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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Genomics and the human genome project: implications for psychiatry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and psychosis: a convergent functional genomics approach.Physiology & Genomics, 4, 83–91. O LIPHANT , A. , B ARKER ,2004), 16(4), 294–300 Genomics and the Human Genome Project:

Kelsoe, J R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Justice and the Human Genome Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the essays gathered in this volume were first presented at a conference, Justice and the Human Genome, in Chicago in early November, 1991. The goal of the, conference was to consider questions of justice as they are and will be raised by the Human Genome Project. To achieve its goal of identifying and elucidating the challenges of justice inherent in genomic research and its social applications the conference drew together in one forum members from academia, medicine, and industry with interests divergent as rate-setting for insurance, the care of newborns, and the history of ethics. The essays in this volume address a number of theoretical and practical concerns relative to the meaning of genomic research.

Murphy, T.F.; Lappe, M. (eds.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

To Know Ourselves: The U.S. Department of Energy and The Human Genome Project  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The Genome Project and its various aspects: why the DOE?; introducing the human genome; exploring the genomic landscape; beyond biology; and ethical, legal, and social implications.

1996-07-00T23:59:59.000Z

4

The Human Genome Diversity (HGD) Project. Summary document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1991 a group of human geneticists and molecular biologists proposed to the scientific community that a world wide survey be undertaken of variation in the human genome. To aid their considerations, the committee therefore decided to hold a small series of international workshops to explore the major scientific issues involved. The intention was to define a framework for the project which could provide a basis for much wider and more detailed discussion and planning--it was recognized that the successful implementation of the proposed project, which has come to be known as the Human Genome Diversity (HGD) Project, would not only involve scientists but also various national and international non-scientific groups all of which should contribute to the project`s development. The international HGD workshop held in Sardinia in September 1993 was the last in the initial series of planning workshops. As such it not only explored new ground but also pulled together into a more coherent form much of the formal and informal discussion that had taken place in the preceding two years. This report presents the deliberations of the Sardinia workshop within a consideration of the overall development of the HGD Project to date.

NONE

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

The Human Genome Project: Information access, management, and regulation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Human Genome Project is a large, internationally coordinated effort in biological research directed at creating a detailed map of human DNA. This report describes the access of information, management, and regulation of the project. The project led to the development of an instructional module titled The Human Genome Project: Biology, Computers, and Privacy, designed for use in high school biology classes. The module consists of print materials and both Macintosh and Windows versions of related computer software-Appendix A contains a copy of the print materials and discs containing the two versions of the software.

McInerney, J.D.; Micikas, L.B.

1996-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

Entrepreneurial experiments in science policy: Analyzing the Human Genome Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We re-conceptualize the role of science policy makers, envisioning and illustrating their move from being simple investors in scientific projects to entrepreneurs who create the conditions for entrepreneurial experiments ...

Huang, Kenneth G.

7

Genome Webcasts: Online Audio and Video Files about Genetics and the Human Genome Project  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

•\tPresentations from special events such as the White House Millenium Evening, ôInformatics Meets Genomics and from various scientific conferences

8

ELSI Bibliography: Ethical legal and social implications of the Human Genome Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This second edition of the ELSI Bibliography provides a current and comprehensive resource for identifying publications on the major topics related to the ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. Since the first edition of the ELSI Bibliography was printed last year, new publications and earlier ones identified by additional searching have doubled our computer database of ELSI publications to over 5600 entries. The second edition of the ELSI Bibliography reflects this growth of the underlying computer database. Researchers should note that an extensive collection of publications in the database is available for public use at the General Law Library of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

Yesley, M.S. [comp.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Human genome. 1993 Program report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to update the Human Genome 1991-92 Program Report and provide new information on the DOE genome program to researchers, program managers, other government agencies, and the interested public. This FY 1993 supplement includes abstracts of 60 new or renewed projects and listings of 112 continuing and 28 completed projects. These two reports, taken together, present the most complete published view of the DOE Human Genome Program through FY 1993. Research is progressing rapidly toward 15-year goals of mapping and sequencing the DNA of each of the 24 different human chromosomes.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

ELSI Bibliography: Ethical, legal and social implications of the Human Genome Project. 1994 Supplement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates and expands the second edition of the ELSI Bibliography, published in 1993. The Bibliography and Supplement provides a comprehensive resource for identifying publications on the major topics related to the ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. The Bibliography and Supplement are extracted from a database compiled at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the support of the Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy. The second edition of the ELSI Bibliography was dated May 1993 but included publications added to the database until fall 1993. This Supplement reflects approximately 1,000 entries added to the database during the past year, bringing the total to approximately 7,000 entries. More than half of the new entries were published in the last year, and the remainder are earlier publications not previously included in the database. Most of the new entries were published in the academic and professional literature. The remainder are press reports from newspapers of record and scientific journals. The topical listing of the second edition has been followed in the Supplement, with a few changes. The topics of Cystic Fibrosis, Huntington`s Disease, and Sickle Cell Anemia have been combined in a single topic, Disorders. Also, all the entries published in the past year are included in a new topic, Publications: September 1993--September 1994, which provides a comprehensive view of recent reporting and commentary on the science and ELSI of genetics.

Yesley, M.S.; Ossorio, P.N. [comps.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Resources with Additional Information Charles DeLisi As head of DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research, Charles DeLisi played a pivotal role in proposing and initiating the Human Genome Program in 1986. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has historically been active in supporting human genome research. On September 10, 2003, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham presented the Secretary's Gold Award to Aristides Patrinos and Francis Collins for their leadership of the government's Human Genome Project. At DOE's Office of Science, Dr. Patrinos is the Associate Director for Biological and Environmental Research. He has been a researcher at the department's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory.

12

Taking stock of the genome project  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the various projects within the Human Genome Project, and what their progress has been in terms of goals met and money spent. The discussion focuses on the need for more funding, and what projects should receive increased funding and which ones should not. The article also describes some of the shifts in research emphasis under a new director.

Roberts, L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The Consensus Coding Sequence (Ccds) Project: Identifying a Common Protein-Coding Gene Set for the Human and Mouse Genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective use of the human and mouse genomes requires reliable identification of genes and their products. Although multiple public resources provide annotation, different methods are used that can result in similar but ...

Kellis, Manolis

14

History of the DOE Human Genome Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

History of the DOE Human Genome Program History of the DOE Human Genome Program The following history is taken from the U.S. Department of Energy 1991-91 Human Genome Program Report (June 1992). This is an archived item. A brief history of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Human Genome Program will be useful in a discussion of the objectives of the DOE program as well as those of the collaborative U.S. Human Genome Project. The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of DOE and its predecessor agencies--the Atomic Energy Commission and the Energy Research and Development Administration--have long sponsored research into genetics, both in microbial systems and in mammals, including basic studies on genome structure, replication, damage, and repair and the consequences of genetic

15

Human Genome Education Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The funds from the DOE Human Genome Program, for the project period 2/1/96 through 1/31/98, have provided major support for the curriculum development and field testing efforts for two high school level instructional units: Unit 1, ''Exploring Genetic Conditions: Genes, Culture and Choices''; and Unit 2, ''DNA Snapshots: Peaking at Your DNA''. In the original proposal, they requested DOE support for the partial salary and benefits of a Field Test Coordinator position to: (1) complete the field testing and revision of two high school curriculum units, and (2) initiate the education of teachers using these units. During the project period of this two-year DOE grant, a part-time Field-Test Coordinator was hired (Ms. Geraldine Horsma) and significant progress has been made in both of the original proposal objectives. Field testing for Unit 1 has occurred in over 12 schools (local and non-local sites with diverse student populations). Field testing for Unit 2 has occurred in over 15 schools (local and non-local sites) and will continue in 12-15 schools during the 96-97 school year. For both curricula, field-test sites and site teachers were selected for their interest in genetics education and in hands-on science education. Many of the site teachers had no previous experience with HGEP or the unit under development. Both of these first-year biology curriculum units, which contain genetics, biotechnology, societal, ethical and cultural issues related to HGP, are being implemented in many local and non-local schools (SF Bay Area, Southern California, Nebraska, Hawaii, and Texas) and in programs for teachers. These units will reach over 10,000 students in the SF Bay Area and continues to receive support from local corporate and private philanthropic organizations. Although HGEP unit development is nearing completion for both units, data is still being gathered and analyzed on unit effectiveness and student learning. The final field testing result from this analysis will contribute to the final revisions of each unit during the second-year of this grant.

Richard Myers; Lane Conn

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

DOE human genome program contractor-grantee workshop VI  

SciTech Connect

Research is presented from the workshop on the Human Genome Project. Topics include sequencing, genetic mapping, informatics, ethical and legal issues, and infrastructure.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Genome Project Standards in a New Era of Sequencing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for clone- based human genome sequencing, this finishing20850, USA  Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College USA  HudsonAlpha Genome Sequencing Center, HudsonAlpha 

Hostetler, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Social implications of the Human Genome Project: Policy roundtable series and journals. Final progress report, March 15, 2001 - March 15, 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reflects the activities of the Harvard Health Caucus at Harvard Medical School that were supported, in part, by the Department of Energy. The following policy roundtables and panels were held: Spring 2001 Policy Roundtable Series: The social implications of the Human Genome Project; Spring 2002 Policy Roundtable Series: Managing globalization to improve health; 13 February 2002 Keynote Address: The globalization of health; 25 February 2002 Healthier or Wealthier: Which comes first in the new global era?; 28 February 2002 The crisis of neglected diseases: Creating R&D incentives for diseases of developing countries; 7 March 2002 Health care education in the developing world: Bridging global and local health care practices; 20 March 2002 Building a legal framework for global health: How can the US and UN work to reduce global disparities?; 25 April 2002 The role of mass media and tobacco control efforts. Caucus organizational information is also included.

Seiguer, Erica

2002-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

Mapping our genes: The genome projects: How big, how fast  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the past 2 years, scientific and technical journals in biology and medicine have extensively covered a debate about whether and how to determine the function and order of human genes on human chromosomes and when to determine the sequence of molecular building blocks that comprise DNA in those chromosomes. In 1987, these issues rose to become part of the public agenda. The debate involves science, technology, and politics. Congress is responsible for /open quotes/writing the rules/close quotes/ of what various federal agencies do and for funding their work. This report surveys the points made so far in the debate, focusing on those that most directly influence the policy options facing the US Congress. Congressional interest focused on how to assess the rationales for conducting human genome projects, how to fund human genome projects (at what level and through which mechanisms), how to coordinate the scientific and technical programs of the several federal agencies and private interests already supporting various genome projects, and how to strike a balance regarding the impact of genome projects on international scientific cooperation and international economic competition in biotechnology. OTA prepared this report with the assistance of several hundred experts throughout the world. 342 refs., 26 figs., 11 tabs.

none,

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

A meeting of the minds on the genome project  

SciTech Connect

There has been some resentment over the the rapidly expanding budget for the Human Genome Project. The genome project is budgeted at nearly $90 million at NIH and $46 million at DOE. Some critics believe this is not being fair to other research efforts. There has also been some differences in opinion in the project's research plans. Bernard Davis of Harvard Medical School supports the first goal of the genome project, mapping the human chromosomes, and thinks sequencing model organisms is a good idea. However, he can't see the value in working out every nucleotide base in the human genome. But, once it was impressed upon Davis that no one is contemplating all-out sequencing for at least 5 years, and even then only if the cost comes down, he endorsed the current plan to map and partially sequence complementary DNAs, or expressed genes. Another skeptic, Don Brown of Carnegie Institution, is opposed to the way the project is organised. Brown's biggest objection is to targeted research, especially the creation of centers to carry out specific research tasks.

Pool, R.

1990-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2007: status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constantly monitoring genome sequencing projects worldwideas part of the Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) project.large scale microbial genome sequencing programs have been

Liolios, Konstantinos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2009: status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large-scale microbial genome sequencing initiatives, e.g. ,in the history of genome sequencing projects: the completedfor publication of genome sequencing projects require the

Liolios, Konstantinos

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

Pennacchio, Len A.

2003-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

24

DOE Human Genome Program contractor-grantee workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume contains the proceedings for the DOE Human Genome Program`s Contractor-Grantee Workshop V held in Sante Fe, New Mexico January 28, February 1, 1996. Presentations were divided into sessions entitled Sequencing; Mapping; Informatics; Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues; and Infrastructure. Reports of individual projects described herein are separately indexed and abstracted for the database.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

USDA and DOE Fund Genomics Projects For Bioenergy Fuels Research |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fund Genomics Projects For Bioenergy Fuels Research Fund Genomics Projects For Bioenergy Fuels Research USDA and DOE Fund Genomics Projects For Bioenergy Fuels Research August 9, 2006 - 8:43am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Aug. 9, 2006 - Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman and Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns today announced that the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy (DOE) have jointly awarded nine grants totaling $5.7 million for biobased fuels research that will accelerate the development of alternative fuel resources. Bodman commented, "These research projects build upon DOE's strategic investments in genomics, to accelerate scientific discovery and promote the development of alternative energy sources vital to America's energy and economic security." "To be a reliable renewable energy source, farmers and ranchers will need

26

Joint Genome Institute (JGI) Projects at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joint Genome Institute Joint Genome Institute (JGI) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) nicole-illumina-flowcell.jpg Key Challenges: Ensuring that there is a robust computational infrastructure for managing, storing and gleaning scientific insights from the torrent of data that constantly flows from the advanced sequencing platforms at the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). JGI sequencing capacity exceeds 40 billion DNA base pairs per year and is growing at a rate that exceeds computer hardware improvements, with exponential increases in computation and storage needed. JGI will generate about 1 petabyte of data in their first year as a NERSC partner; this is expected to double each year. Why it Matters: JGI is the primary production sequencing facility for the DOE. By revealing the genetic blueprint and fundamental principles that

27

Rhodopseudomonas palustris genome project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rhodopseudomonas palustris is a common soil and water bacterium that makes its living by converting sunlight to cellular energy and by absorbing atmospheric carbon dioxide and converting it to biomass. This microbe can also degrade and recycle components of the woody tissues of plants, wood being the most abundant polymer on earth. Because of its intimate involvement in carbon management and recycling, R. palustris was selected by the DOE Carbon Management Program to have its genome sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). This award provided funds for the preparation of R. palustris genomic DNA which was then supplied to the JGI in sufficient amounts to enable the complete sequencing of the R. palustris genome. The PI also supplied the JGI with technical information about the molecular biology of R. palustris.

Harwood, Caroline S.

2000-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

28

Initial impact of the sequencing of the human genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sequence of the human genome has dramatically accelerated biomedical research. Here I explore its impact, in the decade since its publication, on our understanding of the biological functions encoded in the genome, on ...

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Biology; Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard; Lander, Eric S.; Lander, Eric S.

29

The human genome initiative of the Department of Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative. 34 refs.

none,

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Human Genome Program Image Gallery (from genomics.energy.gov)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This collection contains approximately 240 images from the genome programs of DOE's Office of Science. The images are divided into galleries related to biofuels research, systems biology, and basic genomics. Each image has a title, a basic citation, and a credit or source. Most of the images are original graphics created by the Genome Management Information System (GMIS). GMIS images are recognizable by their credit line. Permission to use these graphics is not needed, but please credit the U.S. Department of Energy Genome Programs and provide the website http://genomics.energy.gov. Other images were provided by third parties and not created by the U.S. Department of Energy. Users must contact the person listed in the credit line before using those images. The high-resolution images can be downloaded.

31

Genome Annotation Project Assignment Bioinformatics module 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generally accepted. This is not just a thing of the distant past [1]. Did you observe a similar outcome://www.geneprediction.org/. If you are up for installing software, we of course recommend EvoGene [9], but you may want to explore that is homologous to your human core data set. The more distant the species are, the stronger the signal left

Goldschmidt, Christina

32

Materials Project: A Materials Genome Approach  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Technological innovation - faster computers, more efficient solar cells, more compact energy storage - is often enabled by materials advances. Yet, it takes an average of 18 years to move new materials discoveries from lab to market. This is largely because materials designers operate with very little information and must painstakingly tweak new materials in the lab. Computational materials science is now powerful enough that it can predict many properties of materials before those materials are ever synthesized in the lab. By scaling materials computations over supercomputing clusters, this project has computed some properties of over 80,000 materials and screened 25,000 of these for Li-ion batteries. The computations predicted several new battery materials which were made and tested in the lab and are now being patented. By computing properties of all known materials, the Materials Project aims to remove guesswork from materials design in a variety of applications. Experimental research can be targeted to the most promising compounds from computational data sets. Researchers will be able to data-mine scientific trends in materials properties. By providing materials researchers with the information they need to design better, the Materials Project aims to accelerate innovation in materials research.[copied from http://materialsproject.org/about] You will be asked to register to be granted free, full access.

Ceder, Gerbrand [MIT; Persson, Kristin [LBNL

33

The Human Genome Project: Sequencing the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Performance The Office of Science activities target the Secretary's Innovation goal (Lead the world in science to contribute to new strategies for producing new biofuels, cleaning up legacy waste, and sequestering carbon technology, low-enriched uranium (LEU) target technology, LEU solution reactor technology, and neutron

34

Closing gaps in the human genome using sequencing by synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The most recent release of the finished human genome contains 260 euchromatic gaps (excluding chromosome Y). Recent work has helped explain a large number of these unresolved regions as 'structural' in nature. Another class ...

Arachchi, Harindra M.

35

Practical Software for Aligning ESTs to Human Genome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a pressing need to align growing set of expressed sequence tags (ESTs)to newly sequenced human genome that is still frequently revised, for providing biologists and medical scientists with fresh information. The problem is, however, complicated ...

Jun Ogasawara; Shinichi Morishita

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2009: status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata  

SciTech Connect

The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) is a comprehensive resource for centralized monitoring of genome and metagenome projects worldwide. Both complete and ongoing projects, along with their associated metadata, can be accessed in GOLD through precomputed tables and a search page. As of September 2009, GOLD contains information for more than 5800 sequencing projects, of which 1100 have been completed and their sequence data deposited in a public repository. GOLD continues to expand, moving toward the goal of providing the most comprehensive repository of metadata information related to the projects and their organisms/environments in accordance with the Minimum Information about a (Meta)Genome Sequence (MIGS/MIMS) specification.

Liolios, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Hugenholtz, Phil; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Analysis of human mRNAs with the reference genome sequence reveals potent errors, polymorphisms, and RNA editing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

977. International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium 2001.Res. 32: D32–D34. Mouse Genome Sequencing Consortium 2002.95064, USA; 2 Genome Sequencing Center, Washington

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Human Genome Program Report. Part 2, 1996 Research Abstracts  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This report contains Part 2 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the US Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 2 consists of 1996 research abstracts. Attention is focused on the following: sequencing; mapping; informatics; ethical, legal, and social issues; infrastructure; and small business innovation research.

1997-11-00T23:59:59.000Z

39

Human genome program report. Part 2, 1996 research abstracts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains Part 2 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the US Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 2 consists of 1996 research abstracts. Attention is focused on the following: sequencing; mapping; informatics; ethical, legal, and social issues; infrastructure; and small business innovation research.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Information on a Major New Initiative: Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome (1986 DOE Memorandum)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

In the history of the Human Genome Program, Dr. Charles DeLisi and Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece of the Department of Energy (DOE) were instrumental in moving the seeds of the program forward. This May 1986 memo from DeLisi to Trivelpiece, Director of DOE's Office of Energy Research, documents this fact. Following the March 1986 Santa Fe workshop on the subject of mapping and sequencing the human genome, DeLisi's memo outlines workshop conclusions, explains the relevance of this project to DOE and the importance of the Department's laboratories and capabilities, notes the critical experience of DOE in managing projects of this scale and potential magnitude, and recognizes the fact that the project will impact biomedical science in ways which could not be fully anticipated at the time. Subsequently, program guidance was further sought from the DOE Health Effects Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) and the April 1987 HERAC report recommended that DOE and the nation commit to a large, multidisciplinary, scientific and technological undertaking to map and sequence the human genome.

DeLisi, Charles (Associate Director, Health and Environmental Research, DOE Office of Energy Research)

1986-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

DOE Openess: Human Radiation Experiments - Roadmap to the Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Experiments: Roadmap to the Project DOE Shield DOE Openness: Human Radiation Experiment Roadmap to the Project Roadmap to the Project Home Roadmap What's New Search HREX...

42

The FlyBase database of the Drosophila genome projects andcommunity literature  

SciTech Connect

FlyBase (http://flybase.bio.indiana.edu/) provides an integrated view of the fundamental genomic and genetic data on the major genetic model Drosophila melanogaster and related species. FlyBase has primary responsibility for the continual reannotation of the D.melanogaster genome. The ultimate goal of the reannotation effort is to decorate the euchromatic sequence of the genome with as much biological information as is available from the community and from the major genome project centers. A complete revision of the annotations of the now-finished euchromatic genomic sequence has been completed. There are many points of entry to the genome within FlyBase, most notably through maps, gene products and ontologies, structured phenotypic and gene expression data, and anatomy.

Gelbart, William; Bayraktaroglu, Leyla; Bettencourt, Brian; Campbell, Kathy; Crosby, Madeline; Emmert, David; Hradecky, Pavel; Huang,Yanmei; Letovsky, Stan; Matthews, Beverly; Russo, Susan; Schroeder,Andrew; Smutniak, Frank; Zhou, Pinglei; Zytkovicz, Mark; Ashburner,Michael; Drysdale, Rachel; de Grey, Aubrey; Foulger, Rebecca; Millburn,Gillian; Yamada, Chihiro; Kaufman, Thomas; Matthews, Kathy; Gilbert, Don; Grumbling, Gary; Strelets, Victor; Shemen, C.; Rubin, Gerald; Berman,Brian; Frise, Erwin; Gibson, Mark; Harris, Nomi; Kaminker, Josh; Lewis,Suzanna; Marshall, Brad; Misra, Sima; Mungall, Christopher; Prochnik,Simon; Richter, John; Smith, Christopher; Shu, ShengQiang; Tupy,Jonathan; Wiel, Colin

2002-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

43

Independence) PROJECT TITLE: Clinton Community Human Service Campus Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Area Substance Abuse Council, Inc (a SEP subrecipient of the Iowa Office of Energy STATE: IA Area Substance Abuse Council, Inc (a SEP subrecipient of the Iowa Office of Energy STATE: IA Independence) PROJECT TITLE: Clinton Community Human Service Campus Project Page 1 of2 Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE FOA 000052 EE0000162 GFO-0000162-015 EE162 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

44

EA-0856: Construction and Operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

56: Construction and Operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at 56: Construction and Operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Berkeley, California EA-0856: Construction and Operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Berkeley, California SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a new laboratory for consolidation of current and future activities of the Human Genome Center at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 19, 1994 EA-0856: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Berkeley, California April 19, 1994 EA-0856: Final Environmental Assessment

45

Discovery and characterization of chromatin states for systematic annotation of the human genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A plethora of epigenetic modifications have been described in the human genome and shown to play diverse roles in gene regulation, cellular differentiation and the onset of disease. Although individual modifications have ...

Ernst, Jason M.

46

Alteration of transcription by non-coding elements in the human genome .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The human genome contains ~1.5% coding sequence, with the remaining 98.5% being non-coding. The functional potential of the majority of this non-coding sequence remains unknown.… (more)

Conley, Andrew Berton

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

DOE Human Genome Program: Contractor-Grantee Workshop IV, November 13--17, 1994, Santa Fe, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the proceedings of the fourth Contractor-Grantee Workshop for the Department of Energy (DOE) Human Genome Program. Of the 204 abstracts in this book, some 200 describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors located at the multidisciplinary centers at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory; other DOE-supported laboratories; and more than 54 universities, research organizations, and companies in the United States and abroad. Included are 16 abstracts from ongoing projects in the Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues (ELSI) component, an area that continues to attract considerable attention from a wide variety of interested parties. Three abstracts summarize work in the new Microbial Genome Initiative launched this year by the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) to provide genome sequence and mapping data on industrially important microorganisms and those that live under extreme conditions. Many of the projects will be discussed at plenary sessions held throughout the workshop, and all are represented in the poster sessions.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Distinct p53 genomic binding patterns in normal and cancer-derived human cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report here genome-wide analysis of the tumor suppressor p53 binding sites in normal human cells. 743 high-confidence ChIP-seq peaks representing putative genomic binding sites were identified in normal IMR90 fibroblasts using a reference chromatin sample. More than 40% were located within 2 kb of a transcription start site (TSS), a distribution similar to that documented for individually studied, functional p53 binding sites and, to date, not observed by previous p53 genome-wide studies. Nearly half of the high-confidence binding sites in the IMR90 cells reside in CpG islands, in marked contrast to sites reported in cancer-derived cells. The distinct genomic features of the IMR90 binding sites do not reflect a distinct preference for specific sequences, since the de novo developed p53 motif based on our study is similar to those reported by genome-wide studies of cancer cells. More likely, the different chromatin landscape in normal, compared with cancer-derived cells, influences p53 binding via modulating availability of the sites. We compared the IMR90 ChIPseq peaks to the recently published IMR90 methylome1 and demonstrated that they are enriched at hypomethylated DNA. Our study represents the first genome-wide, de novo mapping of p53 binding sites in normal human cells and reveals that p53 binding sites reside in distinct genomic landscapes in normal and cancer-derived human cells.

Botcheva K.; McCorkle S. R.; McCombie W. R.; Dunn J. J.; Anderson C. W.

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Automated whole-genome multiple alignment of rat, mouse, and human  

SciTech Connect

We have built a whole genome multiple alignment of the three currently available mammalian genomes using a fully automated pipeline which combines the local/global approach of the Berkeley Genome Pipeline and the LAGAN program. The strategy is based on progressive alignment, and consists of two main steps: (1) alignment of the mouse and rat genomes; and (2) alignment of human to either the mouse-rat alignments from step 1, or the remaining unaligned mouse and rat sequences. The resulting alignments demonstrate high sensitivity, with 87% of all human gene-coding areas aligned in both mouse and rat. The specificity is also high: <7% of the rat contigs are aligned to multiple places in human and 97% of all alignments with human sequence > 100kb agree with a three-way synteny map built independently using predicted exons in the three genomes. At the nucleotide level <1% of the rat nucleotides are mapped to multiple places in the human sequence in the alignment; and 96.5% of human nucleotides within all alignments agree with the synteny map. The alignments are publicly available online, with visualization through the novel Multi-VISTA browser that we also present.

Brudno, Michael; Poliakov, Alexander; Salamov, Asaf; Cooper, Gregory M.; Sidow, Arend; Rubin, Edward M.; Solovyev, Victor; Batzoglou, Serafim; Dubchak, Inna

2004-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

50

A Celebration of The Genome, 1953-2003  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the historic culmination of one of the most important scientific projects in history, the sequencing of the human genome, and the 50th anniversary of James Watson and...

51

JGI Fungal Genomics Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JGI Fungal Genomics Program Igor V. Grigoriev 1 Lawrenceof California. JGI Fungal Genomics Program Contact: IgorJGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi,

Grigoriev, Igor V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Automated whole-genome multiple alignment of rat, mouse, and human  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have built a whole genome multiple alignment of the three currently available mammalian genomes using a fully automated pipeline which combines the local/global approach of the Berkeley Genome Pipeline and the LAGAN program. The strategy is based on progressive alignment, and consists of two main steps: (1) alignment of the mouse and rat genomes; and (2) alignment of human to either the mouse-rat alignments from step 1, or the remaining unaligned mouse and rat sequences. The resulting alignments demonstrate high sensitivity, with 87% of all human gene-coding areas aligned in both mouse and rat. The specificity is also high: 100kb agree with a three-way synteny map built independently using predicted exons in the three genomes. At the nucleotide level <1% of the rat nucleotides are mapped to multiple places in the human sequence in the alignment; and 96.5% of human nucleotides within all alignments agree with the synteny map. The alignments are publicly available online, with visualization through the novel Multi-VISTA browser that we also present.

Brudno, Michael; Poliakov, Alexander; Salamov, Asaf; Cooper, Gregory M.; Sidow, Arend; Rubin, Edward M.; Solovyev, Victor; Batzoglou, Serafim; Dubchak, Inna

2004-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

53

Analysis of alterations in the human cancer genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aneuploidy, an abnormal complement of chromosomes, is present in approximately 90% of human malignancies. Despite over 100 years of research, many questions remain regarding the contribution of aneuploidy to the cancer ...

Carter, Scott L. (Scott Lambert)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Mapping cis-Regulatory Domains in the Human Genome UsingMulti-Species Conservation of Synteny  

SciTech Connect

Our inability to associate distant regulatory elements with the genes that they regulate has largely precluded their examination for sequence alterations contributing to human disease. One major obstacle is the large genomic space surrounding targeted genes in which such elements could potentially reside. In order to delineate gene regulatory boundaries we used whole-genome human-mouse-chicken (HMC) and human-mouse-frog (HMF) multiple alignments to compile conserved blocks of synteny (CBS), under the hypothesis that these blocks have been kept intact throughout evolution at least in part by the requirement of regulatory elements to stay linked to the genes that they regulate. A total of 2,116 and 1,942 CBS>200 kb were assembled for HMC and HMF respectively, encompassing 1.53 and 0.86 Gb of human sequence. To support the existence of complex long-range regulatory domains within these CBS we analyzed the prevalence and distribution of chromosomal aberrations leading to position effects (disruption of a genes regulatory environment), observing a clear bias not only for mapping onto CBS but also for longer CBS size. Our results provide a genome wide data set characterizing the regulatory domains of genes and the conserved regulatory elements within them.

Ahituv, Nadav; Prabhakar, Shyam; Poulin, Francis; Rubin, EdwardM.; Couronne, Olivier

2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

55

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Establishing Standard Definitions for Genome  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 8, 2009 October 8, 2009 Establishing Standard Definitions for Genome Sequences Download a podcast of this release! WALNUT CREEK, CA-In 1996, researchers from major genome sequencing centers around the world convened on the island of Bermuda and defined a finished genome as a gapless sequence with a nucleotide error rate of one or less in 10,000 bases. This effectively set the quality target for the human genome effort and was quickly applied to other genome projects. If a genome sequence didn't meet this stringent criterion, it was simply considered a "draft." More than a decade later, researchers are finding that with the advent of the latest sequencing technologies the terms "draft" and "finished" are no longer sufficient to describe the varying levels of genome sequence

56

Understanding Historical Human Migration Patterns and Interbreeding (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eske Willerslev from the University of Copenhagen on "Understanding Historical Human Migration Patterns and Interbreeding Using the Ancient Genomes of a Palaeo-Eskimo and an Aboriginal Australian" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

Willerslev, Eske [University of Copenhagen

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

57

Genome in a Bottle Consortium Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Genome in a Bottle Consortium Workshop. Purpose: NIST ... well. Related Project(s): Genome in a Bottle Consortium. Details: ...

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

58

Methodological Review: 'Big data', Hadoop and cloud computing in genomics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the completion of the Human Genome project at the turn of the Century, there has been an unprecedented proliferation of genomic sequence data. A consequence of this is that the medical discoveries of the future will largely depend on our ability ... Keywords: Big data, Bioinformatics, Cloud computing, Genomics, Hadoop

Aisling O' Driscoll, Jurate Daugelaite, Roy D. Sleator

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Analysis of cis-elements that facilitate extrachromosomal persistence of human papillomavirus genomes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are maintained latently in dividing epithelial cells as nuclear plasmids. Two virally encoded proteins, E1, a helicase, and E2, a transcription factor, are important players in replication and stable plasmid maintenance in host cells. Recent experiments in yeast have demonstrated that viral genomes retain replication and maintenance function independently of E1 and E2 [Angeletti, P.C., Kim, K., Fernandes, F.J., and Lambert, P.F. (2002). Stable replication of papillomavirus genomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Virol. 76(7), 3350-8; Kim, K., Angeletti, P.C., Hassebroek, E.C., and Lambert, P.F. (2005). Identification of cis-acting elements that mediate the replication and maintenance of human papillomavirus type 16 genomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Virol. 79(10), 5933-42]. Flow cytometry studies of EGFP-reporter vectors containing subgenomic HPV fragments with or without a human ARS (hARS), revealed that six fragments located in E6-E7, E1-E2, L1, and L2 regions showed a capacity for plasmid stabilization in the absence of E1 and E2 proteins. Interestingly, four fragments within E7, the 3' end of L2, and the 5' end of L1 exhibited stability in plasmids that lacked an hARS, indicating that they possess both replication and maintenance functions. Two fragments lying in E1-E2 and the 3' region of L1 were stable only in the presence of hARS, that they contained only maintenance function. Mutational analyses of HPV16-GFP reporter constructs provided evidence that genomes lacking E1 and E2 could replicate to an extent similar to wild type HPV16. Together these results support the concept that cellular factors influence HPV replication and maintenance, independently, and perhaps in conjunction with E1 and E2, suggesting a role in the persistent phase of the viral lifecycle.

Pittayakhajonwut, Daraporn [Nebraska Center for Virology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0666 (United States); Angeletti, Peter C. [Nebraska Center for Virology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0666 (United States)], E-mail: Pangeletti2@unl.edu

2008-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

60

Human gene encoding prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS): Genomic organization, chromosomal localization, and promoter activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The prostacyclin synthase gene isolated from human genomic libraries (PTGIS) consists of 10 exons spanning approximately 60 kb. All the splice donor and acceptor sites conform to the GT/AG rule. Genomic Southern blot and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed that the human prostacyclin synthase gene is present as a single copy per haploid genome and is localized on chromosome 20q13.11-q13.13. The 1.5-kb sequence of the 5{prime} of the translational initiation site contained both GC-rich and pyrimidine-rich regions and consensus sequences of the transcription factor recognition sites such as Sp1, AP-2, the interferon-{gamma} response element, GATA, NF-{kappa}B, the CACCC box, and the glucocorticoid response element. The core binding sequence (GAGACC) of the shear stress responsive element was also found in the 5{prime}-flanking region of the gene. The major product of the primer extension analysis suggested that the transcription of the gene started from the positions around 49 bp upstream of the translational initiation codon. Transient transfection experiments using human aortic and bovine arterial endothelial cells demonstrated that the GC-rich region (positions -145 to -10) possessed a significant promoter activity. The 6-kb downstream sequence of the translational termination codon contained multiple polyadenylation signals, Alu repeat sequences, and the consensus sequence of the primate-repetitive DNA element, MER1. Two sizes of the prostacyclin synthase mRNAs (approximately 6 and 3.3 kb) were detected with the human aorta and lung. RNA blot hybridization analysis using the 3{prime}-untranslated region as probe indicated that the sizes of the 3{prime}-flanking regions were different in the major 6-kb and minor 3.3-kb mRNAs. 54 refs., 7 figs.

Yokoyama, Chieko; Yabuki, Tomoko; Inoue, Hiroyasu [National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Osaka (Japan)] [and others] [National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Osaka (Japan); and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Complete genome sequence of Sanguibacter keddieii type strain (ST-74T)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

60%. Strains with a genome sequencing project registered inacknowledgements. Genome sequencing Genome project historyin Table 2. Table 2. Genome sequencing project information

Ivanova, Natalia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute Microbial Genome Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute A typical genome sequencing project AssemblyInstitute A typical genome sequencing project AssemblyJGI Microbial Sequencing US DOE Joint Genome Institute JGI

Lapidus, Alla

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Genomic analysis of mouse tumorigenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The availability of the human and mouse genome sequences has spurred a growing interest in analyzing mouse models of human cancer using genomic techniques. Comparative genomic studies on mouse and human tumors can be ...

Tam, Mandy Chi-Mun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Genome Improvement at JGI-HAGSC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the completion of the sequencing of the human genome, the JGI has rapidly expanded its scientific goals in several DOE mission-relevant areas. At the JGI-HAGSC, we have kept pace with this rapid expansion of projects with our focus on assessing, assembling, improving and finishing eukaryotic whole genome shotgun (WGS) projects for which the shotgun sequence is generated at the Production Genomic Facility (JGI-PGF). We follow this by combining the draft WGS with genomic resources generated at JGI-HAGSC or in collaborator laboratories (including BAC end sequences, genetic maps and FLcDNA sequences) to produce an improved draft sequence. For eukaryotic genomes important to the DOE mission, we then add further information from directed experiments to produce reference genomic sequences that are publicly available for any scientific researcher. Also, we have continued our program for producing BAC-based finished sequence, both for adding information to JGI genome projects and for small BAC-based sequencing projects proposed through any of the JGI sequencing programs. We have now built our computational expertise in WGS assembly and analysis and have moved eukaryotic genome assembly from the JGI-PGF to JGI-HAGSC. We have concentrated our assembly development work on large plant genomes and complex fungal and algal genomes.

Grimwood, Jane: Schmutz, Jeremy, J.: Myers, Richard, M.

2012-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

65

JGI - 2009 Genome Sequencing Targets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 2, 2008 July 2, 2008 Pine Tree, Boat-Boring Bivalve "Bugs", Duck Weed, Oil-Producing Microalgae, Stinkbird Gut, 40 Others Top DOE Joint Genome Institute 2009 Genome Sequencing Targets WALNUT CREEK, CA-In the continuing effort to tap the vast, unexplored reaches of the earth's microbial and plant domains for bioenergy and environmental applications, the DOE Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) has announced its latest portfolio of DNA sequencing projects that it will undertake in the coming year. The 44 projects, culled from nearly 150 proposals received through the Community Sequencing Program (CSP), represent over 60 billion nucleotides of data to be generated through this biodiversity sampling campaign-roughly the equivalent of 20 human genomes. "The scientific and technological advances enabled by the information

66

Genomic analysis of high pressure adaptation in deep sea bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This makes the genome sequencing project of Carnobacteriumpiezophile to undergo genome sequencing. Investigation intoMarine Microbial Genome Sequencing project. The initial

Stratton, Taylor Kristen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with type strain genome sequencing projects registered inResearch, Braunschweig) Genome sequencing and annotationthe complete Table 2. Genome sequencing project information

Clum, Alicia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Development of an integrated genome informatics, data management and workflow infrastructure: A toolbox for the study of complex disease genetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of thousands. The large amount of data from the Human Genome Project (HGP) has necessitated the use of comprehensive data repositories such as EMBL, GenBank and DDBJ, and specific subsets of genomic information such as the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism... STEWART PUBLICATIONS 1473 – 9542. HUMAN GENOMICS . VOL 1. NO 2. 98–109 JANUARY 2004 99 searches locally for large regions became too resource inten- sive. Currently, all genomic information is extracted from a local installation of the Ensembl databases...

Burren, Oliver S; Healy, Barry C; Lam, Alex C; Schuilenburg, Helen; Dolman, Geoffrey E; Everett, Vincent H; Laneri, Davide; Nutland, Sarah; Rance, Helen E; Payne, Felicity; Smyth, Deborah; Lowe, Chris; Barratt, Bryan J; Twells, Rebecca CJ; Rainbow, Daniel B; Wicker, Linda S; Todd, John A; Walker, Neil M; Smink, Luc J

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Requirements and standards for organelle genome databases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the complete genome sequencing of many other organisms (guide the transition from human genome sequencing to being a04334; and Phakopsora genome sequencing direct funding).

Boore, Jeffrey L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

JGI - DOE Sequencing Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Sequencing Projects For status information, see the Genome Projects section Organism Est. Genome Size Branchiostoma floridae (Florida lancelet) 600 Mb Chlamydomonas reinhardtii...

71

A physical map of the papaya genome with integrated genetic map and genome sequence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a part of the genome sequencing project, we constructed ational papaya whole genome sequencing may be carried out inframework to guide the genome sequencing of related species.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Human gene sequencing makes advances  

SciTech Connect

The Human Genome Project is a federal project that is on the scale of the Manhattan Project of the 1940s. The focus of this project is to map and sequence the 100,000 plus genes and 3 billion base pairs that comprise the human genome. This effort has made two recent advances. First, two of the major companies involved in this project formed a strategic alliance that will pump up to 125 million dollars into this project. Second, researchers at Argonne National Lab. have tested a new sequencing technique that could identify 100 million base pairs a day when fully implemented.

Alper, J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Environmental assessment for construction and operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) proposes to construct and operate a new laboratory for consolidation of current and future activities of the Human Genome Center (HGC). This document addresses the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental and human-health effects from the proposed facility construction and operation. This document was prepared in accordance the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (United States Codes 42 USC 4321-4347) (NEPA) and the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Final Rule for NEPA Implementing Procedures [Code of Federal Regulations 10CFR 1021].

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Comparative genomic analysis of fungal genomes reveals intron-rich ancestors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

remain debated. Genome sequencing and comparative analysisInternational Human Genome Sequencing Consortium: Finishingreinhardtii genome structure using large-scale sequencing of

Stajich, Jason E; Dietrich, Fred S; Roy, Scott W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Human Radiation Experiments: Roadmap to the Project: ACHRE Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Members and Staff Acknowledgments Documentary Note Preface Introduction - The Atomic Century Part I - Ethics of Human Subjects Research: A Historical Perspective Overview...

76

Human Radiation Experiments: Roadmap to the Project: ACHRE Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research involving healthy subjects: human experimentation conducted in conjunction with atomic bomb tests. More than 200,000 service personnel--now known as atomic...

77

Genomic structure and chromosomal mapping of the human CD22 gene  

SciTech Connect

The human CD22 gene is expressed specifically in B lymphocytes and likely has an important function in cell-cell interactions. A nearly full length human CD22 cDNA clone was used to isolate genomic clones that span the CD22 gene. The CD22 gene is spread over 22 kb of DNA and is composed of 15 exons. The first exon contains the major transcriptional start sites. The translation initiation codon is located in exon 3, which also encodes a portion of the signal peptide. Exons 4 to 10 encode the seven Ig domains of CD22, exon 11 encodes the transmembrane domain, exons 12 to 15 encode the intracytoplasmic domain of CD22, and exon 15 also contains the 3' untranslated region. A minor form of CD22 mRNA likely results from splicing of exon 5 to exon 8, skipping exons 6 and 7. A 4.6-kb Xbal fragment of the CD22 gene was used to map the chromosomal location of CD22 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The hybridization locus was identified by combining fluorescent images of the probe with the chromosomal banding pattern generated by an Alu probe. The results demonstrate the CD22 is located within the band region q13.1 of chromosome 19. Two closely clustered major transcription start sites and several minor start sites were mapped by primer extension. Similarly to many other lymphoid-specific genes, the CD22 promoter lacks an obvious TATA box. Approximately 4 kb of DNA 5' of the transcription start sites were sequenced and found to contain multiple Alu elements. Potential binding sites for the transcriptional factors NF-kB, AP-1, and Oct-2 are located within 300 bp 5' of the major transcription start sites. A 400-bp fragment (bp -339 through +71) of the CD22 promoter region was subcloned into a pGEM-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase vector and after transfection into B and T cells was found to be active in both B and T cells. 45 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Wilson, G.L.; Kozlow, E.; Kehrl, J.H. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Najfeld, V. (Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)); Menniger, J.; Ward, D. (Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

New families of human regulatory RNA structures identified by comparative analysis of vertebrate genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory RNA structures are often members of families with multiple paralogous instances across the genome. Family members share functional and structural properties, which allow them to be studied as a whole, facilitating ...

Kellis, Manolis

79

Human Radiation Experiments: Roadmap to the Project: ACHRE Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments - Executive Summary Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments - Executive Summary Publication Information The Creation of the Advisory Committee The President's Charge The Committee's Approach The Historical Context Key Findings Key Recommendations What's Next: The Advisory Committee's Legacy PUBLICATION INFORMATION The Final Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (stock number 061-000-00-848-9), the supplemental volumes to the Final Report (stock numbers 061-000-00850-1, 061-000-00851-9, and 061-000-00852-7), and additional copies of this Executive Summary (stock number 061-000-00849-7) may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. All telephone orders should be directed to: Superintendent of Documents

80

Data Management for High-Throughput Genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today's sequencing technology allows sequencing an individual genome within a few weeks for a fraction of the costs of the original Human Genome project. Genomics labs are faced with dozens of TB of data per week that have to be automatically processed and made available to scientists for further analysis. This paper explores the potential and the limitations of using relational database systems as the data processing platform for high-throughput genomics. In particular, we are interested in the storage management for high-throughput sequence data and in leveraging SQL and user-defined functions for data analysis inside a database system. We give an overview of a database design for high-throughput genomics, how we used a SQL Server database in some unconventional ways to prototype this scenario, and we will discuss some initial findings about the scalability and performance of such a more database-centric approach.

Roehm, Uwe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Complete genome sequence of Denitrovibrio acetiphilus type strain (N2460T)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the complete genome sequencing and annotation. Figure 160%. Strains with a genome sequencing project registered inexamined to date. Genome sequencing and annotation Genome

Kiss, Hajnalka

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Complete genome sequence of Beutenbergia cavernae type strain (HKI 0122T)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the complete genome sequencing and annotation. In60%. Strains with a genome-sequencing project regis- tered8] and the complete Genome sequencing and annotation Genome

Land, Miriam

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

JGI - Genomic Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

opportunities for technological access to our user services (including single cell genomics and DNA synthesis). Our Department serves at the interface between the Project...

84

Human Radiation Experiments: Roadmap to the Project: ACHRE Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part IV: Overview Part IV: Overview In part IV we present the overall findings of the Advisory Committee's inquiry and deliberations and the recommendations that follow from these findings. In chapter 17, findings are presented in two parts, first for the period 1944 through 1974 and then for the contemporary period. These parts, in turn, are divided into findings regarding biomedical experiments and those regarding population exposures. We begin our presentation of findings for the period 1944 through 1974 with a summation of what we have learned about human radiation experiments: their number and purpose, the likelihood that they produced harm, and how human radiation experimentation contributed to advances in medicine. We then summarize what we have found concerning the nature of federal rules and policies governing research involving human subjects during this period, and the implementation of these rules in the conduct of human radiation experiments. Findings about the nature and implementation of federal rules cover issues of consent, risk, the selection of subjects, and the role of national security considerations.

85

Contribution of mobile genetic elements to Desulfovibrio vulgaris genome plasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management of the genome sequencing. References Altschul,species revealed the core genome, sequencing of 12 isolatesrevealed by ongoing genome sequencing projects. Although

Walker, C.B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Genomics, Gene Expression and Other Studies in Soybean Rust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Christine Stone GENOME SEQUENCING PROJECT PhakopsoraUS DOE Joint Genome Institute DNA sequencing process LibraryUS DOE Joint Genome Institute DNA sequencing process Rolling

Posada-Buitrago, Martha Lucia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Complete genome sequence of Desulfomicrobium baculatum type strain (XT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is deposited in Genome sequencing and annotation Genomeof Life, GEBA Table 2. Genome sequencing project informationand DNA isolation Genome sequencing and assembly tions to

Copeland, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Genomics of emerging infectious disease: A PLoS collection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Origins and evolutionary genomics of the 2009 swine-originan Infectious Diseases Genomics Project predict and preventRavel J (2009) The role of genomics in the identification,

Eisen, Jonathan A; MacCallum, Catriona J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Complete genome sequence of Leptotrichia buccalis type strain (C-1013-bT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with type strain genome sequencing projects registered inthe acknowledgements. Genome sequencing information Genomein Table 2. Table 2. Genome sequencing project information

Ivanova, Natalia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Complete genome sequence of Brachybacterium faecium type strain (Schefferle 6-10T)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

60%. Strains with a genome-sequencing project registered inacknowledgements. Genome sequencing and annotation Genomeet al. Table 2. Genome sequencing project information MIGS

Lapidus, Alla

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Complete genome sequence of Dyadobacter fermentans type strain (NS114T)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

60%. Strains with a genome sequencing project registered inin the acknowledgements. Genome sequencing and annotationin Table 2. Table 2. Genome sequencing project information

Bristow, Jim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Complete genome sequence of Catenulispora acidiphila type strain (ID 139908T)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

60%. Strains with a genome sequencing project registered inin the acknowledgements. Genome sequencing and annotationin Table 2. Table 2. Genome sequencing project information

Copeland, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

In depth comparison of an individual's DNA and its lymphoblastoid cell line using whole genome sequencing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yeung G, et al: Human genome sequencing using unchained basecell line using whole genome sequencing. BMC Genomics 2012cell line using whole genome sequencing Dorothee Nickles 1 ,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

An Evolutionary Genomic Approach to Identify Genes Involved in Human Birth Timing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coordination of fetal maturation with birth timing is essential for mammalian reproduction. In humans, preterm birth is a disorder of profound global health significance. The signals initiating parturition in humans have ...

Plunkett, Jevon

95

DOE Humanities Projects Announced | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Humanities Projects Announced DOE Humanities Projects Announced Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources ASCR Discovery Monthly News Roundup News Archives ASCR Program Documents ASCR Workshops and Conferences ASCR Presentations 100Gbps Science Network Related Links Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: sc.ascr@science.doe.gov More Information » Miscellaneous DOE Humanities Projects Announced Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Last year, the Department of Energy announced a partnership with the

96

Joint Genome Institute Progress Report 2002-2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S, et al. Comparative genome sequencing of DrosophilaInternational Human Genome Sequencing Consortium. FinishingWhile NIH-funded genome sequencing activities largely

Gilbert, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

JGI Fungal Genomics Program  

SciTech Connect

Genomes of energy and environment fungi are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 50 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such 'parts' suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here

Grigoriev, Igor V.

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

98

Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

Kao, F.T.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The evolution of genome size in ants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for future whole-genome sequencing projects. Page 1 of 9 (genotyping to whole-genome sequencing [1-3]. The genomeconsideration for whole-genome sequencing programs, our

Tsutsui, Neil D; Suarez, Andrew V; Spagna, Joseph C; Johnston, J Spencer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The complete sequence of human chromosome 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium. Initialof problem solving in genome sequencing. Genome Res. 8, 562-8 (2001). 23. Mouse Genome Sequencing Consortium. Initial

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Genomic organization of the human ATP1AL1 gene encoding a ouabain-sensitive H,K-ATPase  

SciTech Connect

The human ATP1AL1 gene belongs to the family of Na,K-ATPase and H,K-ATPase (X,K-ATPases) genes. It encodes a catalytic subunit of hitherto unknown human ouabain-sensitive H,K-ATPase that represents a novel third group of X,K-ATPases distinct from the known Na,K-ATPase and gastric H,K-ATPase. Cloning of the ATP1AL1 gene is described in this report. The exon-intron structure of ATP1AL1 was found to be very similar to that of related genes. It contains 23 exons and spans approximately 32 kb of genomic DNA. All ATP1AL1 exons and 12 of its 22 introns were entirely sequenced. A total of nine Alu repeats were identified in introns. The transcription initiation site was mapped 187 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon by primer extension and S{sub 1} nuclease protection analyses of RNA from human skin and colon. Sequence analysis of the 5{prime}-flanking region (1.48 kb) revealed numerous potential binding sites for transcription factors Sp1 and AP2 and one putative NF-{kappa}B binding site. The 0.85-kb region from position -484 (5{prime}-flanking region) to position + 369 (intron 1) meets the structural criteria of a CpG island. It is suggested that the ATP1AL1 gene contains two poly(A) addition sites that may function in a tissue-specific manner. 47 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Sverdlov, V.E.; Modyanov, N.N. [Medical College of Ohio, Toledo, OH (United States)] [Medical College of Ohio, Toledo, OH (United States); Kostina, M.B. [Ovchinnikov Inst. of Bioorganic Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Ovchinnikov Inst. of Bioorganic Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1996-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

102

DNA Data Bank of Japan at work on genome sequence data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We at the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) (http://www.ddbj.nig.ac.jp ) have recently begun receiving, processing and releasing EST and genome sequence data submitted by various Japanese genome projects. The data include those for human, Arabidopsis thaliana, rice, nematode, Synechocystis sp. and Escherichia coli. Since the quantity of data is very large, we organized teams to conduct preliminary discussions with project teams about data submission and handling for release to the public. We also developed a mass submission tool to cope with a large quantity of data. In addition, to provide genomedataon WWW, we developed a genome information system using Java. This system (http://mol.genes.nig.ac.jp/ ecoli/ ) can in theory be used for any genome sequence data. These activities will facilitate processing of large quantities of EST and genome data. INTRODUCTION Since the publication of the papers outlining the problems of sequencing entire genomes (1,2), great progress has been made. Two p...

Yoshio Tateno; Kaoru Fukami-kobayashi; Satoru Miyazaki; Hideaki Sugawara; Takashi Gojobori

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Mammalian comparative genomics and epigenomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The human genome sequence can be thought of as an instruction manual for our species, written and rewritten over more than a billion of years of evolution. Taking a complete inventory of our genome, dissecting its genes ...

Mikkelsen, Tarjei Sigurd, 1978-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Origins of chromosomal rearrangement hotspots in the human genome: evidence from the AZFadeletion hotspots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Bromage, P. Tempst , T. Honjo, and L.D. Vales. 1994. The recombination signal sequence-binding protein RBP-2N functions as a transcriptional repressor. Mol. Cell. Biol. 14: 3310-3319. Frisse, L., R.R. Hudson, A. Batoszewicz, J.D. Wall, J. Donfack, and A... Tree: analyzing and visualizing evolutionary data. Bioinformatics 14: 68-73. Jeffreys, A.J. and C.A. May. 2004. Intense and highly localized gene conversion activity in human meiotic crossover hot spots. Nature Genet. 36: 152-256. Jobling, M.A. and C. Tyler...

Hurles, Matthew E; Willey, David; Matthews, Lucy; Hussain, Syed Sufyan

2004-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

105

Genome Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue in Response to Controlled, In vivo Low-Dose Low LET Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Pathways and Mechanisms Final Report, September 2013  

SciTech Connect

During course of this project, we have worked in several areas relevant to low-dose ionizing radiation. Using gene expression to measure biological response, we have examined the response of human skin exposed in-vivo to radation, human skin exposed ex-vivo to radiation, and a human-skin model exposed to radiation. We have learned a great deal about the biological response of human skin to low-dose ionizing radiation.

Rocke, David M. [University of California Davis

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

106

JGI - Intro to Genomics 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Introduction to Genomics: The Human Genome and Beyond An Introduction to Genomics: The Human Genome and Beyond 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next>> What is genomics? THE HUMAN BODY consists of trillions of cells. Almost all contain an entire genome--the complete set of inherited genetic information encoded in our DNA. When humans reproduce, the parents' sperm and egg DNA combine to contribute a genome's worth of genetic information to the fertilized embryo. That same information is in each of the cells that eventually make up an organism. cell, DNA helix, and protein structure Some segments of DNA, called genes or "coding" DNA, contain the chemical recipe that determines particular traits; genetics is the study of the inheritance and function of these genes. Scientists now estimate that humans have about 30,000 genes, located along threadlike, tightly coiled

107

Complete genome sequence of Cellulomonas flavigena type strain (134T)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cellulomonas flavigena (Kellerman and McBeth 1912) Bergey et al. 1923 is the type species of the genus Cellulomonas of the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. Members of the genus Cellulomonas are of special interest for their ability to degrade cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly with regard to the use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Cellulomonas, and next to the human pathogen Tropheryma whipplei the second complete genome sequence within the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. The 4,123,179 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,735 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Abt, Birte [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Foster, Brian [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Clum, Alicia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sun, Hui [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pukall, Rudiger [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Complete genome sequence of Coraliomargarita akajimensis type strain (04OKA010-24T)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with type strain genome sequencing projects registered inMavromatis et al. Genome sequencing and annotation Genomeparameters are - Genome sequencing and assembly consed -a

Mavromatis, Konstantinos

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

The positive role of the ecological community in the genomic revolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indeed, as the number of genome sequencing project increasesfrom major genome sequencing centres, researchers generatingNB, et al. (2006) Sequencing genomes from single cells by

Field, Dawn; Methe, Barbara; Nelson, Karen; Kyrpides, Nikos

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Genetic variants associated with fasting glucose and insulin concentrations in an ethnically diverse population: results from the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USA. 19 Office of Population Genomics, National Human GenomeArchitecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) Study.Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Computational methods for analyzing and detecting genomic structural variation : applications to cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate whole human genome sequencing using reversibleson, S. , 2008: Rapid genome sequencing with short universalalterations in cancer. In Genome Sequencing Technology and

Bashir, Ali

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Combinatorial methods in computational genomics : mammalian phylogenetics using microinversions and fragment assembly with short reads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A diagram of whole genome sequencing strategies contrastingInternational Human Genome Sequencing Consortium. Initial921, 2008. [28] Mouse Genome Sequencing Consortium. Initial

Chaisson, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Whole genome sequencing of peach (Prunus persica L.) for SNP identification and selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R, Abbott AG: Rosaceaous Genome Sequencing: Perspectives andal: Accurate whole human genome sequencing using reversibleas: Ahmad et al. : Whole genome sequencing of peach (Prunus

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Evolutionary genomics of divergence and adaptation within the model fungi Neurospora crassa and Neurospora tetrasperma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Taylor JW. 2011. Population genomics and local adaptation inpromise of population genomics: from genotyping to genomeera. Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics 11:265-89.

Ellison, Christopher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

JGI - Sequencing for the DOE Genomics: GTL Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Resources MyJGI: Information for Collaborators Sequencing for the DOE Genomics: GTL Program For status information, see the Genome Projects section. For more...

116

Laying the Foundation for a Genomic Rosetta Stone: Creating Information Hubs through the User of Consensus Idenifiers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ongoing whole-genome sequencing projects in the GenomesDatabase – Whole-genome sequencing efforts are currently be-on over 2500 whole-genome sequencing projects, of which 578

Van Brabant, Bart

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

DFCI Gene Index Project: Genomic Databases for Plants, Animals, Protist, and Fungi from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The DFCI Gene Index Project creates databases for specific organisms. The goal for these databases is to provide an analysis of publicly available Expressed Sequence Transcripts (ESTs). ESTs are fragments of genes that were, at some time, copied from DNA to RNA. and gene sequence data to identify transcrips. The databases are in zipped files and free for download. The website also provides software and tools for use with the data, along with instructions from the website on how to link to background resources. The Gene Indices are organized into four categories: Animals, Plants, Protist, and Fungi.

118

Mitochondrial HMG to CoA synthase (mHS): cDNA cloning in human, mouse and C. elegans, mapping to human chromosome 1p12-13 and partial human genomic cloning  

SciTech Connect

mHS catalyzes the rate-limiting first step of ketogenesis in the liver. A cytoplasmic HS isozyme, encoded by another gene, catalyzes an early step in cholesterol synthesis. Starting from a rat mHS cDNA obtained by RT-PCR from the published rat cDNA sequence, we obtained and sequenced human and mouse cDNAs spanning the entire coding sequence of natural human and mouse mHS, as well as sequencing C. elegans HS-like cDNA. Consensus sequences for 3 mitochondrial and 4 cytoplasmic HSs were created and compared to invertebrate HS sequences. We found high conversation in the active site and at other regions presumably important for HS function. We mapped the mHS locus, HMGCS2 by in situ hybridization to chromosome 1P12-13, in contrast to the human cHS locus (HMGCS1) known to be on chromosome 5p13. Comparative mapping results suggest that these two chromosomal regions may be contiguous in other species, constant with a recent gene duplication event. Furthermore, we have characterized a human genomic mHS subclone containing 4 mHS exons, and found the position of all splice junctions to be identical to that of the hamster cHS gene except for one site in the 3{prime} nontranslated region. We calculate that the mHS and cHS genes were derived from a common ancestor 400-700 Myrs ago, implying that ketogenesis from fat may have become possible around the time of emergence of vertebrates ({approximately}500 Myr ago). Ketogenesis has evolved into an important pathway of energy metabolism, and we predict the mHS deficiency may prove to be responsible for some as yet explained cases of Reye-like syndromes in humans. This hypothesis can now be tested at the molecular level without the necessity of obtaining hepatic tissue.

Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. [Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)]|[Kingston General Hospital, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A clamp ligation method for point mutational spectrometry : marked increase in scanning range for the human genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of human mutagenesis requires methods of measuring somatic mutations in normal human tissues and inherited mutations in human populations. Such methods should permit measurement of rare mutations in the presence ...

Kim, Andrea Seungsun, 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Assemblathon 2: evaluating de novo methods of genome assembly in three vertebrate species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in de novo plant genome sequencing and assembly. Genome BiolJ: Haplotype-resolved genome sequencing of a Gujarati Indianambitious multi-species genome sequencing projects such as

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Meta-analysis of Genomic and Proteomic Features to Predict Synthetic Lethality of Yeast and Human Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major goal in cancer medicine is to find selective drugs with reduced side-effect. A pair of genes is called synthetic lethality (SL) if mutations of both genes will kill a cell while mutation of either gene alone will not. Hence, a gene in SL interactions ... Keywords: Cancer, Classification, Comparative genomics, Meta-analysis, Synthetic lethality, TCGA

Min Wu, Xuejuan Li, Fan Zhang, Xiaoli Li, Chee-Keong Kwoh, Jie Zheng

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

A Fast Algorithm for the Exhaustive Analysis of 12-Nucleotide-Long DNA Sequences. Applications to Human Genomics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a new algorithm that allows the exhaustive determination of words of up to 12 nucleotides in DNA sequences. It is fast enough as to be used at a genomic scale running on a standard personal computer. As an example, we apply the algorithm ...

Vicente Arnau; Ignacio Marín

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring the Standard Model Exploring the Standard Model       You've heard a lot about the Standard Model and the pieces are hopefully beginning to fall into place. However, even a thorough understanding of the Standard Model is not the end of the story but the beginning. By exploring the structure and details of the Standard Model we encounter new questions. Why do the most fundamental particles have the particular masses we observe? Why aren't they all symmetric? How is the mass of a particle related to the masses of its constituents? Is there any other way of organizing the Standard Model? The activities in this project will elucidate but not answer our questions. The Standard Model tells us how particles behave but not necessarily why they do so. The conversation is only beginning. . . .

124

Analyzing genomic data: understanding the genome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effort that led to the sequencing of the human genome ushered life sciences into a new era. One of the largest international scientific endeavors of the time delivered the genetic makeup of our species to the research community. Further international ... Keywords: Algorithmic Development, Biological Data Mining, Data Mining Software Tools

Xosé M. Fernández-Suárez

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Complete genome sequence of Capnocytophaga ochracea type strain (VPI 2845T)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with type strain genome sequencing projects registered inR= IDA; C=TAS; and I= NAS. Genome sequencing and annotationin Table 2. Table 2. Genome sequencing project information

Mavromatis, Konstantinos

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Report on {open_quotes}inspection of human subject research in intelligence and intelligence-related projects{close_quotes}  

SciTech Connect

Executive Order 12333, {open_quotes}United States Intelligence Activities,{close_quotes} (1) designates the Department`s intelligence element as a member of the Intelligence Community, and (2) states that no agency within the Intelligence community shall sponsor, contract for or conduct research on human subjects except in accordance with guidelines issued by the Department of Health and Human Services. The Federal policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, which was based on Department of Health and Human Services regulations, was promulgated in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 745 by the Department of Energy. The purpose of this inspection was to review the internal control procedures used by the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security to manage selected intelligence and intelligence-related projects that involve human subject research.

NONE

1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

127

Complete genome sequence of Leptotrichia buccalis type strain (C-1013-bT)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leptotrichia buccalis (Robin 1853) Trevisan 1879 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated location in the sparsely populated and neither taxonomically nor genomically adequately accessed family 'Leptotrichiaceae' within the phylum 'Fusobacteria'. Species of Leptotrichia are large fusiform non-motile, non-sporulating rods, which often populate the human oral flora. L. buccalis is anaerobic to aerotolerant, and saccharolytic. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order 'Fusobacteriales' and no more than the second sequence from the phylum 'Fusobacteria'. The 2,465,610 bp long single replicon genome with its 2306 protein-coding and 61 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Ivanova, Natalia; Gronow, Sabine; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Saunders, Liz; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Pitluck, Sam; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Chain, Patrick; Rohde, Christine; Goker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

128

SUBGROUPS FOR BIOMASS PROJECT Hon222c Energy & Environment: Humans & Nature P.B.Rhines, Alex Cypro. Bob Koon 10 April 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUBGROUPS FOR BIOMASS PROJECT Hon222c Energy & Environment: Humans & Nature P.B.Rhines, Alex Cypro, and are there other biomass projects competing for it? 2. Air quality, including particulates and winds and human the town? How many jobs will be created? Will this save the paper mill or is it independent? Generally what

129

Physical mapping of a large plant genome using global high-information-content-fingerprinting: the distal region of the wheat ancestor Aegilops tauschii chromosome 3DS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brachypodium Initiative: Genome sequencing and analysis ofInternational Rice Genome Sequencing Project: The map-basedthe International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium http://

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Today, DOE's Joint Genome Institute (a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

characterizing the basic principles and relationships underlying living systems. Social Impact: Armed with the DNA sequence of the human genome, scientists will be able to...

131

When is Reproducibility an Ethical Issue? Genomics ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Genomics, personalized medicine, and human error. ... Dr. Baggerly will present several case studies where simple errors may have put patients at risk ...

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

132

Molluscan Evolutionary Genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

59179 Molluscan Evolutionary Genomics W. Brian Simison andBoore Molluscan Evolutionary Genomics W. Brian Simison andL. Boore Evolutionary Genomics Department, DOE Joint Genome

Simison, W. Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Human genetic-epidemiologic association analysis via allelic composition and DNA sequence similarity methods : applications to blood-based gene expression biomarkers of disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Unrelated Individuals. Human Genomics 2, 39-66 (2005).Related Individuals. Human Genomics (2006). Invited Review.

Wessel, Jennifer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Human factors in the management of Becon Construction Company's Heavy Oil Test Station Project. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January 1986, the Becon Construction Company - an open-shop contractor based in Houston, Texas - mobilized a work force to a construction project location at the Belridge Oil Field, near Bakersfield, California. The construction craftsmen and helpers in Becon's work force were expected to improve their level of productivity as the work proceeded because of the knowledge and skills that they would acquire as a result of the repetitive nature of the work. As it was originally organized, the Becon HOTS project represented almost a pure laboratory environment in which to collect data concerning the learning effect on worker productivity as well as to statistically isolate the impact on productivity of such external factors as weather, absenteeism, turnover, and especially work methods improvement techniques and pay incentives. From the outset of the HOTS project, the project manager had established an accurate system to quantitatively measure and compare the total manhours that each crew - civil, mechanical, electrical, and prefabrication -- performed at individual HOTS construction locations. Additionally, it was initially assumed that the project manager would be relatively free to implement changes to the job site conditions involving incentive pay and work methods improvement. The subsequent effect of these changes on the productivity of separate work crews could then be evaluated in terms of measured manhours per crew per HOTS.

Maurer, D.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

DOE Joint Genome Institute 2008 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While initially a virtual institute, the driving force behind the creation of the DOE Joint Genome Institute in Walnut Creek, California in the Fall of 1999 was the Department of Energy's commitment to sequencing the human genome. With the publication in 2004 of a trio of manuscripts describing the finished 'DOE Human Chromosomes', the Institute successfully completed its human genome mission. In the time between the creation of the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) and completion of the Human Genome Project, sequencing and its role in biology spread to fields extending far beyond what could be imagined when the Human Genome Project first began. Accordingly, the targets of the DOE JGI's sequencing activities changed, moving from a single human genome to the genomes of large numbers of microbes, plants, and other organisms, and the community of users of DOE JGI data similarly expanded and diversified. Transitioning into operating as a user facility, the DOE JGI modeled itself after other DOE user facilities, such as synchrotron light sources and supercomputer facilities, empowering the science of large numbers of investigators working in areas of relevance to energy and the environment. The JGI's approach to being a user facility is based on the concept that by focusing state-of-the-art sequencing and analysis capabilities on the best peer-reviewed ideas drawn from a broad community of scientists, the DOE JGI will effectively encourage creative approaches to DOE mission areas and produce important science. This clearly has occurred, only partially reflected in the fact that the DOE JGI has played a major role in more than 45 papers published in just the past three years alone in Nature and Science. The involvement of a large and engaged community of users working on important problems has helped maximize the impact of JGI science. A seismic technological change is presently underway at the JGI. The Sanger capillary-based sequencing process that dominated how sequencing was done in the last decade is being replaced by a variety of new processes and sequencing instruments. The JGI, with an increasing number of next-generation sequencers, whose throughput is 100- to 1,000-fold greater than the Sanger capillary-based sequencers, is increasingly focused in new directions on projects of scale and complexity not previously attempted. These new directions for the JGI come, in part, from the 2008 National Research Council report on the goals of the National Plant Genome Initiative as well as the 2007 National Research Council report on the New Science of Metagenomics. Both reports outline a crucial need for systematic large-scale surveys of the plant and microbial components of the biosphere as well as an increasing need for large-scale analysis capabilities to meet the challenge of converting sequence data into knowledge. The JGI is extensively discussed in both reports as vital to progress in these fields of major national interest. JGI's future plan for plants and microbes includes a systematic approach for investigation of these organisms at a scale requiring the special capabilities of the JGI to generate, manage, and analyze the datasets. JGI will generate and provide not only community access to these plant and microbial datasets, but also the tools for analyzing them. These activities will produce essential knowledge that will be needed if we are to be able to respond to the world's energy and environmental challenges. As the JGI Plant and Microbial programs advance, the JGI as a user facility is also evolving. The Institute has been highly successful in bending its technical and analytical skills to help users solve large complex problems of major importance, and that effort will continue unabated. The JGI will increasingly move from a central focus on 'one-off' user projects coming from small user communities to much larger scale projects driven by systematic and problem-focused approaches to selection of sequencing targets. Entire communities of scientists working in a particular field, such as feeds

Gilbert, David

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

136

Molluscan Evolutionary Genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today’s high-throughput genome sequencing centers lack thecomplete nuclear genome sequencing, with several mollusksparticipation. The cost of genome sequencing is still very

Simison, W. Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

JGI Fungal Genomics Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

View Supports functional genomics, user data deposition andJGI Fungal Genomics Program Igor V. Grigoriev 1 DOE Jointof California. JGI Fungal Genomics Program Contact: Igor

Grigoriev, Igor V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Sequencing Intractable DNA to Close Microbial Genomes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled intractable resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such difficult regions in the non-contiguous finished Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps) and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap). The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. These developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

NIST Research Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST Human Identity Project Teams within the Applied Genetics Group ... NIST Projects ... NYC OCME & NY/NJ Labs (April 18, 2012) – Statistics ...

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NIST Research Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Applied Genetics Page 8. NIST Human Identity Project Teams ... Current NIST Projects Short Overviews… ... NYC OCME & NY/NJ Labs (April 18, 2012) ...

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

142

Los Alamos National Laboratory: Bioscience Division: Genome Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

areas. B-6 Teams Applications Bioinformatics Computational Finishing Project Management Sequencing Technology Focus on Research Links Resources Joint Genome Institute (JGI)...

143

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Induction of Genomic Instability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brook Why This Project Genomic instability is an important step in radiation-induced cancer. We will investigate one potential repair mechanism involved in radiation-induced...

144

JGI - Project List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ID NCBI taxonomy ID Show projects from: all ARRA BRC-BESC BRC-GLBRC BRC-JBEI BRC-Multi CSP CSP-ICBG CSP-LD DD Director's Science DOE Legacy DOEM FGP GEBA Genomic Tech Grand...

145

Robotics for recombinant DNA and human genetics research  

SciTech Connect

In October of 1989, molecular biologists throughout the world formally embarked on ultimately determining the set of genetic instructions for a human being. Called by some the Manhattan Project'' a molecular biology, pursuit of this goal is projected to require approximately 3000 man years of effort over a 15-year period. The Humane Genome Initiative is a worldwide research effort that has the goal of analyzing the structure of human deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and determining the location of all human genes. The Department of Energy (DOE) has designated three of its national laboratories as centers for the Human Genome Project. These are Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). These laboratories are currently working on different, but complementary technology development areas in support of the Human Genome Project. The robotics group at LANL is currently working at developing the technologies that address the problems associated with physical mapping. This article describes some of these problems and discusses some of the robotics approaches and engineering tolls applicable to their solution. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Beugelsdijk, T.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Genomics Division Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PIs PIs Mark Biggin Jim Bristow Jan-Fang Cheng Inna Dubchak Suzanna Lewis Chris Mungall Len Pennacchio Eddy Rubin Axel Visel Divisional Information Support Staff Seminars Diversity Directory Contact Us The characterization and analysis of genome sequences from such diverse organisms as humans to the most primitive soil microbe represent a watershed opportunity for biology. The Genomics Division is taking advantage of this wealth of new information. While it is well known that DNA encodes the basic blue print of life, it is not known how best to interpret most of this information. To address this question, laboratories within the division are developing computational, biochemical, genetic, and imaging methods to decipher the complex sequence motifs that control RNA transcription, DNA replication, and chromosome structure. The Division is

147

Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of the opportunistic oral pathogen Prevotella multisaccharivorax type strain (PPPA20T)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prevotella multisaccharivorax Sakamoto et al. 2005 is a species of the large genus Prevotella, which belongs to the family Prevotellaceae. The species is of medical interest because its members are able to cause diseases in the human oral cavity such as periodontitis, root caries and others. Although 77 Prevotella genomes have already been sequenced or are targeted for sequencing, this is only the second completed genome sequence of a type strain of a species within the genus Prevotella to be published. The 3,388,644 bp long genome is assembled in three non-contiguous contigs, harbors 2,876 protein-coding and 75 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lu, Megan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Complete genome sequence of the bile-resistant pigment- producing anaerobe Alistipes finegoldii type strain (AHN2437T)  

SciTech Connect

Alistipes finegoldii Rautio et al. 2003 is one of five species of Alistipes with a validly pub- lished name: family Rikenellaceae, order Bacteroidetes, class Bacteroidia, phylum Bacteroidetes. This rod-shaped and strictly anaerobic organism has been isolated mostly from human tissues. Here we describe the features of the type strain of this species, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. A. finegoldii is the first member of the genus Alistipes for which the complete genome sequence of its type strain is now available. The 3,734,239 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,302 protein-coding and 68 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Stackebrandt, Erko [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Munk, Christine [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Comparative genomics in acid mine drainage biofilm communities reveals metabolic and structural differentiation of co-occurring archaea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

co-occurring archaea. BMC Genomics 2013 14:485. Submit yourgenomes. Yelton et al. BMC Genomics 2013, 14:485 http://work was supported by DOE Genomics: GTL project Grant No.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Using Partial Genomic Fosmid Libraries for Sequencing Complete Organellar Genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than total nuclear genome sequencing, making broaderavailable organellar genome sequencing methods, especiallyenables plastid genome sequencing from both parasitic and

McNeal, Joel R.; Leebens-Mack, James H.; Arumuganathan, K.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; dePamphilis, Claude W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genomic Instability and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genomic Instability and Low Dose Low Dose Rate Radiation. Authors: Lei Huang, Suzanne Grim, William F. Morgan Institutions: University of Maryland. Humans will always receive...

152

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Exploring Standards to Advance Microbial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 9, 2009 Exploring Standards to Advance Microbial Genomics WALNUT CREEK, CA-Microbes contribute to manifold human endeavors ranging from bioenergy to agriculture to medicine....

153

Genome resequencing reveals multiscale geographic structure and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S, Bottolo L, Freeman C, McVean G, Donnelly P. 2005. A fine-scale map of recombination rates and hotspots across the human genome. Science 310: 321-324. Neale DB, Ingvarsson PK....

154

Genomic medicine in primary care: Texas physicians' adoption of an innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New applications of genomic medicine stemming from the Human Genome Project are predicted to become routine components of primary care. Primary care physicians (PCPs) will increasingly become responsible for screening patients for inherited diseases, recommending genetic testing, and making referrals to genetic services. Clinical applications of genomic medicine will occur at a variable pace. Characteristics of an innovation such as genomic medicine are strong indicators of its potential for adoption. The purpose of this study is to assess whether (and to what extent) physicians' perceptions of genomic medicine as an innovation influence their likelihood of adopting this innovation into primary care. The study's sample consists of 400 primary care physicians in Texas and employs a survey design. Based on Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations Theory, the perceived characteristics of genomic medicine - Relative Advantage, Compatibility, Complexity, Trialability, and Observability - are the study's independent/predictor variables. Likelihood of PCPs Adopting Genomic Medicine is the dependent variable. The nature of the social system (private or group practice) is examined as a possible moderator variable. The study suggests that Texas PCPs who are likely to adopt genomic medicine strongly perceive its clinical uses (such as genetic testing for carrier status or susceptibility to common diseases, testing an embryo for genetic disorders before it is implanted, and supplementing a family history) to be highly advantageous. For half of the PCPs, genetic services such as genetic counseling and genetic testing are not compatible with current practice. Perceived complexity of the innovation is the strongest predictor of likelihood of PCPs adopting genomic medicine. Many PCPs find it difficult to stay updated on genomic medicine and locate genetic services. Although Texas PCPs feel genomic medicine can be gradually incorporated into primary care practice, most are not presently observing their colleagues adopting genomic medicine or assisting their patients to make decisions regarding genetic services. Future efforts to advance the use of genomic medicine in primary care will require more emphasis on genetics in medical school curriculum and continuing education programs. Links with specialists trained in genetic counseling and health education will be essential to translate relevant information to patients and families.

Suther, Sandra Gayle

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

JGI - A Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Genomic Encyclopedia A Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) The GEBA project is aimed at systematically filling in the gaps in sequencing along the bacterial and archaeal branches of the tree of life. Though the wide variety of microbial sequencing projects undertaken throughout the world has created a rich, diverse collection of microbial genomes, strong biases in what has been sequenced thus far are evident. This project represents the first systematic attempt to use the tree of life itself as a guide to sequencing target selection. JGI is beginning by collaborating on a pilot project with DSMZ. Why GEBA? The GEBA Pilot Project GEBA Sequencing Plans Interpret a Genome for Education Home > User Programs > A Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA)

156

Genomics and Systems Biology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genomics and Systems Biology LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial genomes Read caption + In 2013, Los Alamos scientist Richard Sayre and his team...

157

PNNL: Biological Sciences Programs & Projects: FCSD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects Biological & Environmental Research-PNNL Proteomics Center for Systems Biology of EnteroPathogens DOE Genomic Science Program Foundational Scientific Focus Area (FSFA)...

158

Genomic Data and Annotation from the SEED  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The SEED Project has been extended to support metagenomic samples and concomitant analytical tools. Moreover, the number of genomes being introduced into SEED is growing very rapidly. Building a framework to support this growth while providing highly accurate annotations is centrally important to SEED. The project’s subsystem-based annotation strategy has become the technological foundation for addressing these challenges.(copied from Appendix 7 of Systems Biology Knowledgebase for a New Era in Biology, A Genomics:GTL Report from the May 2008 Workshop, DOE/SC-0113, Grequrick, S; Fredrickson, J.K.; Stevens, R., Pub March 1, 2009.)

Fonstein, Michael; Kogan, Yakov; Osterman, Andrei; Overbeek, Ross; Vonstein, Veronika The Fellowship for Interpretation of Genomes (FIG)

159

Genome Analyses and Supplement Data from the International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The sequencing of the first tree genome, that of Populus, was a project initiated by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE’s Office of Science. The International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC) was formed to help develop and guide post-sequence activities. The IPGC website, hosted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides draft sequence data as it is made available from DOE Joint Genome Institute, genome analyses for Populus, lists of related publications and resources, and the science plan. The data are available at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ipgc/ssr_resource.htm.

International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

160

A High-Resolution Map of Human Evolutionary Constraint Using 29 Mammals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The comparison of related genomes has emerged as a powerful lens for genome interpretation. Here we report the sequencing and comparative analysis of 29 eutherian genomes. We confirm that at least 5.5% of the human genome ...

Mag Washietl, Stefan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Making up the gut microbiome is a host-driven  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 16, 2010 November 16, 2010 Making up the gut microbiome is a host-driven project Baking sourdough bread requires a starter, and so do mammalian guts, which are first colonized by microbial communities from the mother and then acquire more microbes over time. These gut microbial communities are important for maintaining health and combating disease, and it's why the Human Microbiome Project launched by the National Institutes of Health in 2008 is studying the microbial communities that populate the human body by sequencing them and assembling a reference catalog, a project that involves researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI). G. beringei Photo: G. beringei by rbleib While the HMP was getting off the ground, DOE JGI collaborator Howard

162

Instrumentation and Control, Human System Interface, and Information Technology Requirements Project Plan for Nuclear Power Plant Lo ng-Term Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plant owners are looking to extend the operating life of their plants to 80 years and potentially longer. Instrumentation and control, human system interface, and information technologies have changed drastically since the plants were built and will change even more drastically before the plants reach the end of their operating life. A project plan to develop requirements for these technologies is defined here. These requirements will enable plants to better identify future solutions that w...

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

163

JGI Genomics and Bioinformatics for Undergraduate Educators Workshop |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JGI Genomics and Bioinformatics for Undergraduate Educators JGI Genomics and Bioinformatics for Undergraduate Educators Workshop JGI Genomics and Bioinformatics for Undergraduate Educators Workshop March 23, 2013 3:00PM EDT to March 26, 2013 6:00PM EDT University of California The JGI will be holding the JGI Genomics and Bioinformatics for Undergraduate Educators Workshop in conjunction with the JGI User Meeting. The workshop will take place March 23-26, 2013 at the JGI. The DOE Joint Genome Institute's Education Program is providing opportunities for colleges and universities across the country to "interpret" bacterial genomes, such as those sequenced as part of the GEBA project, for analysis. This "Interpret a GEBA Genome" Education Program makes available a selection of recently sequenced genomes

164

2014 REU Program in Computational Neuropsychiatric Genomics research experiences for undergraduates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2014 REU Program in Computational Neuropsychiatric Genomics research experiences for undergraduates space to work on projects with mentor support. Conte Center Training Focus The Center is training & Systems Biology #12;2014 REU Program in Computational Neuropsychiatric Genomics research experiences

Argonne National Laboratory

165

Complete genome sequence of Methanocorpusculum labreanum type strain Z  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methanocorpusculum labreanum is a methanogen belonging to the order Methanomicrobiales within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain Z was isolated from surface sediments of Tar Pit Lake in the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles, California. M. labreanum is of phylogenetic interest because at the time the sequencing project began only one genome had previously been sequenced from the order Methanomicrobiales. We report here the complete genome sequence of M. labreanum type strain Z and its annotation. This is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Goltsman, Eugene [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Whitman, W. B. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

An updated object oriented bovine QTL viewer and genome-wide bovine meta-analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waves of bovine genomic data have been produced as a result of the bovine genome sequencing projects. In addition to the massive amounts of genomic sequence, significant annotation including single nucleotide polymorphisms, sequence tagged sites and haplotype blocks have been produced by the Bovine HapMap Project. Furthermore, many agriculturally significant traits in cattle such as milk yield and carcass weight are measured on a quantitative scale and have been genetically mapped as quantitative trait loci (QTL). QTL data can be used to generate another form of bovine annotation linking phenotype to genotype. However, it is impossible for humans to be able to analyze genomic scale data without computer based tools. Bioinformatic tools have been shown to greatly increase productivity and improve efficiency when dealing with large data sets. My dissertation presents an integrated, extensible database that houses SNPs, STSs, haplotypes, and QTL. The database is presented to researchers through a restructured, object oriented Bovine QTL Viewer that displays multiple levels of bovine annotation synergistically. Evaluation of use of the viewer was performed using a survey based approach and measured quantitatively. In addition, the QTL data from the database was used to analyze the frequency of gene ontology (GO) annotations within QTL regions. QTL regions were divided into 8 trait based groups. GO terms were counted within each category of QTL and in non- QTL regions of the genome. Top level GO term frequencies were generated from the counts and these frequencies were compared between QTL and non-QTL portions of the genome. Furthermore, specific sets of GO terms believed to be related to QTL categories were also used to determine if QTL regions were enriched for genes annotated with such GO terms. As a result, we determined that gene density varied significantly across QTL regions and that many QTL categories showed GO term frequency differences that could be related to the trait’s biology. Furthermore, our selected GO term sets were shown to be significantly enriched in some QTL categories.

Salih, Hanni

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Project information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Information Amistad Project (Texas) Collbran Project (Colorado) Colorado River Storage Project Dolores Project (Colorado) Falcon Project (Texas) Provo River Project (Utah)...

168

Project title:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project title: Roseville Elverta (RSC-ELV) OPGW Replacement Project Project title: Roseville Elverta (RSC-ELV) OPGW Replacement Project Requested By: David Young Mail Code : N1410 Phone: 916-353-4542 Date Submitted: 5/4/2011 Date Required: 5/7/2011 Description of the Project: Purpose and Need The Western Area Power Administration (Western), Sierra Nevada Region (SNR), is responsible for the operation and maintenance (O&M) of federally owned and operated transmission lines, Switchyards, and facilities throughout California. Western and Reclamation must comply with the National Electric Safety Code, Western States Coordinating Council (WECC), and internal directives for protecting human safety, the physical environment, and maintaining the reliable operation of the transmission system. There is an existing OPGW communications fiber on the transmission towers between Roseville and Elverta

169

CGAL: computing genome assembly likelihoods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SM, Lei M, Li J, et al: Genome sequencing in microfabricatedDe novo bacterial genome sequencing: millions of very shortGenome assembly, evaluation, likelihood, sequencing.

Rahman, Atif; Pachter, Lior

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Genetic analysis of tumorigenesis: a conserved region in the human and Chinese hamster genomes contains genetically identified tumor-suppressor genes  

SciTech Connect

Regional chromosome homologies were found in a comparison of human 11p with Chinese hamster 3p. By use of probes that recognize six genes of human 11p (INS, CAT, HBBC, CALC, PTH, and HRAS), the corresponding genes were localized by in situ hybridization on Chinese hamster chromosome 3. INS and CAT were located close to the centromere on 3p, whereas HBBC, CALC, and PTH were at 3q3-4 and HRAS at 3q4. Extensive prior data from chromosome studies of tumorigenic and tumor-derived Chinese hamster cells have suggested the presence of a tumor-suppressor gene on 3p. Two tumor-suppressor genes have been described on human 11p, one linked to CAT and one to INS. The present study raises the possibility that the Chinese hamster suppressor may be closely linked to INS or CAT.

Stenman, G.; Sager, R.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Comparative genomic workflow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

his article describes a workflow for identifying conserved patterns in noncoding regions of vertebrate genomes, with an intention of investigating possible functions of the conserved regions. The annotations of genomes are ...

Rajapakse, Jagath

172

Genome sequence of Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548, an anaerobic bacterium from the phylum Lentisphaerae, isolated from the human gastro-intestinal tract  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548 represents the first cultured representative from the novel phylum Lentisphaerae, a deep-branching bacterial lineage. Few cultured bacteria from this phylum are known, and V. vadensis therefore represents an important organism for evolutionary studies. V. vadensis is a strictly anaerobic sugar-fermenting isolate from the human gastro-intestinal tract.

Van Passel, Mark W.J. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Kant, Ravi [University of Helsinki; Palva, Airi [University of Helsinki; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Sims, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, Paul [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; De Vos, Willem M. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Smidt, Hauke [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Zoetendal, Erwin G. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Genome in a Bottle Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Genome in a Bottle Consortium. Summary: NIST has organized the "Genome in a Bottle Consortium" to develop the reference ...

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

FY10 LDRD Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 LDRD Projects 0 LDRD Projects 2010 Projects Page 1 LDRD Proj. No. Project Title P.I. Dept./Bldg. 07-005 Sensitive Searches for CP-Violation in Hadronic Systems Semertzidis, Y. PHYS/510A 08-002 Strongly Correlated Systems: From Graphene to Quark-Gluon Plasma Kharzeev, D. & Tsvelik, A. PHYS/CMP 08-004 Getting to Know Your Constituents: Studies of Partonic Matter at the EIC Vogelsang, W. PHYS/510A 08-005 Development of the Deuteron EDM Proposal Semertzidis, Y. PHYS/510A 08-008 Development of a Small Gap Magnets and Vacuum Chamber for eRHIC Litvinenko, V. C-AD/817 08-022 Novel Methods for Microcrystal Structure Determination at NSLS and NSLS-II Orville, A. M. BIO/463 08-025 Combined PET/MRI Multimodality Imaging Probe Schlyer, D. Med/490 08-028 Genomic DNA Methylation: The Epigenetic Response of Arabidopsis Thaliana Genome

175

Genome sequencing and analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genome Genome sequencing and analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon The International Brachypodium Initiative* Three subfamilies of grasses, the Ehrhartoideae, Panicoideae and Pooideae, provide the bulk of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), which is, to our knowledge, the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes shows a precise history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grasses, and establishes a template for analysis of the large genomes of economically important pooid grasses such as wheat. The high-quality genome sequence, coupled with ease of cultivation and transformation, small size and rapid life cycle, will help Brachypodium reach its

176

Microsoft PowerPoint - Microbial Genome and Metagenome Analysis Case Study (NERSC Workshop - May 7-8, 2009).ppt [Compatibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genome & Genome & Metagenome Analysis: Computational Challenges Natalia N. Ivanova * Nikos C. Kyrpides * Victor M. Markowitz ** * Genome Biology Program, Joint Genome Institute ** Lawrence Berkeley National Lab Microbial genome & metagenome analysis General aims Understand microbial life Apply to agriculture, bioremediation, biofuels, human health Specific aims include Specific aims include Predict biochemistry & physiology of organisms based on genome sequence Explain known biochemical & physiological properties Metabolic reconstruction * Ivanova & Lykidis (2009) Metabolic reconstruction. Encyclopedia of Microbiology, Elsevier: 607-621. 2 Genome sequence data size Now ~1,400 microbial genomes = 5.5 mil genes ~ 100 metagenomes samples

177

Complete genome sequence of Methanoculleus marisnigri type strain JR1  

SciTech Connect

Methanoculleus marisnigri Romesser et al. 1981 is a methanogen belonging to the order Methanomicrobiales within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain, JR1, was isolated from anoxic sediments of the Black Sea. M. marisnigri is of phylogenetic interest because at the time the sequencing project began only one genome had previously been sequenced from the order Methanomicrobiales. We report here the complete genome sequence of M. marisnigri type strain JR1 and its annotation. This is part of a Joint Genome Institute 2006 Community Sequencing Program to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Goltsman, Eugene [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Whitman, W. B. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (Clark and Norris 1996) is the sole and type species of the genus, which until recently was the only genus within the actinobacterial family Acidimicrobiaceae and in the order Acidomicrobiales. Rapid oxidation of iron pyrite during autotrophic growth in the absence of an enhanced CO2 concentration is characteristic for A. ferrooxidans. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order Acidomicrobiales, and the 2,158,157 bp long single replicon genome with its 2038 protein coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Clum, Alicia; Nolan, Matt; Lang, Elke; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Goker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

179

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Interaction of Genome and Cellular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Genome and Cellular Micronenvioronment of Genome and Cellular Micronenvioronment Mina Bissell Life Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Why this Project While normal stoma can delay or prevent tumorigenesis, abnormal stromal components can promote tumor growth. Acquired or inherited mutations that alter stromal cell function can release the context-suppressed malignant cells. Literature spanning more than a century has shown that inflammation associated with tissue wounding can produce tunors. Radiation produces changes in reactive oxygen that are similar to inflammation and may represent a mechanism for radiation-induced damage. Project Goals To determine the underlying role of stromal alterations in controling genomic instability accompanying epithelial-mesenchyumal transformation.

180

An integrative approach for genomic island prediction in Prokaryotic genomes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A genomic island (GI) is a segment of genomic sequence that is horizontally transferred from other genomes. The detection of genomic islands is extremely important to the medical research. Most of current computational approaches that use sequence composition ... Keywords: gene information, genomic islands, intergenic distance, sequence composition

Han Wang; John Fazekas; Matthew Booth; Qi Liu; Dongsheng Che

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

BMC Genomics BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software Genome Annotation Transfer Utility (GATU): rapid annotation of viral genomes using a closely related reference genome

Vasily Tcherepanov; Angelika Ehlers; Chris Upton

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Genomics and Systems Biology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Los Alamos scientists perform research in functional genomics and structural genomics, and applications for such work cover diverse fields such as energy, agriculture, and environmental cleanup. Get Expertise Babetta Marrone Biofuels Program Manager Email Cheryl Kuske DOE BER Biological System Science Division Program Manager Email Chris Detter Emerging Threats Program Manager: Email Rebecca McDonald Bioscience Communications Email "We were asked to build a rocket ship," said developer Joel Berendzen, "but instead we built a 10,000 mph motorcycle." - Sequedex team LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial genomes Protein research Read caption + In 2013, Los Alamos scientist Richard Sayre and his team genetically

183

Genome Sequence Databases (Overview): Sequencing and Assembly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

complete microbial genome sequencing (you get what you payet al. (2005). Genome sequencing in open microfabricatedof problem solving in genome sequencing. Genome Research 8,

Lapidus, Alla L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Genome Analysis and Systems Modeling Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Microbial Genomes) Pipeline, Comprehensive Genome Analysis Pipeline Genome Channel, Java applet for the comprehensive sequence-based view of genomes. Grail, a tool for the...

185

JGI - Undergraduate Research in Functional Genomics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Education Microbial Genome Analysis Microbial Functional Genomics Undergraduate Research in Microbial Functional Genomics Genomics not only can answer questions about known genes,...

186

Genome Science/Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science & Innovation » Science & Innovation » Science & Engineering Capabilities » Bioscience: Bioenergy, Biosecurity, and Health » Environmental Microbiology » Genome Genome Science/Technologies Los Alamos using cutting-edge sequencing, finishing, and analysis, impact valuable genomic data. Get Expertise Cheryl Kuske DOE BER Biological System Science Division Program Manager Email Srinivas Iyer Bioscience Group Leader Email Momchilo Vuyisich Bioenergy and Biomedical Sciences Email Rebecca McDonald Bioscience Communications Email State-of-the art technology and extensive genomics expertise Protein research Read caption + Los Alamos National Laboratory graduate student, Patricia Langan, changes the properties of a green fluorescent protein in order to create new fluorescent protein variants.

187

Genome Science/Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Momchilo Vuyisich Bioenergy and Biomedical Sciences Email Rebecca McDonald Bioscience Communications Email State-of-the art technology and extensive genomics expertise Protein...

188

Genomic sequencing of Pleistocene cave bears  

SciTech Connect

Despite the information content of genomic DNA, ancient DNA studies to date have largely been limited to amplification of mitochondrial DNA due to technical hurdles such as contamination and degradation of ancient DNAs. In this study, we describe two metagenomic libraries constructed using unamplified DNA extracted from the bones of two 40,000-year-old extinct cave bears. Analysis of {approx}1 Mb of sequence from each library showed that, despite significant microbial contamination, 5.8 percent and 1.1 percent of clones in the libraries contain cave bear inserts, yielding 26,861 bp of cave bear genome sequence. Alignment of this sequence to the dog genome, the closest sequenced genome to cave bear in terms of evolutionary distance, revealed roughly the expected ratio of cave bear exons, repeats and conserved noncoding sequences. Only 0.04 percent of all clones sequenced were derived from contamination with modern human DNA. Comparison of cave bear with orthologous sequences from several modern bear species revealed the evolutionary relationship of these lineages. Using the metagenomic approach described here, we have recovered substantial quantities of mammalian genomic sequence more than twice as old as any previously reported, establishing the feasibility of ancient DNA genomic sequencing programs.

Noonan, James P.; Hofreiter, Michael; Smith, Doug; Priest, JamesR.; Rohland, Nadin; Rabeder, Gernot; Krause, Johannes; Detter, J. Chris; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, Edward M.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Scotts Valley Energy Office and Human Capacity Building that will provide energy-efficiency services and develop sustainable renewable energy projects.  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this project is to develop a Scotts Valley Energy Development Office (SVEDO). This office will further support the mission of the Tribe's existing leadership position as the DOE Tribal Multi-County Weatherization Energy Program (TMCWEP) in creating jobs and providing tribal homes and buildings with weatherization assistance to increase energy efficiency, occupant comfort and improved indoor air quality. This office will also spearhead efforts to move the Tribe towards its further strategic energy goals of implementing renewable energy systems through specific training, resource evaluation, feasibility planning, and implementation. Human capacity building and continuing operations are two key elements of the SVEDO objectives. Therefore, the project will 1) train and employ additional Tribal members in energy efficiency, conservation and renewable resource analyses and implementation; 2) purchase materials and equipment required to implement the strategic priorities as developed by the Scotts Valley Tribe which specifically include implementing energy conservation measures and alternative energy strategies to reduce energy costs for the Tribe and its members; and 3) obtain a dedicated office and storage space for ongoing SVEDO operations.

Anderson, Temashio [Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

190

Scotts Valley Energy Office and Human Capacity Building that will provide energy-efficiency services and develop sustainable renewable energy projects.  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this project is to develop a Scotts Valley Energy Development Office (SVEDO). This office will further support the mission of the Tribe's existing leadership position as the DOE Tribal Multi-County Weatherization Energy Program (TMCWEP) in creating jobs and providing tribal homes and buildings with weatherization assistance to increase energy efficiency, occupant comfort and improved indoor air quality. This office will also spearhead efforts to move the Tribe towards its further strategic energy goals of implementing renewable energy systems through specific training, resource evaluation, feasibility planning, and implementation. Human capacity building and continuing operations are two key elements of the SVEDO objectives. Therefore, the project will 1) train and employ additional Tribal members in energy efficiency, conservation and renewable resource analyses and implementation; 2) purchase materials and equipment required to implement the strategic priorities as developed by the Scotts Valley Tribe which specifically include implementing energy conservation measures and alternative energy strategies to reduce energy costs for the Tribe and its members; and 3) obtain a dedicated office and storage space for ongoing SVEDO operations.

Anderson, Temashio [Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

191

Enhancer Identification through Comparative Genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

through Comparative Genomics Axel Visel, James Bristow andWalnut Creek, CA 94598 USA. Genomics Division, MS 84-171,Len A. Pennacchio, Genomics Division, One Cyclotron Road, MS

Visel, Axel; Bristow, James; Pennacchio, Len A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Communicating Genomics:GTL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Annual DOE Joint Genome Institute User Meeting Sponsored By U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science March 29-April 1, 2006 Embassy Suites Hotel and DOE Joint Genome Institute Walnut Creek, California iii Contents Agenda .................................................................................................................. iv Speaker Presentations . .........................................................................................1 Abtracts in order of presentation according to agenda (p. iv) Poster Presentations ..............................................................................................9 Posters alphabetical by first author. *Presenting author. Attendees...............................................................................................................75

193

Spectrogram analysis of genomes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We perform frequency-domain analysis in the genomes of various organisms using tricolor spectrograms, identifying several types of distinct visual patterns characterizing specific DNA regions. We relate patterns and their frequency characteristics to ... Keywords: DNA spectrograms, frequency-domain analysis, genome analysis

David Sussillo; Anshul Kundaje; Dimitris Anastassiou

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Legume Crop Genomics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book will present this technical theme in a manner that should help many readers answer the question, "What is genomics?" And finally, this book should help readers formulate an opinion on the question, "Why is genomic research needed?" Legume Crop Ge

195

Genome Properties Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Genome Properties system consists of a suite of "Properties" which are carefully defined attributes of prokaryotic organisms whose status can be described by numerical values or controlled vocabulary terms for individual completely sequenced genomes. Evaluation of these properties may take place via manual curation or by computer algorithms (numerical calculations or rules-based assignment of controlled vocabulary terms). The Genome Properties system has been designed to capture the widest possible range of attributes and currently encompasses taxonomic terms, genometric calculations, metabolic pathways, systems of interacting macromolecular components and quantitative and descriptive experimental observations (phenotypes) from the literature. Wherever possible, Genome Properties are linked to traceable lines of evidence and links are provided to data for any genes which are part of this evidence. The primary source of evidence linking genes to properties is homology modelling using Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) from the TIGRFAMs and Pfam databases. (Taken from the Genome Properties Home Page)(Specialized Interface)

Haft, Daniel H.; Selengut, Jeremy D.; Brinkac, Lauren M.; Zafar, Nikhat; White, Owen

196

JGI CSP Delivers First Moss Genome  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13, 2007 13, 2007 DOE JGI Community Sequencing Program Delivers First Moss Genome WALNUT CREEK, CA--Messages from nearly a half-billion years ago, conveyed via the inventory of genes sequenced from a present-day moss, provide clues about the earliest colonization of dry land by plants. The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) was among the leaders of an international effort uniting more than 40 institutions to complete the first genome sequencing project of a nonvascular land plant, the moss Physcomitrella patens. The team's insights into the code that enabled this seminal emergence and dominance of land by plants are published December 13 online in Science Express. Scanning electron micrograph of Physcomitrella patens gametophores (moss shoots).

197

Eukaryotic Genomics Data from the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

From the JGI webportal users can choose Eukaryotic genomes from a photo list, access the JGI FTP directories to download data files, use the Tree of Life navigation tool, or choose a genome and go directly to a website specific to that one genome. The individual sites include direct access to download sequence files, BLAST, search, view and navigate the genomic annotations.

198

Comparative proteogenomics: combining mass spectrometry and comparative genomics to analyze multiple genomes  

SciTech Connect

While bacterial genome annotations have significantly improved in recent years, techniques for bacterial proteome annotation (including post-translational chemical modifications, signal peptides, proteolytic events, etc.) are still in their infancy. At the same time, the number of sequenced bacterial genomes is rising sharply, far outpacing our ability to validate the predicted genes, let alone annotate bacterial proteomes. In this study, we use tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to annotate the proteome of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an important microbe for bioremediation. In particular, we provide the first comprehensive map of post-translational modifications in a bacterial genome, including a large number of chemical modifications, signal peptide cleavages and cleavage of N-terminal methionine residues. We also detect multiple genes that were missed or assigned incorrect start positions by gene prediction programs and suggest corrections to improve the gene annotation. This study demonstrates that complementing every genome sequencing project by an MS/MS project would significantly improve both genome and proteome annotations for a reasonable cost.

Gupta, Nitin; Benhamida, Jamal; Bhargava, Vipul; Goodman, Daniel; Kain , Elisabeth; Kerman, Ian; Nguyen , Ngan; Ollikainen, Noah; Rodriguez, Jesse; Wang, J.; Lipton, Mary S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Bafna, Vineet; Smith, Richard D.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

Genome Clone Libraries and Data from the Integrated Molecular Analysis of Genomes and their Expression (I.M.A.G.E.) Consortium  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The I.M.A.G.E. Consortium was initiated in 1993 by four academic groups on a collaborative basis after informal discussions led to a common vision of how to achieve an important goal in the study of the human genome: the Integrated Molecular Analysis of Genomes and their Expression Consortium's primary goal is to create arrayed cDNA libraries and associated bioinformatics tools, and make them publicly available to the research community. The primary organisms of interest include intensively studied mammalian species, including human, mouse, rat and non-human primate species. The Consortium has also focused on several commonly studied model organisms; as part of this effort it has arrayed cDNAs from zebrafish, and Fugu (pufferfish) as well as Xenopus laevis and X. tropicalis (frog). Utilizing high speed robotics, over nine million individual cDNA clones have been arrayed into 384-well microtiter plates, and sufficient replicas have been created to distribute copies both to sequencing centers and to a network of five distributors located worldwide. The I.M.A.G.E. Consortium represents the world's largest public cDNA collection, and works closely with the National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection(MGC) to help it achieve its goal of creating a full-length cDNA clone for every human and mouse gene. I.M.A.G.E. is also a member of the ORFeome Collaboration, working to generate a complete set of expression-ready open reading frame clones representing each human gene. Custom informatics tools have been developed in support of these projects to better allow the research community to select clones of interest and track and collect all data deposited into public databases about those clones and their related sequences. I.M.A.G.E. clones are publicly available, free of any royalties, and may be used by anyone agreeing with the Consortium's guidelines.

None

200

JGI - FY2002 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Sequencing for the 2 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program For status information, see the Genome Projects section. For more information about the DOE Office of Science's Microbial Genome Program, see http://microbialgenomics.energy.gov/. For more information about microbial sequencing at JGI, contact David Bruce. Eukaryotes Organism Genome Size Thalassiosira pseudonana CCMP 1335 (diatom) 32 Mb Lactic Acid Bacteria Organism Genome Size Bifidobacterium longum DJO10A 2.4 Mb Brevibacterium linens BL2 4.5 Mb Lactobacillus brevis ATCC 367 1.8 Mb Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 2.8 Mb Lactobacillus delbrueckii ATCC BAA-365 1.6 Mb Lactobacillus gasseri ATCC 33323 1.9 Mb Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris SK11 2.6 Mb Leuconostoc mesenteroides ATCC 8293 2 Mb Oenococcus oeni PSU-1 1.8 Mb

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

JGI - FY2003 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Sequencing for the 3 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program For status information, see the Genome Projects section. For more information about the DOE Office of Science's Microbial Genome Program, see http://microbialgenomics.energy.gov/. For more information about microbial sequencing at JGI, contact David Bruce. Eukaryotes Organism Genome Size Emiliania huxleyi 220 Mb Ostreococcus lucimarinus 9.3 Mb Monosiga brevicollis Bacteria Organism Genome Size Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 7 Mb Burkholderia sp. 383 8.80 Mb Burkholderia vietnamiensis G4 8.40 Mb Chlorobium aggregatum Chlorobium chlorochromatii CaD3 2.6 Mb Chlorochromatium aggregatum Lake Dagow Crocosphaera watsonii WH 8501 6.40 Mb Kineococcus radiotolerans SRS30216 4.90 Mb Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1 4.60 Mb

202

The Role of Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability Susan M. Bailey, Eli S. Williams and Robert L. Ullrich The mechanistic role of radiation-induced genomic instability in radiation carcinogenesis is an attractive hypothesis that remains to be rigorously tested. There are few in vivo studies on which to base judgments, but work in our laboratory with mouse models of radiogenic mammary neoplasia provided the first indications that certain inductive forms of genetically predisposed genomic instability may contribute to tumor development. The central goal of this research project is to more firmly establish the mechanistic basis of this radiation-associated genomic instability and, from this, to assess whether such induced instability might play a major role in tumorigenesis at low doses of low LET radiation. In the case of

203

JGI - FY2005 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Sequencing for the 5 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program For status information, see the Genome Projects section. For more information about the DOE Office of Science's Microbial Genome Program, see http://microbialgenomics.energy.gov/. For more information about microbial sequencing at JGI, contact David Bruce. Strains of Shewanella Organism Est. Genome Size Shewanella baltica OS195 5 Mb Shewanella sp. ANA-3 5 Mb Shewanella sp. MR-4 5 Mb Shewanella sp. MR-7 5 Mb Shewanella sp. W3-18-1 5 Mb Shewanella baltica OS223 5 Mb Strains of Chloroflexi Organism Est. Genome Size Chloroflexus aggregans DSM 9485 5 Mb Chloroflexus sp. Y-396-1 5 Mb Chlorothrix halophila (Candidatus) 5 Mb Herpetosiphon aurantiacus DSM 785 5 Mb Roseiflexus castenholzii HLO8 5 Mb Roseiflexus sp. strain RS-1 5 Mb

204

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Biofuel-Producing Bacteria, Insect Gut  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 29, 2009 June 29, 2009 Biofuel-Producing Bacteria, Insect Gut Microbes, ~ 70 other Projects Fill DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Pipeline WALNUT CREEK, CA-The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) has selected 71 new genomic sequencing projects for its 2010 Community Sequencing Program (CSP)-a targeted sampling of the planet's biodiversity-to be characterized for bioenergy, climate, and environmental applications. JGI's Community Sequencing Program is the largest genomic sequencing effort in the world focused on nonmedical organisms, enabling scientists from universities and national laboratories to probe the hidden world of microbes and plants to tap nature's ingenuity for innovative solutions to the nation's major challenges in energy, climate, and environment. The

205

Structural Genomics | Biosciences Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne Midwest Center for Structural Genomics Andrzej Joachimiak Director Bldg: 202. Room: Q 118 E-mail: andrzejj@anl.gov Phone:...

206

Comparative genomics of the core and accessory genomes of 48 Sinorhizobium strains comprising five genospecies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

annotation and comparative genomics. Database (Oxford) 2009,et al. : Comparative genomics of the core and accessoryComparative genomics of the core and accessory genomes of 48

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Genome-Facilitated Analyses of Geomicrobial Processes  

SciTech Connect

This project had the goal(s) of understanding the mechanism(s) of extracellular electron transport (EET) in the microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and a number of other strains and species in the genus Shewanella. The major accomplishments included sequencing, annotation, and analysis of more than 20 Shewanella genomes. The comparative genomics enabled the beginning of a systems biology approach to this genus. Another major contribution involved the study of gene regulation, primarily in the model organism, MR-1. As part of this work, we took advantage of special facilities at the DOE: e.g., the synchrotron radiation facility at ANL, where we successfully used this system for elemental characterization of single cells in different metabolic states (1). We began work with purified enzymes, and identification of partially purified enzymes, leading to initial characterization of several of the 42 c-type cytochromes from MR-1 (2). As the genome became annotated, we began experiments on transcriptome analysis under different conditions of growth, the first step towards systems biology (3,4). Conductive appendages of Shewanella, called bacterial nanowires were identified and characterized during this work (5, 11, 20,21). For the first time, it was possible to measure the electron transfer rate between single cells and a solid substrate (20), a rate that has been confirmed by several other laboratories. We also showed that MR-1 cells preferentially attach to cells at a given charge, and are not attracted, or even repelled by other charges. The interaction with the charged surfaces begins with a stimulation of motility (called electrokinesis), and eventually leads to attachment and growth. One of the things that genomics allows is the comparative analysis of the various Shewanella strains, which led to several important insights. First, while the genomes predicted that none of the strains looked like they should be able to degrade N-acetyl glucosamine (NAG), the monomer that makes up chitin, virtually all of the strains were in fact capable. This led to the discovery of a great many new genes involved with chitin and NAG metabolism (7). In a similar vein, a detailed study of the sugar utilization pathway revealed a major new insight into the regulation of sugar metabolism in this genus (19). Systems Biology and Comparative Genomics of the shewanellae: Several publications were put together describing the use of comparative genomics for analyses of the group Shewanella, and these were a logical culmination of our genomic-driven research (10,15,18). Eight graduate students received their Ph.D. degrees doing part of the work described here, and four postdoctoral fellows were supported. In addition, approximately 20 undergraduates took part in projects during the grant period.

Kenneth H. Nealson

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

208

Promoter Prediction on a Genomic Scale - the Adh Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe our statistical system for promoter recognition in genomic DNA with which we took part in the Genome Annotation Assessment Project (GASP1). We applied two versions of the system; the first uses a region based approach towards transcription start site identification, namely interpolated Markov chains, the second a hybrid approach combining regions and signals within a stochastic segment model. We compare the results of both versions with each other and examine how well the application on a genomic scale compares to the results we previously obtained on smaller data sets.

Uwe Ohler

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Complete genome sequence of Ferroglobus placidus AEDII12DO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ferroglobus placidus belongs to the order Archaeoglobales within the archaeal phylum Euryar- chaeota. Strain AEDII12DO is the type strain of the species and was isolated from a shallow marine hydrothermal system at Vulcano, Italy. It is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic chemoli- thoautotroph, but it can also use a variety of aromatic compounds as electron donors. Here we describe the features of this organism together with the complete genome sequence and anno- tation. The 2,196,266 bp genome with its 2,567 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes was se- quenced as part of a DOE Joint Genome Institute Laboratory Sequencing Program (LSP) project.

Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Risso, Carla [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Holmes, Dawn [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lovley, Derek [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Complete genome sequence of Serratia plymuthica strain AS12  

SciTech Connect

A plant associated member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Serratia plymuthica strain AS12 was isolated from rapeseed roots. It is of scientific interest due to its plant growth promoting and plant pathogen inhibiting ability. The genome of S. plymuthica AS12 comprises a 5,443,009 bp long circular chromosome, which consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome was sequenced within the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010) as part of the project entitled 'Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens'.

Neupane, Saraswoti [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Finlay, Roger D. [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Alstrom, Sadhna [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hogberg, Nils [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus hellenicus P8T  

SciTech Connect

Staphylothermus hellenicus belongs to the order Desulfurococcales within the archaeal phy- lum Crenarchaeota. Strain P8T is the type strain of the species and was isolated from a shal- low hydrothermal vent system at Palaeochori Bay, Milos, Greece. It is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic heterotroph. Here we describe the features of this organism together with the com- plete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,580,347 bp genome with its 1,668 protein- coding and 48 RNA genes was sequenced as part of a DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI) La- boratory Sequencing Program (LSP) project.

Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wirth, Reinhard [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Expansion of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea  

SciTech Connect

To date the vast majority of bacterial and archaeal genomes sequenced are of rather limited phylogenetic diversity as they were chosen based on their physiology and/ or medical importance. The Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project (Wu et al. 2009) is aimed at systematically filling the gaps of the tree of life with phylogenetically diverse reference genomes. However more than 99 percent of microorganisms elude current culturing attempts, severely limiting the ability to recover complete or even partial genomes of these largely mysterious species. These limitations gave rise to the GEBA uncultured project. Here we propose to use single cell genomics to massively expand the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea by targeting 80 single cell representatives of uncultured candidate phyla which have no or very few cultured representatives. Generating these reference genomes of uncultured microbes will dramatically increase the discovery rate of novel protein families and biological functions, shed light on the numerous underrepresented phyla that likely play important roles in the environment, and will assist in improving the reconstruction of the evolutionary history of Bacteria and Archaea. Moreover, these data will improve our ability to interpret metagenomics sequence data from diverse environments, which will be of tremendous value for microbial ecology and evolutionary studies to come.

Rinke, Christian; Sczyrba, Alex; Malfatti, Stephanie; Lee, Janey; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Hallam, Steven; Inskeep, William P.; Hedlund, Brian P.; Sievert, Stefan M.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Tsiamis, George; Hugenholtz, Philip; Woyke, Tanja

2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

213

Expansion of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date the vast majority of bacterial and archaeal genomes sequenced are of rather limited phylogenetic diversity as they were chosen based on their physiology and/ or medical importance. The Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project (Wu et al. 2009) is aimed to systematically filling the gaps of the tree of life with phylogenetically diverse reference genomes. However more than 99percent of microorganisms elude current culturing attempts, severely limiting the ability to recover complete or even partial genomes of these largely mysterious species. These limitations gave rise to the GEBA uncultured project. Here we propose to use single cell genomics to massively expand the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea by targeting 80 single cell representatives of uncultured candidate phyla which have no or very few cultured representatives. Generating these reference genomes of uncultured microbes will dramatically increase the discovery rate of novel protein families and biological functions, shed light on the numerous underrepresented phyla that likely play important roles in the environment, and will assist in improving the reconstruction of the evolutionary history of Bacteria and Archaea. Moreover, these data will improve our ability to interpret metagenomics sequence data from diverse environments, which will be of tremendous value for microbial ecology and evolutionary studies to come.

Rinke, Christian; Sczyrba, Alex; Malfatti, Stephanie; Lee, Janye; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Hallam, Steven; Inskeep, William P.; Hedlund, Brian P.; Sievert, Stefan M.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Tsiamis, George; Hugenholtz, Philip; Woyke, Tanja

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

214

The Trichoplax Genome and the Nature of Placozoans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Placozoans are arguably the simplest free-living animals, possibly evoking an early stage in metazoan evolution, yet their biology is poorly understood. Here we report the sequencing and analysis of the {approx}98 million base pair nuclear genome of the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens. Whole genome phylogenetic analysis suggests that placozoans belong to a 'eumetazoan' clade that includes cnidarians and bilaterians, with sponges as the earliest diverging animals. The compact genome exhibits conserved gene content, gene structure, and synteny relative to the human and other complex eumetazoan genomes. Despite the apparent cellular and organismal simplicity of Trichoplax, its genome encodes a rich array of transcription factor and signaling pathway genes that are typically associated with diverse cell types and developmental processes in eumetazoans, motivating further searches for cryptic cellular complexity and/or as yet unobserved life history stages.

Srivastava, Mansi; Begovic, Emina; Chapman, Jarrod; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Hellsten, Uffe; Kawashima, Takeshi; Kuo, Alan; Mitros, Therese; Salamov, Asaf; Carpenter, Meredith L.; Signorovitch, Ana Y.; Moreno, Maria A.; Kamm, Kai; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Shapiro, Harris; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Buss, Leo W.; Schierwater, Bernd; Dellaporta, Stephen L.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Genome sequencing and analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three subfamilies of grasses, the Ehrhartoideae, Panicoideae and Pooideae, provide the bulk of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), which is, to our knowledge, the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes shows a precise history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grasses, and establishes a template for analysis of the large genomes of economically important pooid grasses such as wheat. The high-quality genome sequence, coupled with ease of cultivation and transformation, small size and rapid life cycle, will help Brachypodium reach its potential as an important model system for developing new energy and food crops.

Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Kalluri, Udaya C [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

FY11 Approved LDRD Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Approved LDRD Projects Approved LDRD Projects 2011 Projects Page 1 LDRD Proj. No. Project Title P.I. Dept./Bldg. Directorate 08-002 Strongly Correlated Systems: From Graphene to Quark-Gluon Plasma Kharzeev, D. & Tsvelik, A. PHYS/CMP NPP/BES 08-028 Genomic DNA Methylation: The Epigenetic Response of Arabidopsis Thaliana Genome to Long-term Elevated Atmospheric Temperature and CO 2 in Global Warming Liu, Q. MED/490 & BIO/463 ELS 09-001 Nanoscale Anode Materials for Lithium Batteries Graetz, J. ES&T/ERD GARS 09-002 Bioconversion of Lignocellulose to Ethanol and Butanol Facilitated by Ionic Liquid Preprocessing Francis, A. J./Wishart, J.F./Dunn, J. ES/Chem./Biol ogy ELS 09-003 Organic Photovoltaics: Nanostructure, Solvent Annealing and Performance Ocko, B. PM/510B BES 09-004 Surface Chemisty and

217

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chart: project timeline - Project Milestones - Budget - Bibliography * Thank you 29 30 Organization Chart * Project team: Purdue University - Dr. Brenda B. Bowen: PI, student...

218

Genomic Science | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) » Genomic Science Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Genomic Science DOE Bioenergy Research Centers Radiochemistry & Imaging Instrumentation Radiobiology: Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Human Subjects Protection Program Structural Biology DOE Joint Genome Institute Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building

219

Evolutionary Genomics of Life in (and from) the Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

web Genomes Online NIH Genome Sequencing Input NIH GenomesAbstract High throughput genome sequencing centers that werefunding sources of genome sequencing in the United States,

Boore, Jeffrey L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Genomics, Gene Expression and Other Studies in Soybean Rust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joint Genome Institute Genomics, Gene Expression and otherRust Martha Lucía Posada-Buitrago Ph.D Genomics DivisionEvolutionary Genomics DOE- Joint Genome Institute Lawrence

Posada-Buitrago, Martha Lucia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Fueling the Future with Fungal Genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. 2008. Fungal genome sequencing and bioenergy. FungalCullen D, et al. 2008. Genome sequencing and analysis of theand lessons learned from genome sequencing. Methods Enzymol.

Grigoriev, Igor V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

DOE Joint Genome Institute 2008 Progress Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Martinez, D. , et al. Genome sequencing and analysis of thegroup, the HudsonAlpha Genome Sequencing Center, will expandnext-genera- tion genome sequencing and add capabilities to

Gilbert, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

DOE JGI Microbial Genomics & Metagenomics Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Joint Genome Institute Microbial Genomics & Metagenomics Workshops Walnut Creek, California The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) will be offering...

224

VISTA - computational tools for comparative genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tools for comparative genomics Kelly A. Frazer 1 , LiorBerkeley, CA, 94720 Genomics Division, Lawrence Berkeleymultiple comparative genomics tools and provides users with

Frazer, Kelly A.; Pachter, Lior; Poliakov, Alexander; Rubin, Edward M.; Dubchak, Inna

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Fueling the Future with Fungal Genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JW. 2010. China's fungal genomics initiative: a whitepaper.and Saccharomycotina. BMC Genomics. 8, 325. Bailly J,Harnessing ectomycorrhizal genomics for ecological insights.

Grigoriev, Igor V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

JGI - Structural Genomics Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structural Genomics Program Structural Genomics Program The structural characterization of proteins of unknown function can be described as structural genomics, an approach in which structure determination by X-ray crystallography supplies key functional information. This is exemplified by studies of the carboxysome. The structures of the first carboxysome shell proteins (Kerfeld et al., Science 2005) confirmed earlier hypotheses that they are indeed the basic building blocks of the carboxysome shell; the quaternary structure and the higher order assemblies of the proteins in the crystals provided insight into how they assemble into shell facets. Likewise, our structure of the carboxysome component CsoS3 revealed that it was a member of the beta-carbonic family, despite having no detectable sequence homology at the level of primary structure

227

USDA and DOE to Coordinate Research of Plant and Microbial Genomics |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Coordinate Research of Plant and Microbial Genomics to Coordinate Research of Plant and Microbial Genomics USDA and DOE to Coordinate Research of Plant and Microbial Genomics January 17, 2006 - 10:39am Addthis -- Soybean DNA to be Decoded -- WASHINGTON - The U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy announced Monday they will share resources and coordinate the study of plant and microbial genomics, and the Department of Energy will tackle the sequencing of the soybean genome as the first project resulting from the agreement. "This agreement demonstrates a joint commitment to support high-quality genomics research and integrated projects to meet the nation's agriculture and energy challenges," said Dr. Colien Hefferan, administrator of USDA's Cooperative State Research, Extension and Economics Service (CSREES), who

228

Microbial Genomics Data from the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

As of March 2008, The Joint Genome Institute has released 296 Prokaryotic microbial sites, with 216 in finished status.

229

Genomic Advances to Improve Biomass for Biofuels (Genomics and Bioenergy)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lawrence Berkeley National Lab bioscientist Daniel Rokhsar discusses genomic advances to improve biomass for biofuels. He presented his talk Feb. 11, 2008 in Berkeley, California as part of Berkeley Lab's community lecture series. Rokhsar works with the U.S. Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and Berkeley Lab's Genomics Division.

Rokhsar, Daniel

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

230

Permanent draft genome sequence of the gliding predator Saprospira grandis strain Sa g1 (= HR1)  

SciTech Connect

Saprospira grandis Gross et al. 1911 is a member of the Saprospiraceae, a family in the class 'Sphingobacteria' that remains poorly characterized at the genomic level. The species is known for preying on other marine bacteria via 'ixotrophy'. S. grandis strain Sa g1 was isolated from decaying crab carapace in France and was selected for genome sequencing because of its isolated location in the tree of life. Only one type strain genome has been published so far from the Saprospiraceae, while the sequence of strain Sa g1 represents the second genome to be published from a non-type strain of S. grandis. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 4,495,250 bp long Improved-High-Quality draft of the genome with its 3,536 protein-coding and 62 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Comparative Analysis of Genome Sequences with VISTA  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

VISTA is a comprehensive suite of programs and databases developed by and hosted at the Genomics Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. They provide information and tools designed to facilitate comparative analysis of genomic sequences. Users have two ways to interact with the suite of applications at the VISTA portal. They can submit their own sequences and alignments for analysis (VISTA servers) or examine pre-computed whole-genome alignments of different species. A key menu option is the Enhancer Browser and Database at http://enhancer.lbl.gov/. The VISTA Enhancer Browser is a central resource for experimentally validated human noncoding fragments with gene enhancer activity as assessed in transgenic mice. Most of these noncoding elements were selected for testing based on their extreme conservation with other vertebrates. The results of this enhancer screen are provided through this publicly available website. The browser also features relevant results by external contributors and a large collection of additional genome-wide conserved noncoding elements which are candidate enhancer sequences. The LBL developers invite external groups to submit computational predictions of developmental enhancers. As of 10/19/2009 the database contains information on 1109 in vivo tested elements - 508 elements with enhancer activity.

Dubchak, Inna

232

FY 2004 funded projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 LDRD PROJECTS 4 LDRD PROJECTS LDRD Proj. Project Title P.I. Dept/Bldg. 02-02 Crystallization and X-ray Analysis of Membrane Proteins D. Fu BIO/463 02-08 Creating a MicroMRI Facility for Research and Development H. Benveniste MED/490 02-09 Targeting Tin-117m to Estrogen Receptors for Breast Cancer Therapy K. Kolsky MED/801 02-22 Electrical Systems Reliability R. Bari ES&T/475B 02-45 Combined Use of Radiotracers and Positron Emission Imaging in Understanding the Integrated Response of Plants to Environmental Stress R. Ferrieri CHEM/901 02-70 Theory of Electronic Transport in Nanostructures and Low-Dimensional Systems A. Tsvelik CMP/510A 02-71 Pressure in Nanopores T. Vogt CMP/510B 02-84a Genomic SELEX to Study Protein DNA/RNA Interactions in Ralstonia metallidurans CH34

233

Life Sciences & Genomics Division Diversity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences & Genomics Diversity imagemap Workforce Diversity Action Plans title Diversity Committee Employment Opportunities Community Outreach Activities htmlempopps.html Read...

234

Communicating Genomics:GTL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Joint Genome Institute User Meeting Sponsored By U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science March 24-26, 2010 Walnut Creek Marriott Walnut Creek, California iii Contents Speaker Presentations ......................................................................................... 1 Poster Presentations........................................................................................... 11 Attendees............................................................................................................. 67 Author Index ...................................................................................................... 75 iv Posters alphabetical by first author. *Presenting author 1 Speaker Presentations Abstracts alphabetical by speaker

235

UV Decontamination of MDA Reagents for Single Cell Genomics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single cell genomics, the amplification and sequencing of genomes from single cells, can provide a glimpse into the genetic make-up and thus life style of the vast majority of uncultured microbial cells, making it an immensely powerful and increasingly popular tool. This is accomplished by use of multiple displacement amplification (MDA), which can generate billions of copies of a single bacterial genome producing microgram-range DNA required for shotgun sequencing. Here, we address a key challenge inherent to this approach and propose a solution for the improved recovery of single cell genomes. While DNA-free reagents for the amplification of a single cell genome are a prerequisite for successful single cell sequencing and analysis, DNA contamination has been detected in various reagents, which poses a considerable challenge. Our study demonstrates the effect of UV irradiation in efficient elimination of exogenous contaminant DNA found in MDA reagents, while maintaining Phi29 activity. Consequently, we also find that increased UV exposure to Phi29 does not adversely affect genome coverage of MDA amplified single cells. While additional challenges in single cell genomics remain to be resolved, the proposed methodology is relatively quick and simple and we believe that its application will be of high value for future single cell sequencing projects.

Lee, Janey; Tighe, Damon; Sczyrba, Alexander; Malmatrom, Rex; Clingenpeel, Scott; Malfatti, Stephanie; Rinke, Christian; Wang, Zhong; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Woyke, Tanja

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

236

JGI - FY2007 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Sequencing for the 7 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program For status information, see the Genome Projects section. For more information about the DOE Office of Science's Microbial Genome Program, see http://microbialgenomics.energy.gov/. For more information about microbial sequencing at JGI, contact David Bruce. Organism(s) Est. Genome Size Acremonium alcalophilum ATCC90507 40 MB Azolla Cyanobacterium, Arthrospira maxima, and Cyanobacterium JSC-1 NA bacterioplankton pool cDNA day, night, night + DOC1, night + DOC2 NA Clostridum carboxidivorans, Clostridium sp. strains, Clostridium straminisolvens, Clostridum thermocellum LQR1 DSM2360 , Clostridium thermocellum JW20 DSM 4150 Thermoanaerobacter italicus Ab9 DSM9252, T. ethanolicus X513, T. ethanoloicus X561, T. mathrani, Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharaolyticum, Thermoanaerobacterium xylanolyticum LX11 DSM7097 3.5-4.0 MB

237

JGI - FY2004 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Sequencing for the 4 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program For status information, see the Genome Projects section. For more information about the DOE Office of Science's Microbial Genome Program, see http://microbialgenomics.energy.gov/. For more information about microbial sequencing at JGI, contact David Bruce. Chlorobia (avg:~2.4Mb) Organism Genome Size Chlorobium ferrooxidans DSM 13031 2.40 Mb Chlorobium limicola DSMZ 245 2.4 Mb Chlorobium phaeobacteroides BS1 2.4 Mb Chlorobium phaeobacteroides DSM 266 2.3 Mb Pelodictyon luteolum DSMZ 273 2.3 Mb Pelodictyon phaeoclathratiforme BU-1 (DSM 5477) 2.4 Mb Prosthecochloris aestuarii DSM 271 2.4 Mb Prosthecochloris vibrioformis DSM 265 2.4 Mb Chlorobaculum parvum n/a Chloroherpeton thalassium n/a Model Syntrophic Consortium

238

JGI - FY2001 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Sequencing for the 1 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program For status information, see the Genome Projects section. For more information about the DOE Office of Science's Microbial Genome Program, see http://microbialgenomics.energy.gov/. For more information about microbial sequencing at JGI, contact David Bruce. Organism Genome Size Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 8 Mb Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl 3 Mb Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 6.8 Mb Cytophaga hutchinsonii ATCC 33406 4.4 Mb Desulfitobacterium halfniense DCB-2 4.7 Mb Enterococcus faecium DO 2.8 Mb Ferroplasma acidarmanus fer1 1.8 Mb Magnetococcus sp. MC-1 4.7 Mb Methanosarcina barkerii fusaro 4.8 Mb Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC 19718 2.8 Mb Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 9.2 Mb Novosphingobium aromaticivorans DSM 12444 4.2 Mb

239

Interactive Data Map from JGI's Microbial Earth Project  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Microbial Earth Project's interactive data map is a graphical representation of the NCBI taxonomy tree for 7623 type strains from DSMZ culture collection. Each leaf represents a type strain. Colors denote stains with or without genome projects (red vs green). Internal nodes (transparent) denote higher taxonomic ranks. Branch lengths are not meaningful. A selection of named taxonomic groups are shown in yellow. Note the highly uneven coverage of the type strain material by genome sequencing projects. For example, groups such as the families Halobacteriaceae and Coriobacteriaceae are well represented by sequencing projects whereas other groups such as the genera Streptomyces and Pseudomonas are largely untouched. The figure was generated by mapping NCBI taxonomic information to DSMZ type strains. Information about genome projects was obtained from the GOLD database. The Guess visualization program was used for rendering with the 'gem' layout. [Copied from http://genome.jgi-psf.org/programs/bacteria-archaea/MEP/index.jsf

240

Genome sequence of the brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution  

SciTech Connect

The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering over 90 percent of the genome. The BN rat sequence is the third complete mammalian genome to be deciphered, and three-way comparisons with the human and mouse genomes resolve details of mammalian evolution. This first comprehensive analysis includes genes and proteins and their relation to human disease, repeated sequences, comparative genome-wide studies of mammalian orthologous chromosomal regions and rearrangement breakpoints, reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and the events leading to existing species, rates of variation, and lineage-specific and lineage-independent evolutionary events such as expansion of gene families, orthology relations and protein evolution.

Gibbs, Richard A.; Weinstock, George M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Sodergren, Erica J.; Scherer, Steven; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Worley, Kim C.; Burch, Paula E.; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Hines, Sandra; Lewis, Lora; DeRamo, Christine; Delgado, Oliver; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Miner, George; Morgan, Margaret; Hawes, Alicia; Gill, Rachel; Holt, Robert A.; Adams, Mark D.; Amanatides, Peter G.; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Barnstead, Mary; Chin, Soo; Evans, Cheryl A.; Ferriera, Steven; Fosler, Carl; Glodek, Anna; Gu, Zhiping; Jennings, Don; Kraft, Cheryl L.; Nguyen, Trixie; Pfannkoch, Cynthia M.; Sitter, Cynthia; Sutton, Granger G.; Venter, J. Craig; Woodage, Trevor; Smith, Douglas; Lee, Hong-Maei; Gustafson, Erik; Cahill, Patrick; Kana, Arnold; Doucette-Stamm, Lynn; Weinstock, Keith; Fechtel, Kim; Weiss, Robert B.; Dunn, Diane M.; Green, Eric D.; Blakesley, Robert W.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhu, Baoli; Marra, Marco; Schein, Jacqueline; Bosdet, Ian; Fjell, Chris; Jones, Steven; Krzywinski, Martin; Mathewson, Carrie; Siddiqui, Asim; Wye, Natasja; McPherson, John; Zhao, Shaying; Fraser, Claire M.; Shetty, Jyoti; Shatsman, Sofiya; Geer, Keita; Chen, Yixin; Abramzon, Sofyia; Nierman, William C.; Havlak, Paul H.; Chen, Rui; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Ren, Yanru; Song, Xing-Zhi; Li, Bingshan; Liu, Yue; Qin, Xiang; Cawley, Simon; Cooney, A.J.; D'Souza, Lisa M.; Martin, Kirt; Wu, Jia Qian; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Jackson, Andrew R.; Kalafus, Kenneth J.; McLeod, Michael P.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Virk, Davinder; Volkov, Andrei; Wheeler, David A.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Eichler, Evan E.; Tuzun, Eray; Birney, Ewan; Mongin, Emmanuel; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Woodwark, Cara; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Bork, Peer; Suyama, Mikita; Torrents, David; Alexandersson, Marina; Trask, Barbara J.; Young, Janet M.; et al.

2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Project Accounts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» Project Accounts » Project Accounts Project Accounts Overview Project accounts are designed to facilitate collaborative computing by allowing multiple users to use the same account. All actions performed by the project account are traceable back to the individual who used the project account to perform those actions via gsisshd accounting logs. Requesting a Project Account PI's, PI proxies and project managers are allowed to request a project account. In NIM do "Actions->Request a Project Account" and fill in the form. Select the repository that the Project Account is to use from the drop-down menu, "Sponsoring Repository". Enter the name you want for the account (8 characters maximum) and a description of what you will use the account for and then click on the "Request Project Account" button. You

242

New culturing tool reveals a full genome from single cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New culturing tool reveals New culturing tool reveals New culturing tool reveals a full genome from single cells A new technique for genetic analysis, "gel microdroplets," helps scientists generate complete genomes from a single cell. March 15, 2013 Two GMD containing gut-community microcolonies are shown, with green fluorescence marking the DNA. Two GMD containing gut-community microcolonies are shown, with green fluorescence marking the DNA. Photo credit A. Dichosa, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email We have demonstrated a novel approach for fully sequencing genomes of microorganisms found in complex communities. Gel microdroplet culturing reveals intraspecies genomic diversity within the human microbiome LOS ALAMOS, N. M., March 15, 2013-A new technique for genetic analysis,

243

Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeatedDNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity  

SciTech Connect

Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in euchromatin. Remarkably, human euchromatin and fly heterochromatin share similar features; such as repeated DNA content, intron lengths and open reading frame sizes. Human cells likely stabilize their DNA content via mechanisms and factors similar to those in Drosophila heterochromatin. Furthermore, my thesis work raises implications for H3K9me and chromatin functions in complex-DNA genome stability, repeated DNA homogenization by molecular drive, and in genome reorganization through evolution.

Peng, Jamy C.

2007-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

244

Projects | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Conferences Supporting Organizations Supercomputing and Computation Home | Science & Discovery | Supercomputing and Computation | Projects Projects 1-10 of 180 Results Prev...

245

Project 244  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROJECT PARTNER Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. Pittsburgh, PA PROJECT PARTNERS Ohio University Athens, OH Texas A&M University-Kingsville Kingsville, TX WEBSITES http:...

246

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the program * Project overall objectives * Technical status * Project summary * Conclusions and future plans 3 Benefit...

247

2012 U.S. Department of Energy: Joint Genome Institute: Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) is to serve the diverse scientific community as a user facility, enabling the application of large-scale genomics and analysis of plants, microbes, and communities of microbes to address the DOE mission goals in bioenergy and the environment. The DOE JGI's sequencing efforts fall under the Eukaryote Super Program, which includes the Plant and Fungal Genomics Programs; and the Prokaryote Super Program, which includes the Microbial Genomics and Metagenomics Programs. In 2012, several projects made news for their contributions to energy and environment research.

Gilbert, David [DOE JGI Public Affairs Manager] [DOE JGI Public Affairs Manager

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Complete genome sequence of Halopiger xanaduensis type strain (SH6T)  

SciTech Connect

Halopiger xanaduensis is the type species of the genus Halopiger and belongs to the euryarchaeal family Halobacteriaceae. H. xanaduensis strain SH-6, which is designated as the type strain, was isolated from the sediment of a salt lake in Inner Mongolia, Lake Shangmatala. Like other members of the family Halobacteriaceae, it is an extreme halophile requiring at least 2.5 M salt for growth. We report here the sequencing and annotation of the 4,355,268 bp genome, which includes one chromosome and three plasmids. This genome is part of a Joint Genome Institute (JGI) Community Sequencing Program (CSP) project to sequence diverse haloarchaeal genomes.

Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Genome sequence of the Antarctic rhodopsins- containing flavobacterium Gillisia limnaea type strain (R- 8282T)  

SciTech Connect

Gillisia limnaea Van Trappen et al. 2004 is the type species of the genus Gillisia, which is a mem- ber of the well characterized family Flavobacteriaceae. The genome of G. limnea R-8282T is the first sequenced genome (permanent draft) from a type strain of the genus Gillisia. Here we de- scribe the features of this organism, together with the permanent-draft genome sequence and an- notation. The 3,966,857 bp long chromosome (two scaffolds) with its 3,569 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Riedel, Thomas [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Complete genome sequence of the facultatively anaerobic, appendaged bacterium Muricauda ruestringensis type strain (B1T)  

SciTech Connect

Muricauda ruestringensis Bruns et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus Muricauda, which belongs to the family Flavobacteriaceae in the phylum Bacteroidetes. The species is of interest because of its isolated position in the genomically unexplored genus Muricauda, which is located in a part of the tree of life containing not many organisms with sequenced genomes. The genome, which consists of a circular chromosome of 3,842,422 bp length with a total of 3,478 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes, is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Mitochondrial genome sequences and comparative genomics of Phytophthora ramorum and P. sojae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sequences and comparative genomics of Phytophthora ramorumAnnotation and comparative genomics - Annotation of codingtools for comparative genomics. Nuc Acids Res July 1:32:

Martin, Frank N.; Douda, Bensasson; Tyler, Brett M.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Coral Reef Genomics: Developing tools for functional genomics of coral symbiosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coral Reef Genomics: Developing toolsfor functional genomics of coral symbiosis Jodi SCHWARZ 1 ,symbiosis functional genomics cDNA microarray ABSTRACT

Schwarz, Jodi; Brokstein, Peter; Manohar, Chitra; Coffroth, Mary Alice; Szmant, Alina; Medina, Monica

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Brown Tide Culprit Sequenced: Genome...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Culprit Sequenced: Genome of the First of Algal Bloom Species WALNUT CREEK, Calif.- Algae play key roles in the global carbon cycle, helping sequester significant amounts of...

254

Inference of tumor phylogenies from genomic assays on heterogeneous samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivation: Tumorigenesis can in principle result from many combinations of mutations, but only a few roughly equivalent sequences of mutations, or "progression pathways", seem to account for most human tumors. There is hope that by cataloguing ... Keywords: array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), cancer, phylogenetics, tumor heterogeneity, tumor progression pathway, unmixing

Ayshwarya Subramanian; Stanley Shackney; Russell Schwartz

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Saltcreek Project Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Summary Project Summary HELP Index Summary Scenario References Student Pages Subject/Content Area: Environmental Science Target Audience: Middle school level - all students, including gifted, learning-disabled, behavior-disordered and limited English proficient Project Goals: As a result of their participation in the Salt Creek Investigation, the students will develop the abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry. They will increase their understanding of factors affecting environmental quality, including the interdependence of organisms, and human-induced hazards. Students will learn how science and technology can help people solve local, national and global environmental problems. Learner Outcomes: Students will: be able to carry out six types of stream monitoring tests.

256

DOE Joint Genome Institute | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Joint Genome Institute DOE Joint Genome Institute Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Genomic Science DOE Bioenergy Research Centers Radiochemistry & Imaging Instrumentation Radiobiology: Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Human Subjects Protection Program Structural Biology DOE Joint Genome Institute Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301)

257

Genomics Presentations from DOE JGI's Fourth Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting, 2009  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

•\tMedicago trunculata Resequencing of 384 lines, Joann Mudge •\tPerformance Comparison of Two Genome Partitioning Platforms, Jon Armstrong •\tPrescreening Illumina Data Results in High-Quality Genome Polishing, Cliff Han •\tGenePRIMP: Improving Microbial Gene Prediction Quality, Amrita Pati •\tIMG Systems for Comparative Analysis of Microbial Genomes and Metagenomes, Victor Markowitz •\tAutomated Microbial Genome Annotation, Miriam Land •\tNew Technology Drafts: Production and Improvements, Alla Lapidus •\tHuman Microbiome Finishing, Jessica Hostetler

258

ECRbase: Database of Evolutionary Conserved Regions, Promoters, and Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Vertebrate Genomes  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Evolutionary conservation of DNA sequences provides a tool for the identification of functional elements in genomes. This database of evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) in vertebrate genomes features a database of syntenic blocks that recapitulate the evolution of rearrangements in vertebrates and a comprehensive collection of promoters in all vertebrate genomes generated using multiple sources of gene annotation. The database also contains a collection of annotated transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in evolutionary conserved and promoter elements. ECRbase currently includes human, rhesus macaque, dog, opossum, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, and fugu genomes. (taken from paper in Journal: Bioinformatics, November 7, 2006, pp. 122-124

Loots, Gabriela G. (LLNL); Ovcharenko, I. (LLNL)

259

A study of the necessary and optimal conditions for success in the most challenging human endeavors : modem day Manhattan Projects are needed for overcoming contemporary global challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is possible to categorize four contemporary challenges as the greatest threats to global well-being and the persistence of humankind. These challenges are global climate and ecological change, poor human health management, ...

Chowdhury, Anando A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Computational methods and analyses in comparative genomics and epigenomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

promise of comparative genomics in mammals. Science, 286,homology relationships. Genomics, Dehal, P. and Boore, J.to plant comparative genomics. Genome Research, 13(5), 999–

Peng, Qian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Salt Stress in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough: An integrated genomics approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002. Integrating cancer genomics and proteomics in theWeb site for comparative genomics. Genome Res 15:1015-22.Hildenborough: An integrated genomics approach. Aindrila

Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Single Cell Whole Genome Amplification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single Cell Whole Genome Amplification Single Cell Whole Genome Amplification of Uncultivated Organisms Mircea Podar , Martin Keller , and Philip Hugenholtz (* ü ) Abstract Whole genome amplification of single cells is emerging as a powerful technique for accessing the genomes of individual members of microbial communi- ties without the complication of identifying the source of sequence data posed by shotgun sequencing of environmental samples (metagenomics). This method holds particular promise for the molecular unveiling of uncultivated organisms that com- prise the bulk of the microbial diversity and functionality on our planet. 1 Introduction Over the last two decades, it has become increasingly apparent that microbial diversity

263

ORNL Genome Analysis Pipeline - Eukaryotic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grail (Microbial Gene Prediction System Internet Link) GrailEXP Genome Analysis Pipeline DomainParser PROSPECT (PROtein Structure Prediction and Evaluation Computer...

264

genome109280 634..641  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(http: www.phytozome.net), Selaginella moellendorffii (http:www. phytozome.net), Sorghum bicolor (http:genome.jgi-psf.org Sorbi1), Vitis vinifera (http:...

265

Population genomics: Whole-genome analysis of polymorphism and divergence in Drosophila simulans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLoS BIOLOGY Population Genomics: Whole-Genome Analysis ofwww.plosbiology.org Population Genomics of D. simulans Table11 | e310 Population Genomics of D. simulans Table S15. GO

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

JGI Visiting Scientist Program The DOE Joint Genome Institute Visiting Scientist Program (VSP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visiting Scientist Program Visiting Scientist Program The DOE Joint Genome Institute Visiting Scientist Program (VSP) provides an opportunity for researchers who are seeking to build upon their line of scientific inquiry by leveraging JGI experimental, computational, and personnel resources for genomic research and sequence-based science. Projects include de novo generation of genome data, assistance in interpreting and/or building on an existing data set, or the refining of new technology (e.g., single-cell genomics; metagenomics, etc.). Length of stay depends on complexity of the project being considered and availability of data and other resources. Investigators, post docs, and graduate students participating in approved JGI User Projects are also invited to apply for on-site access to JGI

267

Algorithms for Gene Clustering Analysis on Genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increased availability of data in biological databases provides many opportunities for understanding biological processes through these data. As recent attention has shifted from sequence analysis to higher-level analysis of genes across multiple genomes, there is a need to develop efficient algorithms for these large-scale applications that can help us understand the functions of genes. The overall objective of my research was to develop improved methods which can automatically assign groups of functionally related genes in large-scale data sets by applying new gene clustering algorithms. Proposed gene clustering algorithms that can help us understand gene function and genome evolution include new algorithms for protein family classification, a window-based strategy for gene clustering on chromosomes, and an exhaustive strategy that allows all clusters of small size to be enumerated. I investigate the problems of gene clustering in multiple genomes, and define gene clustering problems using mathematical methodology and solve the problems by developing efficient and effective algorithms. For protein family classification, I developed two supervised classification algorithms that can assign proteins to existing protein families in public databases and, by taking into account similarities between the unclassified proteins, allows for progressive construction of new families from proteins that cannot be assigned. This approach is useful for rapid assignment of protein sequences from genome sequencing projects to protein families. A comparative analysis of the method to other previously developed methods shows that the algorithm has a higher accuracy rate and lower mis-classification rate when compared to algorithms that are based on the use of multiple sequence alignments and hidden Markov models. The proposed algorithm performs well even on families with very few proteins and on families with low sequence similarity. Apart from the analysis of individual sequences, identifying genomic regions that descended from a common ancestor helps us study gene function and genome evolution. In distantly related genomes, clusters of homologous gene pairs serve as evidence used in function prediction, operon detection, etc. Thus, reliable identification of gene clusters is critical to functional annotation and analysis of genes. I developed an efficient gene clustering algorithm that can be applied on hundreds of genomes at the same time. This approach allows for large-scale study of evolutionary relationships of gene clusters and study of operon formation and destruction. By placing a stricter limit on the maximum cluster size, I developed another algorithm that uses a different formulation based on constraining the overall size of a cluster and statistical estimates that allow direct comparisons of clusters of different size. A comparative analysis of proposed algorithms shows that more biological insight can be obtained by analyzing gene clusters across hundreds of genomes, which can help us understand operon occurrences, gene orientations and gene rearrangements.

Yi, Gang Man

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Induction of Genomic Instability In Vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs gamma rays  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project is to determine if low doses (below or equal to the level traditionally requiring human radiation protection, i.e. less than or equal to 10 cGy) of low LET radiation can induce genomic instability. The magnitude of genomic instability was measured as delayed chromosome instability in bone marrow cells of exposed mice with different levels of endogenous DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) activity, i.e. high (C57BL/6J mice), intermediate (BALB/cJ mice), and extremely low (Scid mice). In addition, at early time points (1 and 4 hrs) following irradiation, levels of activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), a transcription factor known to be involved in regulating the expression of genes responsible for cell protection following stimuli, were measured in these cells. Bone marrow cells were collected at different times following irradiation, i.e. 1 hr, 4 hrs, 1 month, and 6 months. A total of five mice per dose per strain were sacrificed at each time point for sample collection. As a result, a total of 80 mice from each strain were used. The frequency and the type of metaphase chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells collected from exposed mice at different times following irradiation were used as markers for radiation-induced genomic instability. A three-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol for mouse chromosomes 1, 2, and 3 was used for the analysis of delayed stable chromosomal aberrations in metaphase cells. All other visible chromatid-type aberrations and gross structural abnormalities involving non-painted chromosomes were also evaluated on the same metaphase cells used for scoring the stable chromosomal aberrations of painted chromosomes. Levels of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation were also determined in cells at 1 and 4 hrs following irradiation (indicative of early responses).

Rithidech, Kanokporn; Simon, Sanford, R.; Whorton, Elbert, B.

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

269

Genome Majority Vote (GMV), Version 0.x  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genome Majority Vote (GMV), Version 0.x Genome Majority Vote (GMV), Version 0.x The pipeline runs PRODIGAL gene predictions on all genomes, runs pan-reciprocal BLAST, and...

270

One Bacterial Cell, One Complete Genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bader JS, et al. (2005) Genome sequencing in microfabricatedDR (2006) Whole-genome re-sequencing. Curr Opin Genet DevSingle cell MDA and genome sequencing The yellow portion of

Woyke, Tanja

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Rearrangement Phylogeny of Genomes in Contig Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been a trend in increasing phylogenetic coverage for genome sequencing while decreasing the sequencing coverage for each genome. With lower coverage, there is an increasing number of genomes being published in contig form. Rearrangement algorithms, ...

Adriana Muñoz; David Sankoff

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Tissue sampling and standards for vertebrate genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and standards for vertebrate genomics. GigaScience 2012 1:8.transition to conservation genomics. TIG 2010, 26:177–187.Siemens DH: Ecological genomics––changing perspectives on

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

PLATCOM: a platform for computational comparative genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The exponential accumulation of genomic sequence data demands systematic analysis of genetic information and requires use of various computational approaches to handle such huge sets of genomic data. Comparative genomics,

Kwangmin Choi; Jeong-hyeon Choi; Amit Saple; Zhiping Wang; Jason Lee; Sun Kim

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Genome Halving by Block Interchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We address the problem of finding the minimal number of block interchanges (exchange of two intervals) required to transform a duplicated linear genome into a tandem duplicated linear genome. We provide a formula for the distance as well as a polynomial time algorithm for the sorting problem.

Thomas, Antoine; Varré, Jean-Stéphane

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Science Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne Argonne Science Project Ideas! Our Science Project section provides you with sample classroom projects and experiments, online aids for learning about science, as well as ideas for Science Fair Projects. Please select any project below to continue. Also, if you have an idea for a great project or experiment that we could share, please click our Ideas page. We would love to hear from you! Science Fair Ideas Science Fair Ideas! The best ideas for science projects are learning about and investigating something in science that interests you. NEWTON has a list of Science Fair linkd that can help you find the right topic. Toothpick Bridge Web Sites Toothpick Bridge Sites! Building a toothpick bridge is a great class project for physics and engineering students. Here are some sites that we recommend to get you started!

276

Draft Genome Sequence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Draft Draft Genome Sequence of Serratia sp. Strain ATCC 39006, a Model Bacterium for Analysis of the Biosynthesis and Regulation of Prodigiosin, a Carbapenem, and Gas Vesicles Peter C. Fineran, a Marina C. Iglesias Cans, a Joshua P. Ramsay, b Nabil M. Wilf, b Desiree Cossyleon, a Matthew B. McNeil, a Neil R. Williamson, b Rita E. Monson, b S. Anette Becher, c Jo-Ann L. Stanton, d Kim Brügger, e Steven D. Brown, f George P. C. Salmond b Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand a ; Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom b ; AgResearch Ltd., Invermay Agricultural Centre, Mosgiel, New Zealand c ; Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand d ; EASIH, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom e ; Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge,

277

Yeast Ancestral Genome Reconstructions - CECM - Simon Fraser ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on eukaryotic nuclear genomes are based on parsimony (some statistical methods have been used on mitochondrial or bacterial genomes, see Darling et al.

278

BMC Genomics BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article What can you do with 0.1 × genome coverage? A case study based on a genome survey of the scuttle fly Megaselia scalaris (Phoridae)

David A Rasmussen; Mohamed Af Noor

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

JGI - Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow in Genomics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow in Genomics The Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) in Walnut Creek, CA is soliciting Postdoctoral Fellows working in the...

280

EMP: Earth Microbiome Project | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EMP: Earth Microbiome Project EMP: Earth Microbiome Project EMP: Earth Microbiome Project The Earth Microbiome Project is a proposed massively multidisciplinary effort to analyze microbial communities across the globe. The general premise is to examine microbial communities from their own perspective. We propose to characterize the Earth by environmental parameter space into different biomes and then explore these using samples currently available from researchers across the globe. We will analyze 200,000 samples from these communities using metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and amplicon sequencing to produce a global Gene Atlas describing protein space, environmental metabolic models for each biome, approximately 500,000 reconstructed microbial genomes, a global metabolic model, and a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Projects Power Projects Contact SN Customers Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > About SNR Power Projects Central Valley: In California's Central Valley, 18 dams create reservoirs that can store 13 million acre-feet of water. The project's 615 miles of canals irrigate an area 400 miles long and 45 miles wide--almost one third of California. Powerplants at the dams have an installed capacity of 2,099 megawatts and provide enough energy for 650,000 people. Transmission lines total about 865 circuit-miles. Washoe: This project in west-central Nevada and east-central California was designed to improve the regulation of runoff from the Truckee and Carson river systems and to provide supplemental irrigation water and drainage, as well as water for municipal, industrial and fishery use. The project's Stampede Powerplant has a maximum capacity of 4 MW.

282

THE CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS GENOME PROJECT Sean R. Eddy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, PLASMA (ACTIN­DEPOL... C02C2.3 458 350 20.3% ACHG�RAT ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR PROTEIN, GAMMA C... C02C2

Eddy, Sean

283

JGI - Green Alga Genome Project Catalogs Carbon Capture Machinery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

opportunities for improving efficiencies for this conversion process and ultimately biofuels production. "Chlamy's code helps us describe the ancient ancestor of plants and...

284

Genome Project Standards in a New Era of Sequencing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA  Center for Microbial Ecology, Michigan State University,  East 

Hostetler, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Complete genome sequence of Pyrolobus fumarii type strain (1AT)  

SciTech Connect

Pyrolobus fumarii Bl chl et al. 1997 is the type species of the genus Pyrolobus, which be- longs to the crenarchaeal family Pyrodictiaceae. The species is a facultatively microaerophilic non-motile crenarchaeon. It is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the tree of life and because it is a hyperthermophilic chemolithoautotroph known as the primary producer of organic matter at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. P. fumarii exhibits currently the highest optimal growth temperature of all life forms on earth (106 C). This is the first com- pleted genome sequence of a member of the genus Pyrolobus to be published and only the second genome sequence from a member of the family Pyrodictiaceae. Although Diversa Corporation announced the completion of sequencing of the P. fumarii genome on Septem- ber 25, 2001, this sequence was never released to the public. The 1,843,267 bp long genome with its 1,986 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Huber, Harald [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Yasawong, Montri [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Abt, Birte [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Wirth, Reinhard [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Spikemoss Genome Offers New Paths...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2011 Spikemoss Genome Offers New Paths for Biofuels Research--Bridges Plant Development Gap WALNUT CREEK, Calif.- It's not quite Christmas, but the DNA sequence of a small plant...

287

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the program * Project overall objectives * Technical status * Project summary * Conclusions and future plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * This research project develops a reservoir scale CO 2 plume migration model at the Sleipner project, Norway. The Sleipner project in the Norwegian North Sea is the world's first commercial scale geological carbon storage project. 4D seismic data have delineated the CO 2 plume migration history. The relatively long history and high fidelity data make

288

DOE Joint Genome Institute: DOE JGI Announces 2011 Community Sequencing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 4, 2010 October 4, 2010 Bigger is Better: DOE JGI Announces 2011 Community Sequencing Program Portfolio The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) has selected 35 new genomic sequencing projects for its 2011 Community Sequencing Program (CSP)-a targeted sampling of the planet's biodiversity-to be characterized for bioenergy and environmental applications. A sample of CSP 2011 projects *[see photo credits below] Supported by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the DOE Office of Science, the DOE JGI's Community Sequencing Program enables scientists from universities and national laboratories around the world to probe the hidden world of microbes and plants for innovative solutions to the nation's major challenges in energy, climate, and environment. This

289

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and Evaluation of Test and Evaluation of Engineered Biomineralization Technology for Sealing Existing wells Project Number: FE0009599 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Motivation & Benefit to the Program (required) * Benefit to the Program and Project Overview (required) * Background information - Project Concept (MICP) - Ureolytic Biomineralization, Biomineralization Sealing * Accomplishments to Date - Site Characterization - Site Preparation - Experimentation and Modeling - Field Deployable Injection Strategy Development * Summary

290

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL's Consolidated Sequestration Research Program (CSRP) Project Number FWP ESD09-056 Barry Freifeld Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits and Goals of GEO-SEQ * Technical Status - Otway Project (CO2CRC) - In Salah (BP, Sonatrach and Statoil) - Ketzin Project (GFZ, Potsdam) - Aquistore (PTRC) * Accomplishments and Summary * Future Plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed: - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage capacity estimation - Develop and validate technologies to ensure 99 percent storage permanence.

291

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-23, 2012 1-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline I. Benefits II. Project Overview III. Technical Status A. Background B. Results IV. Accomplishments V. Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals. - Prediction of CO 2 storage capacity. * Project benefits. - Workforce/Student Training: Support of 3 student GAs in use of multiphase flow and geochemical models simulating CO 2 injection. - Support of Missouri DGLS Sequestration Program. 4 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Project Goals and Objectives. 1. Training graduate students in use of multi-phase flow models related to CO 2 sequestration. 2. Training graduate students in use of geochemical models to assess interaction of CO

292

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Coal's Center for Coal's FY10 Carbon Sequestration Peer Review February 8 - 12, 2010 2 Collaborators * Tissa Illangasekare (Colorado School of Mines) * Michael Plampin (Colorado School of Mines) * Jeri Sullivan (LANL) * Shaoping Chu (LANL) * Jacob Bauman (LANL) * Mark Porter (LANL) 3 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Project technical status * Accomplishments to date * Future Plans * Appendix 4 Benefit to the program * Program goals being addressed (2011 TPP): - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * Project benefit: - This project is developing system modeling capabilities that can be used to address challenges associated with infrastructure development, integration, permanence &

293

Project 364  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

765-494-5623 lucht@purdue.edu DEVELOPMENT OF NEW OPTICAL SENSORS FOR MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY CONCENTRATIONS, SPECIATION, AND CHEMISTRY Project Description The feasibility of...

294

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and Evaluation of Engineered Biomineralization Technology for Sealing Existing wells Project Number: FE0009599 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State...

295

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of CO 2 Injection on the Subsurface Microbial Community in an Illinois Basin CCS Reservoir: Integrated Student Training in Geoscience and Geomicrobiology Project Number...

296

Project 197  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will bring economic value to both the industrial customers and to the participating companies. * Complete project by June 2006. Accomplishments A ceramic membrane and seal...

297

Project 283  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NJ 07039 973-535 2328 ArchieRobertson@fwc.com Sequestration ADVANCED CO 2 CYCLE POWER GENERATION Background This project will develop a conceptual power plant design...

298

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for...

299

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Concrete products in this project * Standard 8" concrete blocks * Standard 4' x 8' fiber-cement boards CO 2 The Goals * Maximizing carbon uptake by carbonation (at least...

300

Project 252  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stanford Global Climate Energy Project Terralog Technologies TransAlta University of Alaska Fairbanks Washington State Department of Natural Resources Western Interstate...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research partnership to improve the understanding of CO 2 within coal and shale reservoirs. 2 2 3 Presentation Outline * Program Goal and Benefits Statement * Project...

302

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mechanistic insights 5 Project Overview: Scope of work * Task 1 - Pipeline and Casing Steel Corrosion Studies * Evaluate corrosion behavior of pipeline steels in CO 2 mixtures...

303

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20-22, 2013 2 Acknowledgements * NETL * Shell * Tri-State * Trapper Mining * State of Colorado 3 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Project Program Goals * Technical...

304

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Evaluating Potential Groundwater Impacts and Natural Geochemical...

305

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction * Organization * Benefit to Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date...

306

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* This project pinpoints the critical catalyst features necessary to promote carbon dioxide conversion to acrylate, validate the chemical catalysis approach, and develop an...

307

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale CO 2 Injection and Optimization of Storage Capacity in the Southeastern United States Project Number: DE-FE0010554 George J. Koperna, Jr. Shawna Cyphers Advanced Resources...

308

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CCUS Pittsburgh,...

309

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interdisciplinary Investigation of the CO 2 Sequestration in Depleted Shale Gas Formations Project Number DE-FE-0004731 Jennifer Wilcox, Tony Kovscek, Mark Zoback Stanford...

310

Genome sequence of the homoacetogenic bacterium Holophaga foetida type strain (TMBS4T)  

SciTech Connect

Holophaga foetida Liesack et al. 1994 is a member to the genomically so far poorly characterized family Holophagaceae in the class Holophagae within the phylum Acidibacteria. H. foetida is of interest for its ability to anaerobically degrade aromatic compounds and for its production of volatile sulfur compounds through a unique pathway. The genome of H. foetida strain TMBS4T is the first sequenced genome of a member of the class Holophagae. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence (improved high quality draft), and annotation. The 4,127,237 bp long chromosome with its 3,615 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Complete genome sequence of Catenulispora acidiphila type strain (ID 139908T)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catenulispora acidiphila Busti et al. 2006 is the type species of the genus Catenulispora, and is of interest because of the rather isolated phylogenetic location of the genomically little studied suborder Catenulisporineae within the order Actinomycetales. C. acidiphilia is known for its acidophilic, aerobic lifestyle, but can also grow scantly under anaerobic conditions. Under regular conditions C. acidiphilia grows in long filaments of relatively short aerial hyphae with marked septation. It is a free living, non motile, Gram-positive bacterium isolated from a forest soil sample taken from a wooded area in Gerenzano, Italy. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the actinobacterial family Catenulisporaceae, and the 10,467,782 bp long single replicon genome with its 9056 protein-coding and 69 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Rio, Tijana GlavinaDel; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Ali, Zahid; Tindall, Brian J.; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

312

Information entropy based methods for genome comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A plethora of biologically useful information lies obscured in the genomes of organisms. Encoded within the genome of an organism is the information about its evolutionary history. Evolutionary signals are scattered throughout the genome. Bioinformatics ... Keywords: clustering, genome comparison, segmentation, sequence alignment, shannon entropy

Mehul Jani; Rajeev K. Azad

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

DOE Joint Genome Institute 2008 Progress Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biofuel production. Diatom Genome Helps Explain Their Success in Capturing Carbon Diatoms, mighty microscopic algae,

Gilbert, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Genomic Aspects of Research Involving Polyploid Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Almost all extant plant species have spontaneously doubled their genomes at least once in their evolutionary histories, resulting in polyploidy which provided a rich genomic resource for evolutionary processes. Moreover, superior polyploid clones have been created during the process of crop domestication. Polyploid plants generated by evolutionary processes and/or crop domestication have been the intentional or serendipitous focus of research dealing with the dynamics and consequences of genome evolution. One of the new trends in genomics research is to create synthetic polyploid plants which provide materials for studying the initial genomic changes/responses immediately after polyploid formation. Polyploid plants are also used in functional genomics research to study gene expression in a complex genomic background. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in genomics research involving ancient, young, and synthetic polyploid plants, with a focus on genome size evolution, genomics diversity, genomic rearrangement, genetic and epigenetic changes in duplicated genes, gene discovery, and comparative genomics. Implications on plant sciences including evolution, functional genomics, and plant breeding are presented. It is anticipated that polyploids will be a regular subject of genomics research in the foreseeable future as the rapid advances in DNA sequencing technology create unprecedented opportunities for discovering and monitoring genomic and transcriptomic changes in polyploid plants. The fast accumulation of knowledge on polyploid formation, maintenance, and divergence at whole-genome and subgenome levels will not only help plant biologists understand how plants have evolved and diversified, but also assist plant breeders in designing new strategies for crop improvement.

Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Synthetic Genomics: Options for Governance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gene and genome synthesis, that is, constructing long stretches of DNA from constituent chemicals, provides scientists with new and unparalleled capabilities both for understanding biology and for using it for beneficial ...

Garfinkel, Michele

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

316

Annotation-based genome-wide SNP discovery in the large and complex Aegilops tauschii genome using next-generation sequencing without a reference genome sequence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and physical maps, genome sequencing, marker-assistedof scaffolds during genome sequencing. To use RJs in SNPallows for deep genome coverage sequencing, a prerequisite

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Complete genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic mineral-sulfide-oxidizing firmicute Sulfobacillus acidophilus type strain (NALT)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sulfobacillus acidophilus Norris et al. 1996 is a member of the genus Sulfobacillus which comprises five species of the order Clostridiales. Sulfobacillus species are of interest for comparison to other sulfur and iron oxidizers and also have biomining applications. This is the first completed genome sequence of a type strain of the genus Sulfobacillus, and the second published genome of a member of the species S. acidophilus. The genome, which consists of one chromosome and one plasmid with a total size of 3,557,831 bp, harbors 3,626 protein-coding and 69 RNA genes, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Pukall, Rudiger [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

doi:10.1093/nar/gki931 Farm animal genomics and informatics: an update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Farm animal genomics is of interest to a wide audience of researchers because of the utility derived from understanding how genomics and proteomics function in various organisms. Applications such as xenotransplantation, increased livestock productivity, bioengineering new materials, products and even fabrics are several reasons for thriving farm animal genome activity. Currently mined in rapidly growing data warehouses, completed genomes of chicken, fish and cows are available but are largely stored in decentralized data repositories. In this paper, we provide an informatics primer on farm animal bioinformatics and genome project resources which drive attention to the most recent advances in the field. We hope to provide individuals in biotechnology and in the farming industry with information on resources and updates concerning farm animal genome projects. PRELUDE The omics and bioinformatics Genomics is the scientific study of structure, function and interrelationships of both individual genes and the genome in its entirety (1). The field has evolved from identifying short nucleotide strings of DNA to the sequencing of an organism’s complete genome. Current progress in genomics research has facilitated comprehensive mapping of the building blocks of biology (2). Ultimately, researchers hope to gain mastery over the fundamental description of cellular function at the DNA level (3). This would encompass gene regulation, in which proteins often regulate their own production or that of other proteins in a complex web of interactions. Databases can be developed to provide solutions to problems that people encounter when dealing with massive amounts of data. However, the abundance and growing complexity of the data tools and resources required for analysis are overwhelming

Ahmed Fadiel; Ifeanyi Anidi; Kenneth D. Eichenbaum

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Complete genome sequence of the plant-associated Serratia plymuthica strain AS13  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Serratia plymuthica AS13 is a plant-associated Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from rapeseed roots. It is of special interest because of its ability to inhibit fungal pathogens of rapeseed and to promote plant growth. The complete genome of S. plymuthica AS13 consists of a 5,442,549 bp circular chromosome. The chromosome contains 4,951 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome was sequenced as part of the project enti- tled Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens within the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010).

Neupane, Saraswoti [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Finlay, Roger D. [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Alstrom, Sadhna [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Hogberg, Nils [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snøhvit CO Snøhvit CO 2 Storage Project Project Number: FWP-FEW0174 Task 4 Principal Investigators: L. Chiaramonte, *J.A. White Team Members: Y. Hao, J. Wagoner, S. Walsh Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Benefit to Program * Project Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Summary & Accomplishments * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * The research project is focused on mechanical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

InSalah CO InSalah CO 2 Storage Project Project Number: FWP-FEW0174 Task 2 Principal Investigator: W. McNab Team Members: L. Chiaramonte, S. Ezzedine, W. Foxall, Y. Hao, A. Ramirez, *J.A. White Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Benefit to Program * Project Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * The research project is combining sophisticated

322

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Space Geodesy, Seismology, Space Geodesy, Seismology, and Geochemistry for Monitoring Verification and Accounting of CO 2 in Sequestration Sites DE-FE0001580 Tim Dixon, University of South Florida Peter Swart, University of Miami U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to program * Goals & objectives * Preliminary InSAR results (site selection phase) * Project location * Project installed equipment * Specific project results * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Focused on monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) * If successful, our project will demonstrate the utility of low cost, surface

323

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 DE-FE0001159 Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO 2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations Gary Mavko Rock Physics Project/Stanford University 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Motivating technical challenge * Approach * Technical Status - Laboratory results - Theoretical modeling * Summary Mavko: Stanford University 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99% of injected CO 2 remains in injection zones. * Project benefits statement.

324

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Volume Injection of CO Large Volume Injection of CO 2 to Assess Commercial Scale Geological Sequestration in Saline Formations in the Big Sky Region Project Number: DE-FC26-05NT42587 Dr. Lee Spangler Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Goals and Objectives * Project overview * Kevin Dome characteristics * Project design philosophy * Infrastructure * Modeling * Monitoring * Project Opportunities 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

325

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Research on Probabilistic and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical (HTM) Modeling of CO 2 Geological Sequestration (GS) in Fractured Porous Rocks Project DE-FE0002058 Marte Gutierrez, Ph.D. Colorado School of Mines U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program (Program goals addressed and Project benefits) * Project goals and objectives * Technical status - Project tasks * Technical status - Key findings * Lessons learned * Summary - Accomplishments to date 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries'

326

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complexity and Choice of Complexity and Choice of Model Approaches for Practical Simulations of CO 2 Injection, Migration, Leakage, and Long- term Fate Karl W. Bandilla Princeton University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Project Number DE-FE0009563 2 Presentation Outline * Project Goals and Objectives * Project overview * Accomplishments * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * The aim of the project is to develop criteria for the selection of the appropriate level of model complexity for CO 2 sequestration modeling at a given site. This will increase the confidence in modeling results, and reduce computational cost when appropriate.

327

JGI - The GEBA Pilot Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEBA Sequencing Plans GEBA Sequencing Plans For status information, see the Genome Projects section, or go to Microbial Genomics to find the latest releases. Organism Domain Phylum Status IMG-ER NCBI PID Culture ID GOLD ID Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans DSM 10331 Bacteria Actinobacteria draft DSM 10331 Gi02326 Actinosynnema mirum 101, DSM 43827 Bacteria Actinobacteria draft 2500395345 19705 DSM 43827 Gi02064 Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius acidocaldarius 104-IA, DSM 446 Bacteria Firmicutes draft 29405 DSM 446 Gi02324 Anaerococcus prevotii PC 1, DSM 20548 Bacteria Firmicutes draft DSM 20548 Gi02318 Atopobium parvulum IPP 1246, DSM 20469 Bacteria Actinobacteria draft 29401 DSM 20469 Gi02317 Beutenbergia cavernosa HKI 0122, DSM 12333 Bacteria Actinobacteria draft 2500395322 20827 DSM 12333 Gi02225

328

ECRbase: Database of Evolutionary Conserved Regions, Promoters, and Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Vertebrate Genomes  

SciTech Connect

Evolutionary conservation of DNA sequences provides a tool for the identification of functional elements in genomes. We have created a database of evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) in vertebrate genomes entitled ECRbase that is constructed from a collection of pairwise vertebrate genome alignments produced by the ECR Browser database. ECRbase features a database of syntenic blocks that recapitulate the evolution of rearrangements in vertebrates and a collection of promoters in all vertebrate genomes presented in the database. The database also contains a collection of annotated transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in all ECRs and promoter elements. ECRbase currently includes human, rhesus macaque, dog, opossum, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, and two pufferfish genomes. It is freely accessible at http://ECRbase.dcode.org.

Loots, G; Ovcharenko, I

2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

329

HLW System Integrated Project Team  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

l l W S Hi h l W S High Level Waste System High Level Waste System Integrated Project Team Integrated Project Team Integrated Project Team Integrated Project Team Steve Schneider Steve Schneider Office of Engineering and Technology High Level Waste Corporate Board March 5, 2009 This document is intended for planning and analysis purposes, assuming a continuing constrained budget environment. Every effort will be made to comply with all applicable environmental and legal obligations, while also assuring that essential functions necessary to protect human health, the environment and national security are maintained. 1 Introduction Introduction Introduction Introduction Challenges and Priorities High Level Waste Strategic Initiative Results High Level Waste System Integrated

330

Implications of structural genomics target selection strategies: Pfam5000, whole genome, and random approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SK, Bonanno JB. Structural genomics. Methods Biochem AnalMizuguchi K. Structural genomics: an overview. Prog BiophysSE. A tour of structural genomics. Nat Rev Genet 2001;2(10):

Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Western LNG project - Project summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western LNG Project is a major new undertaking involving the liquefaction of conventional natural gas from the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin at a plant on the British Columbia north coast. The gas in its liquid form will be shipped to Japan for consumption by utility companies. The Project represents a new era in gas processing and marketing for the Canadian natural gas industry.

Forgues, E.L.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Evolutionarily conserved sequences on human chromosome 21  

SciTech Connect

Comparison of human sequences with the DNA of other mammals is an excellent means of identifying functional elements in the human genome. Here we describe the utility of high-density oligonucleotide arrays as a rapid approach for comparing human sequences with the DNA of multiple species whose sequences are not presently available. High-density arrays representing approximately 22.5 Mb of nonrepetitive human chromosome 21 sequence were synthesized and then hybridized with mouse and dog DNA to identify sequences conserved between humans and mice (human-mouse elements) and between humans and dogs (human-dog elements). Our data show that sequence comparison of multiple species provides a powerful empiric method for identifying actively conserved elements in the human genome. A large fraction of these evolutionarily conserved elements are present in regions on chromosome 21 that do not encode known genes.

Frazer, Kelly A.; Sheehan, John B.; Stokowski, Renee P.; Chen, Xiyin; Hosseini, Roya; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Fodor, Stephen P.A.; Cox, David R.; Patil, Nila

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Cluster analysis of genome-wide expression differences in disease-unaffected ileal mucosa in inflammatory bowel diseases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whole human genome (Agilent) expression profiling was conducted on disease-unaffected ileal RNA collected from the proximal margin of resected ileum from 47 ileal Crohn's disease (CD), 27 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 25 control patients without inflammatory ...

Tianyi Zhang; Robert A. DeSimone; Hongyan Chen; Christina M. Hamm; Jeffrey Yuan; Qing Qing Gong; Steven R. Hunt; Themistocles Dassopoulos; Rodney D. Newberry; Daniel N. Frank; Charles E. Robertson; Norman R. Pace; Erica Sodergren; George Weinstock; Xiangmin Jiao; Wei Zhu; Ellen Li

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS: CCS: Life Cycle Water Consumption for Carbon Capture and Storage Project Number 49607 Christopher Harto Argonne National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage efficiency while ensuring containment effectiveness. * Project benefits statement. - This work supports the development of active reservoir management approaches by identifying cost effective and environmentally benign strategies for managing extracted brines (Tasks 1 + 2). - This work will help identify water related constraints

335

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leakage Mitigation Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies Project Number: FE0004478 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation & Benefit to the Program (required) * Benefit to the Program and Project Overview (required) * Background Information * Accomplishments to Date - Injection strategy development (control and prediction) - Large core tests - ambient pressure - Large core tests - high pressure - Small core tests - high pressure - MCDP, permeability and porosity assessments * Progress Assessment and Summary

336

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Leakage Mitigation CO2 Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies Project Number FE0004478 Lee H Spangler, Al Cunningham, Robin Gerlach Energy Research Institute Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation * Background information * Large core tests - ambient pressure * Large core tests - high pressure 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. Project benefits statement. The Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies

337

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS CCS Project Number 49607 Christopher Harto Argonne National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Increased control of reservoir pressure, reduced risk of CO2 migration, and expanded formation storage capacity. * Project benefits statement. - This work supports the development of active reservoir management approaches by identifying cost effective and environmentally benign strategies for managing extracted brines (Tasks 1 + 2). - This work will help identify water related constraints on CCS deployment and provide insight into

338

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Multiphase of Multiphase Flow for Improved Injectivity and Trapping 4000.4.641.251.002 Dustin Crandall, URS PI: Grant Bromhal, NETL ORD Morgantown, West Virginia U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Breakdown of FY12 project tasks * Facilities and personnel * Task progress to date * Planned task successes * Tech transfer and summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

339

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Resources International, Inc. Advanced Resources International, Inc. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Project benefits statement: - This research seeks to develop a set of robust mathematical modules to predict how coal and shale permeability and

340

2013 Global Carbon Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Global Carbon Project 2013 Global Carbon Project DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2013_V1.1 image 2013 Budget v1.1 (November 2013) image 2013 Budget v1.3 (December 2013, contains typographical corrections to 2011 Australia emissions from v1.1 and corrections to the 2011 Australia transfer and consumption emissions from v1.2) image image image image Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions to Reach 36 Billion Tonnes in 2013 Global emissions of carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels will reach 36 billion tonnes for the year 2013. "This is a level unprecedented in human history," says CSIRO's Dr Pep Canadell, Executive-Director of the Global Carbon Project (GCP) and co-author of a new report. Global emissions due to fossil fuel alone are set to grow this year at a slightly lower pace of 2.1% than the average 3.1% since 2000, reaching 36

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Unraveling the Threads: Simplest cotton genome  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 19, 2012 December 19, 2012 Unraveling the Threads: Simplest cotton genome offers clues for fiber improvements From the stockings decorating mantles to the new outfits in display windows calling to shoppers, cotton is woven into the fabric of the holiday season. For bioenergy researchers, however, fiber composition matters more than color and texture as each cotton strand is composed of more than two dozen coils of cellulose, a target biomass for next-generation biofuels. In the December 20, 2012 edition of Nature, an international consortium of researchers from 31 institutions including a team from the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) present a high-quality draft assembly of the simplest cotton (Gossypium raimondii) genome. Additionally,

342

DOE Joint Genome Institute Completes Soybean Genome- Data Released to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Press Release: December 8, 2008 Press Release: December 8, 2008 DOE Joint Genome Institute Completes Soybean Genome- Data Released to Advance Biofuel, Food, & Feed Research WALNUT CREEK, CA- The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) has released a complete draft assembly of the soybean (Glycine max) genetic code, making it widely available to the research community to advance new breeding strategies for one of the world's most valuable plant commodities. Soybean not only accounts for 70 percent of the world's edible protein, but also is an emerging feedstock for biodiesel production. Soybean is second only to corn as an agricultural commodity and is the leading U.S. agricultural export. DOE JGI's interest in sequencing the soybean centers on its use for biodiesel, a renewable, alternative fuel with the highest energy content of

343

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Soybean Genome Analysis Reveals Pathways for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 13, 2010 January 13, 2010 Soybean Genome Analysis Reveals Pathways for Improving Biodiesel, Disease Resistance, and Reducing Waste Runoff WALNUT CREEK, CA-Soybean, one of the most important global sources of protein and oil, is now the first legume species with a published complete draft genome sequence. The sequence and its analysis appear in the January 14 edition of the journal Nature. The research team comprised 18 institutions, including the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS), Purdue University and the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. The DOE, National Science Foundation, USDA and United Soybean Board supported the research. helix made of soybeans

344

DOE Joint Genome Institute: New Genomic Model Defines Microbes by  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 8, 2009 September 8, 2009 New Genomic Model Defines Microbes by Diet-Provides Tool for Tracking Environmental Change WALNUT CREEK, CA-In line with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) interest in characterizing the biotic factors involved in global carbon cycling, the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI) characterizes a diverse array of plants, microorganisms, and the communities in which they reside to inform options for reducing and stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gases. Through a novel genomic approach detailed in the September 7 online edition and on the cover September 14 of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, an international team of scientists led by the University of New South Wales and the DOE JGI demonstrates how the microbial diversity of the oceans can be analyzed without necessarily

345

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

behavior of shales as behavior of shales as seals and storage reservoirs for CO2 Project Number: Car Stor_FY131415 Daniel J. Soeder USDOE/NETL/ORD U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Program Goals - Support industry's ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage efficiency while ensuring containment effectiveness * Project Objectives - Assess how shales behave as caprocks in contact with CO 2 under a variety of conditions - Assess the viability of depleted gas shales to serve as storage reservoirs for sequestered CO

346

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 leakage and cap rock remediation DE-FE0001132 Runar Nygaard Missouri University of Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Technical status * Accomplishments to date * Summary 2 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * Project benefits statement. - The project develops a coupled reservoir and geomechanical modeling approach to simulate cap rock leakage and simulate the success of remediation

347

LUCF Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RZWR'HVLJQDQG RZWR'HVLJQDQG +RZWR'HVLJQDQG ,PSOHPHQW&DUERQ ,PSOHPHQW&DUERQ 0HDVXULQJDQG0RQLWRULQJ 0HDVXULQJDQG0RQLWRULQJ $.WLYLWLHVIRU/8&) $.WLYLWLHVIRU/8&) 3URMH.WV 3URMH.WV Sandra Brown Winrock International sbrown@winrock.org Winrock International 2 3URMH.WGHVLJQLVVXHV 3URMH.WGHVLJQLVVXHV z Baselines and additionality z Leakage z Permanence z Measuring and monitoring z Issues vary with projects in developed versus developing countries Winrock International 3 /HDNDJH /HDNDJH z Leakage is the unanticipated loss or gain in carbon benefits outside of the project's boundary as a result of the project activities-divide into two types: - Primary leakage or activity shifting outside project area - Secondary leakage or market effects due to

348

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web-based CO Web-based CO 2 Subsurface Modeling Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Project Number DE-FE0002069 Christopher Paolini San Diego State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Project benefits and goals. * Web interface for simulating water-rock interaction. * Development of, and experience teaching, a new Carbon Capture and Sequestration course at San Diego State University. * Some noteworthy results of student research and training in CCS oriented geochemistry. * Status of active student geochemical and geomechancal modeling projects.

349

Project Title:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Repair flowline 61-66-SX-3 Repair flowline 61-66-SX-3 DOE Code: Project Lead: Wes Riesland NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY # 291 Project Information Date: 3/1 1/2010 Contractor Code: Project Overview In order to repair this line it was decided to trench a line aproximately 100 feet and tie it into the line at 71-3- 1. What are the environmental sx-3. This will get us out of the old flow line which has been repaired 5-6 times. this will mitigate the chances impacts? of having spills in the future. 2. What is the legal location? This flowline runs from the well77-s-1 0 to the B-2-10 manifold.+ "/-,~?X3 3. What is the duration of the project? Approximately 10 hours(1 day) to complete 4. What major equipment will be used backhoe and operator and one hand if any (work over rig. drilling rig.

350

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Co-Sequestration Co-Sequestration Studies Project Number 58159 Task 2 B. Peter McGrail Pacific Northwest National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Program Focus Area and DOE Connections * Goals and Objectives * Scope of Work * Technical Discussion * Accomplishments to Date * Project Wrap-up * Appendix (Organization Chart, Gantt Chart, and Bibliography 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed: - Technology development to predict CO 2 and mixed gas storage capacity in various geologic settings - Demonstrate fate of injected mixed gases * Project benefits statement:

351

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Complexity in Geological Carbon Model Complexity in Geological Carbon Sequestration: A Design of Experiment (DoE) & Response Surface (RS) Uncertainty Analysis Project Number: DE-FE-0009238 Mingkan Zhang 1 , Ye Zhang 1 , Peter Lichtner 2 1. Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 2. OFM Research, Inc., Santa Fe, New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Project major goals and benefits; * Detailed project objectives & success criteria; * Accomplishments to date; * Summary of results; * Appendix (organization chart; Gantt chart; additional results). Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, University of Wyoming

352

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Region Region DE-FE0001812 Brian J. McPherson University of Utah U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Acknowledgements * NETL * Shell * Tri-State * Trapper Mining * State of Colorado 3 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Project / Program Goals * Technical Status: Finalizing 10-Point Protocol for CO 2 Storage Site Characterization * Key Accomplishments * Summary 4 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Project / Program Goals * Technical Status: Finalizing 10-Point Protocol for CO 2 Storage Site Characterization * Key Accomplishments * Summary 5 Benefit to the Program Program Goals Being Addressed by this Project

353

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of CO 2 Exposed Wells to Predict Long Term Leakage through the Development of an Integrated Neural- Genetic Algorithm Project DE FE0009284 Boyun Guo, Ph.D. University of...

354

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Carbonsheds" as a Framework for Optimizing US CCS Pipeline Transport on a Regional to National Scale DOE-ARRA Project Number DE-FE0001943 Lincoln Pratson Nicholas School of the...

355

Project 134  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Goal To demonstrate a "whole plant" approach using by-products from a coal-fired power plant to sequester carbon in an easily quantifiable and verifiable form. Objectives...

356

MANHATTAN PROJECT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy traces its origins to World War II and  the Manhattan Project effort to build the first atomic bomb. As the direct descendent of the Manhattan Engineer District, the...

357

Project 265  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The goal of this project is to develop an on-line instrument using multi- wavelength lasers that is capable of characterizing particulate matter (PM) generated in fossil energy...

358

Project 310  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbohydrate generated from agricultural enterprises in the U.S., such as corn wet-milling. This project is studying the production of a suite of specialty chemicals by...

359

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G., 2011, Design and package of a 14CO2 field analyzer: the Global Monitor Platform (GMP). Proceedings of SPIE, v 8156, p. 81560E 17 DOE-NETL PROJECT REVIEW MEETING 08-21-2012...

360

Project 114  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prototech Company SRI International Kellogg, Brown, and Root ChevronTexaco Sd-Chemie, Inc. COST Total Project Value 20,320,372 DOENon-DOE Share 15,326,608 4,993,764...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23,...

362

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23,...

363

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUMNER SUMNER COUNTY, KANSAS Project Number DE-FE0006821 W. Lynn Watney Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Fountainview Wednesday 8-21-12 1:10-1:35 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary Small Scale Field Test Wellington Field Regional Assessment of deep saline Arbuckle aquifer Acknowledgements & Disclaimer Acknowledgements * The work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Grant DE-FE0002056 and DE- FE0006821, W.L. Watney and Jason Rush, Joint PIs. Project is managed and

364

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0-22, 2013 0-22, 2013 Collaborators Zhengrong Wang, Yale University Kevin Johnson, University of Hawaii 2 Presentation Outline * Program Focus Area and DOE Connections * Goals and Objectives * Scope of Work * Technical Discussion * Accomplishments to Date * Project Wrap-up * Appendix (Organization Chart, Gantt Chart, and Bibliography 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed: - Technology development to predict CO 2 storage capacity - Demonstrate fate of injected CO 2 and most common contaminants * Project benefits statement: This research project conducts modeling, laboratory studies, and pilot-scale research aimed at developing new technologies and new systems for utilization of basalt formations for long term subsurface storage of CO 2 . Findings from this project

365

Project 297  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of this project is to utilize pure oxygen at a feed rate of less than 10% of the stoichiometric requirement in demonstrating the use of oxygen-enhanced combustion in meeting...

366

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Project Number DE-FE0009562 John Stormont, Mahmoud Reda Taha University of New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D...

367

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical (HTM) Modeling of CO 2 Geological Sequestration (GS) in Fractured Porous Rocks Project DE-FE0002058 Marte Gutierrez, Ph.D....

368

Genomics.energy.gov--genome programs of the U.S. Department of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in environmental-waste cleanup, energy production, carbon cycling, and biotechnology. Genomics Image Gallery Visit this site for free downloadable, high-resolution, genomics...

369

A framework for human microbiome research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of microbial communities and their genes (the microbiome) exist throughout the human body, with fundamental roles in human health and disease. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Human Microbiome Project ...

Friedman, Jonathan

370

Genomic Sequencing of Single Microbial Cells from Environmental Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as function of the genome sequencing effort. AdditionalYJ, Chen Z, et al. : Genome sequencing in microfabricatedof whole genome amplification and sequencing. Mechanical

Ishoey, Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Incorporating Genomics and Bioinformatics across the Life Sciences Curriculum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page Incorporating Genomics and Bioinformatics across the2007) Discovering Genomics, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics,2003) Public access for teaching genomics, proteomics, and

Ditty, Jayna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Genomes containing Duplicates are Hard to compare ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and other genomic markers are common in genomes, due to several evolutionary . mechanisms, like gene duplication or whole genomes duplications [San01].

373

Dissection of Plant Defense Mechanisms Using Chemical and Molecular Genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of auxins by a chemical genomics approach." Journal ofadvances in chemical genomics." Current Medicinal Chemistrymolecular and chemical genomics." Phytopathology 97(7): S58-

Rodriguez-Salus, Melinda Sue

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Validation in Genomics: CpG Island Methylation Revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis. In: Functional Genomics: Methods and Protocols, M.Segal: Validation in Genomics: CpG Island Methylationpackage and applications to genomics. Bioinformatics and

Segal, Mark R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Comparative genomics and evolution of eukaryotic phospholipid biosynthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. Banfi and B. Franco, Genomics 55 (1999) 68-77. F. Simmer,Comparative genomics and evolution of eukaryoticwork utilizes comparative genomics and phylogenetics for

Lykidis, Athanasios

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Comparative genomics reveals diversity among xanthomonads infecting tomato and pepper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potnis et al. : Comparative genomics reveals diversity amongtomato and pepper. BMC Genomics Submit your next manuscriptpv. syringae Potnis et al. BMC Genomics 2011, 12:146 http://

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

TOPSAN: a collaborative annotation environment for structural genomics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environment for structural genomics Dana Weekes 1† , S Srihigh-throughput structural genomics centers, despite theirbeing determined by structural genomics centers and high-

Weekes, Dana; Krishna, S; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Wilson, Ian A; Godzik, Adam; Wooley, John

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Application of Statistical Methods to Integrative Analysis of Genomic Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in functional genomics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3throughput technologies in genomics and proteomics promotesElizabeth A. Winzeler. “Genomics, gene expression and DNA

Kim, Kyung Pil

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

A Genome-Wide Analysis of FRT-Like Sequences in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient and precise genome manipulations can be achieved by the Flp/FRT system of site-specific DNA recombination. Applications of this system are limited, however, to cases when target sites for Flp recombinase, FRT sites, are preintroduced into a genome locale of interest. To expand use of the Flp/FRT system in genome engineering, variants of Flp recombinase can be evolved to recognize pre-existing genomic sequences that resemble FRT and thus can serve as recombination sites. To understand the distribution and sequence properties of genomic FRT-like sites, we performed a genome-wide analysis of FRT-like sites in the human genome using the experimentally-derived parameters. Out of 642,151 identified FRT-like sequences, 581,157 sequences were unique and 12,452 sequences had at least one exact duplicate. Duplicated FRT-like sequences are located mostly within LINE1, but also within LTRs of endogenous retroviruses, Alu repeats and other repetitive DNA sequences. The unique FRT-like sequences were classified based on the number of matches to FRT within the first four proximal bases pairs of the Flp binding elements of FRT and the nature of mismatched base pairs in the same region. The data obtained will be useful for the emerging field of genome engineering.

Human Genome; Jeffry L. Shultz; Eugenia Voziyanova; Jay H. Konieczka; Yuri Voziyanov

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

D.: Genome halving with an outgroup  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Some genomes are known to have incurred a genome doubling (tetraploidization) event in their evo lutionary history, and this is reflected today in patterns of duplicated segments scattered throughout their chromosomes. These duplications may be used as data to “halve ” the genome, i.e. to reconstruct the an cestral genome at the moment of tetraploidization, but the solution is often highly non- unique. To resolve this problem, we adapt the genome halving algorithm of El-Mabrouk and Sankoff to take account of an external reference genome. We apply this to reconstruct the tetraploid ancestor of maize, using either rice or sorghum as the reference.

Chunfang Zheng; Qian Zhu; David Sankoff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Complete genome sequence Methanothermus fervidus type strain (V24ST)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methanothermus fervidus Stetter 1982 is the type strain of the genus Methanothermus. This hyperthermophilic genus is of a thought to be endemic in Icelandic hot springs. M. fervidus was not only the first characterized organism with a maximal growth temperature (97 C) close to the boiling point of water, but also the first archaeon in which a detailed functional analysis of its histone protein was reported and the first one in which the function of 2,3-cyclodiphosphoglycerate in thermoadaptation was characterized. Strain V24ST is of interest because of its very low substrate ranges, it grows only on H2 + CO2. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Methanothermaceae. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,243,342 bp long genome with its 1,311 protein-coding and 50 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Djao, Olivier Duplex [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Misra, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Eichinger, Konrad [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Huber, Harald [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Wirth, Reinhard [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Reconstruction of a Bacterial Genome from DNA Cassettes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This basic research program comprised two major areas: (1) acquisition and analysis of marine microbial metagenomic data and development of genomic analysis tools for broad, external community use; (2) development of a minimal bacterial genome. Our Marine Metagenomic Diversity effort generated and analyzed shotgun sequencing data from microbial communities sampled from over 250 sites around the world. About 40% of the 26 Gbp of sequence data has been made publicly available to date with a complete release anticipated in six months. Our results and those mining the deposited data have revealed a vast diversity of genes coding for critical metabolic processes whose phylogenetic and geographic distributions will enable a deeper understanding of carbon and nutrient cycling, microbial ecology, and rapid rate evolutionary processes such as horizontal gene transfer by viruses and plasmids. A global assembly of the generated dataset resulted in a massive set (5Gbp) of genome fragments that provide context to the majority of the generated data that originated from uncultivated organisms. Our Synthetic Biology team has made significant progress towards the goal of synthesizing a minimal mycoplasma genome that will have all of the machinery for independent life. This project, once completed, will provide fundamentally new knowledge about requirements for microbial life and help to lay a basic research foundation for developing microbiological approaches to bioenergy.

Christopher Dupont; John Glass; Laura Sheahan; Shibu Yooseph; Lisa Zeigler Allen; Mathangi Thiagarajan; Andrew Allen; Robert Friedman; J. Craig Venter

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Complete genome sequence of Actinosynnema mirum type strain (101T)  

SciTech Connect

Actinosynnema mirum Hasegawa et al. 1978 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its central phylogenetic location in the Actino-synnemataceae, a rapidly growing family within the actinobacterial suborder Pseudo-nocardineae. A. mirum is characterized by its motile spores borne on synnemata and as a producer of nocardicin antibiotics. It is capable of growing aerobically and under a moderate CO2 atmosphere. The strain is a Gram-positive, aerial and substrate mycelium producing bacterium, originally isolated from a grass blade collected from the Raritan River, New Jersey. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Actinosynnemataceae, and only the second sequence from the actinobacterial suborder Pseudonocardineae. The 8,248,144 bp long single replicon genome with its 7100 protein-coding and 77 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Chen, Feng; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick; Tindall, Brian; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

384

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Geological CO Monitoring Geological CO 2 Sequestration using Perfluorocarbon and Stable Isotope Tracers Project Number FEAA-045 Tommy J. Phelps and David R. Cole* Oak Ridge National Laboratory Phone: 865-574-7290 email: phelpstj@ornl.gov (*The Ohio State University) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 22, 2013 2 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Goal: Develop methods to interrogate subsurface for improved CO 2 sequestration, field test characterization and MVA, demonstrate CO 2 remains in zone, and tech transfer. Objectives: 1. Assessment of injections in field. PFT gas tracers are analyzed by GC-ECD to

385

Project Homepage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle School Home Energy Audit Middle School Home Energy Audit Project Homepage NTEP Home - Project Homepage - Teacher Homepage - Student Pages Abstract: This set of lessons provides an opportunity for midlevel students to gain a basic understanding of how energy is turned into power, how power is measured using a meter, the costs of those units and the eventual reduction of energy consumption and cost to the consumer. Introduction to Research: By conducting energy audits of their own homes and completing exercises to gain baclground information, students begin to see the importance of energy in their daily lives. By using the Internet as a research tool, students gain develop research skills as they gain knowledge for their project. They use e-mail to collaborate with energy experts and share results with other

386

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Title: DEVELOPING A Title: DEVELOPING A COMPREHENSIVE RISK ASSESMENT FRAMEWORK FOR GEOLOGICAL STORAGE OF CO2 Ian Duncan University of Texas U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline 1. Benefit to the Program 2. Goals and Objectives 3. Technical Status Project 4. Accomplishments to Date 5. Summary 3 Benefit to the Program The research project is developing a comprehensive understanding of the programmatic (business), and technical risks associated with CCS particularly the likelihood of leakage and its potential consequences. This contributes to the Carbon Storage Program's effort of ensuring 99 percent CO

387

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Acknowledgments Dave Harris, Kentucky Geological Survey Dave Barnes, Western Michigan University John Rupp, Indiana Geological Survey Scott Marsteller, Schlumberger Carbon Services John McBride, Brigham Young University * Project is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and by a cost share agreement with the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, Office of Coal Development through the Illinois Clean Coal Institute * ConocoPhillips: in-kind match * Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation: matching funding * SeisRes 2020, Houston: VSP acquisition and processing

388

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Analyze Spatial and Temporal to Analyze Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneities in Reservoir and Seal Petrology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry: Implications for CO 2 Sequestration Prediction, Simulation, and Monitoring Project Number DE-FE0001852 Dr. Brenda B. Bowen Purdue University (now at the University of Utah) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction to the project * Tasks * Student training * Student research successes * Lessons learned and future plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Addresses Carbon Storage Program major goals: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

389

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of the CO Investigation of the CO 2 Sequestration in Depleted Shale Gas Formations Project Number DE-FE-0004731 Jennifer Wilcox, Tony Kovscek, Mark Zoback Stanford University, School of Earth Sciences U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Project Benefits * Technical Status * Imaging at mm- to micron-scales using CT - Permeability measurements and application of the Klinkenberg effect - Molecular Dynamics simulations for permeability and viscosity estimates * Accomplishments to Date * Summary Stanford University 3 Benefit to the Program * Carbon Storage Program major goals

390

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fidelity Computational Analysis of Fidelity Computational Analysis of CO2 Trappings at Pore-scales Project Number: DE-FE0002407 Vinod Kumar (vkumar@utep.edu) & Paul Delgado (pmdelgado2@utep.edu) University of Texas at El Paso U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Collaborators: Dr. C. Harris (Shell Oil Company/Imperial College), Dr. G. Bromhal (NETL), Dr. M. Ferer (WVU/NETL), Dr. D. Crandall (NETL-Ctr), and Dr. D. McIntyre (NETL). 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - Pore-network modeling - Conductance derivation for irregular geom. - Pore-to-CFD Computations

391

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Number (DE-FE0002056) W. Lynn Watney & Jason Rush (Joint PIs) Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY Bittersweet Energy Inc. Partners FE0002056 Devilbiss Coring Service Basic Energy Services Wellington Field Operator Industrial and Electrical Power Sources of CO 2 Southwest Kansas CO 2 -EOR Initiative Industry Partners (modeling 4 Chester/Morrowan oil fields to make CO2 ready) +drilling and seismic contractors TBN

392

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Number (DE-FE0002056) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 W. Lynn Watney & Jason Rush (Joint PIs) Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 Brighton 1&2 2:40 August 20, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE Modeling CO 2 Sequestration in Saline A quifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate Regional CO 2 Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau A quifer System, South-Central Kansas Co-Principal Investigators Co-Principal Investigators Kerry D. Newell -- stratigraphy, geochemistry

393

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracer for Tracking Permanent CO 2 Storage in Basaltic Rocks DE-FE0004847 Jennifer Hall Columbia University in the City of New York U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Conservative and Reactive Tracer Techniques * Accomplishments to Date * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * The goal of the project is to develop and test novel geochemical tracer techniques for quantitative monitoring, verification and accounting of stored CO 2 . These techniques contribute to the Carbon Storage Program's

394

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Geotechnical Site and Geotechnical Site Investigations for the Design of a CO 2 Rich Flue Gas Direct Injection Facility Project Number DOE Grant FE0001833 Paul Metz Department of Mining & Geological Engineering University of Alaska Fairbanks U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix: Not Included in Presentation 3 Benefit to the Program * Carbon Storage Program Major Goals: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to

395

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale CO Scale CO 2 Injection and Optimization of Storage Capacity in the Southeastern United States Project Number: DE-FE0010554 George J. Koperna, Jr. Shawna Cyphers Advanced Resources International U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Program Goals * Benefits Statement * Project Overview - Goals - Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix USDOE/NETL Program Goals * Support industry's ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop and validate technologies to ensure 99 percent storage permanence. * Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage

396

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUMNER COUNTY, KANSAS DE-FE0006821 W. Lynn Watney, Jason Rush, Joint PIs Kansas Geological Survey The University of Kansas Lawrence, KS U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Brighton 1&2 Wednesday 8-21-13 1:10-1:35 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary 2 Small Scale Field Test Wellington Field Regional Assessment of deep saline Arbuckle aquifer Project Team DOE-NETL Contract #FE0006821 KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 3 L. Watney (Joint PI), J. Rush (Joint PI), J. Doveton, E. Holubnyak, M. Fazelalavi, R. Miller, D. Newell, J. Raney

397

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seal Repair Using Seal Repair Using Nanocomposite Materials Project Number DE-FE0009562 John Stormont, Mahmoud Reda Taha University of New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Ed Matteo, Thomas Dewers Sandia National Laboratories 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction and overview * Materials synthesis * Materials testing and characterization * Annular seal system testing * Numerical simulation * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * BENEFITS STATEMENT: The project involves the development and testing of polymer-cement nanocomposites for repairing flaws in annular wellbore seals. These materials will have superior characteristics compared to conventional

398

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming: MVA Techniques for Determining Gas Transport and Caprock Integrity Project Number DE-FE0002112 PIs Drs. John Kaszuba and Kenneth Sims Virginia Marcon University of Wyoming U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - Results - Conclusions - Next Steps * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. - Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA). MVA technologies seek to monitor, verify, and

399

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of CO Impact of CO 2 Injection on the Subsurface Microbial Community in an Illinois Basin CCS Reservoir: Integrated Student Training in Geoscience and Geomicrobiology Project Number (DEFE0002421) Dr. Yiran Dong Drs. Bruce W. Fouke, Robert A. Sanford, Stephen Marshak University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Technical status * Results and discussion * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program This research project has developed scientific, technical and institutional collaborations for the development of

400

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mohammad Piri and Felipe Pereira Mohammad Piri and Felipe Pereira University of Wyoming U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status o Experimentation: core-flooding and IFT/CA o Pore-scale modeling modeling * Accomplishments to Date * Summary University of Wyoming 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal: o 'Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent.' * Benefits statement: o The research project is focused on performing reservoir conditions experiments to measure steady-state relative permeabilities,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MVA Tools MVA Tools Sam Clegg, Kristy Nowak-Lovato, Ron Martinez, Julianna Fessenden, Thom Rahn, & Lianjie Huang Los Alamos National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview - Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix - Organization Chart - Bibliography 3 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Surface MVA - Frequency Modulated Spectroscopy - Quantitatively identify CO2, H2S and CH4 seepage from geologic sequestration sites - Distinguish anthropogenic CO2 from natural CO2 emissions * CO2 carbon stable isotope measurements

402

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Results from Simulation Project Results from Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO 2 Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of Midwest United States DOE Award No. DE-FE0001034 Ohio Dept. of Dev. Grant CDO/D-10-03 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting August 21-23, 2012 Joel Sminchak and Neeraj Gupta Battelle Energy Systems sminchak@battelle.org, 614-424-7392 gupta@battelle.org, 614-424-3820 BUSINESS SENSITIVE 2 Presentation Outline 1. Technical Status 2. Background (CO 2 Sources, Geologic Setting) 3. Injection Well history 4. Geocellular Model Development 5. Geological Data (Geological dataset, Geostatistics) 6. Geocellular porosity/permeability model development 7. Pipeline Routing Analysis

403

Research projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yuan » Research projects Yuan » Research projects Research projects Research Interests Scientific computing, domain decomposition methods Linear solvers for sparse matrices Computational plasma physics Grid generation techniques GPU computing Current Research PDSLin: A hybrid linear solver for large-scale highly-indefinite linear systems The Parallel Domain decomposition Schur complement based Linear solver (PDSLin), which implements a hybrid (direct and iterative) linear solver based on a non-overlapping domain decomposition technique called chur complement method, and it has two levels of parallelism: a) to solve independent subdomains in parallel and b) to apply multiple processors per subdomain. In such a framework, load imbalance and excessive communication lead to the performance bottlenecks, and several techniques are developed

404

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SECARB Anthropogenic Test: SECARB Anthropogenic Test: CO 2 Capture/Transportation/Storage Project # DE-FC26-05NT42590 Jerry Hill, Southern Sates Energy Board Richard A. Esposito, Southern Company U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - CO 2 Capture - CO 2 Transportation - CO 2 Storage * Accomplishments to Date * Organization Chart * Gantt Chart * Bibliography * Summary Benefit to the Program 1. Predict storage capacities within +/- 30% * Conducted high resolution reservoir characterization of the Paluxy saline formation key

405

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 BROWN 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits & overview of deriving acrylates from coupling carbon dioxide and ethylene * Chemical catalysis approach: background and battles left to fight * Experimental assessment of the viability of thermochemical acrylate production * Perspectives for the future BROWN 3 Benefit to the Program * This project identifies the critical catalyst features necessary to promote carbon dioxide coupling with ethylene to acrylate at molybdenum catalysts. This research demonstrates the viability of acrylate production

406

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Proof-of-Feasibility of Using Wellbore Deformation as a Diagnostic Tool to Improve CO2 Sequestration DE FE0004542 Larry Murdoch, Clemson University Stephen Moysey, Clemson University Leonid Germanovich, Georgia Tech Cem Ozan, Baker Hughes Sihyun Kim, Georgia Tech Glenn Skawski, Clemson University Alex Hanna, Clemson University Johnathan Ebenhack, Clemson University Josh Smith, Clemson University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Proof-of-Feasibility of Using Wellbore Deformation as a Diagnostic Tool, Larry Murdoch Project Review Meeting, 23 Aug. 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Preliminaries

407

Hallmark Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Project Commercialization of the Secure SCADA Communications Protocol, a cryptographic security solution for device-to-device communication Increased connectivity and automation in the control systems that manage the nation's energy infrastructure have improved system functionality, but left systems more vulnerable to cyber attack. Intruders could severely disrupt control system operation by sending fabricated information or commands to control system devices. To ensure message integrity, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems require a method to validate device-to- device communication and verify that information has come from a trusted source and not been altered in transit. The Secure SCADA Communications Protocol (SSCP) provides message

408

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DE-FE0002225: DE-FE0002225: Actualistic and geochemical modeling of reservoir rock, CO 2 and formation fluid interaction, Citronelle oil field, Alabama West Virginia University & University of Alabama Presenter: Dr. Amy Weislogel (WVU) Co-PI: Dr. Rona Donahoe (UA) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits * Overview & Project Map * Reservoir Geochemical Characterization * Formation Fluid Geochemistry * Geochemical Modeling * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies that will support industries'

409

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DE-FE0001836: DE-FE0001836: Numerical modeling of geomechanical processes related to CO 2 injection within generic reservoirs Andreas Eckert & Runar Nygaard Missouri University of Science & Technology U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Objectives, Benefits and Outcomes * Technical status: Project summary - Teaching - Reservoir scale (Geomechanics & Fluid flow simulation) - Borehole scale (Wellbore integrity & wellbore trajectory planning) * Conclusions * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries'

410

Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms; environmental transport environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H. (comps.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Materials Genome®: CALPHAD, ESPEI, and Beyond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Genomics Past & Future: From CALPHAD to Flight · Modelling the Properties of Multi-Component Commercial Alloys · Molecular Dynamics ...

412

Robust classifying of prokaryotic genomes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a method to classify prokaryotic genomes using the agglomerative information bottleneck method for unsupervised clustering. Although the method we present here is closely related to a group of methods based on detecting the ... Keywords: Agglomerative clustering, COGs, Gene length, IB, Information bottleneck method, Jackknifing, NJ, Phylogenomics, UPGMA

Katerina Korenblat; Zeev Volkovich; Alexander Bolshoy

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Nuclear Organization and Genome Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Organization and Genome Function Kevin Van Bortle and Victor G. Corces Department-range interactions and have proposed roles in nuclear organization. In this review, we explore recent findings for the roles of insulators in nuclear organization. 163 Annu.Rev.CellDev.Biol.2012.28:163-187.Downloadedfromwww

Corces, Victor G.

414

Genomes and evolution Editorial overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. co/i is true for the elephant", asserted Jacques Monod [l] during the heroic age of molecular biology-effective strategy to develop genome sequencing infrastructure as well as to provide grist for biologists' mills and illustrates the utility of studying things in pairs. These two species are highly divergent evolutionarily

Boguski, Mark S.

415

Evolution Confers Morality Department of Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as Mass Length Time Pornography [Officialportrait] #12;Francis Collins ­ Human Genome Project Rejects

416

Why sequence genome closure of lignocellulosic degrader Verrucomicrobium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

genome closure of lignocellulosic genome closure of lignocellulosic degrader Verrucomicrobium sp. strain TAV2? Wood-feeding termites have microbial communities in their guts that are capable of converting cellulose and hemicellulose into sugars, hydrogen and methane. They can break down as much as a billion tons of raw plant biomass annually, and are of interest to bioenergy researchers hoping to harness these abilities for commercial biofuel production. To better understand the interactions and roles within the gut microbial community, the project focuses on sequencing a Termite Associated Verrucomicrobium (TAV) bacterial strain of Verrucomicrobium known as TAV2. Members of the Verrucomicrobia phylum are found in a number of environments both in water and in soils. As members of the soil microbial community,

417

April 20, 2012 NIST “Genomes in a Bottle” Workshop ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... discussed the Archon Genomics XPrize work characterizing genomes and validating pipelines, Ryan Poplin discussed Broad's pipeline to analyze ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

418

USDA-DOE Make Available $4 Million for Biomass Genomics Research |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

USDA-DOE Make Available $4 Million for Biomass Genomics Research USDA-DOE Make Available $4 Million for Biomass Genomics Research USDA-DOE Make Available $4 Million for Biomass Genomics Research October 12, 2006 - 9:08am Addthis ST. LOUIS, MO -- The U.S. Departments of Energy and Agriculture (DOE and USDA) today announced $4 million for bio-based fuels research that will accelerate the development of alternative fuels. The departments issued a solicitation for research proposals for new plant feedstock genomics research projects. Dr. Raymond L. Orbach, DOE Under Secretary for Science, made the announcement at Advancing Renewable Energy: An American Rural Renaissance, a conference jointly hosted by the two agencies in St. Louis. "We are seeking to accelerate research breakthroughs that contribute towards making biofuels a cost-effective alternative to fossil fuels, with

419

Complete genome sequence of Saccharomonospora viridis type strain (P101T)  

SciTech Connect

Saccharomonospora viridis (Schuurmans et al. 1956) Nonomurea and Ohara 1971 is the type species of the genus Saccharomonospora which belongs to the family Pseudonocardiaceae. S. viridis is of interest because it is a Gram-negative organism classified amongst the usually Gram-positive actinomycetes. Members of the species are frequently found in hot compost and hay, and its spores can cause farmer?s lung disease, bagassosis, and humidifier fever. Strains of the species S. viridis have been found to metabolize the xenobiotic pentachlorophenol (PCP). The strain described in this study has been isolated from peat-bog in Ireland. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the family Pseudonocardiaceae, and the 4,308,349 bp long single replicon genome with its 3906 protein-coding and 64 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Pati, Amrita; Sikorski, Johannes; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Kuske, Cheryl; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Chain, Patrick; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian J.; Goker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides1, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

420

Complete genome sequence of the aquatic bacterium Runella slithyformis type strain (LSU 4T)  

SciTech Connect

Runella slithyformis Larkin and Williams 1978 is the type species of the genus Runella, which belongs to the family Cytophagaceae. The species is of interest because it is able to grow at temperatures as low as 4 C. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Runella and the sixth sequence from the family Cytophagaceae. The 6,919,729 bp long genome consists of a 6.6 Mbp circular genome and five circular plasmids of 38.8 to 107.0 kbp length, harboring a total of 5,974 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Zhang, Xiaojing [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Misra, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human genome project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Complete genome sequence of Rhodothermus marinus type strain (R-10T)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rhodothermus marinus Alfredsson et al. 1995 is the type species of the genus and is of phylogenetic interest because the Rhodothermaceae represent the deepest lineage in the phylum Bacteroidetes. R. marinus R-10T is a Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming bacterium isolated from marine hot springs off the coast of Iceland. Strain R-10T is strictly aerobic and requires slightly halophilic conditions for growth. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the genus Rhodothermus, and only the second sequence from members of the family Rhodothermaceae. The 3,386,737 bp genome (including a 125 kb plasmid) with its 2914 protein-coding and 48 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sims, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Sproer, Cathrin [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of Bacteroides coprosuis type strain (PC 139T)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bacteroides coprosuis Whitehead et al. 2005 belongs to the genus Bacteroides, which is a member of the family Bacteroidaceae. Members of the genus Bacteroides in general are known as beneficial protectors of animal guts against pathogenic microorganisms, and as contributors to the degradation of complex molecules such as polysaccharides. B. coprosuis itself was isolated from a manure storage pit of a swine facility, but has not yet been found in an animal host. The species is of interest solely because of its isolated phylogenetic location. The genome of B. coprosuis is already the 5th sequenced type strain genome from the genus Bacteroides. The 2,991,798 bp long genome with its 2,461 protein-coding and 78 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Abt, Birte [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lucas, Susan [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Nolan, Matt [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Tice, Hope [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Cheng, Jan-Fang [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Pitluck, Sam [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Liolios, Konstantinos [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Pagani, Ioanna [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chen, Amy [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Palaniappan, Krishna [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Woyke, Tanja [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Bristow, James [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Eisen, Jonathan [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Markowitz, Victor [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Complete genome sequence of Cryptobacterium curtum type strain (12-3T)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryptobacterium curtum Nakazawa et al. 1999 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its very distant and isolated position within the family Coriobacteriaceae. C. curtum is an asaccharolytic, opportunistic pathogen with a typical occurrence in the oral cavity, involved in dental and oral infections like periodontitis, inflammations and abscesses. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the actinobacterial family Coriobacteriaceae, and this 1,617,804 bp long single replicon genome with its 1364 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pukall, Rudiger; Rohde, Christine; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Kuske, Cheryl; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Rohde, Manfred; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

424

Complete genome sequence of the moderate thermophile Anaerobaculum mobile type strain (NGAT)  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobaculum mobile Menes and Muxi 2002 is one of three described species of the genus Anaerobaculum, family Synergistaceae, phylum Synergistetes. This anaerobic and motile bac- terium ferments a range of carbohydrates and mono- and dicarboxylic acids with acetate, hy- drogen and CO2 as end products. A. mobile NGAT is the first member of the genus Anaerobaculum and the sixth member of the phylum Synergistetes with a completely se- quenced genome. Here we describe the features of this bacterium, together with the com- plete genome sequence, and annotation. The 2,160,700 bp long single replicon genome with its 2,053 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Stackebrandt, Erko [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Oakland University Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Oakland University Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pump Systems Project Type Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal...

426

US. DEPARThIl!NT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

project management activities for both proposed project initiatives. DOE has determined thai impacts related to these tasks will have negligible or no affects on the human and...

427

Genome Stability of Lyme Disease Spirochetes: Comparative Genomics of Borrelia burgdorferi Plasmids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne human illness in North America. In order to understand the molecular pathogenesis, natural diversity, population structure and epizootic spread of the North American Lyme agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, a much better understanding of the natural diversity of its genome will be required. Towards this end we present a comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the numerous plasmids of B. burgdorferi isolates B31, N40, JD1 and 297. These strains were chosen because they include the three most commonly studied laboratory strains, and because they represent different major genetic lineages and so are informative regarding the genetic diversity and evolution of this organism. A unique feature of Borrelia genomes is that they carry a large number of linear and circular plasmids, and this work shows that strains N40, JD1, 297 and B31 carry related but non-identical sets of 16, 20, 19 and 21 plasmids, respectively, that comprise 33-40% of their genomes. We deduce that there are at least 28 plasmid compatibility types among the four strains. The B. burgdorferi {approx}900 Kbp linear chromosomes are evolutionarily exceptionally stable, except for a short {le}20 Kbp plasmid-like section at the right end. A few of the plasmids, including the linear lp54 and circular cp26, are also very stable. We show here that the other plasmids, especially the linear ones, are considerably more variable. Nearly all of the linear plasmids have undergone one or more substantial inter-plasmid rearrangements since their last common ancestor. In spite of these rearrangements and differences in plasmid contents, the overall gene complement of the different isolates has remained relatively constant.

Casjens S. R.; Dunn J.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W.-G.; Luft, B. J.; Schutzer, S. E.; Gilcrease, E. B.; Huang, W. M.; Vujadinovic, M.; Aron, J. K.; Vargas, L. C.; Freeman, S.; Radune, D.; Weidman, J. F.; Dimitrov, G. I.; Khouri, H. M.; Sosa, J. E.; Halpin, R. A.; Fraser, C. M.

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

428

Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories under contract with the Centers for Disease Control. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H. (comps.)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Borrelia afzelii and Two Borrelia garinii Lyme Disease Agent Isolates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human Lyme disease is commonly caused by several species of spirochetes in the Borrelia genus. In Eurasia these species are largely Borrelia afzelii, B. garinii, B. burgdorferi, and B. bavariensis sp. nov. Whole-genome sequencing is an excellent tool for investigating and understanding the influence of bacterial diversity on the pathogenesis and etiology of Lyme disease. We report here the whole-genome sequences of four isolates from two of the Borrelia species that cause human Lyme disease, B. afzelii isolates ACA-1 and PKo and B. garinii isolates PBr and Far04.

Casjens, S.R.; Dunn, J.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W.-G.; Luft, B. J.; Fraser-Liggett, C. M.; Schutzer, S. E.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Echophysiology  

SciTech Connect

Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a motile, facultative {gamma}-Proteobacterium with remarkable respiratory versatility; it can utilize a range of organic and inorganic compounds as terminal electronacceptors for anaerobic metabolism. The ability to effectively reduce nitrate, S0, polyvalent metals andradionuclides has established MR-1 as an important model dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganism for genome-based investigations of biogeochemical transformation of metals and radionuclides that are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites nationwide. Metal-reducing bacteria such as Shewanella also have a highly developed capacity for extracellular transfer of respiratory electrons to solid phase Fe and Mn oxides as well as directly to anode surfaces in microbial fuel cells. More broadly, Shewanellae are recognized free-living microorganisms and members of microbial communities involved in the decomposition of organic matter and the cycling of elements in aquatic and sedimentary systems. To function and compete in environments that are subject to spatial and temporal environmental change, Shewanella must be able to sense and respond to such changes and therefore require relatively robust sensing and regulation systems. The overall goal of this project is to apply the tools of genomics, leveraging the availability of genome sequence for 18 additional strains of Shewanella, to better understand the ecophysiology and speciation of respiratory-versatile members of this important genus. To understand these systems we propose to use genome-based approaches to investigate Shewanella as a system of integrated networks; first describing key cellular subsystems - those involved in signal transduction, regulation, and metabolism - then building towards understanding the function of whole cells and, eventually, cells within populations. As a general approach, this project will employ complimentary "top-down" - bioinformatics-based genome functional predictions, high-throughput expression analyses, and functional genomics approaches to uncover key genes as well as metabolic and regulatory networks. The "bottom-up" component employs more traditional approaches including genetics, physiology and biochemistry to test or verify predictions. This information will ultimately be linked to analyses of signal transduction and transcriptional regulatory systems and used to develop a linked model that will contribute to understanding the ecophysiology of Shewanella in redox stratified environments. A central component of this effort is the development of a data and knowledge integration environment that will allow investigators to query across the individual research domains, link to analysis applications, visualize data in a cell systems context, and produce new knowledge, while minimizing the effort, time and complexity to participating institutions.

Margrethe H. Serres

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

431

Functional genomics of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unicellular freshwater cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 is the model organism for studying the circadian clock in cyanobacteria. Despite tremendous work over the last decade in identification of clock-related loci and elucidation of molecular mechanisms of the central oscillator, many details of the basic steps in generating circadian rhythms of biological processes remain unsolved and many components are still missing. A transposon-mediated mutagenesis and sequencing strategy has been adopted to disrupt essentially every locus in the genome so as to identify all of the loci that are involved in clock function. The complete genome sequence has been determined by a combination of shotgun sequences and transposon-mediated sequences. The S. elongatus PCC 7942 genome is 2,695,903 bp in length, and has a 55.5% GC content. Automated annotation identified 2,856 protein-coding genes and 51 RNA coding loci. A system for community refinement of the annotation was established. Organization and characteristic features of the genome are discussed in this dissertation. More than 95% of the PCC 7942 genome has been mutagenized and mutants affected in approximately 30% of loci have been screened for defects in circadian function. Approximately 70 new clock loci that belong to different functional categories have been discovered through a team effort. Additionally, functional analysis of insertion mutants revealed that the Type-IV pilus assembly protein PilN and the RNA chaperon Hfq are involved in transformation competence of S. elongatus cells. Functional analysis of an atypical short period kaiA insertional mutant showed that the short period phenotype is caused mainly by the truncation of KaiA by three amino acid residues. The interaction between KaiC and the truncated KaiA is weakened as shown by fluorescence anisotropy analysis. Deletion analysis of pANL, the large endogenous plasmid, implies that two toxin-antitoxin cassettes were responsible for inability to cure cells of this plasmid. In summary, the results indicate that this functional genomics project is very promising toward fulfilling our goal to assemble a comprehensive view of the cyanobacterial circadian clock. The mutagenesis reagents and dataset generated in this project will also benefit the greater scientific community.

Chen, You

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Genome of Simplest Animal Reveals Ancient  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

21, 2008 21, 2008 Genome of Simplest Animal Reveals Ancient Lineage, Confounding Array of Complex Capabilities WALNUT CREEK, CA-As Aesop said, appearances are deceiving-even in life's tiniest critters. From first detection in the 1880s, clinging to the sides of an aquarium, to its recent characterization by the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), a simple and primitive animal, Trichoplax adhaerens, appears to harbor a far more complex suite of capabilities than meets the eye. The findings, reported in the August 21 online edition of the journal Nature, establish a group of organisms as a branching point of animal evolution and identify sets of genes, or a "parts list," employed by organisms that have evolved along particular branches.

433

Whole genome sequencing and comparative genomic analyses of two Vibrio cholerae O139 Bengal-specific Podoviruses to other N4-like phages reveal extensive genetic diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chen YJ, Chen Z, et al: Genome sequencing in microfabricatedas: Fouts et al. : Whole genome sequencing and comparativeOpen Access Whole genome sequencing and comparative genomic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

The ecoresponsive genome of Daphnia pulex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides supporting material related to the sequencing of the ecoresponsive genome of Daphnia pulex. This material includes information on materials and methods and supporting text, as well as supplemental figures, tables, and references. The coverage of materials and methods addresses genome sequence, assembly, and mapping to chromosomes, gene inventory, attributes of a compact genome, the origin and preservation of Daphnia pulex genes, implications of Daphnia's genome structure, evolutionary diversification of duplicated genes, functional significance of expanded gene families, and ecoresponsive genes. Supporting text covers chromosome studies, gene homology among Daphnia genomes, micro-RNA and transposable elements and the 46 Daphnia pulex opsins. 36 figures, 50 tables, 183 references.

Colbourne, John K.; Pfrender, Michael E.; Gilbert, Donald; Thomas, W. Kelley; Tucker, Abraham; Oakley, Todd H.; Tokishita, Shinichi; Aerts, Andrea; Arnold, Georg J.; Basu, Malay Kumar; Bauer, Darren J.; Caceres, Carla E.; Carmel, Liran; Casola, Claudio; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Detter, John C.; Dong, Qunfeng; Dusheyko, Serge; Eads, Brian D.; Frohlich, Thomas; Geiler-Samerotte, Kerry A.; Gerlach, Daniel; Hatcher, Phil; Jogdeo, Sanjuro; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Kriventseva, Evgenia V; Kültz, Dietmar; Laforsch, Christian; Lindquist, Erika; Lopez, Jacqueline; Manak, Robert; Muller, Jean; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Patwardhan, Rupali P.; Pitluck, Samuel; Pritham, Ellen J.; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Rho, Mina; Rogozin, Igor B.; Sakarya, Onur; Salamov, Asaf; Schaack, Sarah; Shapiro, Harris; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Skalitzky, Courtney; Smith, Zachary; Souvorov, Alexander; Sung, Way; Tang, Zuojian; Tsuchiya, Dai; Tu, Hank; Vos, Harmjan; Wang, Mei; Wolf, Yuri I.; Yamagata, Hideo; Yamada, Takuji; Ye, Yuzhen; Shaw, Joseph R.; Andrews, Justen; Crease, Teresa J.; Tang, Haixu; Lucas, Susan M.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Bork, Peer; Koonin, Eugene V.; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Lynch, Michael; Boore, Jeffrey L.

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

435

Comparative Omics-Driven Genome Annotation Refinement: Application across Yersiniae  

SciTech Connect

Genome sequencing continues to be a rapidly evolving technology, yet most downstream aspects of genome annotation pipelines remain relatively stable or are even being abandoned. To date, the perceived value of manual curation for genome annotations is not offset by the real cost and time associated with the process. In order to balance the large number of sequences generated, the annotation process is now performed almost exclusively in an automated fashion for most genome sequencing projects. One possible way to reduce errors inherent to automated computational annotations is to apply data from 'omics' measurements (i.e. transcriptional and proteomic) to the un-annotated genome with a proteogenomic-based approach. This approach does require additional experimental and bioinformatics methods to include omics technologies; however, the approach is readily automatable and can benefit from rapid developments occurring in those research domains as well. The annotation process can be improved by experimental validation of transcription and translation and aid in the discovery of annotation errors. Here the concept of annotation refinement has been extended to include a comparative assessment of genomes across closely related species, as is becoming common in sequencing efforts. Transcriptomic and proteomic data derived from three highly similar pathogenic Yersiniae (Y. pestis CO92, Y. pestis pestoides F, and Y. pseudotuberculosis PB1/+) was used to demonstrate a comprehensive comparative omic-based annotation methodology. Peptide and oligo measurements experimentally validated the expression of nearly 40% of each strain's predicted proteome and revealed the identification of 28 novel and 68 previously incorrect protein-coding sequences (e.g., observed frameshifts, extended start sites, and translated pseudogenes) within the three current Yersinia genome annotations. Gene loss is presumed to play a major role in Y. pestis acquiring its niche as a virulent pathogen, thus the discovery of many translated pseudogenes underscores a need for functional analyses to investigate hypotheses related to divergence. Refinements included the discovery of a seemingly essential ribosomal protein, several virulence-associated factors, and a transcriptional regulator, among other proteins, most of which are annotated as hypothetical, that were missed during annotation.

Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Jones, Marcus B.; Chauhan, Sadhana; Purvine, Samuel O.; Sanford, James; Monroe, Matthew E.; Brewer, Heather M.; Payne, Samuel H.; Ansong, Charles; Frank, Bryan C.; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott; Motin, Vladimir L.; Adkins, Joshua N.

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

436

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigating the Fundamental Investigating the Fundamental Scientific Issues Affecting the Long-term Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide Project Number DE-FE0000397 Lee H Spangler Energy Research Institute Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Computational tool development * Laboratory studies to understand subsurface CO 2 behavior * Analog studies to inform risk analysis * Near surface detection technologies / testing * Mitigation method development 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

437

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FE/NETL CTS Cost Models and FE/NETL CTS Cost Models and Benefits Assessment of Carbon Storage R&D Program David Morgan Benefits Division Office of Program Planning and Analysis National Energy Technology Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY 2 Presentation Outline * Overview of benefits assessment * Overview of FE/NETL models used to assess benefits of CO 2 capture and storage * Benefits evaluation of Storage Program's R&D projects using a model to estimate costs of CO 2 storage in a saline aquifer * Description of model used to estimate costs of

438

Project 307  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INTEGRATING MONO ETHANOL AMINE (MEA) INTEGRATING MONO ETHANOL AMINE (MEA) REGENERATION WITH CO 2 COMPRESSION AND PEAKING TO REDUCE CO 2 CAPTURE COSTS Background In Phase I, Trimeric Corporation, in collaboration with the University of Texas at Austin, performed engineering and economic analyses necessary to determine the feasibility of novel MEA processing schemes aimed at reducing the cost of CO 2 capture from flue gas. These novel MEA-based CO 2 capture schemes are designed for integration into coal-fired power plants with the aim of reducing costs and improving efficiency. Primary Project Goal The primary goal of this project was to reduce the cost of MEA scrubbing for the recovery of CO 2 from flue gas by improved process integration. CONTACTS Sean I. Plasynski Sequestration Technology Manager

439

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-23, 2012 1-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview: Why 14 C for MVA? * Technical status: Cartridges, injections, lasers * Summary * Organizational chart * Collaborators 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. Permanent storage of CO 2 can be demonstrated by adding carbon-14 ( 14 C) prior to injection. This research project aims to demonstrate this by tagging fossil CO 2 with 14 C at a field site. When completed, this system will show that 14 C can be a safe and effective tracer for sequestered CO 2 . A laser-based 14 C measurement method is being adapted for continuous monitoring. This technology contributes to the Carbon Storage Program's effort of ensuring 99 percent

440

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leakage Pathways and Leakage Pathways and Mineralization within Caprocks for Geologic Storage of CO 2 Project DE-FC26-0xNT4 FE0001786 James P. Evans Utah State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits * Goals and Objectives * Relationship to overall program goals * Overview of seal bypass * Technical status; bypass systems - Field based studies - Technological advances * Accomplishments and Summary * Appendices 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent.

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441

Project 301  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2006 2006 Combustion Technologies CONTACTS Robert R. Romanosky Advanced Research Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4721 robert.romanosky@netl.doe.gov Arun C. Bose Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4467 arun.bose@netl.doe.gov ADVANCED, LOW/ZERO EMISSION BOILER DESIGN AND OPERATION Background Over the past years, environmental concerns regarding pollutants have grown dramatically. Current annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are 12% higher than they were in 1992. In addition, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions are projected to increase by an additional 34% over the next 20 years. About one third of carbon emissions in the

442

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Michael G. Waddell Earth Sciences and Resources Institute University of South Carolina U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Project goals and benefits * Overview of the geology of the South Georgia Rift basin in SC * Results of petrographic and core analysis from the Rizer #1 * Future investigations in the SGR * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program Program Goals: * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected

443

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Simultaneous Measurements of High-T and Dynamic Gas Pressure in Harsh Environments DE-FE0001127 Investigators: Hai Xiao, Hai-Lung Tsai, Missouri University of Science and Technology Junhang Dong, University of Cincinnati Program Manager: Norm Popkie, Gasification Division, NETL DOE Project Kickoff Meeting in the NETL Pittsburgh December 15, 2009 Outline * Background * Objectives * Project Elements * Management Plan * Research Plan and Approaches * Risk Management * Summary Background * Demands: High-performance, reliable, in situ sensors are highly demanded for advanced process control and lifecycle management in existing and future advanced power and fuel systems - Improved efficiency/safety/reliability/availability/maintainability

444

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mart Oostrom Mart Oostrom Pacific Northwest National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline  Project overview  Sub-Task 1: Investigation of CO 2 migration in heterogeneous porous media  Sub-Task 2: Modeling CCUS deployment in China  Summary Collaboration with China on Clean Energy Research 3 Benefit to the Program The Clean Energy Partnership was established by a memorandum of understanding between the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in May of 2009 with the goal of significantly reducing the environmental emissions and improving the efficiency of

445

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Evaluation of Geophysical Methods for Monitoring and Tracking CO 2 Migration in the Subsurface PI: Jeffrey Daniels Co-PI: Robert Burns & Franklin Schwartz Students: Michael Murphy & Kyle Shalek The Ohio State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 FOA Number: DE-FOA-0000032 NETL Award Number: DE-FE0002441 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program Goal: Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones

446

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin Influence of Local Capillary Trapping on Containment System Effectiveness DE-FE0004956 Steven Bryant The University of Texas at Austin U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Local capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin Local capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation and relevance to Program * Project goals * Technical status * Accomplishments * Summary * Future plans Local capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin Local capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin

447

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Project benefits and objectives * Carbon gasification * Carbon reactivity studies * Catalyst development * Techno-economic analysis * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal: Reduce CO 2 emissions by developing beneficial uses that meet the DOE net cost metric of $10/MT for captured CO 2 that will mitigate CO 2 emissions in areas where geological storage may not be an optimal solution * Benefits statement: Development of a commercial process for converting CO 2 and a carbon source into a commodity chemical at a

448

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Caprock Integrity and Improved Caprock Integrity and Risk Assessment Techniques Project Number (FE0009168) Michael Bruno, PhD, PE GeoMechanics Technologies U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Introduction and Motivation 2 A primary requirement for long-term geologic storage and containment of carbon dioxide is ensuring caprock integrity. Large-scale CO2 injection requires improved and advanced simulation tools and risk assessment techniques to better predict and help control system failures, and to enhance performance of geologic storage. GeoMechanics Technologies is developing enhanced simulation and risk analysis approaches to assess and

449

Irene Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irene Station, African Weather Bureau Irene Station, African Weather Bureau The photos on this site come from the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) project. Additional photos can be found on the SHADOZ Project Web Site. Photo of the Dobson 89 Instrument The Irene Weather Office Agnes Phahlane sits behind the Dobson and collects Total Ozone Data The lab at the Irene station Cal Archer Prepares an ozonesonde Flight Preparations The balloon is readied The release Back to the SAFARI 2000 Photo Page Index Other Sites: Skukuza, MISR Validation Site | Skukuza, Eddy Covariance Site | C-130 Flight Photos | Sua Pan Site | Irene Weather Station | Fire Studies | Kalahari Transect | Kalahari Transect Sites for Canopy Structure Data | ORNL DAAC Home || ORNL Home || NASA || Privacy, Security, Notices || Data

450

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin Inexpensive plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin Inexpensive plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin Inexpensive Monitoring and Uncertainty Assessment of CO 2 Plume Migration DOE-FE0004962 Steven Bryant The University of Texas at Austin U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Inexpensive plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation and relevance to Program * Project goals * Technical status * Accomplishments * Summary * Future plans Inexpensive plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin

451

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Impact on CCS Energy Market Competitiveness Catherine A. Peters Jeffery P. Fitts Michael A. Celia Princeton University Paul D. Kalb Vatsal Bhatt Brookhaven National Laboratory Elizabeth J. Wilson Jeffrey M. Bielicki Melisa Pollak University of Minnesota DOE Award DE-FE0000749 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to CCUS research program * Project Goals & Objectives * Technical Status  Thrust I - Reservoir-scale simulations of leakage potential with permeability evolution

452

Project Description  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Description Project Description The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007), and Presidential Executive Order 13423 all contain requirements for Federal facilities to decrease energy consumption and increase the use of renewable energy by the year 2015. To provide leadership in meeting these requirements, DOE, in partnership with the General Services Administration (GSA), has installed a rooftop solar electric, or PV, system on the roof of DOE's headquarters in Washington, D.C. The 205 kilowatt (kW) installation is one of the largest of its kind in the Nation's capital. A display in the For- restal building will show the power output of the PV system during the day and the energy produced over

453

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Modeling CO for Modeling CO 2 Processes: Pressure Management, Basin-Scale Models, Model Comparison, and Stochastic Inversion ESD09-056 Jens T. Birkholzer with Abdullah Cihan, Marco Bianchi, Quanlin Zhou, Xiaoyi Liu, Sumit Mukhopadhyay, Dorothee Rebscher, Barbara Fialeix Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview and Technical Status - Task 1: Optimization of Brine Extraction for Pressure Management and Mitigation - Task 2: Basin-scale Simulation of CO 2 Storage in the Northern Plains - Prairie Basal Aquifer - Task 3: Sim-SEQ Model Comparison

454

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beneficial Use of CO Beneficial Use of CO 2 in Precast Concrete Production DE-FE0004285 Yixin Shao, Yaodong Jia Liang Hu McGill University 3H Company U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation outline * Goals and objectives * Benefits to the program * Project overview * Technical status * Accomplishment to date * Summary 2 Objective Masonry blocks Fiber-cement panels Prefabricated buildings Concrete pipes To develop a carbonation process to replace steam curing in precast concrete production for energy reduction, and carbon storage and utilization. Goals * CO 2 sequestration capacity by cement:

455

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Kansas Center for Research University of Kansas Center for Research Kansas Geological Survey U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Benefits, objectives, overview * Methods * Background & setting * Technical status * Accomplishments * Summary Benefit to the Program * Program goal addressed: Develop technologies that will support the industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ± 30 percent. * Program goal addressed: This project will confirm - via a horizontal test boring - whether fracture attributes derived from 3-D seismic PSDM Volumetric Curvature (VC) processing are real. If

456

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Project benefits and objectives * Carbon reactivity studies * Catalyst mechanism studies * Catalyst development * Test results * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal: Reduce CO 2 emissions by developing beneficial uses that meet the DOE net cost metric of $10/MT for captured CO 2 that will mitigate CO 2 emissions in areas where geological storage may not be an optimal solution * Benefits statement: Development of a commercial process for converting CO 2 and a carbon source into a commodity chemical at a

457

FUSRAP Project  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Project Project 23b 14501 FUSRAP TECHNICAL BULLETIN N O . - R 3 v . L DATE: 1.2 9-99 SUBJECT : Pr.pec.d BY T r m L u d Approval Summary of the results for the Springdale characterization activities performed per WI-94-015, Rev. 0. TUO separate radiological characterization surveys and a limited cherical characterization survey were performed on the Springdale Site in Octcjer and December, 1993. The design of the radiological surveys were to supplement and define existing ORNL surveys. The limited cher.ica1 characterization survey was performed to assist in the completion of waste disposal paperwork. Radiological contamination is primarily ir. the 'belt cutting and belt fabrication'areas of the building with a small erea of contamination in the south end of the building. The chemiccl sac~le

458

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0-22, 2013 0-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Advanced simulation tool for quantifying transport in porous and fractured geological formations during CO 2 sequestration that includes all mechanisms: convection, diffusion, dissolution and chemical reactions * A simulator that can fully model these processes does not currently exist * Simulator will contribute to our ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations, to within ±30 percent 4 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Comprehensive reservoir simulator for investigation of CO 2 non-isothermal, multiphase flow and long-term storage in

459

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thomas J. Wolery Thomas J. Wolery Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 LLNL-PRES-574632 2 Team Members * Roger Aines * Bill Bourcier * Tom Wolery * Tom Buscheck * Tom Wolfe (consultant) * Mike DiFilippo (consultant) * Larry Lien (Membrane Development Specialists) 3 Presentation Outline * Overview of Active CO 2 Reservoir Management (ACRM) * Subsurface Reservoir Management: Made Possible by Brine Production, Yielding Many Benefits * Brine Disposal Options - What brines are out there? - What are the treatment options? 4 Benefit to the Program * This project is identifying and evaluating

460

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Induction of Genomic Instability in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induction of Genomic Instability in vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs y Induction of Genomic Instability in vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs y rays, Authors: K. Rithidech1, E.B. Whorton2, M. Tungjai1, E. Ar-Bab1, S.R. Simon1, M. Tawde3 and C.W. Anderson3. Institutions: 1Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, NY 11794-8691, USA, 2University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX 77550-1047,3Biology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000. Information on potential health hazards of radiation at doses below or equal to the level traditionally requiring human radiation protection (less than or equal to 10 cGy) is currently lacking. It is therefore important to characterize early and subsequent in vivo biological response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation because such data should provide information that can help determine whether radiation at this dose level

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461

Project Payette  

SciTech Connect

This is the concept for Project Payette, a nuclear event in the Seismic Detection Research Program. For this experiment, a nuclear explosive in the range of 5 to 10 kt will be detonated at a depth of 2000 to 3000 ft in an underground cavity of sufficient size that the walls of the cavity experience only elastic motion. The site will be located in a salt dome. Project Payette has been divided into three phases. Phase I will include site evaluation and engineering design of the construction of the cavity. It is estimated to require about 1 year. Phase II will include construction of the cavity and emplacement hole. It is estimated to require about 2 years. Phase III will include emplacement of instruments and the device, the detonation and the post-shot program including cavity re-entry. This is estimated to require about 1 year. The scope of this concept is intended to define Project Payette sufficiently will that Phase I work may proceed.

Warner, D.

1966-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

HUman MicroNucleus Project: International Database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Molecular Toxicology Laboratory, Third Military Medical University, Chong Qing, China Laboratorio Dosimetria Biologica, Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires, Argentina Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, Auckland, New Zealand Institute for Medical Research end Occupational Health, Zagreb, Croatia Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Havana, Cuba Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy Cell Biology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai, India Department of Radiation Oncology, Leo Jenkins Cancer Center, East Carolina University School of Medicine, Greenville, North Carolina Institute of Genetics and Cytology, Belarus Academy of Sciences, Minsk, Belarus Nacional Center of Hygiene, Medical Ecology and Nutrition, Sofia, Bulgaria Dipartimento di Agrobiologia e Agrochimica, Universita della Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy Institute fur Medizinische Strahlenbiologie, U

Comparison For Results; Stefano Bonassi; Michael Fenech; Cecilia L; Yi-ping Lin; Wushou Peter Chang; Nina Holl; Andrea Zijno

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Human computing and machine understanding of human behavior: a survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A widely accepted prediction is that computing will move to the background, weaving itself into the fabric of our everyday living spaces and projecting the human user into the foreground. If this prediction is to come true, then next generation computing ... Keywords: affective computing, analysis, human behavior understanding, human sensing, multimodal data, socially-aware computing

Maja Pantic; Alex Pentland; Anton Nijholt; Thomas S. Huang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

William Bourcier William Bourcier Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Saline Aquifer Brine Production Well Brine Injection Well Chiller Pretreatment Desalination Brine Permeate To power plant or other use Storage pump CO 2 injection Concept is to extract and desalinate aquifer brines to create fresh water and space for CO 2 storage cap-rock 3 Presentation Outline * Overview, Purpose, Goals and Benefits * Technical status - Brine treatment and disposition - Reservoir management * Accomplishments * Summary and Planned work Goals and Objectives Technical Goals Potential advantages of brine

465

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metrics for Screening CO Metrics for Screening CO 2 Utilization Processes Peter Kabatek Energy Sector Planning and Analysis (ESPA) Services / WorleyParsons U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * NETL's Carbon Storage Program * Introduction of the metrics * Review of the case study technology * Application of metrics to the case study technology * Discussion of metrics interpretation and grouping 3 NETL Carbon Storage Program * The Carbon Storage Program contains three key elements: - Infrastructure - Global Collaborations - Core Research and Development: * Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (MVA) * Geologic Storage

466

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction * Reservoir Simulation Model * Intelligent Leakage Detection System (ILDS) * Accomplishments * Summary Objective * Develop an in-situ CO 2 leak detection technology based on the concept of Smart Fields. - Using real-time pressure data from permanent downhole gauges to estimate the location and the rate of CO 2 leakage. CO2 Leakage(X,Y,Q) Artificial Intelligence & Data Mining Industrial Advisory Committee (IAC) * Project goes through continuous peer-review by an Industrial Review Committee. * Meetings: - November 6 th 2009 : * Conference call * Site selection criteria - November 17 th 2009: * A meeting during the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Meeting in Pittsburgh

467

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training and Research Peter M. Walsh University of Alabama at Birmingham U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CCUS Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania August 21-23, 2012 DE-FE0002224 * Evaluation of the sealing capacity of caprocks serving as barriers to upward migration of CO 2 sequestered in geologic formations. * Education and training of undergraduate and graduate students, through independent research on geologic sequestration. * Education, through an advanced undergraduate/graduate level course on coal combustion and gasification, climate change, and carbon sequestration. * Simulation of CO 2 migration and trapping in storage

468