Sample records for hts power cable

  1. Columbus HTS Power Cable | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  2. Long Island HTS Power Cable | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  3. Project Fact Sheet Long Island HTS Power Cable Superconducting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  4. A Test of HTS Power Cable in a Sweeping Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarz, H.; Hays, S.; Blowers, J.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Short sample HTS power cable composed of multiple 344C-2G strands and designed to energize a fast-cycling dipole magnet was exposed to a sweeping magnetic field in the (2-20) T/s ramping rate. The B-field orientation toward the HTS strands wide surface was varied from 0{sup 0} to 10{sup 0}, in steps of 1{sup 0}. The test arrangement allowed measurement of the combined hysteresis and eddy current power losses. For the validity of these measurements, the power losses of a short sample cable composed of multiple LTS wire strands were also performed to compare with the known data. The test arrangement of the power cable is described, and the test results are compared with the projections for the eddy and hysteresis power losses using the fine details of the test cable structures.

  5. A Test of HTS Power Cable in a Sweeping Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piekarz, H; Blowers, J; Shiltsev, V

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Short sample HTS power cable composed of multiple 344C-2G strands and designed to energize a fast-cycling dipole magnet was exposed to a sweeping magnetic field in the (2-20) T/s rate. The B-field orientation toward the HTS strands wide surface was varied from 0 deg. to 10 deg., in steps of 1 deg.. The test arrangement allowed measurement of the combined hysteresis and eddy current power losses. For the validity of these measurements, the power losses of a short sample cable composed of multiple LTS wire strands were also performed to compare with the known data. The test arrangement of the power cable is described, and the test results are compared with the projections for the eddy and hysteresis power losses using the fine details of the test cable structures.

  6. Thermal management of long-length HTS cable systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Hassenzahl, William V [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Projections of electric power production suggest a major shift to renewables, such as wind and solar, which will be in remote locations where massive quantities of power are available. One solution for transmitting this power over long distances to load centers is direct current (dc), high temperature superconducting (HTS) cables. Electric transmission via dc cables promises to be effective because of the low-loss, highcurrent- carrying capability of HTS wire at cryogenic temperatures. However, the thermal management system for the cable must be carefully designed to achieve reliable and energyefficient operation. Here we extend the analysis of a superconducting dc cable concept proposed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which has one stream of liquid nitrogen flowing in a cryogenic enclosure that includes the power cable, and a separate return tube for the nitrogen. Refrigeration stations positioned every 10 to 20 km cool both nitrogen streams. Both go and return lines are contained in a single vacuum/cryogenic envelope. Other coolants, including gaseous helium and gaseous hydrogen, could provide potential advantages, though they bring some technical challenges to the operation of long-length HTS dc cable systems. A discussion of the heat produced in superconducting cables and a system to remove the heat are discussed. Also, an analysis of the use of various cryogenic fluids in long-distance HTS power cables is presented.

  7. Commercialization of Medium Voltage HTS Triax TM Cable Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, David

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The original project scope that was established in 2007 aimed to install a 1,700 meter (1.1 mile) medium voltage HTS Triax{TM} cable system into the utility grid in New Orleans, LA. In 2010, however, the utility partner withdrew from the project, so the 1,700 meter cable installation was cancelled and the scope of work was reduced. The work then concentrated on the specific barriers to commercialization of HTS cable technology. The modified scope included long-length HTS cable design and testing, high voltage factory test development, optimized cooling system development, and HTS cable life-cycle analysis. In 2012, Southwire again analyzed the market for HTS cables and deemed the near term market acceptance to be low. The scope of work was further reduced to the completion of tasks already started and to testing of the existing HTS cable system in Columbus, OH. The work completed under the project included: • Long-length cable modeling and analysis • HTS wire evaluation and testing • Cable testing for AC losses • Optimized cooling system design • Life cycle testing of the HTS cable in Columbus, OH • Project management. The 200 meter long HTS Triax{TM} cable in Columbus, OH was incorporated into the project under the initial scope changes as a test bed for life cycle testing as well as the site for an optimized HTS cable cooling system. The Columbus cable utilizes the HTS TriaxTM design, so it provided an economical tool for these of the project tasks.

  8. AC Losses of Prototype HTS Transmission Cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, J.A.; Dresner, L.; Hughey, R.L.; Lue, J.W.; Olsen, S.K.; Sinha, U.; Tolbert, J.C.

    1998-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1995 Southwire Company and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have jointly designed, built, and tested nine, l-m long, high temperature superconducting (HTS) transmission cable prototypes. This paper summarizes the AC loss measurements of five of the cables not reported elsewhere, and compares the losses with each other and with theory developed by Dresner. Losses were measured with both a calorimetric and an electrical technique. Because of the broad resistive transition of the HTS tapes, the cables can be operated stably beyond their critical currents. The AC losses were measured in this region as well as below critical currents. Dresner's theory takes into account the broad resistive transition of the HTS tapes and calculates the AC losses both below and above the critical current. The two sets of AC 10SS data agree with each other and with the theory quite welL In particular, at low currents of incomplete penetration, the loss data agree with the theoretical prediction of hysteresis loss based on only the outer two Iayers carrying the total current.

  9. Theory of AC Loss in Cables with 2G HTS Wire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clem, J.R.; Malozemoff, A.P.

    2009-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    While considerable work has been done to understand AC losses in power cables made of first generation (1G) high temperature superconductor (HTS) wires, use of second generation (2G) HTS wires brings in some new considerations. The high critical current density of the HTS layer 2G wire reduces the surface superconductor hysteretic losses. Instead, gap and polygonal losses, flux transfer losses in imbalanced two layer cables and ferromagnetic losses for wires with NiW substrates constitute the principal contributions. Current imbalance and losses associated with the magnetic substrate can be minimized by orienting the substrates of the inner winding inward and the outer winding outward.

  10. Unique ORNL HTS Program Capabilities ORNL cable test facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unique ORNL HTS Program Capabilities ORNL cable test facility In order to achieve market acceptance is the only one in the U.S., is actively used in collaboration with U.S. superconducting wire and equipment of a commercial superconducting wire. Thorough understanding of other characteristics such as ac losses, wire

  11. Test Results For a 25-m Prototype Fault Current Limiting HTS Cable for Project Hydra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rey, Christopher M [ORNL] [ORNL; Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL] [ORNL; Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL] [ORNL; Ellis, Alvin R [ORNL] [ORNL; Gouge, Michael J [ORNL] [ORNL; James, David Randy [ORNL] [ORNL; Tuncer, Enis [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has tested a 25-m long prototype High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cable with inherent Fault-Current Limiting (FCL) capability at its recently upgraded HTS cable test facility in Oak Ridge, TN. The HTS-FCL cable and terminations were designed and fabricated by Ultera, which is a joint venture of Southwire and nkt cables with FCL features and HTS wire provided by American Superconductor Corporation. The overall project is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The ultimate goal of the 25-m HTS-FCL cable test program was to verify the design and ensure the operational integrity for the eventual installation of a ~ 200-m fully functional HTS-FCL cable in the Consolidated Edison electric grid located in downtown New York City. The 25-m HTS-FCL cable consisted of a three-phase (3- ) Triax design with a cold dielectric between the phases. The HTS-FCL cable had an operational voltage of 13.8 kV phase-to-phase and an operating current of 4000 Arms per phase, which is the highest operating current to date of any HTS cable. The 25-m HTS-FCL cable was subjected to a series of cryogenic and electrical tests. Test results from the 25-m HTS-FCL cable are presented and discussed.

  12. HTS Cable Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  13. Cooling Configuration Design Considerations for Long-Length HTS Cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent successes in demonstrating high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable systems hundreds of meters in length have inspired even longer length projects. A compact and energy efficient cooling configuration can be achieved using a counterflow-cooling arrangement. This is particularly attractive when all three phases are contained in a single cryostat because of the elimination of the space and thermal requirements of a separate liquid nitrogen return line. Future cable projects will utilize second generation (2G) wire which is expected to become lower in cost but may have different thermal requirements than first generation (1G) BSCCO wire due to the lower critical temperature and to a lesser extent, the lower thermal conductivity of the wire. HTS cable configurations will be studied with a numerical model to assess thermal hydraulic performance with AC and thermal losses; a summary of the results from the analysis will be presented. An analysis of the cable thermal- hydraulic response to over-current faults will be presented.

  14. Cryogenic System for a High Temperature Superconducting Power Transmission Cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, J.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Hughey, R.L.; Lue, J.W.; Martin, R.; Sinha, U.; Stovall, J.P.

    1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable systems for power transmission are under development that will use pressurized liquid nitrogen to provide cooling of the cable and termination hardware. Southwire Company and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been operating a prototype HTS cable system that contains many of the typical components needed for a commercial power transmission application. It is being used to conduct research in the development of components and systems for eventual commercial deployment. The cryogenic system was built by Air Products and Chemicals, Allentown, Pennsylvania, and can circulate up to 0.35 kg/s of liquid nitrogen at temperatures as low as 67 K at pressures of 1 to 10 bars. Sufficient cooling is provided for testing a 5-m-long HTS transmission cable system that includes the terminations required for room temperature electrical connections. Testing of the 5-m HTS transmission cable has been conducted at the design ac conditions of 1250 A and 7.5 kV line to ground. This paper contains a description of the essential features of the HTS cable cryogenic system and performance results obtained during operation of the system. The salient features of the operation that are important in large commercial HTS cable applications will be discussed.

  15. ac power loss: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are used in many power aplicatons like power cables, high power electric motors, transformers or fault limiters. HTS Motors HTS motors use HTS windings instead of conventional...

  16. HTS applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noe, M; Fietz, W H; Goldacker, W; Schneider, Th

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconductivity has found many attractive applications in medicine, science, power systems, engineering, transport and electronics. One of the most prominent applications of superconductivity are superconducting magnets e.g. MRI magnets, NMR magnets, accelerator magnets, and magnets for fusion; most applications still use low temperature superconductors. Since the discovery of high temperature superconductivity (HTS) in 1986 there has been a tremendous progress in R&D of HTS material, wires and applications. Especially for power system applications, HTS offers considerable economic benefits. Many HTS demonstrator or prototype applications have been built and successfully tested, and some HTS applications like cables and superconducting fault current limiters seem very close to commercialisation. This paper gives an overview about the present and future HTS applications in power applications, high field magnets and current leads. In addition results of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe program to develop H...

  17. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen P. (Cambridge, GB)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  18. HTS Power Transformers Presented to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 HTS Power Transformers Presented to the 2004 DOE Peer Review Committee For the WES flexibility. Allows operation from 20 K to 77 K permitting full system optimization. Best available conductor/SP/EE/ORNL Team By S.W. Schwenterly E.F. Pleva D.W. Hazelton Oak Ridge Waukesha SuperPower, Inc. National

  19. Photonic-powered cable assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanderson, Stephen N; Appel, Titus James; Wrye, IV, Walter C

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A photonic-cable assembly includes a power source cable connector ("PSCC") coupled to a power receive cable connector ("PRCC") via a fiber cable. The PSCC electrically connects to a first electronic device and houses a photonic power source and an optical data transmitter. The fiber cable includes an optical transmit data path coupled to the optical data transmitter, an optical power path coupled to the photonic power source, and an optical feedback path coupled to provide feedback control to the photonic power source. The PRCC electrically connects to a second electronic device and houses an optical data receiver coupled to the optical transmit data path, a feedback controller coupled to the optical feedback path to control the photonic power source, and a photonic power converter coupled to the optical power path to convert photonic energy received over the optical power path to electrical energy to power components of the PRCC.

  20. Photonic-powered cable assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanderson, Stephen N.; Appel, Titus James; Wrye, IV, Walter C.

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A photonic-cable assembly includes a power source cable connector ("PSCC") coupled to a power receive cable connector ("PRCC") via a fiber cable. The PSCC electrically connects to a first electronic device and houses a photonic power source and an optical data transmitter. The fiber cable includes an optical transmit data path coupled to the optical data transmitter, an optical power path coupled to the photonic power source, and an optical feedback path coupled to provide feedback control to the photonic power source. The PRCC electrically connects to a second electronic device and houses an optical data receiver coupled to the optical transmit data path, a feedback controller coupled to the optical feedback path to control the photonic power source, and a photonic power converter coupled to the optical power path to convert photonic energy received over the optical power path to electrical energy to power components of the PRCC.

  1. Columbus HTS Power Cable | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  2. Albany HTS Power Cable | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  3. Albany HTS Power Cable | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  4. High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrell, Roger, A.

    2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the world’s first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

  5. HTS power lead testing at the Fermilab magnet test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabehl, R.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has tested high-temperature superconductor (HTS) power leads for cryogenic feed boxes to be placed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) interaction regions and at the new BTeV C0 interaction region of the Fermilab Tevatron. A new test facility was designed and operated, successfully testing 20 pairs of HTS power leads for the LHC and 2 pairs of HTS power leads for the BTeV experiment. This paper describes the design and operation of the cryogenics, process controls, data acquisition, and quench management systems. Results from the facility commissioning are included, as is the performance of a new insulation method to prevent frost accumulation on the warm ends of the power leads.

  6. Dynamic simulation of 10 kW Brayton cryocooler for HTS cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Chan Woo [Hong Ik University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hyung Suk; Hwang, Si Dole [KEPCO Research Institute, Daejeon, 305-760 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic simulation of a Brayton cryocooler is presented as a partial effort of a Korean governmental project to develop 1?3 km HTS cable systems at transmission level in Jeju Island. Thermodynamic design of a 10 kW Brayton cryocooler was completed, and a prototype construction is underway with a basis of steady-state operation. This study is the next step to investigate the transient behavior of cryocooler for two purposes. The first is to simulate and design the cool-down process after scheduled or unscheduled stoppage. The second is to predict the transient behavior following the variation of external conditions such as cryogenic load or outdoor temperature. The detailed specifications of key components, including plate-fin heat exchangers and cryogenic turbo-expanders are incorporated into a commercial software (Aspen HYSYS) to estimate the temporal change of temperature and flow rate over the cryocooler. An initial cool-down scenario and some examples on daily variation of cryocooler are presented and discussed, aiming at stable control schemes of a long cable system.

  7. Ames Lab 101: Reinventing the Power Cable

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Russell, Alan

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory researchers are working to develop new electrical power cables that are stronger and lighter than the cables currently used in the nation's power grid. Nano Tube animation by Iain Goodyear

  8. Ames Lab 101: Reinventing the Power Cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Alan

    2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory researchers are working to develop new electrical power cables that are stronger and lighter than the cables currently used in the nation's power grid. Nano Tube animation by Iain Goodyear

  9. HTS power leads for the BTEV interaction region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feher, S.; Carcagno, R.; Orris, D.; Page, T.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new Interaction Region (IR) for the BTEV experiment was planned to be built at Fermilab. This IR would have required new superconducting quadrupole magnets and many additional power circuits for their operation. The new ''low beta'' quadrupole magnet design was based upon the Fermilab LHC quadrupole design, and would have operated at 9.56 kA in 4.5 K liquid helium. The use of conventional power leads for these circuits would have required substantially more helium for cooling than is available from the cryogenic plant, which is already operating close to its limit. To decrease the heat load and helium cooling demands, the use of HTS power leads was necessary. In developing specifications for HTS leads for the BTEV interaction region, several 6 kA HTS leads produced by American Superconductor Corporation (ASC) have been tested at over-current conditions. Final design requirements were to be based on these test results. This paper summarizes the test results and describes the design requirements for the 9.65 kA HTS power leads.

  10. V-1 TRANSITION AND N-VALUE OF MULTIFILAMENTARY LTS AND HTS WIRES AND CABLES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GHOSH,A.K.

    2003-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    For low T, multifilamentary conductors like NbTi and Nb{sub 3}Sn, the V-I transition to the normal state is typically quantified by the parameter, n, defined by ({rho}/{rho}{sub c})= (I/I{sub c}){sup n}. For NbTi, this parameterization has been very useful in the development of high Jc wires, where the n-value is regarded as an index of the filament quality. In copper-matrix wires with undistorted filaments, the n-value at 5T is {approx} 40-60, and drops monotonically with increasing field. However, n can vary significantly in conductors with higher resistivity matrices and those with a low copper fraction. Usually high n-values are associated with unstable resistive behavior and premature quenching. The n-value in NbTi Rutherford cables, when compared to that in the wires is useful in evaluating cabling degradation of the critical current due to compaction at the edges of the cable. In Nb{sub 3}Sn wires, n-value has been a less useful tool, since often the resistive transition shows small voltages {approx} a few {mu}V prior to quenching. However, in ''well behaved'' wires, n is {approx} 30-40 at 12T and also shows a monotonic behavior with field. Strain induced I{sub c} degradation in these wires is usually associated with lower n-values. For high T{sub c} multifilamentary wires and tapes, a similar power law often describes the resistive transition. At 4.2K, Bi-2223 tapes as well as Bi-2212 wires exhibit n-values {approx} 15-20. In either case, n does not change appreciably with field. Rutherford cables of Bi-2212 wire show lower values of n than the virgin wire.

  11. Project Fact Sheet Columbus HTS Power Cable Superconductivity

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  12. Long Island HTS Power Cable | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  13. DEVELOPMENT OF HTS CONDUCTORS FOR ELECTRIC POWER APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyal, A.; Rupich, M. (American Superconductor Corp.)

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Second generation (2G) technologies to fabricate high-performance superconducting wires developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were transferred to American Superconductor via this CRADA. In addition, co-development of technologies for over a decade was done to enable fabrication of commercial high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wires with high performance. The massive success of this CRADA has allowed American Superconductor Corporation (AMSC) to become a global leader in the fabrication of HTS wire and the technology is fully based on the Rolling Assisted Biaxially Textured Substrates (RABiTS) technology invented and developed at ORNL.

  14. On the Search for Higher Temperature Superconductors for Power Grid Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud 11, Université de

    availability of HTS wire, transmission and distribution HTS power cables have been successfully tested on three Consultant to AMSC, 64 Jackson Rd, Devens MA 01434 USA High temperature superconductors (HTS) such as YBCO continents, and HTS fault current limiters are starting to be introduced commercially. These applications

  15. Submerged Medium Voltage Cable Systems at Nuclear Power Plants...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Submerged Medium Voltage Cable Systems at Nuclear Power Plants: A Review of Research Efforts Relevant to Aging Mechanisms and Condition Monitoring. Re-direct Destination: In a...

  16. Superconducting Cable Termination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Tolbert, Jerry (Newnan, GA)

    2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a termination that connects high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable immersed in pressurized liquid nitrogen to high voltage and neutral (shield) external bushings at ambient temperature and pressure. The termination consists of a splice between the HTS power (inner) and shield (outer) conductors and concentric copper pipes which are the conductors in the termination. There is also a transition from the dielectric tape insulator used in the HTS cable to the insulators used between and around the copper pipe conductors in the termination. At the warm end of the termination the copper pipes are connected via copper braided straps to the conventional warm external bushings which have low thermal stresses. This termination allows for a natural temperature gradient in the copper pipe conductors inside the termination which enables the controlled flashing of the pressurized liquid coolant (nitrogen) to the gaseous state. Thus the entire termination is near the coolant supply pressure and the high voltage and shield cold bushings, a highly stressed component used in most HTS cables, are eliminated. A sliding seal allows for cable contraction as it is cooled from room temperature to ˜72-82 K. Seals, static vacuum, and multi-layer superinsulation minimize radial heat leak to the environment.

  17. HTS Cable Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  18. Development of superconducting transmission cable. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawsey, R.; Stovall, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hughey, R.L.; Sinha, U.K. [Southwire Co., Carrollton, GA (United States)

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Southwire Company is to develop the technology necessary to proceed to commercialization of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) transmission cables. Power transmission cables are a promising near-term electric utility application for high-temperature superconductivity. Present HTS wires match the needs for a three-phase transmission cable: (1) the wires must conduct high currents in self-field, (2) there are no high forces developed, and (3) the cables may operate at relatively low current density. The commercially-available HTS wires, in 100-m lengths, make construction of a full three-phase, alternating current (ac) transmission cable possible. If completed through the pre-commercialization phase, this project will result in a new capability for electric power companies. The superconducting cable will enable delivery with greater efficiency, higher power density, and lower costs than many alternatives now on the market. Job creation in the US is expected as US manufacturers supply transmission cables to the expanding markets in Asia and to the densely populated European cities where pipe-type cable is prevalent. Finally, superconducting cables may enable delivery of the new, diverse and distributed sources of electricity that will constitute the majority of new installed electrical generation in the world during the coming decades.

  19. Advances in HTS materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tixador, P

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) offer great opportunities to reach higher magnetic flux densities when compared with LTS (Low Temperature Superconductor). The upper generally accepted limit of 23 T using Nb3Sn can be overstep with HTS. HTS Bi-2212 round wires have shown critical current densities as higher than 1000 MA/m2 under 45 T at 4.2 K. The road for very high fields is open. The round shape suits rather well for magnets, especially with high current specifications since the “classical” high current cables (Rutherford, CIC) require elementary round conductor. The absence of current anisotropy in round conductor is another advantage. The YBaCuO coated conductors (HTS second generation conductors) show large opportunities for high fields. Their higher mechanical performances (IBAD process) compared to Bi conductor bring advantages for high field magnets. The protection of HTS magnet is an identified issue since degradations have been observed in several magnets after a quench. A state of the art ...

  20. Fabrication and Test Results for Rutherford-Type Cables Made from BSCCO Strands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlan, R.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract - Wires based on the Bi-2212 HTS superconductor areHTS cables for accelerator magnet app lications. First, the wire

  1. Measurements of AC Losses and Current Distribution in Superconducting Cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Doan A [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Ashworth, Stephen P [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL; Carter, Bill [AMSC; Fleshler, Steven [AMER Superconductor Corp, Devens, MA 01434

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents our new experimental facility and techniques to measure ac loss and current distribution between the layers for High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cables. The facility is powered with a 45 kVA three-phase power supply which can provide three-phase currents up to 5 kA per phase via high current transformers. The system is suitable for measurements at any frequency between 20 and 500 Hz to better understand the ac loss mechanisms in HTS cables. In this paper, we will report techniques and results for ac loss measurements carried out on several HTS cables with and without an HTS shielding layer. For cables without a shielding layer, care must be taken to control the effect of the magnetic fields from return currents on loss measurements. The waveform of the axial magnetic field was also measured by a small pick-up coil placed inside a two-layer cable. The temporal current distribution between the layers can be calculated from the waveform of the axial field.

  2. New Technologies for Repairing Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Westman, Matthew P.

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate a proof-of-concept for a technique to repair aging cables that have been subjected to degradation associated with long-term thermal and radiation exposure in nuclear power plants. The physical degradation of the aging cables manifests itself primarily as cracking and increased brittleness of the polymeric electrical insulation. Therefore, the proposed cable-repair concept comprises development of techniques to impart a softening agent within the deteriorated polymer insulation jacket so as to regain the ability of the insulation to stretch without failing and possibly to heal existing cracks in the insulation. Our approach is to use commercially available ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) as the relevant test material, demonstrate the adsorption of chemical treatments in the EPR and quantify changes in resulting physical and mechanical properties. EPR cable samples have been thermally treated in air to produce specimens corresponding to the full range of cable age-performance points from new (>350% elongation at break) to end-of-life (<50% elongation at break). The current focus is on two chemical treatments selected as candidates for restoring age-related cable elasticity loss: a rubber plasticizer and a reactive silane molecule. EPR specimens of 200, 150, 100, and 50% elongation at break have been soaked in the candidate chemical treatments and the kinetics of chemical uptake, measured by change in mass of the samples, has been determined. Mechanical properties as a function of aging and chemical treatment have been measured including ultimate tensile strength, tensile modulus at 50% strain, elongation at break, and storage modulus. Dimensional changes with treatment and changes in glass transition temperature were also investigated. These ongoing experiments are expected to provide insight into the physical-chemical nature of the effect of thermal degradation on EPR rejuvenation limits and to advance novel methods for restoring the ability of degraded EPR to be compliant and resist fracture. The results of this research reveal that absorption of chemical treatments can lower the glass transition temperature and modulus of EPR. Chemical treatments pursued thus far have proven ineffective at restoring EPR strength and elongation at break. Future work will combine the plasticizer modalities found to successfully increase the volume of the EPR, reduce EPR glass transition temperature and reduce EPR modulus with promising chemistries that will repair the damage of the polymer, potentially using the plasticizer as a host for the new chemistry.

  3. Prospects for HTS applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamble, B.B.; Snitchler, G.L.; Schwall, R.E. [American Superconductor Corp., Westborough, MA (United States)] [American Superconductor Corp., Westborough, MA (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature superconductor (HTS) wire is rapidly maturing into a working material being produced in ever larger quantities and being used in more significant demonstrations and prototypes. Conductor is now produced routinely in several hundred meter lengths with reproducible results. Current density has progressed to a level suitable for demonstration of many applications. Wire strength has improved and large prototypes fabricated or under consideration using HTS include Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES), rotating electrical machines including synchronous ac and dc homopolar motors and drives, generators and condensers, underground transmission cables, utility distribution equipment such as transformers and current limiters, commercial processing applications such as magnetic separation, and specialty magnets such as high field inserts. In this paper the requirements, progress toward these requirements, and the prospects for the future are reviewed.

  4. Dielectrometry measurements of moisture diffusion and temperature dynamics in oil impregnated paper insulated electric power cables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Zachary M. (Zachary Michael)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper insulated lead covered (PILC) cables have played an important role in underground power distribution for a hundred years. Replacing aged PILC before failure is critical to managing power distribution. Three prominent ...

  5. Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants – Interim Study FY13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Westman, Matthew P.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Pardini, Allan F.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Jones, Anthony M.

    2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The most important criterion for cable performance is its ability to withstand a design-basis accident. With nearly 1000 km of power, control, instrumentation, and other cables typically found in an NPP, it would be a significant undertaking to inspect all of the cables. Degradation of the cable jacket, electrical insulation, and other cable components is a key issue that is likely to affect the ability of the currently installed cables to operate safely and reliably for another 20 to 40 years beyond the initial operating life. The development of one or more nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques and supporting models that could assist in determining the remaining life expectancy of cables or their current degradation state would be of significant interest. The ability to nondestructively determine material and electrical properties of cable jackets and insulation without disturbing the cables or connections has been deemed essential. Currently, the only technique accepted by industry to measure cable elasticity (the gold standard for determining cable insulation degradation) is the indentation measurement. All other NDE techniques are used to find flaws in the cable and do not provide information to determine the current health or life expectancy. There is no single NDE technique that can satisfy all of the requirements needed for making a life-expectancy determination, but a wide range of methods have been evaluated for use in NPPs as part of a continuous evaluation program. The commonly used methods are indentation and visual inspection, but these are only suitable for easily accessible cables. Several NDE methodologies using electrical techniques are in use today for flaw detection but there are none that can predict the life of a cable. There are, however, several physical and chemical ptoperty changes in cable insulation as a result of thermal and radiation damage. In principle, these properties may be targets for advanced NDE methods to provide early warning of aging and degradation. Examples of such key indicators include changes in chemical structure, mechanical modulus, and dielectric permittivity. While some of these indicators are the basis of currently used technologies, there is a need to increase the volume of cable that may be inspected with a single measurement, and if possible, to develop techniques for in-situ inspection (i.e., while the cable is in operation). This is the focus of the present report.

  6. Development of a large-capacity superconducting cable for 100 kVA-class power transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funaki, K.; Iwakuma, M.; Satoh, S.; Hiramatsu, M.; Takeo, M.; Yamafuji, K.; Nonaka, S. (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering); Hoshino, M.; Simada, M.; Yoneda, E.S. (Toshiba Corp., Yokohama (JP))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that the authors have designed and fabricated a large-capacity superconducting cable for 1000k VA-class power transformers. The cable is a triply-stacked multi-strand (6 {times} 6 {times} 6) type. The elementary strand has 19,050 NbTi filaments of 0.63 mm thick in CuNi matrix. The test cable is installed as the secondary winding in a superconducting transformer with iron core in a room-temperature space. The primary winding is the second-level subcable of the secondary one and the turn ratio is nearly 14. The designed capacity of the test cable is 4.545 kA at the secondary voltage of 220V. The peak value of the current, 6.43kA (peak), is 78% of the critical current on the load line. The maximum current of the cable at 60Hz operation was 3.78kA (peak). The attained level of the secondary winding is 47% of the critical current. In the 60Hz operation of a small coil wound by the test cable, premature quench was initiated from the terminals of the cable connected with copper plates. It is suggested from the experimental results that the degradation in maximum current of the test cable is related to current transfer between the cable and the copper terminal plates.

  7. Choosing Power Cables on the Basis of Energy Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimachkieh, S.; Brown, D. R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 13-16, 1980 class. CABLE LOSSES AND OPERATING TEMPERATURE If copper losses predominate total losses per unit length are given by q = 3I2r (1) for a three conductor cable where q is cable loss in watts per unit... The parameters r and r 2 are resistances per unit l length at temperatures t l and t z respectively. T is a constant determined by the conductor material. Assuming we know r at temperature t equation (2) l l can be rewritten as r = mt + b (3) where r...

  8. Integrated head package cable carrier for a nuclear power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meuschke, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA); Trombola, Daniel M. (Murrysville, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cabling arrangement is provided for a nuclear reactor located within a containment. Structure inside the containment is characterized by a wall having a near side surrounding the reactor vessel defining a cavity, an operating deck outside the cavity, a sub-space below the deck and on a far side of the wall spaced from the near side, and an operating area above the deck. The arrangement includes a movable frame supporting a plurality of cables extending through the frame, each connectable at a first end to a head package on the reactor vessel and each having a second end located in the sub-space. The frame is movable, with the cables, between a first position during normal operation of the reactor when the cables are connected to the head package, located outside the sub-space proximate the head package, and a second position during refueling when the cables are disconnected from the head package, located in the sub-space. In a preferred embodiment, the frame straddles the top of the wall in a substantially horizontal orientation in the first position, pivots about an end distal from the head package to a substantially vertically oriented intermediate position, and is guided, while remaining about vertically oriented, along a track in the sub-space to the second position.

  9. HVDC submarine power cables systems state of the art and future developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenza, D.; Cipollini, G. [Pirelli Cavi S.p.A., Milano (Italy)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper begins with an introduction on the reasons that lead to the use of HVDC submarine cable links. The main aspects for the choice of direct current are presented as well as the advantages deriving from the utilization of submarine cables. The second part is dedicated to a discussion on the various type of insulation that could be used in power cables and their possible application to HVDC submarine cables. In the following there is a description of the main characteristics and technical details of some particular project that at present time (1995) are in progress. Two projects are briefly presented: Spain-Morocco, a 26 km long interconnection for the transmission, in a first phase, of 700 MW from Spain to Morocco at 400 kV a.c. by means of three cables, plus one spare, of the fluid filled type. The cables are designed for a future change to d.c. 450 kV, allowing a transmission of 500 MW each (i.e., 2 GW total). One of the peculiarities of the link is the maximum water depth of 615 m (world record for submarine power cables at the time of installation). Italy-Greece, a 1km long interconnection for the transmission of 500 MW (bi-directional) by means of one paper insulated mass impregnated cable having 1,250 sq mm conductor size and insulated for a rated voltage of 400 kV. This link (the installation of which will be posterior to the Spain-Morocco) will attain the world record for the maximum water depth for submarine power cables: 1,000 m. The last part deals with the future developments expected in this field, in terms of conductor size and voltage, that means an increase in transmissible capacity.

  10. Number of lightning discharges causing damage to lightning arrester cables for aerial transmission lines in power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikiforov, E. P. [Electric Power Scientific Research Institute (VNIIE), branch of OAO 'NTTs Elektroenergetika' (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Damage by lightning discharges to lightning arrester cables for 110-175 kV aerial transmission lines is analyzed using data from power systems on incidents with aerial transmission lines over a ten year operating period (1997-2006). It is found that failures of lightning arrester cables occur when a tensile force acts on a cable heated to the melting point by a lightning current. The lightning currents required to heat a cable to this extent are greater for larger cable cross sections. The probability that a lightning discharge will develop decreases as the amplitude of the lightning current increases, which greatly reduces the number of lightning discharges which damage TK-70 cables compared to TK-50 cables. In order to increase the reliability of lightning arrester cables for 110 kV aerial transmission lines, TK-70 cables should be used in place of TK-50 cables. The number of lightning discharges per year which damage lightning arrester cables is lowered when the density of aerial transmission lines is reduced within the territory of electrical power systems. An approximate relationship between these two parameters is obtained.

  11. Nuclear power plant cable materials : review of qualification and currently available aging data for margin assessments in cable performance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celina, Mathias Christopher; Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A selective literature review was conducted to assess whether currently available accelerated aging and original qualification data could be used to establish operational margins for the continued use of cable insulation and jacketing materials in nuclear power plant environments. The materials are subject to chemical and physical degradation under extended radiationthermal- oxidative conditions. Of particular interest were the circumstances under which existing aging data could be used to predict whether aged materials should pass loss of coolant accident (LOCA) performance requirements. Original LOCA qualification testing usually involved accelerated aging simulations of the 40-year expected ambient aging conditions followed by a LOCA simulation. The accelerated aging simulations were conducted under rapid accelerated aging conditions that did not account for many of the known limitations in accelerated polymer aging and therefore did not correctly simulate actual aging conditions. These highly accelerated aging conditions resulted in insulation materials with mostlyinert' aging processes as well as jacket materials where oxidative damage dropped quickly away from the air-exposed outside jacket surface. Therefore, for most LOCA performance predictions, testing appears to have relied upon heterogeneous aging behavior with oxidation often limited to the exterior of the cable cross-section - a situation which is not comparable with the nearly homogenous oxidative aging that will occur over decades under low dose rate and low temperature plant conditions. The historical aging conditions are therefore insufficient to determine with reasonable confidence the remaining operational margins for these materials. This does not necessarily imply that the existing 40-year-old materials would fail if LOCA conditions occurred, but rather that unambiguous statements about the current aging state and anticipated LOCA performance cannot be provided based on original qualification testing data alone. The non-availability of conclusive predictions for the aging conditions of 40-year-old cables implies that the same levels of uncertainty will remain for any re-qualification or extended operation of these cables. The highly variable aging behavior of the range of materials employed also implies that simple, standardized aging tests are not sufficient to provide the required aging data and performance predictions for all materials. It is recommended that focused studies be conducted that would yield the material aging parameters needed to predict aging behaviors under low dose, low temperature plant equivalent conditions and that appropriately aged specimens be prepared that would mimic oxidatively-aged 40- to 60- year-old materials for confirmatory LOCA performance testing. This study concludes that it is not sufficient to expose materials to rapid, high radiation and high temperature levels with subsequent LOCA qualification testing in order to predictively quantify safety margins of existing infrastructure with regard to LOCA performance. We need to better understand how cable jacketing and insulation materials have degraded over decades of power plant operation and how this aging history relates to service life prediction and the performance of existing equipment to withstand a LOCA situation.

  12. INFLUENCE OF PROTON IRRADIATION ON ANGULAR DEPENDENCE OF SECOND GENERATION (2G) HTS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ramesh

    of HTS wires are crucial to ensure that they will survive in a high radiation environment. HTS wires from two vendors were studied. Samples of 2G HTS wires from SuperPower and American Superconductor (ASCINFLUENCE OF PROTON IRRADIATION ON ANGULAR DEPENDENCE OF SECOND GENERATION (2G) HTS* Y. Shiroyanagi

  13. Outages of electric power supply resulting from cable failures Boston Edison Company system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factual data are provided regarding 5 electric power supply interruptions that occurred in the Boston Metropolitan area during April to June, 1979. Common to all of these outages was the failure of an underground cable as the initiating event, followed by multiple equipment failures. There was significant variation in the voltage ratings and types of cables which failed. The investigation was unable to delineate a single specific Boston Edison design operating or maintenance practice that could be cited as the cause of the outages. After reviewing the investigative report the following actions were recommended: the development and implementation of a plan to eliminate the direct current cable network; develop a network outage restoration plan; regroup primary feeder cables wherever possible to minimize the number of circuits in manholes, and to separate feeders to high load density areas; develop a program to detect incipient cable faults; evaluate the separation of the north and south sections of Back Bay network into separate networks; and, as a minimum, install the necessary facilities to make it possible to re-energize one section without interfering with the other; and re-evaluate the cathodic protection scheme where necessary. (LCL)

  14. HTS Wire Development Group: Achievements, technology transfer, and plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, G.N. Jr. [American Superconductor Corp., Westborough, MA (United States)

    1994-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the HTS wire development group is to develop high performance HTS wire for use in electric power systems. The HTS wire development group personnel is listed. The HTS wire development group achievements are outlined. These achievements include: focusing on the development of high performance and cost effective HTS wire; HTS wires were fabricated in laboratory scale and production scale lengths; ACS has fabricated the only conductor in the world to meet or surpass the DOE FY94 goals for electric power applications development; these wire fabrication successes at ASC are a direct result of the long-term collaboration between ASC and the other HTS Wire Development Group members; and plans are in place for a successful FY95 program.

  15. Aging and condition monitoring of electric cables in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lofaro, R.J.; Grove, E.; Soo, P.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are a variety of environmental stressors in nuclear power plants that can influence the aging rate of components; these include elevated temperatures, high radiation fields, and humid conditions. Exposure to these stressors over long periods of time can cause degradation of components that may go undetected unless the aging mechanisms are identified and monitored. In some cases the degradation may be mitigated by maintenance or replacement. However, some components receive neither and are thus more susceptible to aging degradation, which might lead to failure. One class of components that falls in this category is electric cables. Cables are very often overlooked in aging analyses since they are passive components that require no maintenance. However, they are very important components since they provide power to safety related equipment and transmit signals to and from instruments and controls. This paper will look at the various aging mechanisms and failure modes associated with electric cables. Condition monitoring techniques that may be useful for monitoring degradation of cables will also be discussed.

  16. HTS Cable Projects | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopmentHEADQUARTERSOutreach & CollaborationFact

  17. BNL | Accelerator Test Facility Cable Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the most valuable resources is cables used for signals (50 ohm), video signals (75 ohm), control cables and power supply cables. Since the number of cables installed at the ATF is...

  18. Microminiaturized minimally invasive intravascular micro-mechanical systems powered and controlled via fiber-optic cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fitch, J.P.; Hagans, K.; Clough, R.; Matthews, D.L.; Lee, A.P.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Benett, W.J.; Silva, L. Da; Celliers, P.M.

    1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro-mechanical system for medical procedures is constructed in the basic form of a catheter having a distal end for insertion into and manipulation within a body and a near end providing for a user to control the manipulation of the distal end within the body. A fiber-optic cable is disposed within the catheter and having a distal end proximate to the distal end of the catheter and a near end for external coupling of laser light energy. A microgripper is attached to the distal end of the catheter and providing for the gripping or releasing of an object within the body. A laser-light-to-mechanical-power converter is connected to receive laser light from the distal end of the fiber-optic cable and connected to mechanically actuate the microgripper. 22 figs.

  19. Microminiaturized minimally invasive intravascular micro-mechanical systems powered and controlled via fiber-optic cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fitch, Joseph P. (Livermore, CA); Hagans, Karla (Livermore, CA); Clough, Robert (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Los Altos, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz (Danville, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro-mechanical system for medical procedures is constructed in the basic form of a catheter having a distal end for insertion into and manipulation within a body and a near end providing for a user to control the manipulation of the distal end within the body. A fiberoptic cable is disposed within the catheter and having a distal end proximate to the distal end of the catheter and a near end for external coupling of laser light energy. A microgripper is attached to the distal end of the catheter and providing for the gripping or releasing of an object within the body. A laser-light-to-mechanical-power converter is connected to receive laser light from the distal end of the fiberoptic cable and connected to mechanically actuate the microgripper.

  20. Reflective HTS switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martens, Jon S. (Albuquerque, NM); Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Hohenwarter, Gert K. G. (Madison, WI)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A HTS switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time.

  1. Reflective HTS switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Hohenwarter, G.K.G.

    1994-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time. 6 figs.

  2. Alternative Design Concepts for Multi-Circuit HTS Link Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballarino, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting cables for power transmission usually contain two conductors for DC application, or three conductors for AC, with high voltage insulation. In contrast, for some applications related to accelerators it is convenient to transfer high currents via superconducting links feeding a number of circuits at relatively low voltage, of the order of a kilovolt, over distances of up to a few hundred meters. For power transmission applications based on cooling via sub-cooled liquid nitrogen, suitable HTS conductors are only available in the form of tape, and a multi-layer variant can be envisaged for the multi-circuit links. However, where cooling to temperatures of the order of 20 K is feasible, MgB2 conductor, available in the form of both tape and wire, can also be envisaged and in the latter case used to assemble round cables. There are, therefore, two distinct topologies - based on the use of wires or tapes - that can be envisaged for use in applications to multi-circuit link systems. In this paper the ...

  3. The US market for high-temperature superconducting wire in transmission cable applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forbes, D.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Telephone interviews were conducted with 23 utility engineers concerning the future prospects for high-temperature superconducting (HTS) transmission cables. All have direct responsibility for transmission in their utility, most of them in a management capacity. The engineers represented their utilities as members of the Electric Power Research Institute`s Underground Transmission Task Force (which has since been disbanded). In that capacity, they followed the superconducting transmission cable program and are aware of the cryogenic implications. Nineteen of the 23 engineers stated the market for underground transmission would grow during the next decade. Twelve of those specified an annual growth rate; the average of these responses was 5.6%. Adjusting that figure downward to incorporate the remaining responses, this study assumes an average growth rate of 3.4%. Factors driving the growth rate include the difficulty in securing rights-of-way for overhead lines, new construction techniques that reduce the costs of underground transmission, deregulation, and the possibility that public utility commissions will allow utilities to include overhead costs in their rate base. Utilities have few plans to replace existing cable as preventive maintenance, even though much of the existing cable has exceeded its 40-year lifetime. Ten of the respondents said the availability of a superconducting cable with the same life-cycle costs as a conventional cable and twice the ampacity would induce them to consider retrofits. The respondents said a cable with those characteristics would capture 73% of their cable retrofits.

  4. Performance of reduced wall EPR insulated medium voltage power cables. Pat 1: Electrical characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cinquemani, P.L.; Wen, Y.; Kuchta, F.L.; Doench, C. [Pirelli Cable Corp., Lexington, SC (United States)] [Pirelli Cable Corp., Lexington, SC (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper insulated lead covered cables (PILC) have had a long and successful heritage. After almost 100 years, this design of cable is still in operation and continues to be manufactured. However, utilities are now looking for a reliable replacement for PILC cables. This is due to two primary reasons: (1) difficulty in installing and maintaining this type of cable and (2) increasing pressure to replace these cables due to environmental concerns. To date diameter limitations of conventional extruded dielectric cables has impeded their replacement in existing PILC conduits. This paper describes a study for the evaluation for reliably reducing the insulation thickness to achieve a lower diameter cable to effectively replace PILC cable in existing conduits. Part 1 of the investigation reviews the theory of insulation wall determination and the test program carried out to evaluate electrical performance of reduced wall EPR cables. Additionally, cable design concepts and constructions are discussed. In Part 2 the mechanical performance on conventional and reduced wall EPR insulated cables are evaluated. This is reported in a separate paper.

  5. A comparison between the ANSI/IEEE and the CENELEC/IEC approach to overload protection of insulated power cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parise, G.; Rubino, G. [Univ. of Rome La Sapienza (Italy). Electrical Engineering Dept.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The same basic principles, on which the methods of power cables protection against overloads are based, are summed up by different criteria and formulations within ANSI/IEEE and CENELEC/IEC publications. The studies carried out by the technical committees of these organizations have been examined and compared in order to point out not only their differences but also their complementary aspects. By arranging the two approaches, it has been possible to outline a third way to determine the admissible duration of overload currents and define intermediate criteria for the emergency ratings of cables and for the coordination of protective devices.

  6. Performance of reduced wall EPR insulated medium voltage power cables. Part 2: Mechanical characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Y.; Cinquemani, P.L. [Pirelli Cable Corp., Lexington, SC (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the replacement of paper insulated lead covered cables (PILC) reduced insulation wall designs have been developed. They provide a reliable lower diameter cable design for installation in existing PILC conduits. Representing Part 2 of the investigation, this paper presents the results of mechanical testing conducted on both reduced and full wall EPR insulated cables. Both jacketed and non-jacketed cable designs have been subjected to mechanical pulling forces which greatly exceed recommended industry limitations, followed by electrical testing to ascertain cable performance. The results of this study conclude that reduced wall EPR insulated cables can safely withstand the same pulling forces as recommended for conventional walls and can be designed for installation under the same pulling limitations.

  7. Superconducting electric power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaugher, R.D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of superconductors to electric power systems has been actively pursued over the past 30 years. Following the realization of high-field, high-current superconductors in 1961, researchers applied these type II materials, such as Nb-Ti and Nb{sub 3}Sn, to laboratory magnets, followed by generators, motors, and transmission cables. Successful prototypes for the latter were constructed and tested by the mid-1980s. It is fair to assume that widespread utility acceptance of these low-temperature superconducting (LTS) power applications was compromised by the necessity for liquid helium cooling. The discovery of the high-temperature superconductors (HTS) in 1986, which offered the prospect for liquid nitrogen cooling, provided renewed interest and impetus and spurred the development of HTS power components. The expectations for HTS power components are, in fact, near realization, as a result of the rapid worldwide progress in HTS wire and tape development. This paper will review the history and present status of superconducting power-system-related applications. The major problems facing this technology and the prospects for commercialization and eventual integration into the utility sector will be discussed. General acceptance for superconducting power equipment by the electric utilities and other end-users will ultimately be based on the respective system performance, efficiency, reliability and maintenance, operational lifetime, and installed cost compared to conventional technologies.

  8. Review of nuclear power plant safety cable aging studies with recommendations for improved approaches and for future work.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Bernstein, Robert

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many U. S. nuclear power plants are approaching 40 years of age and there is a desire to extend their life for up to 100 total years. Safety-related cables were originally qualified for nuclear power plant applications based on IEEE Standards that were published in 1974. The qualifications involved procedures to simulate 40 years of life under ambient power plant aging conditions followed by simulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA). Over the past 35 years or so, substantial efforts were devoted to determining whether the aging assumptions allowed by the original IEEE Standards could be improved upon. These studies led to better accelerated aging methods so that more confident 40-year lifetime predictions became available. Since there is now a desire to potentially extend the life of nuclear power plants way beyond the original 40 year life, there is an interest in reviewing and critiquing the current state-of-the-art in simulating cable aging. These are two of the goals of this report where the discussion is concentrated on the progress made over the past 15 years or so and highlights the most thorough and careful published studies. An additional goal of the report is to suggest work that might prove helpful in answering some of the questions and dealing with some of the issues that still remain with respect to simulating the aging and predicting the lifetimes of safety-related cable materials.

  9. Radiation Testing of a Low Voltage Silicone Nuclear Power Plant Cable.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White II, Gregory Von; Schroeder, John Lee.; Sawyer, Patricia Sue.; Wichhart, Derek; Mata, Guillermo Adrian; Zorrilla, Jorge; Bernstein, Robert

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results generated in FY13 for cable insulation in support of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, in collaboration with the US-Argentine Binational Energy Working Group (BEWG). A silicone (SiR) cable, which was stored in benign conditions for ~30 years, was obtained from Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) in Argentina with the approval of NA-SA (Nucleoelectrica Argentina Sociedad Anonima). Physical property testing was performed on the as-received cable. This cable was artificially aged to assess behavior with additional analysis. SNL observed appreciable tensile elongation values for all cable insulations received, indicative of good mechanical performance. Of particular note, the work presented here provides correlations between measured tensile elongation and other physical properties that may be potentially leveraged as a form of condition monitoring (CM) for actual service cables. It is recognized at this point that the polymer aging community is still lacking the number and types of field returned materials that are desired, but Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) -- along with the help of others -- is continuing to work towards that goal. This work is an initial study that should be complimented with location-mapping of environmental conditions of Argentinean plant conditions (dose and temperature) as well as retrieval, analysis, and comparison with in- service cables.

  10. Radiation Testing of a Low Voltage Silicone Nuclear Power Plant Cable.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Robert

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results generated in FY13 for cable insulation in support of DOE's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, in collaboration with the US- Argentine Binational Energy Working Group (BEWG). A silicone (SiR) cable, which was stored in benign conditions for ~30 years, was obtained from Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) in Argentina. Physical property testing was performed on the as-received cable. This cable was artificially aged to assess behavior with additional analysis. SNL observed appreciable tensile elongation values for all cable insulations received, indicative of good mechanical performance. Of particular note, the work presented here provides correlations between measured tensile elongation and other physical properties that may be potentially leveraged as a form of condition monitoring (CM) for actual service cables. It is recognized at this point that the polymer aging community is still lacking the number and types of field returned materials that are desired, but SNL -- along with the help of others -- is continuing to work towards that goal. This work is an initial study that should be complimented with location- mapping of environmental conditions of CNEA plant conditions (dose and temperature) as well as retrieval, analysis, and comparison with in-service cables.

  11. Development of a termination for the 77kV-class high Tc superconducting power cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimonosono, T.; Nagaya, S. [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., Nagoya (Japan)] [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., Nagoya (Japan); Masuda, T.; Isojima, S. [Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd., Osaka (Japan)] [Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A termination for 77kV-class high Tc superconducting power cables was designed and fabricated. The termination is insulated with SF6 gas, nitrogen gas and liquid nitrogen and is cooled with liquid nitrogen. The current lead has a cross sectional area altered along its axis in order to decrease the heat inlet and to prevent SF6 gas from liquefying. The current lead is insulated with Ethylene-propylene Rubber (EPR) because it passes through nitrogen gas which has low dielectric strength in comparison with liquid nitrogen and SF6 gas. 200A AC current and 70 kV AC voltage to ground were successfully applied simultaneously for 40 hours in total. The measured heat loss of the termination, 9W is in good agreement with the calculated value. As the next step, the applied voltage was increased and the termination was confirmed to withstand the voltage up to 120 kV AC and 400kV Imp to ground.

  12. 18 IEEE Transactions onPower Delivery, Vol. 14, No.1, January 1999 Leak Location in Fluid Filled Cables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , dielectric fluid leaks, fluid-filled cable. Introduction High Pressure Fluid Filled (HPFF), pipe-type cable length ofthe underground transmission cable in the country. An HPFF cable system is comprised of a steel. HPFF cable systems have proven to be very reliable. However, in some cases due to various causes

  13. Control signal transmission through power supply cables of a 3-phase PWM motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendez, Jose A. (Jose Antonio Mendez Alcazar)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modem process control systems often employ accurate position or speed controlled PWM motors, which require feedback data for the drive control loop. Current methods require an independently shielded cable for feedback data ...

  14. Engineered HTS microbridges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, R.W.; Bulman, J.B.; Burch, J.F.; Coons, S.B.; Daly, K.P.; Dozier, W.D.; Hu, R.; Lee, A.E.; Luine, J.A.; Platt, C.E.; Schwarzbek, S.M.; Zani, M.J. (TRW Space and Technology Group, Redondo Beach, CA (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the absence of useful Josephson tunnel junctions made from cuprate superconductors, microbridges of various types are the only useful active devices for HTS electronics applications. A variety of techniques now exist to reproducibly engineer microbridges in high-quality epitaxial YBCO films. This paper reports on two such techniques from our own group that has resulted in high-yield processes for fabricating both dc and rf SQUIDs operating at temperatures as high as 82 K. The authors compare the results on these devices--step-edge microbridges and focused-ion beam microbridges--- with those on several other structures under investigation by other researchers.

  15. Investigation of broadband over power line channel capacity of shipboard power system cables for ship communications networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akinnikawe, Ayorinde

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    cables. The work used a multiconductor transmission line theory based approach to model the channel response of SPS distribution lines and estimated the channel throughput capacity using a “water-filling” communication technique. This work found that BPL...

  16. Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program – Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Brenchley, David L.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hashemian, Hash; Konnik, Robert; Ray, Sheila

    2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters. The workshop was attended by 30 experts in materials, electrical engineering, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory), NDE instrumentation development, universities, commercial NDE services and cable manufacturers, and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The motivation for the R&D roadmap comes from the need to address the aging management of in-containment cables at nuclear power plants (NPPs).

  17. COPPER CABLE RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chelsea Hubbard

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective technologies for use in deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsors large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs). At these LSDDPs, developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to the DOE's projects and to others in the D&D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, and decreased costs of operation. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) generated a list of statements defining specific needs and problems where improved technology could be incorporated into ongoing D&D tasks. One such need is to reduce the volume of waste copper wire and cable generated by D&D. Deactivation and decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities generates hundreds of tons of contaminated copper cable, which are sent to radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology separates the clean copper from contaminated insulation and dust materials in these cables. The recovered copper can then be reclaimed and, more importantly, landfill disposal volumes can be reduced. The existing baseline technology for disposing radioactively contaminated cables is to package the cables in wooden storage boxes and dispose of the cables in radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology is applicable to facility decommissioning projects at many Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and commercial nuclear power plants undergoing decommissioning activities. The INEEL Copper Cable Recycling Technology Demonstration investigated the effectiveness and efficiency to recycle 13.5 tons of copper cable. To determine the effectiveness of separating out radioactive contamination, the copper cable was coated with a surrogate contaminant. The demonstration took place at the Bonneville County Technology Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho.

  18. Superconductor cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allais, Arnaud; Schmidt, Frank; Marzahn, Erik

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconductor cable is described, having a superconductive flexible cable core (1) , which is laid in a cryostat (2, 3, 4), in which the cable core (1) runs in the cryostat (2, 3, 4) in the form of a wave or helix at room temperature.

  19. HTS thin films: Passive microwave components and systems integration issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miranda, F.A.; Chorey, C.M.; Bhasin, K.B. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The excellent microwave properties of the High-Temperature-Superconductors (HTS) have been amply demonstrated in the laboratory by techniques such as resonant cavity, power transmission and microstrip resonator measurements. The low loss and high Q passive structures made possible with HTS, present attractive options for applications in commercial, military and space-based systems. However, to readily insert HTS into these systems improvement is needed in such areas as repeatability in the deposition and processing of the HTS films, metal-contact formation, wire bonding, and overall film endurance to fabrication and assembly procedures. In this paper we present data compiled in our lab which illustrate many of the problems associated with these issues. Much of this data were obtained in the production of a space qualified hybrid receiver-downconverter module for the Naval Research Laboratory`s High Temperature Superconductivity Space Experiment II (HTSSE-II). Examples of variations observed in starting films and finished circuits will be presented. It is shown that under identical processing the properties of the HTS films can degrade to varying extents. Finally, we present data on ohmic contacts and factors affecting their adhesion to HTS films, strength of wire bonds made to such contacts, and aging effects.

  20. Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program – Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, K.L.; Ramuhali, P.; Brenchley, D.L.; Coble, J.B.; Hashemian, H.M.; Konnick, R.; Ray, S.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary [partial] The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. A workshop was held to gather subject matter experts to develop the NDE R&D Roadmap for Cables. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters. The workshop was attended by 30 experts in materials, electrical engineering, and NDE instrumentation development from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory), universities, commercial NDE service vendors and cable manufacturers, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).

  1. HTS Wire Development Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 High-Temperature Superconducting Wire Development Workshop was held on February 16--17 at the St. Petersburg Hilton and Towers in St. Petersburg, Florida. The meeting was hosted by Florida Power Corporation and sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. The meeting focused on recent high-temperature superconducting wire development activities in the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Systems program. The meeting opened with a general discussion on the needs and benefits of superconductivity from a utility perspective, the US global competitiveness position, and an outlook on the overall prospects of wire development. The meeting then focused on four important technology areas: Wire characterization: issues and needs; technology for overcoming barriers: weak links and flux pinning; manufacturing issues for long wire lengths; and physical properties of HTS coils. Following in-depth presentations, working groups were formed in each technology area to discuss the most important current research and development issues. The working groups identified research areas that have the potential for greatly enhancing the wire development effort. These areas are discussed in the summary reports from each of the working groups. This document is a compilation of the workshop proceedings including all general session presentations and summary reports from the working groups.

  2. HTS wire requirements for SMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenung, S.; Schafer, W.J.

    1994-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation/paper gives an overview of the Sandia National Lab`s sponsorship of W.J. Schafer Associates, Inc. to examine the following topics: the refrigeration savings possible by using high temperature superconductors (HTS) in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES), the impact of duty cycle on refrigeration requirements, and outline the required HTS wire performance. Included are specifications for SMES applications, advantages, cost components, assumed conductor performance parameters, and the effects of duty cycle and conductor twist pitch.

  3. Deformation processing of HTS wire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingert, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods to understand, control, and optimize deformation processing of HTS wire are outlined. Topics discussed include: technical progress, deformation processing effects on HTS - core uniformity in composite tapes, effects of rolling on tapes, deformation process modeling, channel die powder compaction stress-strain data, microhardness versus rolling reduction, minimum bifurcation strain versus material state, roll gap geometries for large versus small rolls, interactions, hydrostatic extrusion, and tensile properties.

  4. High-Temperature Superconducting Cable Testing Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    and need for improvement. A 20-strand cable sample was wound into a 12-turn coil, which is also a first of HTS coil technology needed, for example, for the design of a 60 T DC hybrid magnet at the MagLab PhD student who recently formed a company to develop his ideas for making cables out of REBCO coated

  5. Characterization of underground cable incipient failures from on-line monitoring of underground distribution power systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardoso, Jesus

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study. . Results &om TAMU Experiments. 4. 4, 1 Abnormal Activity in the Four Phase and Neutral Currents 4. 4. 2 Abnormal Activity in the Notch and Highpass Filtered Current. . . . 4, 4. 3 Abnormal Activity in the Notch Filtered Current.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. 4. 4 Analysis of Cables Tested More Than Once 40 47 47 48 48 49 4. 5. 1 Example of Activity in TU Electric Data. 4. 5. 2 Abnormal Activity in Both the Notch Filtered and Notch and Highpass Filtered Data 4. 5. 3 Abnormal Activity...

  6. Design and Development of a 100 MVA HTS Generator for Commercial Entry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2007-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002, General Electric and the US Department of Energy (DOE) entered into a cooperative agreement for the development of a commercialized 100 MVA generator using high temperature superconductors (HTS) in the field winding. The intent of the program was to: (1) identify and develop technologies that would be needed for such a generator; (2) develop conceptual designs for generators with ratings of 100 MVA and higher using HTS technology; (3) perform proof of concept tests at the 1.5 MW level for GE's proprietary warm iron rotor HTS generator concept; and (4) design, build, and test a prototype of a commercially viable 100 MVA generator that could be placed on the power grid. This report summarizes work performed during the program and is provided as one of the final program deliverables. The design for the HTS generator was based on GE's warm iron rotor concept in which a cold HTS coil is wound around a warm magnetic iron pole. This approach for rotating HTS electrical machinery provides the efficiency benefits of the HTS technology while addressing the two most important considerations for power generators in utility applications: cost and reliability. The warm iron rotor concept uses the least amount of expensive HTS wire compared to competing concepts and builds on the very high reliability of conventional iron core stators and armature windings.

  7. "Flexible aerogel as a superior thermal insulation for high temperature superconductor cable applications"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Shannon O. [Aspen Aerogel, Inc.; Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Tomich, A. [Aspen Aerogel, Inc.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) cables are an advanced technology that can both strengthen and improve the national electrical distribution infrastructure. HTS cables require sufficient cooling to overcome inherent low temperature heat loading. Heat loads are minimized by the use of cryogenic envelopes or cryostats. Cryostats require improvement in efficiency, reliability, and cost reduction to meet the demanding needs of HTS conductors (1G and 2G wires). Aspen Aerogels has developed a compression resistant aerogel thermal insulation package to replace compression sensitive multi-layer insulation (MLI), the incumbent thermal insulation, in flexible cryostats for HTS cables. Oak Ridge National Laboratory tested a prototype aerogel package in a lab-scale pipe apparatus to measure the rate of heat invasion. The lab-scale pipe test results of the aerogel solution will be presented and directly compared to MLI. A compatibility assessment of the aerogel material with HTS system components will also be presented. The aerogel thermal insulation solution presented will meet the demanding needs of HTS cables.

  8. Review of activities in USA on HTS materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, D.E.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid progress in attaining practical applications of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) has been made since the discovery of these new materials. Many critical parameters influencing HTS powder synthesis and wire processing have been identified through a combination of fundamental exploration and applied research. The complexity of these novel materials with regard to phase behavior and physical properties has become evident as a result of these careful studies. Achieving optimal mechanical and superconducting properties in wires and tapes will require further understanding and synergy among several different technical disciplines. Highlights of efforts towards producing practical superconductors for electric power applications based on rare earth-, bismuth-, and thallium-based systems are reviewed.

  9. albany hts cable: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has been found particularly advantageous for remote monitoring of highways for mining induced subsidence, development of sinkholes, and landslides. It has also been...

  10. 2298 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 13, NO. 2, JUNE 2003 Cryogenic Cooling Temperature of HTS Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Ho-Myung

    , thermal optimization, transformer. I. INTRODUCTION MAIN advantages of HTS power transformers are the small and efficiency. As small size and low power consumption are conflicting in determining the oper- ating at around 77 K [1]. Toward the practical applications, an operation of HTS transformers at temperatures well

  11. Superconductor cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allais, Arnaud (Hannover, DE); Schmidt, Frank (Langenhagen, DE

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconductor cable includes a superconductive cable core (1) and a cryostat (2) enclosing the same. The cable core (1) has a superconductive conductor (3), an insulation (4) surrounding the same and a shielding (5) surrounding the insulation (4). A layer (3b) of a dielectric or semiconducting material is applied to a central element (3a) formed from a normally conducting material as a strand or tube and a layer (3c) of at least one wire or strip of superconductive material is placed helically on top. The central element (3a) and the layer (3c) are connected to each other in an electrically conducting manner at the ends of the cable core (1).

  12. Field Demonstration of a 24-kV Superconducting Cable at Detroit Edison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, Nathan; Corsaro, Pietro

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Customer acceptance of high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable technology requires a substantial field demonstration illustrating both the system's technical capabilities and its suitability for installation and operation within the utility environment. In this project, the world's first underground installation of an HTS cable using existing ductwork, a 120 meter demonstration cable circuit was designed and installed between the 24 kV bus distribution bus and a 120 kV-24 kV transformer at Detroit Edison's Frisbie substation. The system incorporated cables, accessories, a refrigeration system, and control instrumentation. Although the system was never put in operation because of problems with leaks in the cryostat, the project significantly advanced the state-of-the-art in the design and implementation of Warm Dielectric cable systems in substation applications. Lessons learned in this project are already being incorporated in several ongoing demonstration projects.

  13. Determination of the effect of harmonics on pipe-type power cable AC/DC resistance ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, J.A.; Degeneff, R.C. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)); McKernan, T.M.; Halleran, T.M. (Consolidated Edison Co. of NY, Inc., New York (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a closed form expression to compute the AC/CD resistance ratio of HPFF (High Pressure Fluid Filled) pipe-type cable in the presence of harmonics. Industry currently computes this factor, which is a significant part in assessing the current carrying capacity of a system, with the assumption that the currents are purely sinusoidal at 60 Hz. However, as levels of harmonics increase on power systems, concern for the effect of harmonics on system ampacities rises, and that effect has already been discussed for distribution systems. This paper develops a closed form hybrid of the resistance ratio equations presented by Neher and McGrath, and compares the results with measured data at 60 Hz. At present there is no measured data available for the resistance ratio at higher frequencies, so a two dimensional finite element model is developed to view the effect of frequency on the resistance ratio. A discussion is given on the effect of a specific harmonics scenario on the resistance ratio of a given system, and results are presented for some example systems. The paper also discusses the validity and characteristics of each method.

  14. HTS High Gradient Magnetic Separation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, M.A.; Coulter, J.Y.; Hults, W.L. [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the assembly, characterization and operation of a high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnetic separator. The magnet is made of 624 m of Silver/BSCCO superconducting wire and has overall dimensions of 18 cm OD, 15.5 cm height and 5 cm ID. The HTS current leads are designed to operate with the warm end at 75 K and the cold end cooled by a two stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. The upper stage of the cryocooler cools the thermal shield and two heat pipe thermal intercepts. The lower stage of the cryocooler cools the HTS magnet and the bottom end of the HTS current leads. The HTS magnet was initially characterized in liquid cryogens. We report on the current- voltage (I-V) characteristics of the HTS magnet at temperatures ranging from 15 to 40 K. At 40 K the magnet can generate a central field of 2.0 T at a current of 120 A.

  15. HTS wire development at Intermagnetic General Corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haldar, P. [Intermagnetics General Corp., Latham, NY (United States)

    1994-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The HTS wire development program at Intermagnetics General Corporation is outlined. Technical achievements in the Bi-2223, Tl-1223 and Tl-based conductor program are summarized. Long lengths of Tl-based HTS tapes with uniform transport properties have been fabricated. Multifilament samples of Tl-based HTS tapes have been fabricated for the first time. Optimization of thermomechanical processing is ongoing and weak links is still a major problem in P-I-T tapes. Future work is summarized.

  16. albuquerque communications cables: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cooling by flow of dry gas, pulsed power is assumed. Potential approaches to power distribution, cable paths, and cable design for operation in a 5 T magnetic field are described....

  17. aged xlpe cables: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    power is assumed. Potential approaches to power distribution, cable paths, and cable design for operation in a 5 T magnetic field are described. W. E. Cooper 2009-02-17 5...

  18. Investigation of broadband over power line channel capacity of shipboard power system cables for ship communications networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akinnikawe, Ayorinde

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and networking has led to suggestions of applying BPL in other systems including ships. The application of BPL technology using the Shipboard Power System (SPS) as a potential communications network for ship automation systems has been proposed, to achieve recent...

  19. Influence of Proton Irradiation on Angular Dependence of Second Generation (2G)HTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiroyanagi, Y.; Greene, G.; Gupta, R.; Sampson, W.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) the quadrupoles in the fragment separator are exposed to very high radiation and heat loads. High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) are a good candidate for these magnets because they can be used at {approx}30-50 K and tolerate higher heat generation than Nb-Ti magnets. Radiation damage studies of HTS wires are crucial to ensure that they will survive in a high radiation environment. HTS wires from two vendors were studied. Samples of 2G HTS wires from SuperPower and American Superconductor (ASC) were irradiated with a 42 {mu}A, 142 MeV proton beam from the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP). The angular dependence of the critical current was measured in magnetic fields at 77K.

  20. Superconducting Cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughey, Raburn L. (Franklin, GA); Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Reece, David S. (Carrollton, GA); Muller, Albert C. (Eidson, TN)

    2005-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  1. Superconducting Cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughey, Raburn L. (Franklin, GA); Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Reece, David S. (Carrollton, GA); Muller, Albert C. (Eidson, TN)

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  2. Tunneling study on HTS -digest version-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    Tunneling study on HTS -digest version- Tunneling study on HTS -digest version- #12;Type contact tunneling #12;Tunneling spectra observed with different types of probes. (a):600Ê mÓ Pt wire, (b):200Ê mÓ Ag wire of coil shaped and (c):30Ê mÓ Au wire probes. The corresponding surface SEM image were

  3. Development of ceramic superconductors for electric power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balachandran, U.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy supports an applied superconductivity program entitled {open_quotes}Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems.{close_quotes} Activities under this program are designed to help develop the high-temperature superconductor (HTS) technology that is needed for industry to proceed with the commercial development of electric power applications. Research is conducted in three categories: wire development, systems technology development, and Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI). Wire development activities are devoted to improving the critical current density (J{sub c}) of short-length HTS wire, whereas activities in systems technology development focus on fabrication of long-length wires, coils, and magnets. Finally, SPI activities focus on the development of prototypes that consist of a generator coil, a fault current limiter, a transmission cable, and a motor. A current overview and recent progress in the development of HTSs are outlined in this paper. 48 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Recent advances in fabrication of high-T{sub c} superconductors for electric power applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balachandran, U.

    1998-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports an applied superconductivity program entitled ''Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems.'' Activities within this program contribute to development of the high-temperature superconductor (HTS) technology needed for industry to proceed with the commercial development of electric power applications such as motors, generators, transformers, transmission cables, and current limiters. Research is conducted in three categories: wire development, systems technology development, and Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI). Wire development activities are devoted to improving the critical current density (J{sub c}) of short-length HTS wires, whereas systems technology development focuses on fabrication of long-length wires, coils, and on magnets. The SPI activities are aimed at development of prototype products. Significant progress has been made in the development of (HTSs) for various applications: some applications have already made significant strides in the marketplace, while others are still in the developmental stages. For successful electric power applications, it is very important that the HTS be fabricated into long-length conductors that exhibit desired superconducting and mechanical properties. Several parameters of the PIT technique must be carefully controlled to obtain the desired properties. Long lengths of Bi-2223 tapes with respectable superconducting properties have been fabricated by a carefully designed thermomechanical treatment process. A 1-MVA capacity fault current limiter, a 286-hp motor, and 630-kVA transformers, and a 50-m-long conductor, all using HTSs, have already been demonstrated. While the use of HTS devices in the electric utility area has clear advantages, impediments to successful commercialization remain. Issues such as AC losses, conductor cost, and reliable superconducting joints must be addressed. The cost of HTS conductors are still quite high, and significant R and D effort must be focused on this issue. The general acceptance of HTS power equipment will ultimately be based on system performance, reliability and maintenance, efficiency, and installed cost relative to those of conventional technologies.

  5. Accelerator Quality HTS Dipole Magnet Demonstrator Designs for the EuCARD-2, 5 Tesla 40 mm Clear Aperture Magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, GA; Ballarino, A; Bottura, L; Chouika, N; Clement, S; Datskov, V; Fajardo, L; Fleiter, J; Gauthier, R; Gentini, L; Lambert, L; Lopes, M; Perez, JC; de Rijk, G; Rijllart, A; Rossi, L; ten Kate, H; Durante, M; Fazilleau, P; Lorin, C; Härö, E; Stenvall, A; Caspi, S; Marchevsky, M; Goldacker, W; Kario, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future high-energy accelerators will need very high magnetic fields in the range of 20 T. The EuCARD-2 work-package-10 is a collaborative push to take HTS materials into an accelerator quality demonstrator magnet. The demonstrator will produce 5 T standalone and between 17 T and 20 T, when inserted into the 100 mm aperture of Fresca-2 high field out-sert magnet. The HTS magnet will demonstrate the field strength and field quality that can be achieved. An effective quench detection and protection system will have to be developed to operate with the HTS superconducting materials. This paper presents a ReBCO magnet design using multi strand Roebel cable that develops a stand-alone field of 5 T in a 40 mm clear aperture and discusses the challenges associated with good field quality using this type of material. A selection of magnet designs is presented as result of a first phase of development.

  6. Accelerator Quality HTS Dipole Magnet Demonstrator designs for the EuCARD-2, 5 Tesla 40 mm Clear Aperture Magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, G; Ballarino, A; Bottura, L; Chouika, N; Clement, S; Datskov, V; Fajardo, L; Fleiter, J; Gauthier, R; Lambert, L; Lopes, M; Perez, J; DeRijk, G; Rijllart, A; Rossi, L; Ten Kate, H; Durante, M; Fazilleau, P; Lorin, C; Haro, E; Stenvall, A; Caspi, S; Marchevsky, M; Goldacker, W; Kario, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future high-energy accelerators will need very high magnetic fields in the range of 20 T. The EuCARD-2 work-package-10 is a collaborative push to take HTS materials into an accelerator quality demonstrator magnet. The demonstrator will produce 5 T standalone and between 17 T and 20 T, when inserted into the 100 mm aperture of Fresca-2 high field out-sert magnet. The HTS magnet will demonstrate the field strength and field quality that can be achieved. An effective quench detection and protection system will have to be developed to operate with the HTS superconducting materials. This paper presents a ReBCO magnet design using multi strand Roebel cable that develops a stand-alone field of 5 T in a 40 mm clear aperture and discusses the challenges associated with good field quality using this type of material. A selection of magnet designs is presented as result of a first phase of development.

  7. HTS current lead using a composite heat pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, M.A.; Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Daney, D.E.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the design and fabrication of HTS current leads being built by Los Alamos to supply power to a demonstration HTS coil which will operate in a vacuum cooled by a cryocooler. Because vapor cooling is not an option for this application the leads must be entirely conductively cooled. In the design of HTS current leads for this type of application, it is desirable to intercept part of the heat load at an intermediate temperature. This thermal intercept or connection must be electrically insulating but thermally conductive, two mutually exclusive properties of most candidate solid materials. To achieve this end we incorporate a composite nitrogen heat pipe, constructed of conducting and non-conducting materials, to provide efficient thermal communication and simultaneously, electrical isolation between the lead and the intermediate temperature heat sink. Another important feature of the current lead design is the use of high Jc thick film superconductors deposited on a non-conducting substrate to reduce the conductive heat leak through the lower portion of the lead. Two flexible electrical conductors are incorporated to accommodate handling, assembly and the dissimilar expansion coefficients of the various materials.

  8. HTS powder synthesis and wire sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful processing of HTS wires that exhibit superconducting properties and lengths appropriate for applications requires thoroughly understanding and carefully controlling experimental parameters. Initial important processing considerations are the quality and nature of the powder used to produce the superconductor within the wire composite. Following fabrication of the wire, sintering conditions must be chosen based on a knowledge of the phase behavior of the associated materials. HTS wire studies with our industrial partners have involved Bi-2212, Bi-2223, and Tl-1223 based systems. The goals of this project`s efforts in these collaborations have been directed towards: (1) Establishing procedures for HTS powder syntheses that produce superconductors with optimal properties; (2) Studying conditions for HTS wire sintering that produce high current densities appropriate for conductor applications. The Los Alamos project involves 6 staff, 3 technicians, and 4 postdoctoral students.

  9. Characterization of a high-temperature superconducting conductor on round core cables in magnetic fields up to 20 T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Laan, Danko [Advanced Conductor Technologies; Noyes, Patrick [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory; Miller, George [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory; Weijers, Hubertus [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory; Willering, Gerard [CERN

    2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of high-field magnets that will operate at magnetic fields substantially above 20 T, or at temperatures substantially above 4.2 K, requires high-temperature superconductors (HTS). Conductor on round core (CORC) cables, in which RE-Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (RE = rare earth) (REBCO) coated conductors are wound in a helical fashion on a fl?exible core, are a practical and versatile HTS cable option for low-inductance, high-field magnets. We performed the first tests of CORC magnet cables in liquid helium in magnetic fields of up to 20 T. A record critical current I{sub c} of 5021 A was measured at 4.2 K and 19 T. In a cable with an outer diameter of 7.5 mm, this value corresponds to an engineering current density J{sub e} of 114 A mm{sup -2} , the highest J{sub e} ever reported for a superconducting cable at such high magnetic fields. Additionally, the first magnet wound from an HTS cable was constructed from a 6 m-long CORC cable. The 12-turn, double-layer magnet had an inner diameter of 9 cm and was tested in a magnetic field of 20 T, at which it had an I{sub c} of 1966 A. The cables were quenched repetitively without degradation during the measurements, demonstrating the feasibility of HTS CORC cables for use in high-field magnet applications.

  10. Modular test facility for HTS insert coils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardo, V; Bartalesi, A.; Barzi, E.; Lamm, M.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The final beam cooling stages of a Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields in the range of 40-50 T. In this paper we will present a modular test facility developed for the purpose of investigating very high field levels with available 2G HTS superconducting materials. Performance of available conductors is presented, together with magnetic calculations and evaluation of Lorentz forces distribution on the HTS coils. Finally a test of a double pancake coil is presented.

  11. Fabrication and Test Results for Rutherford-Type Cables Made from BSCCO Strands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanlan, R.M.; Dietderich, D.R.; Higley, H.C.; Marken, K.R.; Motowidlo, L.R.; Solokowski, R.; Hasegawa, T.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wires based on the Bi-2212 HTS superconductor are becoming available commercially, with current densities that are attractive for some applications. We report here on our success in using these Bi-2212 wires to fabricate multistrand, kiloamp conductors that can be used to construct dipole and quadrupole magnets for particle accelerator applications. Multistrand cables have been made from several types of Bi-2212 wire supplied by two manufacturers. These cables were made with cores of various compositions and dimensions in order to optimize the fabrication process. In addition, cables have been made from aspected strands as well as round strands. Cable critical currents will be reported and compared for the various cable parameters investigated in this study.

  12. R&D ERL: HTS Solenoid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, R.; Muratore, J.; Plate, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative feature of the ERL project is the use of a solenoid made with High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) with the Superconducting RF cavity. The HTS solenoid design offers many advantages because of several unique design features. Typically the solenoid is placed outside the cryostat which means that the beam gets significantly defused before a focusing element starts. In the current design, the solenoid is placed inside the cryostat which provides an early focusing structure and thus a significant reduction in the emittance of the electron beam. In addition, taking full advantage of the high critical temperature of HTS, the solenoid has been designed to reach the required field at {approx}77 K, which can be obtained with liquid nitrogen. This significantly reduces the cost of testing and allows a variety of critical pre-tests which would have been prohibitively expensive at 4 K in liquid helium because of the additional requirements of cryostat and associated facilities.

  13. AMRIS Update Ultra High Sensitivity NMR: 1-mm HTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    , although they are difficult or impossible to fabricate like standard copper wire, HTS materials can provideAMRIS Update Ultra High Sensitivity NMR: 1-mm HTS Triple Resonance Probe W.W. Brey, NHMFL A and Rich Withers) and others at Conductus developed the first HTS (high temperature superconducting

  14. Condition Monitoring of Cables Task 3 Report: Condition Monitoring Techniques for Electric Cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villaran, M.; Lofaro, R.; na

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    For more than 20 years the NRC has sponsored research studying electric cable aging degradation, condition monitoring, and environmental qualification testing practices for electric cables used in nuclear power plants. This report summarizes several of the most effective and commonly used condition monitoring techniques available to detect damage and measure the extent of degradation in electric cable insulation. The technical basis for each technique is summarized, along with its application, trendability of test data, ease of performing the technique, advantages and limitations, and the usefulness of the test results to characterize and assess the condition of electric cables.

  15. History of HTS motor development at Reliance Electric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiferl, R. [Reliance Electric Co., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) motor development program at Reliance Electric is presented. The project was initiated in 1987 by EPRI to investigate the use of high temperature superconducting materials in electric motors. Liquid nitrogen was proposed as the HTS winding coolant. The ultimate goal, motivation, motor type and HTS wire requirements as well as the program milestones are outlined. It was concluded that the HTS motor development has paralleled wire development; progress continues toward the goal of large horsepower HTS motors for commercial applications; the team is well on the way toward completing the design of a 125 hp, 1800 rpm motor with HTS coils cooled to 20 to 40 K; and the program is a vital step in the development of HTS motors.

  16. Cable Measuring Engine Operation Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Authors, Various

    1997-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cable Measuring Engine (CME) is a tool which measures and records the cable dimensions in a nondestructive fashion. It is used in-line with the superconductor cable as it is being made. The CME is intended to be used as a standard method of measuring cable by the various manufacturers involved in the cable process.

  17. Cable Diagnostic Focused Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartlein, R.A.; Hampton, R.N.

    2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes an extensive effort made to understand how to effectively use the various diagnostic technologies to establish the condition of medium voltage underground cable circuits. These circuits make up an extensive portion of the electric delivery infrastructure in the United States. Much of this infrastructure is old and experiencing unacceptable failure rates. By deploying efficient diagnostic testing programs, electric utilities can replace or repair circuits that are about to fail, providing an optimal approach to improving electric system reliability. This is an intrinsically complex topic. Underground cable systems are not homogeneous. Cable circuits often contain multiple branches with different cable designs and a range of insulation materials. In addition, each insulation material ages differently as a function of time, temperature and operating environment. To complicate matters further, there are a wide variety of diagnostic technologies available for assessing the condition of cable circuits with a diversity of claims about the effectiveness of each approach. As a result, the benefits of deploying cable diagnostic testing programs have been difficult to establish, leading many utilities to avoid the their use altogether. This project was designed to help address these issues. The information provided is the result of a collaborative effort between Georgia Tech NEETRAC staff, Georgia Tech academic faculty, electric utility industry participants, as well as cable system diagnostic testing service providers and test equipment providers. Report topics include: •How cable systems age and fail, •The various technologies available for detecting potential failure sites, •The advantages and disadvantages of different diagnostic technologies, •Different approaches for utilities to employ cable system diagnostics. The primary deliverables of this project are this report, a Cable Diagnostic Handbook (a subset of this report) and an online knowledge based system (KBS) that helps utilities select the most effective diagnostic technologies for a given cable circuit and circuit conditions.

  18. Roebel cables from REBCO coated conductors: a one-century-old concept for the superconductivity of the future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldacker, Wilfried; Pardo, Enric; Kario, Anna; Schlachter, Sonja I; Vojenciak, Michal

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy applications employing high-temperature superconductors (HTS), such as motors/generators, transformers, transmission lines and fault current limiters, are usually operated in the alternate current (AC) regime. In order to be efficient, the HTS devices need to have a sufficiently low value of AC loss, in addition to the necessary current-carrying capacity. Most applications are operated with currents beyond the current capacity of single conductors and consequently require cabled conductor solutions with much higher current carrying capacity, from a few kA to up to 20-30 kA for large hydro-generators. A century ago, in 1914, Ludwig Roebel invented a low-loss cable design for copper cables, which was successively named after him. The main idea behind Roebel cables is to separate the current in different strands and to provide a full transposition of the strands along the cable direction. Nowadays, these cables are commonly used in the stator of large generators. Based on the same design concept of their ...

  19. Noise performance of magneto-inductive cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltshire, M. C. K., E-mail: michael.wiltshire@imperial.ac.uk; Syms, R. R. A. [Optical and Semiconductor Devices Group, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Magneto-inductive (MI) waveguides are metamaterial structures based on periodic arrangements of inductively coupled resonant magnetic elements. They are of interest for power transfer, communications and sensing, and can be realised in a flexible cable format. Signal-to-noise ratio is extremely important in applications involving signals. Here, we present the first experimental measurements of the noise performance of metamaterial cables. We focus on an application involving radiofrequency signal transmission in internal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), where the subdivision of the metamaterial cable provides intrinsic patient safety. We consider MI cables suitable for use at 300 MHz during {sup 1}H MRI at 7 T, and find noise figures of 2.3–2.8?dB/m, together with losses of 3.0–3.9?dB/m, in good agreement with model calculations. These values are high compared to conventional cables, but become acceptable when (as here) the environment precludes the use of continuous conductors. To understand this behaviour, we present arguments for the fundamental performance limitations of these cables.

  20. HTS Conductor Design Issues Including Quench and Stability,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HTS Conductor Design Issues Including Quench and Stability, AC Losses, and Fault Currents M. J objective and technical approach · The purpose of this collaborative R&D project is an investigation of HTS conductor design optimization with emphasis on stability and protection issues for YBCO wires and coils

  1. Correction coil cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, S.T.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wire cable assembly adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies for the Superconducting Super Collider. The correction coil cables have wires collected in wire array with a center rib sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly. The core assembly is surrounded by an assembly housing having an inner spiral wrap and a counter wound outer spiral wrap. An alternate embodiment of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable on a particle tube in a particle tube assembly. 7 figs.

  2. Upgrading the ampacity of HPFF pipe-type cable circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aabo, T.; Lawson, W.G. [Power Technologies, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)] [Power Technologies, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States); Pancholi, S.V. [Potomac Electric Power Co., Washington, DC (United States)] [Potomac Electric Power Co., Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upgrading of several 69 kV pipe-type cable feeders on the Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) ion cable system is The methods used for the ampacity calculation are described. The fluid circulation approach required to meet the feeder emergency load requirements are For the feeders that were in service for approximately 40 years, a system life evaluation was performed.

  3. End moldings for cable dielectrics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roose, Lars D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    End moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of the cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. Disclosed is a method for making the cable connectors either in the field or in a factory, molds suitable for use with the method, and the molded cable connectors, themselves.

  4. Semiconductor Bridge Cable Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KING, TONY L.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The semiconductor bridge (SCB) is an electroexplosive device used to initiate detonators. A C cable is commonly used to connect the SCB to a firing set. A series of tests were performed to identify smaller, lighter cables for firing single and multiple SCBs. This report provides a description of these tests and their results. It was demonstrated that lower threshold voltages and faster firing times can be achieved by increasing the wire size, which reduces ohmic losses. The RF 100 appears to be a reasonable substitute for C cable when firing single SCBs. This would reduce the cable volume by 68% and the weight by 67% while increasing the threshold voltage by only 22%. In general, RG 58 outperforms twisted pair when firing multiple SCBs in parallel. The RG 58's superior performance is attributed to its larger conductor size.

  5. HTS wire irradiation test with 8 GeV protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Feher; H. Glass; Y. Huang; P.J. Limon; D.F. Orris; P. Schlabach; M.A. Tartaglia; J.C. Tompkins

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation level at High Energy Particle Accelerators (HEPA) is relatively high. Any active component which should be close to the accelerator has to be radiation hard. Since High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) have a great potential to be used in HEPAs (e.g., in superconducting magnets, current leads, RF cavities), it is important to understand the radiation hardness of these materials. A radiation test of HTS wire (Bi-2223) was performed at Fermilab. The HTS sample was irradiated with 8 GeV protons and the relative I{sub c} was measured during the irradiation. The total radiation dose was 10 Mrad, and no I{sub c} degradation was observed.

  6. Analysis of Subsea Buried Pipelines and Partially Buried Cables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Yanbin

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    obvious systems are oceanic communication cables and the increasing number of subsea power transmission systems associated with the continuing development of offshore wind farms. In this problem an important numerical modeling challenge is to allow...

  7. Conductor requirements for high-temperature superconducting utility power transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pleva, E. F. [Waukesha Electric Systems, Waukesha, WI; Mehrotra, V. [Waukesha Electric Systems, Waukesha, WI; Schwenterly, S W [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors in utility power transformers must satisfy a set of operating requirements that are driven by two major considerations-HTS transformers must be economically competitive with conventional units, and the conductor must be robust enough to be used in a commercial manufacturing environment. The transformer design and manufacturing process will be described in order to highlight the various requirements that it imposes on the HTS conductor. Spreadsheet estimates of HTS transformer costs allow estimates of the conductor cost required for an HTS transformer to be competitive with a similarly performing conventional unit.

  8. Correction coil cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Sou-Tien (Danville, CA)

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wire cable assembly (10, 310) adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies (532) for the superconducting super collider. The correction coil cables (10, 310) have wires (14, 314) collected in wire arrays (12, 312) with a center rib (16, 316) sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly (18, 318 ). The core assembly (18, 318) is surrounded by an assembly housing (20, 320) having an inner spiral wrap (22, 322) and a counter wound outer spiral wrap (24, 324). An alternate embodiment (410) of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable (410) on a particle tube (733) in a particle tube assembly (732).

  9. Wide-span cable structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santoso, Katherina, 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the application of cable structures in buildings has gained huge popularities. Although cable technology has been established since the 1950s, there is suddenly a surge in the number of its building ...

  10. Cost Effective Open Geometry HTS MRI System amended to BSCCO 2212 Wire for High Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennth Marken

    2006-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The original goal of this Phase II Superconductivity Partnership Initiative project was to build and operate a prototype Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system using high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils wound from continuously processed dip-coated BSCCO 2212 tape conductor. Using dip-coated tape, the plan was for MRI magnet coils to be wound to fit an established commercial open geometry, 0.2 Tesla permanent magnet system. New electronics and imaging software for a prototype higher field superconducting system would have added significantly to the cost. However, the use of the 0.2 T platform would allow the technical feasibility and the cost issues for HTS systems to be fully established. Also it would establish the energy efficiency and savings of HTS open MRI compared with resistive and permanent magnet systems. The commercial goal was an open geometry HTS MRI running at 0.5 T and 20 K. This low field open magnet was using resistive normal metal conductor and its heat loss was rather high around 15 kolwatts. It was expected that an HTS magnet would dissipate around 1 watt, significantly reduce power consumption. The SPI team assembled to achieve this goal was led by Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology (OST), who developed the method of producing commercial dip coated tape. Superconductive Components Inc. (SCI), a leading US supplier of HTS powders, supported the conductor optimization through powder optimization, scaling, and cost reduction. Oxford Magnet Technology (OMT), a joint venture between Oxford Instruments and Siemens and the world’s leading supplier of MRI magnet systems, was involved to design and build the HTS MRI magnet and cryogenics. Siemens Magnetic Resonance Division, a leading developer and supplier of complete MRI imaging systems, was expected to integrate the final system and perform imaging trials. The original MRI demonstration project was ended in July 2004 by mutual consent of Oxford Instruments and Siemens. Between the project start and that date a substantial shift in the MRI marketplace occurred, with rapid growth for systems at higher fields (1.5 T and above) and a consequent decline in the low field market (<1.0 T). While the project aim appeared technically attainable at that time, the conclusion was reached that the system and market economics do not warrant additional investment. The program was redirected to develop BSCCO 2212 multifilament wire development for high field superconducting magnets for NMR and other scientific research upon an agreement between DOE and Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology. The work t took place between September, 2004 and the project end in early 2006 was focused on 2212 multifilamentary wire. This report summarizes the technical achievements both in 2212 dip coated for an HTS MRI system and in BSCCO 2212 multifilamentary wire for high field magnets.

  11. Disposable telemetry cable deployment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, David Joseph (Sandia Park, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A disposable telemetry cable deployment system for facilitating information retrieval while drilling a well includes a cable spool adapted for insertion into a drill string and an unarmored fiber optic cable spooled onto the spool cable and having a downhole end and a stinger end. Connected to the cable spool is a rigid stinger which extends through a kelly of the drilling apparatus. A data transmission device for transmitting data to a data acquisition system is disposed either within or on the upper end of the rigid stinger.

  12. Final Report: MATERIALS, STRANDS, AND CABLES FOR SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR MAGNETS [Grant Number DE-SC0010312

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumption, Mike; Collings, E.

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Our program consisted of the two components: Strand Research and Cable Research, with a focus on Nb3Sn, Bi2212, and YBCO for accelerator magnet applications. We demonstrated a method to refine the grains in Nb3Sn by a factor of two, reaching 45 nm grain sizes, and layer Jcs of 6 kA/mm2 at 12 T. W also measured conductor magnetization for field quality. This has been done both with Nb3Sn conductor, as well as Bi:2212 strand. Work in support of quench studies of YBCO coils was also performed. Cable loss studies in Nb3Sn focused on connecting and comparing persistent magnetization and coupling magnetization for considering their relative impact on HEP machines. In the area of HTS cables, we have investigated both the quench in multistrand YBCO CORC cables, as well as the magnetization of these cables for use in high field magnets. In addition, we examined the magnetic and thermal properties of large (50 T) solenoids.

  13. Method to improve superconductor cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borden, A.R.

    1984-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed of making a stranded superconductor cable having improved flexing and bending characteristics. In such method, a plurality of superconductor strands are helically wound around a cylindrical portion of a mandrel which tapers along a transitional portion to a flat end portion. The helically wound strands form a multistrand hollow cable which is partially flattened by pressure rollers as the cable travels along the transitional portion. The partially flattened cable is impacted with repeated hammer blows as the hollow cable travels along the flat end portion. The hammer blows flatten both the internal and the external surfaces of the strands. The cable is fully flattened and compacted by two sets of pressure rollers which engage the flat sides and the edges of the cable after it has traveled away from the flat end portion of the mandrel. The flattened internal surfaces slide easily over one another when the cable is flexed or bent so that there is very little possibility that the cable will be damaged by the necessary flexing and bending required to wind the cable into magnet coils.

  14. Upgrading the ampacity of HPFF pipe-type cable circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aabo, T.; Lawson, W.G. [Power Technologies, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States); Pancholi, S.V. [Potomac Electric Power Co., Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The upgrading of several 69 kV pipe-type cable feeders on the Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCo) transmission cable system is discussed. The methods used for the ampacity calculation are described. The fluid circulation approach required to meet the feeder emergency load requirements are discussed. For the feeders that were in service for approximately 40 years, a system life evaluation was performed.

  15. ANGULAR MEASUREMENTS OF HTS CRITICAL CURRENT FOR HIGH FIELD SOLENOIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turrioni, D.; Barzi, E.; Lamm, M.; Lombardo, V.; Zlobin, A. V. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Batavia, Illinois, 60510 (United States); Thieme, C. [American Superconductor (AMSC) Westborough, MA, 01581 (United States)

    2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment is in the works at Fermilab to confirm that ionization cooling is an efficient way to shrink the size of a muon beam. This would pave the way for Muon Collider machines, which however require in their last stages of acceleration very high field solenoids. The use of high temperature superconducting materials (HTS) is being considered for these magnets using Helium or higher temperature refrigeration. A sample holder was designed to perform critical current (I{sub c}) measurements of HTS conductors under externally applied magnetic fields varying from zero to 90 degree with respect to the c-axis. This was performed in an ample range of temperatures and magnetic field values. A description of the test setup and results for (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (BSCCO-2223) tapes, and Second Generation HTS in the form of 348 superconductor are presented.

  16. Analysis of Future Prices and Markets for High Temperature Superconductors ENERGY SAVINGS IN HTS DEVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of each device. The incremental capital cost is the cost over and above that of cryogenics and HTS wire SAVINGS IN HTS DEVICES This Appendix collects and explains several of the key assumptions a sequence of changes to the economic analysis of the individual HTS devices. Table 1-1 displays certain

  17. Study of HTS Wires at High Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turrioni, D.; Barzi, E.; Lamm, M.J.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.; Kikuchi, A.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab is working on the development of high field magnet systems for ionization cooling of muon beams. The use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials is being considered for these magnets using Helium refrigeration. Critical current (I{sub c}) measurements of HTS conductors were performed at FNAL and at NIMS up to 28 T under magnetic fields at zero to 90 degree with respect to the sample face. A description of the test setups and results on a BSCCO-2223 tape and second generation (2G) coated conductors are presented.

  18. Part 1, Use of seismic experience and test data to show ruggedness of equipment in nuclear power plants; Part 2, Review procedure to assess seismic ruggedness of cantilever bracket cable tray supports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, R.P. (Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (United States)); von Riesemann, W.A. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Wyllie, L.A. Jr. (Degenkolb (H.J.) Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Schiff, A.J. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States)); Ibanez, P. (Anco Engineers, Inc., Culver City, CA (United States))

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 1980, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) designated Seismic Qualification of Equipment in Operating Plants'' as an Unresolved Safety Issue (USI), A-46. The objective of USI A-46 is to develop alternative seismic qualification methods and acceptance criteria that can be used to assess the capability of mechanical and electrical equipment in operating nuclear power plants to perform the intended safety functions. A group of affected utilities formed the Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG) to work with the NRC in developing a program methodology to enable resolution of the A-46 issue. To assist in developing a program methodology, SQUG and the NRC jointly selected and supported a five-member Senior Seismic Review and Advisory Panel (SSRAP) in June 1983 to make an independent assessment of whether certain classes of equipment in operating nuclear power plants in the United States have demonstrated sufficient ruggedness in past earthquakes so as to render an explicit seismic qualification unnecessary. SSRAP operated as an independent review body with all of its findings submitted concurrently to both SQUG and the NRC. During their period of involvement, SSRAP issued several draft reports on their conclusions. This document contains the final versions of these reports; namely, Use of Seismic Experience and Test Data to Show Ruggedness of Equipment in Nuclear Power Plants,'' dated February 1991 and Review Procedure to Assess Seismic Ruggedness of Cantilever Bracket Cable Tray Supports,'' dated March 1, 1991.

  19. Part 1, Use of seismic experience and test data to show ruggedness of equipment in nuclear power plants; Part 2, Review procedure to assess seismic ruggedness of cantilever bracket cable tray supports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, R.P. [Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (United States); von Riesemann, W.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wyllie, L.A. Jr. [Degenkolb (H.J.) Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States); Schiff, A.J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Ibanez, P. [Anco Engineers, Inc., Culver City, CA (United States)

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 1980, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) designated ``Seismic Qualification of Equipment in Operating Plants`` as an Unresolved Safety Issue (USI), A-46. The objective of USI A-46 is to develop alternative seismic qualification methods and acceptance criteria that can be used to assess the capability of mechanical and electrical equipment in operating nuclear power plants to perform the intended safety functions. A group of affected utilities formed the Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG) to work with the NRC in developing a program methodology to enable resolution of the A-46 issue. To assist in developing a program methodology, SQUG and the NRC jointly selected and supported a five-member Senior Seismic Review and Advisory Panel (SSRAP) in June 1983 to make an independent assessment of whether certain classes of equipment in operating nuclear power plants in the United States have demonstrated sufficient ruggedness in past earthquakes so as to render an explicit seismic qualification unnecessary. SSRAP operated as an independent review body with all of its findings submitted concurrently to both SQUG and the NRC. During their period of involvement, SSRAP issued several draft reports on their conclusions. This document contains the final versions of these reports; namely, ``Use of Seismic Experience and Test Data to Show Ruggedness of Equipment in Nuclear Power Plants,`` dated February 1991 and ``Review Procedure to Assess Seismic Ruggedness of Cantilever Bracket Cable Tray Supports,`` dated March 1, 1991.

  20. Pipe-type cable ampacities in the presence of harmonics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, J.A.; Degeneff, R.C. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)); McKernan, T.M.; Halleran, T.M. (Consolidated Edison Co. of NY, Inc., New York, NY (United States))

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores the effect of harmonics on HPFF pipe-type transmission cable ampacity. Industry currently calculates the current carrying capacity of underground cable based on the assumption of a purely sinusoidal 60k Hz. current. However, increasing levels of harmonics on power systems have raised concern about their effect on cable ampacities. The issue has already been addressed for distribution cables. This paper begins with a discussion of Neher and McGrath's classic equations and some recent revisions, and develops a closed form composite equations accurately reflecting the effect of harmonics. The effect of frequency on the loss ratio is shown and supported by comparison with measured data at 60 Hz. and a finite element analysis at a number of harmonic frequencies. The effect of specific harmonic scenarios is shown in light of the IEEE standard on harmonics. The results are used to develop a derating factor to compensate for current harmonics on transmission systems.

  1. Correlation of electrical reactor cable failure with materials degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuetzer, O.M.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complete circuit failure (shortout) of electrical cables typically used in nuclear power plant containments is investigated. Failure modes are correlated with the mechanical deterioration of the elastomeric cable materials. It is found that for normal reactor operation, electrical cables are reliable and safe over very long periods. During high temperature excursions, however, cables pulled across corners under high stress may short out due to conductor creep. Severe cracking will occur in short times during high temperatures (>150/sup 0/C) and in times of the order of years at elevated temperatures (100/sup 0/C to 140/sup 0/C). A theoretical treatment of stress distribution responsible for creep and for cracking by J.E. Reaugh of Science Applications, Inc. is contained in the Appendix. 29 refs., 32 figs.

  2. Cryogenic experiences during W7-X HTS-current lead tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, Thomas; Lietzow, Ralph [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Technical Physics (ITEP), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) was responsible for design, production and test of the High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) current leads (CL) for the stellerator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X). 16 current leads were delivered. Detailed prototype tests as well as the final acceptance tests were performed at KIT, using a dedicated test cryostat assembled beside and connected to the main vacuum vessel of the TOSKA facility. A unique feature is the upside down orientation of the current leads due to the location of the power supplies in the basement of the experimental area of W7-X. The HTS-CL consists of three main parts: the cold end for the connection to the bus bar at 4.5 K, the HTS part operating in the temperature range from 4.5 K to 65 K and a copper heat exchanger (HEX) in the temperature range from 65 K to room temperature, which is cooled with 50 K helium. Therefore in TOSKA it is possible to cool test specimens simultaneously with helium at two different temperature levels. The current lead tests included different scenarios with currents up to 18.2 kA. In total, 10 cryogenic test campaigns with a total time of about 24 weeks were performed till beginning of 2013. The test facility as well as the 2 kW cryogenic plant of ITEP showed a very good reliability. However, during such a long and complex experimental campaign, one has to deal with failures, technical difficulties and incidents. The paper gives a summary of the test performance comprising the test preparation and operation. This includes the performance and reliability of the refrigerator and the test facility with reference to the process measuring and control system, the data acquisition system, as well as the building infrastructure.

  3. Hydro-Thermal Scheduling (HTS) 1.0 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    1 Hydro-Thermal Scheduling (HTS) 1.0 Introduction From an overall systems view, the single most, relative to that of thermal plants, are very small. There are three basic types of hydroelectric plants;2 Pump-storage This kind of hydro plant is a specialized reservoir-type plant which has capability to act

  4. Fabrication, qualification and test of high Jc ROEBEL YBCO coated conductor cable for HEP magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardo, V.; Barzi, E.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab; Long, N.J.; Badcock, R.A.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ROEBEL cable concept allows for a high critical current cable assembled using commercially available YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{Delta}} coated conductors. this approach to cable design leads to several technological improvements if applied to the manufacture process of next generation low inductance, high current density HTS coils. A reduction in inductance proves to be extremely important when it comes to protection of coils capable of generating fields in the range of 40-50T, such as the ones needed in the last stage of the cooling channel of a muon collider. In this work several aspects are presented including the qualification and minimum requirements for YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{Delta}}coated conductor in terms of 2D current density uniformity and the manufacturing process of ROEBEL cables. Test results achieved using a superconducting transformer for critical current measurements in liquid helium are shown, discussed and compared to the performance of a single YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{Delta}} coated conductor tape.

  5. EIS-0339: Presidential Permit Application, GenPower 500 kV Submarine Electric Transmission Cable from Nova Scotia to New York

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) announced its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) for GenPower New York, L.L.C.’s (GenPower) request for a Presidential permit for a proposed international electric transmission line.

  6. Method and apparatus for electrical cable testing by pulse-arrested spark discharge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnum, John R. (Albuquerque, NM); Warne, Larry K. (Albuquerque, NM); Jorgenson, Roy E. (Albuquerque, NM); Schneider, Larry X. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for electrical cable testing by Pulse-Arrested Spark Discharge (PASD) uses the cable response to a short-duration high-voltage incident pulse to determine the location of an electrical breakdown that occurs at a defect site in the cable. The apparatus for cable testing by PASD includes a pulser for generating the short-duration high-voltage incident pulse, at least one diagnostic sensor to detect the incident pulse and the breakdown-induced reflected and/or transmitted pulses propagating from the electrical breakdown at the defect site, and a transient recorder to record the cable response. The method and apparatus are particularly useful to determine the location of defect sites in critical but inaccessible electrical cabling systems in aging aircraft, ships, nuclear power plants, and industrial complexes.

  7. Fully synthetic taped insulation cables

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsyth, E.B.; Muller, A.C.

    1983-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a cable which, although constructed from inexpensive polyolefin tapes and using typical impregnating oils, furnishes high voltage capability up to 765 kV, and has such excellent dielectric characteristics and heat transfer properties that it is capable of operation at capacities equal to or higher than presently available cables at a given voltage. This is accomplished by using polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene insulating tape which has been specially processed to attain properties which are not generally found in these materials, but are required for their use in impregnated electrical cables. Chief among these properties is compatibility with impregnating oil.

  8. Effort on Developing Cabled Ocean Observatories Research Assitant, Institute of Mechatronics Control Engineering, Zhejiang University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    of Mechatronics Control Engineering, Zhejiang University Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering, University of Hawaii Abstract Cabled ocean observatory that enables abundant powerEffort on Developing Cabled Ocean Observatories in China Yanhu Chen Research Assitant, Institute

  9. Holbrook Substation Superconductor Cable System, Long Island, New York Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, James; McNamara, Joseph

    2010-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The LIPA Superconductor project broke ground on July 4, 2006, was first energized on April 22, 2008 (Earth Day) and was commissioned on June 25, 2008. Since commissioning, up until early March, 2009, there were numerous refrigeration events that impacted steady state operations. This led to the review of the alarms that were being generated and a rewrite of the program logic in order to decrease the hypersensitivity surrounding these alarms. The high temperature superconductor (HTS) cable was energized on March 5, 2009 and ran uninterrupted until a human error during a refrigeration system switchover knocked the cable out of the grid in early February 2010. The HTS cable was in the grid uninterrupted from March 5, 2009 to February 4, 2010. Although there have been refrigeration events (propagated mainly by voltage sags/surges) during this period, the system was able to automatically switch over from the primary to the backup refrigeration system without issue as required during this period. On February 4, 2010, when switching from the backup over to the primary refrigeration system, two rather than one liquid nitrogen pumps were started inadvertently by a human error (communication) causing an overpressure in the cable cooling line. This in turn activated the pressure relief valve located in the grounding substation. The cable was automatically taken out of the grid without any damage to the components or system as a result of signals sent from the AMSC control cabinet to the LIPA substation. The cable was switched back into the grid again on March 16, 2010 without incident and has been operational since that time. Since switching from the backup to the primary is not an automatic process, a recent improvement was added to the refrigeration operating system to allow remote commands to return the system from backup to primary cooling. This improvement makes the switching procedure quicker since travel to the site to perform this operation is no longer necessary and safer since it is now a programmed procedure versus the former written procedure that was still subject to human variation in the process.

  10. Fully synthetic taped insulation cables

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsyth, Eric B. (Brookhaven, NY); Muller, Albert C. (Center Moriches, NY)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high voltage oil-impregnated electrical cable with fully polymer taped insulation operable to 765 kV. Biaxially oriented, specially processed, polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene tape with an embossed pattern is wound in multiple layers over a conductive core with a permeable screen around the insulation. Conventional oil which closely matches the dielectric constant of the tape is used, and the cable can be impregnated after field installation because of its excellent impregnation characteristics.

  11. Infiniband cables installed | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News link to facebookInfiniband cables installed

  12. Thermal and electrical stabilities of solid nitrogen (SN2) cooled YBCO coated conductors for HTS magnet applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, J. B.

    Recently, a cooling system using a solid cryogen such as solid nitrogen (SN2), was introduced for high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnet applications. In order to apply the SN2 cooling system successfully to HTS ...

  13. Design optimization of cable-stayed bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bessas, Georgios

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis is to achieve a basic understanding of cable-stayed systems. Issues to be treated are the diachronic evolution of cable-stayed bridges, including the advantages, the limitations and the basic design ...

  14. Multi-frequency cable vibration experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiggins, Andrew (Andrew Dale)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of Multi-Frequency cable vibration experiments at Reynolds number 7600 were carried out at the MIT Tow Tank using the Virtual Cable Towing Apparatus (VCTA). Motions observed in a Direct Numerical Simulation of a ...

  15. Development of 500-kV AC cable employing laminar insulation of other than conventional cellulosic paper. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahder, G.; Eager, G.S. Jr.; Walker, J.J.; Dima, A.F.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of an investigation to develop a 500 kV ac laminar dielectric power cable and joint having insulation with lower losses than conventional cellulosic paper insulation are presented. Background information is presented on proposed low-loss synthetic and composite synthetic/cellulosic paper insulations. From these studies, fibrous polypropylene paper tape and cellulosic paper-polypropylene film-cellulosic paper composite paper (PPP) were chosen. Extensive testing of hand-wrapped cable models fabricated with each type of tape served to eliminate the fibrous polypropylene paper tape from further consideration. Cable model tests indicate that the PPP tape is satisfactory for insulation in 500 kV ac cable, and that oil impregnants now used in conventional cellulosic paper insulated cables are unsuitable, but that silicone oil with an additive is satisfactory for PPP tapes. Laboratory data indicate that it may be necessary with the PPP tapes to use a significantly lower viscosity impregnating oil which has a greater tendency to drain from pipe-type cables than conventional oil. This may require a modification of the moisture seal. Four final pipe-type cables having a conventional moisture seal were manufactured for possible future field testing. The dielectric loss of the final cables is one-fifth that of conventional cellulosic paper insulated cables. The estimated installed cost per MVA-mile of the PPP insulated cable, neglecting losses, is higher than cellulosic insulated cables impregnated with conventional mineral oil. However, the capacitance of the cable insulated with PPP tape is 25% lower than conventional cable, and therefore, the reactance necessary to compensate for the cable charging current is significantly reduced.

  16. Industrial Cu-Ni alloys for HTS coated conductor tape. A Girard1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Industrial Cu-Ni alloys for HTS coated conductor tape. A Girard1,2,3 , C E Bruzek4 , J L Jorda1 , L efficient substrates for coated conductor wires. The study is focused on two industrial compositions: Cu55Ni-textured substrate is one of the critical steps for the HTS coated conductor development. The RABiTS (Rolling

  17. New MV cable design for wet environments in underground distribution systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teixeira, M.D.R. Jr. (Ficap Fios e Cabos Plasticos do Brasil SA, Rio De Janeiro (BR))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of new wet design MV power cables, up to 35 kV, using EPDM compound as insulation and longitudinal water tightness. The combination of the cable design and the type of insulation compound allow for reduction of the insulation thickness in such a way, as to have an electrical stress at the conductor of 4 kV/mm which is significantly greater than used in MV distribution cables. Following a methodology established, at the author's company, the reliability of this design, cable and EPDM's formulation, in wet location, without metallic water barriers, was well demonstrated. Mini-installation of model cables in service-like conditions, to estimate the ageing rate, are presented and discussed.

  18. Grain growth behavior of Pb-Cu-Te cable sheathing alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahay, S.S.; Guruswamy, S. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering] [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering; Goodwin, F. [International Lead Zinc Research Organization, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)] [International Lead Zinc Research Organization, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead alloys are extensively used as sheathing material for power and telecommunication cables. Excellent extrusion properties, high ductility, extremely low recrystallization temperature, good fatigue and creep resistance, make these alloys ideal for cable sheathing application. Though the thickness of the lead sheath is only a few hundred {mu}m, it is a critical component of the cable. The lead layer in the cable is often the limiting factor both during the cable production and during its service phase. Up to several hundred miles of long single piece cables may be required for underground and underwater cables. Cracking in the lead sheath during the cable sheathing extrusion limits the production of such long cables while cracking of the lead sheath due to repeated vibration, creep and recrystallization limits the service life of these cables. The purpose of the present research is to increase the duration of cable extrusion time without compromising sheath integrity by minimizing deleterious precipitate formation and growth. Concentrations of Cu and Te in the commercial alloy are too small to contribute to precipitation strengthening. Therefore their positive influence on mechanical strength should mainly result from the influence of Cu and Te in solution on interdiffusivity and grain boundary mobility. The formation of large precipitates observed in Pb-Cu-Te alloys can be minimized and extrusion times increased without negatively affecting mechanical properties if the solute content is reduced to near solid solubility levels. In order to examine the effect of lowering solute content on microstructural stability and mechanical properties, compressive stress-strain behavior of a Pb-50 wt ppm Cu-100 wt ppm Te alloy with solute contents close to the solubility limits and a Pb-400 wt ppm Cu-400 wt ppm Te alloy was examined at room temperature. The grain growth kinetics in these alloys were studied in a temperature range of 100 to 225 C.

  19. Assessing Deterioration of ADSS Fiber Optic Cables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing Deterioration of ADSS Fiber Optic Cables Due to Corona Discharge Final Project Report of ADSS Fiber Optic Cables Due to Corona Discharge Final Project Report George G. Karady, Project Leader-Supporting) fiber optic cables installed on high voltage lines. The high electric field on those lines generates

  20. 100 kA Record Current for HTS Conductor "A conductor current of 100,000 A is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, James C.

    in Japan. Fujikura Ltd. provided the tapes used in the experiment. "Yttrium-based HTS wire has been100 kA Record Current for HTS Conductor "A conductor current of 100,000 A is sufficient for fusion, our 100 kA is still lower, however ours is presently the world's highest among HTS conductors. Put

  1. 300 Area signal cable study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whattam, J.W.

    1994-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared to discuss the alternatives available for removing the 300 Area overhead signal cable system. This system, installed in 1969, has been used for various monitoring and communication signaling needs throughout the 300 Area. Over the years this cabling system has deteriorated, has been continually reconfigured, and has been poorly documented to the point of nonreliability. The first step was to look at the systems utilizing the overhead signal cable that are still required for operation. Of the ten systems that once operated via the signal cable, only five are still required; the civil defense evacuation alarms, the public address (PA) system, the criticality alarms, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Facilities Management Control System (FMCS), and the 384 annunciator panel. Of these five, the criticality alarms and the FMCS have been dealt with under other proposals. Therefore, this study focused on the alternatives available for the remaining three systems (evacuation alarms, PA system, and 384 panel) plus the accountability aid phones. Once the systems to be discussed were determined, then three alternatives for providing the signaling pathway were examined for each system: (1) re-wire using underground communication ducts, (2) use the Integrated Voice/Data Telecommunications System (IVDTS) already installed and operated by US West, and (3) use radio control. Each alternative was developed with an estimated cost, advantages, and disadvantages. Finally, a recommendation was provided for the best alternative for each system.

  2. Restoration and testing of an HTS fault current controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waynert, J. A. (Joseph A.); Boenig, H. (Heinrich E.); Mielke, C. H. (Charles H.); Willis, J. O. (Jeffrey O.); Burley, B. L. (Burt L.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-phase, 1200 A, 12.5 kV fault current controller using three HTS 4 mH coils, was built by industry and tested in 1999 at the Center Substation of Southern California Edison in Norwalk, CA. During the testing, it appeared that each of the three single-phase units had experienced a voltage breakdown, one externally and two internally. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was asked by DOE to restore the operation of the fault current controller provided the HTS coils had not been damaged during the initial substation tests. When the internally-failed coil vacuum vessels were opened it became evident that in these two vessels, a flashover had occurred at the high voltage bus section leading to the terminals of the superconducting coil. An investigation into the failure mechanism resulted in six possible causes for the flashover. Based on these causes, the high voltage bus was completely redesigned. Single-phase tests were successfully performed on the modified unit at a 13.7 kV LANL substation. This paper presents the postulated voltage flashover failure mechanisms, the new high voltage bus design which mitigates the failure mechanisms, the sequence of tests used to validate the new design, and finally, the results of variable load and short-circuit tests with the single-phase unit operating on the LANL 13.7 kV substation.

  3. Design, Construction and Test of Cryogen-Free HTS Coil Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hocker, H.; Anerella, M.; Gupta, R.; Plate, S.; Sampson, W.; Schmalzle, J.; Shiroyanagi, Y.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will describe design, construction and test results of a cryo-mechanical structure to study coils made with the second generation High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). A magnet comprised of HTS coils mounted in a vacuum vessel and conduction-cooled with Gifford-McMahon cycle cryocoolers is used to develop and refine design and construction techniques. The study of these techniques and their effect on operations provides a better understanding of the use of cryogen free magnets in future accelerator projects. A cryogen-free, superconducting HTS magnet possesses certain operational advantages over cryogenically cooled, low temperature superconducting magnets.

  4. Electrical and Mechanical Characterizations of Nanocomposite Insulation for HTS Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J K [Composite Technology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO; Fabian, Paul E [Composite Technology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO; Hooker, M W [Composite Technology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO; Lizotte, M J [Composite Technology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO; Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As HTS wire technology continues to advance, a critical need has emerged for dielectric materials that can be used in superconducting components such as terminations, fault current limiters, transformers, and motors. To address this need, CTD is developing nanocomposite insulations based on epoxy and benzoxazine chemistries. Depending on part geometry, some processing methods are more efficient than others. For this reason, CTD is investigating both fiber-reinforced and filled resin systems for use in these applications. A thorough set of electrical testing including AC breakdown, breakdown as a function of thickness, and flashover shows promising performance characteristics. In addition, mechanical testing (short beam shear and compression) indicate that these new materials to have as good or better performance than G10.

  5. Study of HTS Insert Coils for High Field Solenoids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardo, Vito; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab is currently working on the development of high field magnet systems for ionization cooling of muon beams. The use of high temperature superconducting materials (HTS) is being considered for these solenoids using Helium refrigeration. Several studies have been performed on insert coils made of BSCCO-2223 tapes and second generation (2G) YBCO coated conductors, which are tested at various temperatures and at external fields of up to 14 T. Critical current (I{sub c}) measurements of YBCO short samples are presented as a function of bending stress, magnetic field and field orientation with respect to the sample surface. An analytical fit of critical current data as a function of field and field orientation is also presented. Results from several single-layer and double-layer pancake coils are also discussed.

  6. Analytical Study of Stress State in HTS Solenoids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barzi, E.; Terzini, E.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A main challenge for high field solenoids made of in High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) is the large stress developed in the conductor. This is especially constraining for BSCCO, a brittle and strain sensitive ceramic material. To find parametric correlations useful in magnet design, analytical models can be used. A simple model is herein proposed to obtain the radial, azimuthal and axial stresses in a solenoid as a function of size, i.e. self-field, and of the engineering current density for a number of different constraint hypotheses. The analytical model was verified against finite element modeling (FEM) using the same hypotheses of infinite rigidity of the constraints and room temperature properties. FEM was used to separately evaluate the effect of thermal contractions at 4.2 K for BSCCO and YBCO coils. Even though the analytical model allows for a finite stiffness of the constraints, it was run using infinite stiffness. For this reason, FEM was again used to determine how much stresses change when considering an outer stainless steel skin with finite rigidity for both BSCCO and YBCO coils. For a better understanding of the actual loads that high field solenoids made of HTS will be subject to, we have started some analytical studies of stress state in solenoids for a number of constraint hypotheses. This will hopefully show what can be achieved with the present conductor in terms of self-field. The magnetic field (B) exerts a force F = B x J per unit volume. In superconducting magnets, where the field and current density (J) are both high, this force can be very large, and it is therefore important to calculate the stresses in the coil.

  7. Nanostructured high-temperature superconductors: Creation of strong-pinning columnar defects in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong

    's, such as wires for power transmission cables and solenoids.1,2 Conse- quently, enhancing Jc in HTS materials has the growth and incorporation of MgO nanorods into high temperature superconductors (HTS's) has been developedO nanorods create a columnar defect structure in the HTS matrices, form a compositionally sharp interface

  8. Literature review of environmental qualification of safety-related electric cables: Summary of past work. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subudhi, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the findings from a review of published documents dealing with research on the environmental qualification of safety-related electric cables used in nuclear power plants. Simulations of accelerated aging and accident conditions are important considerations in qualifying the cables. Significant research in these two areas has been performed in the US and abroad. The results from studies in France, Germany, and Japan are described in this report. In recent years, the development of methods to monitor the condition of cables has received special attention. Tests involving chemical and physical examination of cable`s insulation and jacket materials, and electrical measurements of the insulation properties of cables are discussed. Although there have been significant advances in many areas, there is no single method which can provide the necessary information about the condition of a cable currently in service. However, it is possible that further research may identify a combination of several methods that can adequately characterize the cable`s condition.

  9. The 345 kV underground/underwater Long Island Sound cable project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grzan, J.; Hahn, E.I. (New York Power Authority, White Plains, NY (United States)); Casalaina, R.V.; Kansog, J.O.C. (Ebasco Services Inc., Lyndhurst, NJ (United States))

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high voltage underground/underwater cable system was installed to increase the transmission capacity from the mainland of New York to Long Island. In terms of weight and diameter, the self-contained, fluid-filled (SCFF) cable used for the underwater portion of the project is the largest underwater cable in the world. The use of high-pressure, fluid-filled (HPFF) pipe-type cable on the land portion represents the largest application of paper-polypropylene-paper (PPP) insulated cable in the United States. State-of-the-art technologies were implemented in the use of fiber optic cables for relay protection and SCADA/RTU, temperature monitoring and leak detection systems, SF[sub 6] gas-insulated substations, and underwater cable laying and embedment techniques. This paper discusses the design and installation of a 750 MVA, 43 km (26.6 mi), 345 kV underground/underwater electric transmission system installed by the New York Power Authority (NYPA).

  10. FESAC-SP Whyte New HTS superconductors + integrated high-B physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    launchers & coupling G-9 Tame PMI & heat exhaust G-10-15 Integrated fusion materials & components High & innovative launchers for steady-state - High pressure boundary & PMI control Demountable HTS coils

  11. SUPERCONDUCTIVITY PROGRAM RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) is a technology with the potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;SUPERCONDUCTIVITY PROGRAM RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS-of-way. The Department of Energy's efforts to advance High Temperature Superconductivity combine major national strengths: the Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI), the 2nd Generation Wire Initiative

  12. Capacitor discharge process for welding braided cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Rick D. (Corvallis, OR)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A capacitor discharge process for welding a braided cable formed from a plurality of individual cable strands to a solid metallic electrically conductive member comprises the steps of: (a) preparing the electrically conductive member for welding by bevelling one of its end portions while leaving an ignition projection extending outwardly from the apex of the bevel; (b) clamping the electrically conductive member in a cathode fixture; (c) connecting the electrically conductive member clamped in the cathode fixture to a capacitor bank capable of being charged to a preselected voltage value; (d) preparing the braided cable for welding by wrapping one of its end portions with a metallic sheet to form a retaining ring operable to maintain the individual strands of the braided cable in fixed position within the retaining ring; (e) clamping the braided cable and the retaining ring as a unit in an anode fixture so that the wrapped end portion of the braided cable faces the ignition projection of the electrically conductive member; and (f) moving the cathode fixture towards the anode fixture until the ignition projection of the electrically conductive member contacts the end portion of the braided cable thereby allowing the capacitor bank to discharge through the electrically conductive member and through the braided cable and causing the electrically conductive member to be welded to the braided cable via capacitor discharge action.

  13. The Winch-Bot : a cable-suspended, under-actuated robot utilizing parametric self-excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Daniel Philip

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple, compact, yet powerful robotic winch, called "Winch-Bot," is presented in this thesis. The Winch-Bot is an underactuated robot having only one controllable axis. Although hanging a load with merely one cable, it ...

  14. A Superconducting transformer system for high current cable testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godeke, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Superconducting Transformer System for High Current CableDC) superconducting transformer system for the high currentsuperconducting cables. The transformer consists of a core-

  15. aerial bundled cables: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "classical" T-duals. Siegfried Echterhoff; Ryszard Nest; Herve Oyono-Oyono 7 Vertex Detector Cable Considerations HEP - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: Vertex detector cable...

  16. An Internal Coaxil Cable Seal System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

    2004-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a seal system for a coaxial cable more specifically an internal seal system placed within the coaxial cable and its constituent components. A series of seal stacks including flexible rigid rings and elastomeric rings are placed on load bearing members within the coaxial cable. The current invention is adapted to seal the annular space between the coaxial cable and an electrical contact passing there through. The coaxial cable is disposed within drilling components to transmit electrical signals between drilling components within a drill string. During oil and gas exploration, a drill string can see a range of pressures and temperatures thus resulting in multiple combinations of temperature and pressure and increasing the difficulty of creating a robust seal for all combinations. The seal system can be used in a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string, drill collars, heavy weight drill pipe, and jars.

  17. Power inverter with optical isolation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, Paul G.; Schroeder, John Alan

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically isolated power electronic power conversion circuit that includes an input electrical power source, a heat pipe, a power electronic switch or plurality of interconnected power electronic switches, a mechanism for connecting the switch to the input power source, a mechanism for connecting comprising an interconnecting cable and/or bus bar or plurality of interconnecting cables and/or input bus bars, an optically isolated drive circuit connected to the switch, a heat sink assembly upon which the power electronic switch or switches is mounted, an output load, a mechanism for connecting the switch to the output load, the mechanism for connecting including an interconnecting cable and/or bus bar or plurality of interconnecting cables and/or output bus bars, at least one a fiber optic temperature sensor mounted on the heat sink assembly, at least one fiber optic current sensor mounted on the load interconnection cable and/or output bus bar, at least one fiber optic voltage sensor mounted on the load interconnection cable and/or output bus bar, at least one fiber optic current sensor mounted on the input power interconnection cable and/or input bus bar, and at least one fiber optic voltage sensor mounted on the input power interconnection cable and/or input bus bar.

  18. Controlled weak point for wireline cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aracena, L.

    1992-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a controllable break device for use in interconnection with wireline cable and cable head. It comprises: an upper sleeve section that is secured to the cable while leading a length of cable axially therethrough; a lower sleeve section slidingly engaged with a portion of the upper sleeve section and receiving the length of cable axially therethrough for being secured to the cable head; an inner tube having upper and lower ends extending axially within the upper and lower sleeve sections, mandrel means receiving the inner tube therethrough and having upper and lower ends extending between the upper and lower sleeve section; first shear pin means securing the mandrel means lower end to the lower sleeve section; second shear pin means securing the inner tube upper end to the upper sleeve section; and limit sleeve means disposed coaxial to the mandrel means and extending between the upper and lower sleeve sections, and subsequent parting of the second shear pin means upon release of cable tension to allow separation of the upper and lower sleeve sections.

  19. Stress Analysis of a High Temperature Superconductor Coil Wound With Bi-2223/Ag Tapes for High Field HTS/LTS NMR Magnet Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiyoshi, Tsukasa

    The electromagnetic stress distribution inside a HTS insert is one of the key issues for construction of a high field high/low temperature superconductor (HTS/LTS) magnet. The rmiddotJmiddotB formulae is widely used for ...

  20. Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2012 Synthetic Cable Termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2012 Synthetic Cable Termination Overview to be grasped. The methods for terminating the metallic cable will not work with the synthetic cable, so a new termination method is needed. The synthetic cable is a new design that has yet to be successfully terminated

  1. 1698 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 18, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2008 Self Field Effect Compensation in an HTS Tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effect Compensation in an HTS Tube Bruno Douine, Kévin Berger, Jean Lévêque, Denis Netter, Olivia Arbey flux density in an HTS tube. It allows characterizing the true zero magnetic flux den- sity behaviour- sity . The characteristic is very important to calculate AC losses in superconducting wires. Indeed

  2. Solid state safety jumper cables

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (353 Church Rd., Beech Island, SC 29841)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state jumper cables for connecting two batteries in parallel, having two bridge rectifiers for developing a reference voltage, a four-input decoder for determining which terminals are to be connected based on a comparison of the voltage at each of the four terminals to the reference voltage, and a pair of relays for effecting the correct connection depending on the determination of the decoder. No connection will be made unless only one terminal of each battery has a higher voltage than the reference voltage, indicating "positive" terminals, and one has a lower voltage than the reference voltage, indicating "negative" terminals, and that, therefore, the two high voltage terminals may be connected and the two lower voltage terminals may be connected. Current flows once the appropriate relay device is closed. The relay device is preferably a MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) combined with a series array of photodiodes that develop MOSFET gate-closing potential when the decoder output causes an LED to light.

  3. Solid state safety jumper cables

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state jumper cables for connecting two batteries in parallel, having two bridge rectifiers for developing a reference voltage, a four-input decoder for determining which terminals are to be connected based on a comparison of the voltage at each of the four terminals to the reference voltage, and a pair of relays for effecting the correct connection depending on the determination of the decoder. No connection will be made unless only one terminal of each battery has a higher voltage than the reference voltage, indicating positive'' terminals, and one has a lower voltage than the reference voltage, indicating negative'' terminals, and that, therefore, the two high voltage terminals may be connected and the two lower voltage terminals may be connected. Current flows once the appropriate relay device is closed. The relay device is preferably a MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) combined with a series array of photodiodes that develop MOSFET gate-closing potential when the decoder output causes an LED to light.

  4. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    cable & conductor into 2,000 ft coiled tubing World first high power laser hardware (optics package & fiber connector) tested to >5,000 psi Achieving target requires "world...

  5. Optimal Selection of AC Cables for Large Scale Offshore Wind Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Weihao

    Optimal Selection of AC Cables for Large Scale Offshore Wind Farms Peng Hou, Weihao Hu, Zhe Chen@et.aau.dk, whu@iet.aau.dk, zch@iet.aau.dk Abstract--The investment of large scale offshore wind farms is high the operational requirements of the offshore wind farms and the connected power systems. In this paper, a new cost

  6. Failure evaluation of underground high voltage cables (115 kV) in Mazatlan, Sinaloa: Microscopic method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valero-Huerta, M.A.; Ramirez-Delgado, R. [Lab. de Pruebas de Equipos y Materiales, Irapuato (Mexico)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper is a complete analysis of the failure which occurred to the 115 kV power cable installed between the Mazatlan Centro and Mazatlan Norte Substations. Laboratory analysis that established the causes of the failure are included. It was concluded that the failure of the cable was provoked by the entrance of sewage water to the screen, and due to the presence of anaerobic organisms, resulted in the formation of sulfidic acid, which caused the severe corrosion that can be observed in the screen. The resulting loss of conductivity provoked heating capable of melting the isolator until its rupture.

  7. Detonator cable initiation system safety investigation: Consequences of energizing the detonator and actuator cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osher, J.; Chau, H.; Von Holle, W.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was performed to explore and assess the worst-case response of a W89-type weapons system, damaged so as to expose detonator and/or detonator safing strong link (DSSL) cables to the most extreme, credible lightning-discharge, environment. The test program used extremely high-current-level, fast-rise-time (1- to 2-{mu}s) discharges to simulate lightning strikes to either the exposed detonator or DSSL cables. Discharges with peak currents above 700 kA were required to explode test sections of detonator cable and launch a flyer fast enough potentially to detonate weapon high explosive (HE). Detonator-safing-strong-link (DSSL) cables were exploded in direct contact with hot LX-17 and Ultrafine TATB (UFTATB). At maximum charging voltage, the discharge system associated with the HE firing chamber exploded the cables at more than 600-kA peak current; however, neither LX-17 nor UFTATB detonated at 250{degree}C. Tests showed that intense surface arc discharges of more than 700 kA/cm in width across the surface of hot UFTATB [generally the more sensitive of the two insensitive high explosives (IHE)] could not initiate this hot IHE. As an extension to this study, we applied the same technique to test sections of the much-narrower but thicker-cover-layer W87 detonator cable. These tests were performed at the same initial stored electrical energy as that used for the W89 study. Because of the narrower cable conductor in the W87 cables, discharges greater than 550-kA peak current were sufficient to explode the cable and launch a fast flyer. In summary, we found that lightning strikes to exposed DSSL cables cannot directly detonate LX-17 or UFTATB even at high temperatures, and they pose no HE safety threat.

  8. Communications Copper Horizontal Cable 27 15 13-1 SECTION 27 15 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Clint N.

    /TIA-568-C.2. C. Cable shall be listed by a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory (NRTL). D. Cable

  9. Marine vertical cable multiple attenuation beyond up/down separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tran, Andre

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine vertical cable acquisition is an emerging technology. It represents an alternative to surface seismic acquisition in areas congested by platforms or other obstacles. The vertical cable acquisition consists of recording pressure at several...

  10. An Energy Conservation Program at a Large Cable Manufacturing Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reale, P. J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atlanta Works is the largest telephone cable manufacturing plant in the world plus the manufacturing center for fiber optic cable for the Western Electric Company and exemplifies how an effective energy conservation program can work...

  11. Improved Power System of the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Rabinowitz

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is intended to provide an insight into physics and engineering that can modernize electric power systems. Topics covered are Flexible ac transmission systems (FACTS), Custom Power, Greatly improved Capacitors, Electrical Insulation, Distribution Cables, Improved Polymeric Insulation, Underground Vault Explosions, Fault Location, Smart Cables, Neutral and Ground, Corrosion and Protection, Conventional Transformers, Compact Transformers, Ferroresonance, and Solid State Transformers.

  12. Apparatus producing constant cable tension for intermittent demand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauritzen, T.

    1984-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to apparatus for producing constant tension in cable or the like when it is unreeled and reeled from a drum or spool under conditions of intermittent demand. The invention is particularly applicable to the handling of superconductive cable, but the invention is also applicable to the unreeling and reeling of other strands, such as electrical cable, wire, cord, other cables, fish line, wrapping paper and numerous other materials.

  13. Cable attachment for a radioactive brachytherapy source capsule

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Ian G; Pierce, Larry A

    2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In cancer brachytherapy treatment, a small californium-252 neutron source capsule is attached to a guide cable using a modified crimping technique. The guide cable has a solid cylindrical end, and the attachment employs circumferential grooves micromachined in the solid cable end. The attachment was designed and tested, and hardware fabricated for use inside a radioactive hot cell. A welding step typically required in other cable attachments is avoided.

  14. Microminiature coaxial cable and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bongianni, W.L.

    1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A coaxial cable is provided having a ribbon inner conductor surrounded by a dielectric and a circumferential conductor. The coaxial cable may be microminiature comprising a very thin ribbon strip conductor from between 5 to 15 [mu]m thick and from 150 to 200 [mu]m wide, having a surrounding foamed dielectric or parylene applied thereon by a vapor plasma process and an outer conductor of an adhering high conductivity metal vacuum deposited on the dielectric. Alternately, the foam dielectric embodiment may have a contiguous parylene coating applied adjacent the inner conductor or the outer conductor or both. Also, the cable may be fabricated by forming a thin ribbon of strip conductive material into an inner conductor, applying thereabout a dielectric by spraying on a solution of polystyrene and polyethylene and then vacuum depositing and adhering high conductivity metal about the dielectric. The cable strength may be increased by adding glass microfilament fibers or glass microspheres to the solution of polystyrene and polyethylene. Further, the outer conductive layer may be applied by electroless deposition in an aqueous solution rather than by vacuum deposition. A thin coating of parylene is preferably applied to the outer conductor to prevent its oxidation and inhibit mechanical abrasion. 2 figs.

  15. Microminiature coaxial cable and methods of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bongianni, W.L.

    1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A coaxial cable is provided having a ribbon inner conductor surrounded by a dielectric and a circumferential conductor. The coaxial cable may be microminiature comprising a very thin ribbon strip conductor from between 5 to 15 ..mu..m thick and from 150 to 200 ..mu..m wide, having a surrounding foamed dielectric or parylene applied thereon by a vapor plasma process and an outer conductor of an adhering high conductivity metal vacuum deposited on the dieleectric. Alternately the foam dielectric embodiment may have a contiguous parylene coating applied adjacent the inner conductor or the outer conductor or both. Also, the cable may be fabricated by forming a thin ribbon of strip conductive material into an inner conductor, applying thereabout a dielectric by spraying on a solution of polystyrene and polyethylene and then vacuum depositing and adhering high conductivity metal about the dielectric. The cable strength may be increased by adding glass microfilament fibers or glass microballoons to the solution of polystyrene and polyethylene. Further, the outer conductive layer may be applied by electroless deposition in an aqueous solution rather than by vacuum deposition. A thin coating of parylene is preferably applied to the outer conductor to prevent its oxidation and inhibit mechanical abrasion.

  16. Reference: RGL 83-09 Subject: POWER TRANSMISSION LINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Reference: RGL 83-09 Subject: POWER TRANSMISSION LINES Title: MARKING OF AERIAL POWER TRANSMISSION. 1. The marking of aerial power transmission lines, cables, and structures over the navigable waters LINES, CABLES, & STRUCTURES Issued: 07/13/83 Expires: 12/31/85 Originator: DAEN-CWO-N Description: ARMY

  17. Second Generation HTs Wire Based on RABiTS Substrates and MOD YBCO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoop, U. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Rupich, Marty [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Thieme, C. L. H. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Verebelyi, D. T. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Zhang, W. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Li, Xiaoping [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Kodenkandath, Thomas [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Nguyen, N. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Siegal, E. E. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Civale, L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Holesinger, T. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Maiorov, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goyal, Amit [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of Second Generation (2G) high temperature superconducting wire manufactured by continuous reel-to-reel processes is nearing the 300 A/cm-width (77 K, self field) performance threshold for commercial power cable applications. The 2G manufacturing approach under development at American Superconductor is based on the combination of the RABiTS substrate-buffer technology with metal organic deposition (MOD) of the YBCO layer. The capability of this process has been demonstrated in multiple 10 meter lengths with critical currents exceeding 250 A/cm-width with high uniformity and reproducibility. Critical currents of 380 A/cm-width have been achieved in short length samples prepared by the same basic process. The incorporation of nanoparticles ('nanodots') into the YBCO layer using the MOD process has resulted in a 2-fold improvement in the critical current at 65 K in a 3 T field. The research and development focus at ASMC is now directed toward the economical scale-up of the RABiTS/MOD process, optimization of the conductor properties for targeted applications and the use of 2G wire in initial demonstration applications.

  18. 2840 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 21, NO. 3, JUNE 2011 Angular, Temperature, and Strain Dependencies of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampshire, Damian

    . It is valuable for many applications such as power cables, transformers, motors, generators and high field temperature supercon- ducting (HTS) tape is the anisotropy which plays a critical Manuscript received August

  19. Superconducting Cable Having A Felexible Former

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughey, Raburn L. (Franklin, GA); Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Reece, David S. (Carrollton, GA); Muller, Albert C. (Eidson, TN)

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  20. Superconducting Cable Having A Flexible Former

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughey, Raburn L. (Franklin, GA); Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Reece, David S. (Carrollton, GA); Muller, Albert C. (Eidson, TN)

    2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  1. HAWC Calibration: Cabling Experience from HAWC30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the 2"-PVC conduits (TWO on each WCD tank: one for fibers and one for HV cables) are through the field-field-enclosure for the fiber connections to the 2"-PVC conduits? · And how do the CAT5 ca- bles complicate this fur- ther? HAWC) is involved and dangerous and done 4.5m in the air on a ladder! · Left: loosen the bracket securing the PVC

  2. Remote grounding device for subterranean power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.P.

    1987-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote grounding device is described for subterranean power cable of an insulated conducting cable which comprises: a grounding module and a grounding mechanism; the grounding module is an assembly of a power buss, an insulation sheath, a reducing tap plug and an insulating receptacle cap. The power buss is intimately connected to the conducting cable by a means of an attachment. The reducing tap plug fits concentrically over the power buss and has a tubular probe path void contiguous and in-line to the power buss and a lip around the outer periphery of the reducing tap plug. The insulating receptacle cap covers the tubular void. The insulating sheath covers and holds reducing tap plug and power cable by a multiplicity of locking means and a grounding mechanism assembly of a frame, a probe, a power drive means, a grounding means, a handle means.

  3. Preventing power outages Power system contingency analysis on the GPU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    problem. Moreover, the power system has to keep functioning properly even when a transmission line failsPreventing power outages Power system contingency analysis on the GPU To provide electricity generators, nuclear power plants, wind turbines, etc.) and a network of lines and cables to transmit

  4. Armored spring-core superconducting cable and method of construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Peter M. (611 Montclair, College Station, TX 77840); Soika, Rainer H. (1 Hensel, #X4C, College Station, TX 77840)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) is provided. The armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) may include a spring-core (20), at least one superconducting strand (24) wound onto the spring-core (20), and an armored shell (22) that encases the superconducting strands (24). The spring-core (20) is generally a perforated tube that allows purge gases and cryogenic liquids to be circulated through the armored superconducting cable (12), as well as managing the internal stresses within the armored spring-core superconducting cable (12). The armored shell (22) manages the external stresses of the armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) to protect the fragile superconducting strands (24). The armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) may also include a conductive jacket (34) formed outwardly of the armored shell (22).

  5. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: 1. Optical fibers that resist hydrogen darkening? for several months instead of hours and days at 300 deg. C and higher. 2. Tube encapsulated cable (TEC) construction that functions as a distributed temperature sensor (DTS) and a power source for a downhole pressure sensor.

  6. Analysis of nonconcurrent cable moorings with rigid and elastic inclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greer, Geral Glen

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cable restraints. A major problem to be faced in the ana- lysis of cable systems subject to hydrodynamic loads is the depen- dence of the hydrodynamic drag forces upon the position of the system. This coupling effect complicates the already difficult... of interest are R , R , R = cable reactions as previously defined Bl, B2, B3 = the sum of all external forces excluding weight and hydrodynamic forces acting on the cylinder qh = directional uniform load distribut1on represent- ing the hydrodynamic...

  7. Superconducting cable-in-conduit low resistance splice

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Artman, Thomas A. (Forest, VA)

    2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A low resistance splice connects two cable-in-conduit superconductors to each other. Dividing collars for arranging sub-cable units from each conduit are provided, along with clamping collars for mating each sub-cable wire assembly to form mated assemblies. The mated assemblies ideally can be accomplished by way of splicing collar. The mated assemblies are cooled by way of a flow of coolant, preferably helium. A method for implementing such a splicing is also described.

  8. aerial cable facility: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system demonstrate the ability of the designed platform-- Autonomous monitoring, mobile robot, crawler, sensors, underground cables, aging status. I. INTRODUCTION he Mamishev,...

  9. A Superconducting transformer system for high current cable testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godeke, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Superconducting Transformer System for High Current Cablea Direct-Current (DC) superconducting transformer system forhigh current test of superconducting cables. The transformer

  10. Two Methods for a First Order Hardware Gradiometer Using Two HTS SQUID's

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espy, M.A.; Flynn, E.R.; Kraus, R.H., Jr.; Matlachov, A.

    1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two different systems for noise cancellation (first order gradiometers) have been developed using two similar high temperature superconducting (HTS) SQUIDs. ''Analog'' gradiometry is accomplished in hardware by either (1) subtracting the signals from the sensor and background SQUIDs at a summing amplifier (parallel technique) or (2) converting the inverted background SQUID signal to a magnetic field at the sensor SQUID (series technique). Balance levels achieved are 2000 and 1000 at 20 Hz for the parallel and series methods respectively. The balance level as a function of frequency is also presented. The effect which time delays in the two sets of SQUID electronics have on this balance level is presented and discussed.

  11. Two methods for a first order hardware gradiometer using two HTS SQUIDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espy, M.A.; Flynn, E.R.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Matlachov, A.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two different systems for noise cancellation (first order gradiometers) have been developed using two similar high temperature superconducting (HTS) SQUIDs. Analog gradiometry is accomplished in hardware by either (1) subtracting the signals from the sensor and background SQUIDs at a summing amplifier (parallel technique) or (2) converting the inverted background SQUID signal to a magnetic field at the sensor SQUID (series technique). Balance levels achieved are 2000 and 1000 at 20 Hz for the parallel and series methods respectively. The balance level as a function of frequency is also presented. The effect which time delays in the two sets of SQUID electronics have on this balance level is presented and discussed.

  12. Published assessments bearing on the future use of ceramic superconductors by the electric power sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giese, R.F.; Wolsky, A.M.

    1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Much has been written about ceramic superconductors since their discovery in 1986. Most of this writing reports and describes scientific research. However, some authors have sought to put this research in context: to assess where the field stands, what might be technically feasible, what might be economically feasible, and what potential impacts ceramic superconductors will bring to the electric power sector. This report`s purpose is to make the results of already published assessments readily available. To that end, this report lists and provides abstracts for various technical and economic assessments related to applications of High-Temperature Superconductors (HTS) to the electric power sector. Those studies deemed most important are identified and summarized. These assessments were identified by two means. First, members of the Executive Committee identified some reports as worthy of consideration and forwarded them to Argonne National Laboratory. Twelve assessments were selected. Each of these is listed and summarized in the following section. Second, a bibliographic search was performed on five databases: INSPEC, NTIS, COMPENDEX, Energy Science & Technology, and Electric Power Database. The search consisted of first selecting all papers related to High Temperature Superconductors. Then papers related to SMES, cables, generators, motors, fault current limiters, or electric utilities were selected. When suitable variants of the above terms were included, this resulted in a selection of 493 citations. These citations were subjected to review by the authors. A number of citations were determined to be inappropriate (e.g. a number referred to digital transmission lines for electronics and communications applications). The reduced list consisted of 200 entries. Each of these citations, with an abstract, is presented in the following sections.

  13. Published assessments bearing on the future use of ceramic superconductors by the electric power sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giese, R.F.; Wolsky, A.M.

    1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Much has been written about ceramic superconductors since their discovery in 1986. Most of this writing reports and describes scientific research. However, some authors have sought to put this research in context: to assess where the field stands, what might be technically feasible, what might be economically feasible, and what potential impacts ceramic superconductors will bring to the electric power sector. This report's purpose is to make the results of already published assessments readily available. To that end, this report lists and provides abstracts for various technical and economic assessments related to applications of High-Temperature Superconductors (HTS) to the electric power sector. Those studies deemed most important are identified and summarized. These assessments were identified by two means. First, members of the Executive Committee identified some reports as worthy of consideration and forwarded them to Argonne National Laboratory. Twelve assessments were selected. Each of these is listed and summarized in the following section. Second, a bibliographic search was performed on five databases: INSPEC, NTIS, COMPENDEX, Energy Science Technology, and Electric Power Database. The search consisted of first selecting all papers related to High Temperature Superconductors. Then papers related to SMES, cables, generators, motors, fault current limiters, or electric utilities were selected. When suitable variants of the above terms were included, this resulted in a selection of 493 citations. These citations were subjected to review by the authors. A number of citations were determined to be inappropriate (e.g. a number referred to digital transmission lines for electronics and communications applications). The reduced list consisted of 200 entries. Each of these citations, with an abstract, is presented in the following sections.

  14. NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Finite Element Analysis of TDR Cable-Grout-Soil Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Finite Element Analysis of TDR Cable-Grout-Soil Mass Interaction During............................................................................................ 13 Finite Element Analysis of Cable Shear Test............................................................................................ 22 Finite Element Analysis of Grout-Cable Composite Shear Test .................................. 25

  15. Microsoft Word - CFN_CSD_Cabling_Infrastructure_v1.1.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commissioning of the cabling systems above are also in the scope of this contract. The supplier shall provide a warranty for the installed cabling systems. Cable trays are out...

  16. Superconducting wire and cable for RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garber, M.; Ghosh, A.K.; Greene, A.; McChesney, D.; Morgillo, A.; Shah, R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); DelRe, S.; Epstein, G.; Hong, S.; Lichtenwalner, J. [Oxford Superconducting Technology, Carteret, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets in the RHIC accelerator ring are to be fabricated from 30-strand superconducting cable. The RHIC wire has a diameter of 0.65 mm, copper-to-superconductor ratio of 2.25, filament diameter of 6 {mu}m and high critical current density. Primary emphasis during manufacturing has been on uniformity of materials, processes and performance. Near final results are presented on a production program which has extended over two years. Measured parameters are described which are important for design of superconducting accelerator magnets.

  17. Field corrosion testing and performance of cable shielding materials in soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, G.; Baboian, R. (Texas Instruments Inc., Electrochemical and Corrosion Lab., 34 Forest St., Mail Station 10-13, Attleboro, MA (US))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the importance of corrosion resistance in cable-shielding materials, describes the mechanisms of shielding corrosion that occur in buried telephone cable, and evaluates the results of the six-year REA Horry Cooperative buried telephone cable corrosion test. In this study, both active and static cables were included. Withdrawals were made over a six-year period. These cables were evaluated for cable-shielding corrosion. Special attention was paid to the comparative behavior of active and static cables. Results indicate that steel shieldings are most susceptible to the effects of alternating current (AC) in active cables. Results of a wide range of shieldings are presented and evaluated.

  18. actin cable architecture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    actin cable architecture First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Actin Cable Dynamics and Rho...

  19. UITV University of Iowa Cable Television ITS VIDEO SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UITV ­ University of Iowa Cable Television ITS VIDEO SERVICES 1 UITV Telecommunication and Network Services ITS Video Services 23 Lindquist Center 319-335-5898 UITV, University of Iowa Cable Television Operations Report Calendar Year 2006 February 12, 2007 ­ Michael J. McBride, Video Services Program Manager

  20. Proposal of a method for real cables EMC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Proposal of a method for real cables EMC modeling Olivier Maurice 23. juillet 2008 Abstract TThis paper deals with a method for the real cables EMC (ElectroMagnetic Compatibility) modeling compatibility (EMC). The objective is firstly to take into account the continuous interlacing of the wires

  1. Cables Links Cdk5 and c-Abl and Facilitates Cdk5 Tyrosine Phosphorylation, Kinase Upregulation, and Neurite Outgrowth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zukerberg, Lawrence R

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a small serine/threonine kinase that plays a pivotal role during development of the CNS. Cables, a novel protein, interacts with Cdk5 in brain lysates. Cables also binds to and is a ...

  2. Antenna mechanism of length control of actin cables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lishibanya Mohapatra; Bruce L. Goode; Jane Kondev

    2015-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Actin cables are linear cytoskeletal structures that serve as tracks for myosin-based intracellular transport of vesicles and organelles in both yeast and mammalian cells. In a yeast cell undergoing budding, cables are in constant dynamic turnover yet some cables grow from the bud neck toward the back of the mother cell until their length roughly equals the diameter of the mother cell. This raises the question: how is the length of these cables controlled? Here we describe a novel molecular mechanism for cable length control inspired by recent experimental observations in cells. This antenna mechanism involves three key proteins: formins, which polymerize actin, Smy1 proteins, which bind formins and inhibit actin polymerization, and myosin motors, which deliver Smy1 to formins, leading to a length-dependent actin polymerization rate. We compute the probability distribution of cable lengths as a function of several experimentally tuneable parameters such as the formin-binding affinity of Smy1 and the concentration of myosin motors delivering Smy1. These results provide testable predictions of the antenna mechanism of actin-cable length control.

  3. Apparatus and method for fabricating multi-strand superconducting cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borden, Albert R. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-strand superconducting cables adapted to be used, for example, to wind a magnet is fabricated by directing wire strands inwardly from spools disposed on the perimeter of a rotating disk and wrapping them diagonally around a tapered mandrel with a flattened cross-sectional shape with a core having a wedge-shaped channel. As the cable is pulled axially, flexibly coupled wedge-shaped pieces are continuously passed through the channel in the mandrel and inserted into the cable as an internal support therefor.

  4. Method for fabricating multi-strand superconducting cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borden, A.R.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-strand superconducting cables adapted to be used, for example, to wind a magnet are fabricated by directing wire strands inwardly from spools disposed on the perimeter of a rotating disk and wrapping them diagonally around a tapered mandrel with a flattened cross-sectional shape with a core having a wedge-shaped channel. As the cable is pulled axially, flexibly coupled wedge-shaped pieces are continuously passed through the channel in the mandrel and inserted into the cable as an internal support therefor.

  5. MOD Buffer/YBCO Approach to Fabricate Low-Cost Second Generation HTS Wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan [ORNL; Bhuiyan, Md S [ORNL; Martin, Patrick M [ORNL; Aytug, Tolga [ORNL; Kim, Kyunghoon [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [ORNL; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL; Li, Jing [ORNL; Zhang, W. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Rupich, Marty [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The metal organic deposition (MOD) of buffer layers on RABiTS substrates is considered a potential, low-cost approach to manufacturing high performance Second Generation (2G) high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires. The typical architecture used by American Superconductor in their 2G HTS wire consists of a Ni-W (5 at.%) substrate with a reactively sputtered Y2O3 seed layer, YSZ barrier layer and a CeO2 cap layer. This architecture supports critical currents of over 300 A/cm-width (77 K, self-field) with 0.8 mum YBCO films deposited by the TFA-MOD process. The main challenge in the development of the MOD buffers is to match or exceed the performance of the standard vacuum deposited buffer architecture. We have recently shown that the texture and properties of MOD - La2Zr2Ogamma (LZO) barrier layers can be improved by inserting a thin sputtered Y2O3 seed layer and prepared MOD deposited LZO layers followed by MOD or RF sputtered CeO2 cap layers that support MOD-YBCO films with Ic's of 200 and 255 A/cm-width, respectively. Detailed X-ray and microstructural characterizations indicated that MOD - CeO2 cap reacted completely with MOD YBCO to form BaCeOs. However, sputtered CeO2 cap/MOD YBCO interface remains clean. By further optimizing the coating conditions and reducing the heat-treatment temperatures, we have demonstrated an Ic of 336 A/cm with improved LZO layers and sputtered CeO2 cap and exceeded the performance of that of standard vacuum deposited buffers.

  6. An Internal Coaxial Cable Electrical Connector For Use In Downhole Tools

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

    2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A coaxial cable electrical connector more specifically an internal coaxial cable connector placed within a coaxial cable and its constituent components. A coaxial cable connector is in electrical communcation with an inductive transformer and a coaxial cable. The connector is in electrical communication with the outer housing of the inductive transfonner. A generally coaxial center conductor, a portion of which could be the coil in the inductive transformer, passes through the connector, is electrically insulated from the connector, and is in electrical communication with the conductive care of the coaxial cable. A plurality of bulbous pliant tabs on the coaxial cable connector mechanically engage the inside diameter of the coaxial cable thus grounding the transformer to the coaxial cable. The coaxial cable and inductive transformer are disposed within downhole tools to transmit electrical signals between downhole tools within a drill string.

  7. The Electrical Resistance of Rutherford-Type Superconducting Cable Splices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heck, C; Fleiter, J; Bottura, L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrical resistance of Large Hadron Collider main busbar cable lap splices produced by soft soldering has been measured with two independent methods as a function of intercable contact area and for splices made of cables with various defects. For defect-free lap splices, the resistance increases from 0.3 to 10 n? (at 4.3 K in self-field) when reducing the cable overlap length from 120 to 3 mm, as expected assuming that the resistance is inversely proportional to the intercable contact area. The resistance of bridge splices that connect side-by-side cables can be predicted from the lap splice resistances and the overlap areas involved.

  8. Characterization and detection of incipient underground cable failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaturbedi, Ritesh

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and intentionally damaged cable sections in a controlled environment. These controlled monitoring (CE) experiments were conducted at the Downed Conductor Testing Facility at Texas A&M University Riverside Campus. The second monitoring system was used to monitor...

  9. San Diego 01.05.2001 Power and Particle Exhaust in ITER Slide 1 by G. Janeschitz, et.al. _______________________________________________________________________ ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Diego 01.05.2001 Power and Particle Exhaust in ITER Slide 1 by G. Janeschitz, et.al. ITER. Pacher, G. Pacher, R. Tivey, M. Sugihara, JCT and HTs #12;San Diego; 01.05.2001 Power and Particle to pump #12;San Diego; 01.05.2001 Power and Particle Exhaust in ITER Slide 3 by G. Janeschitz. ITER

  10. Cost-Effective Cable Insulation: Nanoclay Reinforced Ethylene-Propylene-Rubber for Low-Cost HVDC Cabling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    GENI Project: GE is developing new, low-cost insulation for high-voltage direct current (HVDC) electricity transmission cables. The current material used to insulate HVDC transmission cables is very expensive and can account for as much as 1/3 of the total cost of a high-voltage transmission system. GE is embedding nanomaterials into specialty rubber to create its insulation. Not only are these materials less expensive than those used in conventional HVDC insulation, but also they will help suppress excess charge accumulation. The excess charge left behind on a cable poses a major challenge for high-voltage insulation—if it’s not kept to a low level, it could ultimately lead the insulation to fail. GE’s low-cost insulation is compatible with existing U.S. cable manufacturing processes, further enhancing its cost effectiveness.

  11. Robotic Platform for Monitoring Underground Cable Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamishev, Alexander

    . to traverse and monitor fiber-optic overhead ground transmission wires (OPGW) above 66kV power transmission

  12. Proceedings Nordic Wind Power Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of Possible Power for Wind Plant Control Power Fluctuations from Offshore Wind Farms; Model Validation System grounding of wind farm medium voltage cable grids Faults in the Collection Grid of Offshore systems of wind turbines and wind farms. NWPC presents the newest research results related to technical

  13. Ultrasonic signatures of idealized grout defects in polyethylene-sleeved cable stays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakirekanti, Sreenivas

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . These cable stays contain an annular layer of portland cement grout which surrounds the steel cable strands, and provides corrosion protection to the cables. During the grouting operation there is a possibility that voids may form in the grout layer and act...-type of cable-stayed bridge are as shown in Figure 4n". Problem Statement The typical arrangement of a cable stay consists of a steel multistrand cable encased in a polyethylene (PE) pipe, and grouted with portland cement or epoxy grout. Each strand in turn...

  14. Overload characteristics of paper-polypropylene-paper cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, A. (Underground Systems, Inc., Armonk, NY (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The short-time rating of PPP pipe-type cable may be lower than the equivalent paper cable sized to carry the same normal load. The ratings depend on the relative conductor sizes and the maximum allowable conductor temperatures of the insulation. The insulation thermal resistivity may be a significant parameter for overload times of approximately one hour and should be verified for PPP insulation. The thermal capacitance temperature characteristic of PPP insulation is not known. However, the overload ratings are not very sensitive to this parameter. Overload ratings are given for maximum conductor temperatures from 105 C to 130 C. Use of ratings based on temperatures greater than 105 C would require testing to determine the extent of degradation of the insulation at these higher temperatures. PPP-insulated cable will be thermally stable over a wider range of operating conditions (voltage and current) compared with paper-insulated cable. The short-circuit ratings of PPP- and paper-insulated cable systems and the positive/negative and zero sequence impedances are compared. 21 refs., 22 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Progress in superconducting performance of rolled multifilamentary Bi-2223 HTS composite conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Q.; Riley, G.N. Jr.; Parrella, R.D. [American Superconductor Corp., Westborough, MA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant enhancements in critical current densities in rolled multifilamentary Bi-2223 HTS composite conductors have been achieved using the powder-in-tube technique. At 77 K and self field, oxide critical current densities (J{sub c})of 55 kA/cm{sup 2}, overall or engineering critical current densities of 15 kA/cm{sup 2}, and critical currents of 125 A have been achieved in different rolled multifilamentary composites. Progress in achieving such high electrical performance is believed to stem in part from an improvement of grain connectivity by reducing weak links. The J{sub c} dependence on magnetic field and the degree of c-axis texture of these high quality conductors have been investigated at various temperatures. Our results also demonstrate that the critical current retention in magnetic field can be independently controlled from the self field critical current density, suggesting that flux pinning improvements and weak link reductions can be separately engineered into Bi-2223 composites fabricated using manufacturable processes.

  16. Termination for a superconducting power transmission line including a horizontal cryogenic bushing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Minati, Kurt F. (Northport, NY); Morgan, Gerry H. (Patchogue, NY); McNerney, Andrew J. (Shoreham, NY); Schauer, Felix (Upton, NY)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A termination for a superconducting power transmission line is disclosed which is comprised of a standard air entrance insulated vertical bushing with an elbow, a horizontal cryogenic bushing linking the pressurized cryogenic cable environment to the ambient temperature bushing and a stress cone which terminates the cable outer shield and transforms the large radial voltage gradient in the cable dielectric into a much lower radial voltage gradient in the high density helium coolant at the cold end of the cryogenic bushing.

  17. Horizontal cryogenic bushing for the termination of a superconducting power-transmission line

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Minati, K.F.; Morgan, G.H.; McNerney, A.J.; Schauer, F.

    1982-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A termination for a superconducting power transmission line is disclosed which is comprised of a standard air entrance insulated vertical bushing with an elbow, a horizontal cryogenic bushing linking the pressurized cryogenic cable environment to the ambient temperature bushing and a stress cone which terminated the cable outer shield and transforms the large radial voltage gradient in the cable dielectric into a much lower radial voltage gradient in the high density helium coolant at the cold end of the cryogenic bushing.

  18. Waltz Mill testing of 345-kV PPP cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burghardt, R.R. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Ruffs Dale, PA (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 345-kV PPP-insulated cable was subjected to a two-year accelerated life test program at the EPRI Waltz Mill Cable Test Facility. Testing started in November 1985 and was successfully completed in September 1988. The program included conductor temperatures ranging from 85{degrees}C to 105{degrees}C and line-to-line voltages from 362 kV to 474 kV. Cyclic testing was performed during 17 of the 24 months. Dissipation factor measurements were made throughout the program. The measurements indicated no deterioration of the cable or splices as a consequence of the high temperatures and voltages applied to them in this test program. 2 refs., 24 figs.

  19. Potential impacts of vertical cable seismic: modeling, resolution and multiple attenuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Ryan Justin

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical cable seismic methods are becoming more relevant as we require high quality and high resolution seismic data in both land and marine environments. Our goal in this thesis is to demonstrate the impacts of vertical cable surveying...

  20. Amendment to LM-07-12 for Fiber Optic Cable Trenching at the...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Amendment to LM-07-12 for Fiber Optic Cable Trenching at the Westminster, Colorado, Office Amendment to LM-07-12 for Fiber Optic Cable Trenching at the Westminster, Colorado,...

  1. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Complete FiberCopper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells Complete FiberCopper Cable Solution for Long-Term...

  2. Underground distribution cable incipient fault diagnosis system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaafari Mousavi, Mir Rasoul

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    INTRODUCTION 1.1 PREFACE The power industry has been developing into a challenging and competitive environment due to the ongoing restructuring and deregulation. This structural change has required the electric utilities to reduce operating costs...

  3. 100 Home Power #67 October / November 1998 Code Corner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    of fuses that can be safely used in a photovoltaic (PV) power system. Why Use a Fuse? A fuse is one type when accidents happen. Such accidents include: a cable coming loose in the battery-to-inverter circuit

  4. HIDDEN DAMAGE DETECTION FOR MAIN CABLES OF SUSPENSION BRIDGES INCORPORATING DC MAGNETIZATION WITH A SEARCH COIL-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    with artificially inflicted broken wires. KEYWORDS : Cable NDE, Search coil, Total flux, DC magnetization, Damage. To overcome this limitation, this study proposes a noncontact cable inspection system incorporating been applied for the inspection of steel cables for ski lifts, elevators, and for other applications

  5. PARTIAL DISCHARGE TESTING OF DEFECTIVE THREE-PHASE PILC CABLE UNDER RATED CONDITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    PARTIAL DISCHARGE TESTING OF DEFECTIVE THREE-PHASE PILC CABLE UNDER RATED CONDITIONS J. A. Hunter 1 lifespan. An increase in the failure rates of paper insulated lead covered (PILC) cables that make up is to document the effects of mechanical stress on the generation of partial discharge (PD) for cables of PILC

  6. From Ions to Wires to the Grid: The Transformational Science of LANL Research in High-Tc Superconducting Tapes and Electric Power Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Marken

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been tasked to lead national efforts to modernize the electric grid, enhance security and reliability of the energy infrastructure, and facilitate recovery from disruptions to energy supplies. LANL has pioneered the development of coated conductors – high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes – which permit dramatically greater current densities than conventional copper cable, and enable new technologies to secure the national electric grid. Sustained world-class research from concept, demonstration, transfer, and ongoing industrial support has moved this idea from the laboratory to the commercial marketplace.

  7. From Ions to Wires to the Grid: The Transformational Science of LANL Research in High-Tc Superconducting Tapes and Electric Power Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marken, Ken (Superconductivity Technology Center, Los Alamos) [Superconductivity Technology Center, Los Alamos

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been tasked to lead national efforts to modernize the electric grid, enhance security and reliability of the energy infrastructure, and facilitate recovery from disruptions to energy supplies. LANL has pioneered the development of coated conductors - high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes - which permit dramatically greater current densities than conventional copper cable, and enable new technologies to secure the national electric grid. Sustained world-class research from concept, demonstration, transfer, and ongoing industrial support has moved this idea from the laboratory to the commercial marketplace.

  8. From Ions to Wires to the Grid: The Transformational Science of LANL Research in High-Tc Superconducting Tapes and Electric Power Applications

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ken Marken

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been tasked to lead national efforts to modernize the electric grid, enhance security and reliability of the energy infrastructure, and facilitate recovery from disruptions to energy supplies. LANL has pioneered the development of coated conductors ? high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes ? which permit dramatically greater current densities than conventional copper cable, and enable new technologies to secure the national electric grid. Sustained world-class research from concept, demonstration, transfer, and ongoing industrial support has moved this idea from the laboratory to the commercial marketplace.

  9. Robust Measurement Feedback Control of an Inclined Cable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    a robust control strategy based on modern control tools for distributed parameter systems, hal-00784727 on the construction of a standard linear infinite dimensional state space system and an H feedback control). !"#$%& # ' ( )"#$%& "*++$!++&, - *. , , Fig. 1. Inclined Cable This paper is devoted to the design of control laws for a vi- brating system

  10. A Superconducting transformer system for high current cable testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godeke, A.; Dietderich, D. R.; Joseph, J. M.; Lizarazo, J.; Prestemon, S. O.; Miller, G.; Weijers, H. W.

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the development of a direct-current (dc) superconducting transformer system for the high current test of superconducting cables. The transformer consists of a core-free 10 464 turn primary solenoid which is enclosed by a 6.5 turn secondary. The transformer is designed to deliver a 50 kA dc secondary current at a dc primary current of about 50 A. The secondary current is measured inductively using two toroidal-wound Rogowski coils. The Rogowski coil signal is digitally integrated, resulting in a voltage signal that is proportional to the secondary current. This voltage signal is used to control the secondary current using a feedback loop which automatically compensates for resistive losses in the splices to the superconducting cable samples that are connected to the secondary. The system has been commissioned up to 28 kA secondary current. The reproducibility in the secondary current measurement is better than 0.05% for the relevant current range up to 25 kA. The drift in the secondary current, which results from drift in the digital integrator, is estimated to be below 0.5 A/min. The system's performance is further demonstrated through a voltage-current measurement on a superconducting cable sample at 11 T background magnetic field. The superconducting transformer system enables fast, high resolution, economic, and safe tests of the critical current of superconducting cable samples.

  11. FEM Analysis of Nb-Sn Rutherford-type Cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barzi, Emanuela; Gallo, Giuseppe; Neri, Paolo; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important part of superconducting accelerator magnet work is the conductor. To produce magnetic fields larger than 10 T, brittle conductors are typically used. For instance, for Nb{sub 3}Sn the original round wire, in the form of a composite of Copper, Niobium and Tin, is assembled into a so-called Rutherford-type cable, which is used to wind the magnet. The magnet is then subjected to a high temperature heat treatment to produce the chemical reactions that make the material superconducting. At this stage the superconductor is brittle and its superconducting properties sensitive to strain. This work is based on the development of a 2D finite element model, which simulates the mechanical behavior of Rutherford-type cable before heat treatment. The model was applied to a number of different cable architectures. To validate a critical criterion adopted into the single Nb-Sn wire analysis, the results of the model were compared with those measured experimentally on cable cross sections.

  12. UITV University of Iowa Cable Television ITS VIDEO SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UITV ­ University of Iowa Cable Television ITS VIDEO SERVICES 1 UITV Report for Fiscal Year July 1 and Student Video Productions. o Programs are received from satellite programming services, like SCOLA foreign a venue for student programming, like Daily Iowan Television News and Student Video Productions. · On July

  13. Static Analysis of the Lumped Mass Cable Model Using a Shooting Algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masciola, M. D.; Nahon, M.; Driscoll, F. R.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on a method to solve the static configuration for a lumped mass cable system. The method demonstrated here is intended to be used prior to performing a dynamics simulation of the cable. Conventional static analysis approaches resort to dynamics relaxation methods or root-finding algorithms (such as the Newton-Raphson method) to find the equilibrium profile. The alternative method demonstrated here is general enough for most cable configurations (slack or taut) and ranges of cable elasticity. The forces acting on the cable are attributable to elasticity, weight, buoyancy, and hydrodynamics. For the three-dimensional problem, the initial cable profile is obtained by solving three equations, regardless of the cable discretization resolution. This analysis discusses regions and circumstances under which failures in the method are encountered.

  14. Method and device for tensile testing of cable bundles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robertson, Lawrence M; Ardelean, Emil V; Goodding, James C; Babuska, Vit

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A standard tensile test device is improved to accurately measure the mechanical properties of stranded cables, ropes, and other composite structures wherein a witness is attached to the top and bottom mounting blocks holding the cable under test. The witness is comprised of two parts: a top and a bottom rod of similar diameter with the bottom rod having a smaller diameter stem on its upper end and the top rod having a hollow opening in its lower end into which the stem fits forming a witness joint. A small gap is present between the top rod and the larger diameter portion of the bottom rod. A standard extensometer is attached to the top and bottom rods of the witness spanning this small witness gap. When a force is applied to separate the mounting blocks, the gap in the witness expands the same length that the entire test specimen is stretched.

  15. Aging, Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA), and high potential testing of damaged cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigil, R.A. [Science & Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jacobus, M.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted to assess the effects of high potential testing of cables and to assess the survivability of aged and damaged cables under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions. High potential testing at 240 Vdc/mil on undamaged cables suggested that no damage was incurred on the selected virgin cables. During aging and LOCA testing, Okonite ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) cables with a bonded jacket experienced unexpected failures. The failures appear to be primarily related to the level of thermal aging and the presence of a bonded jacket that ages more rapidly than the insulation. For Brand Rex crosslinked polyolefin (XLPO) cables, the results suggest that 7 mils of insulation remaining should give the cables a high probability of surviving accident exposure following aging. The voltage necessary to detect when 7 mils of insulation remain on unaged Brand Rex cables is approximately 35 kVdc. This voltage level would almost certainly be unacceptable to a utility for use as a damage assessment tool. However, additional tests indicated that a 35 kvdc voltage application would not damage virgin Brand Rex cables when tested in water. Although two damaged Rockbestos silicone rubber cables also failed during the accident test, no correlation between failures and level of damage was apparent.

  16. HoustonChronicle.com Page 1 of 2 http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/printstory.hts/prn/texas/880944 4/23/2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    HoustonChronicle.com Page 1 of 2 http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/printstory.hts/prn/texas/880944 4 in Richardson, Texas (c) 2001 Business Wire. News/Assignment Editors & High-Tech Writers REMINDER...for Tuesday (April 17) --(BUSINESS WIRE)-- WHAT: Chorum Technologies' presentation of findings on advanced, all

  17. HTS Solutions for a New Dimension in Power Superconductivity for Electric Systems 2004 Annual DOE Peer Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ CRADA with ORNL on High Voltage Development, CRADAs with LANL and ANL dependent on funding $12.2M total

  18. Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization (NEPO) final report on aging and condition monitoring of low-voltage cable materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assink, Roger Alan; Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Bernstein, Robert

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results generated on a 5-year cable-aging program that constituted part of the Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization (NEPO) program, an effort cosponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The NEPO cable-aging effort concentrated on two important issues involving the development of better lifetime prediction methods as well as the development and testing of novel cable condition-monitoring (CM) techniques. To address improved life prediction methods, we first describe the use of time-temperature superposition principles, indicating how this approach improves the testing of the Arrhenius model by utilizing all of the experimentally generated data instead of a few selected and processed data points. Although reasonable superposition is often found, we show several cases where non-superposition is evident, a situation that violates the constant acceleration assumption normally used in accelerated aging studies. Long-term aging results over extended temperature ranges allow us to show that curvature in Arrhenius plots for elongation is a common occurrence. In all cases the curvature results in a lowering of the Arrhenius activation energy at lower temperatures implying that typical extrapolation of high temperature results over-estimates material lifetimes. The long-term results also allow us to test the significance of extrapolating through the crystalline melting point of semi-crystalline materials. By utilizing ultrasensitive oxygen consumption (UOC) measurements, we show that it is possible to probe the low temperature extrapolation region normally inaccessible to conventional accelerated aging studies. This allows the quantitative testing of the often-used Arrhenius extrapolation assumption. Such testing indicates that many materials again show evidence of ''downward'' curvature (E{sub a} values drop as the aging temperature is lowered) consistent with the limited elongation results and many literature results. It is also shown how the UOC approach allows the probing of temperatures that cross through the crystalline melting point region of semi-crystalline materials such as XLPO and EPR cable insulations. New results on combined environment aging of neoprene and hypalon cable jacketing materials are presented and offer additional evidence in support of our time-temperature-dose rate (t-T-DR) superposition approach that had been used successfully in the past for such situations.

  19. Tests of industrial ethylene-propylene rubber high voltage cable for cryogenic use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balhan, B; Goddard, B; Muratori, G; Otwinowski, S; Rieubland, Jean Michel; Wang, H; CERN. Geneva. SPS and LEP Division

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the beginning of 1999 UCLA has received a prototype High Voltage Cryogenic Cable supplied fee of charge by Pirelli. The cable is intended for more than ten years of service at 100 kV D.C. and liquid argon temperature. Thecable uses an all welded construction, whichi is axially tight and free of ionizable voids. The cable was submitted to a number of mechanical and electrical tests as described below.

  20. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER DELIVERY, VOL. 23, NO. 3, JULY 2008 1527 A Quasi-Monte Carlo Integration Method Applied to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    --Coupled transmission lines, mutual coupling, power cables, power system transients. I. INTRODUCTION ACLASSICAL approach an effective numeric method to compute Pollaczek integral. This integral is widely used in transmission

  1. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov Talented technical team - Specialty fiber optics development, testing, and production - Downhole cable and tool development and...

  2. The effect of technology on cable service to large, networked communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmeling, Paul K. (Paul Kristoffer), 1975-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Delivering cable television to college and university campuses is maintained by a highly specialized industry which involves significant technological and logistical challenges. As campuses continue to contribute financial ...

  3. O.A.R. 734-055 - Pole Lines, Buried Cables, Pipe lines, Signs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    buried cables, pipe lines, signs miscellaneous operations upon state highway right-of-way and properties under the jurisdiction of the department of transportation. Published N...

  4. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    tool. EGS Challenges for Cable Performance: - Very high temperatures - Highly corrosive environment - High pressure - Self supporting deployment 3 | US DOE Geothermal Office...

  5. 06/18/01 23 Members of Steering Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    savings will be squandered on cooling losses unless the refrigeration system is very small. Cables have Cryogenics Needs of Future HTS Electric Power Equipment July 22, 1998 This workshop addressed the question: Will practical cryogenic refrigerators be available to meet the needs of emerging superconducting power systems

  6. Results of a literature review on the environmental qualification of low-voltage electric cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lofaro, R.; Lee, B.; Villaran, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Gleason, J. [GLS Enterprises, Inc. (United States); Aggarwal, S. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the design of nuclear power plants in the US, safety-related electric equipment must be qualified to provide reasonable assurance it can withstand the effects of a design basis event (DBE) and still be able to perform its prescribed safety function, even if the accident were to occur at the end of its service life. The requirement for environmental qualification (EQ) originates from the General Design Criteria in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 50 (10 CFR 50). The acceptable method of performing the qualification of this equipment has evolved over the years, starting with the NRC Division of Operating Reactors (DOR) Guidelines, which were issued in Bulletin 79--01B, and NUREG-0588 requirements and ending with the current EQ Rule, 10 CFR 50.49. While the EQ methods described in these documents have the same overall objective, there are some notable differences for which a clear technical basis has not been established. One difference is the preaging requirement for equipment prior to LOCA testing. In addition, specific issues related to current EQ practices have been raised by the US NRC which need to be addressed. These issues, which are discussed in detail later in this paper, are related to the sources of conservatism and uncertainty in IEEE Standard 323--1974, which is the qualification standard currently endorsed by the NRC. To address these issues, the NRC Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) implemented a Task Action Plan (TAP), and the Office of Nuclear Reactor Research (RES) initiated a complementary research program. The current focus of this program is on the qualification of low-voltage instrumentation and control cables. These cables were selected since they are not typically replaced on a routine basis, and their degradation could impact plant safety.

  7. Production process for advanced space satellite system cables/interconnects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza, Luis A.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This production process was generated for the satellite system program cables/interconnects group, which in essences had no well defined production process. The driver for the development of a formalized process was based on the set backs, problem areas, challenges, and need improvements faced from within the program at Sandia National Laboratories. In addition, the formal production process was developed from the Master's program of Engineering Management for New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in Socorro New Mexico and submitted as a thesis to meet the institute's graduating requirements.

  8. Low Voltage Cables Market Analysis | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other4Q07) WindLow Voltage Cables Market Analysis

  9. Low Voltage Cables Market Trends | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other4Q07) WindLow Voltage Cables Market

  10. Low Voltage Cables Market size | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other4Q07) WindLow Voltage Cables MarketLow

  11. Low Voltage Cables Market | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other4Q07) WindLow Voltage Cables MarketLowLow

  12. LANL: Superconductivity Technology Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NEWS LIBRARY JOBS Search Materials Physics & Applications: STC STC Home OUR FOCUS HTS Physics HTS Materials Development HTS Materials Processing Power Applications...

  13. Valuable bridges : cable-stayed bridges and value engineering in American civil engineering culture, 1969-1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuels, Fallon M. (Fallon Michele)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A history and theory of cable-stayed bridges in the context of a cultural discourse on civil construction projects' value, this thesis studies the significance of cable-stayed bridge designs to 'value engineering' objectives ...

  14. Mathematical modeling of electromagnetic wave propagation in heterogeneous lossy coaxial cables with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ]. However, as pointed Defect Piezo-electric sensor Co-axial cable Piezo-electric sensor Co-axial cable the Project team POEMS of INRIA and the laboratory LIST of CEA Saclay. The general objective of this collaboration has been the nu- merical simulation of piezo-electric sensors used for non destructive testing

  15. Wrench-Closure Workspace Generation for Cable Driven Parallel Manipulators using a Hybrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    . The manipulator's movement is regulated through the actuation of the individual cables that are attached the dynamics, modelling and control of the system. In addition, cable mounting points at the base platform can). This limitation creates challenging problems in the control of the manipulator [15] and workspace #12

  16. An Internal Coaxial Cable Electrical Connector For Use In Downhole Tools

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

    2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A seal for a coaxial cable electrical connector more specifically an internal seal for a coaxial cable connector placed within a coaxial cable and its constituent components. A coaxial cable connector is in electrical communcation with an inductive transformer and a coaxial cable. The connector is in electrical communication with the outer housing of the inductive transformer. A generally coaxial center conductor, a portion of which could be the coil in the inductive transformer, passes through the connector, is electrically insulated from the connector, and is in electrical communication with the conductive core of the coaxial cable. The electrically insulating material also doubles as a seal to safegaurd against penetration of fluid, thus protecting against shorting out of the electrical connection. The seal is a multi-component seal, which is pre-compressed to a desired pressure rating. The coaxial cable and inductive transformer are disposed within downhole tools to transmit electrical signals between downhole tools within a drill string. The internal coaxial cable connector and its attendant seal can be used in a plurality of downhole tools, such as sections of pipe in a drill string, drill collars, heavy weight drill pipe, and jars.

  17. Aalborg Universitet Line Differential Protection Scheme Modelling for Underground 420 kV Cable Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    alternating current) cable system, a detailed approach to EMTDC/PSCAD modelling of protective relays configuration of the protective relaying. The present paper describes modelling methodology on the basis differential protection, XLPE HVAC cable, EMTDC/PSCAD relay model, SIPROTEC 4 7SD522, 7SD610. 1. Introduction

  18. Direct perturbation analysis on cables with concentrated loads P. Yu *, K. Pan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Pei

    cables, overhead transmission lines, etc. The study of vibrations of suspended cables is of great is the galloping of overhead transmission lines which may cause severe disruptions in the electrical supply and even a cas- cading collapse of a lineÃ?s supporting towers. * Corresponding author. Tel.: +1

  19. Steady state heat transfer experimental studies of LHC superconducting cables operating in cryogenic environment of superfluid helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santandrea, Dario; Tuccillo, Raffaele; Granieri, Pier Paolo.

    The heat management is a basic and fundamental aspect of the superconducting magnets used in the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Indeed, the coil temperature must be kept below the critical value, despite the heat which can be generated or deposited in the magnet during the normal operations. Therefore, this thesis work aims at determining the heating power which can be extracted from the superconducting cables of the LHC, specially through their electrical insulation which represents the main thermal barrier. An experimental measurement campaign in superfluid helium bath was performed on several samples reproducting the main LHC magnets. The heating power was generated in the sample by Joule heating and the temperature increase was measured by means of Cernox bare chip and thermocouples. An innovative instrumentation technique which also includes the in-situ calibration of the thermocouples was developed. A thorough uncertainty analysis on the overall measurement chain concluded the experimental setup. The prese...

  20. Development of optimized PPP insulated pipe-cable systems in the commercial voltage range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allam, E.M.; McKean, A.L. (Cablec Corp., Yonkers, NY (United States))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objectives of this project included the development of an alternate domestic source of Paper-Polypropylene-Paper (PPP) laminate and the development of optimized designs for PPP-insulated pipe-type cable systems in the commercial voltage range. The development of a domestic source of PPP laminate was successfully completed. This laminate was utilized throughout the program for fabrication of full-size prototype cables submitted for laboratory qualification tests. Selected cables at rated voltages of 138, 230 and 345kV have been designed, fabricated and subjected to the series of qualification tests leading to full laboratory qualification. An optimized design of 2000 kcmil, 345kV cable insulated with 600 mils of domestic PPP laminate was fabricated and successfully passed all laboratory qualification tests. This cable design was subsequently installed at Waltz Mill to undergo the series of field tests leading to full commercial qualification.

  1. Development of 500 kV DC PPLP-insulated oil-filled submarine cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujimori, A. [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)] [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, T. [Electric Power Development Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] [Electric Power Development Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Takashima, H. [Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc., Kagawa (Japan)] [Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc., Kagawa (Japan); Imajo, T. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)] [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Hata, R. [Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan)] [Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Tanabe, T. [Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] [Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yoshida, S. [Fujikura, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] [Fujikura, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kakihana, T. [Hitachi Cable, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] [Hitachi Cable, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines the development of a 500 kV DC oil-filled submarine cable capable of transmitting 2,800 MW with {+-} 500 kV 2800A bipole system. Polypropylene Laminated Paper (PPL) was employed as the insulation material, which is the worlds first application to DC cables. The conductor size is 3,000 mm{sup 2}, which is the largest size for submarine cables ever put into practical use. Through various fundamental and prototype tests, the cable proved to have excellent electrical characteristics for DC voltage as well as transient overvoltage. The cable and accessories are currently undergoing a long-term accelerated aging test as the final confirmation of their reliability and stability.

  2. CUDI A Model for Calculation of Electrodynamic and Thermal Behaviour of Superconducting Rutherford Cables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verweij, A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CUDI is the extended Fortran code to calculate the electrodynamic and thermal behaviour of any type of Rutherford cable subject to global and/or local variations in field, transport current, and external heat release. The internal parameters of the cable can be freely varied along the length and across the width, such as contact resistances, critical current, cooling rates etc. In this way, all the typical non-uniformities occurring in a cable, e.g. broken filaments, strand welds, cable joints, and edge degradation can be simulated. Also the characteristics of the strands in the cable can be varied from strand to strand. Heat flows through the matrix, through the interstrand contacts, and to the helium are incorporated, as well as the self-field and self- and mutual inductances between the strands. The main features and structure of the program will be discussed.

  3. Evaluation of 230 kV HPFF pipe-type cable with wrinkled and creased insulating tapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seman, G.W.; Katz, C. [Cable Technology Labs., Inc., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)] [Cable Technology Labs., Inc., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Pancholi, S.V. [Potomac Electric Power Co., Washington, DC (United States)] [Potomac Electric Power Co., Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Severe collapse wrinkles and circumferential creases were discovered in the cellulose paper insulating tapes of a newly installed IIPFF pipe-type cable during splicing and terminating. An evaluation program was developed to assess the electrical and mechanical integrity of the cable having wrinkled and creased insulating tapes. The test results indicated that the cable would perform satisfactorily in service.

  4. Performance Evaluation of K-DEMO Cable-in-conduit Conductors Using the Florida Electro-Mechanical Cable Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Yuhu

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for design of the Toroidal Field (TF) insert coil, which will allow validation of the performance of significant lengths of the conductors to be used in the full scale TF coils in relevant conditions of field, current density and mechanical strain. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) will build the TF insert which will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test facility at JAEA, Naka, Japan. Three dimensional mathematical model of TF Insert was created based on the initial design geometry data, and included the following features: orthotropic material properties of superconductor material and insulation; external magnetic field from CSMC, temperature dependent properties of the materials; pre-compression and plastic deformation in lap joint. Major geometrical characteristics of the design were preserved including cable jacket and insulation shape, mandrel outline, and support clamps and spacers. The model is capable of performing coupled structural, thermal, and electromagnetic analysis using ANSYS. Numerical simulations were performed for room temperature conditions; cool down to 4K, and the operating regime with 68kA current at 11.8 Tesla background field. Numerical simulations led to the final design of the coil producing the required strain levels on the cable, while simultaneously satisfying the ITER magnet structural design criteria.

  5. Optimization of operating temperature in cryocooled HTS magnets for compactness and efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Ho-Myung

    . The magnet systems considered here are refrigerated by a closed-cycle cryocooler, and liquid cryogens may-cooled without any liquid (Fig. 1b). As the operating temperature of the magnet decreases, both the refrigeration load of the magnet and the required power per unit refrigeration at cryocooler increases dramati- cally

  6. Wojciech.Wiechowski@wtwps.com POWER SYSTEM TECHNICAL PERFORMANCE ISSUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    Wojciech.Wiechowski@wtwps.com POWER SYSTEM TECHNICAL PERFORMANCE ISSUES RELATED TO THE APPLICATION of work of Cigre Working Group C4.502 "Power system technical performance issues related underground transmission project are identified. Cable line modeling and model verification techniques

  7. Measurements on Subscale Y-Ba-Cu-O Racetrack Coils at 77 K and Self-Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, X.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    second- generation HTS wire development and manufacturing,”18] SuperPower Inc. , “2G HTS wire for coil applications,”

  8. Tests of Fiber Optic Cables at 300 and 4.2 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huisman, F

    2004-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Strange ''cavity lights'' have been observed in Superconducting Radio Frequency (SCRF) Cavities. In order to understand this phenomenon a spectral analysis of the light is necessary. However, the extreme conditions presented within the cavity require the equipment to function at cryogenic temperatures. Ocean optics P600 UV/VIS fiber optic cables were studied at 300 K and 4.2 K to determine whether or not they would be appropriate for cryogenic temperatures. At 300 K the performance of different lengths of cable, the effect of a lens and the effect of a junction were investigated by taking spectra of red, green, and yellow LEDs at a variety of distances from where the source and the cable/spectrometer were aligned. It was found that there was significant attenuation of the signal between the spectrometer alone and the spectrometer with any combination of cables. The lens reduced the number of locations where a readable signal was produced, but the intensity increased greatly when the lens was aligned with the light source. The junction did not seem to make a difference except when there was a large angle between the light source and the cable. At 4.2 K a 4 m cable and a lens were submerged in liquid Helium to test their capabilities at cryogenic temperatures. The fiber optic cable was found unsuitable for use as it did not function at 4.2 K, and the signal was essentially lost. However, the lens survived.

  9. Critical current measurements of DI-BSCCO tapes as a function of angle in high magnetic This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampshire, Damian

    and excellent mechanical strength. These tapes are valuable for many applications such as power cables, transformers, motors, generators, and high field magnets. Hence their performance in high magnetic fields under. Unlike low temperature superconductors, high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes are strongly

  10. ORNL/HTSPC-16 ORNL Superconducting Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORNL/HTSPC-16 ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for Electric Power Systems Annual Report government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/HTSPC-16 ORNL SUPERCONDUCTING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM FOR ELECTRIC ................................................................ 1-1 1.1 Ultera/ORNL HTS Cable Superconductivity Partnership with Industry (SPI

  11. The State of SuperconductingThe State of Superconducting TechnologyTechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    01581 #12;22 ContentsContents · Enabling Technologies · Applications - Magnets - Power Cables - FCL in motor applications · refrigeration HTS enhances commercial economics Current Surface 20 35 64 50 77 70 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 Magnetic Field (Tesla) Ic(T,B)/Ic(77K,0T

  12. Log of a young author's thinking: George W. Cable's "Drop Shot".

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinitiere, Autry James

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . t 1974 Major Subject: English LOG OF A YOUNG AUTHOR'S THINKING: GEORGE W CABLE'S "DROP SHOT" A Thesis by AUTRY JAMES SINITIERE Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committe Hea of Department M er ember) August 1974 & s ~~. )$, gg... APSTRACT Log of a Young Author's Thinking: George W. Cable's "Drop Shot" (August 1974) Autry James Sinitiere, B. A. , College of Santa Fe Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr Richard H. Ballinger In February 1870 George W. Cable began writing a * p p...

  13. Texas cable television franchises and compliance with the 1972 FCC rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kabrich, Phillip Wayne

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    moving into the nation's major. metropolitan areas, and a ncw dimension has been added Lo the industry: two-way cable com- munications. The lifting of the PCC's "freeze" on cable systems in the nation's top 100 television market areas seemed to open...TEXAS CABLE TELEVISION FRANCHISES AND COMPLIANCE WITH THE 1972 FCC RULES A Thesi. s by PHILLIP WAYNE KABRICH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  14. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Bridge Stay Cable and External Post-Tensioning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCoy, Katlyn Mae

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    such as corrosion, steel strand and wire breakage, tendon section loss, voids in the grout, water infiltration, and other undesired grout conditions can go undetected in nontransparent stay cable and external PT ducts without proper inspection. In this research...

  15. Design and performance relationships for cable distribution in multi-story office buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Richard Cecil

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weaknesses associated with cable distribution systems suggest a lack of design consideration in the planning stage of a building. The primary question to be addressed in this study is do relationships between design considerations and building...

  16. Translational Planar Cable-Direct-Driven Robots Robert L. Williams II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams II, Robert L.

    , Ohio Paolo Gallina University of Trieste Trieste, Italy Journal of Intelligent and Robotic Systems Vol Paolo Gallina University of Trieste Trieste, ITALY ABSTRACT A planar cable-direct-driven robot (CDDR

  17. Losses in 23 strands NbTi and Nb/sub 3/Sn flat cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polak, M.; Krempasky, L.; Hlasnik, I.; Perot, J.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Losses in different samples made of 23 strands multifilamentary NbTi and Nb/sub 3/Sn Rutherford type superconducting cables in pulsed magnetic fields were measured using the magnetization technique. Two technologies were used for sample preparation. One reason for this was to simulate the different winding structure of the pulsed magnets. Another reason was to obtain the samples with different average transverse resistivity across the unsoldered cable. For comparison, one sample, having a low average transverse resistivity, was made of the soldered cable. The influence of the cable pieces length, used for samples, on the rate dependent losses is demonstrated. Problems concerning the measurement of the time constant of the rate dependent magnetization are discussed. 4 refs.

  18. Partial discharge measurements on a high voltage direct current mass impregnated paper cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeroense, M.J.P. [NKF KABEL B.V., Delft (Netherlands); Kreuger, F.H. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Partial discharge measurement has been a good tool for the quality assurance of cables under alternating voltage. With the growing interest in High Voltage Direct Current cables it seems therefore logical to extend this technique for use at direct voltage. The paper describes this technique as used on a HVDC cable with mass impregnated paper. The different phases of operation (no load, full load, cooling phase, etc.) are characterized by a different discharge behavior. Special attention is given to the dangerous cooling phase. Models have been developed which can explain the discharge patterns that were measured. This paper gives an insight in the electrical behavior of a HVDC cable with mass impregnated paper insulation.

  19. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Bridge Stay Cable and External Post-Tensioning Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCoy, Katlyn Mae

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    such as corrosion, steel strand and wire breakage, tendon section loss, voids in the grout, water infiltration, and other undesired grout conditions can go undetected in nontransparent stay cable and external PT ducts without proper inspection. In this research...

  20. An investigation into the properties and characteristics of homogeneous tapered cables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deCastongrene, Russell Othomar

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE PROPERTIES AND CHABACTEBISTICS OF HOMOGENEOUS TAPL'BED CABLES A Thesis by RUSSELL OTHOMAR deCASTONGBENE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement sor... the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCF. May 1975 Major Subject: Civil Engineering AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE PROPERTIES AND CHARACTERISTICS OF HOMOGENEOUS TAPERED CABLES A Thesis RUSSELL OTHOMAR deCASTONGRENE Approved as to style and content by: ( irman...

  1. Device to facilitate moving an electrical cable of an electric vehicle charging station and method of providing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karner, Donald B

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Some embodiments include a device to facilitate moving an electrical cable of an electric vehicle charging station. Other embodiments of related systems and methods are also disclosed.

  2. Vids4Grids: Smart Meters and Super Cables

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Find out more about the power engineers behind the exciting new technologies that are essential to constructing a national Smart Grid.

  3. Medical devices utilizing optical fibers for simultaneous power, communications and control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fitch, Joseph P.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Hagans, Karla G.; Lee, Abraham P.; Krulevitch, Peter; Benett, William J.; Clough, Robert E.; DaSilva, Luiz B.; Celliers, Peter M.

    2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical device is constructed in the basic form of a catheter having a distal end for insertion into and manipulation within a body and a proximal end providing for a user to control the manipulation of the distal end within the body. A fiberoptic cable is disposed within the catheter and having a distal end proximate to the distal end of the catheter and a proximal end for external coupling of laser light energy. A laser-light-to-mechanical-power converter is connected to receive light from the distal end of the fiber optic cable and may include a photo-voltaic cell and an electromechanical motor or a heat-sensitive photo-thermal material. An electronic sensor is connected to receive electrical power from said distal end of the fiberoptic cable and is connected to provide signal information about a particular physical environment and communicated externally through the fiberoptic cable to the proximal end thereof. A mechanical sensor is attached to the distal end of the fiberoptic cable and connected to provide light signal information about a particular physical environment and communicated externally through the fiberoptic cable.

  4. ORNL 2010-G01087/chj UT-B ID 200701895

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    involve ramped magnetic or oscillating magnetic fields or require that the HTS wire carry alternating Applications ·· HTS wire/cable in electric grids ·· Fault current limiters ·· HTS dynamic synchronous significant reduction of energy losses in demanding high temperature superconductor (HTS) applications

  5. An Economic Analysis of the Kilauea Geothermal Development and Inter-Island Cable Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study by NEA completed in April 1987 shows that a large scale (500 MW) geothermal development on the big island of Hawaii and the inter-island power transmission cable is economically infeasible. This updated report, utilizing additional information available since 1987, reaches the same conclusion: (1) The state estimate of $1.7 billion for development cost of the geothermal project is low and extremely optimistic. more realistic development costs are shown to be in the range of $3.4 to $4.3 billion and could go as high as $4.6 billion. (2) Compared to alternative sources of power generation, geothermal can be 1.7 to 2.4 times as costly as oil, and 1.2 to 1.7 times as costly as a solar/oil generating system. (3) yearly operation and maintenance costs for the large scale geothermal project are estimated to be 44.7 million, 72% greater than a solar/oil generating system. (4) Over a 40-year period ratepayers could pay, on average, between 1.3 (17.2%) and 2.4 cents (33%) per kWh per year more for electricity produced by geothermal than they are currently paying (even with oil prices stabilizing at $45 per barrel in 2010). (5) A comparable solar/oil thermal energy development project is technologically feasible, could be island specific, and would cost 20% to 40% less than the proposed geothermal development. (6) Conservation is the cheapest alternative of all, can significantly reduce demand, and provides the greatest return to ratepayers. There are better options than geothermal. Before the State commits the people of Hawaii to future indebtedness and unnecessary electricity rate increases, more specific study should be conducted on the economic feasibility, timing, and magnitude of the geothermal project. The California experience at The Geyers points up the fact that it can be a very risky and disappointing proposition. The state should demand that proponents and developers provide specific answers to geothermals troubling questions before they make an irreversible commitment to it. The state should also more carefully assess the potential risks and hazards of volcanic disturbances, the degree of environmental damage that could occur, the future demand for electricity, and the potential of supplying electricity from alternative energy sources, conservation and small scale power units. As they stated in the April 1987 study, to move ahead with rapid large scale geothermal development on Hawaii without thoroughly studying these aspects of its development is ill-advised and economically unsound.

  6. Pulse Cable for TESLA Modulators Hans-Jrg Eckoldt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the radiation inside the TESLA tunnel and the accessibility of the units the power part of the modulators shall be installed into the service halls. However the transformer tank and the klystrons have to be inside ..........................................................................................................................8 #12;1 Introduction Modulators are used to generate the pulsed power for the klystrons

  7. Federal Power Act section 202(c) - Cross-Sound Cable Company, August 2002 |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOnSTATEMENT OF DAVIDThe data dashboardAof Energy December

  8. Federal Power Act section 202(c) - Cross-Sound Cable Company, August 2003 |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOnSTATEMENT OF DAVIDThe data dashboardAof Energy

  9. 30 IEEE power & energy magazine july/august 2004 by Massoud Amin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Kingdom, and Italy in 2003 underscored electricity infrastructure's vulnerabilities. This vital yet for reliable and disturbance-free electricity. The massive power outages in the United States, Canada, United and finance depend on the robustness of electric power, cable, and wireless telecommunications. Transportation

  10. Waltz Mill testing of 765-kV paper-polypropylene-paper (PPP) cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burghardt, R.R. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Ruffs Dale, PA (United States))

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 765-kV PPP-insulated cable was subjected to a 27-month accelerated life test program at the EPRI Waltz Mill Cable Test Facility. Testing started in August 1981 and was successfully completed in January 1985. The program included conductor temperatures ranging from 85{degree}C to 105{degree}C and line-to-line voltages from 800 kV to 1050 kV. Cyclic testing was performed during 20 of the 27 months. Dissipation factor measurements were made throughout the program. The measurements indicated no deterioration of the cable or splices as a consequence of the high temperatures and voltages applied to them in this test program.

  11. The University of Texas at Austin September 30, 2011 Communications Optical Fiber Backbone Cabling 27 13 23-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Clint N.

    The University of Texas at Austin September 30, 2011 Communications Optical Fiber Backbone Cabling 27 13 23-1 SECTION 27 13 23 COMMUNICATIONS OPTICAL FIBER BACKBONE CABLING PART 1 - GENERAL 1.1 SUMMARY A. This section shall govern the products and installation of optical fiber (single

  12. Economics of PPP-insulated pipe-type cable: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, A.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study has been designed to establish the economic range of application and the potential cost advantage of PPP-insulated pipe-type cable compared with presently utilized paper-insulated designs. The study is in two parts. In the first part the electrical and thermal characteristics of a range of cable sizes are tabulated. This data can be utilized for planning and economic comparison purposes. In the second part 12 transmission load scenarios are studied to determine the relative cost of various designs considering materials, installation and the losses over a wide range of assumptions.

  13. Regulatory instrument review: Aging management of LWR cables, containment and basemat, reactor coolant pumps, and motor-operated valves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werry, E.V.; Somasundaram, S.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of Stage 2 of the Regulatory Instrument Review are presented in this volume. Selected regulatory instruments, such as the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Regulatory Guides, and ASME Codes, were investigated to determine the extent to which these regulations apply aging management to selected safety-related components in nuclear power plants. The Regulatory Instrument Review was funded by the NRC under the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. Stage 2 of the review focused on four safety-related structures and components; namely, cables, containment and basemat, reactor coolant pumps, and motor-operated valves. The review suggests that the primary-emphasis of the regulatory instruments was on the design, construction, start-up, and operation of a nuclear power plant, and that aging issues were primarily addressed after an aging-related problem was recognized. This Stage 2 review confirms the results of the prior review; (see Regulatory Instrument Review: Management of Aging of LWR Major Safety-Related Components NUREG/CR-5490. The observations indicate that the regulations generally address management of age-related degradation indirectly. Specific age-related degradation phenomena frequently are dealt with in bulletins and notices or through generic issues, letters, etc. The major recommendation of this report, therefore, is that the regulatory instruments should more directly and explicitly address the aging phenomenon and the management of the age-related degradation process.

  14. Superconductivity for electric systems program plan, FY 1996--FY 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This describes a comprehensive, integrated approach for the development of HTS (high-temperature superconductivity) technology for cost-effective use in electric power applications. This approach supports the program`s mission: to develop the technology that could lead to industrial commercialization of HTS electric power applications, such as fault-current limiters, motors, generators, transmission cables, superinductors, and superconducting energy storage. The vision is that, by 2010, the US power systems equipment industry will regain a major share of the global market by offering superconducting products that outperform the competition; and in US, the power grid will gain increased efficiency and stability by incorporating many kinds of HTS devices. After an overview and a discussion of the program plan (wires, systems technology, partnership initiative), this document discusses technology status, stakeholders, and the role of US DOE.

  15. SEMIACTIVE DAMPING OF CABLES WITH SAG E.A. Johnson,1 R.E. Christenson,2 and B.F. Spencer, Jr.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Erik A.

    damping, cable galloping, rain-wind induced vibration, cable sag, structural control INTRODUCTION Cables by vortex shedding, wake-induced oscillation, and iced and ice-free galloping. Fatigue of the transmission lines near clamps or masses (such as aircraft warning spheres) is the principal effect of conductor

  16. Power Factor Reactive Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    motor power: 117.7 V x 5.1 A = 600 W? = 0.6 kW? NOT the power measured by meter #12;Page 9 PSERC: displacement power factor: angle between voltage and current = 0 degrees pf = cos(0 degrees) = 1.0 true powerPage 1 PSERC Power Factor and Reactive Power Ward Jewell Wichita State University Power Systems

  17. Analysis Framework for Cooperating Mobile Cable Robots Xiaobo Zhou, Chin Pei Tang and Venkat Krovi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260 USA xzhou9 energy consumption, ease of assembly/disassembly and reconfiguration. Cooperative payload manipulation design and analysis of cooperative mobile cable robots, building upon knowledge base of multi

  18. Engineering in the service of science; construction of a cabled ocean observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Engineering in the service of science; construction of a cabled ocean observatory Mr. Peter Phibbs for maintenance can quickly make a system uneconomic. Peter Phibbs was project manager for the $75M construction ocean observatory, and went into operation fifteen months ago. The infrastructure demonstrates not only

  19. DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION IN A BENCHMARK CABLE-STAYED BRIDGE USING THE INTERPOLATION METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION IN A BENCHMARK CABLE-STAYED BRIDGE USING THE INTERPOLATION METHOD Marco mariagiuseppina.limongelli@polimi.it ABSTRACT In this paper the damage localization algorithm based on Operational Deformed Shapes (ODS) and known as Interpolation Damage Detection Method (IDDM), is applied

  20. State of the art analysis of online fault location on AC cables in underground transmission systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    on transmission level fault location methods have been focused on overhead lines. Because of the very different- termine the fault location. Because only one end meas- urements are used, the algorithm is derived usingState of the art analysis of online fault location on AC cables in underground transmission systems

  1. On the use of doped polyethylene as an insulating material for HVDC cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, M.S. [Sultan Qaboos Univ., Muscat (Oman)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The merits of HVDC cables with polymeric insulation are well recognized. However, the development of such cables is still hampered due to the problems resulting from the complicated dependence of the electrical conductivity of the polymer on the temperature and the dc electric field and the effects of space charge accumulation in this material. Different methods have been suggested to solve these problems yet none of these methods seem to give a conclusive solution. The present report provides, firstly a critical review of the previous works reported in the literature concerning the development of HVDC cables with polymeric insulation. Different aspects of those works are examined and discussed. Secondly, an account is given on an investigation using low density polyethylene (LDPE) doped with an inorganic additive as a candidate insulating material for HVDC cables. Preliminary results from measurements of dc breakdown strength and insulation resistivity of both the undoped and the doped materials are presented. It is shown that the incorporation of an inorganic additive into LDPE has improved the performance of the doped material under polarity reversal dc conditions at room temperature. Moreover, the dependency of the insulation resistivity on temperature for the doped material appears to be beneficially modified.

  2. INTERMODAL RESONANCE OF IN-PLANE FREE VIBRATIONS OF SUSPENDED CABLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rienstra, Sjoerd W.

    -elastic instability is known as galloping [1­16]. For high enough amplitudes neighbouring conductors may get close, The Netherlands E-mail: S.W.Rienstra@tue.nl Keywords: Vibrating suspended cables, galloping, resonance, Lindstedt values right at this resonance will delay or hinder the occurrence of galloping. 1. INTRODUCTION Overhead

  3. Identification of Contradictory Patterns in Experimental Datasets for the Development of Models for Electrical Cables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for Electrical Cables Diagnostics P. Baraldi1 , M. Compare1 , E. Zio1,2,* , M. de Nigris3 , G. Rizzi3 1 Energy thousands of PD patterns recorded by a software tool that processes the PD measurements when these hal, Availability, Maintainability, and Risk Management of International Journal of Performability Engineering 7, 1

  4. Feasibility study of Nb3Al Rutherford cable for high field accelerator magnet application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, R.; /Fermilab; Kikuchi, A.; /Tsukuba Magnet Lab.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Cooper, C.; Feher, S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.; Novitski, I.; /Fermilab; Takeuchi, T.; /Tsukuba Magnet Lab.; Tartaglia, M.; Turrioni, D.; /Fermilab; Verweij, A.P.; /CERN; Wake, M.; Willering, G; /Tsukuba Magnet Lab.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feasibility study of Cu stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al strand and Rutherford cable for the application to high field accelerator magnets are being done at Fermilab in collaboration with NIMS. The Nb{sub 3}Al strand, which was developed and manufactured at NIMS in Japan, has a non-copper Jc of about 844 A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2 K, a copper content of 50%, and filament size of about 50 microns. Rutherford cables with 27 Nb{sub 3}Al strands of 1.03 mm diameter were fabricated and tested. Quench tests on a short cable were done to study its stability with only its self field, utilizing a high current transformer. A pair of 2 meter long Nb{sub 3}Al cables was tested extensively at CERN at 4.3 and 1.9 K up to 11 Tesla including its self field with a high transport current of 20.2 kA. In the low field test we observed instability near splices and in the central region. This is related to the flux-jump like behavior, because of excessive amount of Nb in the Nb{sub 3}Al strand. There is possibility that the Nb in Nb{sub 3}Al can cause instability below 2 Tesla field regions. We need further investigation on this problem. Above 8 Tesla, we observed quenches near the critical surface at fast ramp rate from 1000 to 3000 A/sec, with quench velocity over 100 m/sec. A small racetrack magnet was made using a 14 m of Rutherford cable and successfully tested up to 21.8 kA, corresponding to 8.7 T.

  5. New protection method for HVDC lines including cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeda, H.; Ayakawa, H.; Tsumenaga, N.; Sanpei, M.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the third project of the Hokkaido-Honshu HVDC Link in Japan, called the HVDC Link III project (rated at 250 kVdc-1,200 A-300 MW), the authors developed an HVDC transmission line protection method based on a new working principle that allows high-speed and highly sensitive detection of faults, enhancing reliability in the supply of electric power. In general, increasing the sensitivity of relays will lead to an increased likelihood of undesired operation whereas lowering the sensitivity will impair the responsiveness of the relays. The proposed method meets these apparently incompatible requirements very well. Basically classified as a differential scheme, the HVDC transmission line protection method compensates for a charging and discharging current that flows through the line-to-ground capacitance at times of voltage variations caused by a line fault or by the operation of dc power systems. The developed protection method is also characterized in that it uses current changes induced by voltage variations to restrain the operation of a relay. This configuration has made the proposed method far superior in responsiveness and sensitivity to the conventional protection method. A simulation using an EMTP (Electro-Magnetic Transients Program) was conducted on this method. Developed relay equipment embodying the new protection method was subjected to various verification tests, where this equipment was connected to a power system simulator, before being delivered to the HVDC Link III facility.

  6. Cryogenics Vision Workshop for High-Temperature Superconducting Electric Power Systems Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Energetics, Inc.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy's Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems sponsored the Cryogenics Vision Workshop, which was held on July 27, 1999 in Washington, D.C. This workshop was held in conjunction with the Program's Annual Peer Review meeting. Of the 175 people attending the peer review meeting, 31 were selected in advance to participate in the Cryogenics Vision Workshops discussions. The participants represented cryogenic equipment manufactures, industrial gas manufacturers and distributors, component suppliers, electric power equipment manufacturers (Superconductivity Partnership Initiative participants), electric utilities, federal agencies, national laboratories, and consulting firms. Critical factors were discussed that need to be considered in describing the successful future commercialization of cryogenic systems. Such systems will enable the widespread deployment of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) electric power equipment. Potential research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) activities and partnership opportunities for advancing suitable cryogenic systems were also discussed. The workshop agenda can be found in the following section of this report. Facilitated sessions were held to discuss the following specific focus topics: identifying Critical Factors that need to be included in a Cryogenics Vision for HTS Electric Power Systems (From the HTS equipment end-user perspective) identifying R and D Needs and Partnership Roles (From the cryogenic industry perspective) The findings of the facilitated Cryogenics Vision Workshop were then presented in a plenary session of the Annual Peer Review Meeting. Approximately 120 attendees participated in the afternoon plenary session. This large group heard summary reports from the workshop session leaders and then held a wrap-up session to discuss the findings, cross-cutting themes, and next steps. These summary reports are presented in this document. The ideas and suggestions raised during the Workshop will be used by the DOE Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems in preparing subsequent planning and strategy documents such as a Cryogenic Technology Development Roadmap.

  7. A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: Part 1. Engineering design and instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Seim, Thomas A.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Thronas, Aaron I.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Portland District started development of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS), a nonproprietary technology, in 2001 to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the 31 federal dams in the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Initial development focused on coded acoustic microtransmitters, and autonomous receivers that could be deployed in open reaches of the river for detection of the juvenile salmonids implanted with microtransmitters as they passed the autonomous receiver arrays. In 2006 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with development of an acoustic receiver system for deployment at hydropower facilities (cabled receiver) for detecting fish tagged with microtransmitters as well as tracking them in 2 or 3-dimensions as the fish passed at the facility for determining route of passage. The additional route of passage information, combined with survival estimates, is used by the dam operators and managers to make structural and operational changes at the hydropower facilities to improve survival of fish as they pass the facilities and through the FCRPS.

  8. Mira and her cables | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625DataNeutrino mode fitAdvisory Boardand her

  9. SITE ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.P. McCann

    1999-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Site Electrical Power System receives and distributes utility power to all North Portal site users. The major North Portal users are the Protected Area including the subsurface facility and Balance of Plant areas. The system is remotely monitored and controlled from the Surface Operations Monitoring and Control System. The system monitors power quality and provides the capability to transfer between Off-Site Utility and standby power (including dedicated safeguards and security power). Standby power is only distributed to selected loads for personnel safety and essential operations. Security power is only distributed to essential security operations. The standby safeguards and security power is independent from all other site power. The system also provides surface lighting, grounding grid, and lightning protection for the North Portal. The system distributes power during construction, operation, caretaker, and closure phases of the repository. The system consists of substation equipment (disconnect switches, breakers, transformers and grounding equipment) and power distribution cabling from substation to the north portal switch gear building. Additionally, the system includes subsurface facility substation (located on surface), switch-gear, standby diesel generators, underground duct banks, power cables and conduits, switch-gear building and associated distribution equipment for power distribution. Each area substation distributes power to the electrical loads and includes the site grounding, site lighting and lightning protection equipment. The site electrical power system distributes power of sufficient quantity and quality to meet users demands. The Site Electrical Power System interfaces with the North Portal surface systems requiring electrical power. The system interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical Distribution System which will supply power to the underground facilities from the North Portal. Power required for the South Portal and development side activities of the subsurface facility will be provided at the South Portal by the Subsurface Electrical Distribution System. The Site Electrical Power System interfaces with the Off-Site Utility System for the receipt of power. The System interfaces with the Surface Operations Monitoring and Control System for monitoring and control. The System interfaces with MGR Site Layout System for the physical location of equipment and power distribution.

  10. System solutions study on the fatigue of the fast cable-net structure caused by form-changing operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Peng; Qian, Lei; Yue, You-Ling

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST) is supported by a cable-net structure, whose change in form leads to a stress range of approximately 500MPa. This stress range is more than twice the standard authorized value. The cable-net structure is thus the most critical and fragile part of the FAST reflector system. In this study, we first search for a more appropriate deformation strategy that reduces the stress amplitude generated by the form-changing operation. Second, we roughly estimate the tracking trajectory of the telescope during its service life, and conduct an extensive numerical investigation to assess the fatigue resistance requirements. Finally, we develop a new type of steel cable system that meets that cable requirements for FAST construction.

  11. The U.S. cable television industry : the multi-service operator organizational structure as a bundle of competencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorthy, Satish K. (Satish Kumar)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States cable television industry is experiencing fierce competition from telephone companies and content providers, as well as new and possibly unknown entrants. As organizations in the industry are currently ...

  12. REQUEST BY INTERMAGNETICS GENERAL CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and tested HTS subsystems for generator, fault current controller, cables and transformers. Petitioner has a substantial financial investment directly related to the work to...

  13. Development of preference models for regular dissemination of informational and educational programming through cable television systems of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Larry Arnold

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of formats on the market today. Different manufacturers' equipment is not compatible, and often even equipment manufactured by the same company is not always compatible (9: I). Results of this study will reveal to the Texas cable industry the kinds...DEVELOPMENT OF PREFERENCE MODELS FOR REGULAR DISSEMINATION OF INFORMATIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING THROUGH CABLE TELEVISION SYSTEMS OF TEXAS A Thesis by LARRY ARNOLD QUINN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University...

  14. Design of Experiments to Determine Causes of Flex Cable Solder Wicking, Discoloration and Hole Location Defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, Larry

    2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Design of Experiments (DoE) were developed and performed in an effort to discover and resolve the causes of three different manufacturing issues; large panel voids after Hot Air Solder Leveling (HASL), cable hole locations out of tolerance after lamination and delamination/solder wicking around flat flex cable circuit lands after HASL. Results from a first DoE indicated large panel voids could be eliminated by removing the pre-HASL cleaning. It also revealed eliminating the pre-HASL bake would not be detrimental when using a hard press pad lamination stackup. A second DoE indicated a reduction in hard press pad stackup lamination pressure reduced panel stretch in the y axis approximately 70%. A third DoE illustrated increasing the pre-HASL bake temperature could reduce delamination/solder wicking when using a soft press pad lamination stackup.

  15. Superheated-steam test of ethylene propylene rubber cables using a simultaneous aging and accident environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, P.R.; St. Clair, S.D.; Gilmore, T.W.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The superheated-steam test exposed different ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) cables and insulation specimens to simultaneous aging and a 21-day simultaneous accident environment. In addition, some insulation specimens were exposed to five different aging conditions prior to the 21-day simultaneous accident simulation. The purpose of this superheated-steam test (a follow-on to the saturated-steam tests (NUREG/CR-3538)) was to: (1) examine electrical degradation of different configurations of EPR cables; (2) investigate differences between using superheated-steam or saturated-steam at the start of an accident simulation; (3) determine whether the aging technique used in the saturated-steam test induced artificial degradation; and (4) identify the constituents in EPR that affect moisture absorption.

  16. Final Report-MATERIALS, STRANDS, AND CABLES FOR SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR MAGNETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumption, Mike D [OSU; Collings, E W

    2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on Materials, Strands and Cables for High Energy Physics Particle accelerators. In the materials area, work has included studies of basic reactions, diffusion, transformations, and phase assemblage of Nb3Sn. These materials science aspects have been married to results, in the form of flux pinning, Bc2, Birr, and transport Jc, with an emphasis on obtaining the needed Jc for HEP needs. Attention has also been paid to the “intermediate-temperature superconductor”, magnesium diboride emphasis being placed on (i) irreversibility field enhancement, (ii) critical current density and flux pinning, and (iii) connectivity. We also report on studies of Bi-2212. The second area of the program has been in the area of “Strands” in which, aside from the materials aspect of the conductor, its physical properties and their influence on performance have been studied. Much of this work has been in the area of magnetization estimation and flux jump calculation and control. One of the areas of this work was strand instabilities in high-performance Nb3Sn conductors due to combined fields and currents. Additionally, we investigated quench and thermal propagation in YBCO coated conductors at low temperatures and high fields. The last section, “Cables”, focussed on interstrand contact resistance, ICR, it origins, control, and implications. Following on from earlier work in NbTi, the present work in Nb3Sn has aimed to make ICR intermediate between the two extremes of too little contact (no current sharing) and too much (large and unacceptable magnetization and associated beam de-focussing). Interstrand contact and current sharing measurements are being made on YBCO based Roebel cables using transport current methods. Finally, quench was investigated for YBCO cables and the magnets wound from them, presently with a focus on 50 T solenoids for muon collider applications.

  17. Fluid dynamics of supercritical hellium within cable-in-conduit conductors. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Sciver, S.W.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The enclosed report summarizes work carried out under DOE/MFE Support, during the past four years. Emphasis is placed on progress within the last year. Results of experiments on pressure drop and heat transfer within several Cable-in-Conduit Conductors are described. These results are compared to models for flow in similar geometrics. The work provides a basis for design of magnets using the CIC Conductor Concept.

  18. Fluid dynamics of supercritical hellium within cable-in-conduit conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Sciver, S.W.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The enclosed report summarizes work carried out under DOE/MFE Support, during the past four years. Emphasis is placed on progress within the last year. Results of experiments on pressure drop and heat transfer within several Cable-in-Conduit Conductors are described. These results are compared to models for flow in similar geometrics. The work provides a basis for design of magnets using the CIC Conductor Concept.

  19. Magnetization anomaly of Nb3Al strands and instability of Nb3Al Rutherford cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, Ryuji; /Fermilab; Kikuchi, Akihiro; /Tsukuba Magnet Lab; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a Cu stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al strand with Nb matrix, a 30 meter long Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable was made by a collaboration of Fermilab and NIMS. Recently the strand and cable were tested. In both cases instability was observed at around 1.5 Tesla. The magnetization of this Nb{sub 3}Al strand was measured first using a balanced coil magnetometer at 4.2 K. Strands showed an anomalously large magnetization behavior around at 1.6 T, which is much higher than the usual B{sub c2} {approx} 0.5 Tesla (4.2 K) of Nb matrix. This result is compared with the magnetization data of short strand samples using a SQUID magnetometer, in which a flux-jump signal was observed at 0.5 Tesla, but not at higher field. As a possible explanation for this magnetization anomaly, the interfilament coupling through the thin Nb films in the strands is suggested. The instability problem observed in low field tests of the Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cables is attributed to this effect.

  20. Summary Report of Cable Aging and Performance Data for Fiscal Year 2014.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celina, Mathias C.; Celina, Mathias C.; Redline, Erica Marie; Redline, Erica Marie; Bernstein, Robert; Bernstein, Robert; Quintana, Adam; Quintana, Adam; Giron, Nicholas Henry; Giron, Nicholas Henry; White II, Gregory Von; White II, Gregory Von

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, science - based engineering approaches were employed to address cable degradation behavior under a range of exposure environments. Experiments were conducted with the goal to provide best guidance for aged material states, remaining life and expected performance under specific conditions for a range of cable materials. Generic engineering tests , which focus on rapid accelerated aging and tensile elongation , were combined with complementar y methods from polymer degradation science. Sandia's approach, building on previous years' efforts, enabled the generation of some of the necessary data supporting the development of improved lifetime predictions models, which incorporate known material b ehaviors and feedback from field - returned 'aged' cable materials. Oxidation rate measurements have provided access to material behavior under low dose rate thermal conditions, where slow degradation is not apparent in mechanical property changes. Such da ta have shown aging kinetics consistent with established radiati on - thermal degradation models. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We gratefully acknowledge ongoing technical support at the LICA facility and extensive sample handling provided by Maryla Wasiolek and Don Hans on. Sam Durbin and Patrick Mattie are recognized for valuable guidance throughout the year and assistance in the preparation of the final report. Doug Brunson is appreciated for sample analysis, compilation and plotting of experimental data.

  1. Measured responses of internal enclosures and cables due to burnthrough penetration of weapon cases by lightning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnetzer, G.H.; Fisher, R.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dinallo, M.A. [Quatro Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrical effects of lightning penetration of the outer case of a weapon on internal structures, such as a firing set housing, and on samples of a flat, flexline detonator cable have been investigated experimentally. Maximum open-circuit voltages measured on either simulated structures (126 V) or the cable (46 V) located directly behind the point of penetration were well below any level that is foreseen to create a threat to nuclear safety. On the other hand, it was found that once full burnthrough of the barrier occurred, significant fractions of the incident continuing currents coupled to both the simulated internal structure (up to 300 A) or to the cable sample (69 A) when each was electrically connected internally to case ground. No occurrence was observed of the injection of large amplitude currents from return strokes occurring after barrier penetration. Under circumstances in which small volumes of trapped gases exist behind penetration sites, rapid heating of the gas by return strokes occurring after burnthrough has been shown to produced large mechanical impulses to the adjacent surfaces.

  2. Fabrication and test of a racetrack magnet using pre-reacted Nb3Sn cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorgio Ambrosio et al.

    2002-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A racetrack magnet, using Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting cable reacted before winding, has been fabricated and tested at Fermilab. It consists of two flat racetrack coils, connected in a common-coil configuration, separated by a 5 mm thick fiberglass plate. Synthetic oil was used to prevent sintering of the strands during the heat treatment. The coils were wound and vacuum impregnated in the mechanical structure. The turn-to-turn insulation, consisting of Kapton{reg_sign}and pre-impregnated fiberglass tapes as wide as the cable, was wound together with the bare cable in order to form a continuous inter-turn spacer. The coils were instrumented with voltage taps, temperature sensors, spot heaters and quench heaters. The maximum current achieved was 12675 A which is 78% of the short sample limit at 5.1 K (minimum temperature in the coil during 75 A/s ramp). Measurement of the temperature margin revealed a low degradation in the innermost turns. Quench performances at different temperatures and ramp rate effects have been measured and are presented and discussed.

  3. Power Plant Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

  4. Variable Frequency Operations of an Offshore Wind Power Plant with HVDC-VSC: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.; Singh, M.; Muljadi, E.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a constant Volt/Hz operation applied to the Type 1 wind turbine generator. Various control aspects of Type 1 generators at the plant level and at the turbine level will be investigated. Based on DOE study, wind power generation may reach 330 GW by 2030 at the level of penetration of 20% of the total energy production. From this amount of wind power, 54 GW of wind power will be generated at offshore wind power plants. The deployment of offshore wind power plants requires power transmission from the plant to the load center inland. Since this power transmission requires submarine cable, there is a need to use High-Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission. Otherwise, if the power is transmitted via alternating current, the reactive power generated by the cable capacitance may cause an excessive over voltage in the middle of the transmission distance which requires unnecessary oversized cable voltage breakdown capability. The use of HVDC is usually required for transmission distance longer than 50 kilometers of submarine cables to be economical. The use of HVDC brings another advantage; it is capable of operating at variable frequency. The inland substation will be operated to 60 Hz synched with the grid, the offshore substation can be operated at variable frequency, thus allowing the wind power plant to be operated at constant Volt/Hz. In this paper, a constant Volt/Hz operation applied to the Type 1 wind turbine generator. Various control aspects of Type 1 generators at the plant level and at the turbine level will be investigated.

  5. Proposal for the award of a service contract covering the supply, installation and testing of optical fibre cabling systems on the CERN site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a service contract covering the supply, installation and testing of optical fibre cabling systems on the CERN site

  6. Proposal to negotiate an amendment to a blanket purchase contract for the supply and installation of water-cooled bus bars and cables for the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal to negotiate an amendment to a blanket purchase contract for the supply and installation of water-cooled bus bars and cables for the LHC

  7. Trigger LVL1 "Tower Builder" Add: Cables transmission of fast pulses for: The level 1 calorimeter-trigger in ATLAS (sent on 24-01-1995)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascual, J

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trigger LVL1 "Tower Builder" Add: Cables transmission of fast pulses for: The level 1 calorimeter-trigger in ATLAS (sent on 24-01-1995)

  8. Impurities in extruded cables: A proton-induced x-ray emission diagnostic study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crine, J.P.; Hinrichsen, P.F.; Houdayer, A. (Institut de Recherche d'Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, PQ (Canada))

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impurity contents and distributions in electrical trees grown in various field-aged XLPE distribution cables were measured by micro-Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). The objectives pursued in this preliminary study were the following. Determination of any possible correlation between electrical tree initiation and the nature of some specific impurities. Evaluation of micro-PIXE as a reliable analytical technique to measure impurities in localized defects, such as small trees. For that purpose we used the micro-PIXE facility of the Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire at University of Montreal where proton beams of {approx}20 microns can be focused on small samples. From the emitted x-rays, it is possible to determine the nature and content of most impurities (whose content is above {approx}1 ppM). Cable samples with electrical trees grown either from insulation shield or from water trees were analyzed. A few field-aged cable samples containing breakdown channels of various sizes were also analyzed. The aim here was to determine whether impurities could still be detected after breakdown. The observations made can be summarized as follows: the electrical trees studied were heavily contaminated by a wide variety of impurities; electrical trees contain the same impurities as the connecting water trees and the amounts are about the same in both types of trees; provided that the energy released during breakdown is not too high, that is as long as breakdown channels remain small; the minimum level of contamination leading to tree growth is difficult to ascertain; no clear correlation can be established between the nature of impurities and electrical tree initiation; it cannot be determined whether contamination leads to tree initiation or whether contamination follows tree growth; and micro-PIXE is well suited to study impurities in electrical (and water) trees. 20 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Laboratory testing of repellents to prevent nutria damage to seismic cable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunn, Scott Jeter

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1980 ABSTRACT Laboratory Testing of Repellents to Prevent Nutr1a Damage to Seismic Cable. (August 1980) Scott Jeter Gunn, B. S. , University of Arkansas at Little Rock Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. David J. Schm1dly Five chemical and one... commonly used in repellent testing. The fourth variable, referred to as fa11ure time, was found to be useful in wire testing situations and has not been previously reported. The data show a lack of repellent action by any of the chemicals tested...

  10. Experimental Investigation of the Fresnel Drag Effect in RF Coaxial Cables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T Cahill; David Brotherton

    2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment that confirms the Fresnel drag formalism in RF coaxial cables is reported. The Fresnel `drag' in bulk dielectrics and in optical fibers has previously been well established. An explanation for this formalism is given, and it is shown that there is no actual drag phenomenon, rather that the Fresnel drag effect is merely the consequence of a simplified description of EM scattering within a dielectric in motion wrt the dynamical 3-space. The Fresnel drag effect plays a critical role in the design of various light-speed anisotropy detectors.

  11. O.A.R. 734-055 - Pole Lines, Buried Cables, Pipe lines, Signs, Misc.

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence SeedNunn, Colorado:Cables | Open5-015 Jump

  12. ag-clad bi-2223 superconductors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: The powering of the LHC machine requires more than 1000 High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) current leads. These leads contain, at their cold end, HTS conductors made...

  13. Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mekhiche, Mike [Principal Investigator] [Principal Investigator; Downie, Bruce [Project Manager] [Project Manager

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean wave power can be a significant source of large?scale, renewable energy for the US electrical grid. The Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) conservatively estimated that 20% of all US electricity could be generated by wave energy. Ocean Power Technologies, Inc. (OPT), with funding from private sources and the US Navy, developed the PowerBuoy? to generate renewable energy from the readily available power in ocean waves. OPT's PowerBuoy converts the energy in ocean waves to electricity using the rise and fall of waves to move the buoy up and down (mechanical stroking) which drives an electric generator. This electricity is then conditioned and transmitted ashore as high?voltage power via underwater cable. OPT's wave power generation system includes sophisticated techniques to automatically tune the system for efficient conversion of random wave energy into low cost green electricity, for disconnecting the system in large waves for hardware safety and protection, and for automatically restoring operation when wave conditions normalize. As the first utility scale wave power project in the US, the Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, OR, will consist of 10 PowerBuoys located 2.5 miles off the coast. This U.S. Department of Energy Grant funding along with funding from PNGC Power, an Oregon?based electric power cooperative, was utilized for the design completion, fabrication, assembly and factory testing of the first PowerBuoy for the Reedsport project. At this time, the design and fabrication of this first PowerBuoy and factory testing of the power take?off subsystem are complete; additionally the power take?off subsystem has been successfully integrated into the spar.

  14. Measurement of low radioactivity background in a high voltage cable by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vacri, M. L. di; Nisi, S.; Balata, M. [Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Chemistry Service, SS 17bis km 18.910, 67100 Assergi (Aq) (Italy)] [Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Chemistry Service, SS 17bis km 18.910, 67100 Assergi (Aq) (Italy)

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of naturally occurring low level radioactivity background in a high voltage (HV) cable by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR ICP MS) is presented in this work. The measurements were performed at the Chemistry Service of the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. The contributions to the radioactive background coming from the different components of the heterogeneous material were separated. Based on the mass fraction of the cable, the whole contamination was calculated. The HR ICP MS results were cross-checked by gamma ray spectroscopy analysis that was performed at the low background facility STELLA (Sub Terranean Low Level Assay) of the LNGS underground lab using HPGe detectors.

  15. Preliminary photovoltaic arc-fault prognostic tests using sacrificial fiber optic cabling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jay; Blemel, Kenneth D. [Sentient Business Systems, Inc., Albuquerque, NM; Peter, Francis [Sentient Business Systems, Inc., Albuquerque, NM

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program, Sandia National Laboratories worked with Sentient Business Systems, Inc. to develop and test a novel photovoltaic (PV) arc-fault detection system. The system operates by pairing translucent polymeric fiber optic sensors with electrical circuitry so that any external abrasion to the system or internal heating causes the fiber optic connection to fail or detectably degrade. A periodic pulse of light is sent through the optical path using a transmitter-receiver pair. If the receiver does not detect the pulse, an alarm is sounded and the PV system can be de-energized. This technology has the unique ability to prognostically determine impending failures to the electrical system in two ways: (a) the optical connection is severed prior to physical abrasion or cutting of PV DC electrical conductors, and (b) the polymeric fiber optic cable melts via Joule heating before an arc-fault is established through corrosion. Three arc-faults were created in different configurations found in PV systems with the integrated fiber optic system to determine the feasibility of the technology. In each case, the fiber optic cable was broken and the system annunciated the fault.

  16. FEMCAM Analysis of SULTAN Test Results for ITER Nb3SN Cable-conduit Conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuhu Zhai, Pierluigi Bruzzone, Ciro Calzolaio

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance degradation due to filament fracture of Nb3 Sn cable-in-conduit conductors (CICCs) is a critical issue in large-scale magnet designs such as ITER which is currently being constructed in the South of France. The critical current observed in most SULTAN TF CICC samples is significantly lower than expected and the voltage-current characteristic is seen to have a much broader transition from a single strand to the CICC. Moreover, most conductors exhibit the irreversible degradation due to filament fracture and strain relaxation under electromagnetic cyclic loading. With recent success in monitoring thermal strain distribution and its evolution under the electromagnetic cyclic loading from in situ measurement of critical temperature, we apply FEMCAM which includes strand filament breakage and local current sharing effects to SULTAN tested CICCs to study Nb3 Sn strain sensitivity and irreversible performance degradation. FEMCAM combines the thermal bending effect during cool down and the EM bending effect due to locally accumulating Lorentz force during magnet operation. It also includes strand filament fracture and related local current sharing for the calculation of cable n value. In this paper, we model continuous performance degradation under EM cyclic loading based on strain relaxation and the transition broadening upon cyclic loading to the extreme cases seen in SULTAN test data to better quantify conductor performance degradation.

  17. Multipoint Pressure and Temperature Sensing Fiber Optic Cable for Monitoring CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Challener, William

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work completed on contract DE-FE0010116. The goal of this two year project was to develop and demonstrate in the laboratory a highly accurate multi-point pressure measurement fiber optic cable based on MEMS pressure sensors suitable for downhole deployment in a CO2 sequestration well. The sensor interrogator was also to be demonstrated in a remote monitoring system and environmental testing was to be completed to indicate its downhole survivability over a lengthy period of time (e.g., 20 years). An interrogator system based on a pulsed laser excitation was shown to be capable of multiple (potentially 100+) simultaneous sensor measurements. Two sensors packages were completed and spliced in a cable onto the same fiber and measured. One sensor package was subsequently measured at high temperatures and pressures in supercritical CO2, while the other package was measured prior and after being subjected to high torque stresses to mimic downhole deployment. The environmental and stress tests indicated areas in which the package design should be further improved.

  18. Critical Current Test Facilities for LHC Superconducting NbTi Cable Strands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutboul, T; Denarié, C H; Oberli, L R; Richter, D

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rutherford-type superconducting Cu/NbTi cables of the LHC accelerator are currently mass-produced by a few industrial firms. As a part of the acceptance tests, the critical current of superconducting multifilamentary wires is systematically measured on virgin strands to qualify the wires and on extracted strands to qualify the cables. For this purpose, four test stations are in operation at CERN to measure the critical current of strands at both 4.2 K and 1.9 K in magnetic fields in the 6-11 T range. The measurement setup and procedures of these facilities are reported in this article. The quality of the critical current test is guaranteed by supervising the SPC (Statistical Process Control) charts of a reference sample. The measurement repeatability and reproducibility of the stations are found to be excellent. Moreover, the measured critical current of a strand is found to be almost independent of the test station in which the measurement is performed.

  19. Discovery and Characterization of a Cell-Permeable, Small-Molecule c-Abl Kinase Activator that Binds to the Myristoyl Binding Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jingsong; Campobasso, Nino; Biju, Mangatt P.; Fisher, Kelly; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Cottom, Josh; Galbraith, Sarah; Ho, Thau; Zhang, Hong; Hong, Xuan; Ward, Paris; Hofmann, Glenn; Siegfried, Brett; Zappacosta, Francesca; Washio, Yoshiaki; Cao, Ping; Qu, Junya; Bertrand, Sophie; Wang, Da-Yuan; Head, Martha S.; Li, Hu; Moores, Sheri; Lai, Zhihong; Johanson, Kyung; Burton, George; Erickson-Miller, Connie; Simpson, Graham; Tummino, Peter; Copeland, Robert A.; Oliff, Allen (GSKPA)

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    c-Abl kinase activity is regulated by a unique mechanism involving the formation of an autoinhibited conformation in which the N-terminal myristoyl group binds intramolecularly to the myristoyl binding site on the kinase domain and induces the bending of the {alpha}I helix that creates a docking surface for the SH2 domain. Here, we report a small-molecule c-Abl activator, DPH, that displays potent enzymatic and cellular activity in stimulating c-Abl activation. Structural analyses indicate that DPH binds to the myristoyl binding site and prevents the formation of the bent conformation of the {alpha}I helix through steric hindrance, a mode of action distinct from the previously identified allosteric c-Abl inhibitor, GNF-2, that also binds to the myristoyl binding site. DPH represents the first cell-permeable, small-molecule tool compound for c-Abl activation.

  20. Progress in scale-up of second-generation high-temperature superconductors at SuperPower Inc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    ­431 (2005) 849­857 www.elsevier.com/locate/physc #12;Keywords: Second-generation HTS wire; Coated conductors. Introduction Second-generation (2-G) high-temperature superconductor (HTS) wires are referred as the YBa2Cu3Ox (YBCO)-type superconducting films coated conductors while first-generation (1-G) HTS wires as Bi

  1. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR REACT AND WIND COMMON COIL MAGNETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ramesh

    Temperature Superconductors (HTS) or Nb3Sn cables provide new challenges with respect to the design: The inner bobbin the wire is wound on, the coil winding process, insulation integrity, epoxy vacuum application of reacted HTS and Nb3Sn cables. For practical reasons, the rapid turnaround program forces

  2. Superconducting Magnet Division Mike Harrison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Large Hadron Collider Program

    compensation with wires is also under active R&D at CERN). This also helps the triplets a little with centered-Showa-BNL) · Performance needs to increase by ~ factor of 3 from today HTS cable before and after winding in DCC008 & DCC Winding NOT disastrously large degradation despite extremly large bending strain (~1%) in HTS cable

  3. Instruments aboard the ship, the Pacific Storm, ping sound waves toward the cable. The oceanographer's eyes flicker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.

    Instruments aboard the ship, the Pacific Storm, ping sound waves toward the cable-pound Humboldt squid, and the sound waves, set at 38 kilohertz, bounce off the squid. An image shows up, and it attacks the tethered animal. The oceanographer screams. Fade to black. Seeing with Sound "Actually, I

  4. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF NICKEL HYDRIDE By J. W. CABLE, E. O. WOLLAN, and W. C. KOEHLER,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    460. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF NICKEL HYDRIDE By J. W. CABLE, E. O. WOLLAN, and W. C. KOEHLER, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Résumé. 2014 L'hydrure de nickel est cubique à faces centrées. H occupe les sites octaédriques avec un rapport H/Ni égal à 0,6 ± 0,1. Abstract. 2014 Nickel

  5. Research and Development Roadmaps for Nondestructive Evaluation of Cables, Concrete, Reactor Pressure Vessels, and Piping Fatique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL] [ORNL; Bakhtiari, Sasan [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL] [ORNL; Simmons, Kevin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Coble, Jamie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Brenchley, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Meyer, Ryan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To address these research needs, the MAaD Pathway supported a series of workshops in the summer of 2012 for the purpose of developing R&D roadmaps for enhancing the use of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) technologies and methodologies for detecting aging and degradation of materials and predicting the remaining useful life. The workshops were conducted to assess requirements and technical gaps related to applications of NDE for cables, concrete, reactor pressure vessels (RPV), and piping fatigue for extended reactor life. An overview of the outcomes of the workshops is presented here. Details of the workshop outcomes and proposed R&D also are available in the R&D roadmap documents cited in the bibliography and are available on the LWRS Program website (http://www.inl.gov/lwrs).

  6. Circuit bridging of digital equipment caused by smoke from a cable fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, T.J.; Anderson, D.J.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced reactor systems are likely to use protection systems with digital electronics that ideally should be resistant to environmental hazards, including smoke from possible cable fires. Previous smoke tests have shown that digital safety systems can fail even at relatively low levels of smoke density and that short-term failures are likely to be caused by circuit bridging. Experiments were performed to examine these failures, with a focus on component packaging and protection schemes. Circuit bridging, which causes increased leakage currents and arcs, was gauged by measuring leakage currents among the leads of component packages. The resistance among circuit leads typically varies over a wide range, depending on the nature of the circuitry between the pins, bias conditions, circuit board material, etc. Resistance between leads can be as low as 20 k{Omega} and still be good, depending on the component. For these tests, the authors chose a printed circuit board and components that normally have an interlead resistance above 10{sup 12} {Omega}, but if the circuit is exposed to smoke, circuit bridging causes the resistance to fall below 10{sup 3} {Omega}. Plated-through-hole (PTH) and surface-mounted (SMT) packages were exposed to a series of different smoke environments using a mixture of environmentally qualified cables for fuel. Conformal coatings and enclosures were tested as circuit protection methods. High fuel levels, high humidity, and high flaming burns were the conditions most likely to cause circuit bridging. The inexpensive conformal coating that was tested - an acrylic spray - reduced leakage currents, but enclosure in a chassis with a fan did not. PTH packages were more resistant to smoke-induced circuit bridging than SMT packages. Active components failed most often in tests where the leakage currents were high, but failure did not always accompany high leakage currents.

  7. Standby power consumption in U.S. residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, W.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    {open_quotes}Leaking electricity{close_quotes} is the electricity consumed by appliances while they are switched {open_quotes}off{close_quote} or not performing their principal function. Leaking electricity represents approximately 5 % of U.S. residential electricity. This is a relatively new phenomenon and is a result of proliferation of electronic equipment in homes. The standby losses in TVs, VCRs, compact audio systems, and cable boxes account for almost 40% of all leaking electricity. There is a wide range in standby losses in each appliance group. For example, standby losses in compact audio systems range from 2.1 to 28.6 W, even though their features are identical. In some cases, leaking electricity while switched off was only slightly less than energy consumption in the on mode. New features in these appliances may greatly increase leaking electricity, such as electronic program guides in TVs and cable boxes. In the standby mode, these new features require many extra components energized to permit the downloading of information. Several techniques are available to cut standby losses, most without using any new technologies. Simple redesign of circuits to avoid energizing unused components appears to save the most energy. A separate power supply, precisely designed for the actual power needed, is another solution. A switch mode power supply can substitute for the less efficient linear power supply. Switch mode power supplies cut no-load and standby losses by 60-80%. The combination of these techniques can cut leaking electricity by greater than 75%.

  8. Automatic HTS force measurement instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, Scott T. (Valparaiso, IN); Niemann, Ralph C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for measuring the levitation force of a high temperature superconductor sample with respect to a reference magnet includes a receptacle for holding several high temperature superconductor samples each cooled to superconducting temperature. A rotatable carousel successively locates a selected one of the high temperature superconductor samples in registry with the reference magnet. Mechanism varies the distance between one of the high temperature superconductor samples and the reference magnet, and a sensor measures levitation force of the sample as a function of the distance between the reference magnet and the sample. A method is also disclosed.

  9. Automatic HTS force measurement instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, S.T.; Niemann, R.C.

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is disclosed for measuring the levitation force of a high temperature superconductor sample with respect to a reference magnet includes a receptacle for holding several high temperature superconductor samples each cooled to superconducting temperature. A rotatable carousel successively locates a selected one of the high temperature superconductor samples in registry with the reference magnet. Mechanism varies the distance between one of the high temperature superconductor samples and the reference magnet, and a sensor measures levitation force of the sample as a function of the distance between the reference magnet and the sample. A method is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  10. Wireless Power Transfer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the demand for EV rises. For vehicles that operate over a fixed route such as busses and shuttle vehicles, Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) means that a smaller battery pack can be used. In the traditional system, the battery pack is designed to accommodate the needs of the entire route or shift. With WPT the battery can be downsized because it can be charged when the vehicle stops on its route (a rental car shuttle bus, for example, can charge when it waits in the terminal and again when it waits at the rental car place. Thus the battery only needs enough charge to get to the next stop. This decrease in battery size means significant cost savings to electrify the vehicle. This technology enables efficient "opportunity charging stations" for predefined routes and planned stops reducing down time. Charging can occur in minutes. This improvement also eliminates the harmful emissions that occur in garages while buses are at idle during charging. In larger cities, dynamic charging offers an even greater impact utilizing existing infrastructure. As vehicles travel along busy freeways and interstate systems, wireless charging can occur while the vehicle is in motion. With this technology a vehicle essentially has unlimited electric range while using a relatively small battery pack. In-motion charging stations use vehicle sensors to alert the driver. Traveling at normal speeds, sensors establish in-motion charging. WPT transmit pads sequentially energize to the negotiated power level based on vehicle speed and its requested charging energy. Lower power when vehicle speed is slow and much higher power for faster moving vehicles. Vehicle to Infrastructure communications (V2I) coordinates WPT charging level according to on-board battery pack state-of-charge. V2I activates the roadway transmit pads placing them in standby mode and negotiates charging fee based on prevailing grid rate and vehicle energy demand. Dynamic charging would allow electricity to supply a very large fraction of the energy for the transportation sector and reduce greatly petroleum consump

  11. Wireless Power Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the demand for EV rises. For vehicles that operate over a fixed route such as busses and shuttle vehicles, Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) means that a smaller battery pack can be used. In the traditional system, the battery pack is designed to accommodate the needs of the entire route or shift. With WPT the battery can be downsized because it can be charged when the vehicle stops on its route (a rental car shuttle bus, for example, can charge when it waits in the terminal and again when it waits at the rental car place. Thus the battery only needs enough charge to get to the next stop. This decrease in battery size means significant cost savings to electrify the vehicle. This technology enables efficient "opportunity charging stations" for predefined routes and planned stops reducing down time. Charging can occur in minutes. This improvement also eliminates the harmful emissions that occur in garages while buses are at idle during charging. In larger cities, dynamic charging offers an even greater impact utilizing existing infrastructure. As vehicles travel along busy freeways and interstate systems, wireless charging can occur while the vehicle is in motion. With this technology a vehicle essentially has unlimited electric range while using a relatively small battery pack. In-motion charging stations use vehicle sensors to alert the driver. Traveling at normal speeds, sensors establish in-motion charging. WPT transmit pads sequentially energize to the negotiated power level based on vehicle speed and its requested charging energy. Lower power when vehicle speed is slow and much higher power for faster moving vehicles. Vehicle to Infrastructure communications (V2I) coordinates WPT charging level according to on-board battery pack state-of-charge. V2I activates the roadway transmit pads placing them in standby mode and negotiates charging fee based on prevailing grid rate and vehicle energy demand. Dynamic charging would allow electricity to supply a very large fraction of the energy for the transportation sector and reduce greatly petroleum consump

  12. Proposal for the Award of a Blanket Contract for the Supply and Installation of Optical Fibre Cabling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document concerns the award of a blanket contract for the supply and installation of optical fibre cabling systems. Following a market survey carried out among 41 firms in thirteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-3120/ST/LHC) was sent on 26 February 2003 to three firms and two consortia each consisting of two firms, in six Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received five tenders from the three firms and two consortia in six Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a blanket contract with DRAKA (NL), the lowest bidder, for the supply and installation of optical fibre cabling systems for a total estimated amount not exceeding 12 150 000 Swiss francs, subject to revision for inflation from 1 January 2006. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: NL - 38%; CH - 37%; DE - 12%; FR - 8%; GB - 5%.

  13. INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - PORTER-CABLE CIRCULAR SAW OENHP: 2001-04, VERSION A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Florida International University's (FIU) Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) evaluated five saws for their effectiveness in cutting specially prepared fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. These crates were built as surrogates for crates that presently hold radioactively contaminated glove boxes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos facility. The Porter-Cable circular saw was assessed on August 15-16, 2001 (Porter-Cable No.1 and Porter-Cable No.2, respectively). During the FIU test of efficacy, a team from the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) evaluated the occupational safety and health issues associated with this technology. The Porter-Cable saw is a straightforward machine for cutting wood of varying thickness. The blade is fully guarded with a fixed upper and a lower retractable guard. The lower guard retracts as the blade engages the work piece. The unit is operated with an on/off guarded trigger switch and is supported with a handgrip mounted near the front of the saw. The saw is equipped with a directional nozzle, which aims sawdust away from the operator and the line of cut. An optional vacuum system, attached to the directional nozzle, is used to remove and collect dust. During the demonstration of Porter-Cable No.1, personal noise sampling indicated that one worker was under and one was at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Action Level of 85 decibels (dBA) with time-weighted averages (TWA's) of 82.7 and 84.6 dBA, respectively. During the demonstration of Porter-Cable No.2, however, both workers did exceed the Action Level with TWA's of 89.7 and 90.0 dBA. These data are not entirely representative as they were gathered during a simulation and not at the actual worksite. Additional sampling should be conducted on-site, but the workers should wear hearing protection until it is determined that it is no longer necessary. The total nuisance dust sample for Porter-Cable No.1 was 3.53 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m{sup 3}), which is lower than the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 15 mg/m{sup 3} and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of 10 mg/m{sup 3}. Porter-Cable No.2's nuisance dust results yielded a value of 22.05 mg/m{sup 3}, which is over the PEL and TLV. The fiber analysis for the first demonstration yielded 12.9 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cc), which is much higher than the PEL of 1 f/cc. Galson Laboratories considered the fiber analysis for the second demonstration void due to the overloading of dust on the filter. Kickback, the sudden reaction to a pinched blade, is possible with this saw and could cause the saw to lift up and out of the work piece and toward the operator. Proper work position and firm control of the saw minimizes the potential for a sprain or strain. Care needs to be exercised to support the work piece properly and to not force the tool.

  14. Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supplyof Superconducting 600 A Multi-Conductor Cable for the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply of 25 450 metres of superconducting 600 A multi-conductor cable for the LHC. Following a market survey carried out among 55 firms in fourteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-3140/LHC/LHC) was sent on 6 January 2003 to seven firms in six Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received five tenders from five firms in four Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with HEW-KABEL (DE), the lowest bidder, for the supply of 25 450 metres of superconducting 600 A multi-conductor cable for a total amount of 800 796 euros (1 174 704 Swiss francs), not subject to revision, with options for additional purchases of up to a further 5% of superconducting multi-conductor cable for an amount not exceeding 40 040 euros (58 735 Swiss francs), not subject to revision, bringing the total amount to 840 836 euros (1 233 439 Swiss francs), not subject to revision. The rate of exchange used is that stipulated in ...

  15. Radar-based dynamic testing of the cable-suspended bridge crossing the Ebro River at Amposta, Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentile, Carmelo [Politecnico di Milano, Dept. of Architecture, Built environment and Construction engineering (ABC), Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Luzi, Guido [Centre Tecnòlogic de Telecomunicacions de Catalunya (CTTC), Division of Geomatics, Av. Gauss, 7 E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave remote sensing is the most recent experimental methodology suitable to the non-contact measurement of deflections on large structures, in static or dynamic conditions. After a brief description of the radar measurement system, the paper addresses the application of microwave remote sensing to ambient vibration testing of a cable-suspended bridge. The investigated bridge crosses the Ebro River at Amposta, Spain and consists of two steel stiffening trusses and a series of equally spaced steel floor beams; the main span is supported by inclined stay cables and two series of 8 suspension cables. The dynamic tests were performed in operational conditions, with the sensor being placed in two different positions so that the response of both the steel deck and the arrays of suspension elements was measured. The experimental investigation confirms the simplicity of use of the radar and the accuracy of the results provided by the microwave remote sensing as well as the issues often met in the clear localization of measurement points.

  16. Anode-cathode power distribution systems and methods of using the same for electrochemical reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koehl, Eugene R; Barnes, Laurel A; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Williamson, Mark A; Willit, James L

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Power distribution systems are useable in electrolytic reduction systems and include several cathode and anode assembly electrical contacts that permit flexible modular assembly numbers and placement in standardized connection configurations. Electrical contacts may be arranged at any position where assembly contact is desired. Electrical power may be provided via power cables attached to seating assemblies of the electrical contacts. Cathode and anode assembly electrical contacts may provide electrical power at any desired levels. Pairs of anode and cathode assembly electrical contacts may provide equal and opposite electrical power; different cathode assembly electrical contacts may provide different levels of electrical power to a same or different modular cathode assembly. Electrical systems may be used with an electrolyte container into which the modular cathode and anode assemblies extend and are supported above, with the modular cathode and anode assemblies mechanically and electrically connecting to the respective contacts in power distribution systems.

  17. Development of 230-kV high-pressure, gas-filled, pipe-type cable system: Model test program phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silver, D.A. (Pirelli Cable Corp., Florham Park, NJ (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was the development of a 230 kV high-pressure gas-filled (HPGF) pipe-type cable employing paper or laminate of paper-polypropylene-paper (PPP) insulation pressurized with N{sub 2} gas or a blend of 15% SF{sub 6}/85% N{sub 2} gas. Heretofore, HPGF pipe-type cables have been restricted to 138 kV ratings due to technical difficulties in achieving higher voltage ratings. In view of the high cost of manufacturing and testing a large number of full size cables, cable models with 2 mm (80 mils) and 2.5 mm (100 mils) wall thicknesses of insulation enclosed in a test fixture capable of withstanding a test pressure of 2070 kPa (300 psig) and high electrical stresses were employed for dissipation factor versus voltage measurements and for ac and impulse breakdown tests at rated and emergency operating temperatures. In addition, a 36 cm (14 in) full wall cable model enclosed in a pressure vessel was utilized for transient pressure response tests. The results of this investigation attest tot he technical feasibility of the design and manufacture of a 230 kV HPGF pipe-type cable employing paper or PPP insulation pressurized with 100% N{sub 2} gas or a blend of 15% SF{sub 6}/85% N{sub 2} gas for operation under normal and 100 hour emergency conditions at conductor temperatures of 85{degree} and 105{degree}C, respectively. The manufacture of a full size PPP insulated cable pressurized with a blend of 15% SF{sub 6}/85% N{sub 2} gas employing pre-impregnated PPP insulating tapes and an annular conductor based on the design stresses defined in this report is recommended for laboratory evaluation and extended life tests. 11 refs., 45 figs., 11 tabs.

  18. Thermal hydraulic characteristics study of prototype NET and CEA cable-in-conduit conductors (CICCs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maekawa, Ryuji

    1995-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal hydraulic characteristics of low temperature helium in a Cable-in-Conduit Conductor (CICC) significantly affects the overall design and performance of the associated large scale superconducting magnet system. It is essential to understand the transient and steady state behavior of the helium in the conductor. Throughout the development of CICCs, the reduction of flow impedance has been one of the key factors to improving the overall pressure drop. The newly developed CICC for the ITER project has a hybrid cooling scheme: a central channel that is surrounded by bundles, for which the thermal hydraulic characteristics are not well understood. This thesis describes an experimental and analytical investigation of thermal hydraulic characteristics of low temperature helium in conventional and hybrid CICCS. Pressure drop measurements for both NET and CEA conductors have been conducted, using low temperature helium and liquid nitrogen to obtain a range of Reynolds numbers. The results are correlated with classical friction factor and Reynolds number analysis. The flow impedance reduction of the CEA conductor is described by measures of a developed flow model. Thermally induced flow in the CEA conductor has been studied with an inductive heating method. The induced velocity in the central channel is measured by a Pitot tube with steady state Reynolds number up to {approximately}7000. The transient pressure wave propagation has been recorded with pressure transducers placed equally along the conductor. The supercritical helium temperature in the central channel has been measured with the thermometer probe. However, the reduction of the central channel area significantly affects the overall thermal hydraulic characteristics of the conductor. The results suggest the importance of the central channel. A transient heat transfer experiment studied the.transverse heat transfer mechanism in the CEA conductor. The temperatures in the central channel and bundle region were measured with different sized heat pulses. The results are discussed in terms of a heat transfer model which is based upon the communication of the helium in the central channel and bundle.

  19. Biological investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, R.M.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides results of a comprehensive biological field survey performed on the Sandia National Laboratories Aerial Cable Facility, at the east end of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB), Bernalillo County, New Mexico. This survey was conducted late September through October, 1991. ACF occupies a 440-acre tract of land withdrawn by the US Forest Service (USFS) for use by KAFB, and in turn placed under operational control of SNL by the Department of Energy (DOE). All land used by SNL for ACF is part of a 15,851-acre tract of land withdrawn by the US Forest Service. In addition, a number of different organizations use the 15,851-acre area. The project area used by SNL encompasses portions of approximately six sections (3,840 acres) of US Forest Service land located within the foothills of the west side of the Manzano Mountains (East Mesa). The biological study area is used by the KAFB, the US Department of Interior, and SNL. This area includes: (1) Sol se Mete Springs and Canyon, (2) East Anchor Access Road, (3) East Anchor Site, (4) Rocket Sled Track, (5) North Arena, (6) East Instrumentation Site and Access Road, (7) West Anchor Access Road, (8) West Anchor Site, (9) South Arena, (10) Winch Sites, (11) West Instrumentation Sites, (12) Explosive Assembly Building, (13) Control Building, (14) Lurance Canyon Road and vicinity. Although portions of approximately 960 acres of withdrawn US Forest Service land have been altered, only 700 acres have been disturbed by activities associated with ACF; approximately 2,880 acres consist of natural habitat. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative lack of human disturbance have allowed this area to remain in a more natural vegetative state relative to the condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found on ACF, as well as a comprehensive assessment of biological habitats.

  20. Develop and test an internally cooled, cabled superconductor (ICCS) for large scale MHD magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marston, P.G.; Hale, J.R.; Dawson, A.M.

    1990-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The work conducted under DOE/PETC Contract DE-AC22-84PC70512 has included four principal tasks, (1) development of a Design Requirements Definition for a retrofit MHD magnet system, (2) analysis of an internally cooled, cabled superconductor (ICCS) to use in that design, (3) design of an experiment to test a subscale version of that conductor, which is a NbTi, copper stabilized superconductor, and (4) proof-of-concept testing of the conductor. The program was carried forth through the third task with very successful development and test of a conventional ICCS conductor with 27 multifilamentary copper-superconductor composite strands and a new concept conductor in which, in each triplet, two strands were pure copper and the third strand was a multifilamentary composite. In reviewing the magnet design and the premises for the conductor design it became obvious that, since the principal source of perturbation in MHD magnets derives from slippage between coils, or between turns in a coil, thereby producing frictional heat which must flow through the conductor sheath and the helium to the superconductor strands, an extra barrier might be highly effective in enhancing magnet stability and protection. This concept was developed and a sample conductor manufactured and tested in comparison with an identical conductor lacking such an additional barrier. Results of these conductor tests confirm the potential value of such a barrier. As the work of tasks 1 through 3 has been reported in detail in quarterly and semiannual reports, as well as in special reports prepared throughout the course of this project, this report reviews early work briefly and then discusses this last phase in great detail. 8 refs., 36 figs.

  1. Prefire identification for pulse power systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Longmire, Jerry L. (Los Alamos, NM); Thuot, Michael E. (Espanola, NM); Warren, David S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prefires in a high-power, high-frequency, multi-stage pulse generator are detected by a system having an EMI shielded pulse timing transmitter associated with and tailored to each stage of the pulse generator. Each pulse timing transmitter upon detection of a pulse triggers a laser diode to send an optical signal through a high frequency fiber optic cable to a pulse timing receiver which converts the optical signal to an electrical pulse. The electrical pulses from all pulse timing receivers are fed through an OR circuit to start a time interval measuring device and each electrical pulse is used to stop an individual channel in the measuring device thereby recording the firing sequence of the multi-stage pulse generator.

  2. A low power 12-bit ADC for nuclear instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adachi, R.; Landis, D.; Madden, N. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Silver, E.; LeGros, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low power, successive approximation, analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for low rate, low cost, battery powered applications is described. The ADC is based on a commercial 50 mW successive approximation CMOS device (CS5102). An on-chip self-calibration circuit reduces the inherent differential nonlinearity to 7%. A further reduction of the differential nonlinearity to 0.5% is attained with a four bit Gatti function. The Gatti function is distributed to minimize battery power consumption. All analog functions reside with the ADC while the noisy digital functions reside in the personal computer based histogramming memory. Fiber optic cables carry afl digital information between the ADC and the personal computer based histogramming memory.

  3. OPTIMIZATION OF CURRENT LEADS COOLED BY NATURAL CONVECTION OF VAPOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Ho-Myung

    to HTS power systems where liquid nitrogen is continuously refrigerated by a cryocooler. The design and at the same time to employ a cryocooler for continuous operation. HTS transformers, HTS fault current limiters is constructed with non-metallic materials as in HTS transformers [2,3]. The leads in these cryostats are located

  4. The effects of aging on the fire vulnerability of nuclear power plant components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowlen, S.P.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, has initiated an effort to identify and investigate potential nuclear power plant fire safety issues associated with plant aging. The issues of potential concern, which have been identified are the effects of aging on (1) the vulnerability of electrical equipment to fire induced damage; (2) the propensity with which electrical equipment will initiate, or contribute to the severity of, fires; and (3) the integrity of passive fire protection features. Efforts in this program were initiated late in fiscal year 1988. For fiscal year 1989 efforts will focus on the investigation of the effects of aging on cable damageability and cable flammability. This paper presents the findings of a limited review of past electrical equipment fire aging research and a summary of planned activities for fiscal year 1989. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Joints and terminations for pipe-type cable insulated with paper-polypropylene-paper tapes: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelhardt, J.S.; Ernst, A.; Gear, R.B.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work developed optimized joint and terminal options for 138--550 kV paper-polypropylene-paper (PPP) cables using conventional materials. In the process, the state of the art of conventional jointing and terminating techniques worldwide was examined and a design process formulated and presented. Test data available on hand-taped joints suggested a maximum radial design stress level of 1750 V/mil at impulse for hand-taped PPP splices. Additional testing is recommended to confirm the maximum axial stress level, but available data indicate that levels much greater than present US practice are acceptable. 86 refs., 78 figs., 16 tabs.

  6. Doubly Fed Induction Generator in an Offshore Wind Power Plant Operated at Rated V/Hz: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces the concept of constant Volt/Hz operation of offshore wind power plants. The deployment of offshore WPPs requires power transmission from the plant to the load center inland. Since this power transmission requires submarine cables, there is a need to use High-Voltage Direct Current transmission, which is economical for transmission distances longer than 50 kilometers. In the concept presented here, the onshore substation is operated at 60 Hz synced with the grid, and the offshore substation is operated at variable frequency and voltage, thus allowing the WPP to be operated at constant Volt/Hz.

  7. Design modifications, fabrication and test of HFDB-03 racetrack magnet wound with pre-reacted Nb3Sn Rutherford cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorgio Ambrosio et al.

    2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A 10 T racetrack magnet (HFDB-03) wound with pre-reacted Nb{sub 3}Sn Rutherford cable has been fabricated and tested at Fermilab. This magnet is the third one in a proof-of-principle series for the use of the React-and-Wind technology in common-coil dipole magnets for future accelerators. It consists of two flat racetrack coils (28 turns each) separated by 5 mm. The maximum field on the coil, at the short sample limit of 16530 A, is 10 tesla. The cable has 41 strands with 0.7 mm diameter and the minimum bend radius in the magnet ends is 90 mm. The predecessor of this magnet (HFDB-02) reached 78% of the short sample limit at 7.7 T. The mechanical design was improved and the fabrication procedure was slightly modified in order to address possible causes of limitation. In this paper we present the mechanical design and analysis of HFDB-03, the modifications to the fabrication procedure and the test results.

  8. Nuclear Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilhena and Bardo E.J. Bodmann Carbon-#1;? in Terrestrial and Aquatic Environment of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant: Sources of Production, Releases and Dose Estimates #3;?? Jonas Mazeika Impact of radionuclide discharges from Temel?n Nuclear Power... (chapter 5), ? Instrumentation and control (chapter 6), ? Diagnostics (chapter 7), ? Safety evaluation methods (chapters 6, 8, 9 and 10), ? Environment and nuclear power plants (chapters 11 - 15), ? Human factors (chapter 16), ? Software development...

  9. Power LCAT

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Drennen, Thomas

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    POWER LCAT is a software tool used to compare elements of efficiency, cost, and environmental effects between different sources of energy.

  10. Power LCAT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drennen, Thomas

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    POWER LCAT is a software tool used to compare elements of efficiency, cost, and environmental effects between different sources of energy.

  11. Power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hickam, Christopher Dale (Glasford, IL)

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A power system includes a prime mover, a transmission, and a fluid coupler having a selectively engageable lockup clutch. The fluid coupler may be drivingly connected between the prime mover and the transmission. Additionally, the power system may include a motor/generator drivingly connected to at least one of the prime mover and the transmission. The power-system may also include power-system controls configured to execute a control method. The control method may include selecting one of a plurality of modes of operation of the power system. Additionally, the control method may include controlling the operating state of the lockup clutch dependent upon the mode of operation selected. The control method may also include controlling the operating state of the motor/generator dependent upon the mode of operation selected.

  12. Research and Development Roadmaps for Nondestructive Evaluation of Cables, Concrete, Reactor Pressure Vessels, and Piping Fatigue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Dwight A.; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Smith, Cyrus M.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coble, Jamie B.; Brenchley, David L.; Meyer, Ryan M.

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation Pathway is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting long-term environmental degradation behavior of materials in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on systems, structures, and components is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e., service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enabled by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of systems, structures, and components degradation.

  13. aerospace power systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Location, Smart Cables, Neutral and Ground, Corrosion and Protection, Conventional Transformers, Compact Transformers, Ferroresonance, and Solid State Transformers. Mario...

  14. Strathclyde powerS ahead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Strathclyde powerS ahead the future of renewable energy SHARING AND ENHANCING RESEARCH Discover the vision of Principal Professor Jim McDonald THE FUTURE OF ENERGY Strathclyde pioneers renewableEdicinE Snapshot the reSearcher Following a decade of environmental research in her native egypt, nabila saleem

  15. Long Term Applications Received by DOE/FE to Export

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTerms Loan TermsLong Island HTS Power Cable

  16. Long Term Innovative Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTerms Loan TermsLong Island HTS Power CableLong

  17. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY SUPERPOWER, INC. FOR AN...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Corporation to design, build, install and test a long length, high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable system in the 34.5 kV underground distribution system in Albany, NY....

  18. Power combiner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Mobius; Ives, Robert Lawrence

    2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A power combiner for the combining of symmetric and asymmetric traveling wave energy comprises a feed waveguide having an input port and a launching port, a reflector for reflecting launched wave energy, and a final waveguide for the collection and transport of launched wave energy. The power combiner has a launching port for symmetrical waves which comprises a cylindrical section coaxial to the feed waveguide, and a launching port for asymmetric waves which comprises a sawtooth rotated about a central axis.

  19. Capricious Cables: Understanding the Key Concepts in Transmission Expansion Planning and Its Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donohoo, P.; Milligan, M.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extra-high-voltage transmission network is the bulk transport network of the electric power system. To understand how the future power system may react to planning decisions today, wide-area transmission models are increasingly used to aid decision makers and stakeholders. The goal of this work is to illuminate these models for a broader audience that may include policy makers or relative newcomers to the field of transmission planning. This paper explains the basic transmission expansion planning model formulation. It highlights six of the major simplifications made in transmission expansion planning models and the resulting need to contextualize model results using knowledge from other models and knowledge not captured in the modeling process.

  20. Cleco Power- Power Miser New Home Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Louisiana's Cleco Power offers energy efficiency incentives to eligible customers. Cleco Power offers a rate discount for residential customers building homes that meet the Power Miser Program...

  1. On the way to creating a system of distant power supply for space vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prisniakov, V.F.; Lyagushin, S.F.; Statsenko, I.N. [Dniepropetrovsk State Univ. (Ukraine)] [Dniepropetrovsk State Univ. (Ukraine); Dranovsky, V.I. [Design Enterprise `Pivdenne`, Dniepropetrovsk (Ukraine)] [Design Enterprise `Pivdenne`, Dniepropetrovsk (Ukraine)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar energy is the most suitable basis for power supply for the majority of projects in the near-Earth space. Passing on to the large-scale space-based systems of power supply requires putting into life demonstration experiments in which power transmission by electromagnetic emission is supposed. In the paper the expedience of developing an autonomous power module which provides the possibility of space programs with great power consumption and wireless transmission system running-up is proved. Ukraine can design a solar power satellite of 10-20kW power on the basis of the research satellite AUOS-SM. Two variants of design solutions for such satellite with solar arrays of great area are presented. Power transmission to the space vehicle-consumer can be conducted by cable as well as in a wireless way. The possibilities of placing microwave and laser energy transmission systems on board the satellite are analysed. It is shown that a power supply system for space vehicles with transmission distance of thousands km can be designed basing on modern lasers. Some experiments making use of great electric power generated by the plant of the satellite under consideration are proposed. The running-up of electric thrusters which are necessary for orientation and distancing is of great interest. Wireless power transmission may be carried on to a small satellite equipped with electric thrusters. 26 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Electrical Cable Testing by Pulse-Arrested Spark Discharge (PASD) - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater Use Goal 4:Administration826

  3. Lightweight Superconducting Cables for use with High-Field Magnets and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us countLighting Sign InMilitary

  4. Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation The power factor (PF) is defined as the ratio between the active power and the apparent power of a system. If the current and voltage are periodic with period , and [ ), then the active power is defined by ( ) ( ) (their inner product

  5. Star Power

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  6. Star Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  7. Power applications of high-temperature superconductivity: Variable speed motors, current switches, and energy storage for end use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawsey, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Banerjee, B.B.; Grant, P.M. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to conduct joint research and development activities related to certain electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity (HTS). The new superconductors may allow development of an energy-efficient switch to control current to variable speed motors, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, and other power conversion equipment. Motor types that were considered include induction, permanent magnet, and superconducting ac motors. Because it is impractical to experimentally alter certain key design elements in radial-gap motors, experiments were conducted on an axial field superconducting motor prototype using 4 NbTi magnets. Superconducting magnetic energy storage technology with 0.25--5 kWh stored energy was studied as a viable solution to short duration voltage sag problems on the customer side of the electric meter. The technical performance characteristics of the device wee assembled, along with competing technologies such as active power line conditioners with storage, battery-based uninterruptible power supplies, and supercapacitors, and the market potential for SMES was defined. Four reports were prepared summarizing the results of the project.

  8. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAM JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps.

  9. Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AC power that you get from your electric company into the DC power consumed by most electronics, including your computer. We expect our power supplies to be safe, reliable, and...

  10. Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win 2014 Public Power Wind Awards Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win 2014 Public Power Wind...

  11. Proposal for the Award of a Blanket Contract for theSupply of Multi-Core Signalling and Data-Transmission Cables for the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document concerns the award of a blanket contract for the supply of multi-core signalling and data-transmission cables for the LHC. Following a market survey carried out among 55 firms in fifteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-3128/SPL) was sent on 5 March 2003 to 15 firms in five Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received seven tenders from seven firms in three Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a blanket contract with DRAKA MULTIMEDIA CABLE (DE), the lowest bidder, for the supply of multi-core signalling and data-transmission cables for a total amount not exceeding 895 000 euros (1 300 000 Swiss francs) subject to revision according to London Metal Exchange (LME) copper prices. The rate of exchange used is that stipulated in the tender. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: DE - 100%.

  12. Tidal power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammons, T.J. (Glasgow Univ., Scotland (United Kingdom))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews the physics of tidal power considering gravitational effects of moon and sun; semidiurnal, diurnal, and mixed tides; and major periodic components that affect the tidal range. Shelving, funneling, reflection, and resonance phenomena that have a significant effect on tidal range are also discussed. The paper then examines tidal energy resource for principal developments estimated from parametric modeling in Europe and worldwide. Basic parameters that govern the design of tidal power schemes in terms of mean tidal range and surface area of the enclosed basin are identified. While energy extracted is proportional to the tidal amplitude squared, requisite sluicing are is proportional to the square root of the tidal amplitude. Sites with large tidal amplitudes are therefore best suited for tidal power developments, whereas sites with low tidal amplitudes have sluicing that may be prohibitive. It is shown that 48% of the European tidal resource is in the United Kingdom, 42% in France and 8% in Ireland, other countries having negligible potential. Worldwide tidal resource is identified. Tidal barrage design and construction using caissons is examined, as are alternative operating modes (single-action generation, outflow generation, flood generation, two-way generation, twin basin generation, pumping, etc), development trends and possibilities, generation cost at the barrage boundary, sensitivity to discount rates, general economics, and markets. Environmental effects, and institutional constraints to the development of tidal barrage schemes are also discussed.

  13. Literature review of environmental qualification of safety-related electric cables: Literature analysis and appendices. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lofaro, R.; Bowerman, B.; Carbonaro, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the US NRC Environmental Qualification (EQ) Research Program, a literature review was performed to identify past relevant work that could be used to help fully or partially resolve issues of interest related to the qualification of low-voltage electric cable. A summary of the literature reviewed is documented in Volume 1 of this report. In this, Volume 2 of the report, dossiers are presented which document the issues selected for investigation in this program, along with recommendations for future work to resolve the issues, when necessary. The dossiers are based on an analysis of the literature reviewed, as well as expert opinions. This analysis includes a critical review of the information available from past and ongoing work in thirteen specific areas related to EQ. The analysis for each area focuses on one or more questions which must be answered to consider a particular issue resolved. Results of the analysis are presented, along with recommendations for future work. The analysis is documented in the form of a dossier for each of the areas analyzed.

  14. Performance of extended surface from a cryocooler for subcooling liquid nitrogen by natural convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Ho-Myung

    of cryocooling systems for HTS power devices without any forced circulation of liquid nitrogen. Since the cold for the HTS (high temperature superconductor) power devices over the past several years since liquid nitrogen et al. [3] have proposed a new cryo- genic concept for HTS transformer, operating in the range of 63

  15. Wind power and Wind power and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind power and the CDM #12; Wind power and the CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power 2005 Jyoti P. Painuly, Niels-Erik Clausen, Jørgen Fenhann, Sami Kamel and Romeo Pacudan #12; WIND POWER AND THE CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power projects for the Clean Development Mechanism Energy

  16. Power Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, F.

    , will be the use of the ASTM Theoretical Steam Rate Tables. In addition, the author's experience regarding the minimum size for power recovery units that are economic in a Culf Coast plant will be presented. INTROD\\Jr.'rION When surveying an operation... will be discussed in detail. Each term in the equation will be considered in English units. Secondly, the use of Mollier diagrams to estimate the enthalphy change between the initial and final conditions will be considered. The last method, specific to steam...

  17. Yakama Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhatY-12 recognized for ...BER/NERSCYakama Power May

  18. Fusion Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFunding Opportunity fromFusion Links Fusion

  19. Microstructure dependence of the c-axis critical current density in second-generation YBCO tapes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Y.; Welp, U.; Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.; Malozemoff, A. P.; Rupich, M. W.; Fleshler, S.; Clem, J. R. (Materials Science Division); (American Superconductor Corp.); (Ames Lab.); (Iowa State Univ.)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C-axis current flow in high temperature superconductor (HTS) tape-shaped wires arises in configurations where the local wire axis is not perpendicular to the local magnetic field, such as in power cables with helically wound HTS tapes. The c-axis critical current density J{sub c}{sup c} has been recently found to be orders of magnitude lower than the ab-plane critical current density J{sub c}{sup ab}. Here we report on J{sub c}{sup c} (77 K, sf) values of various YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}-based (YBCO) tapes with different microstructures. Our results show that the value of J{sub c}{sup c} (77 K, sf) decreases significantly with increasing concentration of ab-plane stacking faults in YBCO thin films and that the critical current anisotropy {gamma} = J{sub c}{sup ab}/J{sub c}{sup c} can reach values as high as 2070, implying that in the highest-anisotropy tape, {approx}20% of the tape width carries c-axis current in a helically wound power cable.

  20. Microstructure dependence of the c-axis critical current density in second generation YBCO tapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Y. Welp, U. Crabtree, G.W.; Kwok, W.K.; Malozemoff, A.P.; Rupich, M.W.; Fleshler, S.; Clem, J.R.

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    C-axis current flow in high temperature superconductor (HTS) tape-shaped wires arises in configurations where the local wire axis is not perpendicular to the local magnetic field, such as in power cables with helically wound HTS tapes. The c-axis critical current density J{sub c}{sup c} has been recently found to be orders of magnitude lower than the ab-plane critical current density J{sub c}{sup ab}. Here we report on J{sub c}{sup c} (77 K, sf) values of various YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}-based (YBCO) tapes with different microstructures. Our results show that the value of J{sub c}{sup c} (77 K, sf) decreases significantly with increasing concentration of ab-plane stacking faults in YBCO thin films and that the critical current anisotropy {gamma} = J{sub c}{sup ab}/J{sub c}{sup c} can reach values as high as 2070, implying that in the highest-anisotropy tape, {approx}20% of the tape width carries c-axis current in a helically wound power cable.

  1. Power management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of managing power resources for an electrical system of a vehicle may include identifying enabled power sources from among a plurality of power sources in electrical communication with the electrical system and calculating a threshold power value for the enabled power sources. A total power load placed on the electrical system by one or more power consumers may be measured. If the total power load exceeds the threshold power value, then a determination may be made as to whether one or more additional power sources is available from among the plurality of power sources. At least one of the one or more additional power sources may be enabled, if available.

  2. Solar powered desalination system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008, uses concentrated solar power to split water. Figurethe main reason the potential for solar power is boundless.a clean energy source, solar power is inexhaustible, fairly

  3. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electric power generating plant, and the distributionrequired on the power-generating plant and not on the vehi-in either power-generating plants or combustion engines,

  4. Southwestern Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Courses Instructors NERC Continuing Education Power Operations Training Center You'll find the "Power" of learning at Southwestern's Power Operations Training Center (POTC). POTC's...

  5. Magnetic flux diffusion through HTS shields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Kai-Wai; Fan, C. X.; Havenhill, A. D.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Slow field leakage in a polycrystalline superconducting cupshield placed in an external axial field (H-ext) much weaker than H-C1 shows a diffusive time dependence with a time scale of 10(2) s. As the field strength increases but is still less than...

  6. Method of forming an HTS article

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Zhang, Xun; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming a superconducting article includes providing a substrate tape, forming a superconducting layer overlying the substrate tape, and depositing a capping layer overlying the superconducting layer. The capping layer includes a noble metal and has a thickness not greater than about 1.0 micron. The method further includes electrodepositing a stabilizer layer overlying the capping layer using a solution that is non-reactive to the superconducting layer. The superconducting layer has an as-formed critical current I.sub.C(AF) and a post-stabilized critical current I.sub.C(PS). The I.sub.C(PS) is at least about 95% of the I.sub.C(AF).

  7. POWER PURCHASE AGREEMENT DELMARVA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    POWER PURCHASE AGREEMENT between DELMARVA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY ("Buyer") and BLUEWATER WIND 3.5 Energy Forecasts, Scheduling and Balancing.......................................... 39 3

  8. Power oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gitsevich, Aleksandr (Montgomery Village, MD)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, and an impedance transformation network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to protect the input of the amplifier from a destructive feedback signal. One example of the oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  9. Prospects for the medium- and long-term development of China`s electric power industry and analysis of the potential market for superconductivity technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z. [Bob Lawrence and Associates, Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First of all, overall economic growth objectives in China are concisely and succinctly specified in this report. Secondly, this report presents a forecast of energy supply and demand for China`s economic growth for 2000--2050. In comparison with the capability of energy construction in China in the future, a gap between supply and demand is one of the important factors hindering the sustainable development of Chain`s economy. The electric power industry is one of China`s most important industries. To adopt energy efficiency through high technology and utilizing energy adequately is an important technological policy for the development of China`s electric power industry in the future. After briefly describing the achievements of China`s electric power industry, this report defines the target areas and policies for the development of hydroelectricity and nuclear electricity in the 2000s in China, presents the strategic position of China`s electric power industry as well as objectives and relevant plans of development for 2000--2050. This report finds that with the discovery of superconducting electricity, the discovery of new high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, and progress in materials techniques, the 21st century will be an era of superconductivity. Applications of superconductivity in the energy field, such as superconducting storage, superconducting transmission, superconducting transformers, superconducting motors, its application in Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD), as well as in nuclear fusion, has unique advantages. Its market prospects are quite promising. 12 figs.

  10. PERFORMANCE OF THE CONDUCTION-COOLED LDX LEVITATION COIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's (AMSC) Bi-2223 3-ply Narrow Wire. The transverse field component on the L-coil HTS, which is nearly-temperature superconductor (HTS) Bi-2223 for the L- coil minimizes the electrical and cooling power needed for levitation of commercially-available, 150-A HTS leads. An automatically filled liquid- nitrogen reservoir provides cooling

  11. Abstract--This paper describes a spreadsheet model for estimating the impact of High Temperature Supercon-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to project the following for the years 2000 to 2020: · Amount of HTS wire required, · Cost of Supercon- ducting (HTS) power devices on the national electric grid. The distribution of losses in the national grid is carefully traced and those losses that HTS can eliminate are identi- fied. The energy

  12. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD OF THE SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses: (1) being able to resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP); (2) determining if this system can reduce life costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improve the economics. In April 2003, a cooperative 50% cost share agreement between Enerdyne and the DOE was executed to investigate the feasibility of using cable suspended electric submersible pumps to reduce the life costs and increase the ultimate oil recovery of the Red Mountain Oil Field, located on the Chaco Slope of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. The field was discovered in 1934 and has produced approximately 55,650 cubic meters (m{sup 3}), (350,000 barrels, 42 gallons) of oil. Prior to April 2003, the field was producing only a few cubic meters of oil each month; however, the reservoir characteristics suggest that the field retains ample oil to be economic. This field is unique, in that, the oil accumulations, above fresh water, occur at depths from 88-305 meters, (290 feet to 1000 feet), and serves as a relatively good test area for this experiment.

  13. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pat Fort; Don L. Hanosh

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps. Resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain oil fields located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP), determine if this system can reduce lift costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improved the economics. Three Phases of work have been defined in the DOE Form 4600.1 Notice of Financial Assistance Award for this project, in which the project objectives are to be attained through a joint venture between Enerdyne LLC (Enerdyne), owner and operator of the fields and Pumping Solutions Inc. (PSI), developer of the submersible pumping system. Upon analysis of the results of each Phase, the DOE will determine if the results justify the continuation of the project and approve the next Phase to proceed or terminate the project and request that the wells be plugged. This topical report shall provide the DOE with Phase I results and conclusions reached by Enerdyne and PSI.

  14. Using Cable Suspended Submersible Pumps to Reduce Production Costs to Increase Ultimate Recovery in the Red Mountain Field of the San Juan Basin Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells, installing cable suspended submersible pumps ( Phase I ) and operating the oil field for approximately one year ( Phase II ). Upon the completion of Phases I and II ( Budget Period I ), Enerdyne LLC commenced work on Phase III which required additional drilling in an attempt to improve field economics ( Budget Period II ). The project was funded through a cooperative 50% cost sharing agreement between Enerdyne LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), United States Department of Energy, executed on April 16, 2003. The total estimated cost for the two Budget Periods, of the Agreement, was $1,205,008.00 as detailed in Phase I, II & III Authorization for Expenditures (AFE). This report describes tasks performed and results experienced by Enerdyne LLC during the three phases of the cooperative agreement.

  15. High Temperature Superconducting Cable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An integrated team from Southwire, ORNL and other industry partners will design, build and install a reliable · Introduction (David Lindsay, Southwire) ­ Overall SPI Goals & Objectives ­ Design Approach ­ Review FY 2003 and reliabilities. · SPI-2: Bixby Substation, AEP, Columbus, OH ­To complete a long length demonstration with AEP

  16. Flexible Cables & Proper Termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    .01 inch (0.25 mm). Many off-grid and some larger utility-interactive renewable energy systems use fine

  17. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY IGC-SUPERPOWER, LLC, FOR...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    above referenced cooperative agreement for the development and testing of HTS Power transformers in a typical electric power generation situation. The parties, as a matter of...

  18. LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates December 14, 2011 Mike Dunne LLNL #12;NIf-1111-23714.ppt LIFE power plant 2 #12;LIFE delivery timescale NIf-1111-23714.ppt 3 #12;Timely delivery is enabled dpa) § Removes ion threat and mitigates x-ray threat ­ allows simple steel piping § No need

  19. Electric Power Infrastructure Reliability and Security (EPIRS) Reseach and Development Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rick Meeker; L. Baldwin; Steinar Dale; Alexander Domijan; Davild Larbalestier; Hui Li; Peter McLaren; Sastry Pamidi; Horatio Rodrigo; Michael Steurer

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Power systems have become increasingly complex and face unprecedented challenges posed by population growth, climate change, national security issues, foreign energy dependence and an aging power infrastructure. Increased demand combined with increased economic and environmental constraints is forcing state, regional and national power grids to expand supply without the large safety and stability margins in generation and transmission capacity that have been the rule in the past. Deregulation, distributed generation, natural and man-made catastrophes and other causes serve to further challenge and complicate management of the electric power grid. To meet the challenges of the 21st century while also maintaining system reliability, the electric power grid must effectively integrate new and advanced technologies both in the actual equipment for energy conversion, transfer and use, and in the command, control, and communication systems by which effective and efficient operation of the system is orchestrated - in essence, the 'smart grid'. This evolution calls for advances in development, integration, analysis, and deployment approaches that ultimately seek to take into account, every step of the way, the dynamic behavior of the system, capturing critical effects due to interdependencies and interaction. This approach is necessary to better mitigate the risk of blackouts and other disruptions and to improve the flexibility and capacity of the grid. Building on prior Navy and Department of Energy investments in infrastructure and resources for electric power systems research, testing, modeling, and simulation at the Florida State University (FSU) Center for Advanced Power Systems (CAPS), this project has continued an initiative aimed at assuring reliable and secure grid operation through a more complete understanding and characterization of some of the key technologies that will be important in a modern electric system, while also fulfilling an education and outreach mission to provide future energy workforce talent and support the electric system stakeholder community. Building upon and extending portions of that research effort, this project has been focused in the following areas: (1) Building high-fidelity integrated power and controls hardware-in-the-loop research and development testbed capabilities (Figure 1). (2) Distributed Energy Resources Integration - (a) Testing Requirements and Methods for Fault Current Limiters, (b) Contributions to the Development of IEEE 1547.7, (c) Analysis of a STATCOM Application for Wind Resource Integration, (d) Development of a Grid-Interactive Inverter with Energy Storage Elements, (e) Simulation-Assisted Advancement of Microgrid Understanding and Applications; (3) Availability of High-Fidelity Dynamic Simulation Tools for Grid Disturbance Investigations; (4) HTS Material Characterization - (a) AC Loss Studies on High Temperature Superconductors, (b) Local Identification of Current-Limiting Mechanisms in Coated Conductors; (5) Cryogenic Dielectric Research; and (6) Workshops, education, and outreach.

  20. Solar powered desalination system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are many solar photovoltaic power plants internationally andUSA, Blythe, CA Solar electric power plant, Blythe USA, SanTX Blue Wing solar electric power plant USA, Jacksonville,

  1. Solar powered desalination system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the electrical power output to the solar power input), aSolar Energy Calculator using Google Maps 23 Table 1.24: PV System Power Production Average Daily Irradiance (kWh/m2) Instillation Efficiency Labeled Efficiency Output

  2. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 30, 2013, Santa Clara, CA 2 Outline * Introduction Power Electronics in Electric Drive Vehicles Automotive Power Electronics Module Operation Automotive...

  3. Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PROGRAM REVIEW 2013 Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power Principal Investigator: Prof. Gang Chen Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA...

  4. TVA- Green Power Providers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and participating power distributors of TVA power offer a performance-based incentive program to homeowners and businesses for the installation of renewable...

  5. Electrolytes for power sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytes are disclosed for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids. 7 figures.

  6. Electrolytes for power sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doddapaneni, Narayan (Albuquerque, NM); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytes for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids.

  7. Flex power perspectives of indirect power system control through...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    power perspectives of indirect power system control through dynamic power price (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Flex power perspectives of indirect...

  8. New Horizons Mission Powered by Space Radioisotope Power Systems...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New Horizons Mission Powered by Space Radioisotope Power Systems New Horizons Mission Powered by Space Radioisotope Power Systems January 30, 2008 - 6:47pm Addthis Artist's concept...

  9. 74 Home Power #31 October / November 1992 Code Corner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    turns to goo. It is unknown whether PV module wiring in wet climates provides the conditions necessary) will ensure that the cable meets the highest quality standards and will be the most durable product. Exposed of single conductor cable that is identified as sunlight resistant for PV module interconnections. UF

  10. PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 4314 8/2/2011 13:40 Agriculture Parking Lot Criminal Damage Spark plug cables cut on pick-up truck Report on file

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    :48 Boone Tavern Parking Lot Property Damage Mitsubishi Gallant Report on file 4318 8/10/2011 19:10 Anna Smith Parking Lot Theft by Unlawful Taking Car battery and Jumper Cables Report on file 4319 8 responded 4321 8/14/2011 17:14 Evans Sports Complex Theft by Unlawful Taking Solar Panel and Mounting

  11. Power Series Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    Power Series 16.4 Introduction In this section we consider power series. These are examples of infinite series where each term contains a variable, x, raised to a positive integer power. We use the ratio test to obtain the radius of convergence R, of the power series and state the important result

  12. Offshore Wind Power USA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Offshore Wind Power USA conference provides the latest offshore wind market updates and forecasts.

  13. Dispersed power and renewables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Sullivan, J.B.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed power generation and renewable energy sources are discussed: The following topics are discussed: distributed resources, distributed generation, commercialization requirements, biomass power, location of existing biomass feedstocks, biomass business plan components, North Carolina BGCC partnership, New York biomass co-firing project, alfalfa for power and feed, Hawaii Pioneer Mill LOI project, next steps for biomass, wind power activity, photovoltaic modules and arrays, lead-acid batteries, superconducting magnetic energy storage, fuel cells, and electric power industry trends.

  14. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps. The project was funded through a cooperative 50% cost sharing agreement between Enerdyne LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), United States Department of Energy, executed on April 16, 2003. The total estimated cost for this first phase of the agreement was $386,385.00 as detailed in Phase I Authorization For Expenditure (AFE). This report describes the tasks performed, the results, and conclusions for the first phase (Phase I) of the cooperative agreement.

  15. Online Condition Monitoring to Enable Extended Operation of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Bond, Leonard J.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Safe, secure, and economic operation of nuclear power plants will remain of strategic significance. New and improved monitoring will likely have increased significance in the post-Fukushima world. Prior to Fukushima, many activities were already underway globally to facilitate operation of nuclear power plants beyond their initial licensing periods. Decisions to shut down a nuclear power plant are mostly driven by economic considerations. Online condition monitoring is a means to improve both the safety and economics of extending the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants, enabling adoption of proactive aging management. With regard to active components (e.g., pumps, valves, motors, etc.), significant experience in other industries has been leveraged to build the science base to support adoption for online condition-based maintenance and proactive aging management in the nuclear industry. Many of the research needs are associated with enabling proactive management of aging in passive components (e.g., pipes, vessels, cables, containment structures, etc.). This paper provides an overview of online condition monitoring for the nuclear power industry with an emphasis on passive components. Following the overview, several technology/knowledge gaps are identified, which require addressing to facilitate widespread online condition monitoring of passive components.

  16. Active Power Control from Wind Power (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.; Brooks, D.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to keep the electricity grid stable and the lights on, the power system relies on certain responses from its generating fleet. This presentation evaluates the potential for wind turbines and wind power plants to provide these services and assist the grid during critical times.

  17. High power fast ramping power supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marneris,I.; Bajon, E.; Bonati, R.; Sandberg, J.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Hundred megawatt level fast ramping power converters to drive proton and heavy ion machines are under research and development at accelerator facilities in the world. This is a leading edge technology. There are several topologies to achieve this power level. Their advantages and related issues will be discussed.

  18. Low Insertion HVDC Circuit Breaker: Magnetically Pulsed Hybrid Breaker for HVDC Power Distribution Protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    GENI Project: General Atomics is developing a direct current (DC) circuit breaker that could protect the grid from faults 100 times faster than its alternating current (AC) counterparts. Circuit breakers are critical elements in any electrical system. At the grid level, their main function is to isolate parts of the grid where a fault has occurred—such as a downed power line or a transformer explosion—from the rest of the system. DC circuit breakers must interrupt the system during a fault much faster than AC circuit breakers to prevent possible damage to cables, converters and other grid-level components. General Atomics’ high-voltage DC circuit breaker would react in less than 1/1,000th of a second to interrupt current during a fault, preventing potential hazards to people and equipment.

  19. UGP Power Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wildlife and power generation on the Missouri River. Seven dams and powerplants have the installed capacity of 2,610 MW. That hydroelectric power is delivered across about 7,919...

  20. Residential Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, Gary

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research study will explore the use of residential wind power and associated engineering and environmental issues. There is various wind power generating devices available to the consumer. The study will discuss the dependencies of human...

  1. Power production and ADS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raja, Rajendran; /Fermilab

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the power production process in Accelerator Driven Sub-critical systems employing Thorium-232 and Uranium-238 as fuel and examine the demands on the power of the accelerator required.

  2. Power Factor Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power factor control is a necessary ingredient in any successful Energy Management Program. Many companies are operating with power factors of 70% or less and are being penalized through the electrical utility bill. This paper starts by describing...

  3. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Research Center Blvd. Fayetteville, AR 72701 Phone: (479)-443-5759 Email: marcelo@apei.net Website: www.apei.net High Temperature and High Power Density SiC Power Electronic...

  4. Idaho Power- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net...

  5. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Research Center Blvd. Fayetteville, AR 72701 Phone: (479)-443-5759 Email: mschupb@apei.net Website: www.apei.net High Power Density Silicon Carbide Power Electronic Converters...

  6. Space Solar Power Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arif, H.; Barbosa, H.; Bardet, C.; Baroud, M.; Behar, A.; Berrier, K.; Berthe, P.; Bertrand, R.; Bibyk, I.; Bisson, J.; Bloch, L.; Bobadilla, G.; Bourque, D.; Bush, L.; Carandang, R.; Chiku, T.; Crosby, N.; De Seixas, M.; De Vries, J.; Doll, S.; Dufour, F.; Eckart, P.; Fahey, M.; Fenot, F.; Foeckersperger, S.; Fontaine, J.E.; Fowler, R.; Frey, H.; Fujio, H.; Gasa, J.M.; Gleave, J.; Godoe, J.; Green, I.; Haeberli, R.; Hanada, T.; Ha

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information pertaining to the Space Solar Power Program is presented on energy analysis; markets; overall development plan; organizational plan; environmental and safety issues; power systems; space transportation; space manufacturing, construction, operations; design examples; and finance.

  7. Green Power Purchase Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Class I renewable energy resources include solar, wind, new sustainable biomass, landfill gas, fuel cells (using renewable or non-renewable fuels), ocean thermal power, wave or tidal power, low...

  8. Body powered thermoelectric systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Settaluri, Krishna Tej

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Great interest exists for and progress has be made in the effective utilization of the human body as a possible power supply in hopes of powering such applications as sensors and continuously monitoring medical devices ...

  9. Soldier power. Battery charging.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    hours runtime at full load 50 W #12; (%) (kW) 300 1-5 Siemens-Power 30 (hr) 10,000 Siemens 300 Acumentrics 80 (mW/cm2) 600 400 Siemens-Power 85 (hr) 70,000 3,000 Siemens-Power 15 () 500 25 Siemens-Power 60 >2013 - , Bloom, MHI, Rolls Royce 6 #12; SOFCSOFC * (LSCF ) ( Ag

  10. Concentrating Solar Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its concentrating solar power subprogram.

  11. Power Prepayment Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project OfficePower Electronics Power Electronics PowerPower

  12. Power/Privilege Definitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Major; People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, New Orleans 2. Power is the ability to define reality and to convince other people that it is their definition. ~ Dr. Wade Nobles 3. Power is the capacity to act. 4 different cultures. [JL] RACISM Racism is race prejudice plus power [See Racist]. People's Institute calls

  13. EXTERIOR POWERS KEITH CONRAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    form on a manifold is related to exterior powers of the dual space of the tangent space of a manifoldEXTERIOR POWERS KEITH CONRAD 1. Introduction Let R be a commutative ring. Unless indicated the alternating multilinear functions on Mk: the exterior power k(M). It is a certain quotient module of Mk

  14. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  15. Power Dancers Audition Packet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Power Dancers Dance Team Audition Packet September 8-10, 2014 #12;Power Dancers Dance Team Dear service to their school with the support of the faculty, administration, and other groups on campus, but they also provide a source of great school spirit to UT Dallas. Power Dancers provides a real opportunity

  16. Power Dancers Audition Packet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Power Dancers Dance Team Audition Packet September 9-11, 2013 #12;Power Dancers Dance Team Dear service to their school with the support of the faculty, administration, and other groups on campus, but they also provide a source of great school spirit to UT Dallas. Power Dancers provides a real opportunity

  17. Power Dancers Audition Packet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Power Dancers Dance Team Audition Packet September 10 & 12, 2012 #12;Power Dancers Dance Team Dear service to their school with the support of the faculty, administration, and other groups on campus, but they also provide a source of great school spirit to UT Dallas. Power Dancers provides a real opportunity

  18. Green Power Inverter Prvningsrapport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green Power Inverter Prøvningsrapport SolenergiCentret Søren Poulsen Ivan Katic Oktober 2004 #12;Green Power Inverter målerapport.doc SolenergiCentret - 04-03-2005 2 Forord Nærværende rapport indeholder Teknologisk Instituts bidrag til målinger i forbindelse med PSO projektet "Green Power Inverter

  19. Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Place: India...

  20. How Power is Lost: Illusions of Alliance Among the Powerful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brion, Sebastien

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    while most accounts of power loss focus on ethical breachesPower Loss .1. Proposed Model of Power Loss Figure 2. Social Monitoring

  1. High Power Laser Innovation Sparks Geothermal Power Potential...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    power source among renewables, is poised to emerge also as a flexible power source, balancing intermittent wind and solar power production and reducing variability in energy...

  2. Using government purchasing power to reduce equipment standby power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Jeffrey; Meier, Alan; Bartholomew, Emily; Thomas, Alison; Glickman, Joan; Ware, Michelle

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or external power supply, other specifications, and purchasethe consumer to purchase extra power strips and extensionan internal standby power function, shall purchase Although

  3. Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics (PE) Systems Presentations Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics (PE) Systems Presentations The 2008 Peer Review Meeting for the...

  4. ADEPT: Efficient Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADEPT Project: In today’s increasingly electrified world, power conversion—the process of converting electricity between different currents, voltage levels, and frequencies—forms a vital link between the electronic devices we use every day and the sources of power required to run them. The 14 projects that make up ARPA-E’s ADEPT Project, short for “Agile Delivery of Electrical Power Technology,” are paving the way for more energy efficient power conversion and advancing the basic building blocks of power conversion: circuits, transistors, inductors, transformers, and capacitors.

  5. Multimegawatt space power reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dearien, J.A.; Whitbeck, J.F.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the need of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and long range space exploration and extra-terrestrial basing by the National Air and Space Administration (NASA), concepts for nuclear power systems in the multi-megawatt levels are being designed and evaluated. The requirements for these power systems are being driven primarily by the need to minimize weight and maximize safety and reliability. This paper will discuss the present requirements for space based advanced power systems, technological issues associated with the development of these advanced nuclear power systems, and some of the concepts proposed for generating large amounts of power in space. 31 figs.

  6. AC and DC power transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical and economic assessment of AC and DC transmission systems; long distance transmission, cable transmission, system inter-connection, voltage support, reactive compensation, stabilisation of systems; parallel operation of DC links with AC systems; comparison between alternatives for particular schemes. Design and application equipment: design, testing and application of equipment for HVDC, series and shunt static compensated AC schemes, including associated controls. Installations: overall design of stations and conductor arrangements for HVDC, series and shunt static AC schemes including insulation co-ordination. System analysis and modelling.

  7. Multimode power processor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Sullivan, George A. (Pottersville, NJ); O'Sullivan, Joseph A. (St. Louis, MO)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In one embodiment, a power processor which operates in three modes: an inverter mode wherein power is delivered from a battery to an AC power grid or load; a battery charger mode wherein the battery is charged by a generator; and a parallel mode wherein the generator supplies power to the AC power grid or load in parallel with the battery. In the parallel mode, the system adapts to arbitrary non-linear loads. The power processor may operate on a per-phase basis wherein the load may be synthetically transferred from one phase to another by way of a bumpless transfer which causes no interruption of power to the load when transferring energy sources. Voltage transients and frequency transients delivered to the load when switching between the generator and battery sources are minimized, thereby providing an uninterruptible power supply. The power processor may be used as part of a hybrid electrical power source system which may contain, in one embodiment, a photovoltaic array, diesel engine, and battery power sources.

  8. Multimode power processor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Sullivan, G.A.; O'Sullivan, J.A.

    1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In one embodiment, a power processor which operates in three modes: an inverter mode wherein power is delivered from a battery to an AC power grid or load; a battery charger mode wherein the battery is charged by a generator; and a parallel mode wherein the generator supplies power to the AC power grid or load in parallel with the battery. In the parallel mode, the system adapts to arbitrary non-linear loads. The power processor may operate on a per-phase basis wherein the load may be synthetically transferred from one phase to another by way of a bumpless transfer which causes no interruption of power to the load when transferring energy sources. Voltage transients and frequency transients delivered to the load when switching between the generator and battery sources are minimized, thereby providing an uninterruptible power supply. The power processor may be used as part of a hybrid electrical power source system which may contain, in one embodiment, a photovoltaic array, diesel engine, and battery power sources. 31 figs.

  9. Power Quality Aspects in a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Chacon, J.; Romanowitz, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although many operational aspects affect wind power plant operation, this paper focuses on power quality. Because a wind power plant is connected to the grid, it is very important to understand the sources of disturbances that affect the power quality.

  10. EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI May 3, 2010 EA-1726: Final...

  11. Dynamic Reactive Power Control of Isolated Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falahi, Milad

    2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents dynamic reactive power control of isolated power systems. Isolated systems include MicroGrids in islanded mode, shipboard power systems operating offshore, or any other power system operating in islanded mode intentionally...

  12. High-temperature superconducting transformer performance, cost, and market evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirks, J.A.; Dagle, J.E.; DeSteese, J.G.; Huber, H.D.; Smith, S.A.; Currie, J.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Merrick, S.B. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Williams, T.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent laboratory breakthroughs in high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials have stimulated both the scientific community and general public with questions regarding how these materials can be used in practical applications. While there are obvious benefits from using HTS materials (most notably the potential for reduced energy losses in the conductors), a number of issues (such as overall system energy losses, cost, and reliability) may limit applications of HTS equipment, even if the well known materials problems are solved. This study examined the future application potential of HTS materials to power transformers. This study effort was part of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution (OESD) research program, Superconductivity Technology for Electric Power Systems (STEPS). The study took a systems perspective to gain insights to help guide DOE in managing research designed to realize the vision of HTS applications. Specific objectives of the study were as follows: to develop an understanding of the fundamental HTS transformer design issues that can provide guidance for developing practical devices of interest to the electric utility industry; to identify electric utility requirements for HTS transformers and to evaluate the potential for developing a commercial market; to evaluate the market potential and national benefits for HTS transformers that could be achieved by a successful HTS development program; to develop an integrated systems analysis framework, which can be used to support R&D planning by DOE, by identifying how various HTS materials characteristics impact the performance, cost, and national benefits of the HTS application.

  13. assembled coated conductor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CERN Preprints Summary: The powering of the LHC machine requires more than 1000 High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) current leads. These leads contain, at their cold...

  14. assembling coated conductor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CERN Preprints Summary: The powering of the LHC machine requires more than 1000 High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) current leads. These leads contain, at their cold...

  15. assembled coated conductors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CERN Preprints Summary: The powering of the LHC machine requires more than 1000 High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) current leads. These leads contain, at their cold...

  16. PASSIVE CONTROL OF FLUID POWERED HUMAN POWER AMPLIFIERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    PASSIVE CONTROL OF FLUID POWERED HUMAN POWER AMPLIFIERS Perry Y. Li and Venkat Durbha Center is proposed for the control of fluid powered human power amplifiers. Human power amplifiers are mechanical as a torque/force source. The control objective is to amplify the power that the human exerts on the machine

  17. Alternative Energy Technologies Solar Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    #12;Alternative Energy Technologies Solar Power Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Power;Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Reflector material is Aluminum or Silver Tube material ..... Several possible ............... Mexico, Canada, Peru Alumina ............Guinea, Brazil, Australia, Jamaica Manganese ....... S. Africa

  18. Entangling Power of Permutations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieven Clarisse; Sibasish Ghosh; Simone Severini; Anthony Sudbery

    2005-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion of entangling power of unitary matrices was introduced by Zanardi, Zalka and Faoro [PRA, 62, 030301]. We study the entangling power of permutations, given in terms of a combinatorial formula. We show that the permutation matrices with zero entangling power are, up to local unitaries, the identity and the swap. We construct the permutations with the minimum nonzero entangling power for every dimension. With the use of orthogonal latin squares, we construct the permutations with the maximum entangling power for every dimension. Moreover, we show that the value obtained is maximum over all unitaries of the same dimension, with possible exception for 36. Our result enables us to construct generic examples of 4-qudits maximally entangled states for all dimensions except for 2 and 6. We numerically classify, according to their entangling power, the permutation matrices of dimension 4 and 9, and we give some estimates for higher dimensions.

  19. Interleaved power converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Lizhi (Canton, MI)

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A power converter architecture interleaves full bridge converters to alleviate thermal management problems in high current applications, and may, for example, double the output power capability while reducing parts count and costs. For example, one phase of a three phase inverter is shared between two transformers, which provide power to a rectifier such as a current doubler rectifier to provide two full bridge DC/DC converters with three rather than four high voltage inverter legs.

  20. Electric power annual 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and state levels: generating capability and additions, net generation, fossil-fuel statistics, retail sales and revenue, finanical statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, demand side management, nonutility power producers. Purpose is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets.