the new initiative at Stanford

Ford, James

465

A Collection of Algal Genomes from the JGI  

SciTech Connect

Algae, defined as photosynthetic eukaryotes other than plants, constitute a major component of fundamental eukaryotic diversity. Acquisition of the ability to conduct oxygenic photosynthesis through endosymbiotic events has been a principal driver of eukaryotic evolution, and today algae continue to underpin aquatic food chains as primary producers. Algae play profound roles in the carbon cycle, can impose health and economic costs through toxic blooms, and are candidate sources for bio-fuels; all of these research areas are part of the mission of DOE?s Joint Genome Institute (JGI). A collection of algal projects ongoing at JGI contributes to each of these areas and illustrates analyses employed in their genome exploration.

Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

466

Procedures for Preparing the Research Project Proposal (Revised: March 5, 2010) 1 PROCEDURES FOR A PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Procedures for Preparing the Research Project Proposal (Revised: March 5, 2010) 1 PROCEDURES FOR A PROJECT: for the Master of Science in Human-Computer Interaction, IN 46202 Indiana University - Purdue University, Indianapolis (IUPUI) #12;Procedures for Preparing

Zhou, Yaoqi

467

Abstract A33: Exploring pediatric cancer genomics with the UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...October 2014 meeting-abstract Pediatric Cancer Genomics and Epigenomics Pediatric Cancer Genomics and Epigenomics: Poster Presentations - Proffered...Abstract A33: Exploring pediatric cancer genomics with the UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser Melissa...

Melissa Cline; Olena Morozova; Teresa Swatloski; Brian Craft; Mary Goldman; David Haussler; Jingchun Zhu

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

GIS: a web-based genomics information system for efficiently manipulating and accessing genome physical maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biological science has entered the genome era. Global genome integrative physical and genetic mapping promises to revolutionize modern genomics research. To facilitate manipulation and applications of the results from genomics research, many...

Chen, Huaming

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

469

POSTDOCTORAL POSITION IN BIOINFORMATICS AND EVOLUTIONARY GENOMICS: Next generation sequencing and analysis of complex polyploid genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POSTDOCTORAL POSITION IN BIOINFORMATICS AND EVOLUTIONARY GENOMICS: Next generation sequencing and analysis of complex polyploid genomes The research group Genome Evolution and Speciation (Team) to work on the analysis of genome and transcriptome sequence data (generated using 454 Roche

Rennes, Université de

470

GenomeCons: a web server for manipulating multiple genome sequence alignments and their consensus sequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......December 2014 brief-report Applications Note GenomeCons: a web server for manipulating multiple genome sequence alignments and...molecular biological processes. In this study, we developed a web server, GenomeCons, for manipulating multiple genome sequence......

Tetsuya Sato; Mikita Suyama

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Original article Neisseria Base: a comparative genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article Neisseria Base: a comparative genomics database for Neisseria meningitidis Lee S, septicemia and in some cases pneumonia. Genomic studies hold great promise for N. meningitidis research genomics database and genome browser that houses and displays publicly available N. meningitidis genomes

Jordan, King

472

A Novel Approach for Comparative Genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Novel Approach for Comparative Genomics & Annotation Transfer Alban MANCHERON Raluca URICARU Eric is genome comparison good for?" Genome comparison is crucial for genome annotation, regulatory motifs identification, and vaccine design aims at finding genomic regions either specific to or in one

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

473

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted gene insertion Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and noncoding genes in the human genome Michele Clamp* , Ben Fry... ) Although the Human Genome Project was completed 4 years ago, the catalog of human protein-coding...

474

Single Cell Whole Genome Amplification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single Cell Whole Genome Amplification Single Cell Whole Genome Amplification of Uncultivated Organisms Mircea Podar , Martin Keller , and Philip Hugenholtz (* ü ) Abstract Whole genome amplification of single cells is emerging as a powerful technique for accessing the genomes of individual members of microbial communi- ties without the complication of identifying the source of sequence data posed by shotgun sequencing of environmental samples (metagenomics). This method holds particular promise for the molecular unveiling of uncultivated organisms that com- prise the bulk of the microbial diversity and functionality on our planet. 1 Introduction Over the last two decades, it has become increasingly apparent that microbial diversity

475

Evolutionary Genomics of Prokaryotic Viruses.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Evolutionary history of biological entities is recorded within their nucleic acid sequences and can (sometimes) be deciphered by thorough genomic analysis. In this study we… (more)

Krupovic, Mart

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the program * Project overall objectives * Technical status * Project summary * Conclusions and future plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * This research project develops a reservoir scale CO 2 plume migration model at the Sleipner project, Norway. The Sleipner project in the Norwegian North Sea is the world's first commercial scale geological carbon storage project. 4D seismic data have delineated the CO 2 plume migration history. The relatively long history and high fidelity data make

477

The need for a human gene index  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......need for a human gene index. | Editorial | Abstracting...NEED FOR A HUMAN GENE INDEX Much noise has been made...the year 2000 about the completion of a "draft" of the...changes in assembly and completion of the draft genome...need for a human gene index Towards a true gene index......

C. Victor Jongeneel

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Final project report  

SciTech Connect

The proposed overarching goal for this project was the following: Data integration, simulation and visualization will facilitate metabolic and regulatory network prediction, exploration, and formulation of hypotheses. We stated three specific aims to achieve the overarching goal of this project: (1) Integration of multiple levels of information such as mRNA and protein levels, predicted protein-protein interactions/associations and gene function will enable construction of models describing environmental response and dynamic behavior. (2) Flexible tools for network inference will accelerate our understanding of biological systems. (3) Flexible exploration and queries of model hypotheses will provide focus and reveal novel dependencies. The underlying philosophy of these proposed aims is that an iterative cycle of experiments, experimental design, and verification will lead to a comprehensive and predictive model that will shed light on systems level mechanisms involved in responses elicited by living systems upon sensing a change in their environment. In the previous years report we demonstrated considerable progress in development of data standards, regulatory network inference and data visualization and exploration. We are pleased to report that several manuscripts describing these procedures have been published in top international peer reviewed journals including Genome Biology, PNAS, and Cell. The abstracts of these manuscripts are given and they summarize our accomplishments in this project.

Nitin S. Baliga and Leroy Hood

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

479

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and Evaluation of Test and Evaluation of Engineered Biomineralization Technology for Sealing Existing wells Project Number: FE0009599 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Motivation & Benefit to the Program (required) * Benefit to the Program and Project Overview (required) * Background information - Project Concept (MICP) - Ureolytic Biomineralization, Biomineralization Sealing * Accomplishments to Date - Site Characterization - Site Preparation - Experimentation and Modeling - Field Deployable Injection Strategy Development * Summary

480

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL's Consolidated Sequestration Research Program (CSRP) Project Number FWP ESD09-056 Barry Freifeld Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits and Goals of GEO-SEQ * Technical Status - Otway Project (CO2CRC) - In Salah (BP, Sonatrach and Statoil) - Ketzin Project (GFZ, Potsdam) - Aquistore (PTRC) * Accomplishments and Summary * Future Plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed: - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage capacity estimation - Develop and validate technologies to ensure 99 percent storage permanence.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-23, 2012 1-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline I. Benefits II. Project Overview III. Technical Status A. Background B. Results IV. Accomplishments V. Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals. - Prediction of CO 2 storage capacity. * Project benefits. - Workforce/Student Training: Support of 3 student GAs in use of multiphase flow and geochemical models simulating CO 2 injection. - Support of Missouri DGLS Sequestration Program. 4 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Project Goals and Objectives. 1. Training graduate students in use of multi-phase flow models related to CO 2 sequestration. 2. Training graduate students in use of geochemical models to assess interaction of CO

482

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Coal's Center for Coal's FY10 Carbon Sequestration Peer Review February 8 - 12, 2010 2 Collaborators * Tissa Illangasekare (Colorado School of Mines) * Michael Plampin (Colorado School of Mines) * Jeri Sullivan (LANL) * Shaoping Chu (LANL) * Jacob Bauman (LANL) * Mark Porter (LANL) 3 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Project technical status * Accomplishments to date * Future Plans * Appendix 4 Benefit to the program * Program goals being addressed (2011 TPP): - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * Project benefit: - This project is developing system modeling capabilities that can be used to address challenges associated with infrastructure development, integration, permanence &

483

Discontinued Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page lists projects that received a loan or a loan guarantee from DOE, but that are considered discontinued by LPO for one of several reasons.

484

project management  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the Baseline Change Proposal process. Two 400,000-gallon fire protection water supply tanks and associated pumping facilities were added. Later in the project, an additional...

485

Custom Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Incentive Payment - The ESIP works with utility, industry, and BPA to complete the measurement and verification, reporting and development of a custom project completion...

486

GenomeView: a next-generation genome browser Thomas Abeel1,2,3,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GenomeView: a next-generation genome browser Thomas Abeel1,2,3, *, Thomas Van Parys1,2 , Yvan Saeys GenomeView, a stand-alone genome browser specifically designed to visualize and manipulate a multitude of genomics data. GenomeView enables users to dynamically browse high volumes of aligned short-read data

Gent, Universiteit

487

Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 Wild-Type and Vector-Mediated Genomic Integration Profiles of Human Diploid Fibroblasts Analyzed by Third-Generation PacBio DNA Sequencing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with variant hot spot preferences. DNase-Seq patterns of these sites in human tissues, including liver, muscle, heart, brain, skin, and embryonic stem cells further underline variant chromatin accessibility. In summary, AAV integration is dependent...

Daniela Hüser; Andreas Gogol-Döring; Wei Chen; Regine Heilbronn

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

488

HLW System Integrated Project Team  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

l l W S Hi h l W S High Level Waste System High Level Waste System Integrated Project Team Integrated Project Team Integrated Project Team Integrated Project Team Steve Schneider Steve Schneider Office of Engineering and Technology High Level Waste Corporate Board March 5, 2009 This document is intended for planning and analysis purposes, assuming a continuing constrained budget environment. Every effort will be made to comply with all applicable environmental and legal obligations, while also assuring that essential functions necessary to protect human health, the environment and national security are maintained. 1 Introduction Introduction Introduction Introduction Challenges and Priorities High Level Waste Strategic Initiative Results High Level Waste System Integrated

489

Genome Majority Vote (GMV), Version 0.x  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genome Majority Vote (GMV), Version 0.x Genome Majority Vote (GMV), Version 0.x The pipeline runs PRODIGAL gene predictions on all genomes, runs pan-reciprocal BLAST, and...

490

Trichoderma: the genomics of opportunistic success  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a fungal prey. BMC Genomics 10, 567 (2009). This studythe TrichoEST functional genomics approach. Curr. Genet. 51,in Hypocrea jecorina. BMC Genomics. 9, 430 (2008) Mukherjee,

Druzhinina, Irina S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

From Integrative Genomics to Therapeutic Targets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research. 15 June 2013 review-article Reviews From Integrative Genomics to Therapeutic Targets Rachael Natrajan Paul Wilkerson Corresponding...conventional pathology with genomic profiling and functional genomics have begun to enhance our understanding of the genetic basis...

Rachael Natrajan and Paul Wilkerson

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

492

Whistling Ridge Energy Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(PDCI) Upgrade Project Whistling Ridge Energy Project Line Rebuild, Relocation and Substation Projects Wind Projects Whistling Ridge Energy Project Bonneville Power...

493

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snøhvit CO Snøhvit CO 2 Storage Project Project Number: FWP-FEW0174 Task 4 Principal Investigators: L. Chiaramonte, *J.A. White Team Members: Y. Hao, J. Wagoner, S. Walsh Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Benefit to Program * Project Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Summary & Accomplishments * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * The research project is focused on mechanical

494

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

InSalah CO InSalah CO 2 Storage Project Project Number: FWP-FEW0174 Task 2 Principal Investigator: W. McNab Team Members: L. Chiaramonte, S. Ezzedine, W. Foxall, Y. Hao, A. Ramirez, *J.A. White Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Benefit to Program * Project Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * The research project is combining sophisticated

495

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Space Geodesy, Seismology, Space Geodesy, Seismology, and Geochemistry for Monitoring Verification and Accounting of CO 2 in Sequestration Sites DE-FE0001580 Tim Dixon, University of South Florida Peter Swart, University of Miami U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to program * Goals & objectives * Preliminary InSAR results (site selection phase) * Project location * Project installed equipment * Specific project results * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Focused on monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) * If successful, our project will demonstrate the utility of low cost, surface

496

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 DE-FE0001159 Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO 2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations Gary Mavko Rock Physics Project/Stanford University 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Motivating technical challenge * Approach * Technical Status - Laboratory results - Theoretical modeling * Summary Mavko: Stanford University 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99% of injected CO 2 remains in injection zones. * Project benefits statement.

497

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Volume Injection of CO Large Volume Injection of CO 2 to Assess Commercial Scale Geological Sequestration in Saline Formations in the Big Sky Region Project Number: DE-FC26-05NT42587 Dr. Lee Spangler Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Goals and Objectives * Project overview * Kevin Dome characteristics * Project design philosophy * Infrastructure * Modeling * Monitoring * Project Opportunities 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

498

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Research on Probabilistic and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical (HTM) Modeling of CO 2 Geological Sequestration (GS) in Fractured Porous Rocks Project DE-FE0002058 Marte Gutierrez, Ph.D. Colorado School of Mines U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program (Program goals addressed and Project benefits) * Project goals and objectives * Technical status - Project tasks * Technical status - Key findings * Lessons learned * Summary - Accomplishments to date 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries'

499

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complexity and Choice of Complexity and Choice of Model Approaches for Practical Simulations of CO 2 Injection, Migration, Leakage, and Long- term Fate Karl W. Bandilla Princeton University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Project Number DE-FE0009563 2 Presentation Outline * Project Goals and Objectives * Project overview * Accomplishments * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * The aim of the project is to develop criteria for the selection of the appropriate level of model complexity for CO 2 sequestration modeling at a given site. This will increase the confidence in modeling results, and reduce computational cost when appropriate.

500

A framework for human microbiome research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of microbial communities and their genes (the microbiome) exist throughout the human body, with fundamental roles in human health and disease. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Human Microbiome Project ...

Friedman, Jonathan