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1

Toshifumi Hotchi  

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Melissa M. Lunden, Anna G. Mirer, Michael Spears, and Douglas P. Sullivan. Natural Gas Variability in California: Environmental Impacts and Device Performance - Experimental...

2

Toshifumi Hotchi  

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photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners In Indoor Air 2008. Copenhagen, Denmark: Indoor Air, Paper ID: 297, 2008. Download: Apte, Michael G., Norman Bourassa, David...

3

Microsoft Word - Hult-GarageLeakage_9_19 (1)  

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"""! """! Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Erin L. Hult, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, Phillip N. Price Environmental Energy Technologies Division September 2012 LBNL-5887E    Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

4

Erin Hult  

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Performance of Buildings group. She holds a PhD and an MS in Environmental Fluid Mechanics from Stanford University, and a BS in Mechanical Engineering from MIT. Prior to...

5

Publications  

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C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Katherine Y. Ming, Richard G. Sextro, Emily E. Wood, and Nancy J. Brown. "Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms." Atmospheric...

6

Publications  

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Filters 2004 Singer, Brett C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, and J. J. Kim. "Passive measurement of nitrogen oxides to assess traffic-related pollutant exposure for the...

7

Publications  

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M. Logue, Toshifumi Hotchi, Brett C. Singer, and Max H. Sherman. Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure Ventilation Rates in Homes., 2012...

8

Publications  

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R., Tracy L. Thatcher, Richard G. Sextro, William W. Delp, Sheng-Chieh Chang, Emily E. Wood, Jean C. Deputy, Toshifumi Hotchi, M. R. Sippola, and Douglas P. Sullivan. Joint Urban...

9

Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure  

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Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure Ventilation Rates in Homes Melissa Lunden, David Faulkner, Elizabeth Heredia, Sebastian Cohn, Darryl Dickerhoff, Federico Noris, Jennifer Logue, Toshifumi Hotchi, Brett Singer and Max H. Sherman Environmental Energy Technologies Division October 2012 LBNL-5984E 2 Disclaimer: This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States

10

Publications  

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2 results: 2 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Marion L. Russell [Clear All Filters] 2013 Mullen, Nasim A., Marion L. Russell, Melissa M. Lunden, and Brett C. Singer. "Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and ozone interference for passive deployment of Waters Sep-Pak XPoSure samplers." Atmospheric Environment 80 (2013): 184-189. Noris, Federico, Gary Adamkiewicz, William W. Delp, Toshifumi Hotchi, Marion L. Russell, Brett C. Singer, Michael Spears, Kimberly Vermeer, and William J. Fisk. "Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits." Building Environment 68 (2013): 170-178. Maddalena, Randy L., Amanda Parra, Marion L. Russell, and Wen-Yee Lee. Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on

11

TY JOUR  

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Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits JF Building Environment A1 Federico Noris A1 Gary Adamkiewicz A1 William W Delp A1 Toshifumi Hotchi A1 Marion L Russell A1 Brett C Singer A1 Michael Spears A1 Kimberly Vermeer A1 William J Fisk KW Apartments Energy Indoor environmental quality Retrofit Selection AB p span style color e2e2e font family Arial Unicode MS Arial Unicode Arial URW Gothic L Helvetica Tahoma sans serif font size px font style normal font variant normal font weight letter spacing normal line height px orphans auto text align justify text indent px text transform none white space normal widows auto word spacing px webkit text size adjust auto webkit text stroke width px background color ffffff display inline

12

Publications  

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6 results: 6 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Sheng-Chieh Chang [Clear All Filters] 2008 Galitsky, Christina, Sheng-Chieh Chang, Ernst Worrell, and Eric R. Masanet. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry.. LBNL, 2008. 2006 Galitsky, Christina, Sheng-Chieh Chang, Ernst Worrell, and Eric R. Masanet. Improving Energy Efficiency in Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Operations., 2006. 2004 Price, Phillip N., Sheng-Chieh Chang, and Michael D. Sohn. Characterizing buildings for airflow models: What should we measure?. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2004. Black, Douglas R., Tracy L. Thatcher, Richard G. Sextro, William W. Delp, Sheng-Chieh Chang, Emily E. Wood, Jean C. Deputy, Toshifumi Hotchi, M. R.

13

Marion Russell  

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Marion L Russell Marion L Russell Marion Russell Indoor Environment Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 70-108B Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 70-0222 (510) 495-2915 MLRussell@lbl.gov This publications database is an ongoing project, and not all Division publications are represented here yet. Publications 2013 Noris, Federico, Gary Adamkiewicz, William W. Delp, Toshifumi Hotchi, Marion L. Russell, Brett C. Singer, Michael Spears, Kimberly Vermeer, and William J. Fisk. "Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits." Building Environment 68 (2013): 170-178. Download: PDF (2.56 MB) Mullen, Nasim A., Marion L. Russell, Melissa M. Lunden, and Brett C. Singer. "Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and

14

Publications  

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results: results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Satish Kumar [Clear All Filters] 2006 Sathaye, Jayant A., Lynn K. Price, Satish Kumar, Stephane Rue de la du Can, Corina Warfield, and Srinivasan Padmanabhan. Conference Paper Partnerships for Clean Development and Climate: Business and Technology Cooperation Benefits., 2006. Sathaye, Jayant A., Stephane Rue de la du Can, Satish Kumar, Maithili Iyer, Christina Galitsky, Amol Phadke, Michael A. McNeil, Lynn K. Price, Ranjit Bharvirkar, and Srinivasan Padmanabhan. Implementing End-use Efficiency Improvements in India: Drawing from Experience in the US and Other Countries. USAID|INDIA, 2006. 2002 Apte, Michael G., Alfred T. Hodgson, Derek G. Shendell, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Toshifumi Hotchi, Satish Kumar, Seung-Min Lee, Shawna M.

15

Natural Gas Variability in California: Environmental Impacts and Device  

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Natural Gas Variability in California: Environmental Impacts and Device Natural Gas Variability in California: Environmental Impacts and Device Performance - Experimental Evaluation of Pollutant Emissions from Residential Appliances Title Natural Gas Variability in California: Environmental Impacts and Device Performance - Experimental Evaluation of Pollutant Emissions from Residential Appliances Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-2897E Year of Publication 2009 Authors Singer, Brett C., Michael G. Apte, Douglas R. Black, Toshifumi Hotchi, Donald Lucas, Melissa M. Lunden, Anna G. Mirer, Michael Spears, and Douglas P. Sullivan Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords carbon monoxide, dioxide, energy performance of buildings group, formaldehyde, indoor air quality, indoor airflow and pollutant transport, indoor environment department, liquefied natural gas, nitrogen, nitrogen oxides, particle number, pollutant exposures, ultrafine particles

16

Publications  

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83 results: 83 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Alfred T. Hodgson [Clear All Filters] 2013 Maddalena, Randy L., Na Li, Alfred T. Hodgson, Francis J. Offermann, and Brett C. Singer. "Maximizing Information from Residential Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds." In Healthy Buildings 2012 - 10th International Conference. Brisbane, Australia, 2013. 2008 Hodgson, Alfred T., Hugo Destaillats, Toshifumi Hotchi, and William J. Fisk. Benefits and technological challenges in the implementation of TiO2-based ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners In Indoor Air 2008. Copenhagen, Denmark: Indoor Air, Paper ID: 297, 2008. Maddalena, Randy L., Hugo Destaillats, Marion L. Russell, Alfred T. Hodgson, and Thomas E. McKone. "Indoor pollutants emitted by electronic

17

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2  

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Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance Title Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6196E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Satish, Usha, Mark J. Mendell, Krishnamurthy Shekhar, Toshifumi Hotchi, Douglas P. Sullivan, Siegfried Streufert, and William J. Fisk Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 120 Issue 12 Pagination 1671-1677 Date Published 09/20/2012 Keywords carbon dioxide, cognition, Decision Making, human performance, indoor environmental quality, ventilation Abstract Background - Associations of higher indoor carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations with impaired

18

Publications  

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62 results: 62 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Mark J. Mendell [Clear All Filters] 2013 Fisk, William J., Usha Satish, Mark J. Mendell, Toshifumi Hotchi, and Douglas P. Sullivan. "Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Higher Levels of CO2 May Diminish Decision Making Performance." ASHRAE Journal 55, no. 3 (2013): 84-85. Mendell, Mark J., Ekaterina Eliseeva, Morris G. Davies, Michael Spears, Agnes B. Lobscheid, William J. Fisk, and Michael G. Apte. "Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A Prospective Study in California Elementary Schools." Indoor Air (2013). Fisk, William J., Mark J. Mendell, Molly Davies, Ekaterina Eliseeva, David Faulkner, Tienzen Hong, and Douglas P. Sullivan. Demand Controlled

19

Benefits and technological challenges in the implementation of TiO2-based  

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Benefits and technological challenges in the implementation of TiO2-based Benefits and technological challenges in the implementation of TiO2-based ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners Title Benefits and technological challenges in the implementation of TiO2-based ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2008 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., Hugo Destaillats, Toshifumi Hotchi, and William J. Fisk Conference Name Indoor Air 2008 Pagination 17-22 Date Published August 2008 Publisher Indoor Air, Paper ID: 297 Conference Location Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract Indoor air cleaners based on TiO2 photocatalytic oxidation of organic pollutants are a promising technology to improve or maintain indoor air quality while reducing ventilation energy costs. We evaluated the performance of a pilot scale UVPCO air cleaner under realistic conditions in single pass and recirculation modes

20

Publications  

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6 results: 6 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Donald Lucas [Clear All Filters] 2012 Holder, Amara L., Brietta J. Carter, Regine Goth-Goldstein, Donald Lucas, and Catherine P. Koshland. "Increased Cytotoxicity of Oxidized Flame Soot." Atmospheric Pollution Research 3, no. 1 (2012): 25-31. 2009 Keenan, Christina R., Regine Goth-Goldstein, Donald Lucas, and David L. Sedlak. "Oxidative Stress Induced by Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles and Fe(II) in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells." Environmental Science & Technology 43, no. 12 (2009): 4555-4560. Singer, Brett C., Michael G. Apte, Douglas R. Black, Toshifumi Hotchi, Donald Lucas, Melissa M. Lunden, Anna G. Mirer, Michael Spears, and Douglas P. Sullivan. Natural Gas Variability in California: Environmental Impacts

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hult toshifumi hotchi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 results: 9 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Emily E. Wood [Clear All Filters] 2007 Singer, Brett C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Katherine Y. Ming, Richard G. Sextro, Emily E. Wood, and Nancy J. Brown. "Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms." Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007): 3251-3265. 2006 Jayaraman, Buvaneswari, Elizabeth U. Finlayson, Michael D. Sohn, Tracy L. Thatcher, Phillip N. Price, Emily E. Wood, Richard G. Sextro, and Ashok J. Gadgil. "Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFD Predictions." Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006): 5236-5250. 2005 Jayaraman, Buvaneswari, Elizabeth U. Finlayson, Emily E. Wood, Tracy L.

22

Michael Spears  

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Spears Spears Indoor Environment Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90-3058 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-3029J (510) 486-7044 MSpears@lbl.gov This publications database is an ongoing project, and not all Division publications are represented here yet. Publications 2013 Mendell, Mark J., Ekaterina Eliseeva, Morris G. Davies, Michael Spears, Agnes B. Lobscheid, William J. Fisk, and Michael G. Apte. "Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A Prospective Study in California Elementary Schools." Indoor Air (2013). Download: PDF (1.57 MB) Noris, Federico, Gary Adamkiewicz, William W. Delp, Toshifumi Hotchi, Marion L. Russell, Brett C. Singer, Michael Spears, Kimberly Vermeer, and William J. Fisk. "Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy

23

Publications  

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9 results: 9 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Sippola, M.R. [Clear All Filters] 2005 Sippola, M. R., and William W. Nazaroff. "Particle Deposition in Ventilation Ducts: Connectors, Bends and Developing Flow." Aerosol Science and Technology 39 (2005): 139-150. 2004 Black, Douglas R., Tracy L. Thatcher, Richard G. Sextro, William W. Delp, Sheng-Chieh Chang, Emily E. Wood, Jean C. Deputy, Toshifumi Hotchi, M. R. Sippola, and Douglas P. Sullivan. Joint Urban 2003: Indoor Measurements Final Data Report. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2004. 2003 Sippola, M. R., and William W. Nazaroff. "Experiments Measuring Particle Deposition from Fully Developed Turbulent Flow in Ventilation Ducts." Aerosol Science and Technology 38 (2003): 914-925.

24

Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) /  

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Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) / Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) / Chemisorbent Air Cleaner for Indoor Air Applications Title Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) / Chemisorbent Air Cleaner for Indoor Air Applications Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-62202 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., Hugo Destaillats, Toshifumi Hotchi, and William J. Fisk Report Number LBNL-62202 Abstract We previously reported that gas-phase byproducts of incomplete oxidation were generated when a prototype ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaner was operated in the laboratory with indoor-relevant mixtures of VOCs at realistic concentrations. Under these conditions, there was net production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two important indoor air toxicants. Here, we further explore the issue of byproduct generation. Using the same UVPCO air cleaner, we conducted experiments to identify common VOCs that lead to the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde and to quantify their production rates. We sought to reduce the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde to acceptable levels by employing different chemisorbent scrubbers downstream of the UVPCO device. Additionally, we made preliminary measurements to estimate the capacity and expected lifetime of the chemisorbent media. For most experiments, the system was operated at 680 - 780 m3/h (400 - 460 cfm).

25

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large  

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Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Title Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-59293 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Hotchi, Toshifumi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and William J. Fisk Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract Mock Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) events were implemented in a Target retail store in the San Francisco Bay Area by shutting down some of the building's packaged rooftop air-handling units (RTUs). Measurements were made to determine how this load shedding strategy would affect the outdoor air ventilation rate and the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the sales area. Ventilation rates prior to and during load shedding were measured by tracer gas decay on two days. Samples for individual VOCs, including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, were collected from several RTUs in the morning prior to load shedding and in the late afternoon. Shutting down a portion (three of 11 and five of 12, or 27 and 42%) of the RTUs serving the sales area resulted in about a 30% reduction in ventilation, producing values of 0.50-0.65 air changes per hour. VOCs with the highest concentrations (>10 μg/m3) in the sales area included formaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, toluene and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. Substantial differences in concentrations were observed among RTUs. Concentrations of most VOCs increased during a single mock CPP event, and the median increase was somewhat higher than the fractional decrease in the ventilation rate. There are few guidelines for evaluating indoor VOC concentrations. For formaldehyde, maximum concentrations measured in the store during the event were below guidelines intended to protect the general public from acute health risks.

26

Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms  

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residential rooms residential rooms Title Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-59303 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Singer, Brett C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Katherine Y. Ming, Richard G. Sextro, Emily E. Wood, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 3251-3265 Keywords adsorption, hazardous air pollutants, nerve agents, sink effect, volatile organic compounds Abstract Experiments were conducted to characterize organic gas sorption in residential rooms studied ''as-is'' with furnishings and material surfaces unaltered and in a furnished chamber designed to simulate a residential room. Results are presented for 10 rooms (five bedrooms, two bathrooms, a home office, and two multi-function spaces) and the chamber. Exposed materials were characterized and areas quantified. A mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was rapidly volatilized within each room as it was closed and sealed for a 5-h Adsorb phase; this was followed by 30-min Flush and 2-h closed-room Desorb phases. Included were alkane, aromatic, and oxygenated VOCs representing a range of ambient and indoor air pollutants. Three organophosphorus compounds served as surrogates for Sarin-like nerve agents. Measured gas-phase concentrations were fit to three variations of a mathematical model that considers sorption occurring at a surface sink and potentially a second, embedded sink. The 3-parameter sink-diffusion model provided acceptable fits for most compounds and the 4-parameter two-sink model provided acceptable fits for the others. Initial adsorption rates and sorptive partitioning increased with decreasing vapor pressure for the alkanes, aromatics and oxygenated VOCs. Best-fit sorption parameters obtained from experimental data from the chamber produced best-fit sorption parameters similar to those obtained from the residential rooms

27

Sorption of organic gases in a furnished room  

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a furnished room a furnished room Title Sorption of organic gases in a furnished room Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-53943 Year of Publication 2004 Authors Singer, Brett C., Kenneth L. Revzan, Toshifumi Hotchi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 38 Start Page Chapter Issue 16 Pagination 2483-2494 Abstract We present experimental data and semi-empirical models describing the sorption of organic gases in a simulated indoor residential environment. Two replicate experiments were conducted with 20 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a 50-m3 room finished with painted wallboard, carpet and cushion, draperies and furnishings. The VOCs span a wide volatility range and include ten Hazardous Air Pollutants. VOCs were introduced to the static chamber as a pulse and their gas-phase concentrations were measured during a net adsorption period and a subsequent net desorption period. Three sorption models were fit to the measured concentrations for each compound to determine the simplest formulation needed to adequately describe the observed behavior. Sorption parameter values were determined by fitting the models to adsorption period data then checked by comparing measured and predicted behavior during desorption. The adequacy of each model was evaluated using a goodness of fit parameter calculated for each period. Results indicate that sorption usually does not greatly affect indoor concentrations of methyl-tert-butyl ether, 2-butanone, isoprene and benzene. In contrast, sorption appears to be a relevant indoor process for many of the VOCs studied, including C8-C10 aromatic hydrocarbons (HC), terpenes, and pyridine. These compounds sorbed at rates close to typical residential air change rates and exhibited substantial sorptive partitioning at equilibrium. Polycyclic aromatic HCs, aromatic alcohols, ethenylpyridine and nicotine initially adsorbed to surfaces at rates of 1.5 to >6 h-1 and partitioned 95 to >99% in the sorbed phase at equilibrium

28

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large  

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Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Title Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2006 Authors Hotchi, Toshifumi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and William J. Fisk Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Mock Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) events were implemented in a Target retail store in the San Francisco Bay Area by shutting down some of the building's packaged rooftop air-handling units (RTUs). Measurements were made to determine how this load shedding strategy would affect the outdoor air ventilation rate and the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the sales area. Ventilation rates prior to and during load shedding were measured by tracer gas decay on two days. Samples for individual VOCs, including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, were collected from several RTUs in the morning prior to load shedding and in the late afternoon. Shutting down a portion (three of 11 and five of 12, or 27 and 42%) of the RTUs serving the sales area resulted in about a 30% reduction in ventilation, producing values of 0.50-0.65 air changes per hour. VOCs with the highest concentrations (>10 μg/m3) in the sales area included formaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, toluene and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. Substantial differences in concentrations were observed among RTUs. Concentrations of most VOCs increased during a single mock CPP event, and the median increase was somewhat higher than the fractional decrease in the ventilation rate. There are few guidelines for evaluating indoor VOC concentrations. For formaldehyde, maximum concentrations measured in the store during the event were below guidelines intended to protect the general public from acute health risks

29

Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms  

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Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms Title Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-56787 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Singer, Brett C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Katherine Y. Ming, Richard G. Sextro, Emily E. Wood, and Nancy J. Brown Conference Name Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate - Indoor Air 2005 Volume 2(9) Publisher Tsinghua University Press Conference Location Beijing, China Abstract Experiments were conducted to characterize organic gas sorption in residential bedrooms (n=4), bathrooms (n=2), and a furnished test chamber. Rooms were studied "as-is" with material surfaces and furnishings unaltered. Surface materials were characterized and areas quantified. Experiments included rapid volatilization of a volatile organic compound (VOC) mixture with the room closed and sealed for a 5-h Adsorb phase, followed by 30-min Flush and 2-h closed-room Desorb phases. The mixture included n-alkanes, aromatics, glycol ethers, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, dichlorobenzene, and organophosphorus compounds. Measured gas-phase concentrations were fit to three variations of a mathematical model that considers sorption occurring at one surface sink and one potential embedded sink. The 2-parameter sink model tracked measurements for most compounds, but improved fits were obtained for some VOCs with a 3-parameter sink-diffusion or a 4-parameter two-sink model. Sorptive partitioning and initial adsorption rates increased with decreasing vapour pressure within each chemical class.

30

Simultaneous Energy Savings and IEQ Improvements in Relocatable Classrooms  

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Simultaneous Energy Savings and IEQ Improvements in Relocatable Classrooms Simultaneous Energy Savings and IEQ Improvements in Relocatable Classrooms Title Simultaneous Energy Savings and IEQ Improvements in Relocatable Classrooms Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-52690 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Apte, Michael G., Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Toshifumi Hotchi, Alfred T. Hodgson, Seung-Min Lee, Shawna M. Liff, Leo I. Rainer, Derek G. Shendell, Douglas P. Sullivan, and William J. Fisk Pagination 13 Date Published 06/2003 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Relocatable classrooms (RCs) are commonly used by school districts with changing demographics and enrollment sizes. We designed and constructed four energy-efficient RCs for this study to demonstrate technologies with the potential to simultaneously improve energy efficiency and indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Two were installed at each of two school districts, and energy use and IEQ parameters were monitored during occupancy. Two RCs (one per school) were finished with materials selected for reduced emissions of toxic and odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Each had two HVAC systems, operated on alternate weeks, consisting of a standard heat-pump system and an indirect-direct evaporative cooling (IDEC) system with gas-fired hydronic heating. The IDEC system provides continuous outside air ventilation at "15 CFM (7.5 L s-1) person-1, efficient particle filtration while using significantly less energy for cooling. School year long measurements included: carbon dioxide (CO2), particles, VOCs, temperature, humidity, thermal comfort, noise, meteorology, and energy use. IEQ monitoring results indicate that important ventilation-relevant indoor CO2 and health-relevant VOC concentration reductions were achieved while average cooling and heating energy costs were simultaneously reduced by 50% and 30%, respectively.

31

Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits  

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Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Title Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6373E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Noris, Federico, Gary Adamkiewicz, William W. Delp, Toshifumi Hotchi, Marion L. Russell, Brett C. Singer, Michael Spears, Kimberly Vermeer, and William J. Fisk Journal Building Environment Volume 68 Pagination 170-178 Date Published 10/2013 Keywords Apartments; Energy; Indoor environmental quality; Retrofit; Selection Abstract Sixteen apartments serving low-income populations in three buildings were retrofit with the goal of simultaneously reducing energy consumption and improving indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Retrofit measures varied among apartments and included, among others, envelope sealing, installation of continuous mechanical ventilation systems, upgrading bathroom fans and range hoods, attic insulation, replacement of heating and cooling systems, and adding wall-mounted particle air cleaners. IEQ parameters were measured, generally for two one-week periods before and after the retrofits. The measurements indicate an overall improvement in IEQ conditions after the retrofits. Comfort conditions, bathroom humidity, and concentrations of carbon dioxide, acetaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and particles generally improved. Formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide levels decreased in the building with the highest concentrations, were unchanged in a second building, and increased in a third building. IEQ parameters other than particles improved more in apartments with continuous mechanical ventilation systems installed. In general, but not consistently, larger percent increases in air exchange rates were associated with larger percent decreases in indoor levels of the pollutants that primarily come from indoor sources.

32

Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and  

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Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and energy efficiency in new relocatable classrooms in Northern California Title Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and energy efficiency in new relocatable classrooms in Northern California Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-51101 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Shendell, Derek G., Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, William J. Fisk, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Seung-Min Lee, Douglas P. Sullivan, Michael G. Apte, and Leo I. Rainer Abstract The prevalence of relocatable classrooms (RCs) at schools is rising due to federal and state initiatives to reduce K-3 class size, and limited capital resources. Concerns regarding inadequate ventilation and indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ) in RCs have been raised. Adequate ventilation is an important link between improved IEQ and energy efficiency for schools. Since students and teachers spend the majority of a 7-8 hour school day inside classrooms, indoor contaminant concentrations are assumed to drive personal school-day exposures. We conducted a demonstration project in new relocatable classrooms (RCs) during the 2001-02 school year to address these issues. Four new 24' x 40' (960 ft2) RCs were constructed and sited in pairs at an elementary school campus in each of two participant school districts (SD) in Northern California. Each RC was equipped with two heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, one per module. The two HVAC systems were a standard heat pump with intermittent 25-50% outdoor air ventilation and an energy-efficient advanced system, based on indirect-direct evaporative cooling with an integrated natural gas-fired hydronic heating loop and improved particle filtration, providing continuous 100% outdoor air ventilation at = 15 ft3 min-1 occupant-1. Alternate carpets, wall panels, and ceiling panels were installed in two classrooms - one in each pair - based on the results of a laboratory study of VOC emissions from standard and alternate materials. Numerous IEQ and outdoor air quality and meteorological parameters were measured either continuously over the school year or as integrated school day samples during the fall cooling and winter heating seasons. Details of the RC designs, the field monitoring methodology including handling, storage, transport and management of chemical samples and data, and analyses to be conducted are presented

33

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

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Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Max H. Sherman and Erin L. Hult Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2013 In Press as Sherman, M.H., Hult, E.L. 2013. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development. Atmospheric Environment. LBNL-6114E 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

34

Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information  

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Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, Duo Wang Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Department Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 4 April 2008 This research was sponsored by the California Energy Commission through the Public Interest Energy Research program as the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Classroom HVAC: Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy research project, CEC Contract Number 500-03-041. The study was

35

Kitchen Ventilation Should be High Performance (Not Optional)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kitchen Ventilation Kitchen Ventilation Should be High Performance (not Optional) Brett C. Singer Residential Building Systems & Indoor Environment Groups Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Building America Technical Update Denver, CO April 30, 2013 Acknowledgements PROGRAM SUPPORT *U.S. Department of Energy - Building America Program *U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Indoor Environments Division *U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development - Office of Healthy Homes & Lead Hazard Control *California Energy Commission - Public Interest Energy Research Program TECHNICAL CONTRIBUTIONS *Woody Delp, Tosh Hotchi, Melissa Lunden, Nasim Mullen, Chris Stratton, Doug Sullivan, Iain Walker Kitchen Ventilation Simplified PROBLEM: * Cooking burners & cooking produce odors, moisture

36

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

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03E 03E Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman*, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Duo Wang 4 April 2008 Indoor Environment Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory *Now with the California Energy Commission PIER Program, Sacramento CA. This research was sponsored by the California Energy Commission through the Public Interest Energy Research program as the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Classroom HVAC: Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy research project, CEC Contract Number 500-03-041.

37

Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development  

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of of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development Max H. Sherman, Erin L. Hult * Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R3083, Berkeley, CA 94720-8133, USA h i g h l i g h t s < A lumped parameter model is applied to describe emission and storage buffering of contaminants. < Model is used to assess impact of ventilation on indoor formaldehyde exposure. < Observations of depletion of stored contaminants can be described by model. a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 November 2012 Received in revised form 7 February 2013 Accepted 11 February 2013 Keywords: Buffering capacity Formaldehyde Moisture a b s t r a c t A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde

38

Publications  

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55 results: 55 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Phillip N. Price [Clear All Filters] 2012 Hult, Erin L., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and Phillip N. Price. Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones., 2012. Singer, Brett C., William W. Delp, Michael G. Apte, and Phillip N. Price. "Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices." Indoor Air 22, no. 3 (2012): 224-234. Kiliccote, Sila, Phillip N. Price, Mary Ann Piette, Geoffrey C. Bell, Steve Pierson, Edward Koch, Jeremy Carnam, Hugo Pedro, John Hernandez, and Albert K. Chiu. Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources in California's Ancillary Services Market for Regulation Products. LBNL, 2012. 2011

39

Formadehyde in New Homes: Ventilation vs. Source Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at at Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting March 1, 2012 Austin, Texas Formaldehyde in New Homes --- Ventilation vs. Source Control Brett C. Singer and Henry Willem Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Acknowledgments * Funding - U.S. Department of Energy - Building America Program - U.S. EPA - Indoor Environments Division - U.S. HUD - Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control - Cal. Energy Commission Public Interest Environmental Research * Technical Contributions - Fraunhofer - Ibacos - IEE-SF * LBNL Team - Sherman, Hotchi, Russell, Stratton, and Others Background 1  Formaldehyde is an irritant and a carcinogen  Odor threshold: about 800 ppb  Widely varying health standards  US HUD (8-h): 400 ppb

40

NREL: Awards and Honors - Smart, High-Performance Polyphenylenesulfide  

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Smart, High-Performance Polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) Coating System Smart, High-Performance Polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) Coating System Developers: Dr. Keith Gawlik, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Dr. Toshifumi Sugama, Brookhaven National Laboratory; Edward Curran, Bob Curran & Sons Corporation; Edward Hallahan, Ticona Corporation. The PPS coating system is a giant step forward in the technology of coating carbon-steel surfaces for use in hostile, corrosive environments. It is a smart coating system that repairs itself. It has a high thermal conductivity. It protects surfaces from corrosion, oxidation, cracking, flaking, and fouling. And its use not only extends the life of carbon-steel tubing by 4 to 5 fold, but also cuts capital and maintenance costs for these tubes by as much as two orders of magnitude. The key to these characteristics lies in the PPS coatings' unique

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41

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

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LBNL-203E LBNL-203E Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms Appendix Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman*, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Duo Wang 4 April 2008 A-1 Tables Table A-1. Thermal Comfort Results - May 2005, September 2005, November 2005 Room 13 - 9/19/2005 AM/PM Time Period Operative T and RH Acceptable (% of time) Operative T and RH, and Air Velocity acceptable (% of time) Average Indoor Air T (°C) Average Indoor Air RH (%) AM AM1 66.7 0.0 21.3 67.1 PM PM1 40.0 0.0 24.9 46.8 Room 13 - 5/16/2005 AM AM1 0.0 0.0 21.1 0.4 PM PM1 0.0 0.0 20.8 55.5 Room 13 - 12/1/2005 AM AM1 0.0% 0.0% 17.8 38.5

42

Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

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Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Title Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6114E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Erin L. Hult Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 72 Start Page 41 Pagination 41-49 Date Published 01/2013 Keywords Buffering capacity, formaldehyde, moisture Abstract A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials and the concentration of the species in the indoor air. Storage buffering can decrease the effect of ventilation on the indoor concentration, compared to the inverse dependence of indoor concentration on the air exchange rate that is consistent with a constant emission rate source. If the exposure time of an occupant is long relative to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend inversely on the air exchange rate. This lumped capacitance model is also applied to moisture buffering in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model provides a framework to interpret the impact of storage buffering on time-varying concentrations of chemical species and resulting occupant exposure. Pseudo-steady state behavior is validated using field measurements. Model behavior over longer times is consistent with formaldehyde and moisture concentration measurements in previous studies.

43

Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones  

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Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Title Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5887E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hult, Erin L., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and Phillip N. Price Date Published 09/2012 Keywords infiltration, leakage, residential ventilation Abstract Air leakage between adjacent zones of a building can lead to indoor air quality and energy efficiency concerns, however there is no existing standard for measuring inter-zonal leakage.In this study, synthesized data and field measurements are analyzed in order to explore the uncertainty associated with different methods for collecting and analyzing fan pressurization measurements to calculate inter- zone leakage. The best of the measurement and analysis methods was a method that uses two blower doors simultaneously based on the methods of Herrlin and Modera (1988) to determine the inter-zone leakage to within 16% of the inter-zone leakage flow at 4Pa, over the range of expected conditions for a house and attached garage. Methods were also identified that use a single blower door to determine the inter-zone leakage to within 30% of its value. The test configuration selected can have a large impact on the uncertainty of the results and there are testing configurations and methods that should definitely be avoided. The most rigorous calculation method identified assumes a fixed value for the pressure exponent for the interface between the two zones (rather than determining the interface pressure exponent from the measured data) and then uses an optimization routine to fit a single set of air leakage coefficients and pressure exponents for each of three wall interfaces using both pressurization and depressurization data. Multiple pressure station tests have much less uncertainty than single pressure station approaches. Analyses of field data sets confirm a similar level of variation between test methods as was expected from the analysis of synthesized data sets and confirm the selection of specific test methods to reduce experimental uncertainty.