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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Warming caused by cumulative carbon emissions towards the trillionth tonne  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTERS Warming caused by cumulative carbon emissions towards the trillionth tonne Myles R. Allen1 emission pathways. We find that the peak warming caused by a given cumulative carbon dioxide emission of emissions or peak emission rate). Hence policy targets based on limiting cumulative emissions of carbon

Fischlin, Andreas

2

Industrial emissions cause extreme urban ozone diurnal variability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...network of large coal-fired power plants. Anthropogenic...treatment of standard gas-phase and heterogeneous...emissions from utility power plants located to the...Description of the Fifth Generation Penn State/National...

Renyi Zhang; Wenfang Lei; Xuexi Tie; Peter Hess

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Human Activities: Toward  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Human Activities: Toward Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Human Activities: Toward Verification of Emissions Control Compliance Speaker(s): Marc Fischer Date: April 29, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Local to international control of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will require systematic estimation of emissions and independent verification. California, the only state in the US with legislated controls on GHG emissions, is conducting research to enable emissions verification of the mandated emissions reductions (AB-32). The California Energy Commission supports the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project at LBNL. In collaboration with NOAA, CALGEM measures mixing ratios of all significant GHGs at two tall-towers and on aircraft in

4

Human Rights Fades as a Cause for Scientists  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...human-rights abuses in his home country...disagreement. Even younger scientists who recognize...S.-based Internet publications...especially younger students, view human-rights...human-rights abuse in China...S.-based Internet publications...especially younger students, view...

James Glanz

1998-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

5

Abstract--Historic data shows an increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at airports caused by an increase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this project is to provide the airport manager at major airports, such as Dulles International Airport of emissions offset. The case study of this project will be Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD Abstract-- Historic data shows an increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at airports caused

6

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and gas, have caused a substantial increase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil-caused CO2 emissions and to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. 2.0 What is carbon sequestration? The term "carbon sequestration" is used to describe both natural and deliberate CARBON,INGIGATONSPERYEAR 1.5 Fossil

7

Instability, Collapse and Oscillation of Sheaths Caused by Secondary Electron Emission  

SciTech Connect

The Debye sheath is shown to be unstable under general conditions. For surface materials with sufficient secondary electron emission (SEE) yields, the surface's current-voltage characteristic has an unstable branch when the bulk plasma temperature (Te ) exceeds a critical value, or when there are fast electron populations present. The plasma-surface interaction becomes dynamic where the sheath may undergo spontaneous transitions or oscillations. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we analyze sheath instabilities occurring in a high Te plasma slab bounded by walls with SEE. As the plasma evolves, whenever the sheath enters an unstable state, its amplitude rapidly collapses, allowing a large flux of previously trapped electrons to hit the wall. These hot electrons induce more than one secondary on average, causing a net loss of electrons from the wall. The sheath collapse quenches when the surface charge becomes positive because the attractive field inhibits further electrons from escaping. Sheath instabilities influence the current balance, energy loss, cross-B-field transport and even the bulk plasma properties. Implications for discharges including Hall thrusters are discussed. More generally, the results show that common theories that treat emission as a fixed (time-independent) "coefficient" do not capture the full extent of SEE effects.

M.D. Campanell, A.V. Khrabrov and I.D. Kaganovich

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

8

Effective sea-level rise and deltas: Causes of change and human dimension implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective sea-level rise and deltas: Causes of change and human dimension implications Jason P January 2006 Abstract An assessment is made of contemporary effective sea-level rise (ESLR) for a sample of eustatic sea-level rise, the natural gross rate of fluvial sediment deposition and subsidence

New Hampshire, University of

9

Decrease in Protein Solubility and Cataract Formation Caused by the Pro23 to Thr Mutation in Human D-Crystallin,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decrease in Protein Solubility and Cataract Formation Caused by the Pro23 to Thr Mutation in Human 21, 2004; ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed NoVember 23, 2004 ABSTRACT: The P23T mutation in the human D the molecular mechanism of lens opacity caused by this mutation, we expressed human D-crystallin (HGD), the P23T

Benedek, George B.

10

General Cause of Sheath Instability Identified for Low Collisionality Plasma in Devices with Secondary Electron Emission  

SciTech Connect

A condition for sheath instability due to secondary electron emission (SEE) is derived for low collisionality plasmas. When the SEE coefficient of the electrons bordering the depleted loss cone in energy space exceeds unity, the sheath potential is unstable to a negative perturbation. This result explains three different instability phenomena observed in Hall thruster simulations including a newly found state with spontaneous ~20MHz oscillations. When instabilities occur, the SEE propagating between the walls becomes the dominant contribution to the particle flux, energy loss and axial transport.

M.C. Campanell, A. Khrabrov and I Kaganovich

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

11

Functional lung imaging in humans using Positron Emission Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis deals with a method of functional lung imaging using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). In this technique, a radioactive tracer, nitrogen-13, is dissolved in saline solution, and injected into a peripheral ...

Layfield, Dominick, 1971-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Humboldtian Science, Creole Meteorology, and the Discovery of Human-Caused Climate Change in Northern South America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The belief that human land use is capable of causing large-scale climatic change lies at the root of modern conservation thought and policy. The origins and popularization of this belief were deeply politicized. Alexander ...

Cushman, Gregory T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Cancer-Causing Human Papillomavirus E6 Proteins Display Major Differences in the Phospho-Regulation of their PDZ Interactions.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Rights Reserved. 2014 research-article Cancer-Causing Human Papillomavirus E6 Proteins...I-34149 Trieste, Italy ^ School of Cancer Sciences, University of Birmingham...Previous studies have shown that that the cancer-causing high risk HPV E6 oncoproteins...

Siaw Shi Boon; Vjekoslav Tomai?; Miranda Thomas; Sally Roberts; Lawrence Banks

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

14

Emissions  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the extra emissions that are generated from manufacturing the material used to make CNG tanks); they can amount tc more than 2% of the emissions from 32 the fuel production and...

15

A comparison of the GHG emissions caused by manufacturing tissue paper from virgin pulp or recycled waste paper  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from producing tissue paper from virgin...

Eskinder Demisse Gemechu; Isabela Butnar…

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Causes Degradation of Sp100 Proteins That Suppress Viral Gene Expression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cytomegalovirus Infection Causes Degradation of Sp100 Proteins That Suppress Viral Gene Expression Young-Eui Kim 1 Jin-Hyoung Lee 1 Eui Tae Kim 1 Hye Jin Shin 1 Su Yeon Gu 1 Hyang Sook Seol 1 Paul D. Ling 2 Chan Hee Lee 3 Jin-Hyun Ahn 1...

Young-Eui Kim; Jin-Hyoung Lee; Eui Tae Kim; Hye Jin Shin; Su Yeon Gu; Hyang Sook Seol; Paul D. Ling; Chan Hee Lee; Jin-Hyun Ahn

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

A mid-layer model for human reliability analysis : understanding the cognitive causes of human failure events.  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) at the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) is sponsoring work in response to a Staff Requirements Memorandum (SRM) directing an effort to establish a single human reliability analysis (HRA) method for the agency or guidance for the use of multiple methods. As part of this effort an attempt to develop a comprehensive HRA qualitative approach is being pursued. This paper presents a draft of the method's middle layer, a part of the qualitative analysis phase that links failure mechanisms to performance shaping factors. Starting with a Crew Response Tree (CRT) that has identified human failure events, analysts identify potential failure mechanisms using the mid-layer model. The mid-layer model presented in this paper traces the identification of the failure mechanisms using the Information-Diagnosis/Decision-Action (IDA) model and cognitive models from the psychological literature. Each failure mechanism is grouped according to a phase of IDA. Under each phase of IDA, the cognitive models help identify the relevant performance shaping factors for the failure mechanism. The use of IDA and cognitive models can be traced through fault trees, which provide a detailed complement to the CRT.

Shen, Song-Hua (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Chang, James Y. H. (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Boring,Ronald L. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Whaley, April M. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lois, Erasmia (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt; Oxstrand, Johanna H. (Vattenfall Ringhals AB, Varobacka, Sweden); Forester, John Alan; Kelly, Dana L. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Mosleh, Ali (University of Maryland, College Park, MD)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

ARM - Human Causes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gases are not completely bad. The major constituents of the atmosphere, oxygen and nitrogen, do not act in the same way as the greenhouse package of carbon dioxide, methane,...

19

Co-benefits of mitigating global greenhouse gas emissions for future air quality and human health  

SciTech Connect

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions also influences air quality. We simulate the co-benefits of global GHG reductions on air quality and human health via two mechanisms: a) reducing co-emitted air pollutants, and b) slowing climate change and its effect on air quality. Relative to a reference scenario, global GHG mitigation in the RCP4.5 scenario avoids 0.5±0.2, 1.3±0.6, and 2.2±1.6 million premature deaths in 2030, 2050, and 2100, from changes in fine particulate matter and ozone. Global average marginal co-benefits of avoided mortality are $40-400 (ton CO2)-1, exceeding marginal abatement costs in 2030 and 2050, and within the low range of costs in 2100. East Asian co-benefits are 10-80 times the marginal cost in 2030. These results indicate that transitioning to a low-carbon future might be justified by air quality and health co-benefits.

West, Jason; Smith, Steven J.; Silva, Raquel; Naik, Vaishali; Zhang, Yuqiang; Adelman, Zacariah; Fry, Meridith M.; Anenberg, Susan C.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated Carbon dioxide emissions are the main component of greenhouse gas emissions caused by human activity. Carbon dioxide is emitted mostly as a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels for energy, although certain industrial processes (e.g., cement manufacture) also emit carbon dioxide. The estimates of energy-related carbon emissions require both data on the energy use and carbon emissions coefficients relating energy use to the amount of carbon emitted. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the main source of data on U.S. energy use. Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 used annual data provided by energy suppliers. However, to obtain more detail on how different sectors use energy, the emissions estimates in Energy and GHG Analysis rely data from on surveys of energy users, such as manufacturing establishments and commercial buildings.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hybrid Human Powered Vehicle (Phase 3) The Zero EMission (ZEM) Vehicle Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Construction of ZEM Car ­ a hybrid human/electric/solar powered vehicle (P-2) (2007-2008) Principal) Hybrid human pedaling/ electric powered vehicle- Designed and constructed P-1 prototype Sponsor: SJSU) Hybrid human pedaling/ Electric/solar powered vehicle (HPV-ZEM)-Designed P-2 Sponsor: SJSU-COE 16 ME + 3

Su, Xiao

22

NATURE|Vol 435|26 May 2005 AVIAN FLU COMMENTARY human flu pandemic could cause 20%  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

optimistic predictions of how the next flu pandemic might unfold. Like most emerging virus infections that threaten human health, flu outbreaks originate from animal reservoirs. Because of rapidly changing human with leading research groups from different disciplines. Close watch An outbreak of avian flu among chickens

Cai, Long

23

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1.1 Total emissions Total U.S. anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse gas emissions in 2009 were 5.8 percent below the 2008 total (Table 1). The decline in total emissions-from 6,983 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO2e) in 2008 to 6,576 MMTCO2e in 2009-was the largest since emissions have been tracked over the 1990-2009 time frame. It was largely the result of a 419-MMTCO2e drop in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions (7.1 percent). There was a small increase of 7 MMTCO2e (0.9 percent) in methane (CH4) emissions, and an increase of 8 MMTCO2e (4.9 percent), based on partial data, in emissions of man-made gases with high global warming potentials (high-GWP gases). (Draft estimates for emissions of HFC and PFC

24

Extracellular Factor(s) following Exposure to ? Particles Can Cause Sister Chromatid Exchanges in Normal Human Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Energy-funded projects entitled Latent...emitted from inhaled radon and radon progeny...inhaled radon and radon progeny cause lung...Energy-funded projects entitled oeLatentExpression...Nos. 1 "3,International Corn mission for...Nero (ed), Radon and Its Decay Products...

Bruce E. Lehnert and Edwin H. Goodwin

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS LOCAL IMPACTS ON HUMAN HEALTH RISK.  

SciTech Connect

A thorough quantitative understanding of the processes of mercury emissions, deposition, and translocation through the food chain is currently not available. Complex atmospheric chemistry and dispersion models are required to predict concentration and deposition contributions, and aquatic process models are required to predict effects on fish. However, there are uncertainties in all of these predictions. Therefore, the most reliable method of understanding impacts of coal-fired power plants on Hg deposition is from empirical data. A review of the literature on mercury deposition around sources including coal-fired power plants found studies covering local mercury concentrations in soil, vegetation, and animals (fish and cows). There is strong evidence of enhanced local deposition within 3 km of the chlor-alkali plants, with elevated soil concentrations and estimated deposition rates of 10 times background. For coal-fired power plants, the data show that atmospheric deposition of Hg may be slightly enhanced. On the scale of a few km, modeling suggests that wet deposition may be increased by a factor of two or three over background. The measured data suggest lower increases of 15% or less. The effects of coal-fired plants seem to be less than 10% of total deposition on a national scale, based on emissions and global modeling. The following summarizes our findings from published reports on the impacts of local deposition. In terms of excesses over background the following increments have been observed within a few km of the plant: (1) local soil concentration Hg increments of 30%-60%, (2) sediment increments of 18-30%, (3) wet deposition increments of 11-12%, and (4) fish Hg increments of about 5-6%, based on an empirical finding that fish concentrations are proportional to the square root of deposition. Important uncertainties include possible reductions of RGM to Hg{sub 0} in power plant plumes and the role of water chemistry in the relationship between Hg deposition and fish content. Soil and vegetation sampling programs were performed around two mid-size coal fired power plants. The objectives were to determine if local mercury hot-spots exist, to determine if they could be attributed to deposition of coal-fired power plant emissions, and to determine if they correlated with model predictions. These programs found the following: (1) At both sites, there was no correlation between modeled mercury deposition and either soil concentrations or vegetation concentrations. At the Kincaid plant, there was excess soil Hg along heavily traveled roads. The spatial pattern of soil mercury concentrations did not match the pattern of vegetation Hg concentrations at either plant. (2) At both sites, the subsurface (5-10 cm) samples the Hg concentration correlated strongly with the surface samples (0-5 cm). Average subsurface sample concentrations were slightly less than the surface samples; however, the difference was not statistically significant. (3) An unequivocal definition of background Hg was not possible at either site. Using various assumed background soil mercury concentrations, the percentage of mercury deposited within 10 km of the plant ranged between 1.4 and 8.5% of the RGM emissions. Based on computer modeling, Hg deposition was primarily RGM with much lower deposition from elemental mercury. Estimates of the percentage of total Hg deposition ranged between 0.3 and 1.7%. These small percentages of deposition are consistent with the empirical findings of only minor perturbations in environmental levels, as opposed to ''hot spots'', near the plants. The major objective of this study was to determine if there was evidence for ''hot-spots'' of mercury deposition around coal-fired power plants. Although the term has been used extensively, it has never been defined. From a public health perspective, such a ''hot spot'' must be large enough to insure that it did not occur by chance, and it must affect water bodies large enough to support a population of subsistence fishers. The results of this study support the hypothesis that n

SULLIVAN, T.M.; BOWERMAN, B.; ADAMS, J.; LIPFERT, F.; MORRIS, S.M.; BANDO, A.; PENA, R.; BLAKE, R.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Plutonium-aerosol emission rates and human pulmonary deposition calculations for Nuclear Site 201, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This study determined the plutonium-aerosol fluxes from the soil to quantify (1) the extent of potential human exposure by deep-lung retention of alpha-emitting particles; (2) the source term should there be any significant, long-term, transport of plutonium aerosols; and (3) the resuspension factor and rate so that, for the first time at any nuclear site, one may calculate how long it will take for wind erosion to carry away a significant amount of the contaminated soil. High-volume air samplers and cascade impactors were used to characterize the plutonium aerosols. Meteorological flux-profile methods were used to calculate dust and plutonium aerosol emission rates. A floorless wind tunnel (10-m long) was used to examine resuspension under steady-state, high wind speed. The resuspension factor was two orders of magnitude lower than the other comparable sites at NTS and elsewhere, and the average resuspension rate of 5.3 x 10/sup -8//d was also very low, so that the half-time for resuspension by wind erosion was about 36,000 y.

Shinn, J.H.; Homan, D.N.

1982-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

27

Applying Human Factors and the Resident Assessment Instrument - Home Care: An Examination of Failure Modes, Causes, Effects and Recommendations in the Home Care Environment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Several analytical techniques including use case diagrams, process flow diagrams (PFDs), hierarchical task analysis (HTA), failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA), systematic human error reduction… (more)

Griffin, Melissa Corinne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

HSV-sr39TK Positron Emission Tomography and Suicide Gene Elimination of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Their Progeny in Humanized Mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reversible engraftment of human hematopoietic stem cells. Engineering immunity against cancer by the adoptive transfer of hematopoietic...296:2410-3. 4. Wirth T , Parker N Yla-Herttuala S.History of gene therapy.Gene 2013;525:162-9. 5. Morgan RA...

Eric H. Gschweng; Melissa N. McCracken; Michael L. Kaufman; Michelle Ho; Roger P. Hollis; Xiaoyan Wang; Navdeep Saini; Richard C. Koya; Thinle Chodon; Antoni Ribas; Owen N. Witte; and Donald B. Kohn

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Canine dirofilariosis caused by Dirofilaria immitis is a risk factor for the human population on the island of Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of the present study was compare the prevalence of D. immitis in dogs and seroprevalence in humans of Gran Canaria (Canary Islands, Spain) taking into consideration...Dirofilaria immitis in dogs and the s...

Jose Alberto Montoya-Alonso; Isabel Mellado; Elena Carretón…

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Evidence that bisphenol A (BPA) can be accurately measured without contamination in human serum and urine and that BPA causes numerous hazards from multiple routes of exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract There is extensive evidence that bisphenol A (BPA) is related to a wide range of adverse health effects based on both human and experimental animal studies. However, a number of regulatory agencies have ignored all hazard findings. Reports of high levels of unconjugated (bioactive) serum BPA in dozens of human biomonitoring studies have also been rejected based on the prediction that the findings are due to assay contamination and that virtually all ingested BPA is rapidly converted to inactive metabolites. NIH and industry-sponsored round robin studies have demonstrated that serum BPA can be accurately assayed without contamination, while the FDA lab has acknowledged uncontrolled assay contamination. In reviewing the published BPA biomonitoring data, we find that assay contamination is, in fact, well controlled in most labs, and cannot be used as the basis for discounting evidence that significant and virtually continuous exposure to BPA must be occurring from multiple sources.

Frederick S. vom Saal; Wade V. Welshons

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic emission determination Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

emission... cool- ing. The spontaneous emission events produce unpre- dictable changes in atomic momenta so... of absorption and emission can cause a large change of the ......

32

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic emission analysis Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

emission... cool- ing. The spontaneous emission events produce unpre- dictable changes in atomic momenta so... of absorption and emission can cause a large change of the ......

33

Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions trading is a comparatively new policy instrument which ... electricity systems in Europe. The development of emissions trading thus represents an innovation in its own...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Global Mortality Attributable to Aircraft Cruise Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aircraft emissions impact human health though degradation of air quality. The majority of previous analyses of air quality impacts from aviation have considered only landing and takeoff emissions. We show that aircraft ...

Britter, Rex E.

35

Global distribution of N2O emissions from aquatic systems: natural emissions and anthropogenic eects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global distribution of N2O emissions from aquatic systems: natural emissions and anthropogenic, are increasing due to human activities. Our analysis suggests that a third of global anthropogenic N2O emission the remainder. Over 80% of aquatic anthropogenic N2O emissions are from the Northern Hemisphere mid

Seitzinger, Sybil

36

Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions trading is a market-based instrument to achieve ... The current international dissemination and intended linking of emissions trading schemes underlines the growing relevance of this ... . There are thr...

Edwin Woerdman

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter covers a series of operations which are essential for the implementation of an efficient emissions trading market on the domestic and international level. An introduction to how a national emissions trading

Dr. Michael See

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

An oxygenating additive for improving the performance and emission characteristics of marine diesel engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diesel engines provide the major power sources for marine transportation and contribute to the prosperity of the worldwide economy. However, the emissions from diesel engines also seriously threaten the environment and are considered one of the major sources of air pollution. The pollutants emitted from marine vessels are confirmed to cause the ecological environmental problems such as the ozone layer destruction, enhancement of the greenhouse effect, and acid rain, etc. Marine diesel engine emissions such as particulate matter and black smoke carry carcinogen components that significantly impact the health of human beings. Investigations on reducing pollutants, in particular particulate matter and nitrogen oxides are critical to human health, welfare and continued prosperity. The addition of an oxygenating agent into fuel oil is one of the possible approaches for reducing this problem because of the obvious fuel oil constituent influences on engine emission characteristics. Ethylene glycol monoacetate was found to be a promising candidate primarily due to its low poison and oxygen-rich composition properties. In this experimental study ethylene glycol monoacetate was mixed with diesel fuel in various proportions to prepare oxygenated diesel fuel. A four-cylinder diesel engine was used to test the engine performance and emission characteristics. The influences of ethylene glycol monoacetate ration to diesel oil, inlet air temperature and humidity parameters on the engine’s speed and torque were considered. The experimental results show that an increase in the inlet air temperature caused an increase in brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC), carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide emission, and exhaust gas temperature, while decreasing the excess air, oxygen and nitrogen oxide emission concentrations. Increasing the inlet air humidity increased the carbon monoxide concentration while the decreased excess air, oxygen and nitrogen oxide emission concentrations. In addition, increasing ethylene glycol monoacetate ratio in the diesel fuel caused an increase in the BSFC while the excess air and oxygen emission concentrations decreased.

C.-Y. Lin; J.-C. Huang

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Comparison of methodologies estimating emissions of aircraft pollutants, environmental impact assessment around airports  

SciTech Connect

Air transportation growth has increased continuously over the years. The rise in air transport activity has been accompanied by an increase in the amount of energy used to provide air transportation services. It is also assumed to increase environmental impacts, in particular pollutant emissions. Traditionally, the environmental impacts of atmospheric emissions from aircraft have been addressed in two separate ways; aircraft pollutant emissions occurring during the landing and take-off (LTO) phase (local pollutant emissions) which is the focus of this study, and the non-LTO phase (global/regional pollutant emissions). Aircraft pollutant emissions are an important source of pollution and directly or indirectly harmfully affect human health, ecosystems and cultural heritage. There are many methods to asses pollutant emissions used by various countries. However, using different and separate methodology will cause a variation in results, some lack of information and the use of certain methods will require justification and reliability that must be demonstrated and proven. In relation to this issue, this paper presents identification, comparison and reviews of some of the methodologies of aircraft pollutant assessment from the past, present and future expectations of some studies and projects focusing on emissions factors, fuel consumption, and uncertainty. This paper also provides reliable information on the impacts of aircraft pollutant emissions in short term and long term predictions.

Kurniawan, Jermanto S., E-mail: Jermanto.kurniawan@inrets.fr; Khardi, S., E-mail: Salah.khardi@inrets.f

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Emission control technology  

SciTech Connect

Environmental protection is indispensable for preserving the earth for later generations. Indeed, industrial development has made our life rich; however, it also accelerates environmental pollution. Above all, such global problems as acid rain caused by SOx and NOx emissions and air pollution caused by particulates have become serious in recent years. Countermeasures currently in service or under development for these problems include: upgrading of fuel-burning systems; conversion of energy sources to clean fuels; pretreatment of fuels; and flue gas treatment. This chapter focuses on technologies that treat flue gases including the circumstances of the development of the technologies.

Yamaguchi, Fumihiko

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Cows Causing Global Warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Broadcast Transcript: Remember when President Reagan blamed trees for air pollution? Well now the Japanese are blaming cows for global warming. Apparently, the methane emissions from burping cows account for 5% of all global greenhouse gases. Simple...

Hacker, Randi

2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

43

Limiting net greenhouse gas emissions in the United States  

SciTech Connect

In 1988, Congress requested that DOE produce a study on carbon dioxide inventory and policy to provide an inventory of emissions sources and to analyze policies to achieve a 20% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions in 5 to 10 years and a 50% reduction in 15 to 20 years. Energy and environmental technology data were analyzed using computational analysis models. This information was then evaluated, drawing on current scientific understanding of global climate change, the possible consequences of anthropogenic climate change (change caused by human activity) and the relationship between energy production and use and the emission of radiatively important gases. Topics discussed include: state of the science in estimating atmosphere/climate change relationships, the potential consequences of atmosphere/climate change, us greenhouse emissions past and present, an approach to analyzing the technical potential and cost of reducing US energy-related greenhouse gas emissions, current policy base and National Energy Strategy actions, fiscal instruments, regulatory instruments, combined strategies and instruments, macroeconomic impacts, carbon taxation and international trade, a comparison to other studies.

Bradley, R A; Watts, E C; Williams, E R [eds.] [eds.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Do Cell Phones Cause Cancer?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Do cell phones, household electrical power wiring or appliance, or high voltage power lines cause cancer? Fuggedaboudit! No way! When pigs fly! When I'm the Pope! Don't text while you're driving, however, or eat your cell phone. All organisms absorb microwave radiation directly as thermal energy. In living organisms, the organisms' thermal control systems, including the blood flow, and various cooling mechanisms, such as sweating in humans, that work to maintain a stable body temperature rapidly transfer the absorbed energy to the environment. Any temperature rise is small or even unobserved. Any proposed mechanism by which cell phone radiation might cause cancer must begin with this fact. But the amount of radiation absorbed from a cell phone is less than that produced by normal metabolic processes, and much less than that produced by, for example, exercise. None of these normal metabolic processes cause cancer. Therefore, the much smaller amounts of energy from cell phones doesn't cause cancer either. All f...

Leikind, Bernard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Unintended Impacts of Increased Truck Loads on Pavement Supply-Chain Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unintended Impacts of Increased Truck Loads on Pavement Supply-Chain Emissions Nakul Sathaye, Arpad emissions, raising the question of whether increased vehicle weights may cause unintended environmental consequences. This paper presents scenarios with estimated emissions resulting from load consolidation

California at Berkeley, University of

46

Radon emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SIR,-Wendy Barnaby (August 28) writes on the problem of radon emission from the tailings of uranium milling in Sweden. This problem would arise from ... that has to be treated. She describes Professor Robert O. Pohl's report that "radon can escape more easily from the broken ground of a mine than from an undisturbed ...

SVEN-ERIC BRUNNSJO

1975-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

47

Humanity’s unsustainable environmental footprint  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biodiversity loss or effects on human health or...billion m 3 /year (average for 1996 to 2005...billion m 3 /year (average for 1996 to...emissions from fossil fuels—part of humanity...products in their price—for example, by...The EF of the average global citizen...so-called rebound effect (44). Profound...

Arjen Y. Hoekstra; Thomas O. Wiedmann

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

48

Anthropogenic Lead Emissions in the Ocean: The Evolving Global Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the current distribution of lead and lead isotopes in the ocean with regard to the evolving pattern of human emissions during the past decades and centuries.

Lee, Jong-Mi

49

Health Impacts Research - Emissions & Emission Controls - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Impacts Research Health Impacts Research Another aspect of the emissions research at ORNL focuses on Health Impacts. This effort concentrates on analyzing exhaust for Mobile Source Air Toxics (MSATs) or other unregulated exhaust species that have the potential to harm human health. MSATs are a group of chemical species defined by the U.S. EPA that may pose risk to humans; formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, 1,3-butadiene, benzene, and toluene are some example species. Engines operated with new combustion modes and alternative fuels are studied for MSAT emissions to determine insure that the advanced technologies being developed pose no additional risk to humans. A large part of the Health Impacts research effort at ORNL focuses on particulate matter (PM) which is also defined as an MSAT by the U.S. EPA.

50

Nervous breakdown causes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nervous breakdown causes Nervous breakdown causes Name: Renee Nuckols Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Physiologically, what causes a mental/nervous breakdown besides normal everyday stress? Is it a process that kills neurons? Also please include some internal and external symptoms that occur prior to, during, and after a nervous breakdown. Replies: "Nervous breakdown" may be a misnomer, though. What "breaks down" is not so much the nerves and neurons, but the adrenal glands. A more accurate term would be the "exhaustion phase of the general adaption syndrome," but obviously that is quite a mouthful. Excessive STRESS is what can cause "nervous breakdowns." Stress includes the obvious things like exam pressures, trouble with parents or teachers, peer pressure, but also includes things like a significant personal achievement, making a major purchase, changes in routines of life (sleeping, eating habits), moving to a different part of town - even the change in seasons and temperatures. It can come from almost anything which causes a disturbance in normal living. Stress triggers a number of physiological changes collectively termed "GENERAL ADAPTATION SYNDROME." There are three phases: 1) alarm, 2) resistance, and 3) exhaustion. These phases are controlled and regulated by the adrenal glands. Your adrenal glands lie just above your kidneys and are composed of inner and outer parts. The inner part is called the adrenal medulla, and it secretes the hormones adrenaline and noradrenaline. These hormones help your body deal with stressful situations. If you were alone and met a gang in some back alley, your adrenal glands would flood your body with the hormones, your blood pressure, heart rate, sweat production would shoot way high! Your body is in a "FIGHT or FLIGHT" mode. (Just thinking about getting in such a situation may have caused some stress!) Well, whenever your body deals with smaller stresses, the same hormones are released. The outer part of the adrenal glands is the adrenal cortex. They also produce hormones, but slightly different ones: glucocorticoids and mineralcorticoids. Glucocorticoids can increase blood sugar levels profoundly, while mineralcorticoids affect mineral excretion. These hormones are largely responsible for helping the body deal with prolonged stress. They help provide extra energy and blood supply. For instance, if you had a whole week of finals, your adrenal cortex would work overtime as you burn the midnight oil studying. These instances are the "resistance" phase of the general adaptation syndrome.

51

Modeling Multiple Causes of Carcinogenesis  

SciTech Connect

An array of epidemiological results and databases on test animal indicate that risk of cancer and atherosclerosis can be up- or down-regulated by diet through a range of 200%. Other factors contribute incrementally and include the natural terrestrial environment and various human activities that jointly produce complex exposures to endotoxin-producing microorganisms, ionizing radiations, and chemicals. Ordinary personal habits and simple physical irritants have been demonstrated to affect the immune response and risk of disease. There tends to be poor statistical correlation of long-term risk with single agent exposures incurred throughout working careers. However, Agency recommendations for control of hazardous exposures to humans has been substance-specific instead of contextually realistic even though there is consistent evidence for common mechanisms of toxicological and carcinogenic action. That behavior seems to be best explained by molecular stresses from cellular oxygen metabolism and phagocytosis of antigenic invasion as well as breakdown of normal metabolic compounds associated with homeostatic- and injury-related renewal of cells. There is continually mounting evidence that marrow stroma, comprised largely of monocyte-macrophages and fibroblasts, is important to phagocytic and cytokinetic response, but the complex action of the immune process is difficult to infer from first-principle logic or biomarkers of toxic injury. The many diverse database studies all seem to implicate two important processes, i.e., the univalent reduction of molecular oxygen and breakdown of aginuine, an amino acid, by hydrolysis or digestion of protein which is attendant to normal antigen-antibody action. This behavior indicates that protection guidelines and risk coefficients should be context dependent to include reference considerations of the composite action of parameters that mediate oxygen metabolism. A logic of this type permits the realistic common-scale modeling of multiple causes of carcinogenesis and shifts the risk-assessment logic to considerations of ?what dose does?? in contrast to the current process of the substance-specific question of ?what dose is?? Whether reactive oxygen is the proximate or contributing cause of disease or simply a better estimate of biologically effective dose, it has enormous advantages for improved risk- and policy-based decisions. Various estimates of immune system modulation will be given based on radiobiology.

Jones, T.D.

1999-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

52

Tracking uncertainties in the causal chain from human activities to climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and are designated forthe causal chain from human activities, to GHG emissions, tothe increasing GHG abundances, to the radiative forcing of

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4.1 Total emissions U.S. nitrous oxide emissions in 2009 were 4 MMTCO2e (1.7 percent) below their 2008 total (Table 22). Sources of U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the majority of agricultural emissions result from nitrogen fertilization of agricultural soils (87 percent of the agriculture total) and management of animal waste (13 percent). U.S. nitrous oxide emissions rose from 1990 to 1994, fell from 1994 to 2002, and returned to an upward trajectory from 2003 to 2007, largely as a result of increased use of synthetic fertilizers. Fertilizers are the primary contributor of emissions from nitrogen fertilization of soils, which grew by more than 30 percent from

54

Source Emissions and Transport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electron micrograph image, Lara Gundel with instrumentation electron micrograph image, Lara Gundel with instrumentation Source Emissions and Transport Investigators conduct research here to characterize and better understand the sources of airborne volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic pollutants in the indoor environment. This research includes studies of the physical and chemical processes that govern indoor air pollutant concentrations and exposures. The motivation is to contribute to the reduction of potential human health effects. Contacts Randy Maddalena RLMaddalena@lbl.gov (510) 486-4924 Mark Mendell MJMendell@lbl.gov (510) 486-5762 Links Pollutant Sources, Dynamics and Chemistry Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy Technologies Environmental Impacts

55

Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture  

SciTech Connect

This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min × 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

M. Aslam K. Khalil

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

56

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Review - 2011 (so far) Tim Johnson October 4, 2011 DOE DEER Conference, Detroit JohnsonTV@Corning.com 2 Summary * California LD criteria emission regs are tightening....

57

6.20 Mapping Human Brain Function  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 612011 6.20 Mapping Human Brain Function Many mysteries of the human brain have been unraveled by positron emission tomography (PET), an imaging tool used worldwide to diagnose...

58

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2.1. Total carbon dioxide emissions Annual U.S. carbon dioxide emissions fell by 419 million metric tons in 2009 (7.1 percent), to 5,447 million metric tons (Figure 9 and Table 6). The annual decrease-the largest over the 19-year period beginning with the 1990 baseline-puts 2009 emissions 608 million metric tons below the 2005 level, which is the Obama Administration's benchmark year for its goal of reducing U.S. emissions by 17 percent by 2020. The key factors contributing to the decrease in carbon dioxide emissions in 2009 included an economy in recession with a decrease in gross domestic product of 2.6 percent, a decrease in the energy intensity of the economy of 2.2 percent, and a decrease in the carbon intensity of energy supply of

59

Enforcing Emissions Trading when Emissions Permits are Bankable  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose enforcement strategies for emissions trading programs with bankable emissions permits that guarantee...

John K. Stranlund; Christopher Costello…

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Multiwavelength Thermal Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

California at Santa Cruz, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Measuring congestion and emissions : a network model for Mexico City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Congestion is a major problem for the major cities of today. It reduces mobility, slows economic growth, and is a major cause of emissions. Vehicles traveling at slow speeds emit significantly more pollutants than vehicles ...

Amano, Yasuaki Daniel, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) brought about new awareness regarding the overall health-effects of stationary source fossil combustion emissions. Title III of the CAAA identified 189 pollutants, including mercury, as hazardous or toxic and required the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to evaluate their emissions by source, health effects and environmental implications, including the need to control these emissions. These pollutants are collectively referred to as air toxics or hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The provisions in Title III specific to electric generating units (EGU) were comprehensively addressed by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaborative air toxic characterization programs conducted between 1990 and 1997. This work provided most of the data supporting the conclusions found in EPA's congressionally mandated reports regarding air toxic emissions from coal-fired utility boilers; the Mercury Study Report to Congress (1997)1 and the "Study of Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions from Electric Utility Steam Generating Units -- Final Report to Congress" (1998).2 The first report identified coal-fired power plants as the largest source of human-generated mercury emissions in the U.S. and the second concluded that mercury from coal-fired utilities was the HAP of "greatest potential concern" to the environment and human health that merited additional research and monitoring.

63

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Driving your vehicle can yield both greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from your vehicle's tailpipe and GHG emissions related to the production of the fuel used to power your vehicle. For example, activities associated with fuel production such as feedstock extraction, feedstock transport to a processing plant, and conversion of feedstock to motor fuel, as well as distribution of the motor fuel, can all produce GHG emissions. The Fuel Economy and Environment Label provides a Greenhouse Gas Rating, from 1 (worst) to 10 (best), based on the vehicle's tailpipe carbon dioxide emissions only, and this rating does not reflect any GHG emissions associated with fuel production.

64

Emissions from Ships  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Turbine and Diesel) Engine Exhaust Emission...of relative fuel consumption. For commercial...Marine Diesel Engine and Gas Turbine...Turbine and Diesel) Engine Exhaust Emission...of relative fuel consumption. For commercial...

James J. Corbett; Paul Fischbeck

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Introduction to Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter constitutes an introduction to emissions trading. First, we detail the latest developments ... Second, we introduce the main characteristics of emissions trading, be it in terms of spatial and...2 al...

Dr. Julien Chevallier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Developing Infrastructure & Community Resilience to Natural & Human-Caused Disasters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to move forward resilience efforts in the tri-state/DC region, (4) roles of the National Science Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster and when there is a focus on dealing with such disasters, now is the time

Aydilek, Ahmet

67

Is Cadmium a Cause of Human Pancreatic Cancer?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...g., in nickel-cadmium batteries and electroplating, as a component...cadmium are the burning of fossil fuels and waste materials and the...proteinurea. The health of battery workers exposed to cadmium...cancer incidence in Swedish battery workers exposed to cadmium...

Gary G. Schwartz and Isildinha M. Reis

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Is Cadmium a Cause of Human Pancreatic Cancer?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Biological monitoring of the general population for cadmium...construction equipment and diesel engine manufacturing plant...study of foundry and engine plant workers. Am...mortality at two automobile engine manufacturing plants...

Gary G. Schwartz and Isildinha M. Reis

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Evaluating a Federal agency's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile means getting a solid understanding of the organization's largest emission categories, largest emission sources, and its potential for improvement.

70

Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth by W. G. Breiland, L. A. Bruskas, A. A. Allerman, and T. W. Hargett Motivation-Temperature is a critical factor in the growth of thin films by either chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It is particularly important in compound semiconductor growth because one is often challenged to grow materials with specific chemical compositions in order to maintain stringent lattice-matching conditions or to achieve specified bandgap values. Optical pyrometry can be used to measure surface temperatures, but the thin film growth causes significant changes in the emissivity of the surface, leading to severe errors in the pyrometer measurement. To avoid these errors, emissivity changes must be measured and

71

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 ? ?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend1 ? ?)? i + ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect toSeries Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation 

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

State Emissions Estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Because energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) constitutes over 80 percent of total emissions, the state energy-related CO 2 emission levels provide a good indicator of the relative contribution of individual states to total greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) emissions estimates at the state level for energy-related CO 2 are based on data contained in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). 1 The state-level emissions estimates are based on energy consumption data for the following fuel categories: three categories of coal (residential/commercial, industrial, and electric power sector); natural gas; and ten petroleum products including-- asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gases

73

Ehrlichia Infection as a Cause of Severe Respiratory Distress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...State Department of Health recently alerted physicians about human granulocytic ehrlichiosis in Westchester County, in the lower Hudson River valley, and on Long Island. This region has a high incidence of Lyme disease associated with the Ixodes scapularis tick vector. It has a high population density... To the Editor: Human ehrlichiosis is increasingly being recognized as a cause of a diverse spectrum of illness in geographic regions where the tick vectors are found. The New York State Department of Health recently alerted physicians about human ...

1996-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

74

Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature characteristics. These favorable emissions characteristics were obtained while maintaining performance and fuel economy. These aggressive emissions and performance results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. This systems approach benefits substantially from an integrated experimental and analytical approach to technology development, which is one of DDCs core competencies Also, DDC is uniquely positioned to undertake such a systems technology development approach, given its vertically integrated commercial structure within the DaimlerChrysler organization. State-of-the-art analytical tools were developed targeting specific LEADER program objectives and were applied to guide system enhancements and to provide testing directions, resulting in a shortened and efficient development cycle. Application examples include ammonia/NO{sub x} distribution improvement and urea injection controls development, and were key contributors to significantly reduce engine out as well as tailpipe out emissions. Successful cooperation between DDC and Engelhard Corporation, the major subcontractor for the LEADER program and provider of state-of-the-art technologies on various catalysts, was another contributing factor to ensure that both passenger car and LD truck applications achieved Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions levels. Significant technical challenges, which highlight barriers of commercialization of diesel technology for passenger cars and LD truck applications, are presented at the end of this report.

None

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

75

Consideration of common cause failures in safety systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Systems in which failure could endanger human life are termed safety-critical. The SIS (Safety Instrumented System) should be designed to meet the required safety integrity level as defined in the safety requirement specification. Moreover, the SIS design ... Keywords: IEC 61508, beta-factor-model, common cause failure, multi parameter model, probability of failure on demand

J. Börcsök; P. Holub

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Air pollution and early deaths in the United States : attribution of PM?.? exposure to emissions species, time, location and sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion emissions constitute the largest source of anthropogenic emissions in the US. They lead to the degradation of air quality and human health, by contributing to the formation of fine particulate matter (PM2 .5 ), ...

Dedoussi, Irene Constantina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

A simple model of spontaneous emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a very simple model of a spontaneous emission from a two-level atom, interacting with a field of a finite number of states. Such a process is often said to occur because of the large number of equally-probable states of environment. We show that in our model increasing the number of field states may and may not cause a practically permanent emission, depending on the details of the model. We also describe how irreversibility emerges with growing number of states. Mathematical tools are reduced to a necessary minimum and hopefully can be well understood by undergraduate students.

Krzysztof Piotr Wójcik

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

79

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

80

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants Mercury Emissions Control NETL managed the largest funded research program in the country to develop an in-depth understanding of fossil combustion-based mercury emissions. The program goal was to develop effective control options that would allow generators to comply with regulations. Research focus areas included measurement and characterization of mercury emissions, as well as the development of cost-effective control technologies for the U.S. coal-fired electric generating industry. Control Technologies Field Testing Phase I & II Phase III Novel Concepts APCD Co-benefits Emissions Characterization

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

82

emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emissions emissions Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for emissions. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated December 15th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords emissions New Zealand projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2010 New Zealand emissions outlook (xls, 1.2 MiB)

83

Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions 2 0 1 0 Green TransporTaTion TechnoloGies Compared to traditional gasoline engines, diesel engines require less maintenance, generate energy more efficiently, and produce less carbon dioxide emissions. But when uncontrolled, diesel engines churn out harmful emissions like particu- late matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are currently working to develop

84

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 Tim Johnson October 16, 2012 2 Environmental Technologies Summary * Regulations - LEVIII finalized, Tier 3? RDE in Europe developing and very...

86

EMSL - emission spectra  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

emission-spectra en Structures and Stabilities of (MgO)n Nanoclusters. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsstructures-and-stabilities-mgon-nanoclusters

87

NETL: Emissions Characterization - CMU Emissions Characterization Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Emissions Characterization Study Source Emissions Characterization Study The emissions characterization study is being performed in conjunction with the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study [PDF-744KB], a larger effort that includes ambient measurements and atmospheric modeling of the Pittsburgh region. The main objectives of this portion of the study are: To achieve advanced characterization of the PM in the Pittsburgh region. Measurements include the PM size, surface, volume, and mass distribution; chemical composition as a function of size and on a single particle basis; temporal and spatial variability. To obtain accurate current fingerprints of the major primary PM sources in the Pittsburgh region using traditional filter-based sampling and state-of-the-art techniques such as dilution sampling and single particle analysis using mass spectroscopy and LIBS.

88

Cumulative carbon emissions, emissions floors and short-term rates of warming: implications for policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...link between peak human-induced global warming and cumulative carbon emissions...in avoiding some level of peak global warming. The recent Copenhagen Accord...impacts of climate change, even if global warming does remain below 2C [27,28...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Diurnal tracking of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the Los Angeles basin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diurnal tracking of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the Los Angeles basin Diurnal tracking of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the Los Angeles basin megacity during spring 2010 Title Diurnal tracking of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the Los Angeles basin megacity during spring 2010 Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Newman, Sally, Seongeun Jeong, Marc L. Fischer, Xiaomei Xu, Christine L. Haman, Barry Lefer, Sergio Alvarez, Bernhard Rappenglueck, Eric A. Kort, Arlyn E. Andrews, Jeffrey Peischl, Kevin R. Gurney, Charles E. Miller, and Yuk L. Yung Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Volume 13 Pagination 4359-4372 Abstract Attributing observed CO2 variations to human or natural cause is critical to deducing and tracking emissions from observations. We have used in situ CO2, CO, and planetary boundary layer height (PBLH) measurements recorded during the CalNex-LA (CARB et al., 2008) ground campaign of 15 May-15 June 2010, in Pasadena, CA, to deduce the diurnally varying anthropogenic component of observed CO2 in the megacity of Los Angeles (LA). This affordable and simple technique, validated by carbon isotope observations and WRF-STILT (Weather Research and Forecasting model - Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport model) predictions, is shown to robustly attribute observed CO2 variation to anthropogenic or biogenic origin over the entire diurnal cycle. During CalNex-LA, local fossil fuel combustion contributed up to ~50% of the observed CO2 enhancement overnight, and ~100% of the enhancement near midday. This suggests that sufficiently accurate total column CO2 observations recorded near midday, such as those from the GOSAT or OCO-2 satellites, can potentially be used to track anthropogenic emissions from the LA megacity.

90

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control - Emissions & Emission Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control Catalysts for controlling NOx from lean engines are studied in great detail at FEERC. Lean NOx Traps (LNTs) and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) are two catalyst technologies of interest. Catalysts are studied from the nanoscale to full scale. On the nanoscale, catalyst powders are analyzed with chemisorptions techniques to determine the active metal surface area where catalysis occurs. Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy is used to observe the chemical reactions occurring on the catalyst surface during catalyst operation. Both powder and coated catalyst samples are analyzed on bench flow reactors in controlled simulated exhaust environments to better characterize the chemical

91

Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, Steven K

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Comment on 'Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power'  

SciTech Connect

Katzenstein and Apt investigate the important question of pollution emission reduction benefits from variable generation resources such as wind and solar. Their methodology, which couples an individual variable generator to a dedicated gas plant to produce a flat block of power, is, however, inappropriate. For CO{sub 2}, the authors conclude that variable generators ''achieve {approx}80% of the emission reductions expected if the power fluctuations caused no additional emissions.'' They find even lower NO{sub x} emission reduction benefits with steam injected gas turbines and a 2--4 times net increase in NO{sub x} emissions for systems with dry NO{sub x} control unless the ratio of energy from natural gas to variable plants is greater than 2:1. A more appropriate methodology, however, would find a significantly lower degradation of the emissions benefit than suggested by Katzenstein and Apt.

Mills, A.; Wiser, R.; Milligan, M.; O'Malley, M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Historic patterns of CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuels: Implications for stabilization of emissions  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the historical record of greenhouse gas emissions since 1950, reviews the prospects for emissions into the future, and projects what would be the short-term outcome if the stated targets of the FCCC were in fact achieved. The examination focuses on the most important of the greenhouse gases, CO{sub 2}. The extensive record of historic CO{sub 2} emissions is explored to ascertain if it is an adequate basis for useful extrapolation into the near future. Global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption have been documented. Emissions grew at 4.3% per year from 1950 until the time of the 1973 oil crisis. Another disruption in growth followed the oil price increases of 1979. Global total emissions have been increasing steadily since the 1982-1983 minimum and have grown by more than 20% since then. At present, emission Of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel burning is dominated by a few countries: the U.S., the former Soviet Union, China, the developed countries of Europe and Japan. Only 20 countries emit 84% of emissions from all countries. However, rates of growth in many of the developed countries are now very low. In contrast, energy use has grown rapidly over the last 20 years in some of the large, developing economies. Emissions from fossil fuel consumption are now nearly 4 times those from land use change and are the primary cause of measured increases in the atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2}. The increasing concentration of atmospheric CO{sub 2} has led to rising concern about the possibility of impending changes in the global climate system. In an effort to limit or mitigate potential negative effects of global climate change, 154 countries signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) in Rio de Janeiro in June, 1992. The FCCC asks all countries to conduct an inventory of their current greenhouse gas emissions setting non-binding targets.

Andres, R.J.; Marland, G.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Historic Patterns of CO{sub 2} Emissions from Fossil Fuels: Implications for Stabilization of Emissions  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This paper examines the historical record of greenhouse gas emissions since 1950, reviews the prospects for emissions into the future, and projects what would be the short-term outcome if the stated targets of the FCCC were in fact achieved. The examination focuses on the most important of the greenhouse gases, CO{sub 2}. The extensive record of historic CO{sub 2} emissions is explored to ascertain if it is an adequate basis for useful extrapolation into the near future. Global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption have been documented. Emissions grew at 4.3% per year from 1950 until the time of the 1973 oil crisis. Another disruption in growth followed the oil price increases of 1979. Global total emissions have been increasing steadily since the 1982-1983 minimum and have grown by more than 20% since then. At present, emission Of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel burning is dominated by a few countries: the U.S., the former Soviet Union, China, the developed countries of Europe and Japan. Only 20 countries emit 84% of emissions from all countries. However, rates of growth in many of the developed countries are now very low. In contrast, energy use has grown rapidly over the last 20 years in some of the large, developing economies. Emissions from fossil fuel consumption are now nearly 4 times those from land use change and are the primary cause of measured increases in the atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2}. The increasing concentration of atmospheric CO{sub 2} has led to rising concern about the possibility of impending changes in the global climate system. In an effort to limit or mitigate potential negative effects of global climate change, 154 countries signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) in Rio de Janeiro in June, 1992. The FCCC asks all countries to conduct an inventory of their current greenhouse gas emissions setting non-binding targets.

Andres, R. J.; Marland, G.

1994-06-00T23:59:59.000Z

95

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: Emissions Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Control Emissions Characterization In anticipation of the 1990 CAAAs, specifically the draft Title III regarding the characterization of potential HAPs from electric steam generating units, DOE initiated a new Air Toxics Program in 1989. The DOE Mercury Measurement and Control Program evolved as a result of the findings from the comprehensive assessment of hazardous air pollutants studies conducted by DOE from 1990 through 1997. DOE, in collaboration with EPRI, performed stack tests at a number of coal-fired power plants (identified on map below) to accurately determine the emission rates of a series of potentially toxic chemicals. These tests had not been conducted previously because of their cost, about $1 million per test, so conventional wisdom on emissions was based on emission factors derived from analyses of coal. In general, actual emissions were found to be about one-tenth previous estimates, due to a high fraction of the pollutants being captured by existing particulate control systems. These data resulted in a decision by EPA that most of these pollutants were not a threat to the environment, and needed no further regulation at power plants. This shielded the coal-fired power industry from major (tens of millions) costs that would have resulted from further controlling these emissions. However, another finding of these studies was that mercury was not effectively controlled in coal-fired utility boiler systems. Moreover, EPA concluded that a plausible link exists between these emissions and adverse health effects. Ineffective control of mercury by existing control technologies resulted from a number of factors, including variation in coal composition and variability in the form of the mercury in flue gases. The volatility of mercury was the main contributor for less removal, as compared to the less volatile trace elements/metals which were being removed at efficiencies over 99% with the fly ash. In addition, it was determined that there was no reliable mercury speciation method to accurately distinguish between the elemental and oxidized forms of mercury in the flue gas. These two forms of mercury respond differently to removal techniques in existing air pollution control devices utilized by the coal-fired utility industry.

96

Emissions Control Failures in Passenger Cars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Emissions Control Failures in Passenger Cars Two measures of car model malfunction probability, fraction of cars over 1% CO (y-axis) and average CO concentration of all cars (x-axis), demonstrate that five 1987-89 car models (14 year-model combinations) have a malfunction probability several times that of all other models. When an automobile's emissions control system fails, it may be because that model is more prone to failure than others, according to a study conducted by the Center's Energy Analysis Program and Marc Ross of the University of Michigan. This finding goes against the conventional wisdom that improper maintenance or deliberate disabling of the emissions systems by car owners is the cause of "high-emitting" vehicles. The results may provide clean-air

97

Seismic Emissions Surveys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emissions Surveys Emissions Surveys Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Seismic Emissions Surveys Abstract With recent improvements in acquiring, processing and interpreting data, seismic ground noise provides a valuable tool for geothermal exploration. A time domain beam steering array processing technique is employed. This process eliminates the occurrence of false anomalies caused by local geologic amplification effects. Surveys of this type are used to located naturally fractured reservoirs. Results form Dixie Valley and Desert Peak, Nevada correlate well with the location of productive wells or known geology. Authors Katz and Lewis J. Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, 1984 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

98

Power Generation and Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions from power generation are associated with adverse health and ecological effects. Fossil fuel-based power plants (such as coal, oil, and to a lesser extent, natural gas) are associated with emissions of particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and a variety of organic contaminants such as mercury and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Exposure to emissions from power plants has been associated with a variety of respiratory symptoms, typically based on short-term (e.g., from 5–10 min to 24 h) increases in ambient concentrations. In addition, exposure to constituents from emissions generated by fossil fuels has been associated with increases in premature mortality, particularly in the elderly, and a variety of respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses. Fossil fuels, particularly coal-fired power plants, are responsible for generating the majority of emissions to which humans are exposed.

K. von Stackelberg

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

100

Materials Applications of Photoelectron Emission Microscopy....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications of Photoelectron Emission Microscopy. Materials Applications of Photoelectron Emission Microscopy. Abstract: Photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) is a versatile...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Spontaneous Emission Rate Enhancement Using Optical Antennas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of  Spontaneous  Emission  in  a  Semiconductor  nanoLED,”  emission  rate  enhancement  using  the  Fluorescent  Emission  by  Lattice   Resonances  in  

Kumar, Nikhil

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Emission Abatement System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

Bromberg, Leslie (Sharon, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Rabinovich, Alexander (Swampscott, MA)

2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

103

Chapter 16 - Fuel Effects on Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The majority of fuels consumed by internal combustion engines (ICE) are fossil fuels, mainly gasoline and diesel fuel. Through the fuels' history, their properties have kept changing because of various reasons, such as crude oil prices, progress in refinery technology, changes in vehicle technology, environmental legislation, and political considerations. The environmental legislation has become the most important factor affecting the requirements of automotive fuels, because of: additional limitations caused by changes in vehicle technology (such as the need of unleaded gasoline for catalyst-equipped vehicles); the growing importance of direct fuel effects (their weighting factor rising sharply as a result of very low emission levels mandated in ecological regulations). Numerous research works have been performed to investigate the fuel composition effects on engine exhaust emissions. The effects of different fuel variables on regulated (CO, HC, NOx, PM) and unregulated (benzene, 1,3-butadiene, aldehydes, and PAH) engine exhaust emissions were investigated in the foregoing and in many other research programs. The accumulated knowledge allows main fuel parameters to be defined affecting pollutants emission and fuel/engine/emissions relationships to be revealed with good agreement between different studies.

Yoram Zvirin; Marcel Gutman; Leonid Tartakovsky

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Positron Scanning  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE R&D Accomplishments DOE R&D Accomplishments Search All Database Web Pages for Go The Basics Home About What's New FAQ Contact Us Laureates Nobel Laureates Fermi Laureates Nobel Physicists Nobel Chemists Medicine Nobels Explore Insights SC Stories Snapshots R&D Nuggets Database Search Browse Reports Database Help Finding Aids Site Map A - Z Index Menu Synopsis Blog Archive QR Code RSS Archive Tag Cloud Videos Widget XML Bookmark and Share Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Positron Scanning Resources with Additional Information Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scanner Courtesy Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 'Positron Emission Tomography ... [is a medical imaging technique that] can track chemical reactions in living tissues and merges chemistry with biological imaging. Its strength has been in studies of the brain where there has been significant progress in investigations of drug addiction, aging, mental illness, and neurogenic disorders. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) had its genesis in hot-atom chemical research supported by the Chemical Sciences Division of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Through this research it was learned, over many years, how to prepare short-lived positron emitters such as 18F whose half-life is 110 minutes. In 1975, the molecule [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose was successfully synthesized at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and set the stage for Positron Emission Tomography of the human brain.'

105

EPA Emissions | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPA Emissions ORNL research informs new EPA emissions standards July 11, 2014 Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a streamlined method for determining vehicle...

106

Emission Standards for Contaminants (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations list emissions standards for various contaminants, and contain special requirements for anaerobic lagoons. These regulations also describe alternative emissions limits, which may...

107

Engines - Emissions Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPRI Hybrid Electric Vehicle Working Group: HEV Costs and Emissions EPRI Hybrid Electric Vehicle Working Group: HEV Costs and Emissions Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are attractive options for increasing vehicle fuel economy and reducing emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases. Two automobile manufacturers have already introduced HEVs, and other manufacturers are planning to introduce their own models. One available HEV combines mass reduction (also applicable to conventional vehicles) with idle-stop, regenerative braking, and electric-drive assist to achieve a fuel economy more than 2.5 times the current Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standard. The second HEV combines idle-stop, regenerative braking, electric assist acceleration, and continuously variable transmission (CVT) to achieve a fuel economy of more than twice the current CAFÉ standard, qualifying as a super ultra-low emissions vehicle (SULEV).

108

Gas Turbine Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, preliminary design information regarding gas turbine emissions has been unreliable, particularly for facilities using steam injection and other forms of Best Available Control Technology (BACT). This was probably attributed to the lack...

Frederick, J. D.

109

Photon enhanced thermionic emission  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

110

Fuel Consumption and Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calculating fuel consumption and emissions is a typical offline analysis ... simulations or real trajectory data) and the engine speed (as obtained from gear-shift schemes ... as input and is parameterized by veh...

Martin Treiber; Arne Kesting

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Intelligent field emission arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field emission arrays (FEAs) have been studied extensively as potential electron sources for a number of vacuum microelectronic device applications. For most applications, temporal current stability and spatial current ...

Hong, Ching-yin, 1973-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on a national level involves substantial investment efforts, though part of these may be regained soon.1 On a global level, the costs of the available options are likely to ...

Catrinus J. Jepma; Che Wah Lee

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment; evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions  

SciTech Connect

The report provide estimates of: (1) individual risks based on central tendency exposure; (2) individual risks based on maximum environmental concentrations; (3) risks to highly exposed or susceptible subgroups of the population (e.g., subsistence farmers and school children); (4) risks associated with specific activities that may result in elevated exposures (e.g., subsistence fishermen and deer hunters); and (5) population risk. This approach allows for the estimation of risks to specific segments of the population taking into consideration activity patterns, number of individuals, and actual locations of individuals in these subgroups with respect to the facility. The fate and transport modeling of emissions from the facility to estimate exposures to identified subgroups is described.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Field emission electron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski Missoula Fire burning Greenhouse gases Emission factors a b s t r a c t While the vast majority of carbon emitted wildland fire greenhouse gas and aerosol (organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC)) emission inventories

116

Quantized Media with Absorptive Scatterers and Modified Atomic Emission Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modifications in the spontaneous emission rate of an excited atom that are caused by extinction effects in a nearby dielectric medium are analyzed in a quantummechanical model, in which the medium consists of spherical scatterers with absorptive properties. Use of the dyadic Green function of the electromagnetic field near a a dielectric sphere leads to an expression for the change in the emission rate as a series of multipole contributions for which analytical formulas are obtained. The results for the modified emission rate as a function of the distance between the excited atom and the dielectric medium show the influence of both absorption and scattering processes.

L. G. Suttorp; A. J. van Wonderen

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

117

Human Ecology Human ecology Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human Ecology Impact of Human ecology Research Bonus Issue FROM SCHOLARSHIP TO POLICY MAKING OF HUMAN ECOLOGY APRIL 2005/VOLUME 33, NUMBER 1 #12;Human Ecology Volume 33, Number 1 April 2005 The New York State College of Human Ecology at Cornell University Lisa Staiano-Coico, Ph.D. Rebecca Q

Wang, Z. Jane

118

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environment Environment Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U. S. Release Date: March 31, 2011 | Next Release Date: Report Discontinued | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0573(2009) Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview Diagram Notes [a] CO2 emissions related to petroleum consumption (includes 64 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [b] CO2 emissions related to coal consumption (includes 0.3 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [c] CO2 emissions related to natural gas consumption (includes 13 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [d] Excludes carbon sequestered in nonfuel fossil products. [e] CO2 emissions from the plastics portion of municipal solid waste (11 MMTCO2) combusted for electricity generation and very small amounts (0.4 MMTCO2) of geothermal-related emissions.

119

GHG emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GHG emissions GHG emissions Dataset Summary Description These datasets include GHG and CO2 emissions statistics for the European Union (EU). The statistics are available from the European Commission. Source European Commission Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Biofuels CO2 emissions EU GHG emissions Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Total GHG and CO2 Emissions for EU (xls, 853.5 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon GHG Emissions by Sector, all member countries (xls, 2 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon GHG Emissions from Transport, all member countries (xls, 1.3 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon CO2 emissions by sector, all member countries (xls, 2.1 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon CO2 emissions by transport, all member countries (xls, 1.5 MiB)

120

The effects of potential changes in United States beef production on global grazing systems and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and greenhouse gas emissions Jerome Dumortier1 , Dermot J Hayes2 , Miguel Carriquiry2 , Fengxia Dong3 , Xiaodong in the U.S. causes a net increase in GHG emissions on a global scale. We couple a global agricultural production in the United States. The effects on emissions from agricultural production (i.e., methane

Zhou, Yaoqi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Urban Road Transport in Latin America: CO2 Reduction as a Co-Benefit of Transport Strategies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is broad consensus that GHG are warming the planet (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2007). Many human activities produce GHG emissions, but roughly two thirds of the total anthropogenic emissions

Lee Schipper; Elizabeth Deakin…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Optimal irreversible stimulated emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We studied the dynamics of an initially inverted atom in a semi-infinite waveguide, in the presence of a single propagating photon. We show that atomic relaxation is enhanced by a factor of 2, leading to maximal bunching in the output field. This optimal irreversible stimulated emission is a novel phenomenon that can be observed with state-of-the-art solid-state atoms and waveguides. When the atom interacts with two one-dimensional electromagnetic environments, the preferential emission in the stimulated field can be exploited to efficiently amplify a classical or a quantum state.

D Valente; Y Li; J P Poizat; J M Gerard; L C Kwek; M F Santos; A Auffeves

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

123

Controlled spontaneous emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of spontaneous emission is studied by a direct computer simulation of the dynamics of a combined system: atom + radiation field. The parameters of the discrete finite model, including up to 20k field oscillators, have been optimized by a comparison with the exact solution for the case when the oscillators have equidistant frequencies and equal coupling constants. Simulation of the effect of multi-pulse sequence of phase kicks and emission by a pair of atoms shows that both the frequency and the linewidth of the emitted spectrum could be controlled.

Jae-Seung Lee; Mary A. Rohrdanz; A. K. Khitrin

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

124

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Table Title Formats Overview 1 U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential 2 U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors 3 Distribution of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by end-use sector 4 World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region 5 Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials Carbon dioxide emissions 6 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from energy and industry 7 U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end-use sector 8 U.S. carbon dioxide emission from residential sector energy consumption 9 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from commercial sector energy consumption 10 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sector energy consumption

125

Secondary emission gas chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a hadron calorimeter active element there is considered a gaseous secondary emis-sion detector (150 micron gap, 50 kV/cm). Such one-stage parallel plate chamber must be a radiation hard, fast and simple. A model of such detector has been produced, tested and some characteristics are presented.

V. In'shakov; V. Kryshkin; V. Skvortsov

2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSION REDUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5 Primary Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions for Selected US Chemical Subsectors in 1994 ...............................................................................................................16 Table 2.7 1999 Energy Consumption and Specific Energy Consumption (SEC) in the U.S. Cement Efficiency Technologies and Measures in Cement Industry.................22 Table 2.9 Energy Consumption

Delaware, University of

127

Graphene Coating Coupled Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graphene Coating Coupled Emission A COMSET, A single sheet of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms, called of graphene and its unique properties, I will present amplification of surface graphene-Ag hybrid films which when graphene is used as the spacer layer in a conventional Ag- harnessed the nonlinear properties

Shyamasundar, R.K.

128

New radon cancer hazard study no cause for alarm in Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... subject of a major health study to determine how cancers caused by the emission of radon gas from their foundations can be prevented. ... gas from their foundations can be prevented.Radon-222, a naturally occurring radioactive gas emitted from igneous rock with uranium content such ...

Bill Johnstone

1987-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

129

FETC Programs for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Mark Twain once quipped that everyone talks about the weather but no one does anything about it. With interest in global climate change on the rise, researchers in the fossil-energy sector are feeling the heat to provide new technology to permit continued use of fossil fuels but with reduced emissions of so-called `greenhouse gases.` Three important greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, are released to the atmosphere in the course of recovering and combusting fossil fuels. Their importance for trapping radiation, called forcing, is in the order given. In this report, we briefly review how greenhouse gases cause forcing and why this has a warming effect on the Earth`s atmosphere. Then we discuss programs underway at FETC that are aimed at reducing emissions of methane and carbon dioxide.

Ruether, J.A.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Causes and Control of Wood Decay,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Causes and Control of Wood Decay, Degradation & Stain #12;2 Contents Moisture .................................................................................3 Wood Degradation: Causes and Control..............................4 Weathering......................................................................................................4 Naturally Decay-resistant Species...........................................................5 Wood

131

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Map Click on a Project Name to Get More Information Click to read a DOE TechLine [PDF-22KB] describing three new projects that will improve our current understanding of the link between power plant emissions, PM2.5, and human health. The Health Effects component of NETL's Air Quality Research Program is designed to enhance the body of scientific evidence relating stack emissions from coal plants to adverse health effects resulting from human exposures to air pollution. Despite the fact that coal plants emit significant amounts of PM2.5 and mercury to the atmosphere, there is currently a great deal of uncertainty regarding the actual amount of health damage resulting from these emissions. In order to devise cost-effective

132

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Chicago Area: Year 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Chicago Area: Year 2 Peter J. Popp, Gary A from automobiles are at a maximum when the air/fuel ratio is rich of stoichiometric, and are caused

Denver, University of

133

Allocation of emission rights Economic incentives for emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for all countries High cost effectiviness:High cost effectiviness: International Emission trading Fairness NAM Department of Physical Resource Theory #12;Financial flows from emissions trading 450 ppmGDP SAS CPA WEU NAM Department of Physical Resource Theory #12;Financial flows from emissions trading 450

134

Brain Imaging with Positron Emission Tomography: Quantification and Biomedical Applications in Alzheimer's Disease and Brain Tumors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AB, Elson LM. The human brain coloring book. 1st ed. New21. Toga AW, Mazziotta JC. Brain mapping : the systems. SanSR, Phelps ME. Imaging Brain Function with Positron Emission

Wardak, Mirwais

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model: Version 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model is the part of the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM) that represents the human systems. EPPA is a recursive-dynamic multi-regional general equilibrium model ...

Paltsev, Sergey.

136

Discrimination between Jovian radio emissions and Saturn electrostatic discharges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vertical streaks in the dynamic spectrum of the Cassini/RPWS (Radio and Plasma Wave Science) receiver in the frequency range of a few MHz can be due to Jovian radio emissions or SEDs (Saturn electrostatic discharges caused by lightning in Saturn's atmosphere. We show a method for discriminating between these two

Gurnett, Donald A.

137

Anthropogenic emissions of methane in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...natural gas and coal production Fig. S1. However...emissions in natural gas production areas (14–16...Oklahoma, and Kansas. US EPA estimates...each observation site, using wind...e.g., gas production, human and ruminant...population, (ii) electricity production from...

Scot M. Miller; Steven C. Wofsy; Anna M. Michalak; Eric A. Kort; Arlyn E. Andrews; Sebastien C. Biraud; Edward J. Dlugokencky; Janusz Eluszkiewicz; Marc L. Fischer; Greet Janssens-Maenhout; Ben R. Miller; John B. Miller; Stephen A. Montzka; Thomas Nehrkorn; Colm Sweeney

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Downstream Emissions Trading for Transport  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter addresses the issue of downstream emission trading within the transport sector. It is argued that emission trading may be relevant in this sector, and ... regarding international transport, it is arg...

Charles Raux

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

tive emissions from EVs (e.g., power plant NOx) and GPVs (tailpipe and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a few sluggish electric vehicles would cause enough traffic slowing that the gasoline- powered fleet Analy- sis article on battery-powered vehicles (Sept. 1996, p. 402A) serves as a useful remindertive emissions from EVs (e.g., power plant NOx) and GPVs (tailpipe and associated NO.,. emissions

Denver, University of

140

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

470E-20Ě1 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Prepared by:Environmental Protection Agency, National Emission Standardsfor Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From

Wahl, Linnea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

GBTL Workshop GHG Emissions | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

GHG Emissions GBTL Workshop GHG Emissions EERE Presentation of Greenhouse Gas EmissionsResource Potential gbtlworkshopghgemissions.pdf More Documents & Publications GBTL...

142

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation RyanEnergy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation Ryanand/or site-attributable carbon emissions at commercial and

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Low emissions diesel fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and matter of composition for controlling NO.sub.x emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO.sub.x produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

Compere, Alicia L. (Knoxville, TN); Griffith, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); West, Brian H. (Kingston, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

CORONAL EMISSION LINES AS THERMOMETERS  

SciTech Connect

Coronal emission-line intensities are commonly used to measure electron temperatures using emission measure and/or line ratio methods. In the presence of systematic errors in atomic excitation calculations and data noise, the information on underlying temperature distributions is fundamentally limited. Increasing the number of emission lines used does not necessarily improve the ability to discriminate between different kinds of temperature distributions.

Judge, Philip G., E-mail: judge@ucar.ed [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research , P.O. Box 3000, Boulder CO 80307-3000 (United States)

2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

145

Coronal emission lines as thermometers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coronal emission line intensities are commonly used to measure electron temperatures using emission measure and/or line ratio methods. In the presence of systematic errors in atomic excitation calculations and data noise, the information on underlying temperature distributions is fundamentally limited. Increasing the number of emission lines used does not necessarily improve the ability to discriminate between different kinds of temperature distributions.

Judge, Philip G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Analysis of Emission Shapes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shapes of relative emission sources can be accessed by expanding shapes of correlations at low relative velocities in pair center of mass in Cartesian harmonics. Coefficients of expansion for correlations are related to the respective coefficients of expansion for the sources through one dimensional integral transforms involving properties of pair relative wavefunctions. The methodology is illustrated with analyses of NA49 and PHENIX correlation data.

P. Danielewicz

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

147

Analysis of Emission Shapes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shapes of relative emission sources can be accessed by expanding shapes of correlations at low relative velocities in pair center of mass in Cartesian harmonics. Coefficients of expansion for correlations are related to the respective coefficients of expansion for the sources through one dimensional integral transforms involving properties of pair relative wavefunctions. The methodology is illustrated with analyses of NA49 and PHENIX correlation data.

Danielewicz, P

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Induced and Spontaneous Emission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of induced and spontaneous emission is investigated for an atomic two?level system with incident beams of radiation which are either in a coherent state or in a stationary state (contain a definite number of photons). The treatment is fully quantum?mechanical and is confined to the case where the frequency spectrum of the incident beam is narrow compared to the natural linewidth of the system. It is shown that under such conditions the spontaneous emission for frequencies within the narrow band of the incident radiation is sharply reduced compared to the prediction of the natural lineshape. It is shown that a hole is burned in the natural lineshape within the narrow frequency band thus effectively quenching the spontaneous emission at some frequency within the band. This effect is shown to occur both for the coherent and stationary beams. Quantities proportional to the induced and spontaneous probability amplitudes and the lifetimes are computed for times comparable to and long compared to the free lifetime of the state. An expression is found for the spectrum of the emergent radiation in terms of these quantities. Its physical meaning is briefly discussed. The density operator of the field for all times is given.

Saul M. Bergmann

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Some comments on the possible causes of climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change is an important current issue and there is much debate about the causes and effects. This article examines the changes in our climate, comparing the recent changes with those in the past. There have been changes in temperature, resulting in an average global rise over the last 300 years, as well as widespread melting of snow and ice, and rising global average sea level. There are many theories for the causes of the recent change in the climate, including some natural and some human influenced. The most widely believed cause of the climate change is increasing levels of Greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and as the atmosphere plays an important role in making our planet inhabitable, it is important to understand it in order to protect it. However, there are other theories for the cause of climate change, the Sun and cosmic rays, for example, are felt by some to have a significant role to play. There is also well-established evidence that the three Milankovitch cycles change the amount and alter the distribution of sunlight over the Earth, heating and cooling it. There are many influences on our planet and they all have differing levels of impact. The purpose of this article is to review the present overall position and urge open, reasoned discussion of the problem.

L. Padget; J. Dunning-Davies

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

150

EIA - AEO2010 - Emissions projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions Projections Emissions Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Emissions Projections Figure 93. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 94. Sulfur dioxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 95. Nitrogen oxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Growth of carbon dioxide emissions slows in the projections Federal and State energy policies recently enacted will stimulate increased use of renewable technologies and efficiency improvements in the future, slowing the growth of energy-related CO2 emissions through 2035. In the Reference case, emissions do not exceed pre-recession 2007 levels until 2025. In 2035, energy-related CO2 emissions total 6,320 million metric tons, about 6 percent higher than in 2007 and 9 percent higher than in 2008 (Figure 93). On average, emissions in the Reference case grow by 0.3 percent per year from 2008 to 2035, compared with 0.7 percent per year from 1980 to 2008.

151

Implementation of SB 1368 Emission Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................................................ 18 Calculation of Biomass, Biogas or Landfill Net Emissions ..................................... 19

152

Partnerships to continue moving toward zero emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Partnerships to continue moving toward zero emissions Zero Emission transportation goals Zero Emission MAP makes available technical assistance to states and cities to support the growth of zero emission mobility markets. 1 Research shows

California at Davis, University of

153

Introduction to Photoelectron Emission Microscopy: Principles...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction to Photoelectron Emission Microscopy: Principles and Applications. Introduction to Photoelectron Emission Microscopy: Principles and Applications. Abstract: In the...

154

Improve emissions monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Marathon`s Texas City refinery was subject to five separate EPA regulations in addition to a state program for monitoring and repairing fugitive leaks. In this case history, the refinery sought an organizational solution that reduced monitoring costs and kept the facility fully compliant with current state and federal regulations. Equally important, the new monitoring program incorporated flexibility for future emission-reduction requirements. The paper describes the solution, regulatory background, the previous system, leak-threshold consolidation, operator ownership, and projects benefits.

Vining, S.K. [Marathon Oil Co., Texas City, TX (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Positron Emission Tomography (PET)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

Welch, M. J.

1990-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

156

Zero emission coal  

SciTech Connect

We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Elastic emission polishing  

SciTech Connect

Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Just the Basics: Vehicle Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Are Exhaust Are Exhaust Emissions? In most heavily settled areas of the U.S., the personal automobile is the single greatest producer of harmful vehicle exhaust emissions. Exhaust emissions are generated by the fuel-air mixture burning in internal combus- tion engines, both gasoline-powered and diesel-powered. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation within the vehicle when it is stopped, and again during fueling. The constituents of car (gasoline and diesel) and truck (diesel) emissions vary depending on fuel type and indi- vidual vehicle operating characteris- tics. The bulk of vehicular emissions are composed of water vapor, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen (in unconsumed air). There are other pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned fuel, and

159

UNCERTAINTY IN CLIMATE SENSITIVITY: CAUSES, CONSEQUENCES, CHALLENGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

remarks #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter 2008 DOI: 10.1039/b810350j Fossil fuels supply about 85% of the world's primary energy, and future use fuels will likely be limited by controls on the emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere

Schwartz, Stephen E.

160

In vitro and in vivo analysis of [64Cu-NO2A-8-Aoc-BBN(7–14)NH2]: a site-directed radiopharmaceutical for positron-emission tomography imaging of T-47D human breast cancer tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Introduction Human breast cancer, from which the T-47D cell line was derived, is known to overexpress the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) in some cases. Bombesin (BBN), an agonist for the GRPR, has been appended with a radionuclide capable of positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging and therapy. 64Cu-NO2A-8-Aoc-BBN(7–14)NH2 (NO2A=1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4-diacetate) has produced high-quality microPET images of GRPR-positive breast cancer xenografted tumors in mice. Methods The imaging probe was synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis followed by manual conjugation of the 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA) bifunctional chelator and radiolabeling in aqueous solution. The radiolabeled conjugate was subjected to in vitro and in vivo studies to determine its specificity for the GRPR and its pharmacokinetic profile. A T-47D tumor-bearing mouse was imaged with microPET/CT and microMRI imaging. Results The 64Cu-NO2A-8-Aoc-BBN(7–14)NH2 targeting vector was determined to specifically localize in GRPR-positive tissue. Accumulation was observed in the tumor in sufficient quantities to allow for identification of tumors in microPET imaging procedures. For example, uptake and retention in T-47D xenografts at 1, 4 and 24 h were determined to be 2.27±0.08, 1.35±0.14 and 0.28±0.07 % ID/g, respectively. Conclusions The 64Cu-NO2A-8-Aoc-BBN(7–14)NH2 produced high-quality microPET images. The pharmacokinetic profile justifies investigation of this bioconjugate as a potentially useful diagnostic/therapeutic agent. Additionally, the bioconjugate would serve as a good starting point for modification and optimization of similar agents to maximize tumor uptake and minimize nontarget accumulation.

Adam F. Prasanphanich; Lauren Retzloff; Stephanie R. Lane; Prasant K. Nanda; Gary L. Sieckman; Tammy L. Rold; Lixin Ma; Said D. Figueroa; Samantha V. Sublett; Timothy J. Hoffman; Charles J. Smith

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As part of the state's 1997 electric utility restructuring legislation, Illinois established provisions for the disclosure of fuel mix and emissions data. All electric utilities and alternative...

162

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Oregon's 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires electricity companies and electric service suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions of electric...

163

Emissions trading under market imperfections.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis we consider emissions trading under various market imperfections such as uncertainty over permit price, imperfect competition and noncompliance. First, we study the… (more)

Lappi, Pauli

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

field emission electron microprobe | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

field emission electron microprobe Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

165

EMSL - field emission electron microprobe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

field-emission-electron-microprobe en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

166

Acoustic emission during polymer crystallization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... .G.; part support to L.K.) Acoustic Emission, Special Technical Publication 505, ASTM, Philadelphia, 1971; Grabec, I. & Peterlin, A. J. Polymer Sci. ...

A. Galeski; L. Koenczoel; E. Piorkowska; E. Baer

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Photonically excited electron emission from modified graphitic nanopetal arrays  

SciTech Connect

Efficient electron emission for energy conversion requires a low work function and a stable emitter material. The work function of graphene-based carbon materials can decrease significantly by intercalation with alkali metals, thus increasing their emission current. In this work, electron emission from potassium-intercalated carbon nanosheet extensions grown on electrode graphite is investigated. These petal-like structures, composed of 5-25 layers of graphene, are synthesized using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition. Samples are intercalated with potassium, and a hemispherical energy analyzer is used to measure the emission intensity caused by both thermal and photonic excitation. The emission from the potassium-intercalated structures is found to consistently decrease the work function by 2.4 to 2.8 eV relative to non-intercalated samples. High emission intensity induced by photonic excitation from a solar simulator, with a narrow electron energy distribution relative to established theory, suggests that electron scattering decreases emitted electron energy as compared to surface photoemission. A modified photoemission theory is applied to account for electron scattering, and the sample work function and mean number of scattering events are used as parameters to fit theory to experimental data. The thermal stability of the intercalated nanopetals is investigated, and after an initial heating and cooling cycle, the samples are stable at low temperatures.

McCarthy, Patrick T.; Fisher, Timothy S. [Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Vander Laan, Scott J.; Janes, David B. [Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

168

NETL: Health Effects - Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Given that mercury emissions from coal power plants will almost certainly be limited by some form of national regulation or legislation, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is performing an assessment of the reduction in human health risk that may be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of mercury. The primary pathway for mercury exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to mercury exposure is the fetus. Therefore, the risk assessment focuses on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Preliminary Risk Assessment A preliminary risk assessment was conducted using a simplified approach based on three major topics: Hg emissions and deposition (emphasizing coal plants), Hg consumption through fish, and dose-response functions for Hg. Using information available from recent literature, dose response factors (DRFs) were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions.

169

Variation in Selective Toxicity: Causes and Consequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pre-invasive lesions such as Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS). This project addresses two fundamental questions in human cancer biology: 1. When does the invasive breast cancer phenotype first emerge? and 2. Do cancer stem cells / cancer progenitor...

J. Frank Henderson

1969-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

PAH chemistry and IR emission from circumstellar disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims. The chemistry of, and infrared (IR) emission from, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in disks around Herbig Ae/Be and T Tauri stars are investigated. The equilibrium distribution of the PAHs over all accessible charge/hydrogenation states depends on the size and shape of the PAHs and on the physical properties of the star and surrounding disk. Methods. A chemistry model is created to calculate this equilibrium distribution. Destruction of PAHs by ultraviolet (UV) photons, possibly in multi-photon absorption events, is taken into account. The chemistry model is coupled to a radiative transfer code to provide the physical parameters and to combine the PAH emission with the spectral energy distribution (SED) from the star+disk system. Results. Normally hydrogenated PAHs in Herbig Ae/Be disks account for most of the observed PAH emission, with neutral and positively ionized species contributing in roughly equal amounts. Close to the midplane, the PAHs are more strongly hydrogenated and negatively ionized, but these species do not contribute to the overall emission because of the low UV/optical flux deep inside the disk. PAHs of 50 carbon atoms are destroyed out to 100 AU in the disk's surface layer, and the resulting spatial extent of the emission does not agree well with observations. Rather, PAHs of about 100 carbon atoms or more are predicted to cause most of the observed emission. The emission is extended on a scale similar to that of the size of the disk. Furthermore, the emission from T Tauri disks is much weaker and concentrated more towards the central star than that from Herbig Ae/Be disks. Positively ionized PAHs are predicted to be largely absent in T Tauri disks because of the weaker radiation field.

R. Visser; V. C. Geers; C. P. Dullemond; J. -C. Augereau; K. M. Pontoppidan; E. F. van Dishoeck

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

171

X-ray Emission from Massive StarsX-ray Emission from Massive Stars David CohenDavid Cohen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray Emission from Massive StarsX-ray Emission from Massive Stars David CohenDavid Cohen/s)Velocity (km/s) #12;absorption emission emission occulted emission emission UV telescope side side front back #12;absorption emission emission occulted emission emission UV telescope side side front back #12;The

Cohen, David

172

EMISSIONS TO AIR OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EMISSIONS TO AIR OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE Swansea University Estates Services Singleton Park Swansea to Air Department: Estates and Facilities Site: All Author: Ambreen Jahangir Approved by: Mark Durdin PURPOSE: To minimise emissions and discharges to air from boilers, fume cupboards, air conditioning

Harman, Neal.A.

173

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Requirements Recognizing the impact of carbon-emitting fuels on climate change and to

174

Update on CO2 emissions  

SciTech Connect

Emissions of CO2 are the main contributor to anthropogenic climate change. Here we present updated information on their present and near-future estimates. We calculate that global CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning decreased by 1.3% in 2009 owing to the global financial and economic crisis that started in 2008; this is half the decrease anticipated a year ago1. If economic growth proceeds as expected2, emissions are projected to increase by more than 3% in 2010, approaching the high emissions growth rates that were observed from 2000 to 20081, 3, 4. We estimate that recent CO2 emissions from deforestation and other land-use changes (LUCs) have declined compared with the 1990s, primarily because of reduced rates of deforestation in the tropics5 and a smaller contribution owing to forest regrowth elsewhere.

Friedingstein, P. [University of Exeter, Devon, England; Houghton, R.A. [Woods Hole Research Center, Woods Hole, MA; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Hackler, J. [Woods Hole Research Center, Woods Hole, MA; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL; Conway, T.J. [NOAA, Boulder, CO; Canadell, J.G. [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Raupach, Mike [GCP, Canberra, Australia; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Le Quere, Corrine [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Emissions-critical charge cooling using an organic rankine cycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure provides a system including a Rankine power cycle cooling subsystem providing emissions-critical charge cooling of an input charge flow. The system includes a boiler fluidly coupled to the input charge flow, an energy conversion device fluidly coupled to the boiler, a condenser fluidly coupled to the energy conversion device, a pump fluidly coupled to the condenser and the boiler, an adjuster that adjusts at least one parameter of the Rankine power cycle subsystem to change a temperature of the input charge exiting the boiler, and a sensor adapted to sense a temperature characteristic of the vaporized input charge. The system includes a controller that can determine a target temperature of the input charge sufficient to meet or exceed predetermined target emissions and cause the adjuster to adjust at least one parameter of the Rankine power cycle to achieve the predetermined target emissions.

Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Topics: Analysis Tools Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/29790 Cost: Free Related Tools IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP) Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model ... further results The part of the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM) that represents human systems; a recursive-dynamic multi-regional general equilibrium model

177

Aviation emission inventory development and analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An up to date and accurate aviation emission inventory is a prerequisite for any detailed analysis of aviation emission impact on greenhouse gases and local air quality around airports. In this paper we present an aviation emission inventory using real ... Keywords: Air traffic, Aviation emission, Emission inventory, Environmental modelling

Viet Van Pham; Jiangjun Tang; Sameer Alam; Chris Lokan; Hussein A. Abbass

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Effect of Operating Conditions on SO2 and NOx Emissions in Oxy-Fuel Mini-CFB Combustion Tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Anthropogenic CO2 production is caused primarily by fossil fuel combustion. In consequence, it is increasingly necessary to find ways to reduce these emissions when fossil fuel is used. CO2 capture and storage (C...

L. Jia; Y. Tan; E. J. Anthony

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 7- Emission of Air Contaminants Detrimental to Person or Property (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

No person shall emit any contaminant which either alone or in connection with other emissions, by reason of their concentration or duration, may be injurious to human, plant or animal life, or...

180

Cause of East-West Earth Asymmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The different slope of the Wadati-Benioff zones oriented towards east and west is considered a main asymmetry of the Earth's globe. Under the Americas they have angles of about 30o, while under the Pacific east coasts (Asia, Japan) the angles are steeper. In the framework of plate tectonics geodynamics the cause of this difference can be identified in the tidal drag that would cause a global shift of the lithosphere towards west. But this solution has been many times criticized on the basis of the irrelevance of the tidal forces with respect to viscous friction. Instead, it is possible to show that in a different framework, in which sudden extrusions of mantle materials occur by local phase change toward a more unpacked lattice, the value of the Coriolis fictitious force can rise of several magnitude orders, becoming the main cause of the east-west asymmetry of the Wadati-Benioff zones, which might be ascribed entirely to internal causes of the planet (its rotation and geodynamics) and not to external causes ...

Scalera, Giancarlo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Generalized local emission tomography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Emission tomography enables locations and values of internal isotope density distributions to be determined from radiation emitted from the whole object. In the method for locating the values of discontinuities, the intensities of radiation emitted from either the whole object or a region of the object containing the discontinuities are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the isotope density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) knowing pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object. In the method for determining the location of the discontinuity, the intensities of radiation emitted from an object are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the density discontinuity and the location .GAMMA. of the attenuation coefficient discontinuity. Pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object need not be known in this case.

Katsevich, Alexander J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Molten Metal Treatment by Salt Fluxing with Low Environmental Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Abstract: Chlorine gas is traditionally used for fluxing of aluminum melt for removal of alkali and alkaline earth elements. However this results in undesirable emissions of particulate matter and gases such as HCl and chlorine, which are often at unacceptable levels. Additionally, chlorine gas is highly toxic and its handling, storage, and use pose risks to employees and the local community. Holding of even minimal amounts of chlorine necessitates extensive training for all plant employees. Fugitive emissions from chlorine usage within the plant cause accelerated corrosion of plant equipment. The Secondary Aluminum Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) under the Clean Air Act, finalized in March 2000 has set very tough new limits on particulate matter (PM) and total hydrogen chloride emissions from aluminum melting and holding furnaces. These limits are 0.4 and 0.1 lbs per ton of aluminum for hydrogen chloride and particulate emissions, respectively. Assuming new technologies for meeting these limits can be found, additional requirements under the Clean Air Act (Prevention of Significant Deterioration and New Source Review) trigger Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for new sources with annual emissions (net emissions not expressed per ton of production) over specified amounts. BACT currently is lime coated bag-houses for control of particulate and HCl emissions. These controls are expensive, difficult to operate and maintain, and result in reduced American competitiveness in the global economy. Solid salt fluxing is emerging as a viable option for the replacement of chlorine gas fluxing, provided emissions can be consistently maintained below the required levels. This project was a cooperative effort between the Ohio State University and Alcoa to investigate and optimize the effects of solid chloride flux addition in molten metal for alkali impurity and non-metallic inclusion removal minimizing dust and toxic emissions and maximizing energy conservation. In this program, the salt metal interactions were studies and the emissions at laboratory scale at OSU were monitored. The goal of the project was to obtain a fundamental understanding, based on first principles, of the pollutant formation that occurs when the salts are used in furnaces. This information will be used to control process parameters so that emissions are consistently below the required levels. The information obtained in these experiments will be used in industrial furnaces at aluminum plants and which will help in optimizing the process.

Yogeshwar Sahai

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Trend in Global Black Carbon Emissions from 1960 to 2007  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Black carbon (BC) warms the Earth system by absorbing sunlight and emitting infrared radiation, and by decreasing the ice/snow albedo. ... (2, 3) Therefore, any efforts to reduce BC emission can lead to the dual benefit of slowing down global warming and of protecting human health. ... This work measured PM (EFPM) and EC (EFEC) EF for 9 crop residues and 5 coals in actual rural cooking and coal stoves using the C mass balance method. ...

Rong Wang; Shu Tao; Huizhong Shen; Ye Huang; Han Chen; Yves Balkanski; Olivier Boucher; Philippe Ciais; Guofeng Shen; Wei Li; Yanyan Zhang; Yuanchen Chen; Nan Lin; Shu Su; Bengang Li; Junfeng Liu; Wenxin Liu

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

184

Radiation effects on humans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

185

Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using, a metal hydride.

Kronberg, J.W.

1991-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

187

Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

Kronberg, J.W.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

Ion-induced electron emission microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion beam analysis system that creates multidimensional maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the secondary electrons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted secondary electrons are collected in a strong electric field perpendicular to the sample surface and (optionally) projected and refocused by the electron lenses found in a photon emission electron microscope, amplified by microchannel plates and then their exact position is sensed by a very sensitive X Y position detector. Position signals from this secondary electron detector are then correlated in time with nuclear, atomic or electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these secondary electrons in the fit place.

Doyle, Barney L. (Albuquerque, NM); Vizkelethy, Gyorgy (Albuquerque, NM); Weller, Robert A. (Brentwood, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emissions Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emissions 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Lovelace Respiratory Research...

190

Ion photon emission microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

Doyle, Barney L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

191

Human Nature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the human enhancement debate, both parties advocate a partial truth. On the one hand, the bioconservatives argue that, if transhumanism is unleashed without some kind of bioethical...have (A+) is itself a prod...

Prof.; Dr. Hub Zwart

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Reading for Thursday Emissions scenario summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions, for year 2000 #12;USA ­ CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion (2005) US EPA #12 of global rise in sea level red: reconstructed blue: tide gauges black: satellite #12;Other changes GHG emissions #12;

Schweik, Charles M.

193

NETL: Emissions Characterization - Adv. Low-NOx Burner Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Low-NOx Burner Emissions Characterization Advanced Low-NOx Burner Emissions Characterization The goal of this work is to develop a comprehensive, high-quality database characterizing PM2.5 emissions from utility plants firing high sulfur coals. The specific objectives are to: 1) develop and test an ultra low-NOx pulverized coal burner for plug-in retrofit applications without boiler wall tube modifications, 2) assess the impact of low-NOx PC burner operation on NOx and PM2.5 emissions, and 3) provide high-quality data to ensure that future PM2.5 regulations are based on good scientific information. The work will be performed in the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF), a 100 million Btu/hr near-full-scale facility located at the Alliance Research Center. Related Papers and Publications:

194

Appendix: Mercury Emissions used in CAM-Chem/Hg model. 1. Anthropogenic emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix: Mercury Emissions used in CAM-Chem/Hg model. 1. Anthropogenic emissions The anthropogenic emission of mercury is directly adopted from global mercury emission inventory [Pacyna et al., 2005]. The anthropogenic emissions are shown in annual averaged total mercury emissions. (Unit: µg/m2 /day) 2. Land

Meskhidze, Nicholas

195

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: U.S. emissions inventories Narasimhan K. Larkin a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: U.S. emissions inventories Narasimhan K. Larkin a: Fire emissions Emissions inventories Greenhouse gases a b s t r a c t Emissions from wildland fire fire emissions change considerably due to fluctuations from year to year with overall fire season

196

Human Enhancement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Categorizing different human enhancements into personal, social, or species enhancements, as well as considering whether a particular enhancement technique generates asymmetric or network benefits, brings clarity to discussions about the ethical issues pertaining to any individual technique. The four aspects of principlism can help to assess the ethical implications of different human enhancements, revealing complexities in their aspirational claims for personally directed self-development. At a practical level, this article examines important questions about real expectations, scientific hubris, and hype.

P. Moore

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Emission factor estimates of cereal waste burning in Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Every year more than 5 million ha of cereal fields are affected by fires in order to eliminate cereal waste in Spain. The characteristics of this type of fire with intense flames are similar to those of the African dry savanna heading fires. This paper surveys the atmospheric emission caused by this process by combining results of field and combustion chamber experiments. Combustion chamber experiments show that during the flaming phase 88% of the fire exposed carbon is converted into CO2 and during the smoldering phase this percentage changes to 74%. These combustion chamber experiments also show that the soluble part of the aerosols emitted during the course of fires only represent 3% of the total particulate matter (TPM) produced, being the ions K+ and CI? the predominant ones. The cereal waste fire process can be represented by an arithmetic combination that takes into account the amounts of mass burned during the two phases of the fire: 0.90 flaming +0.10 smoldering. Emission factor estimates from field burning experiment are 13±7 g TPM kg?1(dm) and 2.8±0.2 g NOx kg?1 (dm). Finally, we obtain average emissions of 80–130 Gg TPM, 17–28 Gg NOx, 210–350 Gg CO and 8–14 Tg CO2 in Spain. These emissions represent nearly 25% of the total \\{NOx\\} and 50% of the total CO2 emissions by other pollution sources during the burning period in Spain.

I. Ortiz de Zárate; A. Ezcurra; J.P. Lacaux; Pham Van Dinh

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Emissions Annual Reports for DOE Sites,” memo tooffices providing guidance for report preparation (March 22,470E-2012 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Prepared by

Wahl, Linnea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation Model-Based Diesel Engine Control Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation...

200

Diesel Engine Emission Reduction (DEER) Experiment | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emission Reduction (DEER) Experiment Diesel Engine Emission Reduction (DEER) Experiment Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Collaborative Emissions Research at EMSL | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaborative Emissions Research at EMSL Collaborative Emissions Research at EMSL EMSL produced this video for the annual congressional science expo organized by the National User...

202

Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program - Bangladesh ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLowEmissionsAsianDevel...

203

School Bus Emissions Study | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

School Bus Emissions Study School Bus Emissions Study 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: international Truck and Engine Corporation deer2003slodowske.pdf More Documents &...

204

Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI' Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro...

205

Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance of In-Use Diesel Retrofit Technologies from the National Clean Diesel Campaign Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction...

206

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2011 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NOx control, diesel oxidation catalysts, gasoline particulate filters deer11johnson.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 Diesel Emission...

207

Vehicle Technologies Office: Emission Control | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Batteries Fuel Efficiency & Emissions Combustion Engines Fuel Effects on Combustion Idle Reduction Emissions Waste Heat Recovery Lightweighting Parasitic Loss Reduction Lubricants...

208

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuel Efficiency and Emissions |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Batteries Fuel Efficiency & Emissions Combustion Engines Fuel Effects on Combustion Idle Reduction Emissions Waste Heat Recovery Lightweighting Parasitic Loss Reduction Lubricants...

209

Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced...

210

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems or GDI Engines Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems or GDI Engines 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

211

Corporate response to emissions trading in Lithuania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article highlights the preconditions for emissions trading in Lithuania, identifies the factors that influence ... competitive advantage via participation in the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ET...

R?ta Bubnien?

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using KH-ACT Primary Breakup Model & Detailed Chemistry Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using KH-ACT Primary...

213

Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combustion, and Emission Modeling Using KH-ACT Primary Breakup Model & Detailed Chemistry Sibendu Som, Douglas E. Longman Engine and Emissions Group (Energy Systems Division)...

214

Club Convergence in Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine convergence in carbon dioxide emissions among 128 countries for the period 1960–...2 emissions among all the countries under scrutiny in...

Ekaterini Panopoulou; Theologos Pantelidis

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

CAUSES OF FLUCTUATIONS IN ABUNDANCE OF CONNECTICUT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CAUSES OF FLUCTUATIONS IN ABUNDANCE OF CONNECTICUT ·RIVER .SHAD BY REYNOLD A. FREDIN FISHERY effort, and tagging data which was used t.o estimate the size of the shad runs in the Connecticut River. effect on the" size of the runs entering the river," Investigation of the Connecticut River shad fishery

216

RESEARCH Open Access A human skeletal muscle interactome centered  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have investigated the human interacting-proteins net- work, either at a genome-wide scale [1RESEARCH Open Access A human skeletal muscle interactome centered on proteins involved in muscular and the identification of numerous human disease-causing mutations in its constitutive proteins make it an interesting

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

217

Carbon Emissions: Petroleum Refining Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Refining Industry Petroleum Refining Industry Carbon Emissions in the Petroleum Refining Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 2911) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 79.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.5% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 16.5 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 6,263 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 28.9% Nonfuel Use of Energy Sources: 3,110 trillion Btu (49.7%) -- Naphthas and Other Oils: 1,328 trillion Btu -- Asphalt and Road Oil: 1,224 trillion Btu -- Lubricants: 416 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 12.75 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey", "Monthly Refinery Report" for 1994, and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998.

218

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 2001, Nevada enacted legislation requiring the state’s electric utilities to provide details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of electric generation to their customers. Utilities must...

219

Exoelectron Emission from Synthetic Corundums  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Radiation Protection Dosimetry Article Exoelectron Emission from Synthetic Corundums M. Yousif Charif R. Gout J. Barthe M. Petel Corundums (Alpha Al2O3) have been synthesised by the thermal dehydration of hydrargilite (Al2O3, H2O......

M. Yousif Charif; R. Gout; J. Barthe; M. Petel

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Anomalous Emission from HII regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spinning dust appears to be the best explanation for the anomalous emission that has been observed at $\\sim 10-60$ GHz. One of the best examples of spinning dust comes from a HII region in the Perseus molecular cloud. Observations of other HII regions also show tentative evidence for excess emission at frequencies $\\sim 30$ GHz, although at lower emissivity levels. A new detection of excess emission at 31 GHz in the HII region RCW175 has been made. The most plausible explanation again comes from spinning dust. HII regions are a good place to look for spinning dust as long as accurate radio data spanning the $\\sim 5-100$ GHz range is available.

C. Dickinson

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Iowa adopted regulations in 2003 that generally require rate-regulated electric utilities to disclose to customers the fuel mix and estimated emissions, in pounds per megawatt-hour (MWh), of...

222

Greenhouse Gases and Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases have grown rapidly since the beginning of this century. Unless emissions are controlled, the world could face rapid climate changes, incl...

Alice LeBlanc; Daniel J. Dudek

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

1770 emissions trading system [n  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

envir. pol. (As permitted by the Kyoto Protocol of 1997, the sale of unused quotas of carbon dioxide [CO2] emissions to other countries, which can then use them as credits for their own accounts. The...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Rhode Island requires all entities that sell electricity in the state to disclose details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of their electric generation to end-use customers. This information...

225

Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles Title Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Klepeis, Neil E., Michael G. Apte, Lara A. Gundel, Richard G. Sextro, and William W. Nazaroff Journal Aerosol Science & Technology Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 780-790 Date Published October 2003 Abstract Because size is a major controlling factor for indoor airborne particle behavior, human particle exposure assessments will benefit from improved knowledge of size-specific particle emissions. We report a method of inferring size-specific mass emission factors for indoor sources that makes use of an indoor aerosol dynamics model, measured particle concentration time series data, and an optimization routine. This approach provides -- in addition to estimates of the emissions size distribution and integrated emission factors -- estimates of deposition rate, an enhanced understanding of particle dynamics, and information about model performance. We applied the method to size-specific environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) particle concentrations measured every minute with an 8-channel optical particle counter (PMS-LASAIR; 0.1-2+ micrometer diameters) and every 10 or 30 min with a 34-channel differential mobility particle sizer (TSI-DMPS; 0.01-1+ micrometer diameters) after a single cigarette or cigar was machine-smoked inside a low air-exchange rate 20m^3 chamber. The aerosol dynamics model provided good fits to observed concentrations when using optimized values of mass emission rate and deposition rate for each particle size range as input. Small discrepancies observed in the first 1-2 hours after smoking are likely due to the effect of particle evaporation, a process neglected by the model. Size-specific ETS particle emission factors were fit with log-normal distributions, yielding an average mass median diameter of 0.2 micrometers and an average geometric standard deviation of 2.3 with no systematic differences between cigars and cigarettes. The equivalent total particle emission rate, obtained by integrating each size distribution, was 0.2-0.7 mg/min for cigars and 0.7-0.9 mg/min for cigarettes

226

TRENDS: METHANE EMISSIONS - INTRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Of the total direct radiative forcing of long-lived greenhouse gases (2.45 Of the total direct radiative forcing of long-lived greenhouse gases (2.45 Wm-2), almost 20% is attributable to methane (CH4), according to the 1995 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 1995). Since the mid-1700s, the atmospheric concentration of methane has increased by about 145% (IPCC 1995). Thus, an understanding of the various sources of methane is important. Atmospheric methane is produced both from natural sources (e.g., wetlands) and from human activities (see global methane cycle, from Professor W.S. Reeburgh at the University of California Irvine). Total sources of methane to the atmosphere for the period 1980-1990 were about 535 (range of 410-660) Tg (1 Teragram = 1 million metric tons) CH4 per year, of which 160 (110-210) Tg CH4/yr were from natural sources and 375 (300-450) Tg CH4/yr

227

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Credits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Credits Any state mobile emissions reduction credits program must allow credits for emissions reductions achieved by converting a vehicle to operate on an

228

MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPENDIX A MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES #12;A-1 APPENDIX A MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES 1.0 INTRODUCTION Differential composition of wind turbines at wind energy used is the number of fatalities per wind turbine per year (Anderson et al. 1999). This metric has

229

Tracer method to measure landfill gas emissions from leachate collection systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a method developed for quantification of gas emissions from the leachate collection system at landfills and present emission data measured at two Danish landfills with no landfill gas collection systems in place: Fakse landfill and AV Miljř. Landfill top covers are often designed to prevent infiltration of water and thus are made from low permeable materials. At such sites a large part of the gas will often emit through other pathways such as the leachate collection system. These point releases of gaseous constituents from these locations cannot be measured using traditional flux chambers, which are often used to measure gas emissions from landfills. Comparing tracer measurements of methane (CH4) emissions from leachate systems at Fakse landfill and AV Miljř to measurements of total CH4 emissions, it was found that approximately 47% (351 kg CH4 d?1) and 27% (211 kg CH4 d?1), respectively, of the CH4 emitting from the sites occurred from the leachate collection systems. Emission rates observed from individual leachate collection wells at the two landfills ranged from 0.1 to 76 kg CH4 d?1. A strong influence on emission rates caused by rise and fall in atmospheric pressure was observed when continuously measuring emission from a leachate well over a week. Emission of CH4 was one to two orders of magnitude higher during periods of decreasing pressure compared to periods of increasing pressure.

Anders M. Fredenslund; Charlotte Scheutz; Peter Kjeldsen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

PHEV Engine Cold Start Emissions Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Coordination of engine and powertrain supervisory control strategies to minimize cold start emissions

231

7, 68436902, 2007 An Asian emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 7, 6843­6902, 2007 An Asian emission inventory for the period 1980­2020 T. Ohara et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions An Asian emission inventory of anthropogenic emission sources 7, 6843­6902, 2007 An Asian emission inventory for the period 1980­2020 T. Ohara et al. Title Page

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

232

Compilationof Regional to Global Inventoriesof Anthropogenic Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compilationof Regional to Global Inventoriesof Anthropogenic Emissions CarmenM. Benkovitz, Hajime inventories of emissions of the trace species included in the study at the appropriate sectoral, spatial on emissions is also required at high resolution for the design of policies aimed at reducing emissions

233

High-resolution emission spectra of pulsed terahertz quantum-cascade lasers  

SciTech Connect

The spectra of pulsed terahertz quantum-cascade lasers were measured with high spectral resolution. The characteristic line width at half maximum was 0.01 cm{sup -1}; it is controlled by laser temperature variations during the supply voltage pulse. It was shown that an increase in the laser temperature leads to a decrease in the emission frequency, which is caused by an increase in the effective refractive index of the active region. It was also found that a decrease in the supply voltage results in a decrease in the emission frequency, which is caused by a change in the energy of diagonal transitions between lasing levels.

Ikonnikov, A. V., E-mail: antikon@ipm.sci-nnov.ru; Antonov, A. V.; Lastovkin, A. A.; Gavrilenko, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Sadof'ev, Yu. G.; Samal, N. [Trion Technology (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Human Astroviruses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...observed that activation of the ERK1/2 pathway does not require binding of infectious viruses and...145-158. In YH Hui, JR Gorham, KD Murrell, and DOE Cliver (ed), Foodborne disease handbook, vol. 2. Diseases caused by viruses, parasites...

Albert Bosch; Rosa M. Pintó; Susana Guix

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Vehicle Ethanol Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Laws & Incentives Ethanol Vehicle Emissions When blended with gasoline for use as a vehicle fuel, ethanol can offer some emissions benefits over gasoline, depending on vehicle type, engine

236

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Control Emissions Control Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Control Requirement Heavy-duty diesel vehicles used to perform federally funded state public works contracts must be powered by engines with Level 3 emissions control

237

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Vehicle Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Emissions Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions When used as a vehicle fuel, biodiesel offers some tailpipe and considerable greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions benefits over conventional

238

Worldwide, accelerating glacier loss provides independent and startling evidence that global warming is occurring1 It is now clear that the Earth is warming rapidly due to man-made emissions of carbon dioxide and other heat-trap-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-made emissions of carbon dioxide and other heat-trap- ping gases, which blanket the planet and cause temperatures future limits on carbon emissions. · Electricity consumers should opt for "green power" where imperative that emissions of the main heat-trapping gas, car- bon dioxide (CO2), are significantly reduced

Combes, Stacey A.

239

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program  

SciTech Connect

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W?s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

A. P. Evans

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

240

Advanced Emission Control Development Program.  

SciTech Connect

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

Evans, A.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Air emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1994 emissions report  

SciTech Connect

This report Presents the 1994 update of the Air Emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, S.K.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

S. K. Zohner

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Remote Sensing of Mobile Source Air Pollutant Emissions: Variability and Uncertainty in On-Road Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Road Emissions Estimates of Carbon Monoxide and Hydrocarbons for School and Transit Buses Report No. FHWY/NC/97Remote Sensing of Mobile Source Air Pollutant Emissions: Variability and Uncertainty in On.0 INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Mobile Source Emissions 2 1.2 Emission Regulations 2 1.3 Emissions Contributions of "Non

Frey, H. Christopher

245

Emissions of airborne toxics from coal-fired boilers: Mercury  

SciTech Connect

Concerns over emissions of hazardous air Pollutants (air toxics) have emerged as a major environmental issue, and the authority of the US Environmental Protection Agency to regulate such pollutants was greatly expanded through the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Mercury has been singled out for particular attention because of concerns over possible effects of emissions on human health. This report evaluates available published information on the mercury content of coals mined in the United States, on mercury emitted in coal combustion, and on the efficacy of various environmental control technologies for controlling airborne emissions. Anthracite and bituminous coals have the highest mean-mercury concentrations, with subbituminous coals having the lowest. However, all coal types show very significant variations in mercury concentrations. Mercury emissions from coal combustion are not well-characterized, particularly with regard to determination of specific mercury compounds. Variations in emission rates of more than an order of magnitude have been reported for some boiler types. Data on the capture of mercury by environmental control technologies are available primarily for systems with electrostatic precipitators, where removals of approximately 20% to over 50% have been reported. Reported removals for wet flue-gas-desulfurization systems range between 35 and 95%, while spray-dryer/fabric-filter systems have given removals of 75 to 99% on municipal incinerators. In all cases, better data are needed before any definitive judgments can be made. This report briefly reviews several areas of research that may lead to improvements in mercury control for existing flue-gas-clean-up technologies and summarizes the status of techniques for measuring mercury emissions from combustion sources.

Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.; Zaromb, S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > CO2 Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > CO2 Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants CO2 Emissions Control RD&D Roadmap Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program Accomplishments DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Presentations DOE/NETL's Monthly Carbon Sequestration Newsletter Program Goals and Targets Pre-Combustion CO2 Control Post-Combustion CO2 Control Advanced Combustion CO2 Compression Other Systems Analysis Regulatory Drivers Reference Shelf Carbon capture involves the separation of CO2 from coal-based power plant flue gas or syngas. There are commercially available 1st-Generation CO2

247

Thermodynamics of Radiative Emission Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A basic assumption implicit in the application of thermodynamics to the electromagnetic field is that the laws of thermodynamics are locally valid for radiative emission and absorption processes. This means that a certain minimum amount of entropy must be created by the radiative process itself. It is shown, by considering the extreme case in which the spontaneous emission of a natural spectral line is the only process taking place, that this assumption is correct, and that its validity is essentially a consequence of the uncertainty principle as expressed by the reciprocal relationship between natural line breadth and lifetime.

M. A. Weinstein

1960-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Methane emission by bubbling from Gatun Lake, Panama  

SciTech Connect

We studied methane emission by bubbling from Gatun Lake, Panama, at water depths of less than 1 m to about 10 m. Gas bubbles were collected in floating traps deployed during 12- to 60-hour observation periods. Comparison of floating traps and floating chambers showed that about 98% of methane emission occurred by bubbling and only 2% occurred by diffusion. Average methane concentration of bubbles at our sites varied from 67% to 77%. Methane emission by bubbling occurred episodically, with greatest rates primarily between the hours of 0800 and 1400 LT. Events appear to be triggered by wind. The flux of methane associated with bubbling was strongly anticorrelated with water depth. Seasonal changes in water depth caused seasonal variation of methane emission. Bubble methane fluxes through the lake surface into the atmosphere measured during 24-hour intervals were least (10-200 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1}) at deeper sites (>7 m) and greatest (300-2000 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1}) at shallow sites (<2 m). 37 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

Keller, M. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)] [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Stallard, R.F. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)] [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1994-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

249

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicles » Propane Vehicles » Propane Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Laws & Incentives Propane Vehicle Emissions

250

electricity emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emission factors emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

251

sulfur dioxide emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sulfur dioxide emissions sulfur dioxide emissions Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

252

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reductions Emissions Reductions Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reductions Grants The Carl Moyer Memorial Air Quality Standards Attainment Program (Program) provides incentives to cover the incremental cost of purchasing engines and

253

Emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in China  

SciTech Connect

Emission of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) listed as U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) priority pollutants from major sources in China were compiled. Geographical distribution and temporal change of the PAH emission, as well as emission profiles, are discussed. It was estimated that the total PAH emission in China was 25,300 tons in 2003. The emission profile featured a relatively higher portion of high molecular weight (HMW) species with carcinogenic potential due to large contributions of domestic coal and coking industry. Among various sources, biomass burning, domestic coal combustion, and the coking industry contributed 60%, 20%, and 16% of the total emission, respectively. Total emission, emission density, emission intensity, and emission per capita showed geographical variations. In general, the southeastern provinces were characterized by higher emission density, while those in western and northern China featured higher emission intensity and population-normalized emission. Although energy consumption in China went up continuously during the past two decades, annual emission of PAHs fluctuated depending on the amount of domestic coal consumption, coke production, and the efficiency of energy utilization. 47 refs., 6 figs.

Shanshan Xu; Wenxin Liu; Shu Tao [Peking University, Beijing (China). Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Environmental Sciences

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

GEIA-ACCENT Emission Data Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEIA-ACCENT Emission Data Portal GEIA-ACCENT Emission Data Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) Agency/Company /Organization: National Aeronautics and Space Administration Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.geiacenter.org/ References: Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA)[1] "The GEIA /ACCENT data portal provides gridded emission data; emission data are usually separated into three main categories : anthropogenic emissions, biomass burning emissions, and natural emissions: anthropogenic emissions include emissions from fossil fuel and biofuel consumption, industry and agricultural sources. biomass burning emissions include emissions from forest fires, savannah fires, and sometimes large croplands fires.

255

Gas Emissions FLOODING THE LAND,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

signif- icant sources of emissions of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and, in particular, methane to bacteria breaking down organic matter in the water. Methane, a much more powerful greenhouse gas than coal plants generating the same amounts of power. Dams and their associated reservoirs are globally

Batiste, Oriol

256

Educational Multiwavelength Atomic Emission Spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atomic absorption is the capability for simultaneous multielement analysis. It can be used colleges had acquired atomic absorption instruments by the year 1990.[2] In contrast, atomic emission with the acetylene-air flame source taken from an existing atomic absorption instrument. Two spectrometer units

Nazarenko, Alexander

257

HYPERPARAMETER ESTIMATION FOR EMISSION COMPUTED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYPERPARAMETER ESTIMATION FOR EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY DATA A. LĂłpez (a) , R. Molina (b) (a limited due to several factors. These factors include the need of greater computational time than to the projection data to obtain two-dimensional slices or cross sections (images) of activity distribution. #12

Granada, Universidad de

258

Effect of E85 on Tailpipe Emissions from Light-Duty Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

E85, which consists of nominally 85% fuel grade ethanol and 15% gasoline, must be used in flexible-fuel (or 'flexfuel') vehicles (FFVs) that can operate on fuel with an ethanol content of 0-85%. Published studies include measurements of the effect of E85 on tailpipe emissions for Tier 1 and older vehicles. Car manufacturers have also supplied a large body of FFV certification data to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, primarily on Tier 2 vehicles. These studies and certification data reveal wide variability in the effects of E85 on emissions from different vehicles. Comparing Tier 1 FFVs running on E85 to similar non-FFVs running on gasoline showed, on average, significant reductions in emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx; 54%), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs; 27%), and carbon monoxide (CO; 18%) for E85. Comparing Tier 2 FFVs running on E85 and comparable non-FFVs running on gasoline shows, for E85 on average, a significant reduction in emissions of CO (20%), and no significant effect on emissions of non-methane organic gases (NMOGs). NOx emissions from Tier 2 FFVs averaged approximately 28% less than comparable non-FFVs. However, perhaps because of the wide range of Tier 2 NOx standards, the absolute difference in NOx emissions between Tier 2 FFVs and non-FFVs is not significant (P 0.28). It is interesting that Tier 2 FFVs operating on gasoline produced approximately 13% less NMOGs than non-FFVs operating on gasoline. The data for Tier 1 vehicles show that E85 will cause significant reductions in emissions of benzene and butadiene, and significant increases in emissions of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in comparison to emissions from gasoline in both FFVs and non-FFVs. The compound that makes up the largest proportion of organic emissions from E85-fueled FFVs is ethanol.

Yanowitz, J.; McCormick, R. L.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

An experimental study of emission and combustion characteristics of marine diesel engine with fuel pump malfunctions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Presented paper shows the results of the laboratory study on the relation between the chosen malfunctions of a fuel pump and the exhaust gas composition of the marine engine. The object of research is a laboratory four-stroke diesel engine, operated at a constant speed. During the research over 50 parameters were measured with technical condition of the engine recognized as “working properly” and with simulated fuel pump malfunctions. Considered malfunctions are: fuel injection timing delay and two sets of fuel leakages in the fuel pump of one engine cylinder. The results of laboratory research confirm that fuel injection timing delay and fuel leakage in the fuel pump cause relatively small changes in thermodynamic parameters of the engine. Changes of absolute values are so small they may be omitted by marine engines operators. The measuring of the exhaust gas composition shows markedly affection with simulated malfunctions of the fuel pump. Engine operation with delayed fuel injection timing in one cylinder indicates CO2 emission increase and \\{NOx\\} emission decreases. CO emission increases only at high the engine loads. Fuel leakage in the fuel pump causes changes in CO emission, the increase of CO2 emission and the decrease of \\{NOx\\} emission.

Jerzy Kowalski

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - NOx Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions from Multi-Burners Emissions from Multi-Burners The University of Utah working with Reaction Engineering International and Brigham Young University is investigating a project that consists of integrated experimental, theoretical and computational modeling efforts. The primary objective is to evaluate NOx formation/destruction processes as they occur in multi-burner arrays, a geometry almost always utilized in utility practice. Most controlled experimental work examining NOx has been conducted on single burners. The range of potential intra-burner interactions are likely to provide added degrees of freedom for reducing NOx. The resultant findings may allow existing utilities to arrange fuel and air distribution to minimize NOx. In new applications, orientation of individual burners within an array may also be altered to reduce NOx. Comprehensive combustion codes will be modified to incorporate the latest submodels of nitrogen release and heterogeneous chemistry. Comparison of pilot scale experiments and simulations will be utilized to validate/develop theory.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT OF PCE EMISSIONS FROM DRY CLEANING ACTIVITIES IN FRANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT OF PCE EMISSIONS FROM DRY CLEANING ACTIVITIES IN FRANCE L DELERY1 Verneuil-en-halatte-F ABSTRACT Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) is a solvent used mostly in the dry health effects caused by chronic inhalation exposure of PCE. PCE is suspected to be probably carcinogenic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

262

ECOISLAND: A System for Persuading Users to Reduce CO2 Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A significant portion of the carbon dioxide emissions that have been shown to cause global warming are due to household energy consumption and traffic. EcoIsland is a computer system aimed at persuading and assisting individual families in changing their ... Keywords: Persuasive Technology, Environment Sustainability

Chihiro Takayama; Vili Lehdonvirta; Miyuki Shiraishi; Yasuyuki Washio; Hiroaki Kimura; Tatsuo Nakajima

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Effects of Bioethanol-Blended Diesel Fuel on Combustion and Emission Reduction Characteristics in a Direct-Injection Diesel Engine with Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Sungdong-gu, Seoul 133-791, Korea ... As a fuel for compression engines, bioethanol-blended diesel fuels have some different trends on the exhaust emission characteristics according to the engine load. ... The paper begins with an introduction of general information on the nature of emissions of exhaust gases, including the toxicity and causes of emissions for both spark-ignition and diesel engines. ...

Su Han Park; Junepyo Cha; Chang Sik Lee

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

264

Global human appropriation of net primary production doubled in the 20th century  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Asia: Algeria, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Cyprus, Egypt, Georgia, Iraq, Israel...Human impacts on the energy flow through natural ecosystems, and implications for...tropical land-use change: greenhouse gas emissions from biomass burning, decomposition...

Fridolin Krausmann; Karl-Heinz Erb; Simone Gingrich; Helmut Haberl; Alberte Bondeau; Veronika Gaube; Christian Lauk; Christoph Plutzar; Timothy D. Searchinger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Bayesian Networks for the management of greenhouse gas emissions in the British agricultural sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent years have witnessed a rapid rise in the development of deterministic and non-deterministic models to estimate human impacts on the environment. An important failing of these models is the difficulty that most people have understanding the results ... Keywords: Bayesian Networks, Environmental factors, GHG emissions

E. Pérez-Mińana; P. J. Krause; J. Thornton

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Brain imaging methods used in experimental brain research such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Functional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Brain imaging methods used in experimental brain research such as Positron Emission and are best understood in the context of the underlying 3D brain anatomy. In this paper, we present a novel Brain Mapping, Functional Imaging 1 INTRODUCTION Although the human brain is no longer the black box

Mueller, Klaus

267

IGES GHG Emissions Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES GHG Emissions Data IGES GHG Emissions Data Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IGES GHG Emissions Data Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/report_kyoto.html References: IGES GHG Emissions Data[1] Summary "IGES GHG Emissions Data is aimed at providing comprehensive, organised information on the GHG emissions from Annex I countries to the UNFCCC in an easy-to-understand way. All information is extracted from the publicly available sources on the UNFCCC web-site and this data will be updated regularly. " References ↑ "IGES GHG Emissions Data" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=IGES_GHG_Emissions_Data&oldid=383109"

268

Reducing Emissions in Plant Flaring Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, lowering emissions and maximizing production. Saving energy and reducing emissions are the internal requirements for every division of this major corporation. To achieve the public goals the company set, they issued a five year plan called Methods on Energy...

Duck, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Quantitative Elemental Analyses by Plasma Emission Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Elemental Analyses by Plasma Emission Spectroscopy...Argon-supported inductively coupled plasmas operated at atmospheric pressures are excellent...HIGH-FREQUENCY ARGON PLASMA FOR OPTICAL EMISSION...EXPERIMENTAL-STUDY OF A 1-KW, 50-MHZ RF INDUCTIVELY COUPLED...

Velmer A. Fassel

1978-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

270

Uncertainty in emissions projections for climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future global climate projections are subject to large uncertainties. Major sources of this uncertainty are projections of anthropogenic emissions. We evaluate the uncertainty in future anthropogenic emissions using a ...

Webster, Mort David.; Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Mayer, Monika.; Reilly, John M.; Harnisch, Jochen.; Hyman, Robert C.; Sarofim, Marcus C.; Wang, Chien.

271

Photon emission within the linear sigma model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soft-photon emission rates are calculated within the linear sigma model. The investigation is aimed at answering the question to which extent the emissivities map out the phase structure of this particular effective model of strongly interacting matter.

F. Wunderlich; B. Kampfer

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

272

SMB, X-ray Emission Spectroscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emission Spectroscopy Beam Line 6-2b X-ray Emission Spectroscopy Beam Line 6-2b is an advanced spectroscopy experimental station on the multidisciplinary general user wiggler Beam...

273

Dust Emission from the Perseus Molecular Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using far-infrared emission maps taken by IRAS and Spitzer and a near-infrared extinction map derived from 2MASS data, we have made dust temperature and column density maps of the Perseus molecular cloud. We show that the emission from transiently heated very small grains and the big grain dust emissivity vary as a function of extinction and dust temperature, with higher dust emissivities for colder grains. This variable emissivity can not be explained by temperature gradients along the line of sight or by noise in the emission maps, but is consistent with grain growth in the higher density and lower temperature regions. By accounting for the variations in the dust emissivity and VSG emission, we are able to map the temperature and column density of a nearby molecular cloud with better accuracy than has previously been possible.

S. Schnee; J. Li; A. A. Goodman; A. I. Sargent

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

274

Quantitative Elemental Analyses by Plasma Emission Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Elemental Analyses by Plasma Emission Spectroscopy...inductively coupled plasmas operated at atmospheric...INDUCTIVELY-COUPLED HIGH-FREQUENCY ARGON PLASMA FOR OPTICAL EMISSION...1-KW, 50-MHZ RF INDUCTIVELY COUPLED...STUDIES OF A RADIO-FREQUENCY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED...

Velmer A. Fassel

1978-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

275

Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General;1 Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General Equilibrium Analysis Jennifer Morris* , Mort Webster* and John Reilly* Abstract The electric power sector, which

276

ASSESSMENT OF BUILDING LIFECYLE CARBON EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Even though the Carbon Capture & Sequestration Technologies (CC & ST) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology initiated carbon emission research in late 1990s (CSI, 2013), carbon emissions has only become a hot topic in the last decade...

Kwok, George

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

The implementation of emissions trading in companies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates what activities large companies have undertaken to utilize emissions trading and/or offset projects as part of ... in home countries have affected corporate activity towards emissions trading

Jonatan Pinkse

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Companies and regulators in emissions trading programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Much has been written about the economic and environmental performance of US emissions trading programs for “acid rain” (sulfur dioxide ... whether these features are present in the EU Emissions Trading System an...

Joseph Kruger

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions from Estuaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from estuaries are reviewed in relation with biogeochemical processes and carbon cycling. In estuaries, carbon dioxide and methane emissions show a large spatial and temporal ...

Gwenaël Abril; Alberto Vieira Borges

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Absolute vs. intensity-based emission caps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cap-and-trade systems limit emissions to some pre-specified absolute quantity. Intensity-based limits, that restrict emissions to some pre-specified rate relative to input or output, are much more widely used in environmental ...

Ellerman, A. Denny.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Integrating human related errors with technical errors to determine causes behind offshore accidents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

errors were embedded as an integral part of the oil well drilling opera- tion. To reduce the number assessment of the failure. The method is based on a knowledge model of the oil-well drilling process. All of non-productive time (NPT) during oil-well drilling. NPT exhibits a much lower declining trend than

Aamodt, Agnar

282

In Vitro Differentiation of Human Neuroblastoma Cells Caused by Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oncology during the last quarter century, the overall cure rate for...3The abbreviations used are: cAMP. adenosine 3'.5'-monophosphate...known to raise intracellular cAMP levels, both in neuroblastoma...triplicate cultures. suggests that cAMP may be an important mediator...

Jeffrey C. Pence and Nicholas A. Shorter

1990-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Hypomorphism for human NSMCE2/MMS21 causes primordial dwarfism and insulin resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,4 Stephen O’Rahilly,3,4 Jean-Claude Carel,6,7,8 Inęs Barroso,1,3,4 Mark O’Driscoll,2 and Robert Semple3,4 1The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge, United Kingdom. 2Genome Damage and Stability Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, United... . Written informed consent was obtained from all participants or their parents. Acknowledgments I. Barroso, R.K. Semple, D.B. Savage, and S. O’Rahilly were sup- ported by the Wellcome Trust (grants WT098051, WT098498, WT091551, and WT095515, respectively...

Payne, Felicity; Colnaghi, Rita; Rocha, Nuno; Seth, Asha; Harris, Julie; Carpenter, Gillian; Bottomley, William E.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wong, Stephen; Saudek, Vladimir; Savage, David; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Carel, Jean-Claude; Barroso, Inęs; O'Driscoll, Mark; Semple, Robert

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

284

In situ electric fields causing electro-stimulation from conductor contact of charged human  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......evolution of in situ electric fields in anatomically...the resultant in situ electric fields from a charged...Then, computed in situ electric fields were compared...magnitude of a capacitive discharge is much milder if the...object rather than an arc to the finger tip. Thus......

Toshihiro Nagai; Akimasa Hirata

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Estimating the ability of birds to sustain additional human-caused mortalities using a simple decision  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, impact with vehicles, wind turbines, or power lines). In order to assess the impact of addi- tional, and in a computationally straightforward manner. While this approach has many advantages, there are limitations. The PBR of sources, such as indigenous harvest, recreational hunting, collision with man-made objects (vehicles, wind

Fletcher, David

286

Mutations in MTFMT Underlie a Human Disorder of Formylation Causing Impaired Mitochondrial Translation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The metazoan mitochondrial translation machinery is unusual in having a single tRNA[superscript Met] that fulfills the dual role of the initiator and elongator tRNA[superscript Met]. A portion of the Met-tRNA[superscript ...

Tucker, Elena J.

287

Targeted Expression of Human MYCN Selectively Causes Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors in Transgenic Zebrafish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the myeloblast cell lines (D.U. 11157 and...not account for the transmission of the disease. Studies...Development of 3T3-Lines from BALB/c Mouse...Relation in Experimental Transmission of Avian Erythromyeloblastic...Influence of Host Age and Route of Virus Inoculation...

Hong Wei Yang; Jeffery L. Kutok; Nam Hyuk Lee; Hui Ying Piao; Christopher D. M. Fletcher; John P. Kanki; and A. Thomas Look

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

The high energy emission from black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The origin of the high energy emission (X-rays and gamma-rays) from black holes is still a matter of debate. We present new evidence that hard X-ray emission in the low/hard state may not be dominated by thermal Comptonization. We present an alternative scenario for the origin of the high energy emission that is well suited to explain the high energy emission from GRO J1655-40.

M. D. Caballero-Garcia; J. M. Miller; E. Kuulkers

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

289

Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced Technologies Effects of Advanced Combustion Technologies on...

290

NREL: Transportation Research - Emissions and Fuel Economy Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

greenhouse gas and pollutant emissions by advancing the development of new fuels and engines that deliver both high efficiency and reduced emissions. Emissions that result in...

291

Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Characterized particulate emissions from U.S.-legal...

292

An Automobile/Transit Emissions Evaluation of Southern California's Metrolink  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

percentile) Finn| Report: An Automobile~Transit EmissionsAn Automobile/Transit Emissions Evaluation of Southernregulation. or An Automobile/Transit Emissions Evaluation of

Barth, Matthew J.; Tadi, Ramakrishna R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

High Engine Efficiency at 2010 Emissions | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Engine Efficiency at 2010 Emissions High Engine Efficiency at 2010 Emissions 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005deernelson.pdf...

294

Common Sources of Federal Greenhouse Gas Emissions | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Common Sources of Federal Greenhouse Gas Emissions Common Sources of Federal Greenhouse Gas Emissions Common Sources of Federal Greenhouse Gas Emissions...

295

Mass Correlation of Engine Emissions with Spectral Instruments...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mass Correlation of Engine Emissions with Spectral Instruments Mass Correlation of Engine Emissions with Spectral Instruments 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

296

Effect of Biodiesel Blends on NOx Emissions | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biodiesel Blends on NOx Emissions Effect of Biodiesel Blends on NOx Emissions Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007)....

297

How Exhaust Emissions Drive Diesel Engine Fuel Efficiency | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

How Exhaust Emissions Drive Diesel Engine Fuel Efficiency How Exhaust Emissions Drive Diesel Engine Fuel Efficiency 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

298

Combustion Targets for Low Emissions and High Efficiency | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Targets for Low Emissions and High Efficiency Combustion Targets for Low Emissions and High Efficiency 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and...

299

Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the Northeast Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the Northeast 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions...

300

2010 Emissions from an Electronics Perspective | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

10 Emissions from an Electronics Perspective 2010 Emissions from an Electronics Perspective 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Amendment: Lifecycle Emissions Data Worksheet (December 30, 2008...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lifecycle Emissions Data Worksheet (December 30, 2008) Amendment: Lifecycle Emissions Data Worksheet (December 30, 2008) lew.xls Description Amendment: Lifecycle Emissions Data...

302

Attachment C - Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment C - Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL Attachment C - Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL Attachment-C-Summary-GHG-Emissions-Data-FINAL.xlsx Description Attachment C -...

303

Design of Integrated Laboratory and Heavy-Duty Emissions Testing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Integrated Laboratory and Heavy-Duty Emissions Testing Center Design of Integrated Laboratory and Heavy-Duty Emissions Testing Center Both simulated and actual diesel emissions...

304

TEMPORAL VARIATION OF LFG EMISSION FROM DIFFERENT TYPES OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). This reduction of the landfill gas (LFG) emissions requires the ability to measure low methane emissions methane emissions were observed only near the landfill gas

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

305

The Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study Moving Forward with...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Moving Forward with Assessing the Emissions and Health Effects of New Diesel Technology The Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study Moving Forward with Assessing the Emissions and...

306

Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT? Emission Control System...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT Emission Control System for NOx and PM Emission Reduction in Retrofit Applications Part 1 Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT Emission...

307

Diesel and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of Atmosphere...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of Atmosphere Composition and Health Responses to Inhaled Emissions Diesel and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of...

308

Carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions in urban turf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. C. Lal, R. (2004), Carbon emission from farm operations,facts: Average carbon dioxide emissions resulting fromcalculation of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from fuel

Townsend-Small, Amy; Czimczik, Claudia I

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options for Coal-Fired Electric Utility Boilers Ravi K. Srivastava and Robert E. Hall U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division, Research Triangle Park, NC Sikander Khan and Kevin Culligan U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, Clean Air Markets Division, Washington, DC Bruce W. Lani U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Environmental Projects Division, Pittsburgh, PA ABSTRACT Recent regulations have required reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) from electric utility boilers. To comply with these regulatory requirements, it is increas- ingly important to implement state-of-the-art NO x con- trol technologies on coal-fired utility boilers. This paper reviews NO x control

310

Energy Use and Carbon Emissions:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 1980-2001 World Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 1980-2001 April 2004 Energy Information Administration Contacts Staff from the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU), Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (EMCID) prepared this report. General questions concerning the content of the report may be referred to Mark Rodekohr (Mark.Rodekohr@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-1130), Director of EMCID; or Lowell Feld (Lowell.Feld@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-9502), Leader of the Contingency Information Team. Specific questions about the report should be referred to Nathan Wilson (Nathan.Wilson@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-9883). 1 Table of Contents CONTACTS .......................................................................................................................

311

Spectral Emission of Moving Atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A renewed analysis of the H.E. Ives and G.R. Stilwell's experiment on moving hydrogen canal rays (J. Opt. Soc. Am., 1938, v.28, 215) concludes that the spectral emission of a moving atom exhibits always a redshift which informs not the direction of the atom's motion. The conclusion is also evident from a simple energy relation: atomic spectral radiation is emitted as an orbiting electron consumes a portion of its internal energy on transiting to a lower-energy state which however has in a moving atom an additional energy gain; this results in a redshift in the emission frequency. Based on auxiliary experimental information and a scheme for de Broglie particle formation, we give a vigorous elucidation of the mechanism for deceleration radiation of atomic electron; the corresponding prediction of the redshift is in complete agreement with the Ives and Stilwell's experimental formula.

J. X. Zheng-Johansson

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

312

Integrated Emissivity And Temperature Measurement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-channel spectrometer and a light source are used to measure both the emitted and the reflected light from a surface which is at an elevated temperature relative to its environment. In a first method, the temperature of the surface and emissivity in each wavelength is calculated from a knowledge of the spectrum and the measurement of the incident and reflected light. In the second method, the reflected light is measured from a reference surface having a known reflectivity and the same geometry as the surface of interest and the emitted and the reflected light are measured for the surface of interest. These measurements permit the computation of the emissivity in each channel of the spectrometer and the temperature of the surface of interest.

Poulsen, Peter (Livermore, CA)

2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

313

emissions | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4 4 Varnish cache server Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142228914 Varnish cache server emissions Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 9 January, 2014 - 13:12 Suburbs offset Low Carbon Footprint of major U.S. Cities carbon cities CO2 emissions OpenEI suburbs US New research from the University of California-Berkeley shows that those who live in cities in the United States have significantly smaller per-capita carbon footprints than their suburban counterparts. The

314

Controlling the dynamics of spontaneous emission from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of spontaneous emission from quantum dots by photonic crystals Peter Lodahl1 , A. Floris van Driel2 , Ivan S emission can be manipulated10,11 . Photonic crystals provide such an environment: they strongly modify study spontaneous emission from semiconductor quantum dots embedded in inverse opal photonic crystals16

Vos, Willem L.

315

CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS THROUGH GYRORESONANCE EMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 5 CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS THROUGH GYRORESONANCE EMISSION Stephen M. White This article reviews the use of gyroresonance emission at radio wavelengths to measure coronal magnetic fields. Keywords: Sun, solar corona, solar magnetic fields, solar radio emission Introduction Since the realization

White, Stephen

316

8, 34053430, 2008 Climate and emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 8, 3405­3430, 2008 Climate and emission changes over Canada and Mexico E. Tagaris et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions The role of climate and emission changes in future air quality over.russell@ce.gatech.edu) 3405 #12;ACPD 8, 3405­3430, 2008 Climate and emission changes over Canada and Mexico E. Tagaris et al

Boyer, Edmond

317

4, 66916718, 2004 VOC emissions of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 4, 6691­6718, 2004 VOC emissions of Scots pine V. Tarvainen et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Temperature and light dependence of the VOC emissions of Scots pine V. Tarvainen 1 , H. Hakola 1.tarvainen@fmi.fi) 6691 #12;ACPD 4, 6691­6718, 2004 VOC emissions of Scots pine V. Tarvainen et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

318

5, 90979126, 2005 VOC emissions from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 5, 9097­9126, 2005 VOC emissions from vegetation pyrolysis J. P. Greenberg et al. Title Page Discussions Volatile organic emissions from the distillation and pyrolysis of vegetation J. P. Greenberg, H is licensed under a Creative Commons License. 9097 #12;ACPD 5, 9097­9126, 2005 VOC emissions from vegetation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

319

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Starting with the programs contributing the greatest proportion of building greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the agency should next determine which building types operated by those programs use the most energy (Figure 1). Energy intensity is evaluated instead of emissions in this approach because programs may not have access to emissions data by building type.

320

Emissions Minimization Vehicle Routing Problem Miguel Figliozzi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The level of GHG emissions is a proxy for fuel consumption in diesel engines and in the near future, the minimization of emissions and fuel consumption as the primary or secondary objective. This creates a new type, study, and solve a new vehicle routing problem where the minimization of emissions and fuel consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EPA expands air quality emissions trading policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

EPA expands air quality emissions trading policy ... The Environmental Protection Agency has expanded its old "bubble policy" into a wider-ranging, supposedly more effective, emissions trading program designed to speed up attainment of national air quality standards and save money. ... It also authorizes states to adopt generic emissions trading rules and extend these to all ... ...

1982-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

322

Energy Balance and Emissions Associated with Biochar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy off- sets. 41­64% of these emission reductions are related to the retention of C in biochar offersanenergeticallyefficientstrategyforbioenergyproduction, and the land application of biochar reduces greenhouse emissions to a greater extent than when and contribute significantly to greenhouse gas emissions (1). Bioenergy produced from renewable biomass can

Lehmann, Johannes

323

Nitrous Oxide Emissions from a Municipal Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrous Oxide Emissions from a Municipal Landfill ... Due to the small area of landfills as compared to other land-use classes, the total N2O emissions from landfills are estimated to be of minor importance for the total emissions from Finland. ...

Janne Rinne; Mari Pihlatie; Annalea Lohila; Tea Thum; Mika Aurela; Juha-Pekka Tuovinen; Tuomas Laurila; Timo Vesala

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

324

Emissions Reduction Impact of Renewables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

p. 1 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 EMISSIONS REDUCTION IMPACT OF RENEWABLES October 2012 Jeff Haberl, Bahman Yazdani, Charles Culp Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University p. 2 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012... Do TCEQ: Vince Meiller, Bob Gifford ERCOT: Warren Lasher USEPA: Art Diem, Julie Rosenberg ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS p. 3 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 RENEWABLES Solar PV Solar Thermal Hydro Biomass Landfill Gas Geothermal p. 4...

Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Nitrogen oxides emission trends in Monthly emission estimates of nitrogen oxides from space provide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 5 Nitrogen oxides emission trends in East Asia Abstract Monthly emission estimates present first results of a new emission estimation algorithm, specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emission estimates of short-lived atmospheric

Haak, Hein

326

XX--ray Emission from O Starsray Emission from O Stars David CohenDavid Cohen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

XX--ray Emission from O Starsray Emission from O Stars David CohenDavid Cohen Swarthmore College windstheir magnetically channeled winds 2.2. After ~1After ~1 MyrMyr XX--ray emission is weaker andray emission is weaker and softer: embedded wind shocks in early Osofter: embedded wind shocks in early O

Cohen, David

327

High Energy Astrophysics: Emission and Absorption 1/114 Emission and Absorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Energy Astrophysics: Emission and Absorption 1/114 Emission and Absorption 1 Motivation and the jet. #12;High Energy Astrophysics: Emission and Absorption 2/114 HST optical image of 3C273 Note: Emission and Absorption 3/114 Set of 3 images of the jet of 3C273. Left: HST Middle: Chandra X-ray Right

Bicknell, Geoff

328

Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with Comparisons to Other Source Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: National Environmental Respiratory Center

329

GLOBAL EMISSIONS Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, largely carbon dioxide (CO2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLOBAL EMISSIONS Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, largely carbon dioxide (CO2) from the combustion. Figure 1 Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1850­2030 1850 1860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940- related CO2 emissions have risen 130-fold since 1850--from 200 million tons to 27 billion tons a year

Green, Donna

330

Black Carbon Emissions by Rocket Engines Types of rocket engines Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Carbon Emissions by Rocket Engines Types of rocket engines Emissions Liquid Hydrogen. Note: Black carbon does not deplete ozone. What happens is the black carbon emissions from the rocket. Other black carbon emissions: The number one contributor to black carbon is burning biomass. Also

Toohey, Darin W.

331

Emissions  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

currelt gaseous-diffusion uraniurn-enrichnent technology). The use of more efficient uranium-enrichment technologies, such as the gas centrifuge or the laser isotope...

332

Emission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

collisional-radiative model are compared with experiment. The intensity of singlet lines comes mostly 95% from the contribution of the ground state population and is...

333

Laser-induced ultrafast electron emission from a field emission tip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that a field emission tip electron source that is triggered with a femtosecond laser pulse can generate electron pulses shorter than the laser pulse duration (~100 fs). The emission process is sensitive to a power law of the laser intensity, which supports an emission mechanism based on multiphoton absorption followed by over-the-barrier emission. Observed continuous transitions between power laws of different orders are indicative of field emission processes. We show that the source can also be operated so that thermionic emission processes become significant. Understanding these different emission processes is relevant for the production of sub-cycle electron pulses.

Brett Barwick; Chris Corder; James Strohaber; Nate Chandler-Smith; Cornelis Uiterwaal; Herman Batelaan

2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

334

The nexus of electricity consumption, economic growth and CO2 emissions in the BRICS countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study reexamines the causal link between electricity consumption, economic growth and CO2 emissions in the BRICS countries (i.e., Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa) for the period 1990–2010, using panel causality analysis, accounting for dependency and heterogeneity across countries. Regarding the electricity–GDP nexus, the empirical results support evidence on the feedback hypothesis for Russia and the conservation hypothesis for South Africa. However, a neutrality hypothesis holds for Brazil, India and China, indicating neither electricity consumption nor economic growth is sensitive to each other in these three countries. Regarding the GDP–CO2 emissions nexus, a feedback hypothesis for Russia, a one-way Granger causality running from GDP to CO2 emissions in South Africa and reverse relationship from CO2 emissions to GDP in Brazil is found. There is no evidence of Granger causality between GDP and CO2 emissions in India and China. Furthermore, electricity consumption is found to Granger cause CO2 emissions in India, while there is no Granger causality between electricity consumption and CO2 emissions in Brazil, Russia, China and South Africa. Therefore, the differing results for the BRICS countries imply that policies cannot be uniformly implemented as they will have different effects in each of the BRICS countries under study.

Wendy N. Cowan; Tsangyao Chang; Roula Inglesi-Lotz; Rangan Gupta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in organic and conventional farming systems in the Netherlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Organic agriculture is often considered to contribute to reducing energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, also on a per unit product basis. For energy, this is supported by a large number of studies, but the body of evidence for \\{GHGs\\} is smaller. Dutch agriculture is characterized by relatively intensive land use in both organic and conventional farming, which may affect their performance in terms of energy use and GHG emissions. This paper presents results of a model study on energy use and GHG emissions in Dutch organic and conventional farming systems. Energy use per unit milk in organic dairy is approximately 25% lower than in conventional dairy, while GHG emissions are 5-10% lower. Contrary to dairy farming, energy use and GHG emissions in organic crop production are higher than in conventional crop production. Energy use in organic arable farming is 10-30% and in organic vegetable farming 40-50% higher than in their respective conventional counterparts. GHG emissions in organic arable and vegetable farming are 0-15% and 35-40% higher, respectively. Our results correspond with other studies for dairy farming, but not for crop production. The most likely cause for higher energy use and GHG emissions in Dutch organic crop production is its high intensity level, which is expressed in crop rotations with a large share of high-value crops, relatively high fertiliser inputs and frequent field operations related to weeding.

Jules F.F.P. Bos; Janjo de Haan; Wijnand Sukkel; René L.M. Schils

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Air emissions inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory -- 1995 emissions report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the 1995 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources. The air contaminants reported include nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, particulates, and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs).

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting  

SciTech Connect

The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Information about the Greenhouse Gas Emission Calculations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sources and Assumptions for the Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Sources and Assumptions for the Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Calculator To estimate your CO2 emissions rates and generate the bar graph, we used the following sources and assumptions. Your CO2 Emissions Rates Tailpipe (grams CO2/mile) This is the tailpipe CO2 emissions rate for combined city and highway driving that is shown on the fuel economy and environment label for the vehicle model you selected. It is the same regardless of where you live. Total (grams CO2/mile) This includes the vehicle's tailpipe emissions and emissions associated with the production of electricity used to charge the vehicle. For plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, it also includes emissions associated with the production of gasoline. It is estimated using the sources and assumptions below, and will vary based on where you live.

339

India Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

India India India Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends India's 2008 total fossil-fuel CO2 emissions rose 8.1% over the 2007 level to 475 million metric tons of carbon. From 1950 to 2008, India experienced dramatic growth in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions averaging 5.7% per year and becoming the world's third largest fossil-fuel CO2-emitting country. Indian total emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement production have more than doubled since 1994. Fossil-fuel emissions in India continue to result largely from coal burning with India being the world's third largest producer of coal. Coal contributed 87% of the emissions in 1950 and 71% in 2008; at the same time, the oil fraction increased from 11% to 20%. Indian emissions data reveal little impact from the oil price increases that

340

Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Different Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Different Fuels Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Different Fuels This calculator currently focuses on electricity for a number of reasons. The public's interest in vehicles fueled by electricity is high, and as a result consumers are interested in better understanding the emissions created when electricity is produced. For vehicles that are fueled solely by electricity, tailpipe emissions are zero, so electricity production accounts for all GHG emissions associated with such vehicles. Finally, GHG emissions from electricity production vary significantly by region, which makes a calculator like this one-which uses regional data instead of national averages-particularly useful. If you want to compare total tailpipe plus fuel production GHG emissions for an electric or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle to those for a gasoline

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Vehicle Emission Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics November 22, 2013 - 2:07pm Addthis Vehicle emissions are the gases emitted by the tailpipes of vehicles powered by internal combustion engines, which include gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and propane vehicles. Vehicle emissions are composed of varying amounts of: water vapor carbon dioxide (CO2) nitrogen oxygen pollutants such as: carbon monoxide (CO) nitrogen oxides (NOx) unburned hydrocarbons (UHCs) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) particulate matter (PM) A number of factors determine the composition of emissions, including the vehicle's fuel, the engine's technology, the vehicle's exhaust aftertreatment system, and how the vehicle operates. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation during fueling or even when vehicles are

342

Urban Transportation Emission Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Transport Canada Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Prog/2/UTEC-CETU/Menu.aspx?lang=eng Cost: Free References: http://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Prog/2/UTEC-CETU/Menu.aspx?lang=eng The Urban Transportation Emissions Calculator (UTEC) is a user-friendly tool for estimating annual emissions from personal, commercial, and public transit vehicles. It estimates greenhouse gas (GHG) and criteria air contaminant (CAC) emissions from the operation of vehicles. It also estimates upstream GHG emissions from the production, refining and

343

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Detailed Energy-Related Carbon Emissions All Industry Groups 1994 emissions Selected Industries Petroleum refining Chemicals Iron & Steel Paper Food Stone, clay and glass Methodological Details Estimation methods Glossary Return to: Energy and GHG Analysis Efficiency Page Energy Use in Manufacturing Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing Manufacturing, which accounts for about 80 percent of industrial energy consumption, also accounts for about 80 percent of industrial energy-related carbon emissions. (Agriculture, mining, forestry, and fisheries account for the remaining 20 percent.) In 1994, three industries, petroleum, chemicals, and primary metals, emitted almost 60 percent of the energy-related carbon in manufacturing. The next three largest emitters (paper, food, and the stone, glass, and clay products industry) produced an additional 22 percent of the energy-related manufacturing emissions (Figure 1).

344

Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT? Emission Control System...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Johnson Matthey Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT EGRT (tm) (tm) Emission Control System Emission Control System for for NOx NOx and PM Emission and PM Emission Reduction in...

345

November 2004 / Vol. 54 No. 11 BioScience 991 Atidal wave in the biological sciences, caused by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, caused by the advent of genomic techniques and data, has begun to sweep across the fields of evolutionary of genome biology,or genomics, surged in the late 1980s under the impetus of the Human Genome Project and functional questions. The National Plant Genome Initiative, which brought genomics to the plant sciences

Liu, Zhongchi

346

Tuberculosis (TB) is a major cause of mortality around the world, despite five decades of control programmes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that are distinguished by complex surface lipids. The mycobacteria can be classified into species that cause TB in humans. As has been shown for several bacterial pathogens, the secretion of virulence mediator molecules of lipids and glycolipids are released from mycobacterial cells, in a vesicle-bound form, into the host

Ullrich, Axel

347

A review of the environmental and human impacts from wind parks. A case study for the Prefecture of Lasithi, Crete  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A review of the wind parks’ environmental and human impacts, based on extended research on the most recent relevant bibliography, is carried out in the present paper. The results of former studies are presented on:• the impact on the aesthetic of the landscape • the noise emissions • the impact on birds and wildlife • the shadow flicker from wind turbines • the occupation of land • the wind turbines electromagnetic interference. In addition, the results of case studies for selected wind parks installed in the Prefecture of Lasithi in Crete, concerning their visual impacts and their noise emissions are presented. A statistical survey implemented in Crete concerning the public opinion on wind parks and wind energy is also presented. The accomplished tasks indicated:• There are no serious impacts caused by the installation or operation of wind parks. The wind parks’ impacts may be eliminated with the optimum selection of the installation sites and the appropriate siting of the wind turbines. • People in Crete exhibit a strongly positive attitude towards wind energy and wind parks, although they are not willing to pay a higher price for the electricity produced from wind parks. A map with the optimum sites for wind parks installation in the Prefecture of Lasithi was constructed, taking into account all possible restrictions concerning the use of land, the environmental conservation and the impacts on human life. This map can constitute a flexible tool for the optimum site selection for a wind park installation, contributing to the elimination of environmental and human impacts of new wind parks, to the minimization of the required project's licensing time and to the limitation of possible negative public reactions.

Dimitris Al. Katsaprakakis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

349

Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emission Samples Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission Samples 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute...

350

Modeling of Lean Exhaust Emissions Control Systems | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lean Exhaust Emissions Control Systems Modeling of Lean Exhaust Emissions Control Systems 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

351

Article in Kathimerini, August 9, 2006: Dump fire produces toxic milk The levels of cancer-causing dioxin in milk and chicken produced by farms located near  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-causing dioxin in milk and chicken produced by farms located near the Tagarades landfill in Thessaloniki exceeded produce would be affected by increased dioxin emissions. EKEFE scientists said that dioxin levels in samples of milk and poultry taken from local farms was up to 30 percent above permissible levels. Dioxin

Columbia University

352

NETL: Emissions Characterization - Adv. Low-NOx Burner Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Fine Particulate Emissions using Subcritical Water Characterization of Fine Particulate Emissions using Subcritical Water As part of a Cooperative Agreement with DOE-NETL, the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is developing advanced sampling and analysis methodologies for particulate matter that can be used for source apportionment and to assist in health studies. These techniques will be used to determine sources of fine particulate matter in rural states such as North Dakota. One of the primary activities of this effort is the development of a procedure using subcritical water to fractionate organics in air particulates, and test the toxicity of the fractionated organics using various tests. In contrast to inorganic aerosols, which are often well characterized, only ca. 15%–50% of the organic carbonaceous (OC) particulate mass has been characterized. The characterized compounds are almost exclusively nonpolar. The limited knowledge on OC fractions is due to the use of organic solvents which are able to extract only nonpolar or slightly polar organics. Subcritical water has not previously been used to fractionate OC from air particulates, but should have the ability to extract a broad range of polar to low-polarity OC, as well as to provide extracts in a solvent (water) which is directly useful for biological tests. Earlier studies have shown that compounds of different polarities, such as phenols, PAHs, and alkanes, can be sequentially extracted from a petroleum waste sludge by increases in subcritical water temperature.

353

The SACADA database for human reliability and human performance  

SciTech Connect

Lack of appropriate and sufficient human performance data has been identified as a key factor affecting human reliability analysis (HRA) quality especially in the estimation of human error probability (HEP). The Scenario Authoring, Characterization, and Debriefing Application (SACADA) database was developed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to address this data need. An agreement between NRC and the South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company (STPNOC) was established to support the SACADA development with aims to make the SACADA tool suitable for implementation in the nuclear power plants' operator training program to collect operator performance information. The collected data would support the STPNOC's operator training program and be shared with the NRC for improving HRA quality. This paper discusses the SACADA data taxonomy, the theoretical foundation, the prospective data to be generated from the SACADA raw data to inform human reliability and human performance, and the considerations on the use of simulator data for HRA. Each SACADA data point consists of two information segments: context and performance results. Context is a characterization of the performance challenges to task success. The performance results are the results of performing the task. The data taxonomy uses a macrocognitive functions model for the framework. At a high level, information is classified according to the macrocognitive functions of detecting the plant abnormality, understanding the abnormality, deciding the response plan, executing the response plan, and team related aspects (i.e., communication, teamwork, and supervision). The data are expected to be useful for analyzing the relations between context, error modes and error causes in human performance.

Y. James Chang; Dennis Bley; Lawrence Criscione; Barry Kirwan; Ali Mosleh; Todd Madary; Rodney Nowell; Robert Richards; Emilie M. Roth; Scott Sieben; Antonios Zoulis

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Reflections on the human prospect  

SciTech Connect

World population and the global economy are expanding in a manner that is propelling civilization along a path that is unsustainable, inequitable, and unstable. A concerted, global effort to discover, integrate, disseminate, and apply knowledge about the natural world and human behavior would change this trajectory to a path of sustainable human development. This path would point toward the vision of a society in which the basic human needs and an equitable share of life`s amenities could be met by successive generations while maintaining in perpetuity a health, physically attractive, and biologically productive environment. The scholarly community is urged to provide impetus for the pursuit of this vision. An unprecedented degree of collaboration among the disciplines will be necessary. New modes of communication and cooperation among the major sectors of society will have to be fashioned. Knowledge will become an organizing principle for society in the twenty-first century. Climate change has resulted from continuing economic and demographic growth. To stabilize world climate, the emission of greenhouse gases must be controlled. 57 refs.

Malone, T.F. [Sigma Xi Center, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

High Energy Emission from Magnetars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recently discovered soft gamma-ray emission from the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1841-045 has a luminosity L_g ~ 10^{36} ergs/s. This luminosity exceeds the spindown power by three orders of magnitude and must be fed by an alternative source of energy such as an ultrastrong magnetic field. A gradual release of energy in the stellar magnetosphere is expected if it is twisted and a strong electric current is induced on the closed field lines. We examine two mechanisms of gamma-ray emission associated with the gradual dissipation of this current. (1) A thin surface layer of the star is heated by the downward beam of current-carrying charges, which excite Langmuir turbulence in the layer. As a result, it can reach a temperature kT ~ 100 keV and emit bremsstrahlung photons up to this characteristic energy. (2) The magnetosphere is also a source of soft gamma rays at a distance of ~100 km from the star, where the electron cyclotron energy is in the keV range. A large electric field develops in this region in response to the outward drag force felt by the current-carrying electrons from the flux of keV photons leaving the star. A seed positron injected in this region undergoes a runaway acceleration and upscatters keV photons above the threshold for pair creation. The created pairs emit a synchrotron spectrum consistent with the observed 20-100 keV emission. This spectrum is predicted to extend to higher energies and reach a peak at ~1 MeV.

C. Thompson; A. M. Beloborodov

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Spontaneous emission of heavy clusters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The lifetimes of some heavy nuclei relative to the spontaneous emission of various clusters heavier than the alpha particle are estimated with a model extended from the fission theory of alpha decay, showing that this phenomenon is a new manifestation of the nuclear shell structure. A greater probability is obtained for parent-heavy-cluster combinations leading to a magic or almost magic daughter nucleus. The analytical formula obtained allows one to handle a large number of cases to search for new kinds of radioactivities.

D N Poenaru; M Ivascu; A Sandulescu; W Greiner

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Carbon Emissions of Infrastructure Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For buildings taller than three stories, however, the embodied energy per floor area rises due to exponentially increasing structural material demands. ... Figure 4. Impact of urban density and per-capita GDP (PPP, measured in current international dollars) based on network length and vehicle ownership: (A) water network, (B) wastewater network, (C) road network, (D) car ownership. ... Process efficiency improvement and recycling can contribute to reducing emissions per material output; however, long-term material demand and scrap availability for recycling depend fundamentally on the dynamics of societies' stocks of products in use, an issue that has been largely neglected in climate science. ...

Daniel B. Müller; Gang Liu; Amund N. Lřvik; Roja Modaresi; Stefan Pauliuk; Franciska S. Steinhoff; Helge Brattebř

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

358

Separate determination of PM10 emission factors of road traffic for tailpipe emissions and emissions from abrasion and resuspension processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Little is known about the relevance of mechanically produced particles of road traffic from abrasion and resuspension processes in relation to the exhaust pipe particles. In this paper, emission factors of PM10 and PM1 for light and heavy-duty vehicles were derived for different representative traffic regimes from concentration differences of particles and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in ambient air upwind and downwind of busy roads, or alternatively of kerbsides and nearby background sites. Hereby, PM1 was interpreted as direct exhaust emissions and PM10-PM1 as mechanically produced emissions from abrasion and resuspension processes. The results show that abrasion and resuspension processes represent a significant part of the total primary PM10 emissions of road traffic. At sites with relatively undisturbed traffic flow they are in the same range as the exhaust pipe emissions. At sites with disturbed traffic flow due to traffic lights, emissions from abrasion/resuspension are even higher than those from the exhaust pipes.

Robert Gehrig; Matz Hill; Brigitte Buchmann; David Imhof; Ernest Weingartner; Urs Baltensperger

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Know Stroke Stroke is the third leading cause of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Know Stroke Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States and a leading cause of serious, long-term disability in adults. About 600,000 new strokes are reported in the U.S. each year. The good news is that treatments are available that can greatly reduce the damage caused by a stroke

Bandettini, Peter A.

360

Analysis and optimization of the Graz cycle : a coal fired power generation scheme with near-zero carbon dioxide emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humans are releasing record amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere through the combustion of fossil fuels in power generation plants. With mounting evidence that this carbon dioxide is a leading cause of global ...

Alexander, Brentan R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Exhaust emissions from two intercity passenger locomotives  

SciTech Connect

To enhance the effectiveness of intercity passenger rail service in mitigating exhaust emissions in California, the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) included limits on exhaust emissions in its intercity locomotive procurement specifications. Because there were no available exhaust emission test data on which emission reduction goals could be based, Caltrans funded a test program to acquire gaseous and particulate exhaust emissions data, along with smoke opacity data, from two state-of-the-art intercity passenger locomotives. The two passenger locomotives (an EMD F59PH and a GE DASH8-32BWH) were tested at the Association of American Railroads Chicago Technical Center. The EMD locomotive was equipped with a separate Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) 8V-149 diesel engine used to provide 480 V AC power for the trailing passenger cars. This DDC engine was also emission tested. These data were used to quantify baseline exhaust emission levels as a challenge to locomotive manufacturers to offer new locomotives with reduced emissions. Data from the two locomotive engines were recorded at standard fuel injection timing and with the fuel injection timing retarded 4 deg in an effort to reduce NO[sub x] emissions. Results of this emissions testing were incorporated into the Caltrans locomotive procurement process by including emission performance requirements in the Caltrans intercity passenger locomotive specification, and therefore in the procurement decision. This paper contains steady-state exhaust emission test results for hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NO[sub x]), and particulate matter (PM) from the two locomotives. Computed sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) emissions are also given, and are based on diesel fuel consumption and sulfur content. Exhaust smoke opacity is also reported.

Fritz, S.G. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Dept. of Emissions Research)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

WILD PIG ATTACKS ON HUMANS  

SciTech Connect

Attacks on humans by wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have been documented since ancient times. However, studies characterizing these incidents are lacking. In an effort to better understand this phenomenon, information was collected from 412 wild pig attacks on humans. Similar to studies of large predator attacks on humans, data came from a variety of sources. The various attacks compiled occurred in seven zoogeographic realms. Most attacks occurred within the species native range, and specifically in rural areas. The occurrence was highest during the winter months and daylight hours. Most happened under non-hunting circumstances and appeared to be unprovoked. Wounded animals were the chief cause of these attacks in hunting situations. The animals involved were typically solitary, male and large in size. The fate of the wild pigs involved in these attacks varied depending upon the circumstances, however, most escaped uninjured. Most human victims were adult males traveling on foot and alone. The most frequent outcome for these victims was physical contact/mauling. The severity of resulting injuries ranged from minor to fatal. Most of the mauled victims had injuries to only one part of their bodies, with legs/feet being the most frequent body part injured. Injuries were primarily in the form of lacerations and punctures. Fatalities were typically due to blood loss. In some cases, serious infections or toxemia resulted from the injuries. Other species (i.e., pets and livestock) were also accompanying some of the humans during these attacks. The fates of these animals varied from escaping uninjured to being killed. Frequency data on both non-hunting and hunting incidents of wild pig attacks on humans at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, showed quantitatively that such incidents are rare.

Mayer, J.

2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

363

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as those from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Because this report is intended to discuss radioactive air emissions during calendar year 2010, data on radionuclides in air from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant releases are not presented but will be included in the report for calendar year 2011. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE, 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001(EPA, 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2010, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 17 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000032 mrem/yr, more than 300,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

ASH EMISSIVITY CHARACTERIZATION AND PREDICTION  

SciTech Connect

The increased use of western subbituminous coals has generated concerns regarding highly reflective ash disrupting heat transfer in the radiant zone of pulverized-fuel boilers. Ash emissivity and reflectivity is primarily a function of ash particle size, with reflective deposits expected to consist of very small refractory ash materials such as CaO, MgO, or sulfate materials such as Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. For biomass fuels and biomass-coal blends, similar reflectivity issues may arise as a result of the presence of abundant organically associated calcium and potassium, which can transform during combustion to fine calcium, and potassium oxides and sulfates, which may act as reflective ash. The relationship of reflectivity to ash chemistry is a second-order effect, with the ash particle size distribution and melting point being determined by the size and chemistry of the minerals present in the starting fuel. Measurement of the emission properties of ash and deposits have been performed by several research groups (1-6) using both laboratory methods and measurements in pilot- and full-scale combustion systems. A review of the properties and thermal properties of ash stresses the important effect of ash deposits on heat transfer in the radiant boiler zone (1).

Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Charlene R. Crocker

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Human-machine interactions  

SciTech Connect

Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM); Abbott, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Brannon, Nathan G. (Albuquerque, NM); Bernard, Michael L. (Tijeras, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

366

Simulating cosmic rays in clusters of galaxies – II. A unified scheme for radio haloes and relics with predictions of the -ray emission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......synchrotron emission between 15 MHz and 1.4 GHz, (2) non-thermal...at radio frequencies (nu 10 MHz) as well as at hard X-ray...the thermal core causing the plasma beta parameter to decrease by...these sources within the cluster atmosphere causing some foreground objects......

Christoph Pfrommer; Torsten A. Enßlin; Volker Springel

2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

367

Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water More Documents & Publications Application of Environmental Isotopes to the Evaluation of the Origin of Contamination in a Desert Arroyo: Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale

368

Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water More Documents & Publications Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale Application of Environmental Isotopes to the Evaluation of the Origin of Contamination in a Desert Arroyo: Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico

369

Large methane emission upon spring thaw from natural wetlands in the northern permafrost region  

SciTech Connect

The permafrost carbon climate feedback is one of the major mechanisms in controlling the climate ecosystem interactions in northern high latitudes. Of this feedback, methane (CH4) emission from natural wetlands is critically important due to its high warming potential. The freeze thaw transition has been confirmed to play an important role in annual CH4 budget, yet the magnitude of this effect is uncertain. An intensive field campaign was carried out in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China to estimate the CH4 emission in the spring freeze thaw transition period. The observation concluded that a large CH4 source was caused by spring thaw; the maximum hourly emission rate was 48.6 g C m 2 h 1, more than three orders of the regularly observed CH4 emission rate in the growing season. In some sporadically observed 'hot spots', the spring thawing effect contributed to a large CH4 source of 31.3 10.1 g C m 2, which is approximately 80% of the previously calculated annual CH4 emission in the same study area. If our results are typical for natural wetlands in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region, we estimate a global CH4 source strength of 0.5 1.0 Tg C (1 Tg =1012 g) caused by spring thaw in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region in the year 2011. Combining with available satellite and flask data, a regional extrapolation reaches a temporal pattern of CH4 emission during 2003 2009 which is consistent with recently observed changes in atmospheric CH4 concentration in the high latitudes. This suggests that the CH4 emission upon spring thaw in the high latitudes might be enhanced by the projected climate warming. These findings indicate that the spring thawing effect is an important mechanism in the permafrost carbon climate feedback and needs to be incorporated in Earth system models.

Song, Changchun [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Sun, Xiaoxin [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Sun, Li [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Miao, Yuqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Wang, Xianwei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Guo, Yuedong [Chinese Academy of Sciences

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Europe Europe » Poland Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends Carbon dioxide emissions from Poland's use of fossil-fuels and cement production climbed at a remarkably steady rate of 3.9% per year from 1800 until 1980, when they dropped abruptly (11.7%). Fossil-fuel CO2 emissions crept back up throughout the 1980s peaking in 1987 at 127 million metric tons of carbon. Since the 1987 high, CO2 emissions have plummeted 32% to early 1970s levels while per capita emissions have dropped to late 1960s levels. Poland is the world's ninth largest producer of coal and emissions are predominantly from coal burning: 97% in 1950 and 68% in 2008. The drop following 1980 is apparent in rates of liquid fuel burning but releases from consumption of petroleum products have returned and surpassed 1980s

371

Carbon Emissions: Iron and Steel Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iron and Steel Industry Iron and Steel Industry Carbon Emissions in the Iron and Steel Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 3312) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 39.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 10.7% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 22.2 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 1,649 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 7.6% Nonfuel Use of Energy: 886 trillion Btu (53.7%) -- Coal: 858 trillion Btu (used to make coke) Carbon Intensity: 24.19 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 39.9 Coal 22.7

372

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Transportation, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html Country: United States UN Region: Northern America CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Screenshot References: http://www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html "This Emissions Estimator provides the amount of reduced emissions in terms of pounds of CO2, SO2, and NOX based on input from the User regarding the CHP technology being used. In turn the User will be provided with

373

IPCC Emission Factor Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IPCC Emission Factor Database IPCC Emission Factor Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IPCC Emission Factor Database Agency/Company /Organization: World Meteorological Organization, United Nations Environment Programme Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jp/EFDB/main.php References: IPCC-EFDB[1] About "EFDB is meant to be a recognised library, where users can find emission factors and other parameters with background documentation or technical references that can be used for estimating greenhouse gas emissions and removals. The responsibility of using this information appropriately will always remain with the users themselves." References ↑ "IPCC-EFDB" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=IPCC_Emission_Factor_Database&oldid=367213"

374

Monitoring the progress of emission inventories  

SciTech Connect

This issue of EM contains three articles which focus on the latest improvements on the emissions inventory process. The first, 'Building the national emissions inventory: challenges and plans for improvements' by Doug Solomon and Martin Husk (pages 8-11), looks at the US national emissions inventory. The next, 'Greenhouse gas inventories - a historical perspective and assessment of improvements since 1990' by Bill Irving and Dina Kruger (pages 12-19) assesses improvements in national and international greenhouse gas emissions inventories over the last 15 years. The third article, 'The global mercury emissions inventory' by Leonard Levin (pages 20-25) gives an overview of the challenges associated with conducting a worldwide inventory of mercury emissions.

Levy, J.A. Jr.; Solomon, D.; Husk, M.; Irving, B.; Kruger, D.; Levin. L. [Exponent Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Field Emission and Nanostructure of Carbon Films  

SciTech Connect

The results of field emission measurements of various forms of carbon films are reported. It is shown that the films nanostructure is a crucial factor determining the field emission properties. In particular, smooth, pulsed-laser deposited amorphous carbon films with both high and low sp3 contents are poor field emitters. This is similar to the results obtained for smooth nanocrystalline, sp2-bonded carbon films. In contrast, carbon films prepared by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HE-CVD) exhibit very good field emission properties, including low emission turn-on fields, high emission site density, and excellent durability. HF-CVD carbon films were found to be predominantly sp2-bonded. However, surface morphology studies show that these films are thoroughly nanostructured, which is believed to be responsible for their promising field emission properties.

Merkulov, V.I.; Lowndes, D.H.; Baylor, L.R.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

376

Determine Largest Mobile Greenhouse Gas Emission Sources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

For the purposes of portfolio planning, a Federal agency's first data analysis step is to determine which mobile emissions sources represent the largest contributors to the agency's overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Agencies can use agency-level data to determine which fleets/locations, which vehicle assets (e.g., fleet vehicles, non-fleet equipment, etc.), and which fuel types are producing the largest amounts of emissions.

377

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States, 1985--1990  

SciTech Connect

The Earth`s capacity to support life depends on the moderating influences of gases that envelop the planet and warm its surface and protect it from harmful radiation. These gases are referred to as ``greenhouse gases.`` Their warming capacity, called ``the greenhouse effect,`` is essential to maintaining a climate hospitable to all plant, animal, and human life. In recent years, however, there has been increasing concern that human activity may be affecting the intricate balance between the Earth`s absorption of heat from the sun and its capacity to reradiate excess heat back into space. Emissions of greenhouse gases from human activities may be an important mechanism that affects global climate. Thus, research is intensifying to improve our understanding of the role human activities might play in influencing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. On the basis of scientific findings of the past few decades, the US Government and the international community at large are now taking steps toward stabilizing greenhouse gas emissions. This report contributes to that process. Mandated by Congress this report provides estimates of US emissions of the principal greenhouse gases--carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, chlorofluorcarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane volatile organic compounds. Estimates are for the period 1985 to 1990. Preliminary estimates for 1991 have also been included, whenever data were available.

Not Available

1993-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

378

Progress Update: Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Documents & Publications Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits ADEC II Universal SCR Retrofit System for On-road and Off-road Diesel Engines SCR & DPF RETROFITS FOR MOBILE...

379

Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Augustin J et al. Automated gas chromatographic system forof the atmospheric trace gases methane, carbon dioxide, andfuel consumption and of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Approach Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS): Technical, Institutional...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Policy Lessons Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS): Technical, Institutional and Policy Lessons Agency...

382

Fine Structure Studies in Proton Emission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure Studies in Proton Emission In order to understand the evolution of single particle wave functions and deformations beyond the proton drip line, a program has been...

383

Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) NETL Agreement...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NETL Agreement 13919 Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) NETL Agreement 13919 Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on...

384

Recent increases in global HFC-23 emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009), Greenhouse Gas Emissions Data, http://unfccc.int/ghg_data/ ghg_data_unfccc/items/4146.php, U. N. Framework Conv.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

63 Figure 59. Carbon Intensity of Power Generation,economic energy and carbon intensity by setting short andproduction) and carbon intensity (CO 2 emissions per unit of

Fridley, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Study Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study Reports on Phase 1 testing of new 2007 heavy-duty diesel engines (using a common lubricant) from four manufacturers (Caterpillar,...

387

Resonant seismic emission of subsurface objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E . , and S. Keydar, 1998, Seismic monitoring of diffractionthe barrel. The Resonant Seismic Emission Source ReceiverFigure 1. Geometry o f the seismic experiment to locate a

Korneev, Valeri A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) - Cooperative multi...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

- Cooperative multi-party effort to characterize emissions and possible health effects of new advanced heavy duty engine and control systems and fuels in the market 2007 - 2010...

389

Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) Substantial public health benefits are expected from the new 20072010 enginecontrol systems and fuels, but it is prudent to ensure...

390

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

highlighting representative studies that illustrate the state-of-the-art deer12johnson.pdf More Documents & Publications Diesel Emission Control Review Review of Emerging...

391

Review of Diesel Emission Control Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diesel Emission Control Technology Tim Johnson August 2002 2 Outline * Introduction - Regulatory update and technology approaches * Ultrafines * Filters * NOx - LNC - SCR - LNT *...

392

The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program -...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies Program The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program - Part 2 Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project Scoping and Feasibility...

393

What can emission lines tell us?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Generalities 2 Empirical diagnostics based on emission lines 3 Photoionization modelling 4 Pending questions 5 Appendix: Lists of useful lines and how to deal with them

G. Stasinska

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

394

PHEV Engine Cold Start Emissions Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cold Start Emissions Management Paul Chambon, Dr. David Smith Oak Ridge National Laboratory Dr. David Irick, Dean Deter The University of Tennessee Poster Location P-05 2 Managed...

395

The late emission of thermonuclear supernovae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The subject of late-time emission of Type Ia supernovae and its implications for the understanding of the explosions of C+O WDs is reviewed.

Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

396

Sandia National Laboratories: reducing carbon dioxide emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbon dioxide emissions Measurements of Thermal Stratification in a Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition Engine On February 27, 2013, in CRF, Energy, Facilities, News, News &...

397

Impacts of Biodiesel on Emission Control Devices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

398

Reduction of single-photon emission from a single-emitter system by intersystem crossing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the reduction in the probability of single-photon emission from a single-emitter system caused by intersystem crossing. The physical model is that a single-emitter system with three levels is excited by a square pulse laser, and then a single photon is emitted at a controllable time. We find that the intersystem crossing always reduces the probability of single-photon emission. We obtain quantitative and analytical expressions for the probabilities of zero-, one-, and two-photon emission and Mandel's Q parameter as the function of the intersystem crossing rate under the conditions of finite field strength and finite interaction time with the laser pulse. We discuss the conditions for obtaining the maximal probability of single-photon emission in the presence of intersystem crossing. We find that one can obtain a high probability of single-photon emission from the single-emitter system using square pulse excitation in comparison with continuous wave excitation. Mandel's Q parameter exhibits a transition from a sub-Poissonian behavior to a super-Poissonian behavior due to the influence of intersystem crossing. The calculated Mandel's Q parameter and second-order correlation function of photon emission considering the coherent effect are in better agreement with the experimental data.

Yong He and Lin Dai

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

399

The 'Mine/Yours' method of international comparisons of carbon emissions  

SciTech Connect

In previous work (Schipper, Unander & Lilliu 1999), we summarized a new method for comparing energy use and carbon emissions among various countries. We call this the ''Mine/Yours'' comparison. In this paper, we provide details of the comparisons methodology, and carry out the comparison on a number of IEA countries. We calculate the average energy intensities I for a sample of countries (''yours'') and multiply them by structural parameters S for a particular country (''mine''). Comparing the results with the actual energy use of the country in question gives us an estimate of how much energy that country would use with average intensities but with its own structural conditions. The converse can be calculated as well, that is, average structure and own intensities. Emissions can be introduced through the F (fuel mix) term. These calculations show where differences in the components of emissions lead to large gaps among countries, and where those differences are not important. We show which components cause the largest variance in emissions by sector. In households, home size, average winter climate, and energy intensity appear to be the most important differentiating characteristics for space heating. For other residential energy uses the mix of fuels used to generate electricity (utility mix) is most important. Because some of the differences are ''built in'' - geography, climate, natural resources endowment - we conclude by questioning whether uniform emissions reductions targets make sense. Indeed, the ''Mine/Yours'' tool provides a valuable guide to important ways in which emissions may or may not be flexible.

Murtishaw, Scott; Schipper, Lee; Unander, Fridtjof

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts This report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009, was prepared under the general direction of John Conti, Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis, and Paul Holtberg, Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team. General questions concerning the content of this report may be directed to the Office of Communications at 202/586-8800. Technical information concerning the content of the report may be obtained from Perry Lindstrom at 202/586-0934 (email, perry.lindstrom@eia.gov). Without the assistance of Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), this report would not have been possible. In particular we would like to thank Erin Beddingfield, Keith Forbes, Kristin Igusky, Makely Lyon, Michael Mondshine, and Richard Richards. We also wish to acknowledge the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Spontaneous Photon Emission in Cavities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate spontaneous photon emission processes of two-level atoms in parabolic and ellipsoidal cavities thereby taking into account the full multimode scenario. In particular, we calculate the excitation probabilities of the atoms and the energy density of the resulting few-photon electromagnetic radiation field by using semiclassical methods for the description of the multimode scenario. Based on this approach photon path representations are developed for relevant transition probability amplitudes which are valid in the optical frequency regime where the dipole and the rotating-wave approximations apply. Comparisons with numerical results demonstrate the quality of these semiclassical results even in cases in which the wave length of a spontaneously emitted photon becomes comparable or even larger than characteristic length scales of the cavity. This is the dynamical regime in which diffraction effects become important so that geometric optical considerations are typically not applicable.

Gernot Alber; Nils Trautmann

2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

402

Detaled description of spontaneous emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The wave side of wave-photon duality, describing light as an electromagnetic field (EMF), is used in this article. EMF of spontaneous light emission (SE) of laser excited atom is calculated from first principles for the first time. This calculation is done using simple method of atomic quantum electrodynamics. EMF of SE is calculated also for three types of polyatomic light sources excited by laser. It is shown that light radiated by such sources can be coherent, which explains recent experiments on SE of laser excited atoms. Small sources of SE can be superradiant, which also conforms to experiment. Thus SE is shown not to be a random event itself. Random properties of natural light are simply explained as a result of thermal excitation randomness without additional hypotheses. EMF of SE is described by simple complex functions but not real ones.

Marat Guryev

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

403

Positron emission tomography wrist detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal representing a time-of-occurrence of an annihilation event, generating an address signal representing a channel detecting the annihilation event, and generating a channel signal including the time and address signals. The method also includes generating a composite signal including the channel signal and another similarly generated channel signal concerning another annihilation event. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information includes a time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator. The time signal is asynchronous and the address signal is synchronous to a clock signal. A PET scanner includes a scintillation array, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoders include the time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator.

Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); O'Connor, Paul (Bellport, NY); Woody, Craig (Setauket, NY); Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang (Sound Beach, NY); Radeka, Veljko (Bellport, NY); Vaska, Paul (Sound Beach, NY); Pratte, Jean-Francois (Stony Brook, NY)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Analysis of the causes of heavy aerosol pollution in Beijing, China: A case study with the WRF-Chem model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The causes and variability of a heavy haze episode in the Beijing region was analyzed. During the episode, the PM2.5 concentration reached a peak value of 450 ?g/kg on January 18, 2013 and rapidly decreased to 100 ?g/kg on January 19, 2013, characterizing a large variability in a very short period. This strong variability provides a good opportunity to study the causes of the haze formation. The in situ measurements (including surface meteorological data and vertical structures of the winds, temperature, humidity, and planetary boundary layer (PBL)) together with a chemical/dynamical regional model (WRF-Chem) were used for the analysis. In order to understand the rapid variability of the PM2.5 concentration in the episode, the correlation between the measured meteorological data (including wind speed, PBL height, relative humidity, etc.) and the measured particle concentration (PM2.5 concentration) was studied. In addition, two sensitive model experiments were performed to study the effect of individual contribution from local emissions and regional surrounding emissions to the heavy haze formation. The results suggest that there were two major meteorological factors in controlling the variability of the PM2.5 concentration, namely, surface wind speed and PBL height. During high wind periods, the horizontal transport of aerosol particles played an important role, and the heavy haze was formed when the wind speeds were very weak (less than 1 m/s). Under weak wind conditions, the horizontal transport of aerosol particles was also weak, and the vertical mixing of aerosol particles played an important role. As a result, the PBL height was a major factor in controlling the variability of the PM2.5 concentration. Under the shallow PBL height, aerosol particles were strongly confined near the surface, producing a high surface PM2.5 concentration. The sensitivity model study suggests that the local emissions (emissions from the Beijing region only) were the major cause for the heavy haze events. With only local emissions, the calculated peak value of the PM2.5 concentration was 350 ?g/kg, which accounted for 78% of the measured peak value (450 ?g/kg). In contrast, without the local emissions, the calculated peak value of the PM2.5 concentration was only 100 ?g/kg, which accounted for 22% of the measured peak value.

Hui He; Xuexi Tie; Qiang Zhang; Xiange Liu; Qian Gao; Xia Li; Yang Gao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, 1993 emissions report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the 1993 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to commence the preparation of the permit to operate application for the INEL, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL and provides emissions estimates for both mobile and stationary sources.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Exposure to 1-bromopropane causes degeneration of noradrenergic axons in the rat brain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1-Bromopropane (1-BP) has been used as an alternative to ozone-depleting solvents. Previous studies showed that 1-BP is neurotoxic in animals and humans. In humans, exposure to 1-BP caused various neurological and neurobehavioral symptoms or signs including depressive or irritated mood. However, the neurobiological changes underlying the depressive symptoms induced by 1-BP remain to be determined. The depressive symptoms are thought to be associated with degeneration of axons containing noradrenaline and serotonin. Based on this hypothesis, the present study examined the effects of repeated exposure to 1-BP on serotonergic and noradrenergic axons. Exposure to 1-BP induced dose-dependent decreases in the density of noradrenergic axons in the rat prefrontal cortex, but no apparent change in the density of serotonergic axons. The results suggest that depressive symptoms in workers exposed to 1-BP are due, at least in part, to the degeneration of noradrenergic axons in the brain.

Sahabudeen Sheik Mohideen; Gaku Ichihara; Sahoko Ichihara; Shoji Nakamura

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Cognitive Science (Humanities)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cognitive Science (Humanities) The University of Edinburgh College of Humanities and Social Science: Cognitive Science (Humanities) BSc Honours in: Cognitive Science Please see separate information sheets the disciplines that contribute to the study of human cognition. The Cognitive Science programme at Edinburgh

Schnaufer, Achim

408

Analysis of emission right prices in greenhouse gas emission trading via agent-based model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes a participant nation model for international emission trading; adaptive agents are used to explore the conditions under which an emission trading market is successful. In this study, the participation nation models with and without ... Keywords: Agent-Based Modeling, Compliance Mechanism, Emissions Trading, Kyoto Protocol, Reinforcement Learning

Tomohiro Nakada; Keiki Takadama; Shigeyoshi Watanabe

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Radionuclides from the Fukushima nuclear power plant were detected at the NNSS in March 2011 and are discussed further in Section III. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2011, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1% to a maximum of 12.2% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000024 mrem/yr, more than 400,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

410

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2013  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitations to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011. NNSA/NFO demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations on the NNSS (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 (EPA 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide’s concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2013, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from 0.2% to a maximum of 10.1% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 9 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000011 mrem/yr, more than 900,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

Warren, R.

2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

411

Whole-body biodistribution and radiation dosimetry in monkeys and humans of the phosphodiesterase 4 radioligand [11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whole-body biodistribution and radiation dosimetry in monkeys and humans of the phosphodiesterase 4. Keywords: [11 C](R)-Rolipram; Positron emission tomography; Dosimetry; Biodistribution 1. Introduction used for positron emission Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Nuclear Medicine and Biology 35

Shen, Jun

412

Air Emissions and Oil Displacement Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

battery packs allow vehicles to travel longer distance on electric power instead of gasoline may (1) produce fewer greenhouse gas emissions when powered by electricity instead of gasoline emissions relative to HEVs, depending on electricity source. Plug-in vehicles with large battery packs

Michalek, Jeremy J.

413

Asia-wide emissions of greenhouse gases  

SciTech Connect

Emissions of principal greenhouse gases (GHGs) from Asia are increasing faster than those from any other continent. This is a result of rapid economic growth, as well as the fact that almost half of the world`s population lives in Asian countries. In this paper, the author provides estimates of emissions of the two principal greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}), from individual countries and areas. Recent literature has been reviewed for emission estimates for individual sources, such as carbon dioxide from cement manufacture, and methane from rice fields. There are very large uncertainties in many of these estimates, so several estimates are provided, where available. The largest anthropogenic source of CO{sub 2} emissions is the use of fossil fuels. Energy consumption data from 1992 have been used to calculate estimated emissions of CO{sub 2} from this source. In view of the ongoing negotiations to limit future greenhouse gas emissions, estimates of projected CO{sub 2} emissions from the developing countries of Asia are also provided. These are likely to be 3 times their 1986 levels by 2010, under business as usual scenarios. Even with the implementation of energy efficiency measures and fuel switching where feasible, the emissions of CO{sub 2} are likely to double within the same time period.

Siddiqi, T.A. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States). Program on Environment

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Weak Boson Emission in Hadron Collider Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections to many hadron collider processes are known to become large and negative at high energies, due to the appearance of Sudakov-like logarithms. At the same order in perturbation theory, weak boson emission diagrams contribute. Since the W and Z bosons are massive, the O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections and the contributions from weak boson emission are separately finite. Thus, unlike in QED or QCD calculations, there is no technical reason for including gauge boson emission diagrams in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In most calculations of the O(alpha) electroweak radiative corrections, weak boson emission diagrams are therefore not taken into account. Another reason for not including these diagrams is that they lead to final states which differ from that of the original process. However, in experiment, one usually considers partially inclusive final states. Weak boson emission diagrams thus should be included in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In this paper, I examine the role of weak boson emission in those processes at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN LHC for which the one-loop electroweak radiative corrections are known to become large at high energies (inclusive jet, isolated photon, Z+1 jet, Drell-Yan, di-boson, t-bar t, and single top production). In general, I find that the cross section for weak boson emission is substantial at high energies and that weak boson emission and the O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections partially cancel.

U. Baur

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

415

Extended emission around GPS radio sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extended radio emission detected around a sample of GHz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio sources is discussed. Evidence for extended emission which is related to the GPS source is found in 6 objects out of 33. Three objects are associated with quasars with core-jet pc-scale morphology, and three are identified with galaxies with symmetric (CSO) radio morphology. We conclude that the core-jet GPS quasars are likely to be beamed objects with a continuous supply of energy from the core to the kpc scale. It is also possible that low surface brightness extended radio emission is present in other GPS quasars but the emission is below our detection limit due to the high redshifts of the objects. On the other hand, the CSO/galaxies with extended large scale emission may be rejuvenated sources where the extended emission is the relic of previous activity. In general, the presence of large scale emission associated with GPS galaxies is uncommon, suggesting that in the context of the recurrent activity model, the time scale between subsequent bursts is in general longer than the radiative lifetime of the radio emission from the earlier activity.

C. Stanghellini; C. P. O'Dea; D. Dallacasa; P. Cassaro; S. A. Baum; R. Fanti; C. Fanti

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

416

PHYSICS 359 THERMIONIC EMISSION OF ELECTRONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHYSICS 359 THERMIONIC EMISSION OF ELECTRONS INTRODUCTION: The electrical conductivity of metals of the process of thermionic emission of electrons is provided by the model of an essentially free electron gas at temperature T is then obtained by converting the energy distribution of Eq.(1) to a distribution over

Landstreet, John D.

417

ALGEBRAIC ASPECTS OF EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY WITH ABSORPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALGEBRAIC ASPECTS OF EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY WITH ABSORPTION L. Hajdu and R. Tijdeman Abstract of emission tomography with absorption, con- sider a ray (such as light or X-ray) transmitting through #1; e #22;x ; where #22; #21; 0 denotes the absorption coeĂ?cient of the material, and x is the length

Tijdeman, Robert

418

Fast Globally Convergent Reconstruction in Emission Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

considerable speedup by using only a subset of the projection data per sub- iteration. However, OSEM1 Fast Globally Convergent Reconstruction in Emission Tomography Using COSEM, an Incremental EM globally convergent incremental EM algorithms for reconstruction in emission tomography, COSEM- ML

Rangarajan, Anand

419

X-ray Emission from Massive Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray Emission from Massive Stars David Cohen Department of Physics and Astronomy Swarthmore #12;What is the mechanism by which massive stars produce x-rays? New results from the Chandra X-ray Observatory ­ high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy: measuring Doppler broadening in emission lines Testing

Cohen, David

420

Trending and root cause analysis of TWRS radiological problem reports  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a uniform method for trending and performing root cause analysis for radiological problem reports at Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS).

Brown, R.L.

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Root Cause Analysis (RCA) & Corrective Action Plan (CAP) | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

As part of our effort to build a strong project and contract management foundation, a root cause analysis (RCA) was developed through extensive collaboration between...

422

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation P. Sofronis, I. M. Robertson, D. D. Johnson University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group...

423

carbon dioxide emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dioxide emissions dioxide emissions Dataset Summary Description Total annual carbon dioxide emissions by country, 2005 to 2009 (million metric tons). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords carbon dioxide emissions EIA world Data text/csv icon total_carbon_dioxide_emissions_from_the_consumption_of_energy_2005_2009million_metric_tons.csv (csv, 12.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating

424

hourly emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

60 60 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278660 Varnish cache server hourly emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago)

425

Japan Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania » Japan Oceania » Japan Japan Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends The history of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions from Japan is remarkable for the abrupt change that occurred in 1973. With postwar growth at 9.8% per year from 1950 to 1973, total emissions were virtually constant from 1974-1987. From 1987-96, emissions grew 25.3% reaching 329 million metric tons of carbon. Growth during this period was characterized by a return to mid-1970s consumption levels for liquid petroleum products and increased contributions from coal and natural gas use. Since 1996, Japan's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have vacilated and now total 329 million metric tons of carbon in 2008. Based on United Nations energy trade data for 2008, Japan is the world's largest importer of coal (184 million metric tons) and

426

NETL: Fugitive Gas Emissions Detection Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fugitive Gas Emissions Detection Facilities Fugitive Gas Emissions Detection Facilities NETL uses an array of innovative laboratory techniques and field methods to detect and monitor fugitive emissions of CO2 stored in geologic formations. By providing an accurate accounting of stored CO2 and a high level of confidence that the CO2 will permanently remain in storage, these efforts can help ensure the technical soundness and economic viability of carbon sequestration, a technology that is critical to meeting the national goal of reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Successful research to establish the stability and integrity of host formations will help developers of sequestration projects secure permits and emissions reduction credits, while preventing damage to ecosystems and ensuring public health and safety.

427

Global Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Comma-delimited) Trends Since 1751 approximately 337 billion metric tonnes of carbon have been released to the atmosphere from the consumption of fossil fuels and cement production. Half of these emissions have occurred since the mid 1970s. The 2007 global fossil-fuel carbon emission estimate, 8365 million metric tons of carbon, represents an all-time high and a 1.7% increase from 2006. Globally, liquid and solid fuels accounted for 76.3% of the emissions from fossil-fuel burning and cement production in 2007. Combustion of gas fuels (e.g., natural gas) accounted for 18.5% (1551 million metric tons of carbon) of the total emissions from fossil fuels in 2007 and reflects a gradually increasing global utilization of natural gas. Emissions from

428

Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction Technology Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction Technology January 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative technology that could potentially help some coal-based power generation facilities comply with anticipated new mercury emissions standards was successfully demonstrated in a recently concluded milestone project at a Michigan power plant. Under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), WE Energies demonstrated the TOXECON(TM) process in a $52.9million project at the Presque Isle Power Plant in Marquette, Mich. TOXECON is a relatively cost-effective option for achieving significant reductions in mercury emissions and increasing the

429

NETL: Mercury Emissions Inactive Mercury Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completed Mercury Projects Completed Mercury Projects View specific project information by clicking the state of interest on the map. Clickable U.S. Map ALABAMA Characterizing Toxic Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants Southern Research Institute The objective of this contract is to perform sampling and analysis of air toxic emissions at commercial coal-fired power plants in order to collect data that the EPA will use in their Congressionally mandated report on Hazardous Air Pollutants from Electric Utilities. CALIFORNIA Assessment of Toxic Emissions from a Coal-Fired Power Plant Utilizing an ESP Energy & Environmental Research Corporation – CA The overall objective of this project is to conduct comprehensive assessments of toxic emissions of two coal-fired electric utility power plants. The power plant that was assessed for toxic emissions during Phase I was American Electric Power Service Corporation's Cardinal Station Unit 1.

430

IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios Get Javascript Other reports in this collection Special Report on Emissions Scenarios Foreword Preface Summary for policymakers Technical Summary Chapters Chapter 1: Background and Overview Chapter 2: An Overview of the Scenario Literature Chapter 3: Scenario Driving Forces Chapter 4: An Overview of Scenarios Chapter 5: Emission Scenarios Chapter 6: Summary Discussions and Recommendations Appendices index I: SRES Terms of Reference: New IPCC Emission Scenarios II: SRES Writing Team and SRES Reviewers III: Definition of SRES World Region IV: Six Modeling Approaches V: Database Description VI: Open Process VII Data tables VIII Acronyms and Abbreviations IX Chemical Symbols X Units XI Glossary of Terms XII List of Major IPCC Reports

431

Version 2 Global Fire Emissions Database Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Fire Emissions Database Available Global Fire Emissions Database Available The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set "Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 2 (GFEDv2)." This data set, which supersedes and replaces the Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 1 (GFEDv1), consists of 1 degree x 1 degree gridded monthly burned area, fuel loads, combustion completeness, and fire emissions of carbon (C), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), molecular hydrogen (H2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), nitrous oxide (N2O), particulate matter (PM2.5), total particulate matter (TPM), total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) for the time period January 1997 - December 2004. For more information or to access this data set, please see the Vegetation

432

Infrared emission spectroscopic study of brucite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Both infrared absorption and emission spectroscopy have been used to assign the vibrational bands of brucite. IR absorption bands are observed in the hydroxyl stretching region at 3698 and 3248 cm?1. Low frequency bands are observed at 627, 565 and 440 cm?1. Naturally occurring brucites are contaminated with other magnesium minerals which are easily identified by the infrared spectra. Infrared emission bands are observed at 3686, 3571, 3251 and 2940 cm?1. The intensity of these bands decreases upon thermal treatment corresponding to the dehydration and dehydroxylation of the brucite. Low frequency infrared emission bands are observed at 876, 706, 622 and 559 cm?1. Dehydroxylation of the brucite may be followed by the loss of intensity of the hydroxyl vibrations during thermal treatment. Importantly infrared emission spectroscopy enables the study of the dehydroxylation in situ at the elevated temperatures. Infrared emission also confirms the absorption bands assigned to brucite.

Ray L Frost; J.Theo Kloprogge

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Exhaust emissions from heavy-duty vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exhaust emission tests were conducted on 20 heavy-duty vehicles. These test vehicles were Euro 1 and Euro 2 compliant and included coaches, and trucks ranging from 7.5 to 38 tonne vehicles. The vehicles were tested over the European 13-mode and the FIGE engine dynamometer tests, with some of the vehicles repeat tested using an ultra low sulphur diesel fuel (ULSD). A single test vehicle was tested over a selection of real world driving cycles. In general, Euro 2 vehicles demonstrated lower emissions than Euro 1 vehicles. The ULSD produced large decreases in the emissions of CO and PM with a smaller decrease in NOx. Although Euro 2 vehicles produced less mass of particulate, the number of particles emitted significantly increased when compared to Euro 1. The FIGE and the Truck cycles produced the lowest and similar emission rates, while the bus cycle produced much higher levels, reflecting the importance of vehicle operation on emissions.

Tim Barlow; Ian McCrae

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Industrialized Countries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Industrialized Countries Extended discussion here Carbon emissions per capita 1973 vs. 1991 by major end use. (Denmark comparison is 1972 and 1991) With the third Conference of the Parties (COP-3) in Kyoto approaching, there is a great deal of excitement over policies designed to reduce future carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuels. At COP-3, more than 130 nations will meet to create legally binding targets for CO2 reductions. Accordingly, we have analyzed the patterns of emissions arising from the end uses of energy (and electricity production) in ten industrialized countries, with surprising and, in some cases, worrisome results. The surprise is that emissions in many countries in the early 1990s were lower than in the 1970s in an absolute sense and on a per capita basis; the worry

435

Emission and Absorption of Light by Hot Electrons in Multivalley Semiconductors (TERAHERTZ Range)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The angular dependences of the spontaneous emission by hot electrons in multivalley semiconductors are studied theoretically and experimentally using $n$-Ge as an example. We demonstrate that the change in the scattering mechanism caused by the growth of electron temperature can affect the angular scattering dependence. In the case when the heating field is applied along the symmetry axis of the crystal [for $n$-Ge it is the axis (1,0,0,)], the angular dependence of the emission was observed experimentally for the first time, and the corresponding theory is proposed. When electrons have identical concentration and temperature in every valley, the angular dependence of emission is shown to be related to the violation of symmetry of the energy distribution of electrons (from the theoretical viewpoint, this effect means going beyond the scope of the traditional diffusion approximation).

P. M. Tomchuk; V. M. Bondar

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

436

Very Stable Electron Field Emission From Strontium Titanate Coated Carbon Nanotube Matrices With Low Emission Thresholds  

SciTech Connect

PMMA-STO-CNT matrices were created by opened-tip vertically-aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) with conformal coating of strontium titanate and Poly(methyl methacrylate). Emission threshold of 0.8 V/?m was demonstrated, about five-fold lower than that of the as-grown VAMWCNTs. Theoretical simulation and modeling suggest that PMMA-STO-CNT matrices have suppressed screening effects and Coulombs’ repulsion forces between electrons in adjacent CNTs, leading to low emission threshold, high emission density, and prolong emission stability. These findings are important for practical application of VA-MWCNTs in field emission devices.

Pandey, Archana; Prasad, Abhishek; Moscatello, Jason; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wang, Chong M.; Yap, Yoke K.

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

437

RADIO EMISSION FROM INSTABILITIES IN SPACE PLASMAS: MARGINAL STABILITY,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I t RADIO EMISSION FROM INSTABILITIES IN SPACE PLASMAS: MARGINAL STABILITY, 4TOCHASTIC GROWTH emission, hich is an indirect emission process first discussed by Ginaburg and Zhe/eznyakoe, 9581, and electron cyclotron maser emission (ECME), which is a direct emission ess first discussed in the presently

Melrose, Don

438

Intention to change activities that reduce carbon dioxide emissions related to worry about global climate change consequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Introduction Mitigating the global climate change requires actions at different levels including that lay people change their consumption patterns, which cause emissions of greenhouse gases. Recent research suggests that inducing affects such as fear and worry may have positive effects. Objective To investigate whether worry in addition to personalized information about emissions of carbon dioxide would influence lay people's intentions to change consumption-related personal activities causing carbon-dioxide emissions. Method A municipality-provided tool to calculate their annual carbon dioxide emissions was used by 135 university students who after being informed about negative consequences of global climate change stated their intentions to change a number of personal activities to reduce carbon dioxide emissions during the following 12 months. They also rated how worried they were about eight global climate change consequences. Results Intentions to change travel, energy use at home, food consumption, involvement in environmental organizations, and support of environmental policies increased with worry. An interaction was also observed such that high-emitters’ intentions to invest in energy-efficient infrastructure increased more with worry than did low- and medium-emitters’ intentions. Conclusions In line with recent research positing that affect increases preventive actions, the hypothesis was supported that intentions to change personal activities to reduce carbon dioxide emissions increased with participants’ worry about the consequences of global climate change.

E.-L. Sundblad; A. Biel; T. Gärling

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Analysis Systems Analysis DOE/NETL possesses strong systems analysis and policy-support capabilities. Systems analysis in support of the Innovations for Existing Plants Program consists of conducting various energy analyses that provide input to decisions on issues such as national plans and programs, resource use, environmental and energy security policies, technology options for research and development programs, and paths to deployment of energy technology. This work includes technology, benefits, and current situation and trends analyses related to CO2 emissions control. Systems analyses and economic modeling of potential new processes are crucial to providing sound guidance to R&D efforts. Since the majority of new CO2 capture technologies are still at a bench scale level of development, a conceptual design is first generated with emphasis on mass and energy balances. Based on available data and/or engineering estimates, these systems are optimized, and "what-if" scenarios are evaluated to identify barriers to deployment and help the process developers establish system performance targets. Reports that have been generated describing systems analyses in support of carbon capture efforts are shown in the table below.

440

PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION FROM STRATIFIED JETS  

SciTech Connect

We explore photospheric emissions from stratified two-component jets, wherein a highly relativistic spine outflow is surrounded by a wider and less relativistic sheath outflow. Thermal photons are injected in regions of high optical depth and propagated until the photons escape at the photosphere. Because of the presence of shear in velocity (Lorentz factor) at the boundary of the spine and sheath region, a fraction of the injected photons are accelerated using a Fermi-like acceleration mechanism such that a high-energy power-law tail is formed in the resultant spectrum. We show, in particular, that if a velocity shear with a considerable variance in the bulk Lorentz factor is present, the high-energy part of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) photon spectrum can be explained by this photon acceleration mechanism. We also show that the accelerated photons might also account for the origin of the extra-hard power-law component above the bump of the thermal-like peak seen in some peculiar bursts (e.g., GRB 090510, 090902B, 090926A). We demonstrate that time-integrated spectra can also reproduce the low-energy spectrum of GRBs consistently using a multi-temperature effect when time evolution of the outflow is considered. Last, we show that the empirical E{sub p}-L{sub p} relation can be explained by differences in the outflow properties of individual sources.

Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ono, Masaomi; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong [Astrophysical Big Bang Laboratory, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi [Department of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Pe'er, Asaf [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mizuta, Akira [KEK Theory Center, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Harikae, Seiji, E-mail: hito@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Quants Research Department, Financial Engineering Division, Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley Securities Co., Ltd., Mejirodai Bldg., 3-29-20 Mejirodai, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8688 (Japan)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Understanding the Causes of Spatial Variation in Pesticide Sorption and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Understanding the Causes of Spatial Variation in Pesticide Sorption and Degradation: Abdul Ghafoor) #12;Understanding the causes of spatial variation in pesticide degradation and sorption and sorption of pesticides in soils are both spatially variable and also among the most sensitive factors

442

Initial Estimates of Mercury Emissions to the Atmosphere from Global Biomass Burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Frequently burning grasslands in Africa and Australia, and agricultural waste burning globally, contribute relatively little to the mercury budget. ... Savannas burn frequently (intentionally or by accident), typically annually or biannually, while boreal forest burns at 50?200 year time scales, and wet tropical forests rarely burn at all. ... Total C emissions tracked burning in forested areas (including deforestation fires in the tropics), whereas burned area was largely controlled by savanna fires which responded to different environmental and human factors. ...

H.R. Friedli; A.F. Arellano; S. Cinnirella; N. Pirrone

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions from Domestic Anaerobic Digesters Linked with Sustainable Sanitation in Rural China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions from Domestic Anaerobic Digesters Linked with Sustainable Sanitation in Rural China ... (3) A key technology that may permit a switch from solid fuels to cleaner gaseous fuels in rural China is anaerobic digestion, where organic human and animal wastes are digested under anaerobic conditions generating biogas, composed primarily of methane (CH4), which can be sequestered and burned for cooking, heating, and lighting. ...

Radhika Dhingra; Erick R. Christensen; Yang Liu; Bo Zhong; Chang-Fu Wu; Michael G. Yost; Justin V. Remais

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

444

Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography [PET] in Man Using Small Bismuth Germanate Crystals  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Primary considerations for the design of positron emission tomographs for medical studies in humans are the need for high imaging sensitivity, whole organ coverage, good spatial resolution, high maximum data rates, adequate spatial sampling with minimum mechanical motion, shielding against out of plane activity, pulse height discrimination against scattered photons, and timing discrimination against accidental coincidences. We discuss the choice of detectors, sampling motion, shielding, and electronics to meet these objectives.

Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.; Huesman, R. H.; Cahoon, J. L.

1982-04-00T23:59:59.000Z

445

Temporoparietal cortex in aphasia. Evidence from positron emission tomography  

SciTech Connect

Forty-four aphasic patients were examined with (F18)-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in a resting state to determine whether consistent glucose metabolic abnormalities were present. Ninety-seven percent of subjects showed metabolic abnormalities in the angular gyrus, 89% in the supramarginal gyrus, and 87% in the lateral and transverse superior temporal gyrus. Pearson product moment correlations were calculated between regional metabolic measures and performance on the Western Aphasia Battery. No significant correlations were found between the Western Aphasia Battery scores and right hemisphere metabolic measures. Most left hemisphere regions correlated with more than one score from the Western Aphasia Battery. Temporal but not frontal regions had significant correlations to the comprehension score. The left temporoparietal region was consistently affected in these subjects, suggesting that common features in the aphasias were caused by left temporoparietal dysfunction, while behavioral differences resulted from (1) the extent of temporoparietal changes, and (2) dysfunction elsewhere in the brain, particularly the left frontal and subcortical areas.

Metter, E.J.; Hanson, W.R.; Jackson, C.A.; Kempler, D.; van Lancker, D.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E. (National Institute of Aging, Baltimore, MD (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Emission of Visible Light by Hot Dense Metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HIFAN 1761 EMISSION OF VISIBLE LIGHT BY HOT DENSE METALS ByDE-AC52-07NA27344. HI FAN Emission of Visible Light by HotABSTRACT We consider the emission of visible light by hot

More, R.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Challenges of Meeting Tier2 Bin2 Tailpipe Emissions | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Meeting Tier2 Bin2 Tailpipe Emissions Challenges of Meeting Tier2 Bin2 Tailpipe Emissions Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference...

448

Comparison of On-Road Portable and Bench Emission Measurements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Chassis dynamometer testing using a conventional emissions bench and on-road testing with a portable emissions system were performed to compare exhaust emissions from selected vehicles by both techniques.

449

Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a Marine Seep  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007, Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a Marine2007, Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a MarineTides and the emission of oil and gas from an abandoned oil

Leifer, Ira; Boles, J R; Luyendyk, B P

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Mercury emissions from municipal solid waste combustors  

SciTech Connect

This report examines emissions of mercury (Hg) from municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion in the United States (US). It is projected that total annual nationwide MSW combustor emissions of mercury could decrease from about 97 tonnes (1989 baseline uncontrolled emissions) to less than about 4 tonnes in the year 2000. This represents approximately a 95 percent reduction in the amount of mercury emitted from combusted MSW compared to the 1989 mercury emissions baseline. The likelihood that routinely achievable mercury emissions removal efficiencies of about 80 percent or more can be assured; it is estimated that MSW combustors in the US could prove to be a comparatively minor source of mercury emissions after about 1995. This forecast assumes that diligent measures to control mercury emissions, such as via use of supplemental control technologies (e.g., carbon adsorption), are generally employed at that time. However, no present consensus was found that such emissions control measures can be implemented industry-wide in the US within this time frame. Although the availability of technology is apparently not a limiting factor, practical implementation of necessary control technology may be limited by administrative constraints and other considerations (e.g., planning, budgeting, regulatory compliance requirements, etc.). These projections assume that: (a) about 80 percent mercury emissions reduction control efficiency is achieved with air pollution control equipment likely to be employed by that time; (b) most cylinder-shaped mercury-zinc (CSMZ) batteries used in hospital applications can be prevented from being disposed into the MSW stream or are replaced with alternative batteries that do not contain mercury; and (c) either the amount of mercury used in fluorescent lamps is decreased to an industry-wide average of about 27 milligrams of mercury per lamp or extensive diversion from the MSW stream of fluorescent lamps that contain mercury is accomplished.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Constraining axion by polarized prompt emission from gamma ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A polarized gamma ray emission spread over a sufficiently wide energy band from a strongly magnetized astrophysical object like gamma ray bursts (GRBs) offers an opportunity to test the hypothesis of invisible axion. The axionic induced dichroism of gamma rays at different energies should cause a misalignment of the polarization plane for higher energy events relative to that one for lower energies events resulting in the loss of statistics needed to form a pattern of the polarization signal to be recognized in a detector. According to this, any evidence of polarized gamma rays coming from an object with extended magnetic field could be interpreted as a constraint on the existence of the invisible axion for a certain parameter range. Based on reports of polarized MeV emission detected in several GRBs we derive a constraint on the axion-photon coupling. This constraint $\\g_{a\\gamma\\gamma}\\le 2.2\\cdot 10^{-11} {\\rm GeV^{-1}}$ calculated for the axion mass $m_a=10^{-3} {\\rm eV}$ is competitive with the sensitivity of CAST and becomes even stronger for lower masses.

A. Rubbia; A. S. Sakharov

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

452

Investigating the impact of nuclear energy consumption on GDP growth and CO2 emission: A panel data analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study investigates the influence of nuclear energy consumption on GDP growth and CO2 emission in 30 major nuclear energy consuming countries. The panel mode was used taking the period 1990–2010. The results of the study indicated that nuclear energy consumption has a positive long run effect on GDP growth while it has no long run effect on CO2 emission. The Granger causality test results also revealed that nuclear energy consumption has a positive short run causal relationship with GDP growth while it has a negative short run causal relationship with CO2 emission. Based on the results of this study, nuclear energy consumption has an important role in increasing GDP growth in the investigated countries with no effect on CO2 emission. Consequently, unlike fossil fuels which also increase GDP growth, nuclear energy consumption causes less damage to the environment. From the results of the study, a number of recommendations were provided for the investigated countries.

Usama Al-mulali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Sources of Naphthalene in Diesel Exhaust Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The sale of diesels now account for 20% of new car sales in the UK compared with just 6% in 1990.1 The increased popularity of diesel cars is in part owing to improved engine performance in terms of power output, greater fuel economy, and an improved public image in terms of noise and pollution levels. ... Diesel engines have greater emissions of particulate material than corresponding spark ignition (SI) engines. ... An understanding of the origin of PAH in diesel exhaust emissions is fundamental if adequate control of the emission of these compounds is to be achieved. ...

M. M. Rhead; R. D. Pemberton

1996-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

454

Conical Emission in Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A broadened or double humped away-side structure was observed in 2-particle azimuthal jet-like correlations at RHIC and SPS. This modification can be explained by conical emission, from either Mach-cone shock waves or Cherenkov gluon radiation, and by other physics mechanisms, such as large angle gluon radiation, jets deflected by radial flow and path-length dependent energy loss. Three-particle jet-like correlations are studied for their power to distinguish conical emission from other mechanisms. This article discusses Mach-cone shock waves, Cherenkov gluon radiation and the experimental evidence for conical emission from RHIC and SPS.

Jason Glyndwr Ulery

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

455

Emission abatement system utilizing particulate traps  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

Bromberg, Leslie (Sharon, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Rabinovich, Alexander (Swampscott, MA)

2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

456

The greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs Danish consumption and emissions, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs and SF6 Danish consumption and emissions, 2007 Tomas Sander Poulsen AND EMISSION OF F-GASES 7 1.1.1 Consumption 7 1.1.2 Emission 7 1.1.3 Trends in total GWP contribution from F 21 4 EMISSION OF F-GASES 23 4.1.1 Emissions of HFCs from refrigerants 23 4.1.2 Emissions of HFCs from

457

Organic light emitting device having multiple separate emissive layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic light emitting device having multiple separate emissive layers is provided. Each emissive layer may define an exciton formation region, allowing exciton formation to occur across the entire emissive region. By aligning the energy levels of each emissive layer with the adjacent emissive layers, exciton formation in each layer may be improved. Devices incorporating multiple emissive layers with multiple exciton formation regions may exhibit improved performance, including internal quantum efficiencies of up to 100%.

Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

458

Remote measurement of sulfur dioxide emissions using an ultraviolet light sensitive video system  

SciTech Connect

Remote measurements of SO/sub 2/ emissions and plume velocities were made with a portable ultraviolet light-sensitive video system and compared with EPA in-stack compliance measurement methods. The instrument system measures the ultraviolet light absorption of SO/sub 2/ and movement of SO/sub 2/ fluctuations in the effluent plume and relates these measurements to the SO/sub 2/ concentration and velocity of the plume. Laboratory and field tests were conducted to establish the potential for using this technique for rapid surveillance of SO/sub 2/ emissions. The effects caused by submicron aerosols also were investigated. The field tests were performed on two occasions. On the first occasion, SO/sub 2/ and plume velocity measurements were made at a typical coal-fired power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) controls (concentrations ranged from 80 to 365 ppm). The second occasion involved participation in an urban particulate modeling study, which resulted in routine SO/sub 2/ emission measurements performed at 12 industrial sites. The results of smoke generator and field tests indicate that the sulfur dioxide concentration of smoke stack emissions can be made with an accuracy less than +/-120 ppm (relative to the EPA stack test compliance method), provided the particulate opacity of the emissions is less than 22 percent. The velocity measurement feature of the instrument correlated poorly with the EPA compliance method for stack gas velocity.

McElhoe, H.B.; Conner, W.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Programming with human computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Amazon's Mechanical Turk provides a programmatically accessible micro-task market, allowing a program to hire human workers. This has opened the door to a rich field of research in human computation where programs orchestrate ...

Little, Greg (Danny Greg)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Profile to someone by E-mail Emissions Profile to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Basics Federal Requirements Guidance & Reporting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Fuel Efficiency and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines using Model-Based Transient Calibration Fuel Efficiency and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines using...

462

Advanced Petroleum-Based fuels - Diesel Emissions Control (APBF...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Petroleum-Based fuels - Diesel Emissions Control (APBF-DEC) Activity Advanced Petroleum-Based fuels - Diesel Emissions Control (APBF-DEC) Activity 2003 DEER Conference...

463

Fuel Reformer, LNT and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Reformer, LNT and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirements Fuel Reformer, LNT and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirements...

464

Urea/Ammonia Distribution Optimization in an SCR Emission Control...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UreaAmmonia Distribution Optimization in an SCR Emission Control System Through the Use of CFD Analysis UreaAmmonia Distribution Optimization in an SCR Emission Control System...

465

Simplification of Diesel Emission Control System Packaging Using...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Simplification of Diesel Emission Control System Packaging Using SCR Coated on DPF Simplification of Diesel Emission Control System Packaging Using SCR Coated on DPF Study...

466

Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) emit approximately the same amount of water per mile as vehicles...

467

Regulated Emissions from Diesel and Compressed Natural Gas Transit...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emissions from Diesel and Compressed Natural Gas Transit Buses Regulated Emissions from Diesel and Compressed Natural Gas Transit Buses Poster presentaiton at the 2007 Diesel...

468

Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Fuel Cells Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) emit approximately the same amount of water per...

469

Off-Highway Heavy Vehicle Diesel Efficiency Improvement and Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Engine Efficiency at 2010 Emissions Integrated Engine and Aftertreatment Technology Roadmap for EPA 2010 Heavy-duty Emissions Regulations Optimization of...

470

Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change in NEPA Reviews Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and...

471

Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA Study shows clean diesel programs slashed black carbon, a...

472

Life Cycle Boundaries and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Beef Cattle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Beef cattle are estimated to directly contribute 26% of U.S. agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and future climate change policy may target reducing these emissions.… (more)

Dudley, Quentin M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation by Cummins Power Generation, June 2011 Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation by...

474

Optimization of an Advanced Passive/Active Diesel Emission Control...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

an Advanced PassiveActive Diesel Emission Control System Optimization of an Advanced PassiveActive Diesel Emission Control System Evaluation of PM exhaust aftertreatment...

475

Real Time Tailpipe Emission Measurements | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Real Time Tailpipe Emission Measurements Real Time Tailpipe Emission Measurements 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Brookhaven National Laboratory 2002deerimre.pdf More...

476

Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards Presentation given at DEER 2006,...

477

Low Temperature Combustion and Diesel Emission Reduction Research...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low Temperature Combustion and Diesel Emission Reduction Research Low Temperature Combustion and Diesel Emission Reduction Research Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24,...

478

Development and Deployment of Advanced Emission Controls for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Deployment of Advanced Emission Controls for the Retrofit Market Development and Deployment of Advanced Emission Controls for the Retrofit Market 2003 DEER Conference Presentation:...

479

Guatemala-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guatemala-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Name Guatemala-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

480

Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human caused emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Cathodoluminescence from a device of carbon nanotube-field emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cathodoluminescence from a device of carbon nanotube-field emission display with ZnO nanocluster phosphor. Cathodoluminescence from a device of carbon nanotube-field emission...

482

Preparing Low-emission and Climate-Resilient Development Strategies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Preparing Low-emission and Climate-Resilient Development Strategies (LECRDS) - Executive Summary Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Preparing Low-Emission...

483

Kazakhstan-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Name Kazakhstan-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

484

Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Numerically evaluated and optimized proposed...

485

Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime Administration Energy Technologies Program Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime...

486

Strategies for Integrated Emission Control | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Integrated Emission Control Strategies for Integrated Emission Control A new filter system technology significantly reduces harmful pollutants, uses less precious metals, and...

487

Three-Dimensional Composite Nanostructures for Lean NOx Emission...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Three-Dimensional Composite Nanostructures for Lean NOx Emission Control Three-Dimensional Composite Nanostructures for Lean NOx Emission Control 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and...

488

The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects...

489

Advanced PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Advanced PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program,...

490

Probing Emissions of Military Cargo Aircraft: Description of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions of Military Cargo Aircraft: Description of a Joint Field Measurement Strategic Environmental Research and Probing Emissions of Military Cargo Aircraft: Description of a...

491

Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES): Phase 2 Status...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

: Phase 2 Status Report Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES): Phase 2 Status Report Discusses status of ACES, a cooperative multi-party effort to characterize emissions...

492

Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration DPF regeneration experiments verified the...

493

Alloy Foam Diesel Emissions Control School Bus Implementation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Alloy Foam Diesel Emissions Control School Bus Implementation Alloy Foam Diesel Emissions Control School Bus Implementation Poster presentation from the 2007 Diesel...

494

Reduction of Emissions from a High Speed Ferry | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emissions from a High Speed Ferry Reduction of Emissions from a High Speed Ferry 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: West Virginia University 2003deerthompson.pdf More Documents &...

495

Dilute Clean Diesel Combustion Achieves Low Emissions and High...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Dilute Clean Diesel Combustion Achieves Low Emissions and High Efficiency While Avoiding Control Problems of HCCI Dilute Clean Diesel Combustion Achieves Low Emissions and High...

496

Unregulated Emissions from High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Modes...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Unregulated Emissions from High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Modes - ORNL-FEERC Unregulated Emissions from High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Modes - ORNL-FEERC Poster presentation at...

497

Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic stripper for comparison with Europe's PMP protocol Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic...

498

Phase 1 of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Phase 1 of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES): Highlights of Project Finding Phase 1 of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES): Highlights of Project...

499

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Starting with the programs contributing the greatest...

500

Quality, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biofuels and Biofuel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Quality, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biofuels and Biofuel Blends Quality, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biofuels and Biofuel Blends 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...