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Sample records for hu ja ru

  1. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accepted Manuscript: Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations This content will become publicly available on...

  2. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Wayne Hu

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wayne Hu

    2010-01-08

    Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  3. Doc.~:Ru.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .' , .' c,j .c; Distriblition:~ ;. <; ~..,:L.D.i&%.ay,FiN-OR00 Doc.~:Ru. ,.,. 75. ' Br..Reading 'ire' ,lliv. Read&q File ,: '. ~ ,, .-' . ...: - SURNAME..

  4. Oct. 25 Lecture Highlights Treatment Technology of HU's Proton Therapy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute | Jefferson Lab Oct. 25 Lecture Highlights Treatment Technology of HU's Proton Therapy Institute Oct. 25 Lecture Highlights Treatment Technology of HU's Proton Therapy Institute Cynthia Keppel Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute Scientific and Technical Director, Cynthia Keppel, will present a public lecture titled "Accelerating Protons to Save Lives" on Oct. 25 at Jefferson Lab in Newport News. NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Sept. 29, 2011 - Jefferson Lab's 2011 Fall Science

  5. Effect of Ru thickness on spin pumping in Ru/Py bilayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behera, Nilamani; Singh, M. Sanjoy; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Pandya, Dinesh K. Muduli, P. K.

    2015-05-07

    We report the effect of Ru thickness (t{sub Ru}) on ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line-width of Ru(t{sub Ru})/Py(23?nm) bilayer samples grown on Si(100)/SiO{sub 2} substrates at room temperature by magnetron sputtering. The FMR line-width is found to vary linearly with frequency for all thicknesses of Ru, indicating intrinsic origin of damping. For Ru thicknesses below 15?nm, Gilbert-damping parameter, ? is almost constant. We ascribe this behavior to spin back flow that is operative for Ru thicknesses lower than the spin diffusion length in Ru, ?{sub sd}. For thicknesses >15?nm (>?{sub sd}), the damping constant increases with Ru thickness, indicating spin pumping from Py into Ru.

  6. ja762 | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ja762 Ames Laboratory Profile Jordan Anderson Engineering Assistant-X Facilities Services 167 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-5428 Email Address: ja762

  7. Glycerol Hydrogenolysis on Carbon-Supported PtRu and AuRu Bimetallic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maris,E.; Ketchie, W.; Murayama, M.; Davis, R.

    2007-01-01

    Bimetallic PtRu and AuRu catalysts were prepared by a surface redox method in which Pt or Au was deposited onto the surface of carbon-supported Ru nanoparticles with an average diameter of 2-3 nm. Characterization by H2 chemisorption, analytical TEM, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Ru K-edge, Pt LIII-edge, and Au LIII-edge confirmed that Pt and Au were successfully deposited onto Ru without disrupting the Ru particles. Depression of the ethane hydrogenolysis rate over Ru after addition of Au provided further evidence of successful deposition. The bimetallic particles were subsequently evaluated in the aqueous-phase hydrogenolysis of glycerol at 473 K and 40 bar H2 at neutral and elevated pH. Although monometallic Pt and Ru exhibited different activities and selectivities to products, the bimetallic PtRu catalyst functioned more like Ru. A similar result was obtained for the AuRu bimetallic catalyst. The PtRu catalyst appeared to be stable under the aqueous-phase reaction conditions, whereas the AuRu catalyst was altered by the harsh conditions. Gold appeared to migrate off the Ru and agglomerate on the carbon during the reaction in liquid water.

  8. SUPPORT FOR HU CFRT SUMMER HIGH SCHOOL FUSION WORKSHOP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punjabi, Alkesh

    2010-02-09

    Nine summer fusion science research workshops for minority and female high school students were conducted at the Hampton University Center for Fusion Research and Training from 1996 to 2005. Each workshop was of the duration of eight weeks. In all 35 high school students were mentored. The students presented 28 contributed papers at the annual meetings of the American Physical Society Division of Plasma Physics. These contributed papers were very well received by the plasma physics and fusion science research community. The students won a number of prestigious local, state, and national honors, awards, prizes, and scholarships. The notable among these are the two regional finalist positions in the 1999 Siemens-Westinghouse Science and Technology Competitions; 1st Place U.S. Army Award, 2006; 1st Place U.S. Naval Science Award, 2006; Yale Science and Engineering Association Best 11th Grade Project, 2006; Society of Physics Students Book Award, 2006; APS Corporate Minority Scholarship and others. This workshop program conducted by the HU CFRT has been an exemplary success, and served the minority and female students exceptionally fruitfully. The Summer High School Fusion Science Workshop is an immensely successful outreach activity conducted by the HU CFRT. In this workshop, we train, motivate, and provide high quality research experiences to young and talented high school scholars with emphasis on under-represented minorities and female students in fusion science and related areas. The purpose of this workshop is to expose minority and female students to the excitement of research in science at an early stage in their academic lives. It is our hope that this may lead the high school students to pursue higher education and careers in physical sciences, mathematics, and perhaps in fusion science. To our knowledge, this workshop is the first and only one to date, of fusion science for under-represented minorities and female high school students at an HBCU. The faculty

  9. Facile oxygen intercalation between full layer graphene and Ru...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Facile oxygen intercalation between full layer graphene and Ru(0001) under ambient ... Title: Facile oxygen intercalation between full layer graphene and Ru(0001) under ambient ...

  10. Arrays of Ru Nanoclusters with Narrow Size Distribution Templated by Monolayer Graphene on Ru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, P.; Sutter, E.; Albrecht, P.; Wang, B.; Bocquet M.-L.; Wu, L.; Zhu, Y.

    2011-09-01

    Ru nanoclusters self-assemble over macroscopic sample areas during vapor deposition of Ru on monolayer graphene (MLG) on Ru(0001). The Ru nanoclusters form arrays with a mean lateral cluster diameter of {approx} 20 {angstrom}, cluster heights of 1 or 2 ML, and a size distribution that remains nearly constant with increasing coverage. Combined scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory (DFT) show that the clusters are templated by the MLG/Ru(0001) moire unit cell and identify the preferred binding site of the clusters as the low fcc region of the moire. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM contrast simulations experimentally demonstrate that the interaction of the Ru clusters with the underlying MLG/Ru(0001) leads to a local lifting of the graphene layer of the template. DFT calculations confirm this mechanism of interaction of the Ru clusters with the strongly coupled MLG/Ru(0001). Weakening of the graphene-support coupling via oxygen intercalation is shown to have a major effect on the assembly of Ru nanocluster arrays. With a preferred binding site lacking on decoupled graphene, the Ru nanoclusters grow significantly larger, and clusters with 1 to 4 ML height can coexist.

  11. On an instability exhibited by the ballistic-diffusive heat conduction model of Xu and Hu

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Christov, I. C.; Jordan, P. M.

    2013-11-13

    We show that the constitutive relation for the thermal flux proposed by Xu & Hu (2011) admits an unconditional instability. We also highlight the difference between mathematical models containing delay and those that include relaxation effects.

  12. Champions in Science Whose Stars are Still Rising: Profile of Julia Hu |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Julia Hu News News Home Featured Articles 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Science Highlights Presentations & Testimony News Archives Communications and Public Affairs Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 04.05.16 Champions in Science Whose Stars are Still Rising: Profile of Julia Hu For the run-up to the 2016 National

  13. AuRu/AC as an effective catalyst for hydrogenation reactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Villa, Alberto; Chan-Thaw, Carine E.; Campisi, Sebastiano; Bianchi, Claudia L.; Wang, Di; Kotula, Paul G.; Kübel, Christian; Prati, Laura

    2015-03-23

    AuRu bimetallic catalysts have been prepared by sequential deposition of Au on Ru or vice versa obtaining different nanostructures: when Ru has been deposited on Au, a Aucore–Rushell has been observed, whereas the deposition of Au on Ru leads to a bimetallic phase with Ru enrichment on the surface. In the latter case, the unexpected Ru enrichment could be attributed to the weak adhesion of Ru on the carbon support, thus allowing Ru particles to diffuse on Au particles. Both structures result very active in catalysing the liquid phase hydrogenolysis of glycerol and levulinic acid but the activity, the selectivitymore » and the stability depend on the structure of the bimetallic nanoparticles. Ru@Au/AC core–shell structure mostly behaved as the monometallic Ru, whereas the presence of bimetallic AuRu phase in Au@Ru/AC provides a great beneficial effect on both activity and stability.« less

  14. The cytoskeletal inhibitors latrunculin A and blebbistatin exert antitumorigenic properties in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by interfering with intracellular HuR trafficking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doller, Anke; Badawi, Amel

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the RNA-binding protein HuR for the post-transcriptional deregulation of tumor-relevant genes is well established. Despite of elevations in HuR expression levels, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR abundance in many cases correlates with a high grade of malignancy. Here, we demonstrated that administration of the actin-depolymerizing macrolide latrunculin A, or blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the high cytoplasmic HuR content of HepG2 and Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Subcellular fractionation revealed that in addition, both inhibitors strongly attenuated cytoskeletal and membrane-bound HuR abundance and conversely increased the HuR amount in nuclear cell fractions. Concomitant with changes in intracellular HuR localization, both cytoskeletal inhibitors markedly decreased the half-lives of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cyclin A and cyclin D{sub 1} encoding mRNAs resulting in a significant reduction in their expression levels in HepG2 cells. Importantly, a similar reduction in the expression of these HuR targets was achieved by a RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of either HuR or nonmuscle myoin IIA. Using polysomal fractionation, we further demonstrate that the decrease in cytoplasmic HuR by latrunculin A or blebbistatin is accompanied by a marked change in the allocation of HuR and its mRNA cargo from polysomes to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Functionally, the basal migration and prostaglandin E{sub 2} synthesis are similarly impaired in inhibitor-treated and stable HuR-knockdown HepG2 cells. Our data demonstrate that interfering with the actomyosin-dependent HuR trafficking may comprise a valid therapeutic option for antagonizing pathologic posttranscriptional gene expression by HuR and furthermore emphasize the potential benefit of HuR inhibitory strategies for treatment of HCC. - Highlights: • We tested the effects of latrunculin A and blebbistatin on

  15. Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis: Effect of Reducing Agent for Aqueous-Phase Synthesis Over Ru Nanoparticle and Supported Ru Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendyala, Venkat Ramana Rao; Shafer, Wilson D.; Jacobs, Gary; Graham, Uschi M.; Khalid, Syed; Davis, Burtron H.

    2014-12-27

    The effect of the reducing agent on the performance of a ruthenium nanoparticle catalyst was investigated during aqueous-phase Fischer–Tropsch synthesis using a 1 L stirred tank reactor in the batch mode of operation. For the purpose of comparison, the activity and selectivity of NaY zeolite supported Ru catalyst were also studied. NaBH4 and hydrogen were used as reducing agents in our study, and hydrogen reduced catalysts exhibited higher activities than the NaBH4 reduced catalysts, because of higher extent of reduction and a relatively lower tendency toward agglomeration of Ru particles. The Ru nanoparticle catalyst displayed higher activities than the NaY zeolite supported Ru catalyst for both reducing agents. NaBH4 reduced catalysts are less active and the carbon dioxide selectivity is higher than the hydrogen reduced catalysts. The activity of the supported Ru catalyst (Ru/NaY) was 75 % of that of the Ru nanoparticle catalyst, and has the benefit of easy wax/catalyst slurry separation by filtration. Finally, the hydrogen reduced supported Ru catalyst exhibited superior selectivity towards hydrocarbons (higher C5+ selectivity and lower selectivity to methane) than all other catalysts tested.

  16. MoRu/Be multilayers for extreme ultraviolet applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bajt, Sasa C.; Wall, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    High reflectance, low intrinsic roughness and low stress multilayer systems for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography comprise amorphous layers MoRu and crystalline Be layers. Reflectance greater than 70% has been demonstrated for MoRu/Be multilayers with 50 bilayer pairs. Optical throughput of MoRu/Be multilayers can be 30-40% higher than that of Mo/Be multilayer coatings. The throughput can be improved using a diffusion barrier to make sharper interfaces. A capping layer on the top surface of the multilayer improves the long-term reflectance and EUV radiation stability of the multilayer by forming a very thin native oxide that is water resistant.

  17. JA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    actJvities Include, but are not limited to (a) Geological, geophysical (such as gravity, magnebc, electrical, seismic, radar, and temperature gradient), geochemical, and...

  18. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-27

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C6-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom inmore » the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ~0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. Furthermore, this in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001).« less

  19. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-27

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C6-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom in the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ~0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. Furthermore, this in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001).

  20. JA Solar Holdings Co aka Jingao | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: JA Solar Holdings Co (aka Jingao) Place: Hebei Province, China Product: Chinese PV cell manufacturer. References: JA Solar Holdings Co (aka Jingao)1 This article is a...

  1. AuRu/AC as an effective catalyst for hydrogenation reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa, Alberto; Chan-Thaw, Carine E.; Campisi, Sebastiano; Bianchi, Claudia L.; Wang, Di; Kotula, Paul G.; Kübel, Christian; Prati, Laura

    2015-03-23

    AuRu bimetallic catalysts have been prepared by sequential deposition of Au on Ru or vice versa obtaining different nanostructures: when Ru has been deposited on Au, a AucoreRushell has been observed, whereas the deposition of Au on Ru leads to a bimetallic phase with Ru enrichment on the surface. In the latter case, the unexpected Ru enrichment could be attributed to the weak adhesion of Ru on the carbon support, thus allowing Ru particles to diffuse on Au particles. Both structures result very active in catalysing the liquid phase hydrogenolysis of glycerol and levulinic acid but the activity, the selectivity and the stability depend on the structure of the bimetallic nanoparticles. Ru@Au/AC core–shell structure mostly behaved as the monometallic Ru, whereas the presence of bimetallic AuRu phase in Au@Ru/AC provides a great beneficial effect on both activity and stability.

  2. Spin-memory loss at Co/Ru interfaces (Journal Article) | DOE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spin-memory loss at CoRu interfaces Title: Spin-memory loss at CoRu interfaces Authors: Khasawneh, Mazin A. ; Klose, Carolin ; Pratt, W. P. ; Birge, Norman O. Publication Date: ...

  3. JaWE to Openflow translation software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-09-07

    Jawt2Openfiow isa software product for the Zope content management system that converts a workflow defined by JaWE to a workflow implemented with Openflow in Zope.

  4. Enhanced thermoelectric power and electronic correlations in RuSe₂

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Kefeng; Wang, Aifeng; Tomic, A.; Wang, Limin; Abeykoon, A. M. Milinda; Dooryhee, E.; Billinge, S. J.L.; Petrovic, C.

    2015-03-03

    We report the electronic structure, electric and thermal transport properties of Ru₁₋xIrxSe₂ (x ≤ 0.2). RuSe₂ is a semiconductor that crystallizes in a cubic pyrite unit cell. The Seebeck coefficient of RuSe₂ exceeds -200 µV/K around 730 K. Ir substitution results in the suppression of the resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient, suggesting the removal of the peaks in density of states near the Fermi level. Ru₀.₈Ir₀.₂Se₂ shows a semiconductor-metal crossover at about 30 K. The magnetic field restores the semiconducting behavior. Our results indicate the importance of the electronic correlations in enhanced thermoelectricity of RuSb₂.

  5. Enhanced thermoelectric power and electronic correlations in RuSe₂

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Kefeng; Wang, Aifeng; Tomic, A.; Wang, Limin; Abeykoon, A. M. Milinda; Dooryhee, E.; Billinge, S. J.L.; Petrovic, C.

    2015-03-03

    We report the electronic structure, electric and thermal transport properties of Ru₁₋xIrxSe₂ (x ≤ 0.2). RuSe₂ is a semiconductor that crystallizes in a cubic pyrite unit cell. The Seebeck coefficient of RuSe₂ exceeds -200 µV/K around 730 K. Ir substitution results in the suppression of the resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient, suggesting the removal of the peaks in density of states near the Fermi level. Ru₀.₈Ir₀.₂Se₂ shows a semiconductor-metal crossover at about 30 K. The magnetic field restores the semiconducting behavior. Our results indicate the importance of the electronic correlations in enhanced thermoelectricity of RuSb₂.

  6. Complex of transferrin with ruthenium for medical applications. [Ru 97, Ru 103

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, P.; Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.

    1980-11-03

    A novel Ruthenium-transferrin complex, prepared by reacting iron-free human transferrin dissolved in a sodium acetate solution at pH 7 with ruthenium by heating at about 40/sup 0/C for about 2 hours, and purifying said complex by means of gel chromatography with pH 7 sodium acetate as eluent. The mono- or di-metal complex produced can be used in nuclear medicine in the diagnosis and/or treatment of tumors and abscesses. Comparitive results with Ga-67-citrate, which is the most widely used tumor-localizing agent in nuclear medicine, indicate increased sensitivity of detection and greater tumor uptake with the Ru-transferrin complex.

  7. Nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation by 99Ru

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bessas, D.; Merkel, D. G.; Chumakov, A. I.; Ruffer, R.; Hermann, Raphael P.; Sergueev, I.; Mahmoud, A.; Klobes, B.; McGuire, Michael A.; Sougrati, M. T.; et al

    2014-10-03

    In this study, we measured nuclear forward scattering spectra utilizing the 99Ru transition, 89.571(3) keV, with a notably mixed E2/M1 multipolarity. The extension of the standard evaluation routines to include mixed multipolarity allows us to extract electric and magnetic hyperfine interactions from 99Ru-containing compounds. This paves the way for several other high-energy Mössbauer transitions, E~90 keV. Lastly, the high energy of such transitions allows for operando nuclear forward scattering studies in real devices.

  8. Multiple Pathways for Benzyl Alcohol Oxidation by RuV=O3+ and RuIV=O2+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, Amit; Hull, Jonathan F.; Norris, Michael R.; Chen, Zuofeng; Ess, Daniel H.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2011-01-20

    Significant rate enhancements are found for benzyl alcohol oxidation by the RuV=O3+ form of the water oxidation catalyst [Ru(Mebimpy)(bpy)(OH2)]2+ [Mebimpy = 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine] compared to RuIV=O2+ and for the RuIV=O2+ form with added bases due to a new pathway, concerted hydride proton transfer (HPT).

  9. Multiple Pathways for Benzyl Alcohol Oxidation by RuV=O3+ and RuIV=O2+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, Amit; Hull, Jonathan F.; Norris, Michael R.; Chen, Zuofeng; Ess, Daniel H.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2011-01-20

    Significant rate enhancements are found for benzyl alcohol oxidation by the RuV=O3+ form of the water oxidation catalyst [Ru(Mebimpy)(bpy)(OH2)]2+ [Mebimpy = 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine] compared to RuIV=O2+ and for the RuIV=O2+ form with added bases due to a new pathway involving concerted hydride proton transfer (HPT).

  10. Synthesis of Pd?Ru@Pt nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction in acidic electrolytes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Yu; Hsieh, Yu-Chi; Chang, Li-Chung; Wu, Pu-Wei; Lee, Jyh-Fu

    2014-11-22

    Nanoparticles of PdRu, Pd?Ru, and Pd?Ru are synthesized and impregnated on carbon black via a wet chemical reflux process. X-ray diffraction patterns of the as-synthesized samples, PdxRu/C (x=1/3/9), suggest succesful formation of alloy without presence of individual Pd and Ru nanoparticles. Images from transmission electron microscope confirm irregularly-shaped nanoparticles with average size below 3 nm. Analysis from extended X-ray absorption fine structure on both Pd and Ru K-edge absorption profiles indicate the Ru atoms are enriched on the surface of PdxRu/C. Among these samples, the Pd?Ru/C exhibits the strongest electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an oxygen-saturated 0.1moreM aqueous HClO? solution. Subsequently, the Pd?Ru/C undegoes Cu under potential deposition, followed by a galvanic displacement reaction to deposit a Pt monolayer on the Pd?Ru surface (Pd?Ru@Pt). The Pd?Ru@Pt reveals better ORR performance than that of Pt, reaching a mass activity of 0.38 mA ?g? Pt, as compared to that of commercially available Pt nanoparticles (0.107 mA ?g? Pt). The mechanisms responsible for the ORR enhancement are attributed to the combined effects of lattice strain and ligand interaction. In addition, this core-shell Pd?Ru@Pt electrocatalyst represents a substantial reduction in the amount of Pt consumption and raw material cost.less

  11. Synthesis of Pd9Ru@Pt nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction in acidic electrolytes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Yu; Hsieh, Yu -Chi; Chang, Li -Chung; Wu, Pu -Wei; Lee, Jyh -Fu

    2014-11-22

    Nanoparticles of PdRu, Pd₃Ru, and Pd₉Ru are synthesized and impregnated on carbon black via a wet chemical reflux process. X-ray diffraction patterns of the as-synthesized samples, PdxRu/C (x=1/3/9), suggest succesful formation of alloy without presence of individual Pd and Ru nanoparticles. Images from transmission electron microscope confirm irregularly-shaped nanoparticles with average size below 3 nm. Analysis from extended X-ray absorption fine structure on both Pd and Ru K-edge absorption profiles indicate the Ru atoms are enriched on the surface of PdxRu/C. Among these samples, the Pd₉Ru/C exhibits the strongest electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an oxygen-saturated 0.1more » M aqueous HClO₄ solution. Subsequently, the Pd₉Ru/C undegoes Cu under potential deposition, followed by a galvanic displacement reaction to deposit a Pt monolayer on the Pd₉Ru surface (Pd₉Ru@Pt). The Pd₉Ru@Pt reveals better ORR performance than that of Pt, reaching a mass activity of 0.38 mA μg⁻¹ Pt, as compared to that of commercially available Pt nanoparticles (0.107 mA μg⁻¹ Pt). Thus, the mechanisms responsible for the ORR enhancement are attributed to the combined effects of lattice strain and ligand interaction. In addition, this core-shell Pd₉Ru@Pt electrocatalyst represents a substantial reduction in the amount of Pt consumption and raw material cost.« less

  12. Photoelectrocatalytic study of water oxidation at n-RuS{sub 2} electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salvador, P.; Alonso-Vante, N.; Tributsch, H.

    1998-01-01

    A kinetic study of the photocatalytic oxidation of water at a n-RuS{sub 2} semiconducting single crystal has been undertaken on the basis of photocurrent transients (photocurrent-time behavior as a function of the polarization potential, illumination intensity, and temperature) and electrolyte electroreflectance experiments. The main factor defining the catalytic activity of RuS{sub 2} for water oxidation, both in the dark and under illumination, is a low overpotential ({eta} {approx} 0.3 V), which is comparable to that of the RuO{sub 2} catalyst for oxygen evolution at darkness. Evidence has been given that {eta} is determined by the E{sup o}(Ru{sub s}-OH{sup 0}/Ru{sub s}-H{sub 2}O) redox potential, which strongly depends on the bonding energy of Ru surface species with OH{sup o} radicals generated by direct oxidation of adsorbed water molecules (interfacial Ru-peroxo-type complex formation). This bonding energy increases as the RuS{sub 2} surface becomes oxidized under anodic polarization and reaches its maximum value at the potential of the S{sub 2}RuO{sub 2}/RuS{sub 2} transition (VIII Ru oxidation state). Further oxidation of the Ru-peroxo-type complexes leads to oxygen evolution at a rate which increases with the degree of oxidation of the Ru surface active centers. Although O{sub 2} evolution probably already takes place on Ru(VI) surface sites, high evolution rates (current densities) are only reached under oxidation state VIII. However, in this state (idealized S{sub 2}Ru(VIII)O{sub 2}) Ru-S surface bonds are weakened and occasionally broken, contributing to RuS{sub 2} dissolution with generation of volatile RuO{sub 4} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} soluble ions as the main corrosion products. This phenomenon may be attributed to the reaction in acidic medium of H{sub 2}O molecules with Ru(VIII) surface species, giving rise to the formation of unstable intermediate complexes.

  13. Dimerization Induced Deprotonation of Water on RuO2(110)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mu, Rentao; Cantu Cantu, David; Lin, Xiao; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Wang, Zhitao; Lyubinetsky, Igor; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2014-10-02

    RuO2 has proven to be indispensable as a co-catalyst in numerous systems designed for photocatalytic water splitting. In this study we have carried out a detailed mechanistic study of water behavior on the most stable RuO2 face, RuO2(110), by employing variable temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations. We show that water monomers adsorb molecularly on Ru sites, become mobile above 238 K, diffuse along the Ru rows and form water dimers. The onset for dimer diffusion is observed at ~277 K indicating significantly higher diffusion barrier than that for monomers. More importantly, we find that water dimers deprotonate readily to form Ru-bound H3O2 and bridging OH species. The observed behavior is compared and contrasted with that observed for water on isostructural rutile TiO2(110).

  14. Magnetic properties and spin polarization of Ru doped half metallic CrO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Kevin G.; Dao, Nam N. H.; Lu, Jiwei; Osofsky, Michael; Mazin, I. I.; Wolf, Stuart A.

    2015-07-06

    Chromium dioxide (CrO{sub 2}) is a half metal that is of interest for spintronic devices. It has not been synthesized through traditional physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques because of its thermodynamic instability in low oxygen pressures. Epitaxial thin films of Ru doped tetragonal rutile CrO{sub 2} were synthesized by a PVD technique. The as-deposited Ru{sub x}Cr{sub 1−x}O{sub 2} was ferrimagnetic with the saturation magnetization moment showing a strong dependence on the Ru concentration. Curie temperature as high as 241 K has been obtained for ∼23 at. % Ru. The Ru substitution increased the electrical conductivity by increasing the minority spin concentration. The spin polarization was found to be as high as 70% for 9 at. % Ru and decreased to ∼60% with Ru concentrations up to ∼44 at. %, which is determined by the Fermi velocities of the majority and minority spins. First principle calculations were performed to understand the effect of Ru content on the properties of CrO{sub 2}. The PVD processes of Ru doped CrO{sub 2} could lead to the practical applications of the high spin polarization of CrO{sub 2} in spintronic devices.

  15. Sol-gel Ru/SiO[sub 2] - catalysts: Theoretical and experimental determination of the Ru-in-silica structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, T.; Gomez, R.; Novaro, O. ); Ramirez-Solis, A.; Sanchez-Mora, E.; Castillo, S.; Poulain, E.; Martinez-Magadan, J.M. )

    1993-05-01

    Preparation of Ru/SiO[sub 2] catalysts with sol-gel techniques allows better selectivity and much greater resistance to coke formation and deactivation than the traditional impregnation method. This has been attributed to the incorporation of Ru into the silica network for the sol-gel catalyst. To further understand the structure of the Ru occluded in the silica network, a variety of spectroscopical studies and quantum mechanical calculations were carried out, confirming previously proposed structures and showing good agreement between the theoretical and experimental results. 26 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Low leakage Ru-strontium titanate-Ru metal-insulator-metal capacitors for sub-20 nm technology node in dynamic random access memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popovici, M. Swerts, J.; Redolfi, A.; Kaczer, B.; Aoulaiche, M.; Radu, I.; Clima, S.; Everaert, J.-L.; Van Elshocht, S.; Jurczak, M.

    2014-02-24

    Improved metal-insulator-metal capacitor (MIMCAP) stacks with strontium titanate (STO) as dielectric sandwiched between Ru as top and bottom electrode are shown. The Ru/STO/Ru stack demonstrates clearly its potential to reach sub-20 nm technology nodes for dynamic random access memory. Downscaling of the equivalent oxide thickness, leakage current density (J{sub g}) of the MIMCAPs, and physical thickness of the STO have been realized by control of the Sr/Ti ratio and grain size using a heterogeneous TiO{sub 2}/STO based nanolaminate stack deposition and a two-step crystallization anneal. Replacement of TiN with Ru as both top and bottom electrodes reduces the amount of electrically active defects and is essential to achieve a low leakage current in the MIM capacitor.

  17. Mechanism of water oxidation by [Ru(bda)(L)?]: The return of the "blue dimer"

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Concepcion, Javier J.; Zhong, Diane K.; Szalda, David J.; Muckerman, James T.; Fujita, Etsuko

    2015-02-05

    We describe here a combined solution-surface-DFT calculations study for complexes of the type [Ru(bda)(L)?] including X-ray structure of intermediates, their reactivity, as well as pH-dependent electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry. These studies shed light on the mechanism of water oxidation by [Ru(bda)(L)?], revealing key features unavailable from solution studies with sacrificial oxidants.

  18. Enhanced oxygen evolution activity of IrO2 and RuO2 (100) surfaces...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Enhanced oxygen evolution activity of IrO2 and RuO2 (100) surfaces Citation Details In-Document Search ... Here we report that the (100) surface of IrO2 and RuO2 is ...

  19. The Thermal Behavior of Pd on Graphene/Ru(0001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, Cheol-Woo W.; Szanyi, Janos

    2015-11-01

    The thermal behavior of various amounts of palladium deposited onto graphene/Ru(0001) at room temperature was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) of adsorbed CO. IRAS spectra of adsorbed CO on palladium deposited onto the graphene layer reveal the formation of defect-rich, highly-stepped and/or nanoparticle-typed palladium clusters. Annealing to temperatures below ~900 K, palladium clusters mainly experience agglomeration on the graphene layer, but at higher temperatures intercalation of palladium between the graphene layer and Ru substrate takes place. Eventually, palladium completely desorbs and the graphene layer dissolves into the ruthenium substrate at 1400 K. Even though the annealing induces the intercalation and desorption of palladium, the topmost graphene layer stays intact without any physical damage at and below 1300 K. We gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division for the support of this work. The research described in this article was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute under contract number DE-AC05-76RL01830. CWY also acknowledges the support of this work by Sungshin Women’s University Research Grant of 2014.

  20. packagings -- Historical review Smith, J.A.; Salzbrenner, D....

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    based design for radioactive material transport packagings -- Historical review Smith, J.A.; Salzbrenner, D.; Sorenson, K.; McConnell, P. 42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN...

  1. High antiferromagnetic transition temperature of a honeycomb compound SrRu2O6

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tian, Wei; Svoboda, Chris; Ochi, M.; Matsuda, M.; Cao, Huibo; Cheng, J. -G.; Sales, B. C.; Mandrus, D.; Arita, R.; Trivedi, Nandini; et al

    2015-09-14

    We study the high-temperature magnetic order in a quasi-two-dimensional honeycomb compound SrRu2O6 by measuring magnetization and neutron powder diffraction with both polarized and unpolarized neutrons. SrRu2O6 crystallizes into the hexagonal lead antimonate (PbSb2O6, space group P31m) structure with layers of edge-sharing RuO6 octahedra separated by Sr2+ ions. SrRu2O6 is found to order at TN = 565 K with Ru moments coupled antiferromagnetically both in plane and out of plane. The magnetic moment is 1.30(2) μB/Ru at room temperature and is along the crystallographic c axis in the G-type magnetic structure. We perform density functional calculations with constrained random-phase approximation (RPA)more » to obtain the electronic structure and effective intra- and interorbital interaction parameters. The projected density of states shows strong hybridization between Ru 4d and O 2p. By downfolding to the target t2g bands we extract the effective magnetic Hamiltonian and perform Monte Carlo simulations to determine the transition temperature as a function of interand intraplane couplings. We find a weak interplane coupling, 3% of the strong intraplane coupling, permits three-dimensional magnetic order at the observed TN .« less

  2. Synthesis of Pd9Ru@Pt nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction in acidic electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yu; Hsieh, Yu -Chi; Chang, Li -Chung; Wu, Pu -Wei; Lee, Jyh -Fu

    2014-11-22

    Nanoparticles of PdRu, Pd?Ru, and Pd?Ru are synthesized and impregnated on carbon black via a wet chemical reflux process. X-ray diffraction patterns of the as-synthesized samples, PdxRu/C (x=1/3/9), suggest succesful formation of alloy without presence of individual Pd and Ru nanoparticles. Images from transmission electron microscope confirm irregularly-shaped nanoparticles with average size below 3 nm. Analysis from extended X-ray absorption fine structure on both Pd and Ru K-edge absorption profiles indicate the Ru atoms are enriched on the surface of PdxRu/C. Among these samples, the Pd?Ru/C exhibits the strongest electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an oxygen-saturated 0.1 M aqueous HClO? solution. Subsequently, the Pd?Ru/C undegoes Cu under potential deposition, followed by a galvanic displacement reaction to deposit a Pt monolayer on the Pd?Ru surface (Pd?Ru@Pt). The Pd?Ru@Pt reveals better ORR performance than that of Pt, reaching a mass activity of 0.38 mA ?g? Pt, as compared to that of commercially available Pt nanoparticles (0.107 mA ?g? Pt). Thus, the mechanisms responsible for the ORR enhancement are attributed to the combined effects of lattice strain and ligand interaction. In addition, this core-shell Pd?Ru@Pt electrocatalyst represents a substantial reduction in the amount of Pt consumption and raw material cost.

  3. Synthesis and thermoelectric properties of RuO{sub 2} nanorods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Music, Denis; Basse, Felix H.-U.; Schneider, Jochen M.; Hassdorf, Ralf

    2010-07-15

    We have explored the effect of the O/Ru ratio on the morphology and the Seebeck coefficient of RuO{sub 2} nanorods (space group P4{sub 2}/mnm) synthesized by reactive sputtering. At an O/Ru ratio of 1.69, a faceted surface is observed, while nanorod formation occurs at O/Ru ratios of 2.03 and 2.24. Using classical molecular dynamics with the potential parameters derived in this work, we show that volatile species enable nanorod formation. Based on ab initio calculations, two effects of the nanorod formation on the Seebeck coefficient are observed: (i) increase due to additional states in the vicinity of the Fermi level and (ii) decrease due to oxygen point defects (volatile species). These two competing effects give rise to a moderate increase in the Seebeck coefficient upon nanorod formation.

  4. Tuning the metal-insulator crossover and magnetism in SrRuO3...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in SrRuO3 by ionic gating Reversible control of charge transport and magnetic ... We report a reversible control of charge transport, metal-insulator crossover and ...

  5. Mechanism of water oxidation by [Ru(bda)(L)₂]: The return of the "blue dimer"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Concepcion, Javier J.; Zhong, Diane K.; Szalda, David J.; Muckerman, James T.; Fujita, Etsuko

    2015-02-05

    We describe here a combined solution-surface-DFT calculations study for complexes of the type [Ru(bda)(L)₂] including X-ray structure of intermediates, their reactivity, as well as pH-dependent electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry. These studies shed light on the mechanism of water oxidation by [Ru(bda)(L)₂], revealing key features unavailable from solution studies with sacrificial oxidants.

  6. Epitaxial growth of highly conductive RuO{sub 2} thin films on (100) Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Q.X.; Song, S.G.; Wu, X.D.; Cho, J.H.; Foltyn, S.R.; Findikoglu, A.T.; Smith, J.L.

    1996-02-01

    Conductive RuO{sub 2} thin films have been heteroepitaxially grown by pulsed laser deposition on Si substrates with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) buffer layers. The RuO{sub 2} thin films deposited under optimized processing conditions are {ital a}-axis oriented normal to the Si substrate surface with a high degree of in-plane alignment with the major axes of the (100) Si substrate. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis on the RuO{sub 2}/YSZ/Si multilayer shows an atomically sharp interface between the RuO{sub 2} and the YSZ. Electrical measurements show that the crystalline RuO{sub 2} thin films are metallic over a temperature range from 4.2 to 300 K and are highly conductive with a room-temperature resistivity of 37{plus_minus}2 {mu}{Omega}cm. The residual resistance ratio ({ital R}{sub 300K}/{ital R}{sub 4.2K}) above 5 for our RuO{sub 2} thin films is the highest ever reported for such films on Si substrates. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. X-ray and Raman spectroscopic studies on Ru substituted LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalavathi, S.; Ravindran, T. R.; Sahu, P. Ch.; Kalaivani, D.

    2015-06-24

    Phase pure Ru substituted LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} charge frustrated spinel compounds have been synthesized. Ru substitution for Mn is possible only up to 7.5%. Powder diffraction measurements confirm sustenance of charge frustrated cubic phase with space group Fd3m upon substitution of Ru for Mn. An increase in lattice parameter has been observed indicating replacement of Mn as Ru{sup 3+} or Ru{sup 4+} rather than Ru{sup 5+}. Raman spectroscopic measurements show that the crystal structure is robust against an increase of laser power and the observed bands show an expected red shift. In the case of Ru substituted LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, the A{sub 1g} symmetric stretching mode, the F{sup (1)}{sub 2g} and the F{sup (2)}{sub 2g} symmetric bending modes identified with the Mn-O octahedra show a red shift up to Ru 0.075 and at higher Ru concentrations, revert back to the frequency corresponding to the pristine LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  8. Soft Landing of Bare PtRu Nanoparticles for Electrochemical Reduction of Oxygen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Colby, Robert J.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Moon, DaeWon; Laskin, Julia

    2015-08-07

    Magnetron sputtering of two independent Pt and Ru targets coupled with inert gas aggregation in a modified commercial source has been combined with soft landing of mass-selected ions to prepare bare 4.5 nm diameter PtRu alloy nanoparticles on glassy carbon electrodes with controlled size and morphology for electrochemical reduction of oxygen in solution. Employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) it is shown that the nanoparticles bind randomly to the glassy carbon electrode at a relatively low coverage of 7 x 104 ions µm-2 and that their average height is centered at 4 nm. Scanning transmission electron microscopy images obtained in the high-angle annular dark field mode (STEM-HAADF) further confirm that the soft-landed PtRu alloy nanoparticles are uniform in size and have a Ru core decorated with small regions of Pt on the surface. Wide-area scans of the electrodes using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveal the presence of both Pt and Ru in relative atomic concentrations of ~9% and ~33%, respectively. Deconvolution of the high energy resolution XPS spectra in the Pt4f and Ru3d regions indicates the presence of both oxidized Pt and Ru. The substantially higher loading of Ru compared to Pt and enrichment of Pt at the surface of the alloy nanoparticles is confirmed by wide-area analysis of the electrodes using time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering (TOF-MEIS) employing both 80 keV He+ and O+ ions. The activity of electrodes containing 7 x 104 ions µm-2 of bare 4.5 nm PtRu nanoparticles toward the electrochemical reduction of oxygen was evaluated employing cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 0.1 M HClO4 and 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. In both electrolytes a pronounced reduction peak was observed during O2 purging of the solution that was not evident during purging with Ar. Repeated electrochemical cycling of the electrodes revealed little evolution in the shape or position of the voltammograms indicating high stability of the alloy nanoparticles supported on glassy

  9. Influence of Electron Doping on Magnetic Order in CeRu2Al10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Riki; Kaneko, Koji; Saito, Kotaro; Mignot, Jean-Michel; Andre, Gilles; Robert, Julien; Wakimoto, Shuichi; Matsuda, Masaaki; Chi, Songxue; Haga, Yoshinori; Matsuda, Tatsuma; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Nishioka, Takashi; Tanida, Hiroshi; Sera, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    The effect of electron doping by the substitution of Rh for Ru on unconventional magnetic order in CeRu2Al10 was investigated via neutron powder diffraction. In Ce(Ru1 xRhx)2Al10 with x = 0.05, 0.12, and 0.2, reorientation of the ordered moment from the c-axis as in pure CeRu2Al10 to the a-axis takes place in all samples, while the ordering vector q 0; 1; 0 remains unchanged within this concentration range. The moment reorientation is accompanied by an increase in its size by a factor of 2.4, from = 0.43 B at x = 0 to = 1.06, 1.04, and 1.02 B for x = 0.05, 0.12, and 0.2, respectively. The continuous decrease in the N el temperature T0(TN), despite an abrupt increase in , underlines the strong anisotropy in the exchange interaction in CeRu2Al10 and the fact that this anisotropy is easily suppressed by electron doping. 1.

  10. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of RuFe{sub 3}N nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, A.V. dos; Kuhnen, C.A.

    2009-11-15

    Self-consistent band structure calculations were performed on nitride RuFe{sub 3}N in order to investigate its magnetic and ground state properties. The Linear Muffin-Tin Orbital (LMTO) method was employed and calculations were performed at several lattice parameters so as to obtain the RuFe{sub 3}N equilibrium volume. Nonmagnetic and ferromagnetic LMTO calculations have shown that the RuFe{sub 3}N stable stage is ferromagnetic with constant lattice equilibrium of 7.2502 atomic units (a.u.). At equilibrium volume the LMTO calculations have given magnetic moments of 1.25 and 1.63 mu{sub B} at Ru and Fe sites, respectively, and no magnetic moment at N sites. The analysis of states density at equilibrium volume as well as the results for charge transfer illustrates why this ruthenium nitride is ferromagnetic. The LMTO calculations anticipate that the magnetic moment, the hyperfine field (the Fermi contact) and the isomer shift show a strong dependence on the lattice spacing. - Graphical Abstract: Total energy curves, versus lattice spacing for the RuFe{sub 3}N nitride. It is observed an energy difference between ferromagnetic and paramagnetic states, which provides high critic pressure.

  11. The series of carbon-chain complexes {Ru(dppe)Cp*}?{?-(C?C)x} (x = 48, 11): Synthesis, structures, properties and some reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce, Michael I.; Cole, Marcus L.; Ellis, Benjamin G.; Gaudio, Maryka; Nicholson, Brian K.; Parker, Christian R.; Skelton, Brian W.; White, Allan H.

    2015-01-28

    The construction of a series of compounds {Ru(dppe)Cp*}2(?-C2x) (Ru*-C2x-Ru*, x = 48, 11)) is described. A direct reaction between RuCl(dppe)Cp* and Me3Si(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)4SiMe3 afforded Ru*-C8-Ru* in 89% yield. The Pd(0)/Cu(I)-catalysed coupling of Ru{Ctriple bond; length of mdashCCtriple bond; length of mdashCAu(PPh3)}(dppe)Cp*Ru*-C4-Au (2 equiv.) with diiodoethyne gave Ru*-C10-Ru* (64%), or of 1 equiv. with I(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)3I gave Ru*-C14-Ru* (36%); similarly, Ru{(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)4Au(PPh3)}(dppe)Cp*Ru*-C8-Au and I(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)3I gave Ru*-C22-Ru* (12%). Desilylation (TBAF) of Ru{(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)xSiMe3}(dppe)Cp*Ru*-C2x-Si (x = 3, 4) followed by oxidative coupling [Cu(OAc)2/py] gave Ru*-C12-Ru* (82%) and Ru*-C16-Ru* (58%), respectively. Similar oxidative coupling of Ru(Ctriple bond; length of mdashCCtriple bond; length of mdashCH)(dppe)Cp* was a second route to Ru*-C8-Ru* (82%). Appropriate precursors are already known, or obtained by coupling of Ru*-C2x-Si (x = 2, 4) with AuCl(PPh3)/NaOMe [Ru*-C4-Au, 95%; Ru*-C8-Au, 74%] or from Pd(0)/Cu(I) catalysed coupling of Ru*-C2x-Au (x = 2, 3) with I(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)2SiMe3 (Ru*-C8-Si, 64%; Ru*-C10-Si, 2%). Reactions between Ru*-C2x-Ru* (x = 3, 4) and Fe2(CO)9 gave {Fe3(CO)9}{?3-CCtriple bond; length of mdashC[Ru(dppe)Cp*]}2Fe(C3-Ru*)2 and {Fe3(CO)9}{?3-CCtriple bond; length of mdashC[Ru(dppe)Cp*]}{?3-C(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)2[Ru(dppe)Cp*]} Fe(C3-Ru*)(C5-Ru*), respectively. The redox properties of the series of complexes with 2x = 216 were measured and showed a diminution of the separation of

  12. On the solubility of yttrium in RuO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Music, Denis; Zumdick, Naemi A.; Hallstedt, Bengt; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2011-09-01

    We have investigated the solubility of Y in rutile RuO{sub 2} using experimental and theoretical methods. Nanostructured Ru-Y-O thin films were synthesized via combinatorial reactive sputtering with an O/metal ratio of 2.6 and a Y content of 0.3 to 12.6 at. %. A solubility limit of 1.7 at. % was identified using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Based on ab initio and thermodynamic modeling, the solubility of Y can be understood. Smaller Y amounts are incorporated into the lattice, forming a metastable film, with local structural deformations due to size effects. As the Y content is increased, extensive local structural deformations are observed, but phase separation does not occur due to kinetic limitations. Nanostructured RuO{sub 2} alloyed with Y might lead to enhanced phonon scattering and quantum confinement effects, which in turn improve the thermoelectric efficiency.

  13. Catalytic Ionic Hydrogenation of Ketones by {[Cp*Ru(CO)2]2(? H)}+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fagan, Paul J.; Voges, Mark H.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2010-02-22

    {[Cp*Ru(CO)2]2(? H)}+OTf functions as a homogeneous catalyst precursor for hydrogenation of ketones to alcohols, with hydrogenations at 1 mol % catalyst loading at 90 C under H2 (820 psi) proceeding to completion and providing >90% yields. Hydrogenation of methyl levulinate generates ?-valerolactone, presumably by ring-closing of the initially formed alcohol with the methyl ester. Experiments in neat Et2C=O show that the catalyst loading can be <0.1 mole %, and that at least 1200 turnovers of the catalyst can be obtained. These reactions are proposed to proceed by an ionic hydrogenation pathway, with the highly acidic dihydrogen complex [Cp*Ru(CO)2(?2-H2)]+OTf- being formed under the reaction conditions from reaction of H2 with {[Cp*Ru(CO)2]2(? H)}+OTf .

  14. Ferromagnetic Kondo lattice CeRuSi{sub 2} with non-Fermi-liquid behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikiforov, V. N.; Baran, M.; Irkhin, V. Yu.

    2013-05-15

    The structure, electronic, thermodynamic, and magnetic properties of the CeRuSi{sub 2} Kondo lattice with ferromagnetic ordering characterized by a small moment of the ground state are investigated. Anomalies in the temperature dependences of heat capacity and resistivity (unusual power or logarithmic behavior) observed in the low-temperature range indicate a non-Fermi-liquid behavior. The results are compared with those for other Ce{sub l}Ru{sub n}X{sub m} compounds and anomalous systems based on rare-earth elements and actinides that had been studied earlier.

  15. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST OWN BU RNSIDE MILLSTONE FROSTBUR G JUN EAU PLU MVILLE CHERRY HILL KAN E BOSWELL MAR ION CENT ER CREEKSIDE SALTSBUR G POINT N BLAIR SVILL E COU NCIL RU N SIGEL LEWISVILLE BEAR C REEK AR MBRUST OHIOPYLE HALLT ON BR OOKVILLE MAR KTON NOL O RAT HMEL COR SICA MAR CHAND SMIC KSBU RG HOWE APOLLO SEVEN SPRIN GS YAT ESBORO MCNEES LUCIND A GEORGE PIN EY LEEPER TIMBLIN WILL ET FERGUSON CLIMAX PANIC DAVY HILL TIDIOUT E GRAMPIAN SLIGO ROC KVI LLE

  16. Effects of varying CoCrV seed layer deposition pressure on Ru crystallinity in perpendicular magnetic recording media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joost, W. [Heraeus Materials Technology, Chandler, Arizona 85226 (United States); School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Das, A. [Heraeus Materials Technology, Chandler, Arizona 85226 (United States); Alford, T. L. [School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2009-10-01

    The effects of varying deposition parameters of a CoCrV seed layer under Ru on the structural and interfacial properties of both layers were studied. While sputtering power showed little effect on film structure, sputtering pressure during deposition of the seed layer had a significant effect on the structural properties of the seed layer. In particular, the grain morphology and crystallinity of the seed layer varied considerably with deposition pressure. Deposition of Ru using a constant recipe for all samples demonstrated the effect of varying seed layer deposition pressure on the Ru layer. The strain energy of the Ru film, a measurement of contraction due to the registry with the seed layer, was greatest at moderate seed layer sputtering pressures, while the Ru(0002) peak area was greatest at low sputtering pressures. The competing contributions of interfacial energy and strain energy describe this effect, with interfacial energy dominating at low sputtering pressures.

  17. Heteroepitaxial growth of highly conductive metal oxide RuO{sub 2} thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Q.X.; Wu, X.D.; Foltyn, S.R.; Findikoglu, A.T.; Tiwari, P.; Zheng, J.P.; Jow, T.R.

    1995-09-18

    Highly conductive ruthenium oxide (RuO{sub 2}) has been epitaxially grown on LaAlO{sub 3} substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The RuO{sub 2} film is ({ital h}00) oriented normal to the substrate surface. The heteroepitaxial growth of RuO{sub 2} on LaAlO{sub 3} is demonstrated by the strong in-plane orientation of thin films with respect to the major axes of the substrate. High crystallinity of RuO{sub 2} thin films is also determined from Rutherford backscattering channeling measurements. Electrical measurements on the RuO{sub 2} thin films demonstrate a quite low room-temperature resistivity of 35{plus_minus}2 {mu}{Omega} cm at deposition temperatures of above 500 {degree}C. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  18. NiW and NiRu Bimetallic Catalysts for Ethylene Steam Reforming: Alternative Mechanisms for Sulfur Resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rangan, M.; Yung, M. M.; Medlin, J. W.

    2012-06-01

    Previous investigations of Ni-based catalysts for the steam reforming of hydrocarbons have indicated that the addition of a second metal can reduce the effects of sulfur poisoning. Two systems that have previously shown promise for such applications, NiW and NiRu, are considered here for the steam reforming of ethylene, a key component of biomass derived tars. Monometallic and bimetallic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported Ni and W catalysts were employed for ethylene steam reforming in the presence and absence of sulfur. The NiW catalysts were less active than Ni in the absence of sulfur, but were more active in the presence of 50 ppm H{sub 2}S. The mechanism for the W-induced improvements in sulfur resistance appears to be different from that for Ru in NiRu. To probe reasons for the sulfur resistance of NiRu, the adsorption of S and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} on several bimetallic NiRu alloy surfaces ranging from 11 to 33 % Ru was studied using density functional theory (DFT). The DFT studies reveal that sulfur adsorption is generally favored on hollow sites containing Ru. Ethylene preferentially adsorbs atop the Ru atom in all the NiRu (111) alloys investigated. By comparing trends across the various bimetallic models considered, sulfur adsorption was observed to be correlated with the density of occupied states near the Fermi level while C{sub 2}H{sub 4} adsorption was correlated with the number of unoccupied states in the d-band. The diverging mechanisms for S and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} adsorption allow for bimetallic surfaces such as NiRu that enhance ethylene binding without accompanying increases in sulfur binding energy. In contrast, bimetallics such as NiSn and NiW appear to decrease the affinity of the surface for both the reagent and the poison.

  19. MgO-Supported Cluster Catalysts with Pt-Ru Interactions Prepared from Pt3Ru6(CO)21(u3-H)(u-H)3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chotisuwan,S.; Wittapyakun, J.; Lobo-Lapidus, R.; Gates, B.

    2007-01-01

    Bimetallic MgO-supported catalysts were prepared by adsorption of Pt{sub 3}Ru{sub 6}(CO){sub 21}({mu}{sub 3}-H)({mu}-H){sub 3} on porous MgO. Characterization of the supported clusters by infrared (IR) spectroscopy showed that the adsorbed species were still in the form of metal carbonyls. The supported clusters were decarbonylated by treatment in flowing helium at 300 C, as shown by IR and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data, and the resulting supported PtRu clusters were shown by EXAFS spectroscopy to have metal frames that retained Pt-Ru bonds but were slightly restructured relative to those of the precursor; the average cluster size was almost unchanged as a result of the decarbonylation. These are among the smallest reported bimetallic clusters of group-8 metals. The decarbonylated sample catalyzed ethylene hydrogenation with an activity similar to that reported previously for {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported clusters prepared in nearly the same way and having nearly the same structure. Both samples were also active for n-butane hydrogenolysis, with the MgO-supported catalyst being more active than the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported catalyst.

  20. Influence of nanostructure on charge transport in RuO{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steeves, M. M.; Lad, R. J.

    2010-07-15

    Polycrystalline thin films of RuO{sub 2} were grown on fused-quartz substrates and a parametric study was carried out to probe the influence of film nanostructure on the four-point Van der Pauw resistivity and Hall coefficient. The films were grown via reactive rf magnetron sputtering of a Ru target in an Ar/O{sub 2} plasma using deposition rates from 0.27 to 3.5 A/s and substrate temperatures from 16 to 500 deg. C Room-temperature resistivities of the RuO{sub 2} films ranged from 58 to 360 {mu}{Omega} cm. Upon first heating following deposition, some films showed decreasing resistivity with increasing temperature, but the resistivities also decreased upon subsequent cooling suggesting that the annealing treatment reduces the film defect density. The temperature coefficient of resistance was found to be small (<0.001 K{sup -1}) in agreement with previous investigations. Hall coefficient measurements of the polycrystalline thin films demonstrated that either n-type or p-type majority carriers can be present depending on deposition conditions and the resulting nanostructure, in contrast to single-crystal RuO{sub 2}, which is an n-type metal. Grain size and homogeneous strain within the films were measured by x-ray diffraction and are correlated to the majority carrier type.

  1. Behavior of the Ru-bda water oxidation catalyst covalently anchored on glassy carbon electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matheu, Roc; Francs, Laia; Chernev, Petko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Batista, Victor; Haumann, Michael; Sala, Xavier; Llobet, Antoni

    2015-05-07

    Electrochemical reduction of the dizaonium complex, [RuII(bda)(NO)(NN2)2]3+, 23+ (NN22+ is 4-(pyridin-4-yl) benzenediazonium and bda2 is [2,2'-bipyridine]-6,6'-dicarboxylate), in acetone produces the covalent grafting of this molecular complex onto glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. Multiple cycling voltammetric experiments on the GC electrode generates hybrid materials labeled as GC-4, with the corresponding Ru-aqua complex anchored on the graphite surface. GC-4 has been characterized at pH = 7.0 by electrochemical techniques and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and has been shown to act as an active catalyst for the oxidation of water to dioxygen. This new hybrid material has a lower catalytic performance than its counterpart in homogeneous phase and progressively decomposes to form RuO2 at the electrode surface. The resulting metal oxide attached at the GC electrode surface, GC-RuO2, is a very fast and rugged heterogeneous water oxidation catalyst with TOFis of 300 s1 and TONs >45000. The observed performance is comparable to the best electrocatalysts reported so far, at neutral pH.

  2. Thermodynamics and superconductivity of Th7(Fe, Ru, Os, Co, Rh, Ir)3 system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, James L; Lashley, Jason C; Volz, Heather M; Fisher, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    Expanding the temperature range of previous specific-heat measurements on the Th7(Fe, Ru, Os, Co, Rh, Ir)3 system, we measure the effect of transition-metal substitution on total entropy (S{sub 298 k}), electronic specific heat ({gamma}), and Debye temperature ({Theta}D). In addition we measure the pressure dependence, up to 10 kbar, of the superconducting transition.

  3. Behavior of the Ru-bda water oxidation catalyst covalently anchored on glassy carbon electrodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Matheu, Roc; Francàs, Laia; Chernev, Petko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Batista, Victor; Haumann, Michael; Sala, Xavier; Llobet, Antoni

    2015-05-07

    Electrochemical reduction of the dizaonium complex, [RuII(bda)(NO)(N–N2)2]3+, 23+ (N–N22+ is 4-(pyridin-4-yl) benzenediazonium and bda2– is [2,2'-bipyridine]-6,6'-dicarboxylate), in acetone produces the covalent grafting of this molecular complex onto glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. Multiple cycling voltammetric experiments on the GC electrode generates hybrid materials labeled as GC-4, with the corresponding Ru-aqua complex anchored on the graphite surface. GC-4 has been characterized at pH = 7.0 by electrochemical techniques and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and has been shown to act as an active catalyst for the oxidation of water to dioxygen. This new hybrid material has a lower catalytic performance than its counterpartmore » in homogeneous phase and progressively decomposes to form RuO2 at the electrode surface. The resulting metal oxide attached at the GC electrode surface, GC-RuO2, is a very fast and rugged heterogeneous water oxidation catalyst with TOFis of 300 s–1 and TONs >45000. The observed performance is comparable to the best electrocatalysts reported so far, at neutral pH.« less

  4. Behavior of the Ru-bda water oxidation catalyst covalently anchored on glassy carbon electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matheu, Roc; Francàs, Laia; Chernev, Petko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Batista, Victor; Haumann, Michael; Sala, Xavier; Llobet, Antoni

    2015-05-07

    Electrochemical reduction of the dizaonium complex, [RuII(bda)(NO)(N–N2)2]3+, 23+ (N–N22+ is 4-(pyridin-4-yl) benzenediazonium and bda2– is [2,2'-bipyridine]-6,6'-dicarboxylate), in acetone produces the covalent grafting of this molecular complex onto glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. Multiple cycling voltammetric experiments on the GC electrode generates hybrid materials labeled as GC-4, with the corresponding Ru-aqua complex anchored on the graphite surface. GC-4 has been characterized at pH = 7.0 by electrochemical techniques and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and has been shown to act as an active catalyst for the oxidation of water to dioxygen. This new hybrid material has a lower catalytic performance than its counterpart in homogeneous phase and progressively decomposes to form RuO2 at the electrode surface. The resulting metal oxide attached at the GC electrode surface, GC-RuO2, is a very fast and rugged heterogeneous water oxidation catalyst with TOFis of 300 s–1 and TONs >45000. The observed performance is comparable to the best electrocatalysts reported so far, at neutral pH.

  5. Electrocatalytic Reduction of Carbon Dioxide with a Well-Defined PN 3 -Ru Pincer Complex

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Min, Shixiong; Rasul, Shahid; Li, Huaifeng; Grills, David C.; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Li, Lain-Jong; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2015-11-13

    We established a well-defined PN3-Ru pincer complex (5) bearing a redox-active bipyridine ligand with an aminophosphine arm as an effective and stable molecular electrocatalyst for CO2 reduction to CO and HCOOH with negligible formation of H2 in a H2O/MeCN mixture.

  6. Influence of Electron Doping on Magnetic Order in CeRu2Al10

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kobayashi, Riki; Kaneko, Koji; Saito, Kotaro; Mignot, Jean-Michel; André, Gilles; Robert, Julien; Wakimoto, Shuichi; Matsuda, Masaaki; Chi, Songxue; Haga, Yoshinori; et al

    2014-09-17

    The effect of electron doping by the substitution of Rh for Ru on unconventional magnetic order in CeRu2Al10 was investigated via neutron powder diffraction. In Ce(Ru1-xRhx)2Al10 with x = 0.05, 0.12, and 0.2, reorientation of the ordered moment from the c- to the a-axis takes place in all samples, while the ordering vector q=(0 1 0) remains unchanged within this concentration range. The moment reorientation is accompanied by an enhancement in its size by a factor of ~2.4, from μ=0.43 μB at x=0 to μ =1.06, 1.04, and 1.02 μB for x=0.05, 0.12 and 0.2, respectively. The continuous decrease inmore » N´eel temperature T0(TN), despite an abrupt increase in μ , underlines the strong anisotropy in the exchange interaction in CeRu2Al10, and the fact that this anisotropy is easily suppressed by electron doping.« less

  7. Theoretical calculations for structural, elastic, and thermodynamic properties of RuN{sub 2} under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Bing; Zhou, Xiao-Lin E-mail: lkworld@126.com; Chang, Jing; Liu, Ke E-mail: lkworld@126.com

    2014-08-07

    The structural and elastic properties of RuN{sub 2} were investigated through the first-principles calculation using generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and local density approximation (LDA) within the plane-wave pseudopotential density functional theory. The obtained equilibrium structure and mechanical properties are in excellent agreement with other theoretical results. Then we compared the elastic modulus of RuN{sub 2} with several other isomorphic noble metal nitrides. Results show that RuN{sub 2} can nearly rival with OsN{sub 2} and IrN{sub 2}, which indicate RuN{sub 2} is a potentially ultra-incompressible and hard material. By the elastic stability criteria, it is predicted that RuN{sub 2} is stable in our calculations (0–100 GPa). The calculated B/G ratios indicate that RuN{sub 2} possesses brittle nature at 0 GPa and when the pressure increases to 13.4 GPa (for LDA) or 20.8 GPa (for GGA), it begins to prone to ductility. Through the quasi-harmonic Debye model, we also investigated the thermodynamic properties of RuN{sub 2}.

  8. Structural and Architectural Evaluation of Bimetallic Nanoparticles: A Case Study of Pt−Ru Core−Shell and Alloy Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alayoglu, S.; Zavalij, P; Eichhorn, B; Wang, Q; Frenkel, A; Chupas, P

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive structural/architectural evaluation of the PtRu (1:1) alloy and Ru at Pt core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) provides spatially resolved structural information on sub-5 nm NPs. A combination of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), pair distribution function (PDF) analyses, Debye function simulations of X-ray diffraction (XRD), and field emission transmission electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (FE-TEM/EDS) analyses provides complementary information used to construct a detailed picture of the core/shell and alloy nanostructures. The 4.4 nm PtRu (1:1) alloys are crystalline homogeneous random alloys with little twinning in a typical face-centered cubic (fcc) cell. The Pt atoms are predominantly metallic, whereas the Ru atoms are partially oxidized and are presumably located on the NP surface. The 4.0 nm Ru at Pt NPs have highly distorted hcp Ru cores that are primarily in the metallic state but show little order beyond 8 A. In contrast, the 1-2 monolayer thick Pt shells are relatively crystalline but are slightly distorted (compressed) relative to bulk fcc Pt. The homo- and heterometallic coordination numbers and bond lengths are equal to those predicted by the model cluster structure, showing that the Ru and Pt metals remain phase-separated in the core and shell components and that the interface between the core and shell is quite normal.

  9. Simulating Ru L3-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Model Complexes and Electron Localization in Mixed-Valence Metal Dimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiken, Benjamin E. Van; Valiev, Marat; Daifuku, Stephanie L.; Bannan, Caitlin; Strader, Matthew L.; Cho, Hana; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Govind, Niranjan; Khalil, Munira

    2013-04-26

    Ruthenium L3-edge X-ray absorption (XA) spectroscopy probes unoccupied 4d orbitals of the metal atom and is increasingly being used to investigate the local electronic structure in ground and excited electronic states of Ru complexes. The simultaneous development of computational tools for simulating Ru L3-edge spectra is crucial for interpreting the spectral features at a molecular level. This study demonstrates that time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is a viable and predictive tool for simulating ruthenium L3-edge XA spectroscopy. We systematically investigate the effects of exchange correlation functional and implicit and explicit solvent interactions on a series of RuII and RuIII complexes in their ground and electronic excited states. The TDDFT simulations reproduce all of the experimentally observed features in Ru L3-edge XA spectra within the experimental resolution (0.4 eV). Our simulations identify ligand-specific charge transfer features in complicated Ru L3-edge spectra of [Ru(CN)6]4- and RuII polypyridyl complexes illustrating the advantage of using TDDFT in complex systems. We conclude that the B3LYP functional most accurately predicts the transition energies of charge transfer features in these systems. We use our TDDFT approach to simulate experimental Ru L3-edge XA spectra of transition metal mixed-valence dimers of the form [(NC)5MII-CN-RuIII(NH3)5] (where M = Fe or Ru) dissolved in water. Our study determines the spectral signatures of electron delocalization in Ru L3-edge XA spectra. We find that the inclusion of explicit solvent molecules is necessary for reproducing the spectral features and the experimentally determined valencies in these mixed-valence complexes. This study validates the use of TDDFT for simulating Ru 2p excitations using popular quantum chemistry codes and providing a powerful interpretive tool for equilibrium and ultrafast Ru L3-edge XA spectroscopy.

  10. Oblique-incidence sputtering of Ru intermediate layer for decoupling of intergranular exchange in perpendicular recording media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Shin; Inoue, Ken; Takahashi, Migaku

    2011-04-01

    During the Ru deposition process for granular type perpendicular magnetic recording media, both a reduction in the Ru intermediate layer thickness and lowering of sputtering gas pressure were successfully achieved by focusing on a self-shadowing effect. Oblique-incidence sputtering with a 60 deg. incident angle under an Ar gas pressure of 0.6 Pa yielded (1) columnar Ru grains with a growth direction of 30 deg. from the film normal, (2) c-plane sheet texture by epitaxial growth on the Pt underlayer, and (3) a flat envelope of the surface and a deep gap at grain boundaries. This change in the Ru structure significantly contributes to reducing exchange coupling among magnetic grains, especially in the initial growth region in an overlying granular medium.

  11. The nature and role of bridged carbonyl intermediates in theultrafast photo-induced rearrangement of Ru3(CO)12.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glascoe, Elizabeth A.; Kling, Matthias F.; Shanoski, Jennifer E.; Harris, Charles B.

    2005-09-18

    The photochemistry of the trimetal cluster,Ru(3)(CO)12, was investigated on the ultrafast timescale using UV-vis pump, infrared probe spectroscopy in order to study the transient intermediates formed upon photoexcitation.

  12. Sr{sub 4}Ru{sub 6}ClO{sub 18}, a new Ru{sup 4+/5+} oxy-chloride, solved by precession electron diffraction: Electric and magnetic behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roussel, Pascal; Palatinus, Lukas; Belva, Frdric; Daviero-Minaud, Sylvie; Mentre, Olivier; Huve, Marielle

    2014-04-01

    The crystal structure of Sr{sub 4}Ru{sub 6}ClO{sub 18}, a new Ru{sup 4+/5+} oxo-chloride, has been determined from Precession Electron Diffraction (PED) data acquired on a nanocrystal in a transmission electron microscope using the technique of electron diffraction tomography. This approach is described in details following a pedagogic route and a systematic comparison is made of this rather new method with other experimental methods of electron diffraction, and with the standard single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. Both transport and magnetic measurements, showed a transition at low temperature that may be correlated to Ru{sup 4+}/Ru{sup 5+} charge ordering. - Graphical abstract: Structure of Sr{sub 4}Ru{sub 6}ClO{sub 18}, determined using Precession Electron Diffraction data. - Highlights: Structure of Sr{sub 4}Ru{sub 6}ClO{sub 18} was solved ab initio using precession electron diffraction. This was done both on a nanometric sample and on a micrometric one. Different type of experimental methods of electron diffraction are compared. Single crystal X-ray diffraction was used to confirm the results. Transport properties were characterized and show exotic behavior.

  13. Pulsed laser deposition and characterization of conductive RuO{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iembo, A.; Fuso, F.; Arimondo, E.; Ciofi, C.; Pennelli, G.; Curro, G.M.; Neri, F.; Allegrini, M. |

    1997-06-01

    RuO{sub 2} thin films have been produced on silicon-based substrates by {ital in situ} pulsed laser deposition for the first time. The electrical properties, the surface characteristics, the crystalline structure, and the film-substrate interface of deposited samples have been investigated by 4-probe resistance versus temperature technique, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The films show good electrical properties. The RuO{sub 2}-substrate interface is very thin ({approx}3 nm), since not degraded by any annealing process. These two characteristics render our films suitable to be used as electrodes in PZT-based capacitors.{copyright} {ital 1997 Materials Research Society.}

  14. Upper limit on spontaneous supercurrents in Sr2RuO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Suk Bum

    2010-04-05

    It is widely believed that the perovskite Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} is an unconventional superconductor with broken time reversal symmetry. It has been predicted that superconductors with broken time reversal symmetry should have spontaneously generated supercurrents at edges and domain walls. We have done careful imaging of the magnetic fields above Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} single crystals using scanning Hall bar and SQUID microscopies, and see no evidence for such spontaneously generated supercurrents. We use the results from our magnetic imaging to place upper limits on the spontaneously generated supercurrents at edges and domain walls as a function of domain size. For a single domain, this upper limit is below the predicted signal by two orders of magnitude. We speculate on the causes and implications of the lack of large spontaneous supercurrents in this very interesting superconducting system.

  15. Correlation between microstructure and thermionic electron emission from Os-Ru thin films on dispenser cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swartzentruber, Phillip D.; John Balk, Thomas; Effgen, Michael P.

    2014-07-01

    Osmium-ruthenium films with different microstructures were deposited onto dispenser cathodes and subjected to 1000 h of close-spaced diode testing. Tailored microstructures were achieved by applying substrate biasing during deposition, and these were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy before and after close-spaced diode testing. Knee temperatures determined from the close-spaced diode test data were used to evaluate cathode performance. Cathodes with a large (10-11) Os-Ru film texture possessed comparatively low knee temperatures. Furthermore, a low knee temperature correlated with a low effective work function as calculated from the close-spaced diode data. It is proposed that the formation of strong (10-11) texture is responsible for the superior performance of the cathode with a multilayered Os-Ru coating.

  16. Manipulating Magnetism: Ru-2(5+) Paddlewheels Devoid of Axial Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiarella, Gina M [Texas A& M University; Cotton, F. A. [Texas A& M University; Murillo, Carlos A [Texas A& M University; Ventura, Karen [University of Texas at El Paso; Vilagran, Dino [University of Texas at El Paso; Wang, Xiaoping [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Variable-temperature magnetic and structural data of two pairs of diruthenium isomers, one pair having an axial ligand and the formula Ru-2(DArF)(4)Cl (where DArF is the anion of a diarylformamidine isomer and Ar = p-anisyl or m-anisyl) and the other one being essentially identical but devoid of axial ligands and having the formula [Ru-2(DArF)(4)]BF4, show that the axial ligand has a significant effect on the electronic structure of the diruthenium unit. Variable temperature crystallographic and magnetic data as well as density functional theory calculations unequivocally demonstrate the occurrence of pi interactions between the p orbitals of the chlorine ligand and the pi* orbitals in the Ru-2(5+) units. The magnetic and structural data are consistent with the existence of combined ligand sigma/metal sigma and ligand p pi/metal-d pi interactions. Electron paramagnetic resonance data show unambiguously that the unpaired electrons are in metal-based molecular orbitals.

  17. Characteristics of conductive SrRuO{sub 3} thin films with different microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Q.X.; Chu, F.; Adams, C.D.; Wu, X.D.; Hawley, M.; Cho, J.H.; Findikoglu, A.T.; Foltyn, S.R.; Smith, J.L.; Mitchell, T.E.

    1996-09-01

    Conductive SrRuO{sub 3} thin films were epitaxially grown on (100) LaAlO{sub 3} substrates by pulsed laser deposition over a temperature range from 650{degree}C to 825{degree}C. Well-textured films exhibiting a strong orientation relationship to the underlying substrate could be obtained at a deposition temperature as low as 450{degree}C. The degree of crystallinity of the films improved with increasing deposition temperature as confirmed by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy revealed no particulates on the film surface. The resistivity of the SrRuO{sub 3} thin films was found to be a strong function of the crystallinity of the film and hence the substrate temperature during film deposition. A residual resistivity ratio (RRR={rho}{sub 300K}/{rho}{sub 4.2K}) of more than 8 was obtained for the SrRuO{sub 3} thin films deposited under optimized processing conditions. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  18. Catalytic Ionic Hydrogenation of Ketones by {[Cp*Ru(CO)2]2(-H)}+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullock, R.M.; Fagan, P.J.; Voges, M.H.

    2010-02-22

    {l_brace}[Cp*Ru(CO){sub 2}]{sub 2}({mu}-H){r_brace}{sup +}OTf{sup -} functions as a homogeneous catalyst precursor for hydrogenation of ketones to alcohols, with hydrogenations at 1 mol % catalyst loading at 90 C under H{sub 2} (820 psi) proceeding to completion and providing >90% yields. Hydrogenation of methyl levulinate generates {gamma}-valerolactone, presumably by ring-closing of the initially formed alcohol with the methyl ester. Experiments in neat Et{sub 2}C=O show that the catalyst loading can be <0.1 mol % and that at least 1200 turnovers of the catalyst can be obtained. These reactions are proposed to proceed by an ionic hydrogenation pathway, with the highly acidic dihydrogen complex [Cp*Ru(CO){sub 2}({eta}{sup 2}-H{sub 2})]{sup +}OTf{sup -} being formed under the reaction conditions from reaction of H2 with {l_brace}[Cp*Ru(CO){sub 2}]{sub 2}({mu}-H){r_brace}{sup +}OTf{sup -}.

  19. A dual model HU conversion from MRI intensity values within and outside of bone segment for MRI-based radiotherapy treatment planning of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korhonen, Juha; Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB-180, 00029 HUS ; Kapanen, Mika; Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB-180, 00029 HUS; Department of Medical Physics, Tampere University Hospital, POB-2000, 33521 Tampere ; Keyrilinen, Jani; Seppl, Tiina; Tenhunen, Mikko

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The lack of electron density information in magnetic resonance images (MRI) poses a major challenge for MRI-based radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). In this study the authors convert MRI intensity values into Hounsfield units (HUs) in the male pelvis and thus enable accurate MRI-based RTP for prostate cancer patients with varying tissue anatomy and body fat contents. Methods: T{sub 1}/T{sub 2}*-weighted MRI intensity values and standard computed tomography (CT) image HUs in the male pelvis were analyzed using image data of 10 prostate cancer patients. The collected data were utilized to generate a dual model HU conversion technique from MRI intensity values of the single image set separately within and outside of contoured pelvic bones. Within the bone segment local MRI intensity values were converted to HUs by applying a second-order polynomial model. This model was tuned for each patient by two patient-specific adjustments: MR signal normalization to correct shifts in absolute intensity level and application of a cutoff value to accurately represent low density bony tissue HUs. For soft tissues, such as fat and muscle, located outside of the bone contours, a threshold-based segmentation method without requirements for any patient-specific adjustments was introduced to convert MRI intensity values into HUs. The dual model HU conversion technique was implemented by constructing pseudo-CT images for 10 other prostate cancer patients. The feasibility of these images for RTP was evaluated by comparing HUs in the generated pseudo-CT images with those in standard CT images, and by determining deviations in MRI-based dose distributions compared to those in CT images with 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with the anisotropic analytical algorithm and 360 volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with the Voxel Monte Carlo algorithm. Results: The average HU differences between the constructed pseudo-CT images and standard CT images of each

  20. Surfactant-thermal method to synthesize a new Zn(II)-trimesic MOF with confined Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Hui; Gao, Junkuo; Wang, Jiangpeng; Qian, Xuefeng; Song, Ruijing; Cui, Yuanjing; Yang, Yu; Qian, Guodong

    2015-03-15

    A surfactant-thermal method was used to prepare a new zinc-1,3,5-benzentricarboxylate-based metal-organic framework (ZJU-100) with confined Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} (RuBpy) complex by using surfactant PEG 400 as reaction medium. The RuBpy molecules were encapsulated between the 2-D sheets in ZJU-100. ZJU-100 showed bathochromic shift in the steady-state emission spectrum and increased emission lifetimes relative to RuBpy molecules. The extended lifetime is attributed to the reduced nonradiative decay rate due to the stabilization of RuBpy within the rigid MOF framework. These results represent the first example of MOF with confined complex synthesized by surfactant, indicating that the surfactant-thermal method could offer exciting opportunities for preparing new MOFs host/guest materials with novel structures and interesting luminescent properties. - Graphical abstract: A surfactant-thermal method was used to prepare a new zinc-1,3,5-benzentricarboxylate-based metal-organic framework (ZJU-100) with confined Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} (RuBpy) complex by using surfactant PEG 400 as reaction medium. - Highlights: • Surfactant-thermal synthesis of crystalline metal-organic framework host/guest materials. • RuBpy molecules were encapsulated between the 2-D sheets of MOFs. • Extended lifetime is observed due to the stabilization of RuBpy within the rigid MOF framework.

  1. High antiferromagnetic transition temperature of a honeycomb compound SrRu2O6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Wei; Svoboda, Chris; Ochi, M.; Matsuda, M.; Cao, Huibo; Cheng, J. -G.; Sales, B. C.; Mandrus, D.; Arita, R.; Trivedi, Nandini; Yan, Jiaqiang

    2015-09-14

    We study the high-temperature magnetic order in a quasi-two-dimensional honeycomb compound SrRu2O6 by measuring magnetization and neutron powder diffraction with both polarized and unpolarized neutrons. SrRu2O6 crystallizes into the hexagonal lead antimonate (PbSb2O6, space group P31m) structure with layers of edge-sharing RuO6 octahedra separated by Sr2+ ions. SrRu2O6 is found to order at TN = 565 K with Ru moments coupled antiferromagnetically both in plane and out of plane. The magnetic moment is 1.30(2) ?B/Ru at room temperature and is along the crystallographic c axis in the G-type magnetic structure. We perform density functional calculations with constrained random-phase approximation (RPA) to obtain the electronic structure and effective intra- and interorbital interaction parameters. The projected density of states shows strong hybridization between Ru 4d and O 2p. By downfolding to the target t2g bands we extract the effective magnetic Hamiltonian and perform Monte Carlo simulations to determine the transition temperature as a function of interand intraplane couplings. We find a weak interplane coupling, 3% of the strong intraplane coupling, permits three-dimensional magnetic order at the observed TN .

  2. Features of the band structure and conduction mechanisms in the n-HfNiSn semiconductor heavily doped with Ru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romaka, V. A.; Rogl, P.; Romaka, V. V.; Stadnyk, Yu. V.; Korzh, R. O.; Krayovskyy, V. Ya.; Horyn, A. M.

    2014-12-15

    The crystal and electronic structure and energy and kinetic properties of the n-HfNiSn semiconductor heavily doped with a Ru acceptor impurity are investigated in the temperature and Ru concentration ranges T = 80400 K and N{sub A}{sup Ru} ? 9.5 10{sup 19}?5.7 10{sup 20} cm{sup ?3} (x = 00.03), respectively. The mechanism of structural-defect generation is established, which changes the band gap and degree of compensation of the semiconductor and consists in the simultaneous concentration reduction and elimination of donor structural defects by means of the displacement of ?1% of Ni atoms from the Hf (4a) positions, the generation of acceptor structural defects upon the substitution of Ru atoms for Ni atoms in the 4c positions, and the generation of donor defects in the form of vacancies in the Sn (4b) positions. The calculated electronic structure of HfNi{sub 1?x}Ru{sub x}Sn is consistent with the experiment. The results obtained are discussed within the Shklovsky-Efros model for a heavily doped and compensated semiconductor.

  3. Observation of large magnetocaloric effect in HoRu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paramanik, Tapas Das, Kalipada; Das, I.

    2014-02-28

    Detailed magnetic, magnetotransport, and magnetocaloric measurements on HoRu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} have been performed. In this Letter, we report presence of spin reorientation transition below paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic transition temperature (T{sub N} = 19 K). Large magnetic entropy change 9.1 J/kg K and large negative magnetoresistance ∼21% in a magnetic field of 5 T has been observed around T{sub N}, which is associated with field induced spin-flip metamagnetic transition.

  4. Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3}: Crystal growth and some properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borshchevsky, A.; Fleurial, J.P.

    1993-10-01

    Large samples of Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} were grown from Ge-rich off-stoichiometric melts at a temperature close to 1,460 C by a vertical gradient freeze method in graphite and glassy carbon crucibles. Diffusionless transition from high temperature tetragonal structure to low temperature orthorhombic structure causes twinning and crack formation. Thermal expansion coefficients of both low and high temperature phases were measured. Some electrical transport properties in the 25--1,000 C temperature range in different crystallographic directions are also described for this high temperature semiconductor. Substantial anisotropy is observed.

  5. Coupling reactions of phenylacetylene with water, hydrogen sulfide and primary amines mediated by a Ru(II) phenylvinylidene complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bianchini, C.; Peruzzini, M.; Zanobini, F. [Istituto per lo Studio della Stereochimica ed Energetica dei Composti di Coordinazione, Florence (Italy)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The Ru(II) fragment [(PNP)RuCl{sub 2}] assists the reaction of phenylacetylene with water, hydrogen sulfide and primary amines to give carbonyl, {eta}{sup 1}-benzylthioaldehyde, and isonitrile complexes, respectively [PNP = CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PPh{sub 2}){sub 2}]. In all of these processes, the reaction is initiated by the 1-alkyne to vinylidene tautomerization at the Ru(II) center, followed by attack of the H{sub 2}Z molecule (Z = O, S, NR) on the vinylidene ligand. The mechanisms which account for these transformations have been completely elucidated and several of the intermediates in these reactions have been isolated and fully characterized. The scope of these reactions in view of their potential applications in organic syntheses involving thioaldehydes and optically pure isonitriles will be briefly presented.

  6. Ru/FeCoB double layered film with high in-plane magnetic anisotropy field of 500 Oe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirata, Ken-ichiro; Hashimoto, Atsuto; Matsuu, Toshimitsu; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2009-04-01

    FeCoB layers prepared on Ru underlayer possess a high saturation magnetization M{sub s} and a high in-plane magnetic anisotropy filed H{sub k}. Effects of preparation conditions were investigated. Low Ar gas pressure condition and thicker film thickness were effective to attain distortion of FeCo crystallite. As the crystallinity of Ru underlayer became higher, higher H{sub k} was induced. The accumulation of anisotropic stress in the film caused by the oblique incidences of depositing atoms with high energy seems to be one of the important effects to attain high anisotropy field. It was succeeded to prepare the Ru/FeCoB film with high H{sub k} of 500 Oe.

  7. Coupled Nd and B' spin ordering in the double perovskites Nd2NaB'O6 (B' = Ru, Os)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aczel, Adam A; Bugaris, Dan; Yeon, Jeongho; Dela Cruz, Clarina R; Zur Loye, Hans-Conrad; Nagler, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    We present a neutron powder diffraction study of the monoclinic double perovskite systems Nd$_2$NaB$'$O$_6$ (B$'$~$=$~Ru, Os), with magnetic atoms occupying both the A and B$'$ sites. Our measurements reveal coupled spin ordering between the Nd and B$'$ atoms with magnetic transition temperatures of 14~K for Nd$_2$NaRuO$_6$ and 16~K for Nd$_2$NaOsO$_6$. There is a Type I antiferromagnetic structure associated with the Ru and Os sublattices, with the ferromagnetic planes stacked along the c-axis and [110] direction respectively, while the Nd sublattices exhibit complex, canted antiferromagnetism with different spin arrangements in each system.

  8. Multifold Seebeck increase in RuO{sub 2} films by quantum-guided lanthanide dilute alloying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Music, Denis Basse, Felix H.-U.; Schneider, Jochen M.; Han, Liang; Borca-Tasciuc, Theo; Devender; Gengler, Jamie J.; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Ramanath, Ganpati

    2014-02-03

    Ab initio predictions indicating that alloying RuO{sub 2} with La, Eu, or Lu can increase the Seebeck coefficient ? manifold due to quantum confinement effects are validated in sputter-deposited La-alloyed RuO{sub 2} films showing fourfold ? increase. Combinatorial screening reveals that ? enhancement correlates with La-induced lattice distortion, which also decreases the thermal conductivity twentyfold, conducive for high thermoelectric figures of merit. These insights should facilitate the rational design of high efficiency oxide-based thermoelectrics through quantum-guided alloying.

  9. Strain relaxation in epitaxial SrRuO{sub 3} thin films on LaAlO{sub 3} substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, M.; Du, H.; Dai, C.; Lin, Y.; Ma, C. R.; Liu, M.; Collins, G.; Zhang, Y. M.; Chen, C. L.

    2013-09-30

    Strain relaxation behavior of epitaxial SrRuO{sub 3} thin films on (001) LaAlO{sub 3} substrates was investigated using high resolution X-ray diffraction. Lattice distortion and dislocation densities were systematically studied with samples under different growth conditions. Reciprocal space maps reveal different strain relaxation behavior in SrRuO{sub 3} thin films grown at different temperatures. Two kinds of strain relaxation mechanisms were proposed to understand the growth dynamics, including the evolution of threading dislocations and the tilt of crystalline planes.

  10. Growth of epitaxial (Sr,Ba){sub n+1}Ru{sub n}O{sub 3n+1} films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlom, D.G.; Knapp, S.B.; Wozniak, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering] [and others

    1997-12-01

    We have grown epitaxial (Sr,Ba) (n+1)Ru(n)O(3n+1) films, n = 1, 2, and infinity, by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and controlled their orientation by choosing appropriate substrates. The growth conditions yielding phase pure films have been mapped out. Resistivity versus temperature measurements show that both a and c axis films of Sr2RuO4 are metallic, but not superconducting. The latter is probably due to the presence of low-level impurities that are difficult to avoid given the target preparation process involved in growing these films by PLD.

  11. Spin-lozenge thermodynamics and magnetic excitations in Na3RuO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haraldsen, Jason T; Stone, Matthew B; Lumsden, Mark D; Barnes, Ted {F E }; Jin, Rongying; Taylor, J. W.; Fernandez-Alonso, F

    2009-01-01

    We report inelastic and elastic neutron scattering, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity measurements of polycrystalline sodium ruthenate (Na3RuO4). Previous work suggests this material consists of isolated tetramers of S = 3/2 Ru5+ ions in a so-called lozenge configuration. Using a Heisenberg antiferromagnet Hamiltonian, we analytically determine the energy eigenstates for general spin S. From this model, the neutron scattering cross-sections for excitations associated with spin-3/2 tetramer configurations is determined. Comparison of magnetic susceptibility and inelastic neutron scattering results shows that the proposed lozenge model is not distinctly supported, but provides evidence that the system may be better described as a pair of non-interacting inequivalent dimers, i.e double dimers. However, the existence of long-range magnetic order below Tc ≈ 28 K immediately questions such a description. Although no evidence of the lozenge model is observed, future studies on single crystals may further clarify the appropriate magnetic Hamiltonian.

  12. Influence of Electron Doping on Magnetic Order in CeRu2Al10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Riki; Kaneko, Koji; Saito, Kotaro; Mignot, Jean-Michel; André, Gilles; Robert, Julien; Wakimoto, Shuichi; Matsuda, Masaaki; Chi, Songxue; Haga, Yoshinori; Matsuda, Tatsuma D.; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Nishioka, Takashi; Matsumura, Masahiro; Tanida, Hiroshi; Sera, Masafumi

    2014-09-17

    The effect of electron doping by the substitution of Rh for Ru on unconventional magnetic order in CeRu2Al10 was investigated via neutron powder diffraction. In Ce(Ru1-xRhx)2Al10 with x = 0.05, 0.12, and 0.2, reorientation of the ordered moment from the c- to the a-axis takes place in all samples, while the ordering vector q=(0 1 0) remains unchanged within this concentration range. The moment reorientation is accompanied by an enhancement in its size by a factor of ~2.4, from μ=0.43 μB at x=0 to μ =1.06, 1.04, and 1.02 μB for x=0.05, 0.12 and 0.2, respectively. The continuous decrease in N´eel temperature T0(TN), despite an abrupt increase in μ , underlines the strong anisotropy in the exchange interaction in CeRu2Al10, and the fact that this anisotropy is easily suppressed by electron doping.

  13. Chemical Effect of Dry and Wet Cleaning of the Ru Protective Layer of the Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography Reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belau, Leonid; Park, Jeong Y.; Liang, Ted; Seo, Hyungtak; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2009-04-10

    The authors report the chemical influence of cleaning of the Ru capping layer on the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflector surface. The cleaning of EUV reflector to remove the contamination particles has two requirements: to prevent corrosion and etching of the reflector surface and to maintain the reflectivity functionality of the reflector after the corrosive cleaning processes. Two main approaches for EUV reflector cleaning, wet chemical treatments [sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide mixture (SPM), ozonated water, and ozonated hydrogen peroxide] and dry cleaning (oxygen plasma and UV/ozone treatment), were tested. The changes in surface morphology and roughness were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, while the surface etching and change of oxidation states were probed with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Significant surface oxidation of the Ru capping layer was observed after oxygen plasma and UV/ozone treatment, while the oxidation is unnoticeable after SPM treatment. Based on these surface studies, the authors found that SPM treatment exhibits the minimal corrosive interactions with Ru capping layer. They address the molecular mechanism of corrosive gas and liquid-phase chemical interaction with the surface of Ru capping layer on the EUV reflector.

  14. Intramolecular proton transfer boosts water oxidation catalyzed by a Ru complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matheu, Roc; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Benet-Buchholz, J.; Coronado, Eugenio; Batista, Victor S.; Sala, Xavier; Llobet, Antoni

    2015-07-30

    We introduce a new family of complexes with the general formula [Run(tda)(py)2]m+ (n = 2, m = 0, 1; n = 3, m = 1, 2+; n = 4, m = 2, 32+), with tda2– being [2,2':6',2"-terpyridine]-6,6"-dicarboxylate, including complex [RuIV(OH)(tda-κ-N3O)(py)2]+, 4H+, which we find to be an impressive water oxidation catalyst, formed by hydroxo coordination to 32+ under basic conditions. The complexes are synthesized, isolated, and thoroughly characterized by analytical, spectroscopic (UV–vis, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance), computational, and electrochemical techniques (cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry, coulometry), including solid-state monocrystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In oxidation state IV, the Ru center is seven-coordinated and diamagnetic, whereas in oxidation state II, the complex has an unbonded dangling carboxylate and is six-coordinated while still diamagnetic. With oxidation state III, the coordination number is halfway between the coordination of oxidation states II and IV. Species generated in situ have also been characterized by spectroscopic, computational, and electrochemical techniques, together with the related species derived from a different degree of protonation and oxidation states. 4H+ can be generated potentiometrically, or voltammetrically, from 32+, and both coexist in solution. While complex 32+ is not catalytically active, the catalytic performance of complex 4H+ is characterized by the foot of the wave analysis, giving an impressive turnover frequency record of 8000 s–1 at pH 7.0 and 50,000 s–1 at pH 10.0. Density functional theory calculations provide a complete description of the water oxidation catalytic cycle of 4H+, manifesting the key functional role of the dangling carboxylate in lowering

  15. Understanding the Electronic Structure of 4d Metal Complexes: From Molecular Spinors to L-Edge Spectra of a di-Ru Catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alperovich, Igor; Smolentsev, Grigory; Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Jurss, Jonah W.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Soldatov, Alexander; Pushkar, Yulia

    2015-09-17

    L{sub 2,3}-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has demonstrated unique capabilities for the analysis of the electronic structure of di-Ru complexes such as the blue dimer cis,cis-[Ru{sub 2}{sup III}O(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(bpy){sub 4}]{sup 4+} water oxidation catalyst. Spectra of the blue dimer and the monomeric [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+} model complex show considerably different splitting of the Ru L{sub 2,3} absorption edge, which reflects changes in the relative energies of the Ru 4d orbitals caused by hybridization with a bridging ligand and spin-orbit coupling effects. To aid the interpretation of spectroscopic data, we developed a new approach, which computes L{sub 2,3}-edges XAS spectra as dipole transitions between molecular spinors of 4d transition metal complexes. This allows for careful inclusion of the spin-orbit coupling effects and the hybridization of the Ru 4d and ligand orbitals. The obtained theoretical Ru L{sub 2,3}-edge spectra are in close agreement with experiment. Critically, existing single-electron methods (FEFF, FDMNES) broadly used to simulate XAS could not reproduce the experimental Ru L-edge spectra for the [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+} model complex nor for the blue dimer, while charge transfer multiplet (CTM) calculations were not applicable due to the complexity and low symmetry of the blue dimer water oxidation catalyst. We demonstrated that L-edge spectroscopy is informative for analysis of bridging metal complexes. The developed computational approach enhances L-edge spectroscopy as a tool for analysis of the electronic structures of complexes, materials, catalysts, and reactive intermediates with 4d transition metals.

  16. Thickness-dependent metal-insulator transition in epitaxial SrRuO? ultrathin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shen, Xuan; Qiu, Xiangbiao; Su, Dong; Zhou, Shengqiang; Li., Aidong; Wu, Di

    2015-01-06

    Transport characteristics of ultrathin SrRuO? films, deposited epitaxially on TiO?-terminated SrTiO? (001) single-crystal substrates, were studied as a function of film thickness. Evolution from a metallic to an insulating behavior is observed as the film thickness decreases from 20 to 4 unit cells. In films thicker than 4 unit cells, the transport behavior obeys the Drude low temperature conductivity with quantum corrections, which can be attributed to weak localization. Fitting the data with 2-dimensional localization model indicates that electron-phonon collisions are the main inelastic relaxation mechanism. In the film of 4 unit cells in thickness, the transport behavior follows variablemorerange hopping model, indicating a strongly localized state. Magnetoresistance measurements reveal a likely magnetic anisotropy with the magnetic easy axis along the out-of-plane direction.less

  17. Probing the transition state region in catalytic CO oxidation on Ru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostrom, H.; Oberg, H.; Xin, H.; LaRue, J.; Beye, M.; Dell'Angela, M.; Gladh, J.; Ng, M. L.; Sellberg, J. A.; Kaya, S.; Mercurio, G.; Nordlund, D.; Hantschmann, M.; Hieke, F.; Kuhn, D.; Schlotter, W. F.; Dakovski, G. L.; Turner, J. J.; Minitti, M. P.; Mitra, A.; Moeller, S. P.; Fohlisch, A.; Wolf, M.; Wurth, W.; Persson, M.; Norskov, J. K.; Abild-Pedersen, F.; Ogasawara, H.; Pettersson, L. G. M.; Nilsson, A.

    2015-02-12

    Femtosecond x-ray laser pulses are used to probe the CO oxidation reaction on ruthenium (Ru) initiated by an optical laser pulse. On a time scale of a few hundred femtoseconds, the optical laser pulse excites motions of CO and O on the surface, allowing the reactants to collide, and, with a transient close to a picosecond (ps), new electronic states appear in the O K-edge x-ray absorption spectrum. Density functional theory calculations indicate that these result from changes in the adsorption site and bond formation between CO and O with a distribution of OC–O bond lengths close to the transition state (TS). After 1 ps, 10% of the CO populate the TS region, which is consistent with predictions based on a quantum oscillator model.

  18. Thickness-dependent metal-insulator transition in epitaxial SrRuO3 ultrathin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shen, Xuan; Qiu, Xiangbiao; Su, Dong; Zhou, Shengqiang; Li, Aidong; Wu, Di

    2015-01-06

    Transport characteristics of ultrathin SrRuO₃ films, deposited epitaxially on TiO₂-terminated SrTiO₃ (001) single-crystal substrates, were studied as a function of film thickness. Evolution from a metallic to an insulating behavior is observed as the film thickness decreases from 20 to 4 unit cells. In films thicker than 4 unit cells, the transport behavior obeys the Drude low temperature conductivity with quantum corrections, which can be attributed to weak localization. Fitting the data with 2-dimensional localization model indicates that electron-phonon collisions are the main inelastic relaxation mechanism. In the film of 4 unit cells in thickness, the transport behavior follows variablemore » range hopping model, indicating a strongly localized state. As a result, magnetoresistance measurements reveal a likely magnetic anisotropy with the magnetic easy axis along the out-of-plane direction.« less

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of RuO2/poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) Composite Nanotubes for Supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ran; Duay, Jonathon; Lane, Timothy; Lee, Sang Bok

    2010-01-18

    We report the synthesis of composite RuO2/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanotubes with high specific capacitance and fast charging/discharging capability as well as their potential application as electrode materials for a high-energy and high-power supercapacitor. RuO2/PEDOT nanotubes were synthesized in a porous alumina membrane by a step-wise electrochemical deposition method, and their structures were characterized using electron microscopy. Cyclic voltammetry was used to qualitatively characterize the capacitive properties of the composite RuO2/PEDOT nanotubes. Their specific capacitance, energy density and power density were evaluated by galvanostatic charge/discharge cycles at various current densities. The pseudocapacitance behavior of these composite nanotubes originates from ion diffusion during the simultaneous and parallel redox processes of RuO2 and PEDOT. We show that the energy density (specific capacitance) of PEDOT nanotubes can be remarkably enhanced by electrodepositing RuO2 into their porous walls and onto their rough internal surfaces. The flexible PEDOT prevents the RuO2 from breaking and detaching from the current collector while the rigid RuO2 keeps the PEDOT nanotubes from collapsing and aggregating. The composite RuO2/PEDOT nanotube can reach a high power density of 20 kW kg-1 while maintaining 80% energy density (28 Wh kg-1) of its maximum value. This high power capability is attributed to the fast charge/discharge of nanotubular structures: hollow nanotubes allow counter-ions to readily penetrate into the composite material and access their internal surfaces, while a thin wall provides a short diffusion distance to facilitate ion transport. The high energy density originates from the RuO2, which can store high electrical/electrochemical energy intrinsically. The high specific capacitance (1217 Fg-1

  20. Low-temperature crystal and magnetic structure of α – RuCl3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cao, Huibo B.; Yan, Jiaqiang; Bridges, Craig A.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Mandrus, D. G.; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Nagler, Stephen E.; Banerjee, A.; Tennant, D. A.

    2016-04-19

    Here, single crystals of the Kitaev spin-liquid candidate α – RuCl3 have been studied to determine the low-temperature bulk properties, the structure, and the magnetic ground state. Refinements of x-ray diffraction data show that the low-temperature crystal structure is described by space group C2/m with a nearly perfect honeycomb lattice exhibiting less than 0.2% in-plane distortion. The as-grown single crystals exhibit only one sharp magnetic transition at TN = 7 K. The magnetic order below this temperature exhibits a propagation vector of k=(0,1,1/3), which coincides with a three-layer stacking of the C2/m unit cells. Magnetic transitions at higher temperatures upmore » to 14 K can be introduced by deformations of the crystal that result in regions in the crystal with a two-layer stacking sequence. The best-fit symmetry-allowed magnetic structure of the as-grown crystals shows that the spins lie in the ac plane, with a zigzag configuration in each honeycomb layer. The three-layer repeat out-of-plane structure can be refined as a 120° spiral order or a collinear structure with a spin direction of 35° away from the a axis. The collinear spin configuration yields a slightly better fit and also is physically preferred. The average ordered moment in either structure is less than 0.45(5) μB per Ru3+ ion.« less

  1. Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis: Assessment of the Ripening of Cobalt Clusters and Mixing Between Co and Ru Promoter via Oxidation-Reduction-Cycles over Lower Co-Loaded Ru-Co/A12O3 Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs,G.; Sarkar, A.; Ji, Y.; Luo, M.; Dozier, A.; Davis, B.

    2008-01-01

    A 2% Ru-promoted 15% Co/Al2O3 catalyst was tested after reduction and after being subjected to oxidation-reduction cycles. The catalysts were characterized over four oxidation-reduction cycles by XANES/EXAFS, TPR, HRTEM, and EDS elemental mapping. The oxidation-reduction treatments were found to assist in sintering the metallic clusters to a larger size, and to promote mixing on at least the order of the nanoscale. The larger crystallites in closer proximity to the Ru promoter led to a more facile reduction of the cobalt crystallites. In addition, a catalyst exposed to two oxidation-reduction cycles resulted in slightly higher conversion, higher a-value product, slightly lower methane selectivity, and greater stability over a reduced freshly calcined catalyst.

  2. Pt3Ru6 Clusters Supported on gamma-Al2O3: Synthesis from Pt3Ru6(Cu)21(u3-H)(u-H)3, Structural Characterization, and Catalysis of Ethylene Hydrogenation and n-Butane Hydrogenolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chotisuwan,S.; Wittayakun, J.; Gates, B.

    2006-01-01

    The supported clusters Pt-Ru/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared by adsorption of the bimetallic precursor Pt{sub 3}Ru{sub 6}(Cu){sub 21}({mu}{sub 3}-H)({mu}-H){sub 3} from CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} solution onto {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} followed by decarbonylation in He at 300 C. The resultant supported clusters were characterized by infrared (IR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies and as catalysts for ethylene hydrogenation and n-butane hydrogenolysis. After adsorption, the {nu}{sub CO} peaks characterizing the precursor shifted to lower wavenumbers, and some of the hydroxyl bands of the support disappeared or changed, indicating that the CO ligands of the precursor interacted with support hydroxyl groups. The EXAFS results show that the metal core of the precursor remained essentially unchanged upon adsorption, but there were distortions of the metal core indicated by changes in the metal-metal distances. After decarbonylation of the supported clusters, the EXAFS data indicated that Pt and Ru atoms interacted with support oxygen atoms and that about half of the Pt-Ru bonds were maintained, with the composition of the metal frame remaining almost unchanged. The decarbonylated supported bimetallic clusters reported here are the first having essentially the same metal core composition as that of a precursor metal carbonyl, and they appear to be the best-defined supported bimetallic clusters. The material was found to be an active catalyst for ethylene hydrogenation and n-butane hydrogenolysis under conditions mild enough to prevent substantial cluster disruption.

  3. Ultralow charge-transfer resistance with ultralow Pt loading for hydrogen evolution and oxidation using Ru@Pt core-shell nanocatalysts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Jia X.; Zhang, Yu; Capuano, Christopher B.; Ayers, Katherine E.

    2015-07-15

    We evaluated the activities of well-defined Ru@Pt core-shell nanocatalysts for hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions (HER-HOR) using hanging strips of gas diffusion electrode (GDE) in solution cells. With gas transport limitation alleviated by micro-porous channels in the GDEs, the charge transfer resistances (CTRs) at the hydrogen reversible potential were conveniently determined from linear fit of ohmic-loss-corrected polarization curves. In 1M HClO₄ at 23°C, a CTR as low as 0.04 Ω cm² was obtained with only 20 μg cm⁻² Pt and 11 μg cm⁻² Ru using the carbon-supported Ru@Pt with 1:1 Ru:Pt atomic ratio. Derived from temperature-dependent CTRs, the activation barriermore » of the Ru@Pt catalyst for the HER-HOR in acids is 0.2 eV or 19 kJ mol⁻¹. Using the Ru@Pt catalyst with total metal loadings <50 μg cm⁻² for the HER in proton-exchange-membrane water electrolyzers, we recorded uncompromised activity and durability compared to the baseline established with 3 mg cm⁻² Pt black.« less

  4. Ultralow charge-transfer resistance with ultralow Pt loading for hydrogen evolution and oxidation using Ru@Pt core-shell nanocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jia X.; Zhang, Yu; Capuano, Christopher B.; Ayers, Katherine E.

    2015-07-15

    We evaluated the activities of well-defined Ru@Pt core-shell nanocatalysts for hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions (HER-HOR) using hanging strips of gas diffusion electrode (GDE) in solution cells. With gas transport limitation alleviated by micro-porous channels in the GDEs, the charge transfer resistances (CTRs) at the hydrogen reversible potential were conveniently determined from linear fit of ohmic-loss-corrected polarization curves. In 1M HClO₄ at 23°C, a CTR as low as 0.04 Ω cm² was obtained with only 20 μg cm⁻² Pt and 11 μg cm⁻² Ru using the carbon-supported Ru@Pt with 1:1 Ru:Pt atomic ratio. Derived from temperature-dependent CTRs, the activation barrier of the Ru@Pt catalyst for the HER-HOR in acids is 0.2 eV or 19 kJ mol⁻¹. Using the Ru@Pt catalyst with total metal loadings <50 μg cm⁻² for the HER in proton-exchange-membrane water electrolyzers, we recorded uncompromised activity and durability compared to the baseline established with 3 mg cm⁻² Pt black.

  5. Strain-induced topological transition in SrRu2O6 and CaOs2O6

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ochi, Masayuki; Arita, Ryotaro; Trivedi, Nandini; Okamoto, Satoshi

    2016-05-24

    The topological property of SrRu$_2$O$_6$ and isostructural CaOs$_2$O$_6$ under various strain conditions is investigated using density functional theory. Based on an analysis of parity eigenvalues, we anticipate that a three-dimensional strong topological insulating state should be realized when band inversion is induced at the A point in the hexagonal Brillouin zone. For SrRu$_2$O$_6$, such a transition requires rather unrealistic tuning, where only the $c$ axis is reduced while other structural parameters are unchanged. However, given the larger spin-orbit coupling and smaller lattice constants in CaOs$_2$O$_6$, the desired topological transition does occur under uniform compressive strain. Our study paves a waymore » to realize a topological insulating state in a complex oxide, which has not been experimentally demonstrated so far.« less

  6. Giant spontaneous Hall effect in zero-moment Mn{sub 2}Ru{sub x}Ga

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiyagarajah, Naganivetha; Lau, Yong-Chang; Betto, Davide; Borisov, Kiril; Coey, J. M. D.; Stamenov, Plamen; Rode, Karsten

    2015-03-23

    Spin-dependent transport properties of Mn{sub 2}Ru{sub x}Ga thin-films are studied as function of the Ru concentration and the substrate-induced strain. The large spontaneous Hall angle of 7.7% twenty times bigger than in other 3d metals is a signature of its half-metallicity. The compensation temperature where the magnetization of the two inequivalent antiferromagnetically coupled Mn sublattices cancel can be tuned by varying x or the biaxial strain. This zero-moment half metal is free from demagnetizing forces and creates no stray field, effectively removing two obstacles to integrating magnetic elements in densely packed, nanometer-scale memory elements, and millimeter-wave generators.

  7. Anisotropy of electrical and magnetic transport properties of epitaxial SrRuO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ning, X. K.; Wang, Z. J. Zhang, Z. D.

    2015-03-07

    SrRuO{sub 3} (SRO) thin films with different thickness (2–70 nm) have been grown on (001), (110), and (111) SrTiO{sub 3} substrates. The (001)-SRO films (2–8 nm) exhibited smooth flat surfaces whereas the (110)- and (111)-SRO films featured a faceted island structure. Room temperature resistivity and residual resistivity are the lowest for the (111)-SRO films (30–70 nm). Over all thicknesses, we observed enhanced magnetization in the (111)-SRO films (∼4 μ{sub B}/Ru) compared with that for the (001)- and (110)-SRO films (∼2 μ{sub B}/Ru and ∼3 μ{sub B}/Ru, respectively), suggesting a low-spin state t{sub 2g}(3↑,1↓), high-spin state t{sub 2g}(3↑)e{sub g}(1↑), and mixed low- and high-spin states for the (001)-, (111)-, and (110)-SRO films, respectively. The dependence of resistivity on temperatures near T{sub C} follows a power law with exponent β = 0.312 and β = 0.363 for the (110)- and (111)-SRO films, respectively. These critical exponents are consistent with magnetic data with scaling law M = C (T{sub C} − T){sup β}. At low temperatures, dM/dT and dρ/dT show a linear relationship in the temperature range for the Fermi liquid. These results suggest that the intrinsic electrical and magnetic transport properties are coupled.

  8. Oxidation and reduction under cover: Chemistry at the confined space between ultra-thin nanoporous silicates and Ru(0001)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    J. Anibal Boscoboinik; Zhong, Jian -Qiang; Kestell, John; Waluyo, Iradwikanari; Wilkins, Stuart; Mazzoli, Claudio; Barbour, Andi; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Shete, Meere; Tsapatsis, Michael

    2016-03-23

    The oxidation and reduction of Ru(0001) surfaces at the confined space between two-dimensional nanoporous silica frameworks and Ru(0001) have been investigated using synchrotron-based ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS). The porous nature of the frameworks and the weak interaction between the silica and the ruthenium substrate allow oxygen and hydrogen molecules to go through the nanopores and react with the metal at the interface between the silica framework and the metal surface. In this work, three types of two-dimensional silica frameworks have been used to study their influence in the oxidation and reduction of the ruthenium surface at elevated pressuresmore » and temperatures. These frameworks are bilayer silica (0.5 nm thick), bilayer aluminosilicate (0.5 nm thick), and zeolite MFI nanosheets (3 nm thick). It is found that the silica frameworks stay essentially intact under these conditions, but they strongly affect the oxidation of ruthenium, with the 0.5 nm thick aluminosilicate bilayer completely inhibiting the oxidation. Furthermore, the latter is believed to be related to the lower chemisorbed oxygen content arising from electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged aluminosilicate framework and the Ru(0001) substrate.« less

  9. Chemical pressure tuning of URu?Si? via isoelectronic substitution of Ru with Fe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Das, Pinaki; Kanchanavatee, N.; Helton, J. S.; Huang, K.; Baumbach, R. E.; Bauer, E. D.; White, B. D.; Burnett, V. W.; Maple, M. B.; Lynn, J. W.; et al

    2015-02-01

    We have used specific heat and neutron diffraction measurements on single crystals of URu2xFexSi? for Fe concentrations x ? 0.7 to establish that chemical substitution of Ru with Fe acts as chemical pressure Pch as previously proposed by Kanchanavatee et al. [Phys. Rev. B 84, 245122 (2011)] based on bulk measurements on polycrystalline samples. Notably, neutron diffraction reveals a sharp increase of the uranium magnetic moment at x = 0.1, reminiscent of the behavior at the hidden order to large moment antiferromagnetic (LMAFM) phase transition observed at a pressure Px ? 0.5-0.7 GPa in URu?Si?. Using the unit cell volumemoredetermined from our measurements and an isothermal compressibility ?T = 5.210? GPa? for URu?Si?, we determine the chemical pressure Pch in URu2?xFexSi? as a function of x. The resulting temperature T-chemical pressure Pch phase diagram for URu2?xFexSi? is in agreement with the established temperature T-external pressure P phase diagram of URu?Si?.less

  10. Chemical pressure tuning of URu2Si2 via isoelectronic substitution of Ru with Fe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Das, Pinaki; Kanchanavatee, N.; Helton, J. S.; Huang, K.; Baumbach, R. E.; Bauer, E. D.; White, B. D.; Burnett, V. W.; Maple, M. B.; Lynn, J. W.; et al

    2015-02-26

    We have used specific heat and neutron diffraction measurements on single crystals of URu2–xFexSi₂ for Fe concentrations x ≤ 0.7 to establish that chemical substitution of Ru with Fe acts as “chemical pressure” Pch as previously proposed by Kanchanavatee et al. [Phys. Rev. B 84, 245122 (2011)] based on bulk measurements on polycrystalline samples. Neutron diffraction reveals a sharp increase of the uranium magnetic moment at x = 0.1, reminiscent of the behavior at the “hidden order” to large moment antiferromagnetic (LMAFM) phase transition observed at a pressure Px ≈ 0.5-0.7 GPa in URu₂Si₂. Using the unit cell volume determinedmore » from our measurements and an isothermal compressibility κT = 5.2×10⁻³ GPa⁻¹ for URu₂Si₂, we determine the chemical pressure Pch in URu2−xFexSi₂ as a function of x. The resulting temperature T-chemical pressure Pch phase diagram for URu2−xFexSi₂ is in agreement with the established temperature T-external pressure P phase diagram of URu₂Si₂.« less

  11. Ceria nanoclusters on graphene/Ru(0001): A new model catalyst system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Novotny, Z.; Netzer, F. P.; Dohnalek, Z.

    2016-03-22

    In this study, the growth of ceria nanoclusters on single-layer graphene on Ru(0001) has been examined, with a view towards fabricating a stable system for model catalysis studies. The surface morphology and cluster distribution as a function of oxide coverage and substrate temperature has been monitored by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), whereas the chemical composition of the cluster deposits has been determined by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The ceria nanoparticles are of the CeO2(111)-type and are anchored at the intrinsic defects of the graphene surface, resulting in a variation of the cluster densities across the macroscopic sample surface. The ceriamore » clusters on graphene display a remarkable stability against reduction in ultrahigh vacuum up to 900 K, but some sintering of clusters is observed for temperatures > 450 K. The evolution of the cluster size distribution suggests that the sintering proceeds via a Smoluchowski ripening mechanism, i.e. diffusion and aggregation of entire clusters.« less

  12. High temperature-induced phase transitions in Sr{sub 2}GdRuO{sub 6} complex perovskite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Triana, C.A.; Corredor, L.T.; Landinez Tellez, D.A.; Roa-Rojas, J.

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystal structure, thermal expansion and phase transitions at high-temperature of Sr{sub 2}GdRuO{sub 6} perovskite has been investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray diffraction pattern at 298 K of Sr{sub 2}GdRuO{sub 6} corresponds to monoclinic perovskite-type structure with P2{sub 1}/n space group. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evolution of X-ray diffraction patterns at high-temperature shows that the Sr{sub 2}GdRuO{sub 6} perovskite suffers two-phase transitions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At 573 K the X-ray diffraction pattern of Sr{sub 2}GdRuO{sub 6} corresponds to monoclinic perovskite-type structure with I2/m space group. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At 1273 K the Sr{sub 2}GdRuO{sub 6} perovskite suffers a complete phase-transition from monoclinic I2/m (no. 12) to tetragonal I4/m (no. 87). -- Abstract: The crystal structure behavior of the Sr{sub 2}GdRuO{sub 6} complex perovskite at high-temperature has been investigated over a wide temperature range between 298 K {<=} T {<=} 1273 K. Measurements of X-ray diffraction at room-temperature and Rietveld analysis of the experimental patterns show that this compound crystallizes in a monoclinic perovskite-like structure, which belongs to the P2{sub 1}/n (no. 14) space group and 1:1 ordered arrangement of Ru{sup 5+} and Gd{sup 3+} cations over the six-coordinate M sites. Experimental lattice parameters were obtained to be a =5.8103(5) Angstrom-Sign , b =5.8234(1) Angstrom-Sign , c =8.2193(9) Angstrom-Sign , V = 278.11(2) Angstrom-Sign {sup 3} and angle {beta} = 90.310(5) Degree-Sign . The high-temperature analysis shows the occurrence of two-phase transitions on this material. First, at 573 K it adopts a monoclinic perovskite-type structure with I2/m (no. 12) space group with lattice parameters a = 5.8275(6) Angstrom-Sign , b = 5.8326(3) Angstrom-Sign , c = 8.2449(2) Angstrom-Sign , V = 280.31(3) Angstrom-Sign {sup 3} and angle {beta} = 90.251(3) Degree-Sign . Close

  13. Structure and Reactivity of Pt-Ru/SiO2 Catalysts for the Preferential Oxidation of CO Under Excess H2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin,S.; Alexeev, O.; Amiridis, J.

    2006-01-01

    SiO{sub 2}-supported Pt-Ru bimetallic catalysts subjected to two different types of pretreatment protocols (i.e., subsequent oxidation-reduction treatments at 300 C and direct reduction in H{sub 2} at 300 C) were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of adsorbed CO, and catalytic activity measurements for the preferential oxidation of CO in the presence of excess H{sub 2} (PROX). The EXAFS data show that both treatments led to the formation of dispersed bimetallic structures, with an average Pt-Ru bond distance of 2.68 {angstrom}. The close proximity between Pt and Ru helped stabilize Ru in a highly dispersed form and prevented its sintering after oxidation treatments. The FTIR results indicate that the adsorption of CO was substantially weaker on bimetallic samples than on the corresponding monometallic ones. Interparticle segregation (i.e., segregation of the two metals into individual particles) was observed with the Pt-Ru/SiO{sub 2} sample exposed to direct H{sub 2} treatment; in contrast, intraparticle segregation (i.e., segregation of the two metals within the same particle), with Pt preferentially occupying more surface sites, was observed when consequent O{sub 2}/H{sub 2} treatments were used. As a result, the direct H{sub 2} treatment yielded samples with PROX activity almost identical to that of monometallic Ru catalysts, whereas the O{sub 2}/H{sub 2} treatment yielded samples with PROX activity intermediate to those of monometallic Pt and Ru catalysts.

  14. Anomalous volume expansion in CaRu{sub 0.85}Fe{sub 0.15}O{sub 3}: Neutron powder diffraction and magnetic Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taniguchi, T.; Mizusaki, S.; Okada, N.; Nagata, Y.; Mori, K.; Wuernisha, T.; Kamiyama, T.; Hiraoka, N.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.; Ozawa, T. C.; Noro, Y.; Samata, H.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction and magnetic Compton scattering measurements were conducted for ferromagnetic CaRu{sub 0.85}Fe{sub 0.15}O{sub 3} at temperatures between 10 and 300 K. Anomalous volume expansion was observed in the neutron diffraction measurement below the Curie temperature (85 K), and Invar-like behavior was observed below 40 K. However, no structural phase transition was observed down to 10 K. The strong correlation between the volume expansion, {delta}V, and the square magnetization, M{sup 2}, suggests that the anomalous volume expansion is due to the magnetovolume effect that is caused by the occurrence of ferromagnetism. The magnetic Compton scattering experiments revealed the existence of a magnetic moment on Ru and the antiferromagnetic configuration of Fe and Ru moments. The formation of a ferrimagnetic order through the induction of the magnetic moment on the Ru ion is a possible reason for the anomalous volume expansion observed for CaRu{sub 0.85}Fe{sub 0.15}O{sub 3}.

  15. Tailoring the composition of ultrathin, ternary alloy PtRuFe nanowires for the methanol oxidation reaction and formic acid oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scofield, Megan E.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Wang, Lei; Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2014-11-25

    In the search for alternatives to conventional Pt electrocatalysts, we have synthesized ultrathin, ternary PtRuFe nanowires (NW), possessing different chemical compositions in order to probe their CO tolerance as well as electrochemical activity as a function of composition for both (i) the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and (ii) the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR). As-prepared multifunctional ternary NW catalysts exhibited both higher MOR and FAOR activity as compared with binary Pt?Ru? NW, monometallic Pt NW, and commercial catalyst control samples. In terms of synthetic novelty, we utilized a sustainably mild, ambient wet-synthesis method never previously applied to the fabrication of crystalline, pure ternary systems in order to fabricate ultrathin, homogeneous alloy PtRuFe NWs with a range of controlled compositions. Thus, these NWs were subsequently characterized using a suite of techniques including XRD, TEM, SAED, and EDAX in order to verify not only the incorporation of Ru and Fe into the Pt lattice but also their chemical homogeneity, morphology, as well as physical structure and integrity. Lastly, these NWs were electrochemically tested in order to deduce the appropriateness of conventional explanations such as (i) the bi-functional mechanism as well as (ii) the ligand effect to account for our MOR and FAOR reaction data. Specifically, methanol oxidation appears to be predominantly influenced by the Ru content, whereas formic acid oxidation is primarily impacted by the corresponding Fe content within the ternary metal alloy catalyst itself.

  16. Tailoring the composition of ultrathin, ternary alloy PtRuFe nanowires for the methanol oxidation reaction and formic acid oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scofield, Megan E.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Wang, Lei; Lui, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2014-11-25

    In the search for alternatives to conventional Pt electrocatalysts, we have synthesized ultrathin, ternary PtRuFe nanowires (NW), possessing different chemical compositions in order to probe their CO tolerance as well as electrochemical activity as a function of composition for both (i) the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and (ii) the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR). As-prepared multifunctional ternary NW catalysts exhibited both higher MOR and FAOR activity as compared with binary Pt?Ru? NW, monometallic Pt NW, and commercial catalyst control samples. In terms of synthetic novelty, we utilized a sustainably mild, ambient wet-synthesis method never previously applied to the fabrication of crystalline, pure ternary systems in order to fabricate ultrathin, homogeneous alloy PtRuFe NWs with a range of controlled compositions. These NWs were subsequently characterized using a suite of techniques including XRD, TEM, SAED, and EDAX in order to verify not only the incorporation of Ru and Fe into the Pt lattice but also their chemical homogeneity, morphology, as well as physical structure and integrity. Lastly, these NWs were electrochemically tested in order to deduce the appropriateness of conventional explanations such as (i) the bi-functional mechanism as well as (ii) the ligand effect to account for our MOR and FAOR reaction data. Specifically, methanol oxidation appears to be predominantly influenced by the Ru content, whereas formic acid oxidation is primarily impacted by the corresponding Fe content within the ternary metal alloy catalyst itself.

  17. Intramolecular proton transfer boosts water oxidation catalyzed by a Ru complex

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Matheu, Roc; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Benet-Buchholz, J.; Coronado, Eugenio; Batista, Victor S.; Sala, Xavier; Llobet, Antoni

    2015-07-30

    We introduce a new family of complexes with the general formula [Run(tda)(py)2]m+ (n = 2, m = 0, 1; n = 3, m = 1, 2+; n = 4, m = 2, 32+), with tda2– being [2,2':6',2"-terpyridine]-6,6"-dicarboxylate, including complex [RuIV(OH)(tda-κ-N3O)(py)2]+, 4H+, which we find to be an impressive water oxidation catalyst, formed by hydroxo coordination to 32+ under basic conditions. The complexes are synthesized, isolated, and thoroughly characterized by analytical, spectroscopic (UV–vis, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance), computational, and electrochemical techniques (cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry, coulometry), including solid-state monocrystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In oxidation state IV, the Rumore » center is seven-coordinated and diamagnetic, whereas in oxidation state II, the complex has an unbonded dangling carboxylate and is six-coordinated while still diamagnetic. With oxidation state III, the coordination number is halfway between the coordination of oxidation states II and IV. Species generated in situ have also been characterized by spectroscopic, computational, and electrochemical techniques, together with the related species derived from a different degree of protonation and oxidation states. 4H+ can be generated potentiometrically, or voltammetrically, from 32+, and both coexist in solution. While complex 32+ is not catalytically active, the catalytic performance of complex 4H+ is characterized by the foot of the wave analysis, giving an impressive turnover frequency record of 8000 s–1 at pH 7.0 and 50,000 s–1 at pH 10.0. Density functional theory calculations provide a complete description of the water oxidation catalytic cycle of 4H+, manifesting the key functional role of the dangling carboxylate in lowering the activation free energies that lead to O–O bond formation.« less

  18. Isotopic tracer studies of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Ru/TiO sub 2 catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process in which CO and H{sub 2} react to give predominantly liquid hydrocarbons. The reaction can be considered a special type of polymerization in which the monomer is produced in situ, and chain growth occurs by a sequence of independently repeated additions of the monomer to the growing chain. A investigation has been conducted to study the CO hydrogenation reaction in order to better understand catalyst deactivation and the elementary surface processes involved in chain growth. Isotopic tracers are used in conjunction with transient-response techniques in this study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalysts. Experiments are conducted at a total pressure of 1 atmosphere, reaction temperatures of 453--498 K and D{sub 2}/CO (or H{sub 2}/CO) ratios of 2--5. Synthesis products are analyzed by gas chromatography or isotope-ratio gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Rate constants for chain initiation, propagation and termination are evaluated under steady-state reaction conditions by using transients in isotopic composition. The activation energy for chain termination is much higher than that for propagation, accounting for the observed decrease in the chain growth parameter are also estimated. Coverages by reaction intermediates are also estimated. When small amounts of {sup 12}C-labelled ethylene are added to {sup 13}CO/H{sub 2} synthesis gas, ethylene acts as the sole chain initiator. Ethylene-derived carbon also accounts for 45% of the C{sub 1} monomer pool. 102 refs., 29 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Isotopic tracer studies of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process in which CO and H{sub 2} react to give predominantly liquid hydrocarbons. The reaction can be considered a special type of polymerization in which the monomer is produced in situ, and chain growth occurs by a sequence of independently repeated additions of the monomer to the growing chain. A investigation has been conducted to study the CO hydrogenation reaction in order to better understand catalyst deactivation and the elementary surface processes involved in chain growth. Isotopic tracers are used in conjunction with transient-response techniques in this study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalysts. Experiments are conducted at a total pressure of 1 atmosphere, reaction temperatures of 453--498 K and D{sub 2}/CO (or H{sub 2}/CO) ratios of 2--5. Synthesis products are analyzed by gas chromatography or isotope-ratio gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Rate constants for chain initiation, propagation and termination are evaluated under steady-state reaction conditions by using transients in isotopic composition. The activation energy for chain termination is much higher than that for propagation, accounting for the observed decrease in the chain growth parameter are also estimated. Coverages by reaction intermediates are also estimated. When small amounts of {sup 12}C-labelled ethylene are added to {sup 13}CO/H{sub 2} synthesis gas, ethylene acts as the sole chain initiator. Ethylene-derived carbon also accounts for 45% of the C{sub 1} monomer pool. 102 refs., 29 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. Suhr 7900.955 L*E+ru Pkzza. S. Iv.. Washington, D.C. 20024-i

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Suhr 7900.955 L*E+ru Pkzza. S. Iv.. Washington, D.C. 20024-i 7117~03.8J.cdy.4 23 September 19E M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UN11 The attached elimination recommendation was prepar with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enc Aerospace letter subject: Status of

  1. Comparison of Two Preparation Methods on Catalytic Activity and Selectivity of Ru-Mo/HZSM5 for Methane Dehydroaromatization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic performance of Mo/HZSM5 and Ru-Mo/HZSM5 catalysts prepared by vaporization-deposition of molybdenum trioxide and impregnation with ammonium heptamolybdate was analyzed in terms of catalyst activity and selectivity, nitrogen physisorption analyses, temperature-programmed oxidation of carbonaceous residues, and temperature-programmed reduction. Vaporization-deposition rendered the catalyst more selective to ethylene and coke than the catalyst prepared by impregnation. This result was assigned to lower interaction of molybdenum carbide with the zeolite acidic sites.

  2. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS OF THE DWARF NOVA RU Peg IN QUIESCENCE: PROBE OF THE BOUNDARY LAYER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balman, Soelen; Godon, Patrick; Sion, Edward M.; Ness, Jan-Uwe; Schlegel, Eric; Barrett, Paul E.; Szkody, Paula E-mail: patrick.godon@villanova.edu E-mail: juness@sciops.esa.int E-mail: barrett.paul@usno.navy.mil

    2011-11-10

    We present an analysis of X-ray and UV data obtained with the XMM-Newton Observatory of the long-period dwarf nova RU Peg. RU Peg contains a massive white dwarf (WD), possibly the hottest WD in a dwarf nova (DN), it has a low inclination, thus optimally exposing its X-ray emitting boundary layer (BL), and has an excellent trigonometric parallax distance. We modeled the X-ray data using XSPEC assuming a multi-temperature plasma emission model built from the MEKAL code (i.e., CEVMKL). We obtained a maximum temperature of 31.7 keV, based on the European Photon Imaging Camera MOS1, 2 and pn data, indicating that RU Peg has an X-ray spectrum harder than most DNe, except U Gem. This result is consistent with and indirectly confirms the large mass of the WD in RU Peg. The X-ray luminosity we computed corresponds to a BL luminosity for a mass accretion rate of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} (assuming M{sub wd} = 1.3 M{sub sun}), in agreement with the expected quiescent accretion rate. The modeling of the O VIII emission line at 19 A as observed by the Reflection Grating Spectrometer implies a projected stellar rotational velocity v{sub rot}sin i = 695 km s{sup -1}, i.e., the line is emitted from material rotating at {approx}936-1245 km s{sup -1} (i {approx} 34 Degree-Sign -48 Degree-Sign) or about 1/6 of the Keplerian speed; this velocity is much larger than the rotation speed of the WD inferred from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer spectrum. Cross-correletion analysis yielded an undelayed (time lag {approx} 0) component and a delayed component of 116 {+-} 17 s where the X-ray variations/fluctuations lagged the UV variations. This indicates that the UV fluctuations in the inner disk are propagated into the X-ray emitting region in about 116 s. The undelayed component may be related to irradiation effects.

  3. Self-calibration of a W/Re thermocouple using a miniature Ru-C (1954 °C) eutectic cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ongrai, O.; Pearce, J. V.; Machin, G.; Sweeney, S. J.

    2013-09-11

    Previous successful investigations of miniature cobalt-carbon (Co-C, 1324 °C) and palladium-carbon (Pd-C, 1492 °C) high temperature fixed-point cells for thermocouple self-calibration have been reported [1-2]. In the present work, we describe a series of measurements of a miniature ruthenium-carbon (Ru-C) eutectic cell (melting point 1954 °C) to evaluate the repeatability and stability of a W/Re thermocouple (type C) by means of in-situ calibration. A miniature Ru-C eutectic fixed-point cell with outside diameter 14 mm and length 30 mm was fabricated to be used as a self-calibrating device. The performance of the miniature Ru-C cell and the type C thermocouple is presented, including characterization of the stability, repeatability, thermal environment influence, ITS-90 temperature realization and measurement uncertainty.

  4. Exotic magnetism on the quasi-FCC lattices of the d3 double perovskites La2NaB'O6 (B' = Ru, Os)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aczel, Adam A; Baker, Peter J.; Bugaris, Dan; Yeon, Jeongho; Zur Loye, Hans-Conrad; Guidi, T.; Adroja, D. T.

    2014-01-01

    We find evidence for long-range and short-range ($\\zeta$~$=$~70~\\AA~at 4~K) incommensurate magnetic order on the quasi-face-centered-cubic (FCC) lattices of the monoclinic double perovskites La$_2$NaRuO$_6$ and La$_2$NaOsO$_6$ respectively. Incommensurate magnetic order on the FCC lattice has not been predicted by mean field theory, but may arise via a delicate balance of inequivalent nearest neighbour and next nearest neighbour exchange interactions. In the Ru system with long-range order, inelastic neutron scattering also reveals a spin gap $\\Delta$~$\\sim$~2.75~meV. Magnetic anisotropy is generally minimized in the more familiar octahedrally-coordinated $3d^3$ systems, so the large gap observed for La$_2$NaRuO$_6$ may result from the significantly enhanced value of spin-orbit coupling in this $4d^3$ material.

  5. Spontaneous orientation-tuning driven by the strain variation in self-assembled ZnO-SrRuO{sub 3} heteroepitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yuanmin; Liu, Ruirui; Zhan, Qian; Chang, Wei Sea; Yu, Rong; Wei, Tzu-Chiao; He, Jr-Hau; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2015-11-09

    Heteroepitaxial ZnO and SrRuO{sub 3} were grown on SrTiO{sub 3} (111) substrates and formed a self-assembled wurtzite-perovskite nanostructure. Spontaneous orientation-tuning of the SrRuO{sub 3} pillars was observed, with the growth direction changing from [111]{sub SRO} to [011]{sub SRO} as the film thickness increased, which is attributed to a misfit strain transition from the biaxial strain imposed by the SrTiO{sub 3} substrate to the vertical strain provided by the ZnO matrix. The [011]-SrRuO{sub 3} and [0001]-ZnO combination presents a favorable matching in the nanocomposite films, resulting in higher charge carrier mobility. This vertically integrated configuration and regulation on the crystallographic orientations are expected to be employed in designing multi-functional nanocomposite systems for applications in electronic devices.

  6. Epitaxial YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}/Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlom, D.G.; Merritt, B.A.; Madhavan, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering] [and others

    1997-09-01

    The anisotropic oxide superconductors YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} and Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} have been epitaxially combined in various ways (c-axis on c-axis, c-axis on a-axis, and a-axis on a-axis) though the use of appropriate substrates. Phase-pure a-axis oriented or c-axis oriented epitaxial Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} films were grown by pulsed laser deposition. YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} films were then grown on both orientations of Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} films and the resulting epitaxy was characterized.

  7. Tailoring the composition of ultrathin, ternary alloy PtRuFe nanowires for the methanol oxidation reaction and formic acid oxidation reaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Scofield, Megan E.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Wang, Lei; Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2014-11-25

    In the search for alternatives to conventional Pt electrocatalysts, we have synthesized ultrathin, ternary PtRuFe nanowires (NW), possessing different chemical compositions in order to probe their CO tolerance as well as electrochemical activity as a function of composition for both (i) the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and (ii) the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR). As-prepared ‘multifunctional’ ternary NW catalysts exhibited both higher MOR and FAOR activity as compared with binary Pt₇Ru₃ NW, monometallic Pt NW, and commercial catalyst control samples. In terms of synthetic novelty, we utilized a sustainably mild, ambient wet-synthesis method never previously applied to the fabrication ofmore » crystalline, pure ternary systems in order to fabricate ultrathin, homogeneous alloy PtRuFe NWs with a range of controlled compositions. Thus, these NWs were subsequently characterized using a suite of techniques including XRD, TEM, SAED, and EDAX in order to verify not only the incorporation of Ru and Fe into the Pt lattice but also their chemical homogeneity, morphology, as well as physical structure and integrity. Lastly, these NWs were electrochemically tested in order to deduce the appropriateness of conventional explanations such as (i) the bi-functional mechanism as well as (ii) the ligand effect to account for our MOR and FAOR reaction data. Specifically, methanol oxidation appears to be predominantly influenced by the Ru content, whereas formic acid oxidation is primarily impacted by the corresponding Fe content within the ternary metal alloy catalyst itself.« less

  8. Inverse magnetocaloric effect in Ce(Fe{sub 0.96}Ru{sub 0.04}){sub 2}: Effect of fast neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dube, V.; Mishra, P. K.; Prajapat, C. L.; Singh, M. R.; Ravikumar, G.; Rajarajan, A. K.; Sastry, P. U.; Thakare, S. V.

    2013-02-05

    We have shown the effect of fast neutron irradiation on the magnetic phase transition and magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in a doped Ce(Fe{sub 0.96}Ru{sub 0.04}){sub 2}, intermettalic. We show that this leads to suppression of MCE and a to a disordered ferromagnetic phase.

  9. Low-temperature growth and orientational control in RuO{sub 2} thin films by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, G.R.; Wang, A.; Foster, C.M.; Vetrone, J.; Patel, J.; Wu, X.

    1996-08-01

    For growth temperatures in the range of 275 C to 425 C, highly conductive RuO{sub 2} thin films with either (110)- or (101)-textured orientations have been grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on both SiO{sub 2}/Si(001) and Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si(001) substrates. Both the growth temperature and growth rate were used to control the type and degree of orientational texture of the RuO{sub 2} films. In the upper part of this growth temperature range ({approximately} 350 C) and at a low growth rate (< 30 {angstrom}/min.), the RuO{sub 2} films favored a (110)-textured. In contrast, at the lower part of this growth temperature range ({approximately} 300 C) and at a high growth rate (> 30 {angstrom}/min.), the RuO{sub 2} films favored a (101)-textured. In contrast, a higher growth temperatures (> 425 C) always produced randomly-oriented polycrystalline films. For either of these low-temperature growth processes, the films produced were crack-free, well-adhered to the substrates, and had smooth, specular surfaces. Atomic force microscopy showed that the films had a dense microstructure with an average grain size of 50--80 nm and a rms. surface roughness of {approximately} 3--10 nm. Four-probe electrical transport measurements showed that the films were highly conductive with resistivities of 34--40 {micro}{Omega}-cm ({at} 25 C).

  10. Thickness-dependent metal-insulator transition in epitaxial SrRuO3 ultrathin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Xuan; Qiu, Xiangbiao; Su, Dong; Zhou, Shengqiang; Li, Aidong; Wu, Di

    2015-01-06

    Transport characteristics of ultrathin SrRuO? films, deposited epitaxially on TiO?-terminated SrTiO? (001) single-crystal substrates, were studied as a function of film thickness. Evolution from a metallic to an insulating behavior is observed as the film thickness decreases from 20 to 4 unit cells. In films thicker than 4 unit cells, the transport behavior obeys the Drude low temperature conductivity with quantum corrections, which can be attributed to weak localization. Fitting the data with 2-dimensional localization model indicates that electron-phonon collisions are the main inelastic relaxation mechanism. In the film of 4 unit cells in thickness, the transport behavior follows variable range hopping model, indicating a strongly localized state. As a result, magnetoresistance measurements reveal a likely magnetic anisotropy with the magnetic easy axis along the out-of-plane direction.

  11. Tuning the magnetic and structural phase transitions of PrFeAsO via Fe/Ru spin dilution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yiu, Yuen; Bonfa, Pietro; Sanna, Samuele; De Renzi, Roberto; Caretta, Pietro; McGuire, Michael A; Huq, Ashfia; Nagler, Stephen E

    2014-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and muon spin relaxation measurements are used to obtain a detailed phase diagram of PrFe1{xRuxAsO. The isoelectronic substitution of Ru for Fe acts eectively as spin dilution, suppressing both the structural and magnetic phase transitions. The temperature, TS, of the tetragonal-orthorhombic structural phase transition decreases gradually as a function of x. Slightly below TS coherent precessions of the muon spin are observed corresponding to static magnetism, possibly re ecting a signicant magneto-elastic coupling in the FeAs layers. Short range order in both the Fe and Pr moments persists for higher levels of x. The static magnetic moments disappear at a concentration coincident with that expected for percolation of the J1 - J2 square lattice model.

  12. Analysis of the electrochemical characteristics of a direct methanol fuel cell based on a Pt-Ru/C anode catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arico, A.S.; Creti, P.; Mantegna, R.

    1996-12-31

    This paper deals with a vapour-feed direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) based on a Nafion 117{reg_sign} solid polymer electrolyte. Pt-Ru/C and Pt/C catalysts were employed for methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction, respectively. Structure and surface chemistry of catalysts were investigated by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Membrane/electrode assembly (M&E) was prepared by using a {open_quotes}paste process{close_quotes} method. Electrical power densities of about 150 mW cm{sup -2} were obtained at 95{degrees} C with Pt loadings of 0.8 and 0.5 mg cm{sup -2} at anode and cathode respectively.

  13. Transverse thermoelectric effect in La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3}|SrRuO{sub 3} superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiomi, Y.; Handa, Y.; Kikkawa, T.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-06-08

    Transverse thermoelectric effects in response to an out-of-plane heat current have been studied in an external magnetic field for ferromagnetic superlattices consisting of La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} and SrRuO{sub 3} layers. The superlattices were fabricated on SrTiO{sub 3} substrates by pulsed laser deposition. We found that the sign of the transverse thermoelectric voltage for the superlattices is opposite to that for La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} and SrRuO{sub 3} single layers at 200?K, implying an important role of spin Seebeck effects inside the superlattices. At 10?K, the magnetothermoelectric curves shift from the zero field due to an antiferromagnetic coupling between layers in the superlattices.

  14. Frustration by competing interactions in the highly-distorted double perovskites La2NaB'O6 (B' = Ru, Os)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aczel, Adam A; Bugaris, Dan; Li, Ling; Yan, Jiaqiang; Dela Cruz, Clarina R; Zur Loye, Hans-Conrad; Nagler, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    The usual classical behaviour of S = 3/2, B-site ordered double perovskites generally results in simple, commensurate magnetic ground states. In contrast, heat capacity and neutron powder diffraction measurements for the S = 3/2 systems La2NaB'O6 (B = Ru, Os) reveal an incommensurate magnetic ground state for La2NaRuO6 and a drastically suppressed ordered moment for La2NaOsO6. This behaviour is attributed to the large monoclinic structural distortions of these double perovskites. The distortions have the effect of weakening the nearest neighbour superexchange interactions, presumably to an energy scale that is comparable to the next nearest neighbour superexchange. The exotic ground states in these materials can then arise from a competition between these two types of antiferromagnetic interactions, providing a novel mechanism for achieving frustration in the double perovskite family.

  15. Pressure suppression of unconventional charge-density-wave state in PrRu4P12 studied by optical conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamura H.; Carr G.; Ohta, N.; Takigawa, A.; Matsutori, I.; Shoji, K.; Miyata, K.; Matsunami, M.; Nanba, T.; Sugawara, H.; Sekine, C.; Shirotani, I.; Sato, H.; Moriwaki, T.; Ikemoto, Y.; Liu, Z.

    2012-05-09

    Optical conductivity [{delta}({omega})] of PrRu{sub 4}P{sub 12} has been studied under high pressure to 14 GPa, at low temperatures to 8 K, and at photon energies 12 meV-1.1 eV. The energy gap in {delta}({omega}) at ambient pressure, caused by a metal-insulator transition due to an unconventional charge-density-wave formation at 63 K, is gradually filled in with increasing pressure to 10 GPa. At 14 GPa and below 30 K, {delta}({omega}) exhibits a pronounced Drude-type component due to free carriers. This indicates that the initial insulating ground state at zero pressure has been turned into a metallic one at 14 GPa. This is consistent with a previous resistivity study under pressure, where the resistivity rapidly decreased with cooling below 30 K at 14 GPa. The evolution of electronic structure with pressure is discussed in terms of the hybridization between the 4f and conduction electrons.

  16. Tuning the metal-insulator crossover and magnetism in SrRuO3 by ionic gating

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yi, Hee Taek; Gao, Bin; Xie, Wei; Cheong, Sang -Wook; Podzorov, Vitaly

    2014-10-13

    Reversible control of charge transport and magnetic properties without degradation is a key for device applications of transition metal oxides. Chemical doping during the growth of transition metal oxides can result in large changes in physical properties, but in most of the cases irreversibility is an inevitable constraint. We report a reversible control of charge transport, metal-insulator crossover and magnetism in field-effect devices based on ionically gated archetypal oxide system - SrRuO3. In these thin-film devices, the metal-insulator crossover temperature and the onset of magnetoresistance can be continuously and reversibly tuned in the range 90–250 K and 70–100 K, respectively,more » by application of a small gate voltage. We infer that a reversible diffusion of oxygen ions in the oxide lattice dominates the response of these materials to the gate electric field. These findings provide critical insights into both the understanding of ionically gated oxides and the development of novel applications.« less

  17. Deprotonated Water Dimers: The Building Blocks of Segmented Water Chains on Rutile RuO2(110)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mu, Rentao; Cantu Cantu, David; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Lyubinetsky, Igor; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2015-10-15

    Despite the importance of RuO2 in photocatalytic water splitting and catalysis in general, the interactions of water with even its most stable (110) surface are not well-understood. In this study we employ a combination of high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy imaging with density functional theory based ab initio molecular dynamics, and we follow the formation and binding of linear water clusters on coordinatively unsaturated ruthenium rows. We find that clusters of all sizes (dimers, trimers, tetramers, extended chains) are stabilized by donating one proton per every two water molecules to the surface bridge bonded oxygen sites, in contrast with water monomers that do not show a significant propensity for dissociation. The clusters with odd number of water molecules are less stable than the clusters with even number, and are generally not observed under thermal equilibrium. For all clusters with even numbers, the dissociated dimers represent the fundamental building blocks with strong intra-dimer hydrogen bonds and only very weak inter-dimer interactions resulting in segmented water chains.

  18. Superconductivity in the presence of disorder in skutterudite-related La3Co4Sn13 and La3Ru4Sn13 compounds: Electrical transport and magnetic studies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Slebarski, A.; Maska, M. M.; Fijalkowski, M.; McElroy, C. A.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-06-25

    La3Co4Sn13 and La3Ru4Sn13 were categorized as BCS superconductors. In a plot of the critical field Hc2 vs T, La3Ru4Sn13 displays a second superconducting phase at the higher critical temperature Tc*, characteristic of inhomogeneous superconductors, while La3Co4Sn13 shows bulk superconductivity below Tc. We observe a decrease in critical temperatures with external pressure and magnetic field for both compounds. Additionally, for La3Ru4Sn13 we find that Tc*/dP>dTc/dP. The pressure dependences of Tc are interpreted according to the McMillan theory and understood to be a consequence of lattice stiffening. The investigation of the superconducting state of La3CoxRu4–xSn13 shows a Tc* that is larger thenmore » Tc for x < 4. Furthermore, this unique and unexpected observation is discussed as a result of the local disorder and/or the effect of chemical pressure when Ru atoms are partially replaced by smaller Co atoms.« less

  19. Electronic and magnetic transitions in perovskite SrRu{sub 1-x}Ir{sub x}O{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Lee, Yong Woo; Jeong, Yoon Hee

    2015-09-07

    We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of perovskite SrRu{sub 1−x}Ir{sub x}O{sub 3} (0.0≤ x ≤ 0.25) thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition on atomically flat (001) SrTiO{sub 3} substrates. SrRuO{sub 3} has the properties of a ferromagnetic metal (resistivity ρ ∼ 200 μΩ · cm at T = 300 K) with Curie temperature T{sub C} ∼ 150 K. Substituting Ir (5d{sup 5+}) for Ru (4d{sup 4+}) in SrRuO{sub 3}, films (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.20) showed fully metallic behavior and ferromagnetic ordering, although ρ increased and the ferromagnetic T{sub C} decreased. Films with x = 0.25 underwent the metal-to-insulator transition (T{sub MIT}∼75 K) in ρ, and spin-glass-like ordering (T{sub SG}∼45 K) with the elimination of ferromagnetic long-range ordering caused by the electron localization at the substitution sites. In ferromagnetic films (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.20), ρ increased near-linearly with T at T > T{sub C}, but in paramagnetic film (x = 0.25) ρ increased as T{sup 3/2} at T > T{sub MIT}. Moreover, observed spin-glass-like (T{sub SG}) ordering with the negative magnetoresistance at T < T{sub MIT} in film with x = 0.25 validates the hypothesis that (Anderson) localization favors glassy ordering at amply disorder limit. These observations provide a promising approach for future applications and of fundamental interest in 4d and 5d mixed perovskites.

  20. Ultra-high-performance core–shell structured Ru@Pt/C catalyst prepared by a facile pulse electrochemical deposition method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Dan; Li, Yuexia; Liao, Shijun; Su, Dong; Song, Huiyu; Li, Yingwei; Yang, Lijun; Li, Can

    2015-08-03

    Core–shell structured catalysts, made by placing either a monolayer or a thin layer of a noble metal on relatively cheap core-metal nanoparticles, are fascinating and promising fuel cell catalysts due to their high utilization of noble metals. Here, we report our development of a core–shell structured catalyst, Ru@Pt/C, generated by a novel and facile pulse electrochemical deposition (PED) approach. We demonstrate that compared with a commercial Pt/C catalyst, this novel catalyst achieves over four times higher mass activity towards the anodic oxidation of methanol, and 3.6 times higher mass activity towards the cathodic reduction of oxygen. Importantly, we find that the intrinsic activity of Pt in this Ru@Pt/C catalyst is doubled due to the formation of the core–shell structure. The catalyst also shows superior stability: even after 2000 scans, it still retains up to 90% of the peak current. As a result, our findings demonstrate that this novel PED approach is a promising method for preparing high-performance core–shell catalysts for fuel cell applications.

  1. Ultra-high-performance core–shell structured Ru@Pt/C catalyst prepared by a facile pulse electrochemical deposition method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Dan; Li, Yuexia; Liao, Shijun; Su, Dong; Song, Huiyu; Li, Yingwei; Yang, Lijun; Li, Can

    2015-08-03

    Core–shell structured catalysts, made by placing either a monolayer or a thin layer of a noble metal on relatively cheap core-metal nanoparticles, are fascinating and promising fuel cell catalysts due to their high utilization of noble metals. Here, we report our development of a core–shell structured catalyst, Ru@Pt/C, generated by a novel and facile pulse electrochemical deposition (PED) approach. We demonstrate that compared with a commercial Pt/C catalyst, this novel catalyst achieves over four times higher mass activity towards the anodic oxidation of methanol, and 3.6 times higher mass activity towards the cathodic reduction of oxygen. Importantly, we find thatmore » the intrinsic activity of Pt in this Ru@Pt/C catalyst is doubled due to the formation of the core–shell structure. The catalyst also shows superior stability: even after 2000 scans, it still retains up to 90% of the peak current. As a result, our findings demonstrate that this novel PED approach is a promising method for preparing high-performance core–shell catalysts for fuel cell applications.« less

  2. Structural characterisation of BaTiO{sub 3} thin films deposited on SrRuO{sub 3}/YSZ buffered silicon substrates and silicon microcantilevers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colder, H.; Jorel, C. Mchin, L.; Domengs, B.; Marie, P.; Boisserie, M.; Guillon, S.; Nicu, L.; Galdi, A.

    2014-02-07

    We report on the progress towards an all epitaxial oxide layer technology on silicon substrates for epitaxial piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems. (101)-oriented epitaxial tetragonal BaTiO{sub 3} (BTO) thin films were deposited at two different oxygen pressures, 5.10{sup ?2} mbar and 5.10{sup ?3} mbar, on SrRuO{sub 3}/Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) buffered silicon substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The YSZ layer full (001) orientation allowed the further growth of a fully (110)-oriented conductive SrRuO{sub 3} electrode as shown by X-ray diffraction. The tetragonal structure of the BTO films, which is a prerequisite for the piezoelectric effect, was identified by Raman spectroscopy. In the BTO film deposited at 5.10{sup ?2} mbar strain was mostly localized inside the BTO grains whereas at 5.10{sup ?3} mbar, it was localized at the grain boundaries. The BTO/SRO/YSZ layers were finally deposited on Si microcantilevers at an O{sub 2} pressure of 5.10{sup ?3} mbar. The strain level was low enough to evaluate the BTO Young modulus. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to investigate the epitaxial quality of the layers and their epitaxial relationship on plain silicon wafers as well as on released microcantilevers, thanks to Focused-Ion-Beam TEM lamella preparation.

  3. Calorimetric, spectroscopic and structural investigations of phase polymorphism in [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 3}. Part I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolega, Diana; Mikuli, Edward; Inaba, Akira; Gorska, Natalia; Holderna-Natkaniec, Krystyna; Nitek, Wojciech

    2013-01-15

    Four crystalline phases of the coordination compound [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 3} are identified by adiabatic calorimetry. Three phase transitions, one at T{sub C3}(IV{yields}III)=30.7 K, the second at T{sub C2}(III{yields}II)=91.7 K (both accompanied by comparable entropy changes 3.0 and 3.1 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1}, respectively) and the third at T{sub C1}(II{yields}I)=241.6 K (accompanied by an entropy change of 8.1 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1}) were discovered. X-ray single crystal diffraction (at 293 K) demonstrates that phase I is a highly dynamic disordered cubic phase (Fm3{sup Macron }m, No. 225) with two types of BF{sub 4}{sup -} anions differing in a degree of disorder. In phase II (at 170 K) the structure remains cubic (Ia3{sup Macron }, No. 206), with two different types of cations and four different types of anions. Splitting of certain IR bands connected with NH{sub 3} ligands at the observed phase transitions suggests a lowering of the symmetry of the [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+} complex cation. Both NH{sub 3} ligands and BF{sub 4}{sup -} anions perform fast reorientations ({tau}{sub R} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -12} s), which are significantly slowed down below the phase transition at T{sub C3}. {sup 1}H NMR studies led to estimate the values of the activation energy of NH{sub 3} ligands reorientation in the phases II and I as equal to {approx}8 kJ mol{sup -1}. In phase I the whole hexammineruthenium(III) cations reorientation as a tumbling process can be noticed. The activation energy value of this motion is {approx}24 kJ mol{sup -1}. {sup 19}F NMR studies give the values of the activation energy of BF{sub 4}{sup -} anions reorientation as {approx}6 kJ mol{sup -1}. Above the phase transition temperature half of BF{sub 4}{sup -} anions perform a tumbling motion with E{sub a} Almost-Equal-To 8 kJ mol{sup -1}. - Graphical abstract: A series of complementary methods, such as Adiabatic Calorimetry, Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Fourier

  4. Ru!fsa!!

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... l l more d e t a i l . , 1.1avc ,touched upon, is 1:e):f orn'.A on u s t e t i s t : i . c n l L>:isis t h a t i n c l u d e s a measuse of tlic sr:..:isln.ic da.i:a :;cat.::er. ...

  5. Local magnetism in the molecule-based metamagnet [Ru2(O2CMe)4]3[Cr(CN)6] probed with implanted muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancaster, T.; Pratt, F. L.; Blundell, S. J.; Steele, Andrew J.; Baker, Peter J.; Wright, Jack D.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Miller, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    We present a muon-spin relaxation study of local magnetism in the molecule-based metamagnet [Ru2(O2CMe)4]3[Cr(CN)6]. We observe magnetic order with TN = 33 K, although above 25 K the sublattice spins become less rigid and a degree of static magnetic disorder is observed. The comparison of measurements in applied magnetic field with simulations allows us to understand the origin of the muon response across the metamagnetic transition and to map out the phase diagram of the material. Applied hydrostatic pressures of up to 6 kbar lead to an increase in the local magnetic field along with a complex change in the internal magnetic field distribution.

  6. Dopant-Induced Nanoscale Electronic Inhomogeneities in Ca2-xSrxRuO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jiandi; Ismail, #; Moore, R. G.; Wang, S. -C.; Ding, H.; Jin, Rongying; Mandrus, David; Plummer, E Ward

    2006-01-01

    Ca{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}RuO{sub 4} single crystals with 0.1 {le} x {le} 2.0 have been studied systematically using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). In contrast with the well-ordered lattice structure, the local density of states at the surface clearly shows a strong doping dependent nanoscale electronic inhomogeneity, regardless of the fact of isovalent substitution. Remarkably, the surface electronic roughness measured by STM and the inverse spectral weight of quasiparticle states determined by ARPES are found to vary with x in the same manner as the bulk in-plane residual resistivity, following the Nordheim rule. For the first time, the surface measurements - especially those with STM - are shown to be in good agreement with the bulk transport results, all clearly indicating a doping-induced electronic disorder in the system.

  7. Elucidating hydrogen oxidation/evolution kinetics in base and acid by enhanced activities at the optimized Pt shell thickness on the Ru core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elbert, Katherine; Hu, Jue; Ma, Zhong; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Guangyu; An, Wei; Liu, Ping; Isaacs, Hugh S.; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Wang, Jia X.

    2015-10-05

    Hydrogen oxidation and evolution on Pt in acid are facile processes, while in alkaline electrolytes, they are 2 orders of magnitude slower. Thus, developing catalysts that are more active than Pt for these two reactions is important for advancing the performance of anion exchange membrane fuel cells and water electrolyzers. Herein, we detail a 4-fold enhancement of Pt mass activity that we achieved using single-crystalline Ru@Pt core–shell nanoparticles with two-monolayer-thick Pt shells, which doubles the activity on Pt–Ru alloy nanocatalysts. For Pt specific activity, the two- and one-monolayer-thick Pt shells exhibited enhancement factors of 3.1 and 2.3, respectively, compared to the Pt nanocatalysts in base, differing considerably from the values of 1 and 0.4, respectively, in acid. To explain such behavior and the orders of magnitude difference in activity on going from acid to base, we performed kinetic analyses of polarization curves over a wide range of potential from –250 to 250 mV using the dual-pathway kinetic equation. From acid to base, the activation free energies increase the most for the Volmer reaction, resulting in a switch of the rate-determining step from the Tafel to the Volmer reaction, and a shift to a weaker optimal hydrogen binding energy. Furthermore, the much higher activation barrier for the Volmer reaction in base than in acid is ascribed to one or both of the two catalyst-insensitive factors: slower transport of OH than H+ in water and a stronger O–H bond in water molecules (HO–H) than in hydrated protons (H2O–H+).

  8. Elucidating hydrogen oxidation/evolution kinetics in base and acid by enhanced activities at the optimized Pt shell thickness on the Ru core

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elbert, Katherine; Hu, Jue; Ma, Zhong; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Guangyu; An, Wei; Liu, Ping; Isaacs, Hugh S.; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Wang, Jia X.

    2015-10-05

    Hydrogen oxidation and evolution on Pt in acid are facile processes, while in alkaline electrolytes, they are 2 orders of magnitude slower. Thus, developing catalysts that are more active than Pt for these two reactions is important for advancing the performance of anion exchange membrane fuel cells and water electrolyzers. Herein, we detail a 4-fold enhancement of Pt mass activity that we achieved using single-crystalline Ru@Pt core–shell nanoparticles with two-monolayer-thick Pt shells, which doubles the activity on Pt–Ru alloy nanocatalysts. For Pt specific activity, the two- and one-monolayer-thick Pt shells exhibited enhancement factors of 3.1 and 2.3, respectively, compared tomore » the Pt nanocatalysts in base, differing considerably from the values of 1 and 0.4, respectively, in acid. To explain such behavior and the orders of magnitude difference in activity on going from acid to base, we performed kinetic analyses of polarization curves over a wide range of potential from –250 to 250 mV using the dual-pathway kinetic equation. From acid to base, the activation free energies increase the most for the Volmer reaction, resulting in a switch of the rate-determining step from the Tafel to the Volmer reaction, and a shift to a weaker optimal hydrogen binding energy. Furthermore, the much higher activation barrier for the Volmer reaction in base than in acid is ascribed to one or both of the two catalyst-insensitive factors: slower transport of OH– than H+ in water and a stronger O–H bond in water molecules (HO–H) than in hydrated protons (H2O–H+).« less

  9. Evolution of competing magnetic order in the Jeff=1/2 insulating state of Sr2Ir1-xRuxO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calder, Stuart A.; Kim, Jong-Woo; Cao, Guixin; Cantoni, Claudia; May, Andrew F; Cao, Huibo B.; Aczel, Adam A.; Matsuda, Masaaki; Choi, Yongseong; Haskel, Daniel; Sales, B. C.; Mandrus, David; Lumsden, Mark D.; Christianson, Andrew D.

    2015-10-27

    We investigate the magnetic properties of the series Sr2Ir1-xRuxO4 with neutron, resonant x-ray and magnetization measurements. The results indicate an evolution and coexistence of magnetic structures via a spin flop transition from ab-plane to c-axis collinear order as the 5d Ir4+ ions are replaced with an increasing concentration of 4d Ru4+ ions. The magnetic structures within the ordered regime of the phase diagram (x<0.3) are reported. Despite the changes in magnetic structure no alteration of the Jeff=1/2 ground state is observed. This behavior of Sr2Ir1-xRuxO4 is consistent with electronic phase separation and diverges from a standard scenario of hole doping. The role of lattice alterations with doping on the magnetic and insulating behavior is considered. Our results presented here provide insight into the magnetic insulating states in strong spin-orbit coupled materials and the role perturbations play in altering the behavior.

  10. Synthesis, crystal structure investigation and magnetism of the complex metal-rich boride series Cr{sub x}(Rh{sub 1-y}Ru{sub y}){sub 7-x}B{sub 3} (x=0.88-1; y=0-1) with Th{sub 7}Fe{sub 3}-type structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misse, Patrick R.N.; Mbarki, Mohammed; Fokwa, Boniface P.T.

    2012-08-15

    Powder samples and single crystals of the new complex boride series Cr{sub x}(Rh{sub 1-y}Ru{sub y}){sub 7-x}B{sub 3} (x=0.88-1; y=0-1) have been synthesized by arc-melting the elements under purified argon atmosphere on a water-cooled copper crucible. The products, which have metallic luster, were structurally characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction as well as EDX measurements. Within the whole solid solution range the hexagonal Th{sub 7}Fe{sub 3} structure type (space group P6{sub 3}mc, no. 186, Z=2) was identified. Single-crystal structure refinement results indicate the presence of chromium at two sites (6c and 2b) of the available three metal Wyckoff sites, with a pronounced preference for the 6c site. An unexpected Rh/Ru site preference was found in the Ru-rich region only, leading to two different magnetic behaviors in the solid solution: The Rh-rich region shows a temperature-independent (Pauli) paramagnetism whereas an additional temperature-dependent paramagnetic component is found in the Ru-rich region. - Graphical abstract: The new complex boride series Cr{sub x}(Rh{sub 1-y}Ru{sub y}){sub 7-x}B{sub 3} (x=0.88-1; y=0-1) has been synthesized by arc melting the elements under purified argon atmosphere. Beside the 3d/4d site preference within the whole solid solution, an unexpected Rh/Ru site preference was found in the Ru-rich region only, leading to two different magnetic behaviors: The Rh-rich region shows a temperature-independent (Pauli) paramagnetism whereas an additional temperature-dependent paramagnetic component is found in the Ru-rich region. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of a new boride series fulfilling Vegard Acute-Accent s rule. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3d/4d site preference. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unexpected Ru/Rh site preference. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rh-rich region is Pauli paramagnetic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ru-rich region is Pauli and temperature-dependent paramagnetic.

  11. Thermoelectric, electronic, optical and chemical bonding properties of Ba{sub 2}PrRuO{sub 6}: At temperature 7 K and 150 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reshak, A.H.; Khan, Wilayat

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: DFT-FPLAPW method used for calculating the electronic structure. The Fermi surface of BPRO (7 K and 150 K) is also calculated. The complex dielectric function has been calculated. Thermoelectric properties were also calculated using BoltzTraP code. Power factor shows that both compounds are good thermoelectric materials at 600 K. - Abstract: We present first principles calculations of the band structure, density of states, electronic charge density, Fermi surface and optical properties of Ba{sub 2}PrRuO{sub 6} single crystals at two different temperatures. The atomic positions were optimized by minimizing the forces acting on the atoms. We have employed the full potential linear augmented plane wave method within local density approximation, generalized gradient approximation and EngelVosko generalized gradient approximation to treat the exchange correlation potential. The calculation shows that the compound is superconductor with strong hybridization near the Fermi energy level. Fermi surface is composed of two sheets. The calculated electronic specific heat capacities indicate, very close agreement with the experimental one. The bonding features of the compounds are analyzed using the electronic charge density in the (1 0 0) and (010) crystallographic planes. The dispersion of the optical constants was calculated and discussed. The thermoelectric properties are also calculated using the BoltzTrap code.

  12. Microstructure of (110)-Oriented Epitaxial SrRuO3 Thin Films Grown on Off-Cut Single Crystal YSZ(100) Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Xinhua; Lee, Sung Kyun; Lee, Ho Nyung; Hesse, Dietrich

    2005-01-01

    The microstructure of (1 1 0){sup pc}-oriented epitaxial SrRuO{sub 3} (SRO) thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition on (1 0 0)YSZ (YSZ: yttria-stabilized zirconia) single crystal substrates with a miscut angle of 5{sup o} has been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The films grow epitaxially with their pseudocubic (1 1 0) plane parallel to the (1 0 0) surface of the YSZ single crystal substrate, and with an in-plane orientation relationship of [{ovr 1} 1 1]{sub SRO}//[0 1 1]{sub YSZ}. Cross-sectional TEM investigations show that the films have a rough, facetted surface. Generally, four different azimuthal domains are present in (1 1 0)SRO films on (1 0 0)YSZ. Their number can be significantly reduced using annealed offcut YSZ substrates before SRO deposition, and this reduction effect is shown to be much stronger on [0 1 1]-miscut (1 0 0)YSZ than on [0 0 1]-miscut ones. Size and morphology of the azimuthal pseudocubic domains and their domain boundaries, as well as of anti-phase domains and their domain boundaries are studied by plan-view and cross-section TEM.

  13. Surface chemical reactivity of ultrathin Pd(111) films on Ru(0001): Importance of orbital symmetry in the application of the d-band model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Xiangshi; Cooper, Valentino R.; Weitering, Hanno H.; Snijders, Paul C.

    2015-09-22

    The chemical bonding of adsorbate molecules on transition-metal surfaces is strongly influenced by the hybridization between the molecular orbitals and the metal d-band. The strength of this interaction is often correlated with the location of the metal d-band center relative to the Fermi level. Here, we exploit finite size effects in the electronic structure of ultrathin Pd(111) films grown on Ru(0001) to tune their reactivity by changing the film thickness one atom layer at a time, while keeping all other variables unchanged. Interestingly, while bulk Pd(111) is reactive toward oxygen, Pd(111) films below five monolayers are surprisingly inert. This observation is fully in line with the d-band model prediction when applied to the orbitals involved in the bonding. The shift of the d-band center with film thickness is primarily attributed to shifts in the partial density of states associated with the 4dxz and 4dyz orbitals. This study provides an in-depth look into the orbital specific contributions to the surface chemical reactivity, providing new insights that could be useful in surface catalysis.

  14. Surface chemical reactivity of ultrathin Pd(111) films on Ru(0001): Importance of orbital symmetry in the application of the d-band model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yin, Xiangshi; Cooper, Valentino R.; Weitering, Hanno H.; Snijders, Paul C.

    2015-09-22

    The chemical bonding of adsorbate molecules on transition-metal surfaces is strongly influenced by the hybridization between the molecular orbitals and the metal d-band. The strength of this interaction is often correlated with the location of the metal d-band center relative to the Fermi level. Here, we exploit finite size effects in the electronic structure of ultrathin Pd(111) films grown on Ru(0001) to tune their reactivity by changing the film thickness one atom layer at a time, while keeping all other variables unchanged. Interestingly, while bulk Pd(111) is reactive toward oxygen, Pd(111) films below five monolayers are surprisingly inert. This observationmore » is fully in line with the d-band model prediction when applied to the orbitals involved in the bonding. The shift of the d-band center with film thickness is primarily attributed to shifts in the partial density of states associated with the 4dxz and 4dyz orbitals. This study provides an in-depth look into the orbital specific contributions to the surface chemical reactivity, providing new insights that could be useful in surface catalysis.« less

  15. Crystal structure, magnetism and transport properties of Ce{sub 3}Ni{sub 25.75}Ru{sub 3.16}Al{sub 4.1}B{sub 10}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janka, Oliver; Baumbach, Ryan E.; Thompson, Joe D.; Bauer, Eric D.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2013-09-15

    Single crystals of Ce{sub 3}Ni{sub 25.75}Ru{sub 3.16}Al{sub 4.1}B{sub 10} were obtained from a process in which a polycrystalline sample of CeRu{sub 2}Al{sub 2}B was annealed in an excess of a NiIn flux. The initial phase, CeRu{sub 2}Al{sub 2}B, does not recrystallize, instead, crystals of a new phase, Ce{sub 3}Ni{sub 25.75}Ru{sub 3.16}Al{sub 4.1}B{sub 10}, could be isolated once the flux was removed. The title compound crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4/nmm (No. 129) with a=1139.02(8), c=801.68(6) pm (c/a=0.70) in the Nd{sub 3}Ni{sub 29}Si{sub 4}B{sub 10} structure type. Electrical resistivity measurements reveal metallic behavior with a minimum of 700 ? cm and a small residual resistivity ratio of RRR=1.4 indicating a large amount of disorder scattering. The cerium atoms are either in the 4+ or an intermediate valence state with a valence fluctuation temperature far above room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Single crystals of Ce{sub 3}Ni{sub 25.75}Ru{sub 3.16}A{sub l4.1}B{sub 10} were obtained using a process in which a polycrystalline sample of CeRu{sub 2}Al{sub 2}B was annealed in an excess of a NiIn flux. Electrical resistivity measurements reveal metallic behavior with a minimum of 700 ?? cm and a small residual resistivity ratio of RRR=1.4 indicating a large amount of disorder scattering. The cerium atoms are either in the 4+ or an intermediate valence state with a valence fluctuation temperature far above room temperature. Display Omitted - Highlights: Flux synthesis of high quality single crystals of Ce{sub 3}Ni{sub 25.75}Ru{sub 3.16}Al{sub 4.1}B{sub 10} is presented along with the crystal structure, magnetic and transport properties. The compound is isostructural to Nd{sub 3}Ni{sub 29}Si{sub 4}B{sub 10} but is first of this structure type showing mixed occupancies of d-elements. This is an intermetallic phase with Ce in either the 4+ or an intermediate valence state. The fact that this structure with mixed occupied transition

  16. Mechanistic insight into peroxydisulfate reactivity: Oxidation of the cis,cis-[Ru(bpy)2(OH2)]2O4+ "Blue Dimmer"

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hurst, James K.; Roemeling, Margo D.; Lymar, Sergei V.

    2015-04-10

    One-electron oxidation of the μ-oxo dimer (cis,cis-[RuIII(bpy)2(OH2)]2O4+, {3,3}) to {3,4} by S2O82- can be described by three concurrent reaction pathways corresponding to the three protic forms of {3,3}. Free energy correlations of the rate constants, transient species dynamics determined by pulse radiolysis, and medium and temperature dependencies of the alkaline pathway all suggest that the rate determining step in these reactions is a strongly non-adiabatic dissociative electron transfer within a precursor ion pair leading to the {3,4}|SO42-|SO4•- ion triple. As deduced from the SO4•- scavenging experiments with 2-propanol, the SO4•- radical then either oxidizes {3,4} to {4,4} within the ionmore » triple, effecting a net two-electron oxidation of {3,3}, or escapes in solution with ~25 % probability to react with additional {3,3} and {3,4}, that is, effecting sequential one-electron oxidations. The reaction model presented also invokes rapid {3,3} + {4,4} → 2{3,4} comproportionation, for which kcom ~5×107 M-1 s-1 was independently measured. The model provides an explanation for the observation that despite favorable energetics, no oxidation beyond the {3,4} state was detected. As a result, the indiscriminate nature of oxidation by SO4•- indicates that its fate must be quantitatively determined when using S2O82- as an oxidant« less

  17. Metal insulator transition and magnetotransport anomalies in perovskite SrIr{sub 0.5}Ru{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Lee, Yong Woo; Kim, Sang Woo; Jeong, Yoon Hee

    2015-03-21

    We investigated the nature of transport and magnetic properties in SrIr{sub 0.5}Ru{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} (SIRO), which has characteristics intermediate between a correlated non-Fermi liquid state and an itinerant Fermi liquid state, by growing perovskite thin films on various substrates (e.g., SrTiO{sub 3} (001), (LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3}(Sr{sub 2}TaAlO{sub 6}){sub 0.7} (001), and LaAlO{sub 3} (001)). We observed systematic variation of underlying substrate dependent metal-to-insulator transition temperatures (T{sub MIT} ∼ 80 K on SrTiO{sub 3}, ∼90 K on (LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3}(Sr{sub 2}TaAlO{sub 6}){sub 0.7}, and ∼100 K on LaAlO{sub 3}) in resistivity. At temperature 300 K ≥ T ≥ T{sub MIT}, SIRO is metallic and its resistivity follows a T{sup 3/2} power law, whereas insulating nature at T < T{sub MIT} is due to the localization effect. Magnetoresistance (MR) measurement of SIRO on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) shows negative MR at T < 25 K and positive MR at T > 25 K, with negative MR ∝ B{sup 1/2} and positive MR ∝ B{sup 2}; consistent with the localized-to-normal transport crossover dynamics. Furthermore, observed spin glass like behavior of SIRO on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) at T < 25 K in the localized regime validates the hypothesis that (Anderson) localization favors glassy ordering. These remarkable features provide a promising approach for future applications and of fundamental interest in oxide thin films.

  18. Structurally-driven metal-insulator transition in Ca{sub 2}Ru{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 4} (0{<=}x<0.14): A single crystal X-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, T.F.; Ge, M.; Korneta, O.B.; Parkin, S.; De Long, L.E.; Cao, G.

    2011-04-15

    Correlation between structure and transport properties are investigated in high-quality single-crystals of Ca{sub 2}Ru{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 4} with 013.5% and the system behaves as an insulator. Such a large, sharp metal-insulator transition and tuneable transition temperature may have potential applications in electronic devices. -- Graphical abstract: The metal-insulator transition temperature (T{sub MI}) was drastically reduced by Cr doping, and is closely related to the distortion of structure. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} The metal-insulator transition temperature (T{sub MI}) was drastically reduced by doping Cr into Ca{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} single crystal. {yields} Detailed single crystal structural analysis provided important insight into this structurally-driven metal-insulator transition. {yields} Negative Volume Thermal Expansion (NVTE) was observed with increasing temperature.

  19. Xu Hou,1,2 Yuhang Hu,1 Alison Grinthal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... flow rate Q, and on the viscosity of the transport liquid ... robust non-fouling behavior for solutions and suspensions. ... Xu, Z. K. Mineral-Coated Polymer Membranes with ...

  20. Cosmology on the Beach - Wayne Hu: Lecture 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wayne Hu

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  1. Shaw-JA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scanning Radiometer Measurements of Air-Sea Temperature Difference in the Tropical ... The AC- coupled radiometer output voltage generates air-sea temperature differences from ...

  2. Manipulating the ferromagnetism in narrow-bandwidth Pr{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.6) by means of the Mn-Ru t{sub 2g} ferromagnetic super-exchanges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y. L.; Liu, M. F.; Xie, Y. L.; Yan, Z. B.; Dong, S.; Liu, J.-M.

    2015-09-28

    The concurrent ferromagnetic and metal-insulator transitions via the double-exchange route and electronic phase separation scenario represent the core ingredients of the physics of manganites. In this work, a Ca{sup 2+} and Ru{sup 4+} co-substitution of Pr{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 3+} in narrow-bandwidth and insulating PrMnO{sub 3}, namely, Pr{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}Mn{sub 1-x}Ru{sub x}O{sub 3} (PCMRO, x ≤ 0.6), is carried out in order to investigate an alternative approach to effectively manipulate the ferromagnetism of PrMnO{sub 3}-based manganites. It is revealed that PCMRO over the whole substitution range is homogeneous solid solution with increased lattice distortion. The preference of Ru{sup 4+} valence state and the absence of Mn{sup 4+} valence state disable the Mn{sup 3+}-Mn{sup 4+} e{sub g}-orbital double-exchange, and the random occupation of Ru{sup 4+} in the lattice excludes the charge ordering and electronic phase separation. While all these consequences should favor antiferromagnetic insulating states, nevertheless, a high-temperature ferromagnetic transition is triggered by the co-substitution and the magnetization can reach up to ∼1.0 μ{sub B}/f.u. at x ∼ 0.2–0.3, much bigger than the moment (<0.1 μ{sub B}/f.u.) of Pr{sub 1−x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} in the weak ferromagnetic insulator state. It is suggested that this strong ferromagnetism is substantially ascribed to the Mn{sup 3+}-Ru{sup 4+} t{sub 2g}-orbital ferromagnetic super-exchange, and a simple geometric network illustration of the magnetism and electrical transport is presented.

  3. First-principles studies of structural stabilities and enthalpies of formation of refractory intermetallics: TM and TM3 (T = Ti, Zr, Hf; M = Ru, Rh, Pd, Os, Ir, Pt)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing, Weiwei; Chen, X.; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Y. Y.; Fu, Chong Long; Meschel, S.

    2012-01-01

    Using first-principles local density functional approach, we have calculated the ground-state structural phase stabilities and enthalpies of formation of thirty-six binary transition-metal refractory TM and TM3 compounds formed by Group IV elements T (T = Ti, Zr, Hf) and platinum group elements M (M = Ru, Rh, Pd, Os, Ir, Pt) . We compared our results with the available experimental data and found good agreement between theory and experiment in both the trends of structural stabilities and the magnitudes of formation enthalpies. Moreover, based on our calculated results, an empirical relationship between cohesive energies ( E) and melting temperatures (Tm) was derived as Tm = 0.0292 E/kB (where kB is the Boltzmann constant) for both TM and TM3 compounds.

  4. Enhanced inverse spin Hall contribution at high microwave power levels in La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3}/SrRuO{sub 3} epitaxial bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haidar, S. M. Lustikova, J.; Shiomi, Y.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-10-12

    We have investigated microwave power dependence of dc voltage generated upon ferromagnetic resonance in a La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3}/SrRuO{sub 3} epitaxial bilayer film at room temperature. With increasing microwave power above ∼75 mW, the magnitude of the voltage signal decreases as the sample temperature approaches the Curie temperature of La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} due to heating effects. By analyzing the dependence of the voltage signal on the direction of the magnetic field, we show that with increasing microwave power the contribution from the inverse spin Hall effect becomes more dominant than that from the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect.

  5. Chemical pressure tuning of URu2Si2 via isoelectronic substitution of Ru with Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Pinaki; Kanchanavatee, N.; Helton, J. S.; Huang, K.; Baumbach, R. E.; Bauer, E. D.; White, B. D.; Burnett, V. W.; Maple, M. B.; Lynn, J. W.; Janoschek, M.

    2015-02-26

    We have used specific heat and neutron diffraction measurements on single crystals of URu2–xFexSi₂ for Fe concentrations x ≤ 0.7 to establish that chemical substitution of Ru with Fe acts as “chemical pressure” Pch as previously proposed by Kanchanavatee et al. [Phys. Rev. B 84, 245122 (2011)] based on bulk measurements on polycrystalline samples. Neutron diffraction reveals a sharp increase of the uranium magnetic moment at x = 0.1, reminiscent of the behavior at the “hidden order” to large moment antiferromagnetic (LMAFM) phase transition observed at a pressure Px ≈ 0.5-0.7 GPa in URu₂Si₂. Using the unit cell volume determined from our measurements and an isothermal compressibility κT = 5.2×10⁻³ GPa⁻¹ for URu₂Si₂, we determine the chemical pressure Pch in URu2−xFexSi₂ as a function of x. The resulting temperature T-chemical pressure Pch phase diagram for URu2−xFexSi₂ is in agreement with the established temperature T-external pressure P phase diagram of URu₂Si₂.

  6. Resistive switching in ultra-thin La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/SrRuO{sub 3} superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jammalamadaka, S. Narayana; Vanacken, Johan; Moshchalkov, V. V.

    2014-07-21

    Superlattices may play an important role in next generation electronic and spintronic devices if the key-challenge of the reading and writing data can be solved. This challenge emerges from the coupling of low dimensional individual layers with macroscopic world. Here, we report the study of the resistive switching characteristics of a hybrid structure made out of a superlattice with ultrathin layers of two ferromagnetic metallic oxides, La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO) and SrRuO{sub 3} (SRO). Bipolar resistive switching memory effects are measured on these LSMO/SRO superlattices, and the observed switching is explainable by ohmic and space charge-limited conduction laws. It is evident from the endurance characteristics that the on/off memory window of the cell is greater than 14, which indicates that this cell can reliably distinguish the stored information between high and low resistance states. The findings may pave a way to the construction of devices based on nonvolatile resistive memory effects.

  7. Percolation theory and quantum critical systems: A new description of the critical behavior in Ce(Ru{sub 0.24}Fe{sub 0.76}){sub 2}Ge{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaddy, John; Heitmann, Tom; Montfrooij, Wouter

    2014-05-07

    The onset of ordering in quantum critical systems is characterized by a competition between the Kondo shielding of magnetic moments and the ordering of these moments. We show how a distribution of Kondo shielding temperaturesresulting from chemical dopingleads to critical behavior whose main characteristics are given by percolation physics. With the aid of Monte Carlo computer simulations, we are able to infer the low temperature part of the distribution of shielding temperatures in heavily doped quantum critical Ce(Ru{sub 0.24}Fe{sub 0.76}){sub 2}Ge{sub 2}. Based on this distribution, we show that the ordering dynamicssuch as the growth of the correlation length upon coolingcan be understood by the spawning of magnetic clusters. Our findings explain why the search for universal exponents in quantum critical systems has been unsuccessful: the underlying percolation network associated with the chemical doping of quantum critical systems has to be incorporated in the modeling of these quantum critical systems.

  8. Energy and charge transfers between (Bu{sub 4}N){sub 2}(Ru)(dcbpyH){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2} (N719) and ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni Manman; Cheng Qiang; Zhang, W. F.

    2010-03-15

    ZnO thin films and (Bu{sub 4}N){sub 2}(Ru)(dcbpyH){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2} (called N719) sensitized ZnO thin films are grown on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) conducting glass substrates using laser molecular beam epitaxy. Ultraviolet-visible absorption, photoluminescence (PL), surface photovoltage spectroscopy, and Raman scattering are employed to probe into the transition process of photogenerated charges and the interaction between ZnO and N719. The experimental results indicate that there is a significant electronic interaction between N719 and ZnO through chemiadsorption. The interaction greatly enhances the photogenerated charge separation and thus the photovoltaic response of the ZnO film but remarkedly weakens its radiative recombination, i.e., PL, implying strong energy and charge transfer occurring between N719 and ZnO. In addition, a new PL peak observed at about 720 nm in N719 sensitized ZnO/FTO is attributed to the electron-hole recombination of N719.

  9. LOW-TEMPERATURE ION TRAP STUDIES OF N{sup +}({sup 3} P{sub ja} ) + H{sub 2}(j) {yields} NH{sup +} + H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zymak, I.; Hejduk, M.; Mulin, D.; Plasil, R.; Glosik, J.; Gerlich, D.

    2013-05-01

    Using a low-temperature 22-pole ion trap apparatus, detailed measurements for the title reaction have been performed between 10 K and 100 K in order to get some state specific information about this fundamental hydrogen abstraction process. The relative population of the two lowest H{sub 2} rotational states, j = 0 and 1, has been varied systematically. NH{sup +} formation is nearly thermo-neutral; however, to date, the energetics are not known with the accuracy required for low-temperature astrochemistry. Additional complications arise from the fact that, so far, there is no reliable theoretical or experimental information on how the reactivity of the N{sup +} ion depends on its fine-structure (FS) state {sup 3} P{sub ja} . Since in the present trapping experiment, thermalization of the initially hot FS population competes with hydrogen abstraction, the evaluation of the decay of N{sup +} ions over long storage times and at various He and H{sub 2} gas densities provides information on these processes. First assuming strict adiabatic behavior, a set of state specific rate coefficients is derived from the measured thermal rate coefficients. In addition, by recording the disappearance of the N{sup +} ions over several orders of magnitude, information on nonadiabatic transitions is extracted including FS-changing collisions.

  10. Mechanistic insight into peroxydisulfate reactivity: Oxidation of the cis,cis-[Ru(bpy)2(OH2)]2O4+ "Blue Dimmer"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurst, James K.; Roemeling, Margo D.; Lymar, Sergei V.

    2015-04-10

    One-electron oxidation of the ?-oxo dimer (cis,cis-[RuIII(bpy)2(OH2)]2O4+, {3,3}) to {3,4} by S2O82- can be described by three concurrent reaction pathways corresponding to the three protic forms of {3,3}. Free energy correlations of the rate constants, transient species dynamics determined by pulse radiolysis, and medium and temperature dependencies of the alkaline pathway all suggest that the rate determining step in these reactions is a strongly non-adiabatic dissociative electron transfer within a precursor ion pair leading to the {3,4}|SO42-|SO4- ion triple. As deduced from the SO4- scavenging experiments with 2-propanol, the SO4- radical then either oxidizes {3,4} to {4,4} within the ion triple, effecting a net two-electron oxidation of {3,3}, or escapes in solution with ~25 % probability to react with additional {3,3} and {3,4}, that is, effecting sequential one-electron oxidations. The reaction model presented also invokes rapid {3,3} + {4,4} ? 2{3,4} comproportionation, for which kcom ~5107 M-1 s-1 was independently measured. The model provides an explanation for the observation that despite favorable energetics, no oxidation beyond the {3,4} state was detected. As a result, the indiscriminate nature of oxidation by SO4- indicates that its fate must be quantitatively determined when using S2O82- as an oxidant

  11. 2010 > Publications > Research > The Energy Materials Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CV Subban, Q Zhou, A Hu, TE Moylan, FT Wagner and FJ DiSalvo Journal of the American Chemical Society, 132(49), pp 17531-17536, 2010 DOI: 10.1021ja1074163 Pt-Decorated PdCo@PdC...

  12. HuMiChip: Development of a Functional Gene Array for the Study...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 1008326 Report Number(s): LBNL-4326E-Poster DOE Contract Number: ... Research Org: Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (US) ...

  13. Hmelo, Bin Hu, Alamgir Karim, Martyn McLachlan, and Ron Jones...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Interactions with "nontraditional" users Interactions with "nontraditional" users Next-generation capabilities Suggestions for workshopssymposia gg p y p ...

  14. X-ray diffraction structure of the 1,1{prime}-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene (dppf)-bridged complex [(dppf)AgCl]{sub 2}: An unexpected product from the reaction between cis-(bpy){sub 2}RuCl{sub 2} and dppf in the presence of AgBF{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, K.; Bott, S.G.; Richmond, M.G.

    1995-05-01

    The reaction between cis-Ru(bpy){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(where bpy = bipyridine) and the diphosphine ligand 1,1 {prime} - bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene (dppf) in the presence of AgBF{sub 4} has led to the isolation of the title compound [Ag(dppf)Cl]{sub 2}. [Ag(dppf)Cl]{sub 2} has been structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, which confirms the bridging mode adopted by the ancillary dppf ligand and the centrosymmetric nature of this molecule. Dimeric [Ag(dppf)Cl]{sub 2} crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1, a = 11.426(1) {angstrom}, b = 11.509(1) {angstrom}, c = 12.786(1) {angstrom}, {alpha} = 68.96(2){degrees}, {beta} = 70.66(2){degrees} = {gamma} = 71.24(2){degrees}, V = 1441(1) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 1, d{sub calc} = 1.608 g {center_dot} cm{sup {minus}3}; R = 0.0445, R{sub 2} = 0.0566 for 4486 observed reflections with l {ge} 3{sigma}(l).

  15. Bulk modulus and specific heat of B-site doped (La{sub 0.3}Pr{sub 0.7}){sub 0.65}Ca{sub 0.35}Mn{sub 1−x}B{sub x}O{sub 3} (B=Fe, Cr, Ru, Al, Ga)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, Archana; Thakur, Rasna; Gaur, N. K.

    2014-04-24

    Specific heat (C{sub p}) thermal expansion (α) and Bulk modulus (B{sub T}) of lightly doped Rare Earth manganites (La{sub 0.3}Pr{sub 0.7}){sub 0.65}Ca{sub 0.35}Mn{sub 1−x}B{sub x}O{sub 3} (B{sup 3+} = Fe{sup 3+},Cr{sup 3+},Ga{sup 3+},Al{sup 3+},Ru4+); (0.3

  16. R A O I A P O N Sne., WNIV. OF CALIF. (15 crs]Hu~r~ ON LOAN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Table C10. Energy Consumption Estimates by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2014 Rank Residential Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector a Transportation Sector Total Consumption a State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu 1 Texas 1,709.5 Texas 1,638.8 Texas 6,288.8 Texas 3,262.4 Texas 12,899.5 2 California 1,397.4 California 1,418.5 Louisiana 3,024.3 California 2,948.3 California 7,620.1 3 Florida 1,199.2 New York 1,134.8 California

  17. UNC EFRC - Center for Solar FuelsUNC EFRC - Center for Solar Fuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 - 37 Publications 20. Chen, Z.; Concepcion, J. J.; Meyer, T. J. Rapid catalytic water oxidation by a single site, Ru carbene catalyst. Dalton Trans. 2011, 40 (15), 3789-3792. LINK 21. Meyer, T. J.; Papanikolas, J. M.; Heyer, C. M. Solar Fuels and Next Generation Photovoltaics: The UNC-CH Energy Frontier Research Center. Catal. Lett. 2011, 141 (1), 1-7. LINK 22. Ess, D. H.; Johnson, E. R.; Hu, X.; Yang, W. Singlet-Triplet Energy Gaps for Diradicals from Fractional-Spin Density-Functional

  18. NMMSS Newsletter, March 2009

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    R e p o rtin g M o n th T ra n s a c tio ns D u e In ve n to ry D u e Ja n ua ry 2 0 0 9 F e b ru a ry 1 0 F e b ru a ry 1 6 F e b ru a ry 2 0 09 M a rch 1 1 M a rch 1 6 M a rch 2 00 9 A p ril 1 0 A p ril 1 5 A p ril 2 0 09 M a y 1 2 M a y 1 5 M a y 2 0 0 9 Ju n e 1 0 Ju n e 1 5

  19. TH-C-BRD-05: Reducing Proton Beam Range Uncertainty with Patient-Specific CT HU to RSP Calibrations Based On Single-Detector Proton Radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doolan, P; Sharp, G; Testa, M; Lu, H-M; Bentefour, E; Royle, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Beam range uncertainty in proton treatment comes primarily from converting the patient's X-ray CT (xCT) dataset to relative stopping power (RSP). Current practices use a single curve for this conversion, produced by a stoichiometric calibration based on tissue composition data for average, healthy, adult humans, but not for the individual in question. Proton radiographs produce water-equivalent path length (WEPL) maps, dependent on the RSP of tissues within the specific patient. This work investigates the use of such WEPL maps to optimize patient-specific calibration curves for reducing beam range uncertainty. Methods: The optimization procedure works on the principle of minimizing the difference between the known WEPL map, obtained from a proton radiograph, and a digitally-reconstructed WEPL map (DRWM) through an RSP dataset, by altering the calibration curve that is used to convert the xCT into an RSP dataset. DRWMs were produced with Plastimatch, an in-house developed software, and an optimization procedure was implemented in Matlab. Tests were made on a range of systems including simulated datasets with computed WEPL maps and phantoms (anthropomorphic and real biological tissue) with WEPL maps measured by single detector proton radiography. Results: For the simulated datasets, the optimizer showed excellent results. It was able to either completely eradicate or significantly reduce the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) in the WEPL for the homogeneous phantoms (to zero for individual materials or from 1.5% to 0.2% for the simultaneous optimization of multiple materials). For the heterogeneous phantom the RMSE was reduced from 1.9% to 0.3%. Conclusion: An optimization procedure has been designed to produce patient-specific calibration curves. Test results on a range of systems with different complexities and sizes have been promising for accurate beam range control in patients. This project was funded equally by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (UK) and Ion Beam Applications (Louvain-La-Neuve, Belgium)

  20. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), Steve Jackson (1) and Robert King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information ...

  1. Project RU LlSON COPY ON-SITE RADIOLOGICAL PROGRAMS DURING REENTRY...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... a joint experiment sponsored b y Austral Oil C o m - pany, Inc:, the U. S. A t o m i c ... The MSA Model 1-500 Combustible Gas Detection System was operated by EIC for Austral Oil. ...

  2. Materials Data on Sr(Sb3Ru)4 (SG:204) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Sr(AsRu)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Sr(GeRu)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Sr(RuO3)2 (SG:44) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-05-16

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Ce3(Al3Ru)4 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Gd(Sn3Ru2)2 (SG:121) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Ba2LaRuO6 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on GdGeRu (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Li7RuO6 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on AsRu (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Fabrication of 3D Core-Shell Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube@RuO2...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Number: SC0001160 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: ACS Nano; Journal Volume: 9(1); Related Information: NEES partners with University of Maryland...

  13. Materials Data on NbRu (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on TaRu (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on BaLaZnRuO6 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on BaLaMgRuO6 (SG:82) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Co2RuO4 (SG:74) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-26

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on BaLaCuRuO6 (SG:82) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-15

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Ba(AsRu)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-24

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on BaRuO3 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-05-16

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Ba3PrRu2O9 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-08

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Ba3CuRu2O9 (SG:63) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-07

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Co5RuO8 (SG:166) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on CeSi3Ru (SG:107) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on ThB2Ru3 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on ErB2Ru3 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on TbB2Ru3 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on SmB2Ru3 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on DyB2Ru3 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on YbB2Ru3 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on U2Ga8Ru (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on U2SnRu2 (SG:127) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Composition and work function relationship in Os-Ru-W ternary...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; CATHODES; COATINGS; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; ENERGY ...

  14. Materials Data on VSbRu (SG:216) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-18

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 Gas Reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF >100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern PA (Panel 3 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  16. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 Liquids Reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern PA (Panel 3 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Liquids

  17. Materials Data on RuS2 (SG:205) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Sc2Al3Ru (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on ZrRu3C (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on ThRu3C (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Y(GeRu)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Co2RuO4 (SG:74) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF >100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern PA (Panel 3 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  4. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    No 2001 Liquids Reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern PA (Panel 3 of 7) Oil and Gas ...

  5. Materials Data on Ho2Ru2O7 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Er2Ru2O7 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. A=5He (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 5He) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 5.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations:(1978RE1A, 1979JA31, 1979KA06, 1979LU1A, 1979MA1J, 1980HA1M, 1981BE10, 1981KR1J, 1982FI13). Special states (The first T = 5/2 state of 5He is predicted to lie at Ex ~ 40 MeV (1981BE25; theor.).): (1979JA31, 1981BE10, 1981KU1H, 1982EM1A, 1982FI13, 1982FR1D). Complex reactions involving 5He:(1979BR02, 1979RU1B). Reactions involving pions:(1978FI1D,

  8. A=6Li (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Li) GENERAL: See Table 6.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). See also (AU55, LA55, ME56, FR57, HU57D, LE57F, PI58, BA59K, BR59M, FE59E, SK59, UB59, AN60, JA60G, KO60E, PH60A, TA60L, WA60F, BA61N, KO61A, SH61B, TA61G, VA61, CO62B, CR62A, DI62B, FO62E, GA62C, IN62, IN62A, IN62B, JA62, ME62A, NA62C, SA62C, ST62B, WA62H, BO63B, BU63D, DA63D, EL63D, HA63K, JA63C, JO63B, KL63, KU63B, KU63I, MO63C, OL63B, SA63K, SC63E, SC63I, VL63A, WA63, GR64C, JI64,

  9. Tet3 CXXC Domain and Dioxygenase Activity Cooperatively Regulate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Xu, Yufei ; Xu, Chao ; Kato, Akiko ; Tempel, Wolfram ; Abreu, Jose Garcia ; Bian, Chuanbing ; Hu, Yeguang ; Hu, Di ; Zhao, Bin ; Cerovina, Tanja ; Diao, Jianbo ; Wu, ...

  10. A=15O (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 15O) GENERAL: See also (1981AJ01) and Table 15.17 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Nuclear models:(1982WA1Q, 1982YA1D, 1983SH38). Special states:(1979GO27, 1980GO1Q, 1980HI1C, 1984ST1E). Electromagentic transitions:(1980KO1L, 1980MI1G, 1980RI06, 1982AW02, 1983TO08, 1984CA02). Astrophysical questions:(1980BA1P, 1981WA1Q, 1983LI01, 1985GI1C). Complex reactions involving 15O:(1981HU1D, 1981SC1P, 1983DE26, 1983FR1A, 1983JA05, 1983OL1A, 1983WI1A,

  11. Materials Data on Ba6Na2V2Ru2O17 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Suhr 7900.955 L*E+ru Pkzza. S. Iv.. Washington, D.C. 20024-i

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Several colleges and universities, in of California, the University of Chicago, Iowa State ... by insertion of a copy of th M LOCATION California Inst. of Technology Pasadena, CA ...

  13. Crystal and magnetic structure of Ca{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ANTIFERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS; ANTIFERROMAGNETISM; CALCIUM COMPOUNDS; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; ...

  14. Magnetic properties of RT2Zn20; R = rare earth, T = Fe, Co, Ru, Os and Ir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Shuang

    2008-12-15

    It is well known that rare earth intermetallic compounds have versatile, magnetic properties associated with the 4f electrons: a local moment associated with the Hund's rule ground state is formed in general, but a strongly correlated, hybridized state may also appear for specific 4f electronic configuration (eg. for rare earth elements such as Ce or Yb). On the other hand, the conduction electrons in rare earth intermetallic compounds, certainly ones associated with non hybridizing rare earths, usually manifest non-magnetic behavior and can be treated as a normal, non-interacted Fermi liquid, except for some 3d-transition metal rich binary or ternary systems which often manifest strong, itinerant, d electron dominant magnetic behavior. Of particular interest are examples in which the band filling of the conduction electrons puts the system in the vicinity of a Stoner transition: such systems, characterized as nearly or weakly ferromagnet, manifest strongly correlated electronic properties [Moriya, 1985]. For rare earth intermetallic compounds, such systems provide an additional versatility and allow for the study of the behaviors of local moments and hybridized moments which are associated with 4f electron in a correlated conduction electron background.

  15. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report (Abbreviated), Ja

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2010 - 2016 (thousand short tons) January - March April - June July - September October - December Total Year Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports 2010 17,807 4,803 21,965 5,058 21,074 4,680 20,870 4,811 81,716 19,353 2011 26,617 3,381 26,987 3,419 25,976 3,588 27,679 2,700 107,259 13,088 2012 28,642 2,022 37,534 2,329 31,563 2,415 28,006 2,394 125,746 9,159 2013 31,835 1,429 29,427 2,756 28,589 2,398 27,809 2,323

  16. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report (Abbreviated), Ja

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2010 - 2016 (dollars per short ton) January - March April - June July - September October - December Total Year Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports 2010 106.52 62.02 121.36 71.91 125.45 77.12 126.16 76.18 120.41 71.77 2011 139.34 86.00 153.00 105.86 155.88 112.06 147.38 110.19 148.86 103.32 2012 134.88 103.82 118.95 100.89 115.12 93.25 104.64 90.39 118.43 96.78 2013 99.68 86.87 96.77 83.18 91.64 81.66

  17. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report (Abbreviated), Ja

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Quantity and Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports by Origin, 2010 - 2016 (short tons and dollars per short ton) Year and Quarter Australia Canada Colombia Indonesia China Venezuela Other Countries Total 2010 380,404 1,766,896 14,583,950 1,904,040 52,869 581,700 82,828 19,352,687 2011 61,745 1,680,490 9,500,387 856,038 22,128 778,887 187,931 13,087,606 2012 - 1,107,727 6,951,515 517,532 77,738 287,147 217,598 9,159,257 2013 22 1,116,076 6,575,927 886,920 51,944 42,428 233,108 8,906,425 2014 532

  18. A=18F (1959AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See Energy Level Diagram for 18F) GENERAL: See also Table 18.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (RE54C, EL55, EL55A, NE56D, GR57D, WA59). 1. 18F(β+)18O Qm = 1.677 The positron end point is 635 ± 15 (BL49A), 649 ± 9 keV (RU51). The spectrum is simple (see (DR56A)). The half-life is 112 ± 1 min (BL49A), 111 ± 1 min (JA55), 110 ± 1 min (BE58G): log ft = 3.62. The fact that the β transition to the ground state of 18O is allowed indicates J = 1+ for 18F (assumed T

  19. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    April 2016 , American Physical Society Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on ... are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on ...

  20. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Filter Results Filter by Author Hong, Kunlun (2) Hu, Qiao -Sheng (1) Hu, Qiao-Sheng (1) Xing, Chun-Hui (1) Zhang, Hong -Hai (1) Zhang, Honghai (1) Save Results Excel (limit 2000) ...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Filter by Author Chen, Chih-Ching (2) Chen, Pisin (2) Hu, Chia-Yu (2) Save Results Save ... by Ultra High Energy Cosmic Neutrinos Hu, Chia-Yu ; Chen, Chih-Ching ; Taiwan, Natl. ...

  2. Rutile-structured TiO{sub 2} deposited by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition using tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium precursor on in-situ oxidized Ru electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pointet, John; Gonon, Patrice; Latu-Romain, Lawrence; Bsiesy, Ahmad Vallée, Christophe

    2014-01-15

    In this work, tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium precursor as well as in-situ oxidized ruthenium bottom electrode were used to grow rutile-structured titanium dioxide thin layers by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition. Metal–insulator–metal capacitors have been elaborated in order to study the electrical properties of the device. It is shown that this process leads to devices exhibiting excellent results in terms of dielectric constant and leakage current.

  3. A Materials-Based Mitigation Strategy for SU/SD in PEM Fuel Cells: Properties and Performance-Specific Testing of IrRu OER Catalysts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atanasoski, Radoslav; Cullen, David A; Vernstrom, George; Haugen, Gregory; Atanasoska, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    Catalysts that enable proton exchange membrane fuel cells to weather the damaging conditions experienced during transient periods of fuel starvation have been developed. The addition of minute amounts of iridium and ruthenium to the cathode enhances the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) during start-up/shutdown events, thus lowering the peak cell voltage closer to the onset of water oxidation. The catalyst loadings ranged from 1 to 10 g/cm2, but showed surprisingly high activity and durability. At such low loadings, it is possible to fully integrate the OER catalysts with negligible interference on fuel cell performance and a marginal increase in catalyst cost.

  4. A=07Li (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Li) GENERAL: See (HU57D, BA59K, BA59N, BR59M, FE59E, MA59E, MA59H, KU60A, PE60E, PH60A, SH60C, TA60L, BA61H, BA61N, BL61C, CL61D, KH61, TA61G, TO61B, CL62E, CR62A, IN62, CH63, CL63C, KL63, SC63I, BE64H, GR64C, MA64HH, NE64C, OL64A, SA64G, BE65F, FA65A, JA65H, NE65, PR65). See also Table 7.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Ground state: Q = -45 ± 5 mb (KA61F, VA63F, WH64); μ = +3.2564 nm (FU65E). 1. 4He(t, γ)7Li Qm = 2.467 Excitation functions

  5. A=14C (70AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 14C) GENERAL: See Table 14.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). See (JA54A, EL56B, VI57, BA58E, OT59, SK59, TA60L, WA60, BA61D, FR61B, TA62F, BL63C, NA63A, SO63, VL63A, LI64I, LO64C, BA65T, KO65F, WA65D, ZA65B, BA66PP, BO66J, GU66D, MI66C, ZA66B, GR67M, HA67G, IN67A, KO67C, KO67S, EI68, FA68C, FR68C, NE68A, RO68C, AR69E, AT69, FR69B, SH69, SO69A, SO69D). 1. 14C(β-)14N Qm = 0.156 Recent values are 5745 ± 50 y (MA61B, HU64B), 5780 ± 65 y (WA61E),

  6. Platinum-ruthenium nanotubes and platinum-ruthenium coated copper nanowires as efficient catalysts for electro-oxidation of methanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Jie; Cullen, David A.; Forest, Robert V.; Wittkopf, Jarrid A.; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Zheng, Whenchao; Chen, Jingguang G.; Yan, Yushan

    2015-01-15

    The sluggish kinetics of methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) is a major barrier to the commercialization of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). In this study, we report a facile synthesis of platinum–ruthenium nanotubes (PtRuNTs) and platinum–ruthenium-coated copper nanowires (PtRu/CuNWs) by galvanic displacement reaction using copper nanowires as a template. The PtRu compositional effect on MOR is investigated; the optimum Pt/Ru bulk atomic ratio is about 4 and surface atomic ratio about 1 for both PtRuNTs and PtRu/CuNWs. Enhanced specific MOR activities are observed on both PtRuNTs and PtRu/CuNWs compared with the benchmark commercial carbon-supported PtRu catalyst (PtRu/C, Hispec 12100). Finally, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals a larger extent of electron transfer from Ru to Pt on PtRu/CuNWs, which may lead to a modification of the d-band center of Pt and consequently a weaker bonding of CO (the poisoning intermediate) on Pt and a higher MOR activity on PtRu/CuNWs.

  7. Platinum-ruthenium nanotubes and platinum-ruthenium coated copper nanowires as efficient catalysts for electro-oxidation of methanol

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Jie; Cullen, David A.; Forest, Robert V.; Wittkopf, Jarrid A.; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Zheng, Whenchao; Chen, Jingguang G.; Yan, Yushan

    2015-01-15

    The sluggish kinetics of methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) is a major barrier to the commercialization of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). In this study, we report a facile synthesis of platinum–ruthenium nanotubes (PtRuNTs) and platinum–ruthenium-coated copper nanowires (PtRu/CuNWs) by galvanic displacement reaction using copper nanowires as a template. The PtRu compositional effect on MOR is investigated; the optimum Pt/Ru bulk atomic ratio is about 4 and surface atomic ratio about 1 for both PtRuNTs and PtRu/CuNWs. Enhanced specific MOR activities are observed on both PtRuNTs and PtRu/CuNWs compared with the benchmark commercial carbon-supported PtRu catalyst (PtRu/C, Hispec 12100). Finally, x-raymore » photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals a larger extent of electron transfer from Ru to Pt on PtRu/CuNWs, which may lead to a modification of the d-band center of Pt and consequently a weaker bonding of CO (the poisoning intermediate) on Pt and a higher MOR activity on PtRu/CuNWs.« less

  8. Oxygen Control of Atomic Structure and Physical Properties of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Properties of SrRuO3 Surfaces Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Oxygen Control of Atomic Structure and Physical Properties of SrRuO3 Surfaces Authors: Tselev, ...

  9. Microsoft Word - WIPP9000.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    88221 Fo WIPP r October 7 (WIPP) rec arking an cold war. nt mileston RU waste PP team ha ctive of the pment, wh PP at abou aste Treatm half of the IPP has re RU waste s Environm...

  10. ARM - Journal Articles 2014

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    ... ARM ASR Hu Insights on organic aerosol aging and the influence of coal combustion at a ... surface albedo from ground-based transmission data alone: Toward an operational ...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    ... (IE) (United States) USDOE Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence (IN) (United ... Coexistence of multiple metastable polytypes in rhombohedral bismuth Shu, Yu ; Hu, Wentao ...

  12. Rix Biodiesel Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rix Biodiesel Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: Rix Biodiesel Limited Place: Hull, United Kingdom Zip: HU8 7JR Product: Manufacture, blends and resells biodiesel....

  13. Neptune Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Neptune Renewable Energy Place: United Kingdom Zip: HU14 3JP Product: Tidal project developer. References: Neptune Renewable Energy1 This article is a stub. You...

  14. Multi-omics analysis reveals regulators of the response to nitrogen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Erin L. 1 ; Purvine, Samuel O. 1 ; Hu, Dehong 1 ; Metz, Thomas O. 1 ; Baker, Scott E. 1 + Show Author Affiliations Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), ...

  15. Development of 3rd Generation Advanced High Strength Steels ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    properties Limitations: Phase transformation and bainite, not considered Hu et al., Journal Paper in preparation. PNNL, CSM, EMSL Technical Accomplishment - Nano-SIMS...

  16. Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves by Periodic Resonator...

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    Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves by Periodic Resonator Arrays Prev Next Title: Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves by Periodic Resonator Arrays Authors: Hu,...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hu, Jun" Name Name ORCID Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report ThesisDissertation ...

  18. Wildlife Impact Assessment Palisades Project, Idaho, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather-Blair, Signe

    1985-02-01

    The Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate pre- and post-construction habitat conditions of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Palisades Project in eastern Idaho. Eight evaluation species were selected with losses expressed in the number of Habitat Units (HU's). One HU is equivalent to one acre of prime habitat. The evaluation estimated that a loss of 2454 HU's of mule deer habitat, 2276 HU's of mink habitat, 2622 HU's of mallard habitat, 805 HU's of Canada goose habitat, 2331 HU's of ruffed grouse habitat, 5941 and 18,565 HU's for breeding and wintering bald eagles, and 1336 and 704 HU's for forested and scrub-shrub wetland nongame species occurred as a result of the project. The study area currently has 29 active osprey nests located around the reservoir and the mudflats probably provide more feeding habitat for migratory shore birds and waterfowl than was previously available along the river. A comparison of flow conditions on the South Fork of the Snake River below the dam between pre- and post-construction periods also could not substantiate claims that water releases from the dam were causing more Canada goose nest losses than flow in the river prior to construction. 41 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Effect of sealing on the morphology of anodized aluminum oxide Hu, Naiping ; Dong, Xuecheng ; He, Xueying ; Browning, James F. ; Schaefer, Dale W. August 2015 , Elsevier ...

  20. Structure and dynamics of the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Kruse, Andrew C. ; Hu, Jianxin ; Pan, Albert C. ; Arlow, Daniel H. ; Rosenbaum, Daniel M. ; Rosemond, Erica ; Green, Hillary F. ; Liu, Tong ; Chae, Pil Seok ; Dror, Ron O. ...

  1. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

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    Full Text Available February 2013, American Physical Society Candidate Source of Flux Noise in SQUIDs: Adsorbed Oxygen Molecules Wang, Hui ; Shi, Chuntai ; Hu, Jun ; Han, Sungho...

  2. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    with distillate and gasoline production, respectively. In addition, data for planned maintenance on catalytic reforming units (CRU) and hydrocracking units (HU) are provided. The...

  3. Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) for Power...

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    This report summarizes major results of this research. Authors: Forsberg, Charles 1 ; Hu, Lin-wen 1 ; Peterson, Per 2 ; Sridharan, Kumar 3 + Show Author Affiliations ...

  4. Uranyl-Peroxide Nanocapsules in Aqueous Solution: Force Field...

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    Uranyl-Peroxide Nanocapsules in Aqueous Solution: Force Field Development and First Applications Previous Next List Pere Mir, Bess Vlaisavljevich, Allison L. Dzubak, Shuxian Hu,...

  5. SC0007842FinalTech.pdf

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Brazil He, Jie University of Miami Hryniw, Natalia University of Washington Hsu, Juno (Chia Hui) University of California - Irvine Hu, Ning Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ...

  6. 2011 - 09 | Jefferson Lab

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    9 Sep 2011 Thu, 2011-09-29 14:00 Oct. 25 Lecture Highlights Treatment Technology of HU's Proton Therapy Institute

  7. The Effects of Cold Work on the Microstructure and Mechanical...

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    that form upon casting. (C) The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society and ASM International 2015 Authors: Hu, B. ; Trotter, G. ; Baker, Ian ; Miller, M. K. ; Yao, L. ; ...

  8. Structure of the oxygen-annealed chalcogenide superconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    x Authors: Hu, Hefei ; Zuo, Jian-Min ; Zheng, Mao ; Eckstein, James N. ; Park, Wan Kyu ; Greene, Laura H. ; Wen, Jinsheng ; Xu, Zhijun ; Lin, Zhiwei ; Li, Qiang ; Gu,...

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    ... USDOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) (United States) USDOE Office of ... structure for high-performance flexible solid-state supercapacitors Hu, Nantao ; ...

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    ; Hu, Han-Shi ; Li, Jun, E-mail: junli@tsinghua.edu.cn ; William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, ...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    ... Nanotwinned diamond with unprecedented hardness and stability Huang, Quan ; Yu, Dongli ; ... November 2009 Superhard and high-strength yne-diamond semimetals Hu, Meng ; Huang, Quan ; ...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    ... ; Tian, Yongjun ; Yu, Dongli February 2016 , Nature Publishing Group Nanotwinned diamond with unprecedented hardness and stability Huang, Quan ; Yu, Dongli ; Xu, Bo ; Hu, ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    ... Nanotwinned diamond with unprecedented hardness and stability Huang, Quan ; Yu, Dongli ; Xu, Bo ; Hu, Wentao ; Ma, Yanming ; Wang, Yanbin ; Zhao, Zhisheng ; Wen, Bin ; He, Julong ; ...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Nanotwinned diamond with unprecedented hardness and stability Huang, Quan ; Yu, Dongli ; ... Superhard and high-strength yne-diamond semimetals Hu, Meng ; Huang, Quan ; Zhao, ...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    ... (ER) (United States) USDOE Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) (United States) ... methods (1) algebra (1) boltzmann statistics (1) Filter by Author Hu, Jonathan J. ...

  16. SU-E-J-267: Change in Mean CT Intensity of Lung Tumors During Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahon, R; Tennyson, N; Weiss, E; Hugo, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate CT intensity change of lung tumors during radiation therapy. Methods: Repeated 4D CT images were acquired on a CT simulator during the course of therapy for 27 lung cancer patients on IRB approved protocols. All subjects received definitive radiation treatment ± chemotherapy. CT scans were completed prior to treatment, and 2–7 times during the treatment course. Primary tumor was delineated by an experienced Radiation Oncologist. Contours were thresholded between −100 HU and 200 HU to remove airways and bone. Correlations between the change in the mean tumor intensity and initial tumor intensity, SUVmax, and tumor volume change rate were investigated. Reproducibility was assessed by evaluating the variation in mean intensity over all phases in 4DCT, for a subgroup of 19 subjects. Results: Reproducibility of tumor intensity between phases as characterized by the root mean square of standard deviation across 19 subjects was 1.8 HU. Subjects had a mean initial tumor intensity of 16.5 ± 11.6 HU and an overall reduction in HU by 10.3 ± 8.5 HU. Evaluation of the changes in tumor intensity during treatment showed a decrease of 0.3 ± 0.3 HU/day for all subjects, except three. No significant correlation was found between change in HU/day and initial HU intensity (p=0.53), initial PET SUVmax (p=0.69), or initial tumor volume (p=0.70). The rate of tumor volume change was weakly correlated (R{sup 2}=0.05) with HU change (p=0.01). Conclusion: Most lung cancer subjects showed a marked trend of decreasing mean tumor CT intensity throughout radiotherapy, including early in the treatment course. Change in HU/day is not correlated with other potential early predictors for response, such as SUV and tumor volume change. This Result supports future studies to evaluate change in tumor intensity on CT as an early predictor of response.

  17. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

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    Hong, Kunlun (1) Hu, Qiao-Sheng (1) Xing, Chun-Hui (1) Zhang, Honghai (1) Save Results ... or Pd2(dba)3t Bu3PArX as the Initiator Zhang, Honghai ; Xing, Chun-Hui ; Hu, Qiao-Sheng ...

  18. Size Effect of Ruthenium Nanoparticles in Catalytic Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joo, Sang Hoon; Park, Jeong Y.; Renzas, J. Russell; Butcher, Derek R.; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-04-04

    Carbon monoxide oxidation over ruthenium catalysts has shown an unusual catalytic behavior. Here we report a particle size effect on CO oxidation over Ru nanoparticle (NP) catalysts. Uniform Ru NPs with a tunable particle size from 2 to 6 nm were synthesized by a polyol reduction of Ru(acac){sub 3} precursor in the presence of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) stabilizer. The measurement of catalytic activity of CO oxidation over two-dimensional Ru NPs arrays under oxidizing reaction conditions (40 Torr CO and 100 Torr O{sub 2}) showed an activity dependence on the Ru NP size. The CO oxidation activity increases with NP size, and the 6 nm Ru NP catalyst shows 8-fold higher activity than the 2 nm catalysts. The results gained from this study will provide the scientific basis for future design of Ru-based oxidation catalysts.

  19. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/'MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1.CNRC DCODE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... JA PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND 6 99 MEASUREMENT PLAN (PEMP) J.5 PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE ... JA PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND 9 99 MEASUREMENT PLAN (PEMP) J.5 PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE ...

  20. Steric Effect for Proton, Hydrogen-Atom, andHydride Transfer Reactions with Geometric Isomers of NADH-Model Ruthenium Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita E.; Cohen, B.W.; Polyansky, D.E.; Achord, P.; Cabelli, D.; Muckerman, J.T.; Tanaka, K.; Thummel, R.P.; Zong, R.

    2012-01-01

    Two isomers, [Ru(1)]{sup 2+} (Ru = Ru(bpy){sub 2}, bpy = 2,2{prime}-bipyridine, 1 = 2-(pyrid-2{prime}-yl)-1-azaacridine) and [Ru(2)]{sup 2+} (2 = 3-(pyrid-2{prime}-yl)-4-azaacridine), are bio-inspired model compounds containing the nicotinamide functionality and can serve as precursors for the photogeneration of C-H hydrides for studying reactions pertinent to the photochemical reduction of metal-C{sub 1} complexes and/or carbon dioxide. While it has been shown that the structural differences between the azaacridine ligands of [Ru(1)]{sup 2+} and [Ru(2)]{sup 2+} have a significant effect on the mechanism of formation of the hydride donors, [Ru(1HH)]{sup 2+} and [Ru(2HH)]{sup 2+}, in aqueous solution, we describe the steric implications for proton, net-hydrogen-atom and net-hydride transfer reactions in this work. Protonation of [Ru(2{sup {sm_bullet}-})]{sup +} in aprotic and even protic media is slow compared to that of [Ru(1{sup {sm_bullet}-})]{sup +}. The net hydrogen-atom transfer between *[Ru(1)]{sup 2+} and hydroquinone (H{sub 2}Q) proceeds by one-step EPT, rather than stepwise electron-proton transfer. Such a reaction was not observed for *[Ru(2)]{sup 2+} because the non-coordinated N atom is not easily available for an interaction with H{sub 2}Q. Finally, the rate of the net hydride ion transfer from [Ru(1HH)]{sup 2+} to [Ph{sub 3}C]{sup +} is significantly slower than that of [Ru(2HH)]{sup 2+} owing to steric congestion at the donor site.

  1. Strong influence of coadsorbate interaction on CO desorption dynamics on

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ru(0001) probed by ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and ab initio simulations (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Strong influence of coadsorbate interaction on CO desorption dynamics on Ru(0001) probed by ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and ab initio simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Strong influence of coadsorbate interaction on CO desorption dynamics on Ru(0001) probed by ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and ab initio simulations We show that coadsorbed oxygen

  2. A first principles analysis of the hydrogenation of C1C4 aldehydes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    oxygenate molecules can influence their chemisorption and reactivity on metal surfaces. ... mode onto the Ru(0001) surface and result in rehybridization of the CO bond. ...

  3. Revealing a steroid receptor ligand as a unique PPAR[gamma] agonist...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    regulates metabolic homeostasis and is a molecular target for anti-diabetic drugs. ... Similar to rosiglitazone, RU-486 modulates the expression of key PPARgamma target genes ...

  4. The biokinetics of ruthenium in the human body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2011-01-01

    The biokinetics of ruthenium (Ru) in the human body is of interest due mainly to the potential for occupational or environmental exposure to 106Ru (T1/2 = 373.6 d) and 103Ru (T1/2 = 39.3 d), which typically represent a significant portion of the fission products in a reactor inventory. During reactor operations or nuclear fuel reprocessing these ruthenium isotopes may be present as ruthenium tetroxide (RuO4) vapor, a highly mobile form of ruthenium that has been involved in a number of cases of accidental exposure to 106Ru or 103Ru. This paper summarizes the biokinetic database for ruthenium and proposes a new respiratory model for inhaled RuO4 vapor, a new biokinetic for systemic (absorbed) ruthenium, and material-specific gastrointestinal absorption fractions for ruthenium. The proposed respiratory model for RuO4 differs from the current ICRP model mainly in that it depicts slower clearance of deposited activity from the respiratory tract and lower absorption to blood than depicted in the current ICRP model. The proposed systemic biokinetic model depicts more realistic paths of movement of absorbed ruthenium in the body than the current ICRP model and, in contrast to the present model, a less uniform distribution of systemic activity. Implications of the proposed models with regard to inhalation and ingestion dose coefficients for 106Ru are examined.

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    ... quantum mechanics, general physics (1) graphene (1) photoelectron spectroscopy (1) ... Facile oxygen intercalation between full layer graphene and Ru(0001) under ambient ...

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    ... Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Facile oxygen intercalation between full layer graphene and Ru(0001) under ambient conditions Dong, Aiyi ; Fu, ...

  7. Modified magnetism within the coherence volume of superconducting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Leiner J. ; Thampy V. ; Christianson, A. D. ; Abernathy, D. L. ; Stone, M. B. ; Lumsden, M. D. ; Sefat, A. S. ; Sales, B. C. ; Hu, Jin ; Mao, Zhiqiang ; Bao, Wei ; ...

  8. A Compact, Low-Power Cantilever-Based Sensor Array for Chemical...

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    Authors: Loui, A ; Ratto, T ; Wilson, T ; Mukerjee, E ; Hu, Z ; Sulchek, T ; Hart, B Publication Date: 2007-02-22 OSTI Identifier: 909629 Report Number(s): UCRL-CONF-228511 TRN: ...

  9. Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-X-2014_Development of Fiber Optic Sensors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Chem. 2008, 80, 4269-4283. Wong, W. C.; Chan, C. C.; Hu, P.; Chan, J. R.; Low, Y. T.; Dong, X.; Leong, K. C. Miniature pH optical fiber sensor based on waist-enlarged bitaper and ...

  10. MOF Coating a Promising Path to White LEDs

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    Hu et al. designed a new yellow phosphor with high quantum yield by immobilizing a preslected chromophore into the rigid framework of a metal-organic framework (MOF); the structure ...

  11. Slow light Mach-Zehnder interferometer as label-free biosensor...

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    Moreover, the experimental bulk refractive index detection sensitivity of 84,000 radRIU-cm is realized and nucleic acid detection is also demonstrated. Authors: Qin, Kun 1 ; Hu, ...

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    Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report ThesisDissertation ... VOx Catalysts by High-Field and Fast-Spinning 51V MAS NMR Hu, Jian Z. ; Xu, Suochang ; ...

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    Hu, Chia-Yu (2) Save Results Save this search to My Library Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit 5000) XML (limit 5000) Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? ...

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    ... by reducing HuR-mediated MMP-9 mRNA stability for the inhibition of invasive potential ... site in the transmembrane core to the cytoplasmic G-protein-coupling domains. ...

  15. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

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    Mary S. (2) Paa-Toli, Ljiljana (2) Wu, Si (2) Zhao, Rui (2) Baker, Scott E. (1) Brown, Roslyn N. (1) Deng, Shuang (1) Feng, Ju (1) Hu, Jian Zhi (1) Jiang, Yuxuan (1) Meng,...

  16. Pulse Tidal formerly Pulse Generation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    formerly Pulse Generation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pulse Tidal (formerly Pulse Generation) Place: Hull, England, United Kingdom Zip: HU5 3LP Product: UK-based developer of...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    ... Chakravarthy, Srinivas (1) Ellingboe, John (1) Frank, David A. (1) Golas, Jennifer (1) Gopalsamy, Ariamala (1) Hu, Tiancen (1) Johnson, Mark (1) Kim, Hak J. (1) Lee, Frederick (1) ...

  18. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - CNMS Research

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    and manipulation of the competing electronic phases near the Mott metal-insulator transition Tae-Hwan Kim1, M. Angst2, B. Hu3, R. Jin3, X. G. Zhang1, J. F. Wendelken1, E. W....

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    ... The pair-distribution function (PDF) analysis of the same data found that the local ... in Germanium Anodes in Lithium-Ion Batteries Jung, Hyeyoung ; Allan, Phoebe K ; Hu, ...

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    ... Elucidation of the Local and Long-Range Structural Changes that Occur in Germanium Anodes in Lithium-Ion Batteries Jung, Hyeyoung ; Allan, Phoebe K ; Hu, Yan-Yan ; Borkiewicz, Olaf ...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Elucidation of the Local and Long-Range Structural Changes that Occur in Germanium Anodes in Lithium-Ion Batteries Jung, Hyeyoung ; Allan, Phoebe K ; Hu, Yan-Yan ; Borkiewicz, Olaf ...

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    ... deposition (1) dna (1) dna damages (1) dna replication (1) entropy (1) genes (1) heat-shock proteins (1) Filter by Author Hu, Qi (2) Mer, Georges (2) Su, Dan (2) Zhang, Zhiguo (2) ...

  3. Human 3[alpha]-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3: structural...

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    and enzyme down-regulation decreasing MCF7 cell growth Citation Details In-Document Search ... and enzyme down-regulation decreasing MCF7 cell growth Authors: Zhang, Bo ; Hu, Xiao-Jian ...

  4. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

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    Holesinger, Terry G. (1) Hu, Xiao (1) Kim, Jeehoon (1) Koshelev, Alexei E. (1) Lin, Shi -Zeng (1) McDonald, Ross D. (1) Save Results Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit 5000) XML (limit ...

  5. 14.11.05 RH Stabilized Si Microwire - JCAP

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    Stabilized Si Microwire Arrays for Solar-Driven H2O Oxidation Shaner, M. R., Hu, S., Sun, ... O2 for >2200 h with near 100% Faradaic efficiency under simulated 1 Sun illumination. ...

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    ... USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) (United States) USDOE Office ... FeO and FeOOH under deep lower-mantle conditions and Earth's oxygen-hydrogen cycles Hu, ...

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    Search for: All records 2 results for: All records CreatorsAuthors contains: "Zhang, ... Bonnesen, Peter V. (1) Hu, Qiao-Sheng (1) Xing, Chun-Hui (1) Zhang, Honghai (1) Zhang, ...

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    Zhu, Leyi (6) Dagotto, Elbio R (5) Hu, Bin (5) Zhang, Xiaoguang (5) Chi, Miaofang (4) ... Paul C ; Ward, Thomas Zac ; Gai, Zheng ; Zhang, Xiaoguang ; Shen, Jian January 2014 ...

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    Search for: All records CreatorsAuthors contains: "Zhang, Hong -Hai" Sort by Relevance ... Filter by Author Hong, Kunlun (1) Hu, Qiao -Sheng (1) Zhang, Hong -Hai (1) Save Results ...

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    ... under the static field of MRI magnet Mariappan, Leo ; Hu, Gang ; He, ... with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. ...

  11. Experimental observation of incoherent-coherent crossover and...

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    Authors: Liu, Z. K. ; Yi, M. ; Zhang, Y. ; Hu, J. ; Yu, R. ; Zhu, J.-X. ; He, R.-H. ; Chen, Y. L. ; Hashimoto, M. ; Moore, R. G. ; Mo, S.-K. ; Hussain, Z. ; Si, Q. ; Mao, Z. Q. ; ...

  12. Impact of Fixed Change on Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Barrier...

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    Title: Impact of Fixed Change on Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Barrier Height Reduction Authors: Hu, J. ; Nainani, A. ; Sun, Y. ; Saraswat, K.C. ; Wong, H.-S.P. Publication Date: ...

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    A GPU-based Calculation Method for Near Field Effects of Cherenkov Radiation Induced by Ultra High Energy Cosmic Neutrinos Hu, Chia-Yu ; Chen, Chih-Ching ; Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. ...

  14. Structure of the oxygen-annealed chalcogenide superconductor...

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    Fe1.08Te0.55Se0.45Ox Authors: Hu, Hefei ; Zuo, Jian-Min ; Zheng, Mao ; Eckstein, James N. ; Park, Wan Kyu ; Greene, Laura H. ; Wen, Jinsheng ; Xu, Zhijun ; Lin, Zhiwei ; Li,...

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    ... Allan, Phoebe K (1) Borkiewicz, Olaf (1) Chapman, Karena W. (1) Chupas, Peter J. (1) Du, Lin-Shu (1) Grey, Clare P. (1) Han, Wei-Qiang (1) Hu, Yan-Yan (1) Jung, Hyeyoung (1) ...

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    ... Chapman, Karena W. (1) Cheng, Jun (1) Chupas, Peter J. (1) Du, Lin-Shu (1) Dunstan, Matthew (1) Grey, Clare P. (1) Hu, Yan-Yan (1) Hua, Xiao (1) Liu, Zigeng (1) Nam, Kyung-Wan (1) ...

  17. Poster

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    HuMiChip: Development of a Functional Gene Array for the Study of Human Microbiomes Qichao Tu 1 , Ye Deng 1 , Lu Lin 12 , Jian Xu 2 , Chris L. Hemme 1 , Zhili He 1 , Jizhong Zhou 1 ...

  18. A GPU-based Calculation Method for Near Field Effects of Cherenkov...

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    Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. Authors: Hu, Chia-Yu ; Chen, Chih-Ching ; Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. ; Chen, Pisin ; Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U....

  19. HEI Report 133 Characterization of Metals Emitted from Motor...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... the help of Min-Suk Bae. Dr Robert Smith and students at the University of ... Atmos Environ 37:1163-1173. Aust AE, Ball JC, Hu AA, Lighty JS, Smith KR, Straccia AM, ...

  20. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Text4 Citation Only3 Filtered Results Filter Results Filter by Author Wu, Ruqian (7) Hu, Jun (4) Alicea, Jason (2) Franz, Marcel (2) Camley, Robert (1) Czap, Gregory (1) Fu,...

  1. Methods for producing complex films, and films produced thereby...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Duty, Chad E. ; Bennett, Charlee J. C. ; Moon, Ji -Won ; Phelps, Tommy J. ; Blue, Craig A. ; Dai, Quanqin ; Hu, Michael Z. ; Ivanov, Ilia N. ; Jellison, Jr., Gerald E. ; ...

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Shelton, William A. (8) Bylaska, Eric J. (6) Hu, Hanshi (5) Jarrell, Mark (5) Moreno, Juana (5) Villa, Oreste (5) Ma, Wenjing (4) Wang, Xue B. (4) Xantheas, Sotiris S. (4) Save ...

  3. Hungary: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Hungary Population 9,937,628 GDP 145,153,000,000 Energy Consumption 1.11 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code HU 3-letter ISO code HUN Numeric ISO...

  4. U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC) U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC) In November 2009, President Barack Obama and President Hu Jintao announced the establishment of the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC). In November 2009, President Barack Obama and President Hu Jintao announced the establishment of the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC). About CERC The U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC) operates under a bilateral diplomatic initiative to

  5. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF CO- AND H{sub 2}S-TOLERANT ELECTROCATALYSTS FOR PEM FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2005-04-05

    The present state-of-art Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) technology is based on platinum (Pt) as a catalyst for both the fuel (anode) and air (cathode) electrodes. This catalyst is highly active but susceptible to poisoning by CO, which may be present in the H{sub 2}-fuel used or may be introduced during the fuel processing. Presence of trace amount of CO and H{sub 2}S in the H{sub 2}-fuel poisons the anode irreversibly and decreases the performance of the PEMFCs. In an effort to reduce the Pt-loading and improve the PEMFC performance, we propose to synthesize a number of Pt-based binary, ternary, and quaternary electrocatalysts using Ru, Mo, Ir, Ni, and Co as a substitute for Pt. By fine-tuning the metal loadings and compositions of candidate electrocatalysts, we plan to minimize the cost and optimize the catalyst activity and performance in PEMFC. The feasibility of the novel electrocatalysts will be demonstrated in the proposed effort with gas phase CO and H{sub 2}S concentrations typical of those found in reformed fuel gas with coal/natural gas/methanol feedstocks. During this reporting period several tri-metallic electrocatalysts were synthesized using both ultra-sonication and conventional method. These catalysts (Pt/Ru/Mo, Pt/Ru/Ir, Pt/Ru/W, Ptr/Ru/Co, and Pt/Ru/Se on carbon) were tested in MEAs. From Galvonstatic study the catalytic activity was found in the order of: Pt/Ru/Mo/C > Pt/Ru/Ir/C > Pt/Ru/W/C > Ptr/Ru/Co/C > and Pt/Ru/Se. It appears that electrocatalysts prepared by ultra-sonication process are more active compared to the conventional technique. Work is in progress to further study these catalysts for CO-tolerance in PEMFC.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of CO- and H2S-Tolerant Electrocatalysts for PEM Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2005-07-20

    The present state-of-art Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) technology is based on platinum (Pt) as a catalyst for both the fuel (anode) and air (cathode) electrodes. This catalyst is highly active but susceptible to poisoning by CO, which may be present in the H{sub 2}-fuel used or may be introduced during the fuel processing. Presence of trace amount of CO and H{sub 2}S in the H{sub 2}-fuel poisons the anode irreversibly and decreases the performance of the PEMFCs. In an effort to reduce the Pt-loading and improve the PEMFC performance, we propose to synthesize a number of Pt-based binary, ternary, and quaternary electrocatalysts using Ru, Mo, Ir, Ni, and Co as a substitute for Pt. By fine-tuning the metal loadings and compositions of candidate electrocatalysts, we plan to minimize the cost and optimize the catalyst activity and performance in PEMFC. The feasibility of the novel electrocatalysts will be demonstrated in the proposed effort with gas phase CO and H{sub 2}S concentrations typical of those found in reformed fuel gas with coal/natural gas/methanol feedstocks. During this reporting period we synthesized several tri-metallic electrocatalysts catalysts (Pt/Ru/Mo, Pt/Ru/Ir, Pt/Ru/W, Ptr/Ru/Co, and Pt/Ru/Se on Vulcan XG72 Carbon) by ultrasonication method. These catalysts were tested in MEAs for CO tolerance at 20 and 100 ppm CO concentrations. From Galvonstatic study the catalytic activity was found in the order of: Pt/Ru/Mo/C > Pt/Ru/Ir/C > Pt/Ru/W/C > Ptr/Ru/Co/C > and Pt/Ru/Se. The catalysts performed very well at 20 ppm CO but at 100 ppm CO performance dropped significantly.

  7. New Catalysts for Direct Methanol Oxidation Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adzic, Radoslav

    1998-08-01

    A new class of efficient electrocatalytic materials based on platinum - metal oxide systems has been synthetized and characterized by several techniques. Best activity was found with NiWO{sub 4}-, CoWO{sub 4}-, and RuO{sub 2}- srpported platinum catalysts. A very similar activity at room temperature was observed with the electrodes prepared with the catalyst obtained from International Fuel Cells Inc. for the same Pt loading. Surprisingly, the two tungstates per se show a small activity for methanol oxidation without any Pt loading. Synthesis of NiWO{sub 4} and CoWO{sub 4} were carried out by solid-state reactions. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the tungstates contain a certain amount of physically adsorbed water even after heating samples at 200{degrees}C. A direct relationship between the activity for methanol oxidation and the amount of adsorbed water on those oxides has been found. The Ru(0001) single crystal shows a very small activity for CO adsorption and oxidation, in contrast to the behavior of polycrystalline Ru. In situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) showed that the OH adsorption on Ru in the Pt-Ru alloy appears to be the limiting step in methanol oxidation. This does not occur for Pt-RuO{SUB 2} electrocatalyst, which explains its advantages over the Pt-Ru alloys. The IFCC electrocatalyst has the properties of the Pt-Ru alloy.

  8. SEPARATION OF RUTHENIUM COMPOUNDS FROM GASEOUS MIXTURES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newby, B.J.; Hanson, D.A.; May, C.E.

    1960-12-13

    A process is given for removing RuO/sub 4/ from waste calcination off- gases by adsorption on silica gel, preferably of from 70 to 80 deg C. The RuO/sub 4/ can be eluted from the silica gel with water of a temperature between 60 and 70 deg C.

  9. SOME RECENT STUDIES IN RUGHENIUM ELECTROCHEMISTRY AND ELECTROCATALYSIS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MARINKOVIC, N.S.; VUKMIROVIC, M.B.; ADZIC, R.R.

    2006-08-01

    Ruthenium is a metal of a considerable importance in electrochemical science and technology. It is a catalyst or co-catalyst material in Pt-Ru alloys for methanol- and reformate hydrogen-oxidation in fuel cells, while ruthenium oxide, a component in chlorine-evolution catalysts, represents an attractive material for electrochemical supercapacitors. Its facile surface oxidation generates an oxygen-containing species that provides active oxygen in some reactions. Ru sites in Pt-Ru catalysts increase the ''CO tolerance'' of Pt in the catalytic oxidation-reaction in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) and in reformate hydrogen-oxidation in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). The mechanism of Ru action is not completely understood, although current consensus revolves around the so-called ''bifunctional mechanism'' wherein Ru provides oxygenated species to oxidize CO that blocks Pt sites, and has an electronic effect on Pt-CO interaction. While various studies of polycrystalline Ru go back several decades those involving single crystal surfaces and the structural sensitivity of reactions on Ru surfaces emerged only recently. Using well-ordered single crystalline surfaces brings useful information as the processes on realistic catalysts are far too complex to allow identification of the microscopic reaction steps. In this article, we focus on progress in model systems and conditions, such as electrochemistry and electrocatalysis on bare and Pt-modified well-ordered Ru(0001) and Ru(10{bar 1}0) single-crystal surfaces. We also review current understanding of the mechanistic principles of Pt-Ru systems and a new development of a Pt submonolayer on Ru support electrocatalyst. Ruthenium crystallizes in a hexagonal close-packed structure, (hcp). Figure 1.1 shows the two single crystal surfaces of Ru. The Ru(0001) surface possesses the densest, i.e. hexagonal arrangement of atoms, Fig. 1.1a. The other plane, Ru(10{bar 1}0), can have one of the two terminations of the

  10. An expert system framework for nondestructive waste assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, G.K.

    1996-10-01

    Management and disposition of transuranic (RU) waste forms necessitates determining entrained RU and associated radioactive material quantities as per National RU Waste Characterization Program requirements. Technical justification and demonstration of a given NDA method used to determine RU mass and uncertainty in accordance with program quality assurance is difficult for many waste forms. Difficulties are typically founded in waste NDA methods that employ standards compensation and/or employment of simplifying assumptions on waste form configurations. Capability to determine and justify RU mass and mass uncertainty can be enhanced through integration of waste container data/information using expert system and empirical data-driven techniques with conventional data acquisition and analysis. Presented is a preliminary expert system framework that integrates the waste form data base, alogrithmic techniques, statistical analyses, expert domain knowledge bases, and empirical artificial intelligence modules into a cohesive system. The framework design and bases in addition to module development activities are discussed.

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thornton, JA" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent ... Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records CreatorsAuthors contains: "Thornton, JA

  12. United States Government Department of Ener

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    using the property title transfer strategy. In 1999, the J.A. Jones Construction Services Company (J.A. Jones) was ... disclosed all internal control deficiencies that may have ...

  13. Unit-cell thick BaTiO{sub 3} blocks octahedral tilt propagation across oxide heterointerface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kan, Daisuke Aso, Ryotaro; Kurata, Hiroki; Shimakawa, Yuichi

    2014-05-14

    We fabricated SrRuO{sub 3}/BaTiO{sub 3}/GdScO{sub 3} heterostructures in which the BaTiO{sub 3} layer is one unit cell thick by pulsed laser deposition and elucidated how the BaTiO{sub 3} layer influences structural and magneto-transport properties of the SrRuO{sub 3} layer through octahedral connections across the heterointerface. Our X-ray-diffraction-based structural characterizations show that while an epitaxial SrRuO{sub 3} layer grown directly on a GdScO{sub 3} substrate is in the monoclinic phase with RuO{sub 6} octahedral tilts, a one-unit-cell-thick BaTiO{sub 3} layer inserted between SrRuO{sub 3} and GdScO{sub 3} stabilizes the tetragonal SrRuO{sub 3} layer with largely reduced RuO{sub 6} tilts. Our high-angle annular dark-field and annular bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy observations provide an atomic-level view of the octahedral connections across the heterostructure and reveal that the BaTiO{sub 3} layer only one unit cell thick is thick enough to stabilize the RuO{sub 6}-TiO{sub 6} octahedral connections with negligible in-plane oxygen atomic displacements. This results in no octahedral tilts propagating into the SrRuO{sub 3} layer and leads to the formation of a tetragonal SrRuO{sub 3} layer. The magneto-transport property characterizations also reveal a strong impact of the octahedral connections modified by the inserted BaTiO{sub 3} layer on the spin-orbit interaction of the SrRuO{sub 3} layer. The SrRuO{sub 3} layer on BaTiO{sub 3}/ GdScO{sub 3} has in-plane magnetic anisotropy. This is in contrast to the magnetic anisotropy of the monoclinic SrRuO{sub 3} films on the GdScO{sub 3} substrate, in which the easy axis is ?45 to the film surface normal. Our results demonstrate that the one-unit-cell-thick layer of BaTiO{sub 3} can control and manipulate the interfacial octahedral connection closely linked to the structure-property relationship of heterostructures.

  14. Relation between combustion heat and chemical wood composition during white and brown rot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobry, J.; Dziurzynski, A.; Rypacek, V.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of beech and spruce wood were incubated with the white rot fungi Pleurotus ostreatus and Lentinus tigrinus and the brown rot fungi Fomitopsis pinicola and Serpula lacrymans (S. lacrimans) for four months. Decomposition (expressed as percent weight loss) and amounts of holocellulose, lignin, humic acids (HU), hymatomelanic acids (HY) and fulvo acids (FU) were determined and expressed in weight percent. Combustion heat of holocellulose and lignin was determined in healthy wood and in specimens where decomposition was greater than 50%. During white rot decomposition, combustion heat was unchanged even at high decomposition and the relative amounts of holocellulose and lignin remained the same. Total amounts of HU, HY and FU increased during the initial stages and stabilized at 20%. The content of HU plus HY was negligible even at the highest degree of decomposition. During brown rot decomposition, combustion heat was unchanged only in the initial stages, it increased continously with increasing rot. Lignin content was unchanged in the initial stages and increased after 30% weight loss. Total amounts of HU, HY and FU increased continuously, reaching higher values than in white rot decomposition; there were differences between the two species. Biosynthesis of HU plus HY began when weight loss reached 30%; there were differences in absolute and relative amounts between species. 24 references.

  15. Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dell'Angela, M.; Anniyev, T.; Beye, M.; Coffee, R.; Föhlisch, A.; Gladh, J.; Kaya, S.; Katayama, T.; Krupin, O.; Nilsson, A.; et al

    2015-03-01

    Vacuum space charge-induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES) have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL) for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001). We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse.

  16. Ruthenium / aerogel nanocomposits via Atomic Layer Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biener, J; Baumann, T F; Wang, Y; Nelson, E J; Kucheyev, S O; Hamza, A V; Kemell, M; Ritala, M; Leskela, M

    2006-08-28

    We present a general approach to prepare metal/aerogel nanocomposites via template directed atomic layer deposition (ALD). In particular, we used a Ru ALD process consisting of alternating exposures to bis(cyclopentadienyl)ruthenium (RuCp{sub 2}) and air at 350 C to deposit metallic Ru nanoparticles on the internal surfaces of carbon and silica aerogels. The process does not affect the morphology of the aerogel template and offers excellent control over metal loading by simply adjusting the number of ALD cycles. We also discuss the limitations of our ALD approach, and suggest ways to overcome these.

  17. Microsoft Word - Section J Appendix A MOd 0192

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Section J, Appendix A J-A-1 ATTACHMENT J.1 APPENDIX A ADVANCE UNDERSTANDINGS ON HUMAN RESOURCES Applicable to the Operation of AMES Laboratory Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 Contract Modification No. 0192 Section J, Appendix A J-A-2 Table of Contents Appendix A AMES LABORATORY ADVANCE UNDERSTANDINGS ON HUMAN RESOURCES I. INTRODUCTION J-A-3 II. HUMAN RESOURCES STRATEGY, BUSINESS PLANNING AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT J-A-4 III. COMPENSATION J-A-4 IV. ANCILLARY PAY

  18. MODELING THE NONLINEAR CLUSTERING IN MODIFIED GRAVITY MODELS. I. A FITTING FORMULA FOR THE MATTER POWER SPECTRUM OF f(R) GRAVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2014-04-01

    Based on a suite of N-body simulations of the Hu-Sawicki model of f(R) gravity with different sets of model and cosmological parameters, we develop a new fitting formula with a numeric code, MGHalofit, to calculate the nonlinear matter power spectrum P(k) for the Hu-Sawicki model. We compare the MGHalofit predictions at various redshifts (z ? 1) to the f(R) simulations and find that the relative error of the MGHalofit fitting formula of P(k) is no larger than 6% at k ? 1 h Mpc{sup 1} and 12% at k in (1, 10] h Mpc{sup 1}, respectively. Based on a sensitivity study of an ongoing and a future spectroscopic survey, we estimate the detectability of a signal of modified gravity described by the Hu-Sawicki model using the power spectrum up to quasi-nonlinear scales.

  19. Human monoclonal antibodies derived from a patient infected with 2009 pandemic influenza A virus broadly cross-neutralize group 1 influenza viruses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Yang; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Du, Anariwa; and others

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: Influenza infection can elicit heterosubtypic antibodies to group 1 influenza virus. Three human monoclonal antibodies were generated from an H1N1-infected patient. The antibodies predominantly recognized ?-helical stem of viral hemagglutinin (HA). The antibodies inhibited HA structural activation during the fusion process. The antibodies are potential candidates for future antibody therapy to influenza. - Abstract: Influenza viruses are a continuous threat to human public health because of their ability to evolve rapidly through genetic drift and reassortment. Three human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) were generated in this study, 1H11, 2H5 and 5G2, and they cross-neutralize a diverse range of group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H5N1 and H9N2. The three HuMAbs were prepared by fusing peripheral blood lymphocytes from an H1N1pdm-infected patient with a newly developed fusion partner cell line, SPYMEG. All the HuMAbs had little hemagglutination inhibition activity but had strong membrane-fusion inhibition activity against influenza viruses. A protease digestion assay showed the HuMAbs targeted commonly a short ?-helix region in the stalk of the hemagglutinin. Furthermore, Ile45Phe and Glu47Gly double substitutions in the ?-helix region made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAbs. These two amino acid residues are highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1, H5N1 and H9N2 viruses. The HuMAbs reported here may be potential candidates for the development of therapeutic antibodies against group 1 influenza viruses.

  20. SU-E-I-63: Quantitative Evaluation of the Effects of Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction (OMAR) Software On CT Images for Radiotherapy Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jani, S [Sharp Memorial Hospital, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: CT simulation for patients with metal implants can often be challenging due to artifacts that obscure tumor/target delineation and normal organ definition. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction (OMAR), a commercially available software, in reducing metal-induced artifacts and its effect on computed dose during treatment planning. Methods: CT images of water surrounding metallic cylindrical rods made of aluminum, copper and iron were studied in terms of Hounsfield Units (HU) spread. Metal-induced artifacts were characterized in terms of HU/Volume Histogram (HVH) using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Effects of OMAR on enhancing our ability to delineate organs on CT and subsequent dose computation were examined in nine (9) patients with hip implants and two (2) patients with breast tissue expanders. Results: Our study characterized water at 1000 HU with a standard deviation (SD) of about 20 HU. The HVHs allowed us to evaluate how the presence of metal changed the HU spread. For example, introducing a 2.54 cm diameter copper rod in water increased the SD in HU of the surrounding water from 20 to 209, representing an increase in artifacts. Subsequent use of OMAR brought the SD down to 78. Aluminum produced least artifacts whereas Iron showed largest amount of artifacts. In general, an increase in kVp and mA during CT scanning showed better effectiveness of OMAR in reducing artifacts. Our dose analysis showed that some isodose contours shifted by several mm with OMAR but infrequently and were nonsignificant in planning process. Computed volumes of various dose levels showed <2% change. Conclusions: In our experience, OMAR software greatly reduced the metal-induced CT artifacts for the majority of patients with implants, thereby improving our ability to delineate tumor and surrounding organs. OMAR had a clinically negligible effect on computed dose within tissues. Partially funded by unrestricted

  1. Conformational Melding Permits a Conserved Binding Geometry in TCR Recognition of Foreign and Self Molecular Mimics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Baker, Brian M.

    2012-03-16

    Molecular mimicry between foreign and self Ags is a mechanism of TCR cross-reactivity and is thought to contribute to the development of autoimmunity. The {alpha}{beta} TCR A6 recognizes the foreign Ag Tax from the human T cell leukemia virus-1 when presented by the class I MHC HLA-A2. In a possible link with the autoimmune disease human T cell leukemia virus-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, A6 also recognizes a self peptide from the neuronal protein HuD in the context of HLA-A2. We found in our study that the complexes of the HuD and Tax epitopes with HLA-A2 are close but imperfect structural mimics and that in contrast with other recent structures of TCRs with self Ags, A6 engages the HuD Ag with the same traditional binding mode used to engage Tax. Although peptide and MHC conformational changes are needed for recognition of HuD but not Tax and the difference of a single hydroxyl triggers an altered TCR loop conformation, TCR affinity toward HuD is still within the range believed to result in negative selection. Probing further, we found that the HuD-HLA-A2 complex is only weakly stable. Overall, these findings help clarify how molecular mimicry can drive self/nonself cross-reactivity and illustrate how low peptide-MHC stability can permit the survival of T cells expressing self-reactive TCRs that nonetheless bind with a traditional binding mode.

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search Authors Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent Journal Article Miscellaneous ... ; Morozkin, A.V., E-mail: morozkin@tech.chem.msu.ru ; Ivanova, T.I. ; Koshkid'ko, Yu.S. ...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Castro Neto, Antonio H. ; et al Full Text Available March 2015 , American Physical Society Epitaxial growth of large-area bilayer graphene on Ru(0001) Que, Yande ; Xiao, Wende, E-m...

  4. Characterization of Palladium and Ruthenium after Reaction with Tetraphenylborate and Mercury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duff, M.C.

    2001-09-11

    This report documents a second series of X-ray fine structure and chemical analyses to examine the form that Pd - and, to a lesser extent, ruthenium (Ru) - takes in simulated high-level slurries containing TPB salts.

  5. Platinum Nickel Nanowires as Methanol Oxidation Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alia, Shaun M.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Neyerlin, Kenneth C.; Kocha, Shyam S.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-08-27

    We investigated platinum(Pt) nickel (Ni) nanowires (PtNiNWs) as methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) catalysts in rotating disk electrode (RDE) half-cells under acidic conditions. Pt-ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles have long been the state of the art MOR catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) where Ru provides oxophilic sites, lowering the potential for carbon monoxide oxidation and the MOR onset. Ru, however, is a precious metal that has long term durability concerns. Ni/Ni oxide species offer a potential to replace Ru in MOR electrocatalysis. PtNiNWs were investigated for MOR and oxygen annealing was investigated as a route to improve catalyst performance (mass activity 65% greater) and stability to potential cycling. Our results presented show that PtNiNWs offer significant promise in the area, but also result in Ni ion leaching that is a concern requiring further evaluation in fuel cells.

  6. Platinum Nickel Nanowires as Methanol Oxidation Electrocatalysts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alia, Shaun M.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Neyerlin, Kenneth C.; Kocha, Shyam S.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-08-27

    We investigated platinum(Pt) nickel (Ni) nanowires (PtNiNWs) as methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) catalysts in rotating disk electrode (RDE) half-cells under acidic conditions. Pt-ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles have long been the state of the art MOR catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) where Ru provides oxophilic sites, lowering the potential for carbon monoxide oxidation and the MOR onset. Ru, however, is a precious metal that has long term durability concerns. Ni/Ni oxide species offer a potential to replace Ru in MOR electrocatalysis. PtNiNWs were investigated for MOR and oxygen annealing was investigated as a route to improve catalyst performance (mass activitymore » 65% greater) and stability to potential cycling. Our results presented show that PtNiNWs offer significant promise in the area, but also result in Ni ion leaching that is a concern requiring further evaluation in fuel cells.« less

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Future directions for research are also discussed. less January 2012 , Oxford University Press, Oxford, United Kingdom Strain-induced topological transition in SrRu2O6 and ...

  8. Microsoft Word - Tacoma-Raver-Substation-Antenna-CX.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EH ZRUNLQJ ZLWKLQ WKH HLVWLQJ&15; JUDYHOHG VXEVWDWLRQ DUGV DQG FRQWURO KRXVHV&30; WKHUH LV QR YHJHWDWLRQ LQ WKH DUGV DQG QR KDELWDW RU VSHFLDO DUHDV RI LQWHUHVW WKDW ZRXOG EH...

  9. Elucidating Hydrogen Oxidation/Evolution Kinetics in Base and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Elucidating Hydrogen OxidationEvolution Kinetics in Base and Acid by Enhanced Activities at the Optimized Pt Shell Thickness on the Ru Core Citation Details In-Document Search...

  10. Bioenergy Technology Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bioenergy Technology Ltd Place: East Sussex, United Kingdom Zip: TN22 5RU Sector: Biomass Product: Firm dedicated to the use of...

  11. Hammerfest Strom UK co owned by StatoilHydro | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: Hammerfest Strom UK co owned by StatoilHydro Address: The Innovation Centre 1 Ainslie Road Hillington Business Park Place: Glasgow Zip: G52 4RU Region:...

  12. Sisters in Science | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    her sister Molly is an engineer at NASA. Meanwhile, Ru-Shyan Yen chose ... Molly developed an interest in aerodynamics, and now works as an engineer at the NASA ...

  13. Effects of heat and mass transfer on the kinetics of CO oxidation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects of heat and mass transfer on the kinetics of CO oxidation over RuO2(110) catalyst Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effects of heat and mass transfer on the ...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Effects of heat and mass transfer on the kinetics of CO oxidation over RuO2(110) catalyst Mei, Donghai ; Lin, Guang By combining first-principles kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) ...

  15. 7Be

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7Be(EC); measured decay products, E, I; deduced precise T12 values for different materials. Measurements for Branching Ratios 1938RU01: 7Be. 1948KU10: 7Be; measured E....

  16. Microsoft Word - 11-0656 _signature on file_.docx

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    RU:MAG:11-0656:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 August 17, 2011 Mr. John Kieling, Acting Chief Hazardous Waste...

  17. DATE

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    ... by ETI-039 1RQURDG (QJLQHV WKH JHQHUDWRUV FDQ EH RSHUDWHG XS WR PRQWKV RU OHVV UHJDUGOHVV RI VLH DW WKH project location without being subject to air permitting requirements. ...

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... (RASA) Program, ORNWIU-8600, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge Natl. ... SOIL SAMPLE 0 YlscRuINpoos SAMPLE VUMCC GREEN AP- 7-13pRh FEET 0 5 10 d 013 6 METERS ...

  19. Allocation of Flight Hours

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Allocation of Flight Hours for G-1 Pattern Number Name/Description Hours per flight Number of Flights Total # of Hours Fraction of Allotment (60hrs) Likely Start Time Weather Conditions 1 Stack Pattern 1 (Instrument testing) 3.5 1 3.5 6% 10:00-12:00 Shallow clouds, Cu Hu- Cu Me, Ci are okay 2 Stack Pattern 2 Basic OKC Cloudy Air Flight Plan (some in coordination with ER-2) 3.5 5 17.5 30% 10:00-12:00 Shallow clouds, Cu Hu- Cu Me, Ci are okay 3 Stack Pattern 3 Basic OKC Clear Air Flight Plan 3.5 5

  20. Localization of human elav-like neuronal protein 1 (Hel-N1) on chromosome 9p21 by chromosome microdissection polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Jian; Knops, J.F.; Longshore, J.W.; King, P.H.

    1996-08-15

    Hel-N1 is a member of the highly conserved elav family of neuronal genes. It shares considerable sequence homology with HuD, another human member, and both genes are expressed in brain. HuD was recently mapped to chromosome 1p34. Here, we have utilized chromosome microdissection polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization to map Hel-N1 to chromosome 9p21. The different chromosomal locations of these homologous genes underscore their distinct identities. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Self-oscillating AB diblock copolymer developed by post modification strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueki, Takeshi E-mail: ryo@cross.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Onoda, Michika; Tamate, Ryota; Yoshida, Ryo E-mail: ryo@cross.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2015-06-15

    We prepared AB diblock copolymer composed of hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide) segment and self-oscillating polymer segment. In the latter segment, ruthenium tris(2,2′-bipyridine) (Ru(bpy){sub 3}), a catalyst of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, is introduced into the polymer architecture based on N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm). The Ru(bpy){sub 3} was introduced into the polymer segment by two methods; (i) direct random copolymerization (DP) of NIPAAm and Ru(bpy){sub 3} vinyl monomer and (ii) post modification (PM) of Ru(bpy){sub 3} with random copolymer of NIPAAm and N-3-aminopropylmethacrylamide. For both the diblock copolymers, a bistable temperature region (the temperature range; ΔT{sub m}), where the block copolymer self-assembles into micelle at reduced Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} state whereas it breaks-up into individual polymer chain at oxidized Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 3+} state, monotonically extends as the composition of the Ru(bpy){sub 3} increases. The ΔT{sub m} of the block copolymer prepared by PM is larger than that by DP. The difference in ΔT{sub m} is rationalized from the statistical analysis of the arrangement of the Ru(bpy){sub 3} moiety along the self-oscillating segments. By using the PM method, the well-defined AB diblock copolymer having ΔT{sub m} (ca. 25 °C) large enough to cause stable self-oscillation can be prepared. The periodic structural transition of the diblock copolymer in a dilute solution ([Polymer] = 0.1 wt. %) is closely investigated in terms of the time-resolved dynamic light scattering technique at constant temperature in the bistable region. A macroscopic viscosity oscillation of a concentrated polymer solution (15 wt. %) coupled with the periodic microphase separation is also demonstrated.

  2. Vapor Synthesis and Thermal Modification of Supportless Platinum–Ruthenium Nanotubes and Application as Methanol Electrooxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson III, Robert W.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Zawodzinski, Jr., Thomas A.; Papandrew, Alexander B.

    2015-04-23

    Metallic, mixed-phase, and alloyed bimetallic Pt-Ru nanotubes were synthesized by a novel route based on the sublimation of metal acetylacetonate precursors and their subsequent vapor deposition within anodic alumina templates. Nanotube architectures were tuned by thermal annealing treatments. As-synthesized nanotubes are composed of nanoparticulate, metallic platinum and hydrous ruthenium oxide whose respective thicknesses depend on the sample chemical composition. The Pt-decorated, hydrous Ru oxide nanotubes may be thermally annealed to promote a series of chemical and physical changes to the nanotube structures including alloy formation, crystallite growth and morphological evolution. Annealed Pt-Ru alloy nanotubes and their as-synthesized analogs demonstrate relatively high specific activities for the oxidation of methanol. As-synthesized, mixed-phase Pt-Ru nanotubes (0.39 mA/cm2) and metallic alloyed Pt64Ru36NTs (0.33 mA/cm2) have considerably higher area-normalized activities than PtRu black (0.22 mA/cm2) at 0.65 V vs. RHE.

  3. Research Update: Interface-engineered oxygen octahedral tilts in perovskite oxide heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kan, Daisuke Aso, Ryotaro; Kurata, Hiroki; Shimakawa, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    Interface engineering of structural distortions is a key for exploring the functional properties of oxide heterostructures and superlattices. In this paper, we report on our comprehensive investigations of oxygen octahedral distortions at the heterointerface between perovskite oxides SrRuO{sub 3} and BaTiO{sub 3} on GdScO{sub 3} substrates and of the influences of the interfacially engineered distortions on the magneto-transport properties of the SrRuO{sub 3} layer. Our state-of-the-art annular bright-field imaging in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy revealed that the RuO{sub 6} octahedral distortions in the SrRuO{sub 3} layer have strong dependence on the stacking order of the SrRuO{sub 3} and BaTiO{sub 3} layers on the substrate. This can be attributed to the difference in the interfacial octahedral connections. We also found that the stacking order of the oxide layers has a strong impact on the magneto-transport properties, allowing for control of the magnetic anisotropy of the SrRuO{sub 3} layer through interface engineering. Our results demonstrate the significance of the interface engineering of the octahedral distortions on the structural and physical properties of perovskite oxides.

  4. Vapor Synthesis and Thermal Modification of Supportless Platinum-Ruthenium Nanotubes and Application as Methanol Electrooxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson III, Robert; Unocic, Raymond R; Unocic, Kinga A; Veith, Gabriel M; Papandrew, Alexander B; Zawodzinski, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    Metallic, mixed-phase, and alloyed bimetallic Pt-Ru nanotubes were synthesized by a novel route based on the sublimation of metal acetylacetonate precursors and their subsequent vapor deposition within anodic alumina templates. Nanotube architectures were tuned by thermal annealing treatments. As-synthesized nanotubes are composed of nanoparticulate, metallic platinum and hydrous ruthenium oxide whose respective thicknesses depend on the sample chemical composition. The Pt-decorated, hydrous Ru oxide nanotubes may be thermally annealed to promote a series of chemical and physical changes to the nanotube structures including alloy formation, crystallite growth and morphological evolution. Annealed Pt-Ru alloy nanotubes and their as-synthesized analogs demonstrate relatively high specific activities for the oxidation of methanol. As-synthesized, mixed-phase Pt-Ru nanotubes (0.39 mA/cm2) and metallic alloyed Pt64Ru36NTs (0.33 mA/cm2) have considerably higher area-normalized activities than PtRu black (0.22 mA/cm2) at 0.65 V vs. RHE.

  5. Probing the Electronic Structure of a Photoexcited Solar Cell Dye with Transient X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiken, Benjamin E. Van; Huse, Nils; Cho, Hana; Strader, Matthew L.; Lynch, Michael S.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Khalil, Munira

    2012-05-01

    This study uses transient X-ray absorption (XA) spectroscopy and timedependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to directly visualize the charge density around the metal atom and the surrounding ligands following an ultrafast metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) process in the widely used RuII solar cell dye, Ru(dcbpy)2(NCS)2 (termed N3). We measure the Ru L-edge XA spectra of the singlet ground (1A1) and the transient triplet (3MLCT) excited state of N34 and perform TD-DFT calculations of 2p core-level excitations, which identify a unique spectral signature of the electron density on the NCS ligands. We find that the Ru 2p, Ru eg, and NCS orbitals are stabilized by 2.0, 1.0, and 0.6 eV, respectively, in the transient 3MLCT state of the dye. These results highlight the role of the NCS ligands in governing the oxidation state of the Ru center.

  6. Vapor Synthesis and Thermal Modification of Supportless Platinum–Ruthenium Nanotubes and Application as Methanol Electrooxidation Catalysts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Atkinson III, Robert W.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Zawodzinski, Jr., Thomas A.; Papandrew, Alexander B.

    2015-04-23

    Metallic, mixed-phase, and alloyed bimetallic Pt-Ru nanotubes were synthesized by a novel route based on the sublimation of metal acetylacetonate precursors and their subsequent vapor deposition within anodic alumina templates. Nanotube architectures were tuned by thermal annealing treatments. As-synthesized nanotubes are composed of nanoparticulate, metallic platinum and hydrous ruthenium oxide whose respective thicknesses depend on the sample chemical composition. The Pt-decorated, hydrous Ru oxide nanotubes may be thermally annealed to promote a series of chemical and physical changes to the nanotube structures including alloy formation, crystallite growth and morphological evolution. Annealed Pt-Ru alloy nanotubes and their as-synthesized analogs demonstrate relativelymore » high specific activities for the oxidation of methanol. As-synthesized, mixed-phase Pt-Ru nanotubes (0.39 mA/cm2) and metallic alloyed Pt64Ru36NTs (0.33 mA/cm2) have considerably higher area-normalized activities than PtRu black (0.22 mA/cm2) at 0.65 V vs. RHE.« less

  7. Microsoft Word - FY07AnnualReport.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (EZ) 1 18,000,000 FRANCE (FR) 5 8,093,198 GABON (GB) 1 441,600 GAMBIA (GA) 1 49,300 GERMANY FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF (GE) 3 1,698,498 HUNGARY (HU) 1 4,000,000 KAZAKHSTAN (KZ) 3...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Guo, Peijun (1) Hao, Yulin (1) Hu, Yan (1) Kai, Ji-Jung (1) Lee, Chi-Hung (1) Leonardi, ... Tsai, Shuo-Cheng ; Huang, E-Wen ; Kai, Ji-Jung ; Chen, Fu-Rong ; NTHU-Taiwan) March 2013 ...

  9. DOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop: Final Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    T Th hu ur rs sd da ay y ( (R Ro oo om m G GH H- -0 01 19 ... am HyTrans Model - David Greene, ORNL 10:10 am Market ... Marianne Mintz (ANL), and Mark Ruth (NREL) 12:00 pm Lunch ...

  10. U.S.-China Clean Energy Fora

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Assistant Secretary David Sandalow co-hosted the U.S.-China Energy Efficiency Forum, the U.S.-China Renewable Energy Forum and the U.S.-China Advanced Biofuels Forum in Beijing. These three fora were established under the clean energy cooperation measures announced by President Barack Obama and President Hu Jintao in 2009.

  11. ENVIROISSUES PAGE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Local Government Meynard ?1hU1a Pam Laen RoDer Larson Jerry Peltier Jim Curdy Bob Parks ... HBl1ford Pr.j.t Office " .713 Jidwin. uile4 Ff COrulcTtsUS ArlVloo 168 Ro:hland, W ...

  12. MSGOUID MONTICELLO PROJECTS *FEDERAL FACILITIES AGREEMENT REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... 0 Pump hllll failed w q:np LDS 1 2Z2 31.7 13S Plmq:l hu fail

  13. Microsoft Word - DETF_Final.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REPORT OF THE DARK ENERGY TASK FORCE Andreas Albrecht, University of California, Davis Gary Bernstein, University of Pennsylvania Robert Cahn, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Wendy L. Freedman, Carnegie Observatories Jacqueline Hewitt, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Wayne Hu, University of Chicago John Huth, Harvard University Marc Kamionkowski, California Institute of Technology Edward W. Kolb, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and The University of Chicago Lloyd Knox,

  14. A=20F (1959AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are listed in Table 20.4 Resonances in 19F(n, )16N (in PDF or PS) (BO55A, MA55L: see graph in (HU58)). See also (WI37E, BO55D, GR55D, KO58A). 15. 19F(d, p)20F Qm 4.379 Q0 ...

  15. A=8Li (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    one event corresponding to the transition to an excited state at 0.7 0.2 MeV. 3. 7Li(n, )8Li Qm 2.035 The thermal capture cross section is 33 5 mb (HU47A), 42 10 mb...

  16. Integrating Human Performance and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald K. Farris; Heather Medema

    2012-05-01

    Human error is a significant factor in the cause and/or complication of events that occur in the commercial nuclear industry. In recent years, great gains have been made using Human Performance (HU) tools focused on targeting individual behaviors. However, the cost of improving HU is growing and resistance to add yet another HU tool certainly exists, particularly for those tools that increase the paperwork for operations. Improvements in HU that are the result of leveraging existing technology, such as hand-held mobile technologies, have the potential to reduce human error in controlling system configurations, safety tag-outs, and other verifications. Operator rounds, valve line-up verifications, containment closure verifications, safety & equipment protection, and system tagging can be supported by field-deployable wireless technologies. These devices can also support the availability of critical component data in the main control room and other locations. This research pilot project reviewing wireless hand-held technology is part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRSP), a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The project is being performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing, and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRSP vision is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current nuclear reactor fleet.

  17. Book review of Dragonfly Genera of the New World. An Illustrated and Annotated Key to the Anisoptera. Garrison, R.W., N. Von Ellenrieder and J.A. Louton, Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, Baltimore, MD. xi+368 pp. Hardback, ISBN 0-8018-8446-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannings, R.A.

    2007-03-15

    This superb book is the most important reference on the Order Odonata to appear since the 1999 publication of Philip Corbet's monumental work on the behavior and ecology of Odonata. In the context of specimen identification and faunistics, it is the most significant contribution in decades, for it opens a new door to the most diverse and least known dragonfly fauna on Earth, that of the Neotropical Region. The book treats the genera of all the New World dragonflies, but while the Nearctic Anisoptera (at least north of the Mexican border) is extensively summarized in many taxonomic and identification manuals (e.g., Needham et al. 2000), the Neotropical fauna remains rather poorly known. Much of it still is undescribed and taxonomic syntheses are few and far between. This is partly because of its huge diversity, the remoteness of much of the region, and the relative scarcity of specimens in collections. As T. W. Donnelly (2006) noted in a recent review of this book, the New World tropics have always been a challenge to biologists in many disciplines because the region was first colonized by the Spanish and Portuguese who largely lacked the tradition of natural history studies characteristic of the British, French, Dutch and Germans in Africa, India or Southeast Asia. In South America there simply was no F. C. Fraser to write an equivalent to his three volumes on the Odonata in The Fauna of British India. Borror (1945) was an early and wonderful resource for deciphering the genera of the large family Libellulidae in the Americas. Calvert's hard-to-find contributions on the Odonata (1902-1908) in the Biologia Centrali-Americana helped students of the Central American fauna; the updated equivalent by Foerster (2001) for Mesoamerican genera is also important. But as far as syntheses and overviews, that's about all there was - until now.

  18. SU-E-I-05: A Correction Algorithm for Kilovoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Dose Calculations in Cervical Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J; Zhang, W; Lu, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy and feasibility of dose calculations using kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography in cervical cancer radiotherapy using a correction algorithm. Methods: The Hounsfield units (HU) and electron density (HU-density) curve was obtained for both planning CT (pCT) and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) using a CIRS-062 calibration phantom. The pCT and kV-CBCT images have different HU values, and if the HU-density curve of CBCT was directly used to calculate dose in CBCT images may have a deviation on dose distribution. It is necessary to normalize the different HU values between pCT and CBCT. A HU correction algorithm was used for CBCT images (cCBCT). Fifteen intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans of cervical cancer were chosen, and the plans were transferred to the pCT and cCBCT data sets without any changes for dose calculations. Phantom and patient studies were carried out. The dose differences and dose distributions were compared between cCBCT plan and pCT plan. Results: The HU number of CBCT was measured by several times, and the maximum change was less than 2%. To compare with pCT, the CBCT and cCBCT has a discrepancy, the dose differences in CBCT and cCBCT images were 2.48%±0.65% (range: 1.3%∼3.8%) and 0.48%±0.21% (range: 0.1%∼0.82%) for phantom study, respectively. For dose calculation in patient images, the dose differences were 2.25%±0.43% (range: 1.4%∼3.4%) and 0.63%±0.35% (range: 0.13%∼0.97%), respectively. And for the dose distributions, the passing rate of cCBCT was higher than the CBCTs. Conclusion: The CBCT image for dose calculation is feasible in cervical cancer radiotherapy, and the correction algorithm offers acceptable accuracy. It will become a useful tool for adaptive radiation therapy.

  19. Dedini A ucar e lcool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Dedini Aucar e lcool Place: So Ja da Boa Vista, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 13870 Product: Dedini Aucar e lcool is a local...

  20. Towards time-resolved serial crystallography in a microfluidic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Pawate, Ashtamurthy S. ; Srajer, Vukica ; Schieferstein, Jeremy ; Guha, Sudipto ; Henning, Robert ; Kosheleva, Irina ; Schmidt, Marius ; Ren, Zhong ; Kenis, Paul J.A. ; ...

  1. Stochastic Forecasting of Algae Blooms in Lakes (Book) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Springer Proceedings in Mathematics & Statistics, 28:99-108 Publisher: JA Ferreira, et al; Springer, New York, NY, United States(US). Research Org: Pacific Northwest National ...

  2. Tank Operations Contract No. DE-A C27-08R VI 4800

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluation Measurement Plan (PEMP) to incorporate additional FY2010 performance measures. ... JA PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT 49 PLAN (PEMP) L To: Attachment Title of ...

  3. Most Viewed Documents for Materials: September 2014 | OSTI, US...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    based design for radioactive material transport packagings -- Historical review Smith, J.A.; Salzbrenner, D.; Sorenson, K.; McConnell, P. (1998) 61 Charpy impact test ...

  4. doe-sc-arm-16-024

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... In AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts 2013 December (Vol. 1, p. 05). Campbell JE, JA Berry, U Seibt, SJ Smith, and SA Montzka. "Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide constraints on terrestrial ...

  5. Fracture mechanics based design for radioactive material transport...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In addition to the research and development work, code and standards development and regulatory positions are also discussed. Authors: Smith, J.A. ; Salzbrenner, D. ; Sorenson, K. ...

  6. Most Viewed Documents for Engineering: September 2014 | OSTI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    based design for radioactive material transport packagings -- Historical review Smith, J.A.; Salzbrenner, D.; Sorenson, K.; McConnell, P. (1998) 61 Conduction heat transfer ...

  7. High-temperature superconductivity: A conventional conundrum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: High-temperature superconductivity: A conventional conundrum Citation ... OSTI Identifier: 1245373 Report Number(s): BNL--111729-2016-JA Journal ID: ISSN 1745-2473; ...

  8. REFlex | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Evaluating the Limits of Solar Photovoltaics (PV) in Electric Power Systems Utilizing Energy Storage and Other Enabling Technologies, NREL Report No. JA-6A2-453152 Logo:...

  9. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Continuous Parameters Over the Size Spectrum Khvorostyanov, V.I. and Curry, J.A., ... spectra and continuous integration over the size spectrum when evaluation the moments. ...

  10. Temperature coefficients for PV modules and arrays: Measurement...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    methods, difficulties, and results King, D.L.; Kratochvil, J.A.; Boyson, W.E. 14 SOLAR ENERGY; SOLAR CELL ARRAYS; SOLAR CELLS; MEASURING METHODS; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE;...

  11. State of the Lab!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Construction Will be Completed in 2009 Other Nations are Leveraging ITER Very Strongly * Major New Plasma Confinement Experiments - China, South Korea, India, Europe, JA-EU in ...

  12. NREL Demonstrates Efficient Solar Water Splitting by Metal Oxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference: Seabold, J.A.; Zhu, K.; Neale. N.R. (2014). "Efficient Solar Photoelectrolysis ... NRELFS-5900-61070 | January 2014 NREL Demonstrates Efficient Solar Water Splitting by ...

  13. An Ab Initio Approach Towards Engineering Fischer-Tropsch Surface Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Neurock; Siddharth Chopra

    2003-09-11

    As the US seeks to develop an energy strategy that reduces the reliance on foreign oil, there is a renewed interest in the research and development of the Fischer Tropsch synthesis for converting syngas into long chain hydrocarbon products. This report investigates some of the basic elementary steps for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over ideal Pt, Ru and carbon-covered Pt and Ru metal surfaces by using ab initio density functional theoretical calculations. We examine in detail the adsorption sites as well as the binding energies for C, CH, CH{sub 2}, CH3 and CH4 on Pt(111), Ru(0001), 2x2-C-Pt(111) and 2x2-C-Ru(0001). The results indicate that the binding energies increase with decreasing the hydrogen in the fragment molecule, i.e. CH{sub 4} < CH{sub 3} < CH{sub 2} < CH < C. More specifically the work analyzes the elementary steps involved in the activation of methane. This is simply the reverse set of steps necessary for the hydrogenation of C to CH{sub 4}. The results indicate that these hydrocarbon intermediates bind more strongly to Ru than Pt. The introduction of co-adsorbed carbon atoms onto both Ru(0001) as well as Pt(111) significantly increased the overall energies as well as the activation barriers for C-H bond activation. The results suggest that Ru may be so active that it initially can initially activate CH4 into CH or C but ultimately it dies because the CH and C intermediates poison the surface and thus kill its activity. Methane can dissociate on Pt but subsequent hydrocarbon coupling reactions act to remove the surface carbon.

  14. Sample-morphology effects on x-ray photoelectron peak intensities. II. Estimation of detection limits for thin-film materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Cedric J.; Werner, Wolfgang S. M.; Smekal, Werner

    2014-09-01

    The authors show that the National Institute of Standards and Technology database for the simulation of electron spectra for surface analysis (SESSA) can be used to determine detection limits for thin-film materials such as a thin film on a substrate or buried at varying depths in another material for common x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement conditions. Illustrative simulations were made for a W film on or in a Ru matrix and for a Ru film on or in a W matrix. In the former case, the thickness of a W film at a given depth in the Ru matrix was varied so that the intensity of the W 4d{sub 5/2} peak was essentially the same as that for a homogeneous RuW{sub 0.001} alloy. Similarly, the thickness of a Ru film at a selected depth in the W matrix was varied so that the intensity of the Ru 3p{sub 3/2} peak matched that from a homogeneous WRu{sub 0.01} alloy. These film thicknesses correspond to the detection limits of each minor component for measurement conditions where the detection limits for a homogeneous sample varied between 0.1 at.?% (for the RuW{sub 0.001} alloy) and 1 at.?% (for the WRu{sub 0.01} alloy). SESSA can be similarly used to convert estimates of XPS detection limits for a minor species in a homogeneous solid to the corresponding XPS detection limits for that species as a thin film on or buried in the chosen solid.

  15. A human monoclonal antibody derived from a vaccinated volunteer recognizes heterosubtypically a novel epitope on the hemagglutinin globular head of H1 and H9 influenza A viruses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Panthong, Sumolrat; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Phuygun, Siripaporn; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya; Prachasupap, Apichai; Yasugi, Mayo; Ono, Ken-ichiro; and others

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: A human monoclonal antibody against influenza virus was produced from a volunteer. The antibody was generated from the PBMCs of the volunteer using the fusion method. The antibody neutralized heterosubtypically group 1 influenza A viruses (H1 and H9). The antibody targeted a novel epitope in globular head region of the hemagglutinin. Sequences of the identified epitope are highly conserved among H1 and H9 subtypes. - Abstract: Most neutralizing antibodies elicited during influenza virus infection or by vaccination have a narrow spectrum because they usually target variable epitopes in the globular head region of hemagglutinin (HA). In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (HuMAb), 5D7, that was prepared from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of a vaccinated volunteer using the fusion method. The HuMAb heterosubtypically neutralizes group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H9N2, with a strong hemagglutinin inhibition activity. Selection of an escape mutant showed that the HuMAb targets a novel conformational epitope that is located in the HA head region but is distinct from the receptor binding site. Furthermore, Phe114Ile substitution in the epitope made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAb. Amino acid residues in the predicted epitope region are also highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1 and H9N2. The HuMAb reported here may be a potential candidate for the development of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies against H1 and H9 influenza viruses.

  16. SU-E-J-218: Evaluation of CT Images Created Using a New Metal Artifact Reduction Reconstruction Algorithm for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemkiewicz, J; Palmiotti, A; Miner, M; Stunja, L; Bergene, J [Lehigh Valley Health Network, Allentown, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Metal in patients creates streak artifacts in CT images. When used for radiation treatment planning, these artifacts make it difficult to identify internal structures and affects radiation dose calculations, which depend on HU numbers for inhomogeneity correction. This work quantitatively evaluates a new metal artifact reduction (MAR) CT image reconstruction algorithm (GE Healthcare CT-0521-04.13-EN-US DOC1381483) when metal is present. Methods: A Gammex Model 467 Tissue Characterization phantom was used. CT images were taken of this phantom on a GE Optima580RT CT scanner with and without steel and titanium plugs using both the standard and MAR reconstruction algorithms. HU values were compared pixel by pixel to determine if the MAR algorithm altered the HUs of normal tissues when no metal is present, and to evaluate the effect of using the MAR algorithm when metal is present. Also, CT images of patients with internal metal objects using standard and MAR reconstruction algorithms were compared. Results: Comparing the standard and MAR reconstructed images of the phantom without metal, 95.0% of pixels were within 35 HU and 98.0% of pixels were within 85 HU. Also, the MAR reconstruction algorithm showed significant improvement in maintaining HUs of non-metallic regions in the images taken of the phantom with metal. HU Gamma analysis (2%, 2mm) of metal vs. non-metal phantom imaging using standard reconstruction resulted in an 84.8% pass rate compared to 96.6% for the MAR reconstructed images. CT images of patients with metal show significant artifact reduction when reconstructed with the MAR algorithm. Conclusion: CT imaging using the MAR reconstruction algorithm provides improved visualization of internal anatomy and more accurate HUs when metal is present compared to the standard reconstruction algorithm. MAR reconstructed CT images provide qualitative and quantitative improvements over current reconstruction algorithms, thus improving radiation treatment

  17. SU-E-T-599: The Variation of Hounsfield Unit and Relative Electron Density Determination as a Function of KVp and Its Effect On Dose Calculation Accuracy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohl, A; Boer, S De

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the differences in relative electron density for different energy (kVp) settings and the effect that these differences have on dose calculations. Methods: A Nuclear Associates 76-430 Mini CT QC Phantom with materials of known relative electron densities was imaged by one multi-slice (16) and one single-slice computed tomography (CT) scanner. The Hounsfield unit (HU) was recorded for each material with energies ranging from 80 to 140 kVp and a representative relative electron density (RED) curve was created. A 5 cm thick inhomogeneity was created in the treatment planning system (TPS) image at a depth of 5 cm. The inhomogeneity was assigned HU for various materials for each kVp calibration curve. The dose was then calculated with the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) at points within and below the inhomogeneity and compared using the 80 kVp beam as a baseline. Results: The differences in RED values as a function of kVp showed the largest variations of 580 and 547 HU for the Aluminum and Bone materials; the smallest differences of 0.6 and 3.0 HU were observed for the air and lung inhomogeneities. The corresponding dose calculations for the different RED values assigned to the 5 cm thick slab revealed the largest differences inside the aluminum and bone inhomogeneities of 2.2 to 6.4% and 4.3 to 7.0% respectively. The dose differences beyond these two inhomogeneities were between 0.4 to 1.6% for aluminum and 1.9 to 2.2 % for bone. For materials with lower HU the calculated dose differences were less than 1.0%. Conclusion: For high CT number materials the dose differences in the phantom calculation as high as 7.0% are significant. This result may indicate that implementing energy specific RED curves can increase dose calculation accuracy.

  18. Identification of a haloalkaliphilic and thermostable cellulase with improved ionic liquid tolerance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Tao; Datta, Supratim; Eichler, Jerry; Ivanova, Natalia; Axen, Seth D.; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Chen, Feng; Kyrpides, Nikos; Hugenholtz, Philip; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Sale, Kenneth L.; Simmons, Blake; Rubin, Eddy

    2011-02-17

    Some ionic liquids (ILs) have been shown to be very effective solvents for biomass pretreatment. It is known that some ILs can have a strong inhibitory effect on fungal cellulases, making the digestion of cellulose inefficient in the presence of ILs. The identification of IL-tolerant enzymes that could be produced as a cellulase cocktail would reduce the costs and water use requirements of the IL pretreatment process. Due to their adaptation to high salinity environments, halophilic enzymes are hypothesized to be good candidates for screening and identifying IL-resistant cellulases. Using a genome-based approach, we have identified and characterized a halophilic cellulase (Hu-CBH1) from the halophilic archaeon, Halorhabdus utahensis. Hu-CBH1 is present in a gene cluster containing multiple putative cellulolytic enzymes. Sequence and theoretical structure analysis indicate that Hu-CBH1 is highly enriched with negatively charged acidic amino acids on the surface, which may form a solvation shell that may stabilize the enzyme, through interaction with salt ions and/or water molecules. Hu-CBH1 is a heat tolerant haloalkaliphilic cellulase and is active in salt concentrations up to 5 M NaCl. In high salt buffer, Hu-CBH1 can tolerate alkali (pH 11.5) conditions and, more importantly, is tolerant to high levels (20percent w/w) of ILs, including 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Amim]Cl). Interestingly, the tolerances to heat, alkali and ILs are found to be salt-dependent, suggesting that the enzyme is stabilized by the presence of salt. Our results indicate that halophilic enzymes are good candidates for the screening of IL-tolerant cellulolytic enzymes.

  19. MRI-Based Computed Tomography Metal Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation Accuracy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Peter C.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Roper, Justin; Elder, Eric; Crocker, Ian; Fox, Tim; Zhu, X. Ronald; Dong, Lei; Dhabaan, Anees

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) artifacts can severely degrade dose calculation accuracy in proton therapy. Prompted by the recently increased popularity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the radiation therapy clinic, we developed an MRI-based CT artifact correction method for improving the accuracy of proton range calculations. Methods and Materials: The proposed method replaces corrupted CT data by mapping CT Hounsfield units (HU number) from a nearby artifact-free slice, using a coregistered MRI. MRI and CT volumetric images were registered with use of 3-dimensional (3D) deformable image registration (DIR). The registration was fine-tuned on a slice-by-slice basis by using 2D DIR. Based on the intensity of paired MRI pixel values and HU from an artifact-free slice, we performed a comprehensive analysis to predict the correct HU for the corrupted region. For a proof-of-concept validation, metal artifacts were simulated on a reference data set. Proton range was calculated using reference, artifactual, and corrected images to quantify the reduction in proton range error. The correction method was applied to 4 unique clinical cases. Results: The correction method resulted in substantial artifact reduction, both quantitatively and qualitatively. On respective simulated brain and head and neck CT images, the mean error was reduced from 495 and 370 HU to 108 and 92 HU after correction. Correspondingly, the absolute mean proton range errors of 2.4 cm and 1.7 cm were reduced to less than 2 mm in both cases. Conclusions: Our MRI-based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation accuracy for patients with severe CT artifacts.

  20. SULFUR REDUCTION IN GASOLINE AND DIESEL FUELS BY EXTRACTION/ADSORPTION OF REFRACTORY DIBENZOTHIOPHENES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott G. McKinley; Celedonio M. Alvarez

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to remove thiophene, benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene from a simulated gasoline feedstock. We found that Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sup 2+} reacts with a variety of thiophenes (Th*), affording Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}(Th*){sup 2+}. We used this reactivity to design a biphasic extraction process that removes more than 50% of the dibenzothiophene in the simulated feedstock. This extraction system consists of a hydrocarbon phase (simulated petroleum feedstock) and extractant Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sup 2+} in an aqueous phase (70% dimethylformamide, 30% H{sub 2}O). The DBT is removed in situ from the newly formed Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}(DBT){sup 2+} by either an oxidation process or addition of H{sub 2}O, to regenerate Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sup 2+}.

  1. Effects of Ar plasma treatment for deposition of ruthenium film by remote plasma atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Taeyong; Lee, Jaesang; Park, Jingyu; Jeon, Heeyoung; Jeon, Hyeongtag; Lee, Ki-Hoon; Cho, Byung-Chul; Kim, Moo-Sung; Ahn, Heui-Bok

    2012-01-15

    Ruthenium thin films were deposited on argon plasma-treated SiO{sub 2} and untreated SiO{sub 2} substrates by remote plasma atomic layer deposition using bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium [Ru(EtCp){sub 2}] as a Ru precursor and ammonia plasma as a reactant. The results of in situ Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) analysis indicate that the initial transient region of Ru deposition was decreased by Ar plasma treatment at 400 deg. C, but did not change significantly at 300 deg. C The deposition rate exhibited linearity after continuous film formation and the deposition rates were about 1.7 A/cycle and 0.4 A/cycle at 400 deg. C and 300 deg. C, respectively. Changes of surface energy and polar and dispersive components were measured by the sessile drop test. The quantity of surface amine groups was measured from the surface nitrogen concentration with AES. Furthermore, the Ar plasma-treated SiO{sub 2} contained more amine groups and less hydroxyl groups on the surface than on untreated SiO{sub 2}. Auger spectra exhibited chemical shifts by Ru-O bonding, and larger shifts were observed on untreated substrates due to the strong adhesion of Ru films.

  2. Iridium−Ruthenium Alloyed Nanoparticles for the Ethanol Oxidation Fuel Cell Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su D.; Du, W.; Deskins, N.A.; Teng, X.

    2012-06-01

    In this study, carbon supported Ir-Ru nanoparticles with average sizes ranging from 2.9 to 3.7 nm were prepared using a polyol method. The combined characterization techniques, that is, scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, were used to determine an Ir-Ru alloy nanostructure. Both cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry (CA) results demonstrate that Ir{sub 77}Ru{sub 23}/C bears superior catalytic activities for the ethanol oxidation reaction compared to Ir/C and commercial Pt/C catalysts. In particular, the Ir{sub 77}Ru{sub 23}/C catalyst shows more than 21 times higher mass current density than that of Pt/C after 2 h reaction at a potential of 0.2 V vs Ag/AgCl in CA measurement. Density functional theory simulations also demonstrate the superiority of Ir-Ru alloys compared to Ir for the ethanol oxidation reaction.

  3. Investigation of methanol oxidation on a highly active and stable Pt–Sn electrocatalyst supported on carbon–polyaniline composite for application in a passive direct methanol fuel cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amani, Mitra; Kazemeini, Mohammad; Hamedanian, Mahboobeh; Pahlavanzadeh, Hassan; Gharibi, Hussein

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • PtSn/C-PANI performed superior in the MOR compared with a commercial PtRu/C. • Catalytic activity of PtRu/C was highly reduced during the accelerated durability test. • Anode of the PtSn/C-PANI in a passive DMFC lowered methanol crossover by 30%. - Abstract: Polyaniline fiber (PANI) was synthesized and utilized to fabricate a vulcan–polyaniline (C-PANI) composite. Pt/C-PANI and PtSn/C-PANI electro-catalysts with different Pt:Sn atomic ratios were prepared by the impregnation method. These electro-catalysts, along with commercial PtRu/C (Electrochem), were characterized with respect to their structural and electrochemical properties in methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). PtSn(70:30)/C-PANI showed excellent performance in MOR, the obtained maximum current density being about 40% and 50% higher than that for PtRu/C and Pt/C-PANI, respectively. It was also found that the CO tolerance and stability of PtSn(70:30)/C-PANI was considerably higher than that of PtRu/C. Finally, the performance of these two materials was compared in a passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The DMFC test results demonstrated that the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) prepared using PtSn(70:30)/C-PANI anode catalyst performed more satisfactorily in terms of maximum power density and lower methanol crossover.

  4. Low temperature synthesis of Ru–Cu alloy nanoparticles with the compositions in the miscibility gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martynova, S.A.; Filatov, E.Yu.; Korenev, S.V.; Kuratieva, N.V.; Sheludyakova, L.A.; Plusnin, P.E.; Shubin, Yu.V.; Slavinskaya, E.M.; Boronin, A.I.

    2014-04-01

    A complex salt [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}Cl][Cu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}H{sub 2}O]—the precursor of nanoalloys combining ruthenium and copper was prepared. It crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/n. Thermal properties of the prepared salt were examined in different atmospheres (helium, hydrogen, oxygen). Thermal decomposition of the precursor in inert atmosphere was thoroughly examined and the intermediate products were characterized. Experimental conditions for preparation of copper-rich (up to 12 at% of copper) metastable solid solution Cu{sub x}Ru{sub 1−x} (based on Ru structure) were optimized, what is in sharp contrast to the bimetallic miscibility gap known for the bulk counterparts in a wide composition range. Catalytic properties of copper–ruthenium oxide composite were tested in catalytic oxidation of CO. - Highlights: • We synthesized new precursor of CuRu metastable nanoalloys. • Thermal properties of the prepared salt were examined in different atmospheres. • Thermodestruction mechanism of precursor are studied. • Cu{sub 0.12}Ru{sub 0.88} nanoalloy with the compositions in the miscibility gap is obtained. • Catalytic conversion of CO on copper–ruthenium oxide composite were examined.

  5. Seed influence on the ferromagnetic resonance response of Co/Ni multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabino, Maria Patricia Rouelli, E-mail: maria-sabino@dsi.a-star.edu.sg; Tran, Michael; Hin Sim, Cheow; Ji Feng, Ying; Eason, Kwaku [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117608 (Singapore)

    2014-05-07

    The effect of Pd and Ru seed layers on the magnetic properties of [Co/Ni]{sub N} multilayers with varying number of bilayer repeats N is investigated using vector network analyzer ferromagnetic resonance. The effective anisotropy field H{sub Keff} is found to increase with N for Ru seed, but decreases for Pd until N?=?15. As N is increased beyond 15, H{sub Keff} decreases for both seeds. In contrast, the damping parameter ? decreases with N regardless of the seed, showing a 1/N dependence. Taking spin pumping into account, the intrinsic damping ?{sub 0} for both Pd and Ru seeds reduce to ?{sub 0} ? 0.01. These results demonstrate that there can be a strong influence of the seed/Co interface on anisotropy, especially for sufficiently low N, but not necessarily on ?{sub 0}.

  6. Platinum adlayered ruthenium nanoparticles, method for preparing, and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tong, YuYe; Du, Bingchen

    2015-08-11

    A superior, industrially scalable one-pot ethylene glycol-based wet chemistry method to prepare platinum-adlayered ruthenium nanoparticles has been developed that offers an exquisite control of the platinum packing density of the adlayers and effectively prevents sintering of the nanoparticles during the deposition process. The wet chemistry based method for the controlled deposition of submonolayer platinum is advantageous in terms of processing and maximizing the use of platinum and can, in principle, be scaled up straightforwardly to an industrial level. The reactivity of the Pt(31)-Ru sample was about 150% higher than that of the industrial benchmark PtRu (1:1) alloy sample but with 3.5 times less platinum loading. Using the Pt(31)-Ru nanoparticles would lower the electrode material cost compared to using the industrial benchmark alloy nanoparticles for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  7. SULFUR REDUCTION IN GASOLINE AND DIESEL FUELS BY EXTRACTION/ADSORPTION OF REFRACTORY DIBENZOTHIOPHENES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Angelici; Scott G. McKinley; Celedonio Alvarez

    2001-10-01

    Using the classical coordination compound, Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sup 2+}, they have prepared a metal complex with a 4,6-dimenthyldibenzothiophene ligand. The compound Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sup 2+} also reacts with thiophene, benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene (DBT) at room temperature. They have found that Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sup 2+} removes over 50% of the DBT in simulated petroleum feedstocks by a biphasic extraction process. The extraction phase is readily generated by air-oxidation thereby completing a cyclic process that removes DBT from petroleum feedstocks.

  8. Fragile structural transition in Mo3Sb7

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yan, Jiaqiang -Q.; McGuire, Michael A; May, Andrew F; Parker, David S.; Mandrus, D. G.; Sales, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    Mo3Sb7 single crystals lightly doped with Cr, Ru, or Te are studied in order to explore the interplay between superconductivity, magnetism, and the cubic-tetragonal structural transition. The structural transition at 53 K is extremely sensitive to Ru or Te substitution which introduces additional electrons, but robust against Cr substitution. We observed no sign of a structural transition in superconducting Mo2.91Ru0.09Sb7 and Mo3Sb6.975Te0.025. In contrast, 3 at.% Cr doping only slightly suppresses the structural transition to 48 K while leaving no trace of superconductivity above 1.8 K. Analysis of magnetic properties suggests that the interdimer interaction in Mo3Sb7 is near amore » critical value and essential for the structural transition. Futhermore, all dopants suppress the superconductivity of Mo3Sb7. The tetragonal structure is not necessary for superconductivity.« less

  9. Giant switchable Rashba effect in oxide heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Zhicheng; Si, Liang; Zhang, Qinfang; Yin, Wei-Guo; Yunoki, Seiji; Held, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    One of the most fundamental phenomena and a reminder of the electrons relativistic nature is the Rashba spin splitting for broken inversion symmetry. Usually this splitting is a tiny relativistic correction. Interfacing ferroelectric BaTiO? and a 5d (or 4d) transition metal oxide with a large spin-orbit coupling, Ba(Os,Ir,Ru)O?, we show that giant Rashba spin splittings are indeed possible and even controllable by an external electric field. Based on density functional theory and a microscopic tight binding understanding, we conclude that the electric field is amplified and stored as a ferroelectric Ti-O distortion which, through the network of oxygen octahedra, induces a large (Os,Ir,Ru)-O distortion. The BaTiO?/Ba(Os,Ru,Ir)O? heterostructure is hence the ideal test station for switching and studying the Rashba effect and allows applications at room temperature.

  10. Buffer layers on metal alloy substrates for superconducting tapes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Arendt, Paul N.; Groves, James R.

    2004-10-05

    An article including a substrate, at least one intermediate layer upon the surface of the substrate, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the at least one intermediate layer, and a layer of a SrRuO.sub.3 buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer is provided together with additional layers such as a HTS top-layer of YBCO directly upon the layer of a SrRuO.sub.3 buffer material layer. With a HTS top-layer of YBCO upon at least one layer of the SrRuO.sub.3 buffer material in such an article, J.sub.c 's of up to 1.3.times.10.sup.6 A/cm.sup.2 have been demonstrated with projected I.sub.c 's of over 200 Amperes across a sample 1 cm wide.

  11. A High-Reflectivity, Ambient-Stable Graphene Mirror for Neutral Atomic and Molecular Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, P.; Minniti, M.; Albrecht, P.; Farias, D.; Miranda, R.; Sutter, E.

    2011-11-21

    We report a He and H{sub 2} diffraction study of graphene-terminated Ru(0001) thin films grown epitaxially on c-axis sapphire. Even for samples exposed for several weeks to ambient conditions, brief annealing in ultrahigh vacuum restored extraordinarily high specular reflectivities for He and H{sub 2} beams (23% and 7% of the incident beam, respectively). The quality of the angular distributions recorded with both probes exceeds the one obtained from in-situ prepared graphene on Ru(0001) single crystals. Our results for graphene-terminated Ru thin films represent a significant step toward ambient tolerant, high-reflectivity curved surface mirrors for He-atom microscopy.

  12. Optimized capping layers for EUV multilayers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bajt, Sasa; Folta, James A.; Spiller, Eberhard A.

    2004-08-24

    A new capping multilayer structure for EUV-reflective Mo/Si multilayers consists of two layers: A top layer that protects the multilayer structure from the environment and a bottom layer that acts as a diffusion barrier between the top layer and the structure beneath. One embodiment combines a first layer of Ru with a second layer of B.sub.4 C. Another embodiment combines a first layer of Ru with a second layer of Mo. These embodiments have the additional advantage that the reflectivity is also enhanced. Ru has the best oxidation resistance of all materials investigated so far. B.sub.4 C is an excellent barrier against silicide formation while the silicide layer formed at the Si boundary is well controlled.

  13. Giant switchable Rashba effect in oxide heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhong, Zhicheng; Si, Liang; Zhang, Qinfang; Yin, Wei-Guo; Yunoki, Seiji; Held, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    One of the most fundamental phenomena and a reminder of the electron’s relativistic nature is the Rashba spin splitting for broken inversion symmetry. Usually this splitting is a tiny relativistic correction. Interfacing ferroelectric BaTiO₃ and a 5d (or 4d) transition metal oxide with a large spin-orbit coupling, Ba(Os,Ir,Ru)O₃, we show that giant Rashba spin splittings are indeed possible and even controllable by an external electric field. Based on density functional theory and a microscopic tight binding understanding, we conclude that the electric field is amplified and stored as a ferroelectric Ti-O distortion which, through the network of oxygen octahedra, inducesmore » a large (Os,Ir,Ru)-O distortion. The BaTiO₃/Ba(Os,Ru,Ir)O₃ heterostructure is hence the ideal test station for switching and studying the Rashba effect and allows applications at room temperature.« less

  14. Dendrimer-Encapsulated Ruthenium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for Lithium-O2 Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Kovarik, Libor; Bowden, Mark E.; Li, Shari; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-12-01

    Dendrimer-encapsulated ruthenium nanoparticles (DEN-Ru) have been used as catalysts in lithium-O2 batteries for the first time. Results obtained from UV-vis spectroscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy show that the nanoparticles synthesized by the dendrimer template method are ruthenium oxide instead of metallic ruthenium reported earlier by other groups. The DEN-Ru significantly improve the cycling stability of lithium (Li)-O2 batteries with carbon black electrodes and decrease the charging potential even at low catalyst loading. The monodispersity, porosity and large number of surface functionalities of the dendrimer template prevent the aggregation of the ruthenium nanoparticles making their entire surface area available for catalysis. The potential of using DEN-Ru as stand-alone cathode materials for Li-O2 batteries is also explored.

  15. Giant switchable Rashba effect in oxide heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Zhicheng; Si, Liang; Zhang, Qinfang; Yin, Wei-Guo; Yunoki, Seiji; Held, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    One of the most fundamental phenomena and a reminder of the electron’s relativistic nature is the Rashba spin splitting for broken inversion symmetry. Usually this splitting is a tiny relativistic correction. Interfacing ferroelectric BaTiO₃ and a 5d (or 4d) transition metal oxide with a large spin-orbit coupling, Ba(Os,Ir,Ru)O₃, we show that giant Rashba spin splittings are indeed possible and even controllable by an external electric field. Based on density functional theory and a microscopic tight binding understanding, we conclude that the electric field is amplified and stored as a ferroelectric Ti-O distortion which, through the network of oxygen octahedra, induces a large (Os,Ir,Ru)-O distortion. The BaTiO₃/Ba(Os,Ru,Ir)O₃ heterostructure is hence the ideal test station for switching and studying the Rashba effect and allows applications at room temperature.

  16. 9977 TYPE B PACKAGING INTERNAL DATA COLLECTION FEASIBILITY TESTING - MAGNETIC FIELD COMMUNICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shull, D.

    2012-06-18

    The objective of this report is to document the findings from proof-of-concept testing performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) R&D Engineering and Visible Assets, Inc. for the DOE Packaging Certification Program (PCP) to determine if RuBee (IEEE 1902.1) tags and readers could be used to provide a communication link from within a drum-style DOE certified Type B radioactive materials packaging. A Model 9977 Type B Packaging was used to test the read/write capability and range performance of a RuBee tag and reader. Testing was performed with the RuBee tags placed in various locations inside the packaging including inside the drum on the outside of the lid of the containment vessel and also inside of the containment vessel. This report documents the test methods and results. A path forward will also be recommended.

  17. When ruthenia met titania: Achieving extraordinary catalytic activity at low temperature by nanostructuring of oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graciani, J.; Stacchiola, D.; Yang, F.; Evans, J.; Vidal, A. B.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Sanz, J. F.

    2015-09-09

    Nanostructured RuOx/TiO2(110) catalysts have a remarkable catalytic activity for CO oxidation at temperatures in the range of 350–375 K. Furthermore, the RuO2(110) surface has no activity. The state-of-the-art DFT calculations indicate that the main reasons for such an impressive improvement in the catalytic activity are: (i) a decrease of the diffusion barrier of adsorbed O atoms by around 40%, from 1.07 eV in RuO2(110) to 0.66 eV in RuOx/TiO2(110), which explains the shift of the activity to lower temperatures and (ii) a lowering of the barrier by 20% for the association of adsorbed CO and O species to give CO2 (the main barrier for the CO oxidation reaction) passing from around 0.7 eV in RuO2(110) to 0.55 eV in RuOx/TiO2(110). We show that the catalytic properties of ruthenia are strongly modified when supported as nanostructures on titania, attaining higher activity at temperatures 100 K lower than that needed for pure ruthenia. As in other systems consisting of ceria nanostructures supported on titania, nanostructured ruthenia shows strongly modified properties compared to the pure oxide, consolidating the fact that the nanostructuring of oxides is a main way to attain higher catalytic activity at lower temperatures.

  18. When ruthenia met titania: Achieving extraordinary catalytic activity at low temperature by nanostructuring of oxides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Graciani, J.; Stacchiola, D.; Yang, F.; Evans, J.; Vidal, A. B.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Sanz, J. F.

    2015-09-09

    Nanostructured RuOx/TiO2(110) catalysts have a remarkable catalytic activity for CO oxidation at temperatures in the range of 350–375 K. Furthermore, the RuO2(110) surface has no activity. The state-of-the-art DFT calculations indicate that the main reasons for such an impressive improvement in the catalytic activity are: (i) a decrease of the diffusion barrier of adsorbed O atoms by around 40%, from 1.07 eV in RuO2(110) to 0.66 eV in RuOx/TiO2(110), which explains the shift of the activity to lower temperatures and (ii) a lowering of the barrier by 20% for the association of adsorbed CO and O species to give CO2more » (the main barrier for the CO oxidation reaction) passing from around 0.7 eV in RuO2(110) to 0.55 eV in RuOx/TiO2(110). We show that the catalytic properties of ruthenia are strongly modified when supported as nanostructures on titania, attaining higher activity at temperatures 100 K lower than that needed for pure ruthenia. As in other systems consisting of ceria nanostructures supported on titania, nanostructured ruthenia shows strongly modified properties compared to the pure oxide, consolidating the fact that the nanostructuring of oxides is a main way to attain higher catalytic activity at lower temperatures.« less

  19. Synthesis and reactivity of compounds containing ruthenium-carbon, -nitrogen, and -oxygen bonds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwig, J.F.

    1990-12-01

    The products and mechanisms of the thermal reactions of several complexes of the general structure (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(X)(Y) and (DMPM){sub 2}Ru(X)(Y) where X and Y are hydride, aryl, and benzyl groups, have been investigated. The mechanism of decomposition depends critically on the structure of the complex and the medium in which the thermolysis is carried out. The alkyl hydride complexes are do not react with alkane solvent, but undergo C-H activation processes with aromatic solvents by several different mechanisms. Thermolysis of (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(Ph)(Me) or (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(Ph){sub 2} leads to the ruthenium benzyne complex (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}) (1) by a mechanism which involves reversible dissociation of phosphine. In many ways its chemistry is analogous to that of early rather than late organo transition metal complexes. The synthesis, structure, variable temperature NMR spectroscopy and reactivity of ruthenium complexes containing aryloxide or arylamide ligands are reported. These complexes undergo cleavage of a P-C bond in coordinated trimethylphosphine, insertion of CO and CO{sub 2} and hydrogenolysis. Mechanistic studies on these reactions are described. The generation of a series of reactive ruthenium complexes of the general formula (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(R)(enolate) is reported. Most of these enolates have been shown to bind to the ruthenium center through the oxygen atom. Two of the enolate complexes 8 and 9 exist in equilibrium between the O- and C-bound forms. The reactions of these compounds are reported, including reactions to form oxygen-containing metallacycles. The structure and reactivity of these ruthenium metallacycles is reported, including their thermal chemistry and reactivity toward protic acids, electrophiles, carbon monoxide, hydrogen and trimethylsilane. 243 refs., 10 tabs.

  20. Recent progress of magnetocaloric effect and magnetic refrigerant materials of Mn compounds (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wada, H. Takahara, T.; Katagiri, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Soejima, K.; Yamashita, K.

    2015-05-07

    Magnetocaloric and related properties of Ru and Ni substituted (MnFe){sub 2}(PSi) are presented. It is found that Ru and Ni are effective doping elements to reduce the thermal hysteresis of (MnFe){sub 2}(PSi). The origin of the thermal hysteresis is discussed on the basis of a thermodynamic model. It is shown that the elastic energy is responsible for the thermal hysteresis. We also show recent developments of the production process of Mn compounds in an industrial scale.

  1. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovered the radical-mediated C-O bond activation mechanism on the multifunctional Ru/RuO x catalyst that enables up to 76% yield of 2-methyl furan in catalytic transfer hydrogenolysis of furfural using a renewable hydrogen donor. Metal/Metal Oxide Cooperativity for Low-Temperature C-O Bond Activation Work was performed in CCEI lab at the University of Delaware CATALYSIS CENTER FOR ENERGY INNOVATION - http://www.efrc.udel.edu/ Research Details * Selective C-O scission occurs via the

  2. A=13N (1970AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 13N) GENERAL: See Table 13.21 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1955LA1A, 1957HU1C, 1959BA1D, 1960PH1A, 1960TA1C, 1961KU17, 1961KU1C, 1961NE1B, 1962IN02, 1962TA1E, 1963BA43, 1963BO1G, 1963SE19, 1963TR02, 1964AM1D, 1964BO1K, 1964ST1B, 1965BO1N, 1965MA1T, 1965ME1C, 1965WE1D, 1966EL08, 1966HA18, 1966NO1B, 1967BR1Q, 1967FA1A, 1967HU1C, 1967KU1E, 1967NE1D, 1967PO1J, 1967WA1C, 1968FI1F, 1968GO01, 1968HO1H, 1969VA1C, 1969ZU1B). Other:

  3. A=14O (1976AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    76AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 14O) GENERAL: See also (1970AJ04) and Table 14.29 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1973SA30, 1974KU1F). Special reactions involving 14O: (1971AR02, 1973BA81, 1975BA1Q, 1975HU14). Reactions involving pions: (1973CH20, 1973DA37, 1975HU1D, 1975RE01). Other topics: (1970FO1B, 1972AN05, 1972CA37, 1972KU1C, 1973GO1H, 1973KA1H, 1973PA1F, 1973RO1R, 1973SP1A, 1974BO22, 1974KU1F, 1974SE1B, 1974VA24, 1975BU1M). Ground state: (1975BE31). 1.

  4. A study of Central Exclusive Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monk, James; /Manchester U.

    2008-09-01

    Central exclusive production of a system X in a collision between two hadrons h is defined as hh {yields} h + X + h with no other activity apart from the decay products of X. This thesis presents predictions for the production cross section of a CP violating supersymmetric Higgs boson and the radion of the Randall-Sundrum model. The ExHuME Monte Carlo generator was written to simulate central exclusive processes and is described and explored. A comparison to di-jet observations made by the D0 detector at the Tevatron, Fermilab between January and June 2004 is made and the distributions found support the predictions of ExHuME.

  5. A=20O (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    87AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20O) GENERAL: See (1983AJ01) and Table 20.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(1978WI1B, 1982SH30, 1984CH1V, 1984HA14, 1984RA13, 1984SA37, 1985HA15, 1985HU08, 1985LE1L, 1986COZZ, 1986HE13, 1986HU1G, 1986VO07, 1986WA1R, 1987IA1B). Complex reactions involving 20O:(1983FR1A, 1983WI1A, 1984HI1A, 1985HA1N, 1985PO11, 1986HA1B, 1986IR01, 1986PO06, 1986PO15, 1987RI03). Other topics:(1978WI1B, 1983SH32, 1984PO11, 1984SA37, 1985AN28,

  6. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Minimal Shortwave Anomalous Absorption Found over ACRF Sites Download a printable PDF Submitter: Dong, X., University of Arizona Minnis, P., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Dong, X, BA Wielicki, B Xi, Y Hu, GG Mace, S Benson, F Rose, S Kato, T Charlock, and P Minnis. 2008. "Using observations of deep convective systems to constrain atmospheric column absorption of solar radiation in the optically

  7. NEES - EFRC | University of Maryland Energy Frontier Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications 201 records found. Authors Title / Citation 1 Hongli Zhu, Wei Luo, Peter N. Ciesielski, Zhiqiang Fang, J. Y. Zhu, Gunnar Henriksson, Michael E. Himmel, Liangbing Hu Wood-Derived Materials for Green Electronics, Biological Devices, and Energy Applications Chemical Reviews, 2016, doi: 10.1021/acs.chemrev.6b00225 2 Alexander J. Pearse, Eleanor Gillette, Sang Bok Lee, Gary W. Rubloff The reaction current distribution in battery electrode materials revealed by XPS-based state-of-charge

  8. News Story | NEES - EFRC | University of Maryland Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center Invalid Story ID No article found for this site Current Headlines Wood Windows are Cooler than Glass Gary Rubloff named Distinguished University Professor EFRC NEES 2016 Collaboration Travel Grant Awards Ingenious method enables sharper flat-panel displays at lower energy costs NEES project shows hybrid battery/capacitor with off-the-charts cycling capacity Hu and Munday Win Young Investigator Award UMD has Largest University Showing at 2016 ARPA-E Summit CREB Kicks Off its Research

  9. People | NEES - EFRC | University of Maryland Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center People Directors Director Gary Rubloff, UMD Website Deputy Director Sang Bok Lee, UMD Website Assoc Director for Sandia Sean Hearne, SNL-ALBQ Assoc Director for Programs Elizabeth Lathrop, UMD Primary Investigators Thrust 1 Phil Collins - UCI Bryan Eichhorn - UMD Kevin Leung - SNL-ALBQ Chuck Martin - UFL Zuzanna Siwy - UCI Thrust 2 Chunsheng Wang - UMD Sang Bok Lee - UMD Liangbing Hu - UMD Mark Reed - Yale YuHuang Wang - UMD Thrust 3 Reginald Penner - UCI John Cumings - UMD Katherine

  10. Advanced Membrane Separations to Improve Efficiency of Thermochemical Conversion Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2015 Project Peer Review Advanced Membrane Separations to Improve Efficiency of Thermochemical Conversion March 24, 2015 Technology Area Review Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Project Team: Michael Hu Brian Bischoff Chaiwat Engtrakul Mark Davis High Performance Architectured Surface-Selective (HiPAS) 2 Presentation name Goal Statement This project seeks to develop & employ a new class of HiPAS membranes, to improve the efficiency of bio-oil

  11. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Application of SGP Data to CERES Retrievals of Shortwave and Longwave Fluxes Charlock, T.P., Minnis, P., and Wong, T., National Aeronautics and Space Administration- Langley Research Center; Rose, F.G., Alberta, T.L., Analytical Services and Materials; Fu, Q., Dalhousie University; Hu, Y., Hampton University; Morcrette, J.-J., European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Data over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) for

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hu, Yung-Jin" Name Name ORCID Product Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX

  13. TH-C-BRD-06: A Novel MRI Based CT Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation in the Presence of Severe CT Artifacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, P; Schreibmann, E; Fox, T; Roper, J; Elder, E; Tejani, M; Crocker, I; Curran, W; Dhabaan, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Severe CT artifacts can impair our ability to accurately calculate proton range thereby resulting in a clinically unacceptable treatment plan. In this work, we investigated a novel CT artifact correction method based on a coregistered MRI and investigated its ability to estimate CT HU and proton range in the presence of severe CT artifacts. Methods: The proposed method corrects corrupted CT data using a coregistered MRI to guide the mapping of CT values from a nearby artifact-free region. First patient MRI and CT images were registered using 3D deformable image registration software based on B-spline and mutual information. The CT slice with severe artifacts was selected as well as a nearby slice free of artifacts (e.g. 1cm away from the artifact). The two sets of paired MRI and CT images at different slice locations were further registered by applying 2D deformable image registration. Based on the artifact free paired MRI and CT images, a comprehensive geospatial analysis was performed to predict the correct CT HU of the CT image with severe artifact. For a proof of concept, a known artifact was introduced that changed the ground truth CT HU value up to 30% and up to 5cm error in proton range. The ability of the proposed method to recover the ground truth was quantified using a selected head and neck case. Results: A significant improvement in image quality was observed visually. Our proof of concept study showed that 90% of area that had 30% errors in CT HU was corrected to 3% of its ground truth value. Furthermore, the maximum proton range error up to 5cm was reduced to 4mm error. Conclusion: MRI based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation for patients with severe CT artifacts.

  14. SU-E-J-190: Characterization of Radiation Induced CT Number Changes in Tumor and Normal Lung During Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, C; Liu, F; Tai, A; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To measure CT number (CTN) changes in tumor and normal lung as a function of radiation therapy (RT) dose during the course of RT delivery for lung cancer using daily IGRT CT images and single respiration phase CT images. Methods: 4D CT acquired during planning simulation and daily 3D CT acquired during daily IGRT for 10 lung cancer cases randomly selected in terms of age, caner type and stage, were analyzed using an in-house developed software tool. All patients were treated in 2 Gy fractions to primary tumors and involved nodal regions. Regions enclosed by a series of isodose surfaces in normal lung were delineated. The obtained contours along with target contours (GTVs) were populated to each singlephase planning CT and daily CT. CTN in term of Hounsfield Unit (HU) of each voxel in these delineated regions were collectively analyzed using histogram, mean, mode and linear correlation. Results: Respiration induced normal lung CTN change, as analyzed from single-phase planning CTs, ranged from 9 to 23 (2) HU for the patients studied. Normal lung CTN change was as large as 50 (12) HU over the entire treatment course, was dose and patient dependent and was measurable with dose changes as low as 1.5 Gy. For patients with obvious tumor volume regression, CTN within the GTV drops monotonically as much as 10 (1) HU during the early fractions with a total dose of 20 Gy delivered. The GTV and CTN reductions are significantly correlated with correlation coefficient >0.95. Conclusion: Significant RT dose induced CTN changes in lung tissue and tumor region can be observed during even the early phase of RT delivery, and may potentially be used for early prediction of radiation response. Single respiration phase CT images have dramatically reduced statistical noise in ROIs, making daily dose response evaluation possible.

  15. Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2017 Academic Year Fall Semester 2016 Wood Windows are Cooler than Glass Gary Rubloff named Distinguished University Professor 2015-2016 Academic Year Spring Semester 2016 EFRC NEES 2016 Collaboration Travel Grant Awards Ingenious method enables sharper flat-panel displays at lower energy costs NEES project shows hybrid battery/capacitor with off-the-charts cycling capacity Hu and Munday Win Young Investigator Award UMD has Largest University Showing at 2016 ARPA-E Summit CREB Kicks Off its

  16. THE WHITE HOUSE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    November 17, 2009 FACT SHEET: U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center President Barack Obama and President Hu Jintao today announced the establishment of the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center. The Protocol formally establishing the Center was signed at ceremonies in Beijing by U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, Chinese Minister of Science and Technology Wan Gang, and Chinese National Energy Agency Administrator Zhang Guobao The U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center will facilitate joint

  17. THE WHITE HOUSE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Action Plan Today, President Barack Obama and President Hu Jintao announced the launch of a new U.S.-China Energy Efficiency Action Plan to strengthen the economy, improve energy security and combat climate change by reducing energy waste in both countries. The United States and China consume over 40 percent of global energy resources, costing businesses and households in the two countries roughly $1.5 trillion per year. Working together to improve energy efficiency in

  18. THE WHITE HOUSE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Vehicles Initiative Today, President Barack Obama and President Hu Jintao announced the launch of a U.S.-China Electric Vehicles Initiative. The two leaders emphasized their countries' strong shared interest in accelerating the deployment of electric vehicles in order to reduce oil dependence, cut greenhouse gas emissions and promote economic growth. Activities under the initiative will include: * Joint standards development. The two countries will explore development of joint product

  19. THE WHITE HOUSE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Energy Partnership Today, President Barack Obama and President Hu Jintao announced the launch of a new U.S.-China Renewable Energy Partnership.. Both Presidents embraced a vision of wide-scale deployment of renewable energy including wind, solar and advanced bio- fuels, with a modern electric grid, and agreed to work together to make that vision possible. The two Presidents recognized that, given the combined market size of the U.S. and China, accelerated deployment of renewable energy

  20. THE WHITE HOUSE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas Resource Initiative Today, President Barack Obama and President Hu Jintao announced the launch of a new U.S.-China Shale Gas Resource Initiative. This Initiative will help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, promote energy security and create commercial opportunities for U.S. companies through:  Shale gas resource assessment: The Initiative will use experience gained in the United States to assess China's shale gas potential and promote environmentally sustainable development of shale

  1. Poster Thur Eve 62: A Retrospective Assessment of the Prevalence and Dosimetric Effect of Lateral Electron Disequilibrium in a Population of Lung Cancer Patients Treated by Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Disher, Brandon; Wade, Laura; Hajdok, George; Gaede, Stewart; Battista, Jerry J.; Palma, David

    2014-08-15

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) is a treatment option for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). SBRT uses tightly conformed megavoltage (MV) x-ray beams to ablate the tumour. However, small MV x-ray fields may produce lateral electron disequilibrium (LED) within lung tissue, which can reduce the dose to tumour. The goal of this work is to estimate the prevalence of LED in NSCLC patients treated with SBRT, and determine dose effects for patients prone or averse to LED. Thirty NSCLC patients were randomly selected for analysis. 4-dimensional CT lung images were segmented into the right and left upper and lower lobes (RUL, RLL, LUL, LLL), and the right middle lobe. Dose calculations were performed using volume-modulated arc therapy in the Pinnacle{sup 3} TPS. Most tumours were located in the upper lobes (RUL 53%, LUL 27%) where density was significantly lower (RUL ?80846 HU vs. RLL ?74371 HU; LUL ?808 56 HU vs. LLL ?74670 HU; p<0.001). In general, the prevalence of LED increased with higher beam energy. Using 6MV photons, patients with a RUL tumour experienced moderate (81 %), and mild (19%) levels of LED. At 18MV, LED became more prominent with severe (50%) and moderate (50%) LED exhibited. Dosimetrically, for patients prone to LED, poorer target coverage (i.e. increased R100 by 20%) and improved lung sparing (i.e. reduced V20 by ?46%) was observed. The common location of lung cancers in the upper lobes, coupled with lower lung density, results in the potential occurrence of LED, which may underdose the tumour.

  2. SU-D-201-02: Prediction of Delivered Dose Based On a Joint Histogram of CT and FDG PET Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, M; Choi, Y; Cho, A; Hwang, S; Cha, J; Lee, N; Yun, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether pre-treatment images can be used in predicting microsphere distribution in tumors. When intra-arterial radioembolization using Y90 microspheres was performed, the microspheres were often delivered non-uniformly within the tumor, which could lead to an inefficient therapy. Therefore, it is important to estimate the distribution of microspheres. Methods: Early arterial phase CT and FDG PET images were acquired for patients with primary liver cancer prior to radioembolization (RE) using Y90 microspheres. Tumor volume was delineated on CT images and fused with FDG PET images. From each voxel (3.9×3.9×3.3 mm3) in the tumor, the Hounsfield unit (HU) from the CT and SUV values from the FDG PET were harvested. We binned both HU and SUV into 11 bins and then calculated a normalized joint-histogram in an 11×11 array.Patients also underwent a post-treatment Y90 PET imaging. Radiation dose for the tumor was estimated using convolution of the Y90 distribution with a dose-point kernel. We also calculated a fraction of the tumor volume that received a radiation dose great than 100Gy. Results: Averaged over 40 patients, 55% of tumor volume received a dose greater than 100Gy (range : 1.1 – 100%). The width of the joint histogram was narrower for patients with a high dose. For patients with a low dose, the width was wider and a larger fraction of tumor volume had low HU. Conclusion: We have shown the pattern of joint histogram of the HU and SUV depends on delivered dose. The patterns can predict the efficacy of uniform intra-arterial delivery of Y90 microspheres.

  3. NERSC-ScienceHighlightsJan2013.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 2013 NERSC Science Highlights --- 1 --- NERSC User Science Highlights Math AMR method allows pore- scale modeling of carbon sequestration effects at unprecedented scale (D. Trebotich, LBNL) Climate Study sheds light on question of how well climate change mitigation might defer sea level rise (A. Hu, NCAR) Chemistry New method affords molecular- level insight into process responsible for lithium battery failure (T. Miller, Caltech) Materials Computation helps elucidate mechanism of

  4. Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    temperature versus sea-level rise | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global temperature versus sea-level rise Authors: Gerald A. Meehl, Aixue Hu, Claudia Tebaldi, Julie M. Arblaster, Warren M. Washington, Haiyan Teng, Benjamin M. Sanderson, Toby Ault, Warren G. Strand & James B. White III There is a common perception that, if human societies make the significant adjustments necessary to substantively cut emissions of

  5. Posters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Posters Use of Cloud and Radiation Testbed Measurements to Evaluate Cloud Cover and Convective Parameterizations C. J. Walcek and Q. Hu State University of New York Albany, New York Abstract We have used temperature and humidity soundings and radiation measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in northern Oklahoma to evaluate an improved cloud cover algorithm. We have also used a new single-column model cumulus parameterization to

  6. Fall 2007 American Geophysical Union Meeting Student Travel Support for Environmental Nanomaterials Session (#B35) (December 10-14, 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael F. Hochella, Jr.

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of award no. DE-FG02-08ER15925 was to fund travel for students to present at the Fall 2007 American Geophysical Meeting. This was done successfully, and five students (Bin Xie, Qiaona Hu, Katie Schreiner, Daria Kibanova, and Frank-Andreas Weber) gave excellent oral and poster presentations at the meeting. Provided are the conference abstracts for their presentations.

  7. CASL-U-2015-0087-000 Dakota, A Multilevel Parallel Object-Oriented Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    87-000 Dakota, A Multilevel Parallel Object-Oriented Framework for Design Optimization, Parameter Estimation, Uncertainty Quantification, and Sensitivity Analysis: Version 6.1 User's Manual Brian M. Adams Mohamed S. Ebeida Michael S. Eldred John D. Jakeman Laura P. Swiler J. Adam Stephens Dena M. Vigil Timothy M. Wildey William J. Bohnhoff Keith R. Dalbey John P. Eddy Kenneth T. Hu Lara E. Bauman Patricia D. Hough Sandia National Laboratory November 7, 2014 SAND2014-4633 Unlimited Release July

  8. Climate System Response to External Forcings and Climate Change Projections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in CCSM4 | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Climate System Response to External Forcings and Climate Change Projections in CCSM4 Authors: Meehl, G.A., Washington, WM, Arblaster, JM, Hu, A., Teng, H., Tebaldi, C., White III, J.B., Strand Jr., WG Results are presented from experiments performed with the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). These include multiple ensemble members of 20th century climate with

  9. Structure of Human Ferritin L Chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang,Z.; Li, C.; Ellenburg, M.; Soistman, E.; Ruble, J.; Wright, B.; Ho, J.; Carter, D.

    2006-01-01

    Ferritin is the major iron-storage protein present in all cells. It generally contains 24 subunits, with different ratios of heavy chain (H) to light chain (L), in the shape of a hollow sphere hosting up to 4500 ferric Fe atoms inside. H-rich ferritins catalyze the oxidation of iron(II), while L-rich ferritins promote the nucleation and storage of iron(III). Several X-ray structures have been determined, including those of L-chain ferritins from horse spleen (HoSF), recombinant L-chain ferritins from horse (HoLF), mouse (MoLF) and bullfrog (BfLF) as well as recombinant human H-chain ferritin (HuHF). Here, structures have been determined of two crystal forms of recombinant human L-chain ferritin (HuLF) obtained from native and perdeuterated proteins. The structures show a cluster of acidic residues at the ferrihydrite nucleation site and at the iron channel along the threefold axis. An ordered Cd{sup 2+} structure is observed within the iron channel, offering further insight into the route and mechanism of iron transport into the capsid. The loop between helices D and E, which is disordered in many other L-chain structures, is clearly visible in these two structures. The crystals generated from perdeuterated HuLF will be used for neutron diffraction studies.

  10. Rutherford backscattering analysis of the failure of chlorine anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vallet, C.E.; Tilak, B.V.

    1996-06-01

    Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry, carried out at the ORNL Surface Modification And Characterization Collaborative Research Center (SMAC) facility, has been applied to the nondestructive analysis of RuO[sub 2]-TiO[sub 2] electrodes of 5000 Angstroms, which mimic the DSA anodes in composition and the method of preparation. Occidental Chemical Corporation provided electrodes, which had been subjected to life time testing in H[sub 2]S04 solution, for analysis by ORNL. The results were used to test the hypothesis of degradation of theses, and similar electrodes, from a process involving a decrease in the RuO[sub 2]:TiO[sub 2] ratio at and near the electrode surface and the related decrease in the electrode electrical conductivity. The drop in electrode activity is closely linked to a decrease in Ru content, and the measured profiles show that the loss takes place across the thin RuO[sub 2]-TiO[sub 2] coating. No build up of a pure TiO[sub 2] layer is apparent. The data agree quantitatively with the critical concentration previously reported by ORNL for materials produced by ion implantation and characterized by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and Photoacoustic Spectrometry. The study has brought a better understanding of the degradation process in electrodes of great technological importance, and has given a more solid background in designing new fabrication procedures for improved electrodes.

  11. PRECIPITATION OF ZIRCONIUM, NIOBIUM, AND RUTHENIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, A.S.

    1958-08-12

    An improvement on the"head end process" for decontaminating dissolver solutions of their Zr, Ni. and Ru values. The process consists in adding a water soluble symmetrical dialkyl ketone. e.g. acetone, before the formation of the manganese dioxide precipitate. The effect is that upon digestion, the ruthenium oxide does not volatilize, but is carried on the manganese dioxide precipitate.

  12. Catalytic membranes for CO oxidation in fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandi-Tapia, Giselle; Carrado Gregar, Kathleen; Kizilel, Riza

    2010-06-08

    A hydrogen permeable membrane, which includes a polymer stable at temperatures of about 200 C having clay impregnated with Pt or Au or Ru or Pd particles or mixtures thereof with average diameters of less than about 10 nanometers (nms) is disclosed. The membranes are useful in fuel cells or any device which requires hydrogen to be separated from carbon monoxide.

  13. PROCEDUREPORTiEPRECIPI¶!ATIONOPl!RORIUE~~~ I/

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ABC-NY0 report ia the near ,fut-* Ru, solution nreJl oontain 2 to 150 mg. of thorium 0-e:. ... ulll be@n ln about 10 mlnutee when 50 to 100 ' a,l . of thorium are present. il (

  14. R U S O N PROJECT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    O F - - T h i s interim report, on t h e RuUson Project, covers t h e casing emplacement and cmenting operations on t h e Austlal Oil Co.'s Number 25-95 A Hayward Well i n Garfield ...

  15. Correlating the chemical composition and size of various metal oxide substrates with the catalytic activity and stability of as-deposited Pt nanoparticles for the methanol oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Megan E. Scofield; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Bobb-Semple, Dara; Tao, Jing; Tong, Xiao; Wang, Lei; Lewis, Crystal S.; Vuklmirovic, Miomir; Zhu, Yimei; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2015-12-09

    The performance of electrode materials in conventional direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC) is constrained by (i) the low activity of the catalyst materials relative to their overall cost, (ii) the poisoning of the active sites due to the presence of partially oxidized carbon species (such as but not limited to CO, formate, and acetate) produced during small molecule oxidation, and (iii) the lack of catalytic stability and durability on the underlying commercial carbon support. Therefore, as a viable alternative, we have synthesized various metal oxide and perovskite materials of different sizes and chemical compositions as supports for Pt nanoparticles (NPs). Our results including unique mechanistic studies demonstrate that the SrRuO3 substrate with immobilized Pt NPs at its surface evinces the best methanol oxidation performance as compared with all of the other substrate materials tested herein, including commercial carbon itself. In addition, data from electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of electron transfer from bound Pt NPs to surface Ru species within the SrRuO3 substrate itself, thereby suggesting that favorable metal support interactions are responsible for the increased methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) activity of Pt species with respect to the underlying SrRuO3 composite catalyst material.

  16. Isonitrile radionuclide complexes for labelling and imaging agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Abrams, Michael J.

    1984-06-04

    A coordination complex of an isonitrile ligand and radionuclide such as Tc, Ru, Co, Pt, Fe, Os, Ir, W, Re, Cr, Mo, Mn, Ni, Rh, Pd, Nb and Ta, is useful as a diagnostic agent for labelling liposomes or vesicles, and selected living cells containing lipid membranes, such as blood clots, myocardial tissue, gall bladder tissue, etc.

  17. Fuel cycle integration issues associated with P/T technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaels, G.E.; Ludwig, S.B.

    1992-04-01

    The three primary interfaces between a generic partitioning and transmutation (P/T) technology and the existing United States fuel cycle are the light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel inventory, the reprocessed uranium (RU) stream, and the high-level waste stream. The features and implications of these three interfaces are reviewed and their implications for P/T system design and for waste management are assessed. The variability of transuranic nuclide composition in the LWR spent fuel is calculated and its potential implications for transmutation system core design are discussed. The radiological characteristics of the RU stream are presented, and options for disposition of the stream are reviewed. Most P/T scenarios assume that RU will be recycled to LWRs. This study demonstrates, however, that LWR recycle cannot totally consume the reprocessed stream, and disposal of a waste uranium steam with high levels of radiologically-significant isotopes will still be necessary. The radioactivity of the tails stream for enrichment plants resulting from a dedicated RU campaign is calculated. The tendency of gaseous diffusion plant enrichment technology to deplete the tails stream of minor uranium isotopes is seen as a benefit and an advantage over Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation-type technology. Finally, the implications of P/T on LWR-origin wastes reporting to the repository is discussed, and several significant differences between LWR-origin waste originating from transmutation systems are assessed.

  18. Fuel cycle integration issues associated with P/T technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaels, G.E.; Ludwig, S.B.

    1992-01-01

    The three primary interfaces between a generic partitioning and transmutation (P/T) technology and the existing United States fuel cycle are the light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel inventory, the reprocessed uranium (RU) stream, and the high-level waste stream. The features and implications of these three interfaces are reviewed and their implications for P/T system design and for waste management are assessed. The variability of transuranic nuclide composition in the LWR spent fuel is calculated and its potential implications for transmutation system core design are discussed. The radiological characteristics of the RU stream are presented, and options for disposition of the stream are reviewed. Most P/T scenarios assume that RU will be recycled to LWRs. This study demonstrates, however, that LWR recycle cannot totally consume the reprocessed stream, and disposal of a waste uranium steam with high levels of radiologically-significant isotopes will still be necessary. The radioactivity of the tails stream for enrichment plants resulting from a dedicated RU campaign is calculated. The tendency of gaseous diffusion plant enrichment technology to deplete the tails stream of minor uranium isotopes is seen as a benefit and an advantage over Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation-type technology. Finally, the implications of P/T on LWR-origin wastes reporting to the repository is discussed, and several significant differences between LWR-origin waste originating from transmutation systems are assessed.

  19. Correlating the chemical composition and size of various metal oxide substrates with the catalytic activity and stability of as-deposited Pt nanoparticles for the methanol oxidation reaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Megan E. Scofield; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Bobb-Semple, Dara; Tao, Jing; Tong, Xiao; Wang, Lei; Lewis, Crystal S.; Vuklmirovic, Miomir; Zhu, Yimei; et al

    2015-12-09

    The performance of electrode materials in conventional direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC) is constrained by (i) the low activity of the catalyst materials relative to their overall cost, (ii) the poisoning of the active sites due to the presence of partially oxidized carbon species (such as but not limited to CO, formate, and acetate) produced during small molecule oxidation, and (iii) the lack of catalytic stability and durability on the underlying commercial carbon support. Therefore, as a viable alternative, we have synthesized various metal oxide and perovskite materials of different sizes and chemical compositions as supports for Pt nanoparticles (NPs).more » Our results including unique mechanistic studies demonstrate that the SrRuO3 substrate with immobilized Pt NPs at its surface evinces the best methanol oxidation performance as compared with all of the other substrate materials tested herein, including commercial carbon itself. In addition, data from electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of electron transfer from bound Pt NPs to surface Ru species within the SrRuO3 substrate itself, thereby suggesting that favorable metal support interactions are responsible for the increased methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) activity of Pt species with respect to the underlying SrRuO3 composite catalyst material.« less

  20. Hydrodesulfurization of dibenzothiophene catalyzed by alumina-supported ruthenium carbonyl complexes in a pressurized flow system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    Ruthenium sulfide has been found to be most active for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of thiophenes as well as hydrogenation and hydrodenitrogenation among transition metal sulfides. When ruthenium sulfide is supported on alumina, silica, or zeolite with high surface area, highly dispersed ruthenium sulfide formed on the supports would increase the catalytic activity per a ruthenium atom. Several researchers have already reported HDS using supported ruthenium sulfides. In these works [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup +}, Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}, RuCl{sub 3}, and Ru(III) acetate supported on alumina, zeoliate, carbon, etc., were used as catalyst precursors in HDS of thiophene, benzothiophene, or dibenzothiophene. Although these HDS reactions were performed under an atmospheric pressure, the activity of the catalysts derived from supported ruthenium in a pressurized flow system have not yet been understood. In the present study, HDS of DBT catalyzed by ruthenium catalysts is investigated in a pressurized flow reactor. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Doped colloidal artificial spin ice (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Date: 2015-10-07 OSTI Identifier: 1236014 Report Number(s): LA-UR--15-24826 Journal ID: ISSN 1367-2630 GrantContract Number: PN-II-RU-TE-2011-3-0114; AC52-06NA25396...

  2. Doped colloidal artificial spin ice (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Date: 2015-10-07 OSTI Identifier: 1236014 Report Number(s): LA-UR--15-24826 Journal ID: ISSN 1367-2630 GrantContract Number: PN-II-RU-TE-2011-3-0114; AC52-06NA25396...

  3. BPA-2013-01256-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M1C1-Ti SSQcJTES, RC. AttojrneyN at.Law RECEIVED BY tWA FOIA OFFICE TillS DATE - 1143 DUE DATE: OF COUNS 6L 0014 5. KATES bATneonow4b. WA RuTh P HARING IL&Tri5w fri. HC'RDCZIcO Ws...

  4. Biomass-derived Lignin to Jet Fuel Range Hydrocarbons via Aqueous Phase Hydrodeoxygenation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hongliang; Ruan, Hao; Pei, Haisheng; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Xiaowen; Tucker, Melvin P.; Cort, John R.; Yang, Bin

    2015-09-14

    A catalytic process, involving the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of the dilute alkali extracted corn stover lignin catalysed by noble metal catalyst (Ru/Al2O3) and acidic zeolite (H+-Y), to produce lignin-substructure-based hydrocarbons (C7-C18), primarily C12-C18 cyclic structure hydrocarbons in the jet fuel range, was demonstrated.

  5. Ou,I~

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ir.CPZCl2tf f?V??,',orr E s'or-v &J fixed-asYet ustch'ru5 31. - .-L s?:ts-Filly, t be cp-*3icSed In the ne%r fzta,q. zT;y dsc rea3c it- tlc prc:;sst InScrtr tcrzs k:Ll...

  6. RIFLE TO SAN JUAN

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Di r ec to r Wes t e r n A r e a - E l ec tric Ru r al E l ec t rifica tio n Adminis t r a tio n 14 th & Inde p e nde nce Ave., S.W. Washi n g ton, D.C. 20250 Tele pho n e:...

  7. Electrochemical Oxidation of H? Catalyzed by Ruthenium Hydride Complexes Bearing P?N? Ligands With Pendant Amines as Proton Relays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Tianbiao L.; Rakowski DuBois, Mary; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2014-01-01

    Two Ru hydride complexes (Cp*Ru(PPh?NBn?)H, (1-H) and Cp*Ru(PtBu?NBn?)H, (2-H) supported by cyclic PR?NR'? ligands (Cp* = n?-C?Me?; 1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane, where R = Ph or tBu and R' = Bn) have been synthesized and fully characterized. Both complexes are demonstrated to be electrocatalysts for oxidation of H? (1 atm, 22 C) in the presence of external base, DBU (1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene). The turnover frequency of 2-H is 1.2 s-1, with an overpotential at Ecat/2 of 0.45 V, while catalysis by 1-H has a turnover frequency of 0.6 s-1 and an overpotential of 0.6 V at Ecat/2. Addition of H?O facilitates oxidation of H? by 2-H and increases its turnover frequency to 1.9 s-1 while , H?O slows down the catalysis by 1-H. The different effects of H?O for 1-H and 2-H are ascribed to different binding affinities of H?O to the Ru center of the corresponding unsaturated species, [Cp*Ru(PPh?NBn?)]+ and [Cp*Ru(PPh?NBn?)]+. In addition, studies of Cp*Ru(dmpm)H (where dmpm = bis(dimethylphosphino)methane), a control complex lacking pendent amines in its diphosphine ligand, confirms the critical roles of the pendent amines of P?N? ligands for oxidation of H?. We thank the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, for supporting initial parts of the work. Current work is supported by the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. Stereochemical determination of carbon partitioning between photosynthesis and photorespiration in C3 plants: use of (3R)-D-(3-3H1, 3-14C)glyceric acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, K.R.

    1984-07-01

    When (3R)-D-(3-3H1,3-14C)glyceric acid is supplied in tracer amounts to illuminated tobacco leaf discs, the acid penetrates to the chloroplasts without loss of 3H, and is phosphorylated there. Subsequent metabolism associated with the reductive photosynthetic cycle fully conserves 3H. Oxidation of ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP) by RuBP carboxylase-oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.39) results in the formation of (2R)-(2-3H1, 14C)glycolic acid which, on oxidation by glycolate oxidase (EC 1.1.3.1), releases 3H to water. Loss of 3H from the combined photosynthetic and photorespiratory systems is, therefore, associated with the oxidative photorespiratory loop. Assuming steady-state conditions and a basic metabolic model, the fraction of RuBP oxidized and the photorespiratory carbon flux relative to gross or net CO2 fixation can be calculated from the fraction of supplied 3H retained in the triose phosphates exported from the chloroplasts. This retention can be determined from the 3H:14C ratio for glucose obtained from isolated sucrose. The dependence of 3H retention upon O2 and CO2 concentrations can be deduced by assuming simple competitive kinetics for RuBP carboxylase-oxygenase. The experimental results confirmed the stereochemical assumptions made. Under conditions of negligible photorespiration 3H retention was essentially complete. The change in 3H retention with O2 and CO2 concentrations were investigated. For leaf discs (upper surface up) in normal air, it was estimated that 39% of the RuBP was oxidized, 32% of the fixed CO2 was photorespired, and the photorespiration rate was 46% of the net photosynthetic CO2 fixation rate. These are minimal estimates, as it is assumed that the only source of photorespired CO2 is glycine decarboxylation.

  9. Development of a Low Input and sustainable Switchgrass Feedstock Production System Utilizing Beneficial Bacterial Endophytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Chuansheng; Nowak, Jerzy; Seiler, John

    2014-10-24

    JN bacterization. With the MapMan software to analyze microarray data, the number of up- and down-regulated probes was calculated. The number of up-regulated probes in Alamo was 26, 14, 14, and 12% at 0.5, 2, 4 and 8 days after inoculation (DAI) with PsJN, respectively while the corresponding number in CR was 24, 22, 21, and 19%, respectively. In both cultivars, the largest number of up-regulated probes occurred at 0.5 DAI. Noticeable differences throughout the timeframe between Alamo and CR were that the number was dramatically decreased to half (12%) in Alamo but remained high in CR (approximately 20%). The number of down regulated genes demonstrated different trends in Alamo and CR. Alamo had an increasing trend from 9% at 0.5 DAI to 11, 17, and 28% at 2, 4, and 8 DAI, respectively. However, CR had 13% at 0.5 and 2 DAI, and declined to 10% at 4 and 8 DAI. With the aid of MapMan and PageMan, we mapped the response of the ID probes to the observed major gene regulatory network and major biosynthetic pathway changes associated with the beneficial bacterial endophyte infection, colonization, and early growth promotion process. We found significant differences in gene expression patterns between responsive and non-responsive cultivars in many pathways, including redox state regulation, signaling, proteolysis, transcription factors, as well as hormone (SA and JA in particular)-associated pathways. Form microarray data, a total of 50 key genes have been verified using qPCR. Ten of these genes were chosen for further functional study via either overexpression and/or RNAi knockout technologies. These genes were calmodulin-related calcium sensor protein (CAM), glutathione S-transferase (GST), histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein (H-221), 3 different zinc finger proteins (ZF-371, ZF131 and ZF242), EF hand transcription factor (EF-622), peroxidase, cellulose synthase catalytic submit A2 (CESA2), and Aux/IAA family. A total of 8 overexpression and 5 RNAi transgenic plants have been

  10. Ruthenium Behavior at Phase Separation of Borosilicate Glass-12259

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enokida, Youichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, 463-8603 (Japan); Sawada, Kayo [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya, 463-8603 (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    The Rokkasho reprocessing plant (RRP) located in Aomori, Japan, vitrifies high level waste (HLW) into a borosilicate glass. The HLW is generated from the reprocessing of spent fuel and contains ruthenium (Ru) and other platinum group metals (PGMs). Based on the recent consequences after a huge earthquake that occurred in Japan, a hypothetical blackout was postulated for the RRP to address additional safety analysis requirements. During a prolonged blackout, the borosilicate glass could phase separate due to cooling of the glass in the melter. The Ru present in the glass matrix could migrate into separate phases and impact the durability of the borosilicate glass. The durability of the glass is important for quality assurance and performance assessment of the vitrified HLW. A fundamental study was performed at an independent university to understand the impact of a prolonged blackout. Simulated HLW glasses were prepared for the RRP, and the Ru behavior in phase separated glasses was studied. The simulated HLW glasses contained nonradioactive elements and PGMs. The glass compositions were then altered to enhance the formation of the phase-separated glasses when subjected to thermal treatment at 700 deg. C for 24 hours. The synthesized simulated glasses contained 1.1 % Ru by weight as ruthenium dioxide (RuO{sub 2}). A portion of the RuO{sub 2} formed needle-shaped crystals in the glass specimens. After the thermal treatment, the glass specimen had separated into two phases. One of the two phases was a B{sub 2}O{sub 3} rich phase, and the other phase was a SiO{sub 2} rich phase. The majority of the chemical species in the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} rich phase was leached away with the Material Characterization Center-3 (MCC-3) protocol standardized by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory using an aqueous low-concentrated nitric acid solution, but the leaching of the Ru fraction was very limited; less than 1% of the original Ru content. The Ru leaching was much less than

  11. Sandia Energy - Elucidating the Role of Twin Boundaries in Deformation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metals Authors J.G. Brons, J.A. Hardwick, H.A. Padilla II, K. Hattar, G.B. Thompson, B.L. Boyce Scientific Achievement Simulation results suggest that twins don't just...

  12. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Jeffery Aguiar, Ph. D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Implications for Radiation Damage Evolution and Fast Ion Conduction."The Journal of Chemical Physics 140(19); 194701. Patel, M.K.; Tallman, D. J.; Valdez, J. A.; Aguiar, J.A.;...

  13. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using GFS Weather Model to Reduce Diurnal Differences Between GPS PW and ARM MWR PW Van Hove, T.(a), Liljegren, J.C.(b), Rocken, C.(a), and Braun, J.(a), University Corporation for...

  14. Signal Post-processing and Reflectivity Calibration of the Atmospheric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Tridon F. ; Luke E. ; Battaglia, A. ; Kollias, P. ; Williams, C. R. Publication Date: 2013-06-01 OSTI Identifier: 1108588 Report Number(s): BNL--101382-2013-JA Journal ID: ...

  15. Thomas McDonald | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The Mechanism of Carbon Dioxide Adsorption in an Alkylamine-Functionalized Metal-Organic Framework, J. Am. Chem Soc., 135, 7402-7405 (2013). 10.1021ja4004766 McDonald, Thomas ...

  16. Gradual Release of Strongly Bound Nitric Oxide from Fe2(NO)2...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soc., 137, 3466-3469 (2015) DOI: 10.1021ja5132243 gradual release Abstract: An iron(II)-based metal-organic framework featuring coordinatively unsaturated redox-active metal ...

  17. Hye Jeong Park | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Functionality, ISelection of Topology, and Enhancement of Gas Adsorption in Multivariate Metal-organic Framework-177 J. Am. Chem. Soc., 137, 2641-2650 (2015). 10.1021ja512311a

  18. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    about this research see the full Scientific Highlight R.S. Mathew-Fenn, R. Das, J.A. Silverman, P.A. Walker, P.A.B. Harbury, "A Molecular Ruler for Measuring Quantitative Distance...

  19. A Golden Ruler Used to Measure DNA Structure in Solution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    here for higher resolution image) Primary Citation: R.S. Mathew-Fenn, R. Das, J.A. Silverman, P.A. Walker, P.A.B. Harbury, "A Molecular Ruler for Measuring Quantitative Distance...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    ... (below 1 eV), hyperthermal less January 2010 , Springer, New York, United States(US). ... January 2013 , JA Ferreira, et al; Springer, New York, United States(US). Stochastic ...

  1. Stochastic Forecasting of Algae Blooms in Lakes (Conference)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Media, September 12-14, 2011, Coimbra, Portugal. Springer Proceedings in Mathematics & Statistics, 28:99-108 Publisher: JA Ferreira, et al; Springer, New York, United States(US). ...

  2. Crystallization, Preliminary X-ray Diffraction and Structure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Phenix, C. ; Puttick, J. ; Nienaber, K. ; Palmer, D. ; Delbaere, L. Publication Date: 2006-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 914082 Report Number(s): BNL--78650-2007-JA TRN: US0801528 DOE...

  3. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Prepared for US Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign J.-A. Wang, H. Wang, and H. Jiang B. B. Bevard and R. L. Howard Oak Ridge National Laboratory September 2014 ...

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Search for: All records CreatorsAuthors contains: "Owen, H" Sort by Relevance Sort by ... Filter by Author Owen, H. (147) Harandi, M.N. (48) Schipper, P.H. (24) Herbst, J.A. (19) ...

  5. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolys...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Date: 2015-04-08 OSTI Identifier: 1215609 Report Number(s): BNL--108347-2015-JA Journal ID: ISSN 0022-2631; 400412000 GrantContract Number: SC00112704 Type: Accepted...

  6. The pilus usher controls protein interactions via domain masking...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Date: 2015-06-08 OSTI Identifier: 1215608 Report Number(s): BNL--108346-2015-JA Journal ID: ISSN 1545-9993; 600301010 GrantContract Number: SC00112704 Type: Accepted...

  7. Most Viewed Documents for Renewable Energy Sources: September...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    difficulties, and results King, D.L.; Kratochvil, J.A.; Boyson, W.E. (1997) 66 Solar radiation data manual for flat-plate and concentrating collectors Dunlap, M.A. ed.; ...

  8. April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Renewable Energy Sources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    difficulties, and results King, D.L.; Kratochvil, J.A.; Boyson, W.E. (1997) 159 Solar radiation data manual for flat-plate and concentrating collectors Dunlap, M.A. ed.; ...

  9. Arctic Clouds Infrared Imaging Field Campaign Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... European Journal of Physics 34(6): S111-S121. 9 JA Shaw, March 2016, DOESC-ARM-16-002 Shupe, MD, VP Walden, E Eloranta, T Uttal, JR Campbell, SM Starkweather, and M Shiobara. ...

  10. Transitions from near-surface to interior redox upon lithiation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Report Number(s): BNL--107622-2015-JA Journal ID: ISSN 1530-6984; R&D Project: 16060; KC0403020 GrantContract Number: SC00112704 Type: Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Nano ...

  11. Transparent Y3Al5O12: Li, Ce Ceramics for Thermal Neutron Detection...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report Number(s): BNL--101188-2013-JA Journal ID: ISSN 0002-7820; R&D Project: NC-001 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC02-98CH10886 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: ...

  12. Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames

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    (Sandia National Laboratories and JILA); N. Hansen, A. McIlroy, J.A. Miller, J.P. Senosiain, and S.J. Klippenstein (Sandia National Laboratories); F. Qi (Sandia National...

  13. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dennis L. Nielson, Pisto Larry, C.W. Criswell, R. Gribble, K. Meeker, J.A. Musgrave, T. Smith, D. Wilson (1989) Scientific Core Hole Valles Caldera No. 2B (VC-2B), New Mexico:...

  14. Scientific Core Hole Valles Caldera No. 2B (VC-2B), New Mexico...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dennis L. Nielson, Pisto Larry, C.W. Criswell, R. Gribble, K. Meeker, J.A. Musgrave, T. Smith and D. Wilson Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Santa Rosa, CA; 19890101 Published...

  15. mho8364.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Isot. 19:345-351. ,. Jungerrnaq J.A., Lagunas-Solar, M.C. (1981), Cyclotron Production of ... of 5-1241Iodo-2'- deoxyuridine for Functional Imaging of Cell ProMeration in vivo. ...

  16. Sustainable technologies for the building construction industry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Strategies, technologies, and opportunities are presented to improve the sustainability of the built environment. less Authors: Vanegas, J.A. ; DuBose, J.R. ; Pearce, A.R. 1 + ...

  17. Micro-Earthquake At Coso Geothermal Area (2002-2005) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    reservoir crack characterization: the Coso geothermal field Rial, J.A.; Elkibbi, M.; Yang, M. (1 January 2005) Shear-wave splitting as a tool for the characterization of...

  18. Shear-wave splitting as a tool for the characterization of geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    extensions, from nearly a decade of practice. Authors Rial, J.A.; Elkibbi, M.; Yang and M. Published Journal Geothermics, 112005 DOI http:dx.doi.org10.1016...

  19. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

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    Regional Climate System Model Pinto, J.O.(a), Curry, J.A.(b), Cassano, J.(a), and Lynch, A.H.(a), University of Colorado (a), Georgia Tech University (b) Thirteenth...

  20. June 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Renewable Energy Sources...

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    difficulties, and results King, D.L.; Kratochvil, J.A.; Boyson, W.E. (1997) 95 Water-lithium bromide double-effect absorption cooling analysis Vliet, G.C.; Lawson, M.B.; ...