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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

"Table HC3.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,11.3,9.3,0.6,"Q",0.4,0.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,66.8,54.7,3.6,1.7,1.9,4.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,65.8,54,3.6,1.7,1.9,4.7

2

"Table HC3.6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,11.3,9.3,0.6,"Q",0.4,0.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,66.8,54.7,3.6,1.7,1.9,4.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,65.8,54,3.6,1.7,1.9,4.7

3

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings...

4

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings...

5

1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million U.S. Households; 45 pages, 128 kb) Million U.S. Households; 45 pages, 128 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-4a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-6a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-7a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4

6

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

7

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Household Demographics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census...

8

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census...

9

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Household Demographics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

10

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC.1.11 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census...

11

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East...

12

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census...

13

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Household Demographics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

14

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" " ",,,"East North Central Census...

15

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

16

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,61.1,5.6,6.3,15.2,5.8 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,2.6,0.2,0.7,0.9,0.4 "Do Not Have Air Conditioning Equipment",14.7,8.1,0.9,2.1,3,0.7 "Type of Air Conditioning Equipment "

17

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions) ","Single-Family...

18

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

19

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

20

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Space...

22

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than...

23

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More...

24

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry"...

25

1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent of U.S. Households; 45 pages, 121 kb) Percent of U.S. Households; 45 pages, 121 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-2b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-3b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-4b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-5b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-6b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-7b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4

26

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Air Conditioning",,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Air Conditioning Equipment"

27

A study of the housing of United States Air Force married personnel, 1953-1957  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Private Financing as a Solution to the USAF Housing Problem, " !dmnmjl AFB, Alabama, 1+~/~ (Mimeographed ). domo officers~ pnrCic'iL"rQ~" JaC piloCs, cosC -i'e;;ov::~a;monC cp; roxi- moceg "10&3~NB to Crv. '-. ~ znd, i" aCs uho goC oddiCionsl c...

Goforth, Robert Gerald

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

28

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2...

29

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

30

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,16.5,22.4,40.5,14.6 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,1.4,1.2,0.9,1.4 "Do Not Have Air Conditioning Equipment",14.7,2.8,2.3,0.7,8.9 "Type of Air Conditioning Equipment " "Used (more than one may apply)" "Use Central Air Conditioning Equipment",69.7,7.2,17.1,34.6,10.8

31

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Asked (Apartments in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,5.8,6.2,2.8,2.8,1.5 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

32

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Asked (Apartments in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,4.4,3.7,6.2,4.7 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

33

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Asked (Apartments in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,9.6,5,2.2,1.5,0.8 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

34

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,10.9,1.5,1.5,2.8,1.2 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,61.2,6.1,6.3,13.9,5.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,60.3,6,6.1,13.5,5.5 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,1,"Q",0.2,0.4,"Q"

35

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Air Conditioning",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,24.6,30.2,15.1,13.5,10.6 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,1.7,1.5,0.7,0.6,0.5 "Do Not Have Air Conditioning Equipment",14.7,5,4.1,2.3,1.7,1.7 "Type of Air Conditioning Equipment "

36

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,4.4,1,0.5,0.5,3.4,2.4,0.6,0.5 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

37

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"With 5 or More Units)",19.1,2.3,16.8,"N","N","N","N","N","N",2.3,16.8,"N","N" "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

38

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,2,0.7,1.3,2.6,4.1,3.5,2.5,2.4 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

39

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"With 5 or More Units)",19.1,6.2,3.5,0.5,0.5,1.1,0.6,"Q",0.7,0.4,0.2,2,1.4,0.6 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

40

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,4.7,0.9,0.4,0.3,"Q",0.6,0.4,"Q",3.8,2.9,0.9 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,3.7,2.7,0.9,0.6,0.3,0.9,1,0.2,0.6,0.2 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

42

Million U.S. Housing Units Total............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Attached Attached 2 to 4 Units Table HC2.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Type of Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Home Electronics Usage Indicators Detached Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Attached 2 to 4 Units Table HC2.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Type of Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Home Electronics Usage Indicators Detached Status of PC When Not in Use Left On..............................................................

43

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 10.2 0.6 0.3 1.1 1.1 Table HC2.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units...

44

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Air Conditioning in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Air Conditioning in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Air Conditioning",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,16.5,3.9,1.9,2,12.6,5.3,4.4,2.9 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But"

45

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,18.3,22.3,17.9,11.9,8.1,5.1,10.4,12.8 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,1.5,1.3,0.9,0.5,0.2,0.1,0.3,1

46

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Air Conditioning in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Air Conditioning in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Air Conditioning",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,22.4,15,4.3,3.1,1.8,5.9,7.4,2.3,3.4,1.7

47

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Table HC3.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 Home Appliances Usage Indicators...

48

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Table HC4.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 Home Appliances Usage Indicators...

49

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Air Conditioning in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Air Conditioning in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Air Conditioning",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

50

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,10.5,4,10.6,10.5,15.1,14.1,14.7,14.4 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,0.9,0.2,0.8,0.6,0.8,0.9,0.3,0.4 "Do Not Have Air Conditioning Equipment",14.7,3,0.9,2.2,2.2,2.4,2,1.3,0.8

51

On-site Housing Unit Types | Staff Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

On-site Housing Unit Types On-site Housing Unit Types Registration is required for all computers, wireless notebooks or other network devices used on the BNL Network. Devices that are not registered will be disconnected from the network. Apartments Apartments are available in 1, 2, 3 and 4 bedrooms. They are fully furnished and supplied with linens, kitchen utensils and cookware. Utilities are included in the rental price. *Note: These units do NOT have air conditioning. Each unit is equipped with DSL connection, satellite television and a microwave. Cisco Wireless Access Points (WAPs) connections are also available in Buildings 2-10. More Photos (PDF) Cavendish House The Cavendish house is a male dormitory consisting of 83 private single occupancy rooms equipped with air conditioning, Ethernet connection and

52

Air Distribution Retrofit Strategies for Affordable Housing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques -- manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multi-unit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder two-story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

Dentz, J.; Conlin, F.; Holloway, P.; Podorson, D.; Varshney, K.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,"5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Appliances",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,62.3,6.4,8.7,18.3,6.5 "1.",100.8,61,6.4,8.6,18.3,6.5 "2 or More",1.5,1.3,0.1,"Q","Q","Q" "Do Not Use a Stove",11.3,9.5,0.3,0.3,0.8,0.4

54

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Household Demographics" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,14.4,2.1,3.4,9.6,1.9 "2 Persons",35.8,24.2,1.9,2.5,5,2.1 "3 Persons",18.1,12.1,1.2,1.3,2.2,1.2 "4 Persons",15.7,11.5,1,1,1.5,0.8 "5 Persons",7.7,5.8,0.3,0.5,0.6,0.5

55

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Fuels Used and End Uses" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Natural Gas",69.2,45.6,4.7,6.1,11,1.8 "Propane/LPG",48.9,39.6,2.4,1.7,2,3.2 "Wood",13.1,11.4,0.3,0.2,0.5,0.7 "Fuel Oil",7.7,5.1,0.4,0.7,1.3,0.1

56

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.8,0.1,0.2,0.6,0.1 1,108.1,67.5,6.5,8.8,18.5,6.8 "2 or More",2.7,2.5,0.1,"Q","Q","Q" "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,69.5,6.5,8.9,18.6,6.8 1,3.1,2.2,0.2,0.2,0.5,"Q"

57

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Space Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,70.5,6.5,8.7,17.7,6.7 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,0.8,0.2,0.2,1,0.1 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,"Q",0.1,0.4,"Q"

58

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Space Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,20.8,25.8,41.1,22.4 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,"Q","Q",0.7,1.6 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"N","Q",0.3,0.8 "Main Heating Fuel and Equipment2" "Natural Gas",55.6,10.8,17.9,13.3,13.6 "Central Warm-Air Furnace",44.3,6.1,15.9,11.3,11

59

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" "Appliances",,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both"

60

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" "Household Demographics",,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Number of Household Members"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions"

62

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Space Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Space Heating Equipment"

63

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,5.4,5.3,2.7,2.5,2 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,24.6,29.6,15.7,13.4,10 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,24,29.1,15.5,13.2,9.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.6,0.5,"Q",0.2,0.4 "Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2" "Central System",65.9,15.3,22.6,10.7,9.9,7.3

64

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,5.4,5.3,2.7,2.5,2 "Have Coolling Equipment",93.3,24.6,29.6,15.7,13.4,10 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,24,29.1,15.5,13.2,9.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.6,0.5,"Q",0.2,0.4 "Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2 " "Central System",65.9,15.3,22.6,10.7,9.9,7.3

65

Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

before the United States House of before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development to appear before you today to discuss the President's Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 budget request for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE). Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development More Documents & Publications

66

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,3.2,4.7,3.6,5.5,0.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,7.7,21.4,23.7,18.5,21.9 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,7.6,21,23.4,17.9,21.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,"Q",0.4,0.4,0.6,0.3

67

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.5,0.1,0.2,0.6,"Q" 1,24.2,11,1.2,3,7.3,1.7 2,37.5,21.4,2.4,3.3,7.7,2.7 3,26.6,18.4,2,1.8,2.8,1.6 4,14.2,11.6,0.7,0.6,0.5,0.7 "5 or More",9.7,8.8,0.4,0.2,"Q",0.2 "Most-Used Television" "Display Size"

68

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Computers and Other Electronics" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,13.3,1.6,3.1,6.2,3.2 1,46.9,29,3,3.9,8.4,2.6 2,24.3,17.4,1.2,1.5,3.4,0.8 3,9.5,7.5,0.6,0.4,0.8,0.2 4,3.6,3,0.2,0.1,0.2,"Q" "5 or More",2,1.7,0.1,"Q",0.1,"Q"

69

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters"

70

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4

71

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Computers and Other Electronics" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4

72

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Fuels Used for Any Use"

73

"Table HC3.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,13.4,10.4,1.4,1,0.3,0.4 "New England",5.5,3.8,3.1,"Q",0.3,"Q","Q" "Middle Atlantic",15.1,9.6,7.3,1.3,0.6,"Q","Q"

74

"Table HC4.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,7.2,0.8,0.9,1.6,3.8,"Q" "New England",5.5,1.7,0.2,"Q",0.6,0.9,"Q" "Middle Atlantic",15.1,5.5,0.7,0.9,1,2.9,"Q"

75

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,11.2,2.3,2.5,4.2,0.4 "New England",5.5,3.2,0.2,0.9,1,0.2 "Middle Atlantic",15.1,7.9,2.1,1.6,3.2,0.3 "Midwest",25.6,18.7,1.5,1.5,3.1,0.8 "East North Central",17.7,12.9,1.2,1.2,2.1,0.4

76

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Appliances in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Appliances in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Appliances",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)"

77

North American wood markets hit by United States housing crash North American wood markets hit by United States housing crash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

North American wood markets hit by United States housing crash North American wood markets hit by United States housing crash North American wood markets hit by United States housing crash 19 themes were: 1. softwood market developments, and 2. wood energy and wood mobilization. The main

78

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.4,"Q","Q",0.4,"Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,71.7,7.5,7.6,16.3,6.8 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,71.5,7.4,7.4,16,6.7 "Have But Do Not Use Equipment",0.8,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

79

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Household Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,11.4,1.6,1,1.9,6.6,0.3 "2 Persons",34.8,8,1.9,0.8,1.5,3.5,0.3 "3 Persons",18.4,5.6,1.5,0.7,1.2,1.9,0.2 "4 Persons",15.9,4.3,1.3,0.6,0.7,1.6,"Q"

80

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,68.7,7.4,7.6,15.9,6.7 "2 or More",3.7,3.2,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,"Q","Q","Q",0.6,"Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" ,,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX"

82

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Computers and Other Electronics",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX"

83

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Televisions in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 1 Televisions in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Televisions",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

84

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,3.9,1.8,2.2,2.1,3.1,2.6,1.7,0.4 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,10.8,5.6,10.3,10.4,15.8,16,15.6,8.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,10.6,5.5,10.3,10.3,15.3,15.7,15.3,8.6 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,"Q","Q","Q","Q",0.6,0.4,0.3,"Q"

85

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,3.2,4.7,3.6,5.5,0.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,7.7,21.4,23.7,18.5,21.9 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,7.6,21,23.4,17.9,21.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,"Q",0.4,0.4,0.6,0.3

86

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Appliances",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,28.8,31.7,16.3,14,11.5 "1.",100.8,28.5,31.2,16,13.9,11.2 "2 or More",1.5,0.3,0.5,0.2,0.2,0.3 "Do Not Use a Stove",11.3,2.5,4.1,1.8,1.7,1.2 "Most-Used Stove Fuel" "Electric",61.9,18.3,19.7,9.7,8.2,6.1

87

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Appliances" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,22.2,25.8,19.4,13,8.1,4.9,8.8,15.9 "1.",100.8,22,25.6,19.2,12.8,8,4.7,8.5,15.8

88

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Home Appliances in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Home Appliances in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Home Appliances",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,19.2,5.2,2.3,2.8,14.1,6.8,4.6,2.7

89

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" 6 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Appliances",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,35.8,32.4,11.6,17.3,5.2 "1.",100.8,35.1,31.9,11.5,17.1,5.1 "2 or More",1.5,0.7,0.5,0.1,0.2,"Q" "Do Not Use a Stove",11.3,3,3,2.5,1.8,1.1 "Most-Used Stove Fuel"

90

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Appliances" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,13.2,4.9,12.3,11.2,16.5,15.6,14.9,13.7 "1.",100.8,13,4.8,12.2,10.9,16.3,15.4,14.7,13.5 "2 or More",1.5,0.2,0.1,0.2,0.2,0.2,0.2,0.1,0.2

91

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

92

United Cool Air  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

While our process may start with a "basic model" it is seldom that we fabricate more than a few units that are identical.  Therefore, the definition of "basic model" has a large impact on the...

93

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer",35.5,17.8,3.1,3.7,7.3,3.6 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,54.2,4.5,4,9.4,3.4 "Most-Used Personal Computer" "Type of PC" "Desk-top Model",58.6,42.9,3.3,3,6.6,2.9

94

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions) ","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,4.8,0.5,0.7,1.4,0.8 "2 Times A Day",24.6,15.6,1.8,2,3.6,1.6 "Once a Day",42.3,28.8,2.7,2.8,5.4,2.6 "A Few Times Each Week",27.2,17.8,2,1.7,4.1,1.5

95

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Household Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,14.8,2.4,2.6,7.9,2.4 "2 Persons",34.8,24.8,2.1,2,4.2,1.7 "3 Persons",18.4,12.3,1.2,1.6,2.2,1.2 "4 Persons",15.9,11.1,1.2,0.9,1.6,1 "5 Persons",7.9,6.2,0.5,0.4,0.4,0.4 "6 or More Persons",4.1,2.9,0.2,0.3,0.4,0.3

96

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.4,"Q","Q",0.4,"Q" "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,71.7,7.5,7.6,16.3,6.8 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,71.5,7.4,7.4,16,6.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use It",0.8,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

97

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Living Space Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,0.4,"Q",0.6,1.7,0.4 "500 to 999",23.8,4.8,1.4,4.2,10.2,3.2 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,10.6,1.8,1.8,4,2.6 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,12.4,1.5,0.5,0.5,0.4

98

Indoor Air Quality in New Energy-Efficient Houses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 Indoor Air Quality in New Energy-Efficient Houses Figure 1: Measurements of total volatile organic compounds in five new houses in Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Florida and median concentration in U.S. EPA study. In 1993, the Indoor Environment Program began investigating indoor air quality in new energy-efficient houses. Five new houses have been included in the study, all in the eastern U.S. Two had nearly identical floor plans and were part of a demonstration project near Pittsburgh, PA; one was built conventionally, while the other incorporated a number of energy-efficient features. The conventional house was studied for one year following construction, and the energy-efficient house was sampled on three occasions over a two-year period. The other three demonstration houses were in

99

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Natural Gas",69.2,13.8,2.9,1.7,1.1,10.9,5.7,2.3,2.8

100

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 1 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Computers and Other Electronics",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Computers and Other Electronics",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,4.7,1,0.5,0.5,3.7,1.7,1.4,0.5 1,46.9,8.7,2.3,1,1.3,6.4,3.2,2,1.2 2,24.3,4.3,1.2,0.5,0.7,3.1,1.4,0.9,0.8

102

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Space Heating",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

103

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.3,0.4,0.7,0.5 1,108.1,19.3,25,40.2,23.6 "2 or More",2.7,0.2,0.5,1.2,0.7 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,19.4,25.6,41.2,24.2 1,3.1,1.4,0.3,0.8,0.6 "2 or More",0.1,"Q","N","Q","Q" "Main Water Heater" "Main Water Heater Type" "Storage Tank",110.6,19.4,25.5,41.3,24.3

104

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Space Heating",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,30.3,35,17.6,15.2,12 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,0.6,0.6,0.3,0.4,0.4 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.3,0.3,0.2,0.1,0.3 "Main Heating Fuel and Equipment2" "Natural Gas",55.6,14.1,17.9,9.4,7.9,6.3

105

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Space Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,22.8,26.5,20.5,13.8,9.1,5.6,11.8,16.1 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,0.6,0.7,0.5,0.2,0.2,0.1,0.1,0.5

106

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Televisions in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Televisions in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Televisions",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.4,0.1,0.1,"Q",0.2,"Q","Q","Q" 1,24.2,4.6,1.2,0.6,0.6,3.5,2,1,0.4

107

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Computers and Other Electronics",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,6.7,4.7,1.1,1.1,0.6,2,2,0.6,1,0.5

108

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Water Heating",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

109

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Space Heating",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do "

110

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" 6 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Household Demographics",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,11,9.7,3.3,5.4,1.9 "2 Persons",35.8,12.4,11.2,4.4,5.9,1.8 "3 Persons",18.1,6,5.7,2.2,3.1,1.1 "4 Persons",15.7,5.3,4.9,2,2.6,0.9 "5 Persons",7.7,2.6,2.4,1.1,1.2,0.4 "6 or More Persons",5,1.5,1.5,1,0.8,0.2

111

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8

112

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC4.9 Televisions in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" HC4.9 Televisions in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Televisions",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.3,0.2,"Q","Q","Q","Q",0.1,"Q","Q","Q"

113

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Household Demographics of Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Household Demographics of Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Household Demographics",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,6,1.5,0.7,0.8,4.5,2.1,1.6,0.8 "2 Persons",35.8,6.3,1.8,0.8,1,4.5,2,1.5,0.9

114

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,,,,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Water Heating",,,,"IL","MI","WI","IN, OH",,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.4,0.3,"Q","Q","Q","Q",0.1,"Q","Q","Q"

115

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" 6 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Space Heating",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,38.7,35.4,12.5,17.6,6 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,"Q","N",1.3,0.7,0.3 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q",0.3,0.8,"Q" "Main Heating Fuel and Equipment3"

116

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Space Heating",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

117

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" " ",,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Space Heating",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,25.8,17.8,4.7,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8

118

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" ,,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Urban and Rural2" "Urban",88.1,18,4.4,2.2,2.2,13.6,6.6,3.9,3.1 "Rural",25.5,2.8,1.1,0.3,0.8,1.7,0.6,1,"Q"

119

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

11 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 11 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Water Heating",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

120

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Appliances in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Appliances in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Appliances",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

122

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" ,,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Urban and Rural2" "Urban",88.1,19.9,14.6,4.1,2.9,1.8,5.8,5.3,1.6,2.4,1.4

123

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC.1.11 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" HC.1.11 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

124

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Televisions in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Televisions in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Televisions",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

125

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Household Demographics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Household Demographics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Household Demographics",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

126

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Urban and Rural2" "Urban",88.1,18,19.9,28.6,21.5 "Rural",25.5,2.8,6,13.4,3.3 "Metropolitan and Micropolitan" "Statistical Area" "In metropolitan statistical area",94,18.6,19.4,33.4,22.7 "In micropolitan statistical area",12.4,1.5,4.7,4.7,1.5 "Not in metropolitan or micropolitan"

127

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Appliances in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 1 Appliances in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Appliances",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7 "Cooking Appliances"

128

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 1 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" ,,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

129

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Household Demographics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 1 Household Demographics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Household Demographics",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

130

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,,,,,"5 or More Members" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.8,6,6.3,3.3,3.1,2.1 "New England",5.5,1.5,1.8,1,0.7,0.5 "Middle Atlantic",15.3,4.5,4.5,2.3,2.4,1.6 "Midwest",25.9,7.4,8.5,3.9,3.5,2.6 "East North Central",17.9,5.1,5.6,2.7,2.5,1.9

131

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Household Demographics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Household Demographics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Household Demographics",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,7.4,5.1,1.4,1,0.6,2.1,2.3,0.6,1.1,0.6

132

Air Handling Unit Supply Air Temperature Optimization During Economizer Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Handling Unit Supply Air Temperature Optimization during Economizer Cycles Gang Wang, Zhan Wang, Ke Xu and Mingsheng Liu University of Nebraska – Lincoln Omaha, Nebraska, USA ABSTRACT Most air handling units (AHUs) in commercial...

Xu, K.; Liu, M.; Wang, G.; Wang, Z.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Water Heating Characteristics",,"City","Town","Surburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,45.5,18.2,21.6,21 "2 or More",3.7,1,0.6,0.9,1.1 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,"Q","Q","Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater" "One Housing Unit",99.7,39.4,17.4,21,21.8 "Two or More Housing Units",10.3,7.1,1.4,1.5,"Q" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,"Q","Q","Q"

134

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Housing Unit Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,1.9,9.8,8.9,"N","N" "New England",5.5,1.3,4.1,"Q","N","N" "Middle Atlantic",15.1,"Q",5.7,8.8,"N","N"

135

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,28.8,33.4,17.4,15.3,11.4 "2 or More",3.7,0.6,1.1,0.8,0.5,0.6 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,0.3,"Q","Q","Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater" "One Housing Unit",99.7,25.3,31.8,16.6,14.6,11.3 "Two or More Housing Units",10.3,4.2,2.7,1.6,1.2,0.6

136

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.4,"Q",0.2,0.1,0.3,0.2,0.1,0.1 1,24.2,4.2,1.2,3.1,3,3.8,3.7,2.9,2.3 2,37.5,4.7,1.9,4.3,4.5,6.4,6.2,5,4.4 3,26.6,2.9,1,3.1,3,4.4,3.7,4.1,4.4 4,14.2,1.4,0.5,1.6,1.7,2.1,1.9,2.3,2.7 "5 or More",9.7,0.9,0.4,1.2,1,1.3,1.3,1.9,1.7

137

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Natural Gas",69.2,18,21.6,11.5,9.8,8.2 "Propane/LPG",48.9,8.3,17.6,8.4,8.3,6.3 "Wood",13.1,2.3,4.8,2.3,2,1.7 "Fuel Oil",7.7,2.2,2.4,1.1,1.1,0.9 "Kerosene",1.7,0.4,0.5,0.3,0.2,0.3

138

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.5,0.4,0.2,0.2,"Q","Q",0.1,0.3 1,24.2,8,6.4,4.2,2.5,1.1,0.7,1.2,4.8 2,37.5,8.7,10.3,6.7,4.6,2.7,1.4,3.1,5.9 3,26.6,4.2,6.3,5.4,3.6,2.6,1.6,2.9,3.5

139

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.5,0.2,0.3,0.3,0.5,0.3,0.3,0.5 1,108.1,13.7,4.9,13,12.8,17.5,16.3,15.6,14.4 "2 or More",2.7,0.3,"Q",0.3,0.2,0.3,0.4,0.5,0.6 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,14,5,13.2,13,17.9,16.6,16,14.9

140

" Million Housing Units, Preliminary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, By Number of Household Members, 2009" Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, By Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Preliminary" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Computers and Other Electronics",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,12.9,7.6,3,1.8,2.1 1,46.9,14.5,15.5,6.7,5.7,4.5 2,24.3,3.1,9.3,4.6,4.2,3.1 3,9.5,0.5,2.6,2.5,2.3,1.7 4,3.6,0.2,0.6,0.9,1.2,0.7 "5 or More",2,0.1,0.3,0.4,0.5,0.7 "Most-Used Computer" "Computer Type" "Desktop",48.3,10.5,16.2,7.9,7.4,6.3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Household Demographics" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,11.3,9.4,5,2.8,1.2,0.5,1,5 "2 Persons",35.8,5.7,8.3,7,5.3,3.1,2,4.3,3.9 "3 Persons",18.1,2.9,3.9,3.5,2.3,1.9,1.1,2.4,2.9

142

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Number of Household Members" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,6,7.4,11.5,6.3 "2 Persons",35.8,6.3,8.5,13.4,7.6 "3 Persons",18.1,3.3,3.9,6.8,4.1 "4 Persons",15.7,3.1,3.5,5.8,3.3 "5 Persons",7.7,1.3,1.7,2.8,2 "6 or More Persons",5,0.8,0.9,1.8,1.5 "2009 Annual Household Income" "Less than $20,000",23.7,4,5.5,10,4.3 "$20,000 to $39,999",27.5,4.3,6.5,10.7,6

143

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Fuels Used and End Uses" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Natural Gas",69.2,13.8,19.4,17.7,18.3 "Propane/LPG",48.9,9.4,12.1,16.5,11 "Wood",13.1,2.5,2.9,4,3.7 "Fuel Oil",7.7,6.3,0.5,0.7,0.2 "Kerosene",1.7,0.5,0.4,0.6,0.2 "Solar",1.2,0.2,0.2,0.3,0.5 "Electricity End Uses2" "(more than one may apply)"

144

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Fuels Used and End Uses" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Natural Gas",69.2,10.9,3.8,10,9.1,10.1,8.2,8.6,8.4 "Propane/LPG",48.9,5.9,1.9,5.7,4.9,7.6,6.9,8.1,7.9 "Wood",13.1,1.4,0.5,1.5,1.5,2.5,2.7,1.9,1.1

145

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.8,5.6,1.3,3.4,2.6,2.6,2.2,1.5,1.6 "New England",5.5,1.8,0.3,0.7,0.6,0.7,0.8,0.3,0.4 "Middle Atlantic",15.3,3.8,1.1,2.7,2,1.9,1.4,1.1,1.2

146

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Water Heating",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.9,0.8,0.4,0.4,0.3 1,108.1,30.2,33.9,17.3,14.9,11.9 "2 or More",2.7,0.2,1.1,0.4,0.4,0.5 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,30.6,34.8,17.5,15.2,12.3 1,3.1,0.7,1,0.5,0.5,0.4 "2 or More",0.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

147

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Computers and Other Electronics" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,12.4,9,3.6,1.5,0.4,0.1,0.3,8.4 1,46.9,8.2,13,10.6,6.7,3.7,1.8,2.8,5.8 2,24.3,2.2,4.1,4.6,3.7,2.9,2.2,4.6,1.8 3,9.5,0.6,1,1.6,1.5,1.6,1,2.3,0.5

148

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" 6 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Televisions",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.6,0.4,0.2,0.2,0.2 1,24.2,8.5,6.9,2.7,4.1,2 2,37.5,12.4,11.6,5.1,6.2,2.1 3,26.6,8.9,8.5,3.2,4.7,1.2 4,14.2,4.8,4.7,1.8,2.4,0.6 "5 or More",9.7,3.6,3.3,1,1.5,0.3 "Most-Used Television" "Display Size" "Less than 21 Inches",12.5,4.4,4,1.3,2.1,0.6

149

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Computers and Other Electronics" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,4.7,6.7,11.1,4.8 1,46.9,8.7,10.6,17.2,10.3 2,24.3,4.3,5.5,8.7,5.8 3,9.5,2.1,1.9,3.1,2.4 4,3.6,0.7,0.8,1.4,0.8 "5 or More",2,0.4,0.3,0.6,0.7 "Most-Used Computer" "Computer Type" "Desktop",48.3,9.1,11,16.8,11.4 "Flat-Panel LCD Monitor",38.3,7.3,8.4,13.4,9.3 "Standard Monitor",10,1.9,2.6,3.4,2.1

150

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Televisions",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,1,0.3,"Q","Q",0.1 1,24.2,12.9,6.7,2.2,1.3,1.1 2,37.5,11.6,13.6,5.4,4,2.8 3,26.6,4,9.1,5.7,4.5,3.3 4,14.2,1.2,3.9,2.9,3.3,2.8 "5 or More",9.7,0.6,2.1,1.7,2.6,2.7 "Most-Used Television" "Display Size" "Less than 21 Inches",12.5,4.9,3.9,1.4,1.1,1.2

151

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Number of Household Members",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "2009 Annual Household Income" "Less than $20,000",23.7,11.3,5.7,2.9,2,1.9 "$20,000 to $39,999",27.5,9.4,8.3,3.9,3,2.9 "$40,000 to $59,000",21.2,5,7,3.5,3,2.6 "$60,000 to $79,999",14.2,2.8,5.3,2.3,2.2,1.6 "$80,000 to $99,999",9.3,1.2,3.1,1.9,1.7,1.3 "$100,000 to $119,999",5.7,0.5,2,1.1,1.4,0.7

152

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" 6 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Water Heating",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.3,0.8,0.4,0.4,0.1 1,108.1,36.8,33.9,13.3,18,6 "2 or More",2.7,0.7,0.8,0.4,0.7,0.1 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters3" 0,110.4,37.4,34.6,13.7,18.5,6.1 1,3.1,1.3,0.8,0.4,0.5,0.1 "2 or More",0.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N"

153

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Computers and Other Electronics" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,3.8,1.7,3.8,3.9,4.6,4.4,3.1,2.1 1,46.9,6,2.1,5.3,5.4,7.8,7,6.5,6.7 2,24.3,3,0.9,2.8,2.5,3.7,3.3,4.1,4 3,9.5,1.1,0.3,1.1,1,1.4,1.4,1.7,1.6 4,3.6,0.4,0.1,0.4,0.3,0.6,0.5,0.6,0.8

154

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Space Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,14.2,5,13.1,12.7,17.5,16.4,16,15.2 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,0.2,"Q",0.3,0.3,0.5,0.4,0.3,0.3 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.1,0.1,0.1,0.2,0.3,0.1,0.1,"Q"

155

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.4,0.3,0.5,0.4 1,24.2,4.6,5.4,8.1,6.1 2,37.5,7,8,13.8,8.5 3,26.6,4.5,6.1,10.5,5.3 4,14.2,2.2,3.4,5.7,2.9 "5 or More",9.7,1.9,2.7,3.4,1.5 "Most-Used Television" "Display Size" "Less than 21 Inches",12.5,2.3,3,4.7,2.5 "21 to 36 Inches",53.6,10.5,12.8,19.5,10.9 "37 Inches or More",46,7.6,9.8,17.4,11.1

156

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Household Demographics" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,4.8,1.5,3.9,3.9,5,5,3.9,3.3 "2 Persons",35.8,4.5,1.6,4.1,4.3,6.2,5.2,5.2,4.6 "3 Persons",18.1,2,0.9,2.3,2.1,2.8,2.9,2.7,2.4 "4 Persons",15.7,1.8,0.6,1.8,1.6,2.2,2.1,2.6,3.1

157

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.7,0.5,0.3,0.4,0.3,0.2,0.5,0.5 1,108.1,22.9,26.7,20.4,13.4,8.7,5.3,10.6,16.3 "2 or More",2.7,0.1,0.3,0.4,0.4,0.3,0.2,0.9,0.1 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters3"

158

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" 6 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Natural Gas",69.2,27.4,19.8,11.3,6.7,4 "Propane/LPG",48.9,19.6,14.6,5.5,6.8,2.5 "Wood",13.1,5,4,1.5,1.4,1.2 "Fuel Oil",7.7,4.6,2.9,"Q","Q","Q" "Kerosene",1.7,0.8,0.7,0.1,"Q","Q"

159

Million U.S. Housing Units Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.... .... 111.1 10.9 26.1 27.3 24.0 22.8 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment........................... 17.8 3.2 4.7 3.6 5.5 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment........................................ 93.3 7.7 21.4 23.7 18.5 21.9 Use Cooling Equipment......................................... 91.4 7.6 21.0 23.4 17.9 21.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it........................ 1.9 Q 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.3 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 2, 3 Central System..................................................... 65.9 4.8 12.3 15.1 14.9 18.7 Without a Heat Pump......................................... 53.5 4.7 11.5 11.6 12.3 13.6 With a Heat Pump.............................................. 12.3 Q 0.9 3.5 2.7 5.2 Window/Wall Units.............................................. 28.9 3.1 9.3 8.8 4.0 3.7 1 Unit.................................................................

160

Million U.S. Housing Units Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment........................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment........................................ 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment......................................... 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it........................ 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System...................................................... 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump......................................... 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump.............................................. 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units................................................. 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Million U.S. Housing Units Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment........................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment........................................ 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment......................................... 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it........................ 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System...................................................... 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump......................................... 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump.............................................. 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units................................................. 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.................................................................

162

Million U.S. Housing Units Total U.S. Housing Units........................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units........................................ Housing Units........................................ 111.1 10.9 26.1 27.3 24.0 22.8 Do Not Have Heating Equipment........................... 1.2 Q Q N 0.3 0.8 Have Space Heating Equipment............................. 109.8 10.9 26.0 27.3 23.7 22.0 Use Space Heating Equipment.............................. 109.1 10.9 26.0 27.3 23.2 21.7 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.......................... 0.8 N N Q 0.5 Q Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None.................................................................. 3.6 Q 0.5 Q 1.4 1.4 1 to 499............................................................. 6.1 0.2 1.2 1.5 1.9 1.2 500 to 999.......................................................... 27.7 2.3 6.9 6.5 6.5 5.6 1,000 to 1,499....................................................

163

Table HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Homes Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.4 1.8 2.1 1.4 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 13.0 10.8 1.1 0.5 0.6 11.4 New England .............................. 3.5 3.1 0.2 Q 0.1 16.9 Middle Atlantic ............................ 9.5 7.7 0.9 0.4 0.4 13.4 Midwest ......................................... 17.5 16.0 0.3 Q 1.0 10.3 East North Central ......................

164

Million U.S. Housing Units Total.....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment....................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................... 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment..................................... 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................... 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System................................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................... 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump......................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units............................................ 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit.............................................................

165

Analysis of Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses Title Analysis of Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Chan, Wanyu R., Jeffrey Joh, and Max H. Sherman Journal Energy and Buildings Start Page 616 Pagination 616-625 Date Published 08/2013 Abstract Building envelope airtightness is important for residential energy use, occupant health and comfort. Weanalyzed the air leakage measurements of 134,000 single-family detached homes in US, using normalizedleakage (NL) as the metric. Weatherization assistance programs (WAPs) and residential energy efficiencyprograms contributed most of the data. We performed regression analyses to examine the relationshipbetween NL and various house characteristics. Explanatory variables that are correlated with NL includeyear built, climate zone, floor area, house height, and whether homes participated in WAPs or if theyare energy efficiency rated homes. Foundation type and whether ducts are located outside or inside theconditioned space are also found to be useful parameters for predicting NL. We developed a regressionmodel that explains approximately 68% of the observed variability across US homes. Of these variablesconsidered, year built and climate zone are the two that have the largest influence on NL. The regressionmodel can be used to predict air leakage values for individual homes, and distributions for groups ofhomes, based on their characteristics. Using RECS 2009 data, the regression model predicts 90% of UShouses have NL between 0.22 and 1.95, with a median of 0.67.

166

" Million U.S. Housing Units,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,7,5.2,3.2,1.8,0.9,0.3,0.8,4.5 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

167

Air Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Title Air Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-48671 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Nance Matson Abstract Most dwellings in the United States are ventilated primarily through leaks in the building shell (i.e., infiltration) rather than by whole-house mechanical ventilation systems. Consequently, quantification of envelope air-tightness is critical to determining how much energy is being lost through infiltration and how much infiltration is contributing toward ventilation requirements. Envelope air tightness and air leakage can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. Tens of thousands of unique fan pressurization measurements have been made of U.S. dwellings over the past decades. LBNL has collected the available data on residential infiltration into its Residential Diagnostics Database, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy. This report documents the envelope air leakage section of the LBNL database, with particular emphasis on new construction. The work reported here is an update of similar efforts carried out a decade ago, which used available data largely focused on the housing stock, rather than on new construction. The current effort emphasizes shell tightness measurements made on houses soon after they are built. These newer data come from over two dozen datasets, including over 73,000 measurements spread throughout a majority of the U.S. Roughly one-third of the measurements are for houses identified as energy-efficient through participation in a government or utility program. As a result, the characteristics reported here provide a quantitative estimate of the impact that energy-efficiency programs have on envelope tightness in the US, as well as on trends in construction.

168

Table HC4.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 .4 Space Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................ 111.1 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.6 Q Q Q 0.3 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 32.3 8.0 3.3 5.8 14.1 1.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 31.8 8.0 3.2 5.6 13.9 1.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.5 N Q Q Q Q Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 16.4 4.5 2.1 3.2 6.2 0.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 10.0 3.3 1.4 1.6 3.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 8.6 3.3 1.2 1.4 2.4 0.3 For Two Housing Units..........................

169

Table HC3.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 .4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................ 111.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.6 0.3 N Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 77.5 63.7 4.2 1.8 2.2 5.6 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 77.2 63.6 4.2 1.8 2.1 5.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 Q N Q Q Q Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 41.8 35.3 2.8 1.2 1.0 1.6 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 34.8 29.7 2.3 0.7 0.6 1.4 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 34.3 29.5 2.3 0.6 0.6 1.4 For Two Housing Units..........................

170

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Housing Unit Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,5.6,1.8,3.3,2.4,2.7,2.3,1.5,0.9 "New England",5.5,1.9,0.4,0.7,0.6,0.6,0.6,0.4,0.3 "Middle Atlantic",15.1,3.8,1.4,2.6,1.9,2.1,1.7,1.1,0.6 "Midwest",25.6,4.1,2.3,3.2,3.2,4,2.8,4.1,1.8

171

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9,0.5,0.5,0.5,"Q",0.2 "Stone",1,"Q",0.4,"Q","Q","Q" "Other",1.5,0.4,0.6,0.3,"Q","Q" "FoundationBasement of Single-" "Family Units and Apartments in" "2 to 4 Unit Buildings" "(more...

172

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Shingle)",1.9,0.7,0.4,0.4,0.4 "Stone",1,0.3,"Q",0.3,0.3 "Other",1.5,0.5,"Q",0.2,0.6 "FoundationBasement of Single-" "Family Units and Apartments in" "2 to 4 Unit Buildings" "(more...

173

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Space Heating Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.3,0.3,"Q",0.2,0.2 "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,29.7,34.5,18.2,15.6,11.8 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,29.5,34.4,18.1,15.5,11.6 "Have But Do Not Use Equipment",0.8,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

174

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,12,6.2,10,10.3,15.3,15.9,14.5,7.6 "1.",28.6,3.5,2.1,3.8,3.3,5.2,5,3.6,2.2 "2.",29.5,4.2,2.2,3.5,3.3,4.9,5,4.5,2

175

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Space Heating Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,"N","Q","Q",0.2,0.4,0.2,0.2,"Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,14.7,7.4,12.4,12.2,18.5,18.3,17.1,9.2 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,14.6,7.3,12.4,12.2,18.2,18.2,17.1,9.1

176

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Household Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,30,"N","N","N","N" "2 Persons",34.8,"N",34.8,"N","N","N" "3 Persons",18.4,"N","N",18.4,"N","N" "4 Persons",15.9,"N","N","N",15.9,"N"

177

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,10.3,25.2,26.2,23,21.7 "2 or More",3.7,0.4,0.7,0.6,0.9,1.1 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.3,0.2,0.5,"Q","Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater" "One Housing Unit",99.7,10.1,22.9,23,22,21.7

178

Analysis of air leakage measurements of US houses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Building envelope airtightness is important for residential energy use, occupant health and comfort. We analyzed the air leakage measurements of 134,000 single-family detached homes in US, using normalized leakage (NL) as the metric. Weatherization assistance programs (WAPs) and residential energy efficiency programs contributed most of the data. We performed regression analyses to examine the relationship between NL and various house characteristics. Explanatory variables that are correlated with NL include year built, climate zone, floor area, house height, and whether homes participated in \\{WAPs\\} or if they are energy efficiency rated homes. Foundation type and whether ducts are located outside or inside the conditioned space are also found to be useful parameters for predicting NL. We developed a regression model that explains approximately 68% of the observed variability across US homes. Of these variables considered, year built and climate zone are the two that have the largest influence on NL. The regression model can be used to predict air leakage values for individual homes, and distributions for groups of homes, based on their characteristics. Using RECS 2009 data, the regression model predicts 90% of US houses have NL between 0.22 and 1.95, with a median of 0.67.

Wanyu R. Chan; Jeffrey Joh; Max H. Sherman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Supply Fan Control for Constant Air Volume Air Handling Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since terminal boxes do not have a modulation damper in constant volume (CV) air handling unit (AHU) systems, zone reheat coils have to be modulated to maintain the space temperature with constant supply airflow. This conventional control sequence...

Cho, Y.; Wang, G.; Liu, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Home Electronics Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,5.7,3.3,4.6,4.7,5.8,5.7,4,1.7 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,9,4.1,7.9,7.8,13.1,12.9,13.3,7.5 "Number of Desktop PCs" "1.",50.3,5.8,2.8,6.1,5.1,9.3,8.7,7.8,4.8

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181

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Household Characteristics",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,11.5,6.2,2.1,3.2 "2 Persons",34.8,12.5,6.5,2.1,3.9 "3 Persons",18.4,7,4,1.1,1.8 "4 Persons",15.9,5.6,2.9,1.2,1.5 "5 Persons",7.9,2.9,1.5,0.3,1.1 "6 or More Persons",4.1,1.2,0.5,"Q",0.6 "2005 Annual Household Income Category"

182

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Household Characteristics",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,5.5,3.8,1.7 "2 Persons",34.8,6.5,4.8,1.7 "3 Persons",18.4,3.4,2.4,1.1 "4 Persons",15.9,3,2.4,0.7 "5 Persons",7.9,1.4,1.2,0.2 "6 or More Persons",4.1,0.7,0.6,0.1 "2005 Annual Household Income Category" "Less than $9,999",9.9,1.9,1.4,0.5 "$10,000 to $14,999",8.5,1.8,1.4,0.4

183

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,1,0.8,1,1.2,1.4,1.2,1,0.6 "2 Times A Day",24.6,3.6,1.7,2.3,2.9,4.6,3.8,3.9,1.9 "Once a Day",42.3,5.4,2.5,4.7,4.5,7,7.9,6.6,3.8

184

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Home Electronics Characteristics",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,16.9,6.5,4.6,7.6 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,30.3,12.5,18.1,14.7 "Number of Desktop PCs" "1.",50.3,21.1,8.3,10.7,10.1 "2.",16.2,6.2,2.8,4.1,3 "3 or More",9,2.9,1.4,3.2,1.6 "Number of Laptop PCs" "1.",22.5,9.1,3.6,6,3.8 "2.",4,1.5,0.6,1.3,0.7

185

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC8.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" HC8.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total U.S.",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,46.2,18.8,22.5,22.1 "1.",103.3,44.1,17.8,21.2,20.2 "2 or More",6.2,2.1,1,1.3,1.9 "Do Not Use an Oven",1.5,1,"Q",0.2,"Q" "Most-Used Oven Fuel" "Electric",67.9,26.8,11.5,14.4,15.1 "Natural Gas",36.4,19.2,6.9,7.6,2.7

186

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" 2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer",35.5,16.3,9.4,4,2.7,3.2 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,13.8,25.4,14.4,13.2,8.8 "Most-Used Personal Computer" "Type of PC" "Desk-top Model",58.6,10,20,11.2,10.1,7.3 "Laptop Model",16.9,3.7,5.4,3.2,3.1,1.5 "Hours Turned on Per Week"

187

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,1.4,1.9,1.4,1,2.4 "2 Times A Day",24.6,4.3,7.6,4.3,4.8,3.7 "Once a Day",42.3,9.9,14.4,7.4,6.7,4 "A Few Times Each Week",27.2,8.9,9.1,4.6,3.1,1.5 "About Once a Week",3.9,2.2,1,0.5,"Q","Q"

188

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC5.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" HC5.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,14.4,7.2,12.4,12.4,18.6,18.3,17.2,9.1 "1.",103.3,13.5,6.8,11.8,11.5,17.7,17.5,16.1,8.4 "2 or More",6.2,1,0.4,0.6,0.8,0.9,0.8,1.1,0.7

189

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Electronics Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,16.3,9.4,4,2.7,3.2 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,13.8,25.4,14.4,13.2,8.8 "Number of Desktop PCs" "1.",50.3,11.9,17.4,8.5,7.3,5.2 "2.",16.2,1.5,5.8,3.8,3.3,1.9 "3 or More",9,0.4,2.2,2.1,2.7,1.7 "Number of Laptop PCs"

190

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC6.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" HC6.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,29.5,34.4,18.2,15.7,11.8 "1.",103.3,28.4,32,17.3,14.7,11 "2 or More",6.2,1.1,2.5,1,0.9,0.8 "Do Not Use an Oven",1.5,0.6,0.4,"Q","Q","Q" "Most-Used Oven Fuel" "Electric",67.9,18.2,22.5,11.2,9.5,6.5

191

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,14,7.2,12.2,12,18.4,17.7,16.1,8.8 "2 or More",3.7,0.6,"Q","Q",0.3,0.3,0.7,1.1,0.4 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

192

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Space Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","N",0.3,0.8 "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,10.9,26,27.3,23.7,22 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,10.9,26,27.3,23.2,21.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use It",0.8,"N","N","Q",0.5,"Q"

193

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" 2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer",35.5,5.7,3.3,4.6,4.7,5.8,5.7,4,1.7 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,9,4.1,7.9,7.8,13.1,12.9,13.3,7.5 "Most-Used Personal Computer" "Type of PC"

194

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Space Heating Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" Space Heating Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Space Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"N","Q","Q",0.2,0.4,0.2,0.2,"Q" "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,14.7,7.4,12.4,12.2,18.5,18.3,17.1,9.2 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,14.6,7.3,12.4,12.2,18.2,18.2,17.1,9.1

195

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Household Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,7.3,5,2.3 "2 Persons",34.8,8.4,5.7,2.7 "3 Persons",18.4,4.1,3,1.1 "4 Persons",15.9,3.2,2.2,1 "5 Persons",7.9,1.8,1.4,0.4 "6 or More Persons",4.1,0.7,0.4,0.3 "2005 Annual Household Income Category" "Less than $9,999",9.9,2.3,1.8,0.5 "$10,000 to $14,999",8.5,2,1.4,0.6

196

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Space Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.3,0.3,"Q",0.2,0.2 "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,29.7,34.5,18.2,15.6,11.8 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,29.5,34.4,18.1,15.5,11.6 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use It",0.8,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

197

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,"City","Town","Surburbs","Rural" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,38.6,15.3,19.5,18.3 "1.",28.6,14.3,4.6,4.8,5 "2.",29.5,12.1,4.9,6.2,6.3 "3.",14.7,5.7,2.6,3.4,2.9 "4.",9.3,3.3,1.5,2.2,2.3 "5 or More",9.7,3.3,1.7,2.9,1.8 "Energy-Efficient Bulbs Used",31.1,13.6,5.1,6.8,5.5

198

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Year of Construction Unit, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Year of Construction Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Household Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,4.6,2.5,3.7,3.2,5.4,5.5,3.7,1.6 "2 Persons",34.8,4.3,1.9,4.4,4.1,5.9,5.3,5.5,3.4 "3 Persons",18.4,2.5,1.3,1.7,1.9,2.9,3.5,2.8,1.6 "4 Persons",15.9,1.9,0.8,1.5,1.6,3,2.5,3.1,1.4

199

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Average Square Footage of Midwest Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 1 Average Square Footage of Midwest Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Midwest",25.9,2272,1898,1372,912,762,551 "Midwest Divisions and States" "East North Central",17.9,2251,1869,1281,892,741,508 "Illinois",4.8,2186,1911,1451,860,752,571 "Michigan",3.8,1954,1559,962,729,582,359 "Wisconsin",2.3,2605,2091,1258,1105,887,534

200

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Average Square Footage of West Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 3 Average Square Footage of West Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total West",24.8,1708,1374,800,628,506,294 "West Divisions and States" "Mountain",7.9,1928,1695,1105,723,635,415 "Mountain North",3.9,2107,1858,912,776,684,336 "Colorado",1.9,2082,1832,722,896,788,311 "Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming",2,2130,1883,1093,691,610,354

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Analysis of air leakage measurements of US houses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Buildings 66 (2013) 616-625 Buildings 66 (2013) 616-625 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Energy and Buildings j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / e n b u i l d Analysis of air leakage measurements of US houses Wanyu R. Chan ∗ , Jeffrey Joh, Max H. Sherman Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 90R3058, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 November 2012 Received in revised form 4 March 2013 Accepted 16 July 2013 Keywords: Blower door Fan pressurization test Normalized leakage Air infiltration Building envelope airtightness a b s t r a c t Building envelope airtightness is important for residential energy use, occupant health and comfort. We analyzed the air leakage measurements of 134,000 single-family detached homes in US, using normalized

202

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Living Space Characteristics",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,2.1,0.6,"Q",0.4 "500 to 999",23.8,13.6,3.7,3.2,3.2 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,9.5,3.7,3.4,4.2 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,6.6,2.7,2.5,3.6 "2,000 to 2,499",12.2,5,2.1,2.8,2.4 "2,500 to 2,999",10.3,3.7,1.8,2.8,2.1 "3,000 to 3,499",6.7,2,1.4,1.7,1.6

203

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Household Characteristics",,"City","Town","Surburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,14.7,5.1,5.1,5.1 "2 Persons",34.8,12.8,6.1,7.5,8.5 "3 Persons",18.4,7.6,3,3.8,3.9 "4 Persons",15.9,6.8,2.6,3.3,3.1 "5 Persons",7.9,3.3,1.5,2.1,1 "6 or More Persons",4.1,1.9,0.7,0.8,0.7 "2005 Annual Household Income Category" "Less than $9,999",9.9,5.2,1.6,1.2,1.9 "$10,000 to $14,999",8.5,4.5,1.6,0.8,1.6

204

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Household Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,2.6,7.9,7.3,6.5,5.8 "2 Persons",34.8,4.3,7.7,8.2,7.1,7.5 "3 Persons",18.4,1.8,4.2,4.8,3.9,3.7 "4 Persons",15.9,1.2,3.7,4,3.9,2.9 "5 Persons",7.9,0.7,1.8,2,1.4,2 "6 or More Persons",4.1,0.3,0.8,1,1.1,0.8

205

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" 9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,10.9,25.7,27.1,23.4,22.4 "1.",103.3,10.2,24.3,25.3,22.2,21.3 "2 or More",6.2,0.6,1.5,1.8,1.2,1.1 "Do Not Use an Oven",1.5,"Q",0.3,"Q",0.6,0.4

206

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,8.2,22.3,23.1,19.7,18.4 "1.",28.6,2.3,7.1,6.7,6.4,6.2 "2.",29.5,2.6,6.9,7.7,6.6,5.7 "3.",14.7,1.3,4.1,3.4,2.9,3

207

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace2" "Fewer than 500",3.2,"Q",0.8,0.9,0.8,0.5 "500 to 999",23.8,1.5,5.4,5.5,6.1,5.3 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,1.4,4,5.2,5,5.2 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,1.4,3.1,3.5,3.6,3.8

208

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.7,0.8,0.4,0.3,"Q" "500 to 999",23.8,10.2,6.4,3.4,2.3,1.5 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,5.5,6.3,3,3.3,2.6 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,3.8,4.7,2.9,2.2,1.9 "2,000 to 2,499",12.2,2.6,4,2.5,2,1.3 "2,500 to 2,999",10.3,1.9,4.1,1.7,1.3,1.3

209

" Million U.S. Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million U.S. Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.8,4,4.3,3.5,2.8,1.9,1.5,2.8,2.9 "New England",5.5,1.1,1,1,0.8,0.5,0.4,0.8,0.8

210

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Average Square Footage of South Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 2 Average Square Footage of South Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total South",42.1,1867,1637,1549,732,642,607 "South Divisions and States" "South Atlantic",22.2,1944,1687,1596,771,668,633 "Virginia",3,2227,1977,1802,855,759,692 "Georgia",3.5,2304,1983,1906,855,736,707 "Florida",7,1668,1432,1509,690,593,625 "DC, DE, MD, WV",3.4,2218,1831,1440,864,713,561

211

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Average Square Footage of Single-Family Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 4 Average Square Footage of Single-Family Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Single-Family",78.6,2422,2002,1522,880,727,553 "Census Region" "Northeast",12.7,2843,2150,1237,1009,763,439 "Midwest",19.2,2721,2249,1664,1019,842,624 "South",29.7,2232,1945,1843,828,722,684 "West",16.9,2100,1712,1009,725,591,348 "Urban and Rural3"

212

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Average Square Footage of Northeast Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 0 Average Square Footage of Northeast Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Northeast",20.8,2121,1663,921,836,656,363 "Northeast Divisions and States" "New England",5.5,2232,1680,625,903,680,253 "Massachusetts",2.5,2076,1556,676,850,637,277 "CT, ME, NH, RI, VT",3,2360,1781,583,946,714,234 "Mid-Atlantic",15.3,2080,1657,1028,813,647,402

213

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Average Square Footage of Multi-Family Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 5 Average Square Footage of Multi-Family Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Multi-Family",28.1,930,807,535,453,393,261 "Census Region" "Northeast",7.6,991,897,408,471,426,194 "Midwest",5.6,957,857,518,521,466,282 "South",8.4,924,846,819,462,423,410 "West",6.5,843,606,329,374,269,146 "Urban and Rural3" "Urban",26.9,927,803,531,450,390,258

214

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Average Square Footage of Mobile Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 6 Average Square Footage of Mobile Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Mobile Homes",6.9,1087,985,746,413,375,283 "Census Region" "Northeast",0.5,1030,968,711,524,492,362 "Midwest",1.1,1090,1069,595,400,392,218 "South",3.9,1128,1008,894,423,378,335 "West",1.4,995,867,466,369,322,173 "Urban and Rural3" "Urban",3.5,1002,919,684,396,364,271

215

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Average Square Footage of U.S. Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 9 Average Square Footage of U.S. Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total",113.6,1971,1644,1230,766,639,478 "Census Region" "Northeast",20.8,2121,1663,921,836,656,363 "Midwest",25.9,2272,1898,1372,912,762,551 "South",42.1,1867,1637,1549,732,642,607 "West",24.8,1708,1374,800,628,506,294 "Urban and Rural3" "Urban",88.1,1857,1546,1148,728,607,450

216

UNITED STATES AIR FORCE OUTSIDE THE NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

program in order to reduce Federal employee's contribution to traffic congestion and air pollutionUNITED STATES AIR FORCE OUTSIDE THE NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION BENEFIT PROGRAM): ____________ City (Residence): __________________________State: _______________ Zip Code: ________________ Air Force

217

"Table HC13.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" "City",47.1,17.8,10.5,2.2,5.1 "Town",19,4.9,2.2,0.7,2 "Suburbs",22.7,7.6,4.1,1.1,2.4 "Rural",22.3,10.4,4.9,2.9,2.6 "Climate Zone1" "Less than 2,000 CDD and--" "Greater than 7,000 HDD",10.9,"N","N","N","N"

218

"Table HC12.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" "City",47.1,9.7,7.3,2.4 "Town",19,5,2.9,2.1 "Suburbs",22.7,5.7,4.3,1.4 "Rural",22.3,5.2,3.3,1.9 "Climate Zone1" "Less than 2,000 CDD and--" "Greater than 7,000 HDD",10.9,6.9,4.9,"Q" "5,500 to 7,000 HDD",26.1,12.3,9.9,"Q"

219

STATE OF CALIFORNIA ICE STORAGE AIR CONDITIONING (ISAC) UNITS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling with the compressor). Yes No #12;STATE OF CALIFORNIA ICE STORAGE AIR CONDITIONING (ISAC) UNITS CECSTATE OF CALIFORNIA ICE STORAGE AIR CONDITIONING (ISAC) UNITS CEC-CF-6R-MECH-08 (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-MECH-08 Ice Storage Air Conditioning (ISAC) Units

220

Table HC1.1.4 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2005" 4 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2005" ,,,"Average Square Feet per Apartment in a --" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"2 to 4 Unit Building",,,"5 or More Unit Building" ,,"Apartments (millions)" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Total","Heated","Cooled","Total","Heated","Cooled" "Total",111.1,24.5,1090,902,341,872,780,441 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,6.7,1247,1032,"Q",811,788,147 "New England",5.5,1.9,1365,1127,"Q",814,748,107 "Middle Atlantic",15.1,4.8,1182,978,"Q",810,800,159 "Midwest",25.6,4.6,1349,1133,506,895,810,346

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

"Table HC4.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,"Q","Q","Q",0.3,"Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,32.3,8,3.3,5.8,14.1,1.1

222

"Table HC3.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,0.3,"N","Q","Q","Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,77.5,63.7,4.2,1.8,2.2,5.6

223

"Table HC3.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,65,54.3,3.3,1.5,1.6,4.4 "1.",28.6,17.9,14,0.9,0.6,0.7,1.7

224

Table HC1-12a. Housing Unit Characteristics by West Census Region,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by West Census Region, 2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.7 1.1 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 20.3 -- -- -- NF New England ............................................. 5.4 -- -- -- NF Middle Atlantic ........................................... 14.8 -- -- -- NF Midwest ....................................................... 24.5 -- -- -- NF East North Central ..................................... 17.1 -- -- -- NF West North Central ....................................

225

Table HC1-11a. Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region, 1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.9 1.2 1.4 1.4 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 20.3 -- -- -- -- NF New England ............................................. 5.4 -- -- -- -- NF Middle Atlantic ........................................... 14.8 -- -- -- -- NF Midwest ....................................................... 24.5 -- -- -- -- NF East North Central .....................................

226

New report from White House outlines largest problems facing United States  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New report from White House outlines largest problems facing United States New report from White House outlines largest problems facing United States energy grid Home > Blogs > Graham7781's blog Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 16 August, 2013 - 12:21 energy grid OpenEI President Smart Grid United States White House On Monday, the White House released a new report that identifies the one of the biggest problems facing today's power grid. As prepared by the President's Council of Economic Advisers, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability and the White House Office of Science and Technology, the report, entitled "Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages," states that the grid is extremely vulnerable to power outages due

227

Application of discrete event simulation techniques for prioritization of U.S. Air Force Military Family Housing Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study, through the use of discrete event simulation and modeling, explores various prioritization disciplines for U.S. Air Force Military Family Housing maintenance, repair, and renovation projects. Actual data from the Military Family Housing...

Krukenberg, Harry J.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The measured energy impact of air leakage on a house  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELS . Approach. Interpretation of the solar aperture Analysis of UAo value for both models. . . . . Results from the synthetic data runs of the STAM program. Network model with infiltration concept V EXPERIMENTAL SETUP Test house description... for differed solar apeiture value 4 2 STAM results using synthetic data with the solar aperture of 5 ma 39 and for differed UA value 40 5 I Channel numbers. 57 6. 1 File information of data set of tests done on the house which was in the original...

Vaidya, Shilpa Arvind

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

229

Housing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A large part of the world’s energy consumption is used in the housing and transport sectors. Any reduction in their energy consumption, for the same quality of product or service, is highly worthwhile. Housing...

Christian Ngô; Marcel H. Van de Voorde

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

"Table HC15.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million Housing Units" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,7.1,"N","N","N" "New England",5.5,"N","N","N","N" "Middle Atlantic",15.1,7.1,"N","N","N" "Midwest",25.6,"N","N","N","N" "East North Central",17.7,"N","N","N","N"

231

"Table HC3.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,0.3,"N","Q","Q","Q" "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,77.5,63.7,4.2,1.8,2.2,5.6

232

"Table HC3.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,74.5,60.9,4,1.8,2.2,5.5 "2 or More",3.7,3.3,3,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.3,"Q","Q","N","Q","Q"

233

"Table HC4.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC4.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" HC4.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S.",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,32.3,7.9,3.3,5.9,14.1,1.1 "1.",103.3,31.4,7.6,3.3,5.7,13.7,1.1 "2 or More",6.2,0.9,0.3,"Q","Q",0.4,"Q"

234

"Table HC3.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Electronics Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,20.3,14.8,1.2,0.6,0.9,2.8 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,57.8,49.2,2.9,1.2,1.4,3 "Number of Desktop PCs"

235

"Table HC3.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC3.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" HC3.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S.",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,77.3,63.4,4.1,1.8,2.3,5.6 "1.",103.3,71.9,58.6,3.9,1.6,2.2,5.5 "2 or More",6.2,5.4,4.8,"Q","Q","Q","Q"

236

"Table HC4.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Electronics Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,15.3,3,1.9,3.1,6.4,0.8 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,17.7,5,1.6,2.8,8,0.4 "Number of Desktop PCs"

237

"Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions) " ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q",0.4 "500 to 999",23.8,7.2,3.5,0.3,0.3,0.9,2.2

238

"Table HC4.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,3.4,1,0.4,0.6,1.2,"Q" "2 Times A Day",24.6,8.6,2.3,1,1.6,3.5,0.2

239

"Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q",0.4 "500 to 999",23.8,7.2,3.5,0.3,0.3,0.9,2.2

240

"Table HC4.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,31.9,7.9,3.4,5.8,13.7,1.1 "2 or More",3.7,0.4,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.7,"Q","Q","Q",0.6,"Q"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: In-House R&D  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Research Ambient Monitoring - NETL / OST Monitoring Site This project is part of the NETL In-House R&D Ambient Air Quality Research Program. As part of the overall DOE-FE air quality sampling and analysis activities, NETL's Office of Science & Technology (OST) has initiated an in-house ambient monitoring program that builds upon the Center's core capabilities and competencies in inorganic and organic analyses and instrumentation. The program has culminated with the establishment of a fine particulate/air toxics sampling station at the Center's research laboratory in Pittsburgh. This air monitoring station consists of a new 715 ft2 indoor facility housing equipment to monitor continuously gaseous pollutants O3, SO2, NH3, NOy, NOx, CO, H2S, and peroxide, and PM2.5 particulates containing carbon and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. In addition, a fully-instrumented, fourteen bay rack has been constructed to support a variety of ambient monitoring equipment. OST will also collaborate with Consol and the Allegheny (PA) County Health Department in evaluating the performance of PM2.5 FRM samplers. The NETL sampling station will use an existing 10-meter meteorological tower that has been collecting weather-related data for the past seven years. Two in-house laboratories have been completely renovated to support the analysis of PM2.5/air toxics samples, including the installation of a Kratos MS50 high-resolution mass spectrometer for the detailed characterization of organic compounds.

242

Investigation on Per- and Polyfluorinated Compounds in Paired Samples of House Dust and Indoor Air from Norwegian Homes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation on Per- and Polyfluorinated Compounds in Paired Samples of House Dust and Indoor Air from Norwegian Homes ... (13) It turned out that the percentage of home carpeting was positively correlated to these compounds, and as old houses tended to have less carpeting this was suggested to be the reason for the lower PFC levels found in the old houses. ...

Line S. Haug; Sandra Huber; Martin Schlabach; Georg Becher; Cathrine Thomsen

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

243

Chemical Looping Air Separation Unit and Methods of Use  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Looping Air Separation Unit and Methods of Use Looping Air Separation Unit and Methods of Use Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov October 2012 Opportunity Research is currently active on the patent-pending technology "Chemical Looping Air Separation Unit and Methods of Use" that combines the best attributes of chemical looping and oxy-fuel combustion technologies. Following patent approval, the technology will be available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Significance * Combines chemical looping and oxy-fuel technologies * Separates oxygen from air at high efficiencies * Removes CO

244

Table HC1.1.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Stone",1,0.9,3.7,1.4,2.4,1.3,1.6,1.4 "Other",1.5,1.4,4,1.6,3,1.7,1.7,1.5 "FoundationBasement of Single-" "Family Units and Apartments in" "2 to 4 Unit Buildings" "(more...

245

Table HC1-9a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 20.3 20.3 14.8 5.4 NF New England ............................................. 5.4 5.4 Q 5.4 NF Middle Atlantic ........................................... 14.8 14.8 14.8 Q NF Midwest ....................................................... 24.5 -- -- -- NF East North Central ..................................... 17.1 -- -- -- NF

246

Table HC1-10a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.8 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 20.3 -- -- -- NF New England ............................................. 5.4 -- -- -- NF Middle Atlantic ........................................... 14.8 -- -- -- NF Midwest ....................................................... 24.5 24.5 17.1 7.4 NF East North Central ..................................... 17.1 17.1

247

Economizer Applications in Dual-Duct Air-Handling Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper provides analytical tools and engineering methods to evaluate the feasibility of the economizer for dual-duct air-handling units. The results show that the economizer decreases cooling energy consumption without heating energy penalties...

Joo, I.; Liu, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Automatic Continuous Commissioning of Measurement Instruments in Air Handling Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a robust strategy based on a condition-based adaptive statistical method for automatic commissioning of measurement instruments typically employed in air-handling units (AHU). The multivariate statistic method, principal...

Xiao, F.; Wang, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

UC Santa Barbara Policy 6015 Issuing Unit: Housing & Auxiliary Services Date: February 1, 1985  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Campus Food Service. The Director will authorize the placement of all vending machines and will negotiateUC Santa Barbara Policy 6015 Policies Issuing Unit: Housing & Auxiliary Services Date: February 1, 1985 VENDING MACHINES I. REFERENCES: A. UCSB Policies Manual, Policy 6010, Sale or Distribution of Food

Sideris, Thomas C.

250

Table HC7-6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.0 0.9 3.0 Total ............................................... 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 28.7 9.2 6.5 12.1 0.9 7.5 Personal Computers 1 ................... 14.3 5.3 2.9 5.9 0.3 10.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 11.0 4.0 2.4 4.4 0.3 11.4 2 or more .................................... 1.7 0.7 0.2 0.7 Q 30.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

251

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors wereevaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature andrelative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using theheating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Indoor temperatures during sampling ranged from 14o C to 33o C, and relative humidity (RH) varied between 35percentand 74percent. Ventilation rates were increased in some trailers using bathroom fans and vents during some of the sampling events. Ventilation rates measured during some aselection of sampling events varied from 0.14 to 4.3 h-1. Steady state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 10 mu g-m-3 to 1000 mu g-m-3. The formaldehyde concentrations in the trailers were of toxicological significance. The effects of temperature, humidity and ventilation rates were also studied. A linearregression model was built using log of percentage relative humidity, inverse of temperature (in K-1), and inverse log ACH as continuous independent variables, trailermanufacturer as a categorical independent variable, and log of the chemical emission factors as the dependent variable. The coefficients of inverse temperature, log relativehumidity, log inverse ACH with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. The regression model wasfound to explain about 84percent of the variation in the dependent variable. Most VOC concentrations measured indoors in the Purvis THUs were mostly found to be belowvalues reported in earlier studies by Maddalena et al.,1,2 Hodgson et al.,3 and Hippelein4. Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found to be higher than values reported in comparable housing by Hodgson et al.,3. Emissions of phenol were also found to be slightly higher than values reported in earlier studies1,2,3. This study can assist in retrospective formaldehyde exposure assessments of THUs where estimates of the occupants indoor formaldehyde exposures are needed.

Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Air handling unit supply air temperature optimal control during economizer cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most air handling units (AHUs) in commercial buildings have an air economizer cycle for free cooling under certain outside air conditions. During the economizer cycle, the outside air and return air dampers are modulated to seek supply air temperature at its setpoint. The supply air temperature is typically set at 55 F (13 °C) to control humidity in the space. However, dehumidification is not necessary when the outside air is dry. Meanwhile, the space may have less cooling load due to envelope heat loss and/or occupant schedule changes. These facts provide an opportunity to use higher supply air temperature to reduce or eliminate mechanical cooling and terminal box reheat. On the contrary, a higher supply air temperature requires increased air flow as well as fan power. Therefore, an optimization question is formed, through which an optimal supply air temperature is identified to minimize total energy consumption. In this paper a steady-state energy consumption model is established for AHU systems under the economizer, and then an analytical optimization method is used to seek an optimal supply air temperature setpoint to minimize the energy cost. This paper presents AHU system energy modeling, supply air temperature optimization, simulated energy savings, and control sequence development.

Gang Wang; Li Song

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Implementation of the Laboratory Air Handling Unit Systems (LAHU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementation of the Laboratory Air Handling Unit Systems (LAHU) Y. Cui Graduate Student Energy Systems Laboratory University of Nebraska-Lincoln Omaha, NE, USA M. Liu, Ph.D., P.E. Associate Professor Energy Systems Laboratory...-around coils [18, 19], the variable air volume (VAV) fume hoods [8-16] and the usage-based control devices (UBC) [17]. These measures have effectively reduced the cooling energy, preheat energy and fan power consumption, and sometime, improved indoor...

Cui, Y.; Liu, M.; Conger, K.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Table HC11.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005 1.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Total......................................................................... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported) City....................................................................... 47.1 6.9 4.7 2.2 Town..................................................................... 19.0 6.0 4.2 1.9 Suburbs................................................................ 22.7 4.4 4.0 0.5 Rural..................................................................... 22.3 3.2 2.3 0.9 Climate Zone 1 Less than 2,000 CDD and-- Greater than 7,000 HDD.................................... 10.9 1.9 Q 1.3 5,500 to 7,000 HDD........................................... 26.1 9.8 5.7 4.1 4,000 to 5,499 HDD...........................................

255

United_CoolAir_Ex Parte Meeting Memo.pdf  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rod Beever [mailto:rbeever@unitedcoolair.com] Rod Beever [mailto:rbeever@unitedcoolair.com] Sent: Friday, October 05, 2012 10:02 AM To: Cymbalsky, John; Adin, Lucas; Barhydt, Laura; Tong, Clarence Cc: Athar Khan; Neil Tucker; Jack Bardol; maureen_o'dea@casey.senate.gov; brett_doyle@toomey.senate.gov; kevin_stanton@casey.senate.gov Subject: Meeting 10-2-12 at DOE Thank you for providing the opportunity to meet with your group to discuss the regulations for commercial air conditioning as it relates to small business. Our conversation included the following: 1. An explanation about the definition of "Basic Model" and how it relates to the number of units to be tested. 2. The impact of how unit options can be handled in relation to how United CoolAir defines our Basic Models. 3. We discussed the fact that single phase units are not only residential, but are also applied in

256

Table HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.8 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 8.0 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 20.3 1.9 10.0 8.4 Q Q 6.8 New England .............................. 5.4 1.4 4.0 Q Q Q 18.4 Middle Atlantic ............................ 14.8 0.5 6.0 8.4 Q Q 4.6 Midwest ......................................... 24.5 5.4 14.8 4.3 Q Q 19.0 East North Central ...................... 17.1

257

Table HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 20.3 3.3 4.2 4.9 7.8 2.6 6.8 6.4 New England .............................. 5.4 0.8 1.1 1.3 2.3 0.6 1.6 9.9 Middle Atlantic ............................ 14.8 2.6 3.2 3.5 5.6 2.0 5.2 7.7 Midwest ......................................... 24.5 3.7 5.2 6.8 8.9 2.8 7.4 5.8 East North Central ......................

258

Table HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.5 1.6 1.2 1.0 1.1 1.1 0.8 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.3 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 20.3 1.5 2.4 2.1 2.8 3.0 8.5 8.8 New England .............................. 5.4 0.4 0.7 0.4 0.8 0.9 2.3 11.3 Middle Atlantic ............................ 14.8 1.1 1.7 1.7 2.0 2.2 6.2 11.2 Midwest ......................................... 24.5 2.8 3.7 3.6 2.9 3.5 8.1 10.2 East North Central ...................... 17.1 2.0 2.5 2.5 2.0 2.6 5.5 11.9

259

Table HC1-8a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.5 0.8 1.3 1.3 1.4 Total .............................................................. 107.0 49.9 18.0 21.2 17.9 4.2 Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 20.3 7.7 4.5 4.7 3.4 7.4 New England ............................................. 5.4 2.1 1.6 0.7 1.1 13.4 Middle Atlantic ........................................... 14.8 5.6 2.9 4.0 2.3 8.5 Midwest ....................................................... 24.5 11.1 4.9 4.8 3.7 10.1 East North Central ..................................... 17.1 8.3 3.0 3.4 2.5

260

Demolition of High-Rise Public Housing Increases Particulate Matter Air Pollution in Communities of High-Risk Asthmatics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) air pollution, which may ad- versely affect the respiratory health of nearby residents. DemolitionDemolition of High-Rise Public Housing Increases Particulate Matter Air Pollution in Communities of High-Risk Asthmatics Samuel Dorevitch Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences

Illinois at Chicago, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Mechanical Air Distribution Interactions with the House System in Hot and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Return leaks can also draw in gases like radon as weU as pesticide and herbicide residues present in the soil around the home. A 1989 study at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories found that an air handler with a poorly sealed retum plenum could exert a... quantities of moisture, radon. allergens, or particulates into the home. Worse yet, what if this interaction causes health problems or a house fire. This is a set of potential problems that simply can't be ignored. There have been successful lawsuits...

Garrett, D. A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Passive Room-to-Room Air Transfer, Fresno, California (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In this project, IBACOS, a U.S. Department of Energy Building America team, assessed a strategy for providing conditioned air to bedrooms when the bedroom doors are closed and measured potential thermal discomfort that occupants may experience when this strategy is used. Builders can use this information to discuss space conditioning options for low-load houses with their clients to determine acceptable comfort levels for occupants in these cost-optimized, energy-efficient houses.

263

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-conditioning units part Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fans... : Use of mechanical equipment such as refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans... -handling units and mechanical, compressed air, and electric ......

264

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,5.3,4.7,2.8,1.9,3.1,3.6,7.5 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,21.5,24.1,17.8,11.2,18.8,13,31.1 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,21,23.5,17.4,11,18.6,12.6,30.3 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.5,0.6,0.4,"Q","Q",0.5,0.8

265

Air heating of passive houses in cold climates: Investigation using detailed dynamic simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The passive house (PH) standard was originally defined for Central Europe and has subsequently been applied to many cold climate countries. In these conditions, the relation between this standard and the air heating (AH) is not clear while both concepts are usually associated. Furthermore, the AH provides a way to simplify the space-heating distribution system. The present contribution investigates the feasibility of the AH concept in PH along with its challenges in terms of thermal dynamics: the magnitude of the AH temperature needed, the temperature difference between rooms, the impact of internal gains, the influence of thermal losses from ventilation ducts and the AH control. This is performed using detailed dynamic simulations (TRNSYS) on a typical detached house typology. Practically, four cold climate zones are considered as well as different insulation levels and construction materials. Results show limitations related to a centralized AH as well as provide guidelines for a consistent AH design in cold climates. In addition, a simple analytical method used for the design of German PH is tested and proved accurate enough to estimate the maximal AH temperature during the heating season.

Laurent Georges; Monica Berner; Hans Martin Mathisen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

TEE-0062 - In the Matter of United CoolAir Corp. | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TEE-0062 - In the Matter of United CoolAir Corp. TEE-0062 - In the Matter of United CoolAir Corp. TEE-0062 - In the Matter of United CoolAir Corp. This Decision and Order considers an Application for Exception filed by United CoolAir Corporation (United CoolAir) seeking exception relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 431, Subpart F, Energy Conservation Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Commercial Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Energy Conservation Standards (Commercial Air Conditioner Standards).1 In its Application, United CoolAir asserts that the firm would suffer serious hardship, inequity, or unfair distribution of burdens if required to comply with the 13 SEER energy efficiency standard effective January 1, 2010, 10 C.F.R. § 431.97(b). If United CoolAir's Application for Exception were granted, the firm would

267

TEE-0062 - In the Matter of United CoolAir Corp. | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 - In the Matter of United CoolAir Corp. 2 - In the Matter of United CoolAir Corp. TEE-0062 - In the Matter of United CoolAir Corp. This Decision and Order considers an Application for Exception filed by United CoolAir Corporation (United CoolAir) seeking exception relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 431, Subpart F, Energy Conservation Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Commercial Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Energy Conservation Standards (Commercial Air Conditioner Standards).1 In its Application, United CoolAir asserts that the firm would suffer serious hardship, inequity, or unfair distribution of burdens if required to comply with the 13 SEER energy efficiency standard effective January 1, 2010, 10 C.F.R. § 431.97(b). If United CoolAir's Application for Exception were granted, the firm would

268

Infiltration and indoor air quality in a sample of passive-solar and super-insulated houses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infiltration rates and indoor air quality were measured in 16 solar and super insulated houses in California. In this area careful construction can, at reasonable cost, reduce infiltration to 0.2 to 0.5 air changes per hour (40 to 100 ft/sup 3//min). To evaluate possible indoor air quality problems at these low infiltration rates, levels of three pollutants were monitored in early 1982 during weather cold enough to encourage occupants to keep their windows closed. NO/sub 2/, formaldehyde, and radon were measured using inexpensive, passive monitors. The blower door infiltration measurements are described and relationships between relevant building and occupant characteristics and observed levels of pollutants are discussed. These levels are also compared to current standards; implications for housing design and construction techniques are discussed, and further research needs are suggested.

Wagner, B.S,; Rosenfeld, A.H.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Performance and Impact from Duct Repair and Ventilation Modifications of Two Newly Constructed Manufactured Houses Located in a Hot and Humid Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

season. By design, the major difference between houses was the type of air conditioning units. House A had a standard split air conditioner and House B had a twospeed split air conditioner. In an effort to make the buildings more similar, the building...

Withers, C.; Moyer, N.; Chasar, D.; Chandra, S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Financial analysis of the implementation of a Drain Water Heat Recovery unit in residential housing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract One of the ways of diminishing energy consumption for hot water heating is the use of Drain Water Heat Recovery (DWHR) units. The aim of the use of these devices is thermal energy recovery from warm drain water and transferring it to incoming cold water. This paper presents the calculation model that allows the estimation of the financial efficiency of the project involving the construction of a shower Drain Water Heat Recovery system in a single-family dwelling house. The presented method of investment risk assessment can be used for decision making by individual users, designers and others. The study of the financial performance was carried out for the various parameters of the installation and the different heat recovery system configurations. From investors point of view the most beneficial option of heat recovery system installation is the system in which preheated water is fed to both the hot water heater and shower mixing valve. Additionally, it was proved that obtained financial results are affected by showering time and water consumption. DWHR units will be therefore particularly beneficial to apply in case of swimming pools, sports facilities or fitness clubs, where high rotation of users is observed.

Daniel S?y?; Sabina Kordana

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

NOISE CONTROL METHODS FOR A RECIPROCATING AIR COMPRESSOR USED IN FUEL CELL AUXILIARY POWER UNIT (APU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOISE CONTROL METHODS FOR A RECIPROCATING AIR COMPRESSOR USED IN FUEL CELL AUXILIARY POWER UNIT Air pollution Noise pollution Engine life Remedy Fuel cell APU Quieter Low emissions Exhaust Heat, Case History: Noise control approaches for an air-compressor in a fuel-cell auxiliary power unit, Noise

Carver, Jeffrey C.

272

Table HC7-5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.3 2.1 3.0 1.6 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 67.5 59.0 2.0 1.7 4.8 7.0 Personal Computers 1 ................... 45.7 41.1 1.3 0.9 2.4 8.6 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 34.1 30.5 1.0 0.7 1.9 9.7 2 or more .................................... 7.4 7.0 Q Q 0.2 18.4 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

273

ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICAL EMISSIONS IN FOUR FEMA TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS – FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composite Wood Products, California Air Resources Board.in Air and Emission Rates from Wood Products Using a LargeComposite Wood Products, California Air Resources Board.

Maddalena, Randy L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Automated Proactive Techniques for Commissioning Air-Handling Units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many buildings today use sophisticated building automation systems (BASs) to manage a wide and varied range of building systems. Although the capabilities of the BASs seem to have increased over time, many buildings still are not properly commissioned, operated or maintained. Lack of or improper commissioning, the inability of the building operators to grasp the complex controls, and lack of proper maintenance leads to inefficient operations and reduced lifetimes of the equipment. If regularly scheduled manual maintenance or re-commissioning practices are adopted, they can be expensive and time consuming. Automated proactive commissioning and diagnostic technologies address two of the main barriers to commissioning: cost and schedules. Automated proactive continuous commissioning tools can reduce both the cost and time associated with commissioning, as well as enhance the persistence of commissioning fixes. In the long run, automation even offers the potential for automatically correcting problems by reconfiguring controls or changing control algorithms dynamically. This paper will discuss procedures and processes that can be used to automate and continuously commission the economizer operation and outdoor-air ventilation systems of an air-handling unit.

Katipamula, Srinivas (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Brambley, Michael R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Luskay, Larry (Portland Energy Conservation, Inc.)

2003-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Housing Unit Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,4.9,5.4,3.5,2.4,4.3,3.2,8.1 "New England",5.5,1.3,1.3,1,0.6,1.2,0.7,2.3 "Middle Atlantic",15.1,3.7,4.1,2.5,1.8,3.1,2.5,5.8 "Midwest",25.6,6.5,6.6,4.7,3,4.8,3.5,9.4

276

"Table HC2.1 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, By Housing Unit Type, 2009"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, By Housing Unit Type, 2009" Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, By Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,,,"2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" ,,"Detached","Attached" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.8,10.9,1.8,3.1,4.4,0.5 "New England",5.5,3.1,0.3,1,1,0.1 "Middle Atlantic",15.3,7.8,1.5,2.1,3.4,0.4 "Midwest",25.9,18,1.2,1.9,3.7,1.1

277

Comparison of Large Scale Renewable Energy Projects for the United States Air Force.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis focused on the performance of large-scale renewable energy projects for the United States Air Force. As global energy demands continue to rise, the… (more)

Hughes, Jeffrey S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Table HC2.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................... 111.1 72.1 7.6 7.8 16.7 6.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ............... 35.5 17.8 3.1 3.7 7.3 3.6 Use a Personal Computer............................. 75.6 54.2 4.5 4.0 9.4 3.4 Number of Desktop PCs 1.............................................................. 50.3 33.9 3.1 3.0 7.6 2.7 2.............................................................. 16.2 12.7 0.9 0.7 1.4 0.5 3 or More................................................. 9.0 7.7 0.5 0.4 0.5 Q Number of Laptop PCs 1.............................................................. 22.5 16.0 1.4 1.3 3.2 0.6 2.............................................................. 4.0 3.2 0.2 Q 0.4 Q 3 or More.................................................

279

Table HC2.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million U.S. Housing Units Total U.S............................................................ 111.1 72.1 7.6 7.8 16.7 6.9 Cooking Appliances Conventional Ovens Use an Oven............................................... 109.6 71.3 7.4 7.7 16.4 6.8 1.............................................................. 103.3 66.2 7.2 7.4 15.9 6.7 2 or More................................................. 6.2 5.1 Q 0.3 0.5 Q Do Not Use an Oven................................... 1.5 0.7 Q Q 0.4 Q Most-Used Oven Fuel Electric..................................................... 67.9 45.5 4.4 3.7 10.7 3.7 Natural Gas.............................................. 36.4 22.0 3.0 3.9 5.6 1.8 Propane/LPG........................................... 5.2 3.8 Q Q Q 1.3 Self-Cleaning Oven Use a Self-Cleaning Oven........................

280

Variability in surface ozone background over the United States: Implications for air quality policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variability in surface ozone background over the United States: Implications for air quality policy background over the United States: Implications for air quality policy, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D24), 4787, doi Agency (EPA) accounts for a background O3 level above which risk to human health is assessed. Since

Liu, Hongyu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A Specific Multi-channel Photon-Counting Unit for Air-Pollution Measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Specific Multi-channel Photon-Counting Unit for Air-Pollution Measurement Papageorgas P.1.g. confocal microscopy), air pollution optical measurements, laser sounding of the atmosphere for the in situ quantitative monitoring of up to five air pollutants simultaneously and one calibration channel

Athens, University of

282

Economic and Policy Implications of Urban Air Pollution in the United States: 1970 to 2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

awareness of the link between urban air pollutant levels and negative health effects have led to numerous the demand for air pollution health. This framework provides a way to consistently value effectsEconomic and Policy Implications of Urban Air Pollution in the United States: 1970 to 2000 by Trent

283

The Effects of Climate and Electricity Emissions on Air Quality in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effects of Climate and Electricity Emissions on Air Quality in the United States by Steven D and Motivation 1 A. Background ­ Ozone and Fine Particulate Matter 2 B. The National Ambient Air Quality Standards 4 C. Improving Future Air Quality 6 D. Research Overview 8 Figures 10 References 15 Chapter 2

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

284

Ordinances to enable energy efficiency in rental housing in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improved energy efficiency in rental housing is important from the perspectives of environmental, economic, and social policy, but upgrades to such buildings lag those of owner-occupied properties. With myriad reasons to ...

Coleman, Patrick J., M.C.P. (Patrick Joseph). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Housing growth in and near United States protected areas limits their conservation value  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...II). By contrast, national forests are managed for sustainable use and are afforded the least protection...administrative boundaries of national forests is prized real estate. Future Housing Growth in and near Protected Areas...

Volker C. Radeloff; Susan I. Stewart; Todd J. Hawbaker; Urs Gimmi; Anna M. Pidgeon; Curtis H. Flather; Roger B. Hammer; David P. Helmers

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Wind power systems for zero net energy housing in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work investigates the feasibility of renewable energy housing development in the U.S. using wind power and solar thermal systems to attain zero net energy consumption. The over all objective was to determine how the wind power and solar thermal system designs and economics differ with various climates, wind and solar resources, energy prices, and state incentives, such as net-metering. Five U.S. cities, one in each of the five climate zones, were selected for this study based on their potential for wind power. A zero net energy housing design tool was developed in order to analyze and compare various system designs. The energy performance and economics of the designs were compared for various sizes of housing development, for seven turbine models, and selected heating systems. The results suggest that while there are some economical options for wind powered zero net energy housing developments, they are generally more expensive (except in the warmest climate zone) than housing with natural gas heating. In all of the cases, the economies of scale for large-scale wind turbines gave more of an economic advantage than net-metering programs gave small- and medium-scale wind turbines.

Melissa R. Elkinton; Jon G. McGowan; James F. Manwell

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Tree and forest effects on air quality and human health in the United David J. Nowak a, *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tree and forest effects on air quality and human health in the United States David J. Nowak a 26 May 2014 Available online xxx Keywords: Air pollution removal Air quality Ecosystem services Human and value of the effects of trees and forests on air quality and human health across the United States

288

Cooling energy efficiency and classroom air environment of a school building operated by the heat recovery air conditioning unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The recently-built school buildings have adopted novel heat recovery ventilator and air conditioning system. Heat recovery efficiency of the heat recovery facility and energy conservation ratio of the air conditioning unit were analytically modeled, taking the ventilation networks into account. Following that, school classroom displacement ventilation and its thermal stratification and indoor air quality indicated by the CO2 concentration have been numerically modeled concerning the effects of delivering ventilation flow rate and supplying air temperature. Numerical results indicate that the promotion of mechanical ventilation rate can simultaneously boost the dilution of indoor air pollutants and the non-uniformity of indoor thermal and pollutant distributions. Subsequent energy performance analysis demonstrates that classroom energy demands for ventilation and cooling could be reduced with the promotion of heat recovery efficiency of the ventilation facility, and the energy conservation ratio of the air conditioning unit decreases with the increasing temperatures of supplying air. Fitting correlations of heat recovery ventilation and cooling energy conservation have been presented.

Yang Wang; Fu-Yun Zhao; Jens Kuckelkorn; Di Liu; Li-Qun Liu; Xiao-Chuan Pan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Compatible and Cost-Effective Fault Diagnostic Solutions for Air Handling Unit–Variable Air Volume and Air Handling Unit–Constant Air Volume Systems- 2014 BTO Peer Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presenter: Jin Wen, Drexel University The goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a library of diagnostics decision-support tools for medium-to-large-sized commercial buildings that use air handling unit (AHU) systems that can enable cost-effective diagnostics solutions (both embedded and add-on solutions) for existing buildings.

290

Using Product Specific Simulation Models in a Tool for Manual Commissioning of Air Handling Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This short paper describes an outline of a tool for manual commissioning of air handling units. The prototype tool is implemented EES professional version that can generate standalone programs. The idea is to use the benefit of simulation models...

Eriksson, J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction HEPA filtered vacuum radioactive air emission units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This notice of construction (NOC) requests a categorical approval for construction and operation of certain portable high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtered vacuum radionuclide airborne emission units (HVUs). Approval of this NOC application is intended to allow operation of the HVUs without prior project-specific approval. This NOC does not request replacement or supersedence of any previous agreements/approvals by the Washington State Department of Health for the use of vacuums on the Hanford Site. These previous agreement/approvals include the approved NOCs for the use of EuroClean HEPA vacuums at the T Plant Complex (routine technical meeting 12/10/96) and the Kelly Decontamination System at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant (routine technical meeting 06/25/96). Also, this NOC does not replace or supersede the agreement reached regarding the use of HEPA hand-held/shop-vacuum cleaners for routine cleanup activities conducted by the Environmental Restoration Project. Routine cleanup activities are conducted during the surveillance and maintenance of inactive waste sites (Radioactive Area Remedial Action Project) and inactive facilities. HEPA hand-held/shop-vacuum cleaners are used to clean up spot surface contamination areas found during outdoor radiological field surveys, and to clean up localized radiologically contaminated material (e.g., dust, dirt, bird droppings, animal feces, liquids, insects, spider webs, etc.). This agreement, documented in the October 12, 1994 Routine Meeting Minutes, is based on routine cleanup consisting of spot cleanup of low-level contamination provided that, in each case, the source term potential would be below 0.1 millirem per year.

JOHNSON, R.E.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

From Modelica Models to Fault Diagnosis in Air Handling Units Raymond Sterling1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From Modelica Models to Fault Diagnosis in Air Handling Units Raymond Sterling1 , Peter Struss2 Handling Unit (AHU). This solution is derived from a general first-principle Modelica model and exploits 4 presents the modelica models and its calibration. In section 5 an example of the complete tool

Cengarle, María Victoria

293

"Table HC10.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by U.S. Census Region...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Shingle)",1.9,0.7,0.3,0.7,"Q" "Stone",1,0.4,"Q",0.5,"Q" "Other",1.5,"Q",0.7,0.5,"Q" "FoundationBasement of Single-" "Family Units and Apartments in" "2 to 4 Unit Buildings" "(more...

294

"Table HC11.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Shingle)",1.9,0.7,0.6,0.2 "Stone",1,0.4,0.4,"N" "Other",1.5,"Q","Q","Q" "FoundationBasement of Single-" "Family Units and Apartments in" "2 to 4 Unit Buildings" "(more...

295

Energy performance of direct expansion air handling unit in office buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Buildings and their occupants generate a large amount of carbon emissions. In Korea, buildings contribute to about 30% of the total greenhouse gases emissions, and the proportion has been rapidly increasing to the level of the developed counties (i.e., more than 40% of the total emissions. A direct expansion air handling unit, of which a refrigerant is directly delivered to the heating and cooling, has a potential to save cooling and heating energy use, compared to water-based central air conditioning systems. The aim of this study is to compare heating and cooling energy uses of an identical office building but with different air conditioning systems, i.e. direct expansion and water-based air conditioning systems. Dynamic building energy simulations that reflect the actual use of a monitored building and its air handling unit operation have been conducted in this study. Simulation results show good agreement with the actual energy consumption obtained from the field measurements of the building. Our study quantifies the amount of cooling and heating energy uses saved by a direct expansion air handing unit and reveals reasons for this savings, i.e. higher energy efficiency of the unit and reduction in pump and fan energy demands.

Geun Young Yun; Jongdae Choi; Jeong Tai Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Table HC1-7a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.4 Q Q Q 15.6 More than 20 Floors ... Q Q Q Q Q NF FoundationBasement of Single-Family Homes and Apartments in Buildings With 2 to 4 Units (More...

297

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,20.8,23.6,17,11.3,19.1,13,30.7 "1.",28.6,9.4,9.1,4.5,2.4,3.2,5.7,12.6 "2.",29.5,6.8,8,5.8,3.7,5.2,4.2,10.2

298

Determining Critical Pressure and Duct Leakage in VAV Air-Handling Units  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Determining Critical Pressure and Duct Leakage in VAV Air-Handling Units Determining Critical Pressure and Duct Leakage in VAV Air-Handling Units Speaker(s): Clifford Federspiel Date: December 3, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Nance Matson Fans for moving air in buildings use a significant amount of energy. It is well known that fan energy use in variable-air-volume (VAV) systems can be reduced by resetting the supply duct pressure. The standard way to reset duct pressure is by controlling the most-open terminal damper to a nearly open position. Most systems can't measure terminal damper positions, so pressures are either not reset at all or use ad hoc resetting strategies that are configured sub-optimally. In this seminar I will describe a new method of determining the critical supply duct pressure for VAV systems.

299

Room Air Conditioners | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Room Air Conditioners Room Air Conditioners Room Air Conditioners July 1, 2012 - 5:35pm Addthis A window air conditioner is one solution to cooling part of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/kschulze. A window air conditioner is one solution to cooling part of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/kschulze. What does this mean for me? Room air conditioners are less expensive and disruptive to install than central air conditioning systems. Room air conditioners can be a cost-effective alternative to central air conditioning systems. How does it work? Room air conditioners work by cooling one part of your home. Room or window air conditioners cool rooms rather than the entire home or business. If they provide cooling only where they're needed, room air conditioners are less expensive to operate than central units, even though

300

A plug and play framework for an HVAC air handling unit and temperature sensor auto recognition technique.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A plug and play framework for an HVAC air handling unit control system is proposed in this study. This is the foundation and the first… (more)

Zhou, Xiaohui

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Planning for a multi-generational future : policies, regulations, and designs for multi-generational housing in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-generational housing is a rising trend that is increasingly being considered as a viable housing option for the Boomerang generation, Baby Boomers and the aging population, and immigrant families. Cultural preferences, ...

Shin, Stephanie H

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Impact of IRAQI invasion on United States energy and economic security. Hearing before the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, Second session  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the Hearing before the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session, September 5, 1990 on the Impact of Iraqi Invasion on United States Energy and Economic Security. This hearing examines the long-term economic and energy security of the United States in relation to the Persian Gulf crisis and how to reduce our dangerous reliance on an unstable energy supply.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Experimental Tests and Predictive Model of an Adsorptive Air Conditioning Unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An adsorption air conditioning unit has been built operating with a heat and mass recovery cycle and a zeolite?water pair. A new consolidated adsorbent composite with good heat transfer properties has been developed and implemented in the adsorber. At an ...

Florence Poyelle; Jean-Jacques Guilleminot; Francis Meunier

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

304

Feasibility Study of Developing a Virtual Chilled Water Flow Meter at Air Handling Unit Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, a virtual Air handling unit (AHU) level water flow meter is explored by using a control valve as a measurement device. The flow through the valve is indirectly calculated using differential pressure over both the valve and its...

Song, L.; Swamy, A.; Shim, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Geothermal Energy Development in the Eastern United States: Technical assistance report No. 6 geothermal space heating and airconditioning -- McGuire Air Force Base, New Jersey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of utilizing the geothermal (66 F) water resource for space heating and cooling of 200 of the 1452 housing units at McGuire AFB is suggested. Using projections of future costs of gas, coal and electricity made by DOD and by industry (Westinghouse), the relative costs of the geothermal-water-plus-heat-pump system and the otherwise-planned central gas heating (to be converted to coal in 1984) and air-conditioning (using individual electric units) system are compared. For heating with the geothermal/heat-pump system, an outlet temperature of 130 F is selected, requiring a longer running time than the conventional system (at 180 F) but permitting a COP (coefficient of performance) of the heat pump of about 3.4. For cooling (obtained in this study by changing directions of water flow, not refrigerant cycles), the change in temperature is less, and a COP near 4.5 is obtained. The cost of cooling in the summer months would be significantly less than the cost of using individual electric air-conditioners. Thus, by using nonreversible heat pumps, geothermal water is used to heat and to cool a section of the housing compound, minimizing operating expenditures. It is estimated that, to drill 1000 ft deep production and reinjection wells and to install ten heat pumps, heat exchangers and piping, would require a capital outlay of $643 K. This cost would replace the capital cost of purchasing and installing 200 air-conditioning units and 14% of the cost of the future coal-fired central heating system (which would otherwise serve all 1452 housing units at McGuire). The net additional capital outlay would be $299 K, which could be amortized in 10 years by the lower operating cost of the geothermal system if electricity and coal prices escalate as industry suggests. If the coal and electricity costs rise at the more modest rates that DOD projects, the capital costs would be amortized in a 15 year period.

Hill, F.K.; Briesen R. von

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

The relationship between filter pressure drop, indoor air quality, and energy consumption in rooftop HVAC units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract HVAC filters are commonly used to decrease exposure to particulate matter, yet little is known about the energy impacts and air quality consequences of high efficiency filters installed in commercial buildings. To explore these effects, system airflow, filter and coil pressure drop, fan pressure rise, and power draw were measured, and cooling capacity and compressor power were modeled for at least four filter pressure drops in 15 rooftop units equipped with and without fan speed control. Energy implications and clean-air-delivery-rate were estimated for a large dataset of filters divided into four efficiency (MERV) categories. Field measurements conducted on units without fan speed control showed that increased filter pressure drop decreased flow, cooling capacity, and power. For a unit with fan speed control, the same increase in pressure drop resulted in the same magnitude change of fan power but in the opposite direction, and other parameters were unchanged. Replacing MERV 8 with MERV 13/14 resulted in higher energy consumption (2–4%) during cooling mode for both unit types, energy savings during fan-only mode (8–13%) in units without fan speed control, and increased energy consumption in fan-only mode (11–18%) in the unit with fan speed control. Energy consumption increases were offset by improvement in clean-air-delivery-rate, especially for PM2.5 (2.9–3.8 times increase going from MERV 8 to MERV 13/14), with larger benefits achieved for the unit with fan speed control. A comprehensive understanding of the impact of filtration is essential to selecting the appropriate efficiency of filters that ensures low-energy use and a healthy indoor environment.

Marwa Zaatari; Atila Novoselac; Jeffrey Siegel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-MECH-08 Ice Storage Air Conditioning (ISAC) Units (Page 1 of 2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling with the compressor). Yes No #12;INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-MECH-08 Ice Storage AirINSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-MECH-08 Ice Storage Air Conditioning (ISAC) Units (Page 1 of 2) Site Address: Enforcement Agency: Permit Number: 2008 Residential Compliance Forms August 2009 Ice Storage Air

308

Self-Correcting HVAC Controls: Algorithms for Sensors and Dampers in Air-Handling Units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the self-correction algorithms developed in the Self-Correcting Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) Controls project funded jointly by the Bonneville Power Administration and the Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The algorithms address faults for temperature sensors, humidity sensors, and dampers in air-handling units and correction of persistent manual overrides of automated control systems. All faults considered create energy waste when left uncorrected as is frequently the case in actual systems.

Fernandez, Nicholas; Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

Public Housing: A Tailored Approach to Energy Retrofits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over one million HUD-supported public housing units provide rental housing for eligible low-income families across the country. A survey of over 100 PHAs across the country indicated that there is a high level of interest in developing low cost solutions that improve energy efficiency and can be seamlessly included in the refurbishment process. Further, PHAs, have incentives (both internal and external) to reduce utility bills. ARIES worked with two public housing authorities (PHAs) to develop packages of energy efficiency retrofit measures the PHAs can cost effectively implement with their own staffs in the normal course of housing operations at the time when units are refurbished between occupancies. The energy efficiency turnover protocols emphasized air infiltration reduction, duct sealing and measures that improve equipment efficiency. ARIES documented implementation in ten housing units. Reductions in average air leakage were 16-20% and duct leakage reductions averaged 38%. Total source energy consumption savings was estimated at 6-10% based on BEopt modeling with a simple payback of 1.7 to 2.2 years. Implementation challenges were encountered mainly related to required operational changes and budgetary constraints. Nevertheless, simple measures can feasibly be accomplished by PHA staff at low or no cost. At typical housing unit turnover rates, these measures could impact hundreds of thousands of unit per year nationally.

Dentz, J.; Conlin, F.; Podorson, D.; Alaigh, K.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Solar heating and earth insulation for economical houses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The implementation of manufactured solar energy systems for home use has been stagnated by high costs. The Rural Housing Research Unit has directed a major portion of its research efforts toward site built warm air solar systems. These systems are integrated into the house structure and have been found to be effective and economical. Several earth embanked structures have been built and evaluated. This paper describes the design considerations, the construction experience, and the results achieved.

Newman, J.O.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Solar heating and earth insulation for economical houses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The implementation of manufactured solar energy systems for home use has been stagnated by high costs. The Rural Housing Research Unit has directed a major portion of its research efforts toward site built warm air solar systems. These systems are integrated into the house structure and have been found to be effective and economical. Several earth embanked structures have been built and evaluated. This paper describes the design considerations, the construction experience, and the results achieved.

Newman, J.O.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Retrofitting Inefficient Rooftop Air-Conditioning Units Reduces U.S. Navy Energy Use (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Navy's overall energy strategy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) partnered with the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) to demonstrate market-ready energy efficiency measures, renewable energy generation, and energy systems integration. One such technology - retrofitting rooftop air-conditioning units with an advanced rooftop control system - was identified as a promising source for reducing energy use and costs, and can contribute to increasing energy security.

Not Available

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,25.8,28,19.6,12.7,20.2,16,37.3 "2 or More",3.7,0.3,0.5,0.9,0.4,1.7,"Q",0.5 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,0.3,"Q","N","Q",0.5,0.8

314

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Space Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.5,0.3,0.2,"Q",0.2,0.3,0.6 "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,26.2,28.5,20.4,13,21.8,16.3,37.9 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,25.9,28.1,20.3,12.9,21.8,16,37.3

315

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC7.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" HC7.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,26.1,28.5,20.2,12.9,21.8,16.3,37.8 "1.",103.3,25.1,27.1,19.2,12.3,19.6,15.8,36.3 "2 or More",6.2,0.9,1.4,1,0.6,2.2,0.5,1.5

316

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Electronics Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,17.1,10.8,4.2,1.8,1.6,10.3,20.6 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,9.6,18,16.4,11.3,20.3,6.4,17.9 "Number of Desktop PCs" "1.",50.3,8.3,14.2,11.4,7.2,9.2,5.3,14.2

317

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.9,0.9,"Q","Q","Q",1.3,2.3 "500 to 999",23.8,10.5,7.3,3.3,1.4,1.2,6.6,12.9 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,5.8,7,3.8,2.2,2,3.9,8.9

318

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Household Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,13.5,8.5,4.3,2,1.8,5.9,13.1 "2 Persons",34.8,6,8.8,7.3,4.4,8.4,3.5,8.4 "3 Persons",18.4,3.1,4.7,3.4,2.5,4.6,2,5.8 "4 Persons",15.9,2.2,3.5,3.3,2.7,4.3,2.2,5.1

319

"Table HC1.3 Heated Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Heated Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" 3 Heated Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Heated Floorspace (square feet)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Fewer than 500","500 to 999","1,000 to 1,499","1,500 to 1,999","2,000 to 2,499","2,500 to 2,999","3,000 or More" "Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,6.1,27.7,26,17.6,10,"7 7.8",11.6 "No Main Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"N","N","N","N","N","N","N" "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,6.1,27.7,26,17.6,10,"7 7.8",11.6 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,6.1,27.7,26,17.6,10,"7 7.8",11.6

320

"Table HC1.4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" 4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Cooled Floorspace (square feet)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Fewer than 500","500 to 999","1,000 to 1,499","1,500 to 1,999","2,000 to 2,499","2,500 to 2,999","3,000 or More" "Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,49.2,15.1,15.6,11.1,7,5.2,8 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,31.3,15.1,15.6,11.1,7,5.2,8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,30.4,14.6,15.4,11.1,6.9,5.2,7.9 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,1,0.5,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q" "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,17.8,"N","N","N","N","N","N"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Evluating Through-Wall Air Transfer Fans, Pittburgh, Pennsylvania  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In this project, Building America team IBACOS performed field testing in a new construction unoccupied test house in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to evaluate HVAC distribution systems during heating, cooling, and midseason conditions.

322

Heterotrophic bacteria in an air-handling system.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...well-maintained air-handling system with no reported...microbiology of building air-handling systems (AHSs) first...encountered in the AHS. MATERIALS AND METHODS The AHS...large built-up air-handling units (AHUs), housed...September 1990. A schematic diagram of AHU 1 and the closest...

P Hugenholtz; J A Fuerst

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wood",13.1,2.5,2.9,4,3.7 "Fuel Oil",7.7,6.3,0.5,0.7,0.2 "Kerosene",1.7,0.5,0.4,0.6,0.2 "Solar",1.2,0.2,0.2,0.3,0.5 "Electricity End Uses2" "(more than one may apply)" "Space...

324

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Fuel Oil",7.7,5.1,0.4,0.7,1.3,0.1 "Kerosene",1.7,1.1,"Q","Q","Q",0.5 "Solar",1.2,1.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Electricity End Uses2" "(more than one may apply)" "Space...

325

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

il",7.7,6.3,2.6,0.8,1.8,3.7,2.3,1.1,0.3 "Kerosene",1.7,0.5,0.2,"Q",0.2,0.4,0.2,0.2,"N" "Solar",1.2,0.2,0.1,"Q",0.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Electricity End Uses2" "(more than one may...

326

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil",7.7,2.4,0.6,1.5,1,0.8,0.5,0.4,0.3 "Kerosene",1.7,0.2,"Q",0.1,0.2,0.4,0.2,0.3,0.2 "Solar",1.2,0.1,"Q",0.2,0.2,0.2,0.3,0.2,0.2 "Electricity End Uses2" "(more than one may...

327

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Fuel Oil",7.7,4.6,2.9,"Q","Q","Q" "Kerosene",1.7,0.8,0.7,0.1,"Q","Q" "Solar",1.2,0.5,0.1,0.3,0.3,0.1 "Electricity End Uses3" "(more than one may apply)" "Space...

328

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Fuel Oil",7.7,2.2,2.4,1.1,1.1,0.9 "Kerosene",1.7,0.4,0.5,0.3,0.2,0.3 "Solar",1.2,0.2,0.6,0.2,0.1,0.1 "Electricity End Uses2" "(more than one may apply)" "Space...

329

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Satellite",2.7,0.6,0.3,"Q",0.1,"Q","Q",0.3,0.1,0.1,"Q" "DSLFiber Optic",33.7,7.4,5,1.8,0.7,0.6,1.9,2.4,0.8,1.2,0.4 "Dial-Up",5.4,1.5,1.1,"Q",0.3,0.1,0.5,0.5,...

330

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,3.9,7.1,7.1,5.6,4,2.8,6,2.7 "Satellite",2.7,0.3,0.6,0.6,0.5,0.2,0.1,0.4,0.2 "DSLFiber Optic",33.7,3.9,6.6,7.3,5.1,3.8,2.4,4.8,3.1 "Dial-Up",5.4,1,1.5,1.3,0.7,0.4,0.2,0.3,0.7 "Not...

331

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.7,1.6,4.6,4.2,5.7,5.4,5.3,5 "Satellite",2.7,0.3,"Q",0.2,0.2,0.4,0.5,0.5,0.6 "DSLFiber Optic",33.7,3.9,1.3,3.6,3.6,5,4.9,5.6,5.9 "Dial-Up",5.4,0.7,0.2,0.6,0.6,0.9,0.8,0.9,0.7 "Not...

332

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

apply)" "Cable",36.5,24.1,2.6,2.6,6,1.2 "Satellite",2.7,2.2,"Q",0.1,0.2,0.2 "DSLFiber Optic",33.7,24.6,1.9,1.9,4.3,1.2 "Dial-Up",5.4,4,0.2,0.3,0.7,0.2 "Not Specified",4.5,2.5,0.2...

333

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Satellite",2.7,0.9,0.4,"Q",0.1,0.1,"N","Q",0.2,"Q",0.1,0.4,0.2,"Q" "DSLFiber Optic",33.7,14.1,7.5,0.8,1.4,2.2,1.1,1.9,2.1,0.5,1.6,4.5,3.3,1.3 "Dial-Up",5.4,2,0.9,0.2,0.1...

334

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

may apply)" "Cable",36.5,9.8,7.7,10.9,8.1 "Satellite",2.7,0.3,0.6,0.9,0.8 "DSLFiber Optic",33.7,4.3,7.4,14.1,8 "Dial-Up",5.4,0.6,1.5,2,1.3 "Not Specified",4.5,0.5,1,2,1.1 "No...

335

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,2.6,1.2,1.4,7.2,3.6,1.9,1.6 "Satellite",2.7,0.3,0.1,"Q",0.1,0.2,0.1,"Q","Q" "DSLFiber Optic",33.7,4.3,1.3,0.6,0.7,3,1.1,1,0.9 "Dial-Up",5.4,0.6,0.2,0.1,0.2,0.4,0.1,0.2,"Q" "Not...

336

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Satellite",2.7,0.8,0.4,0.3,0.2,"Q","Q","Q","Q",0.4,0.2,0.2 "DSLFiber Optic",33.7,8,2.3,1.3,0.7,0.6,0.9,0.4,0.5,5.7,4.5,1.3 "Dial-Up",5.4,1.3,0.4,0.2,"Q","Q",0.1,...

337

" Million Housing Units, Preliminary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Cable",36.5,7.4,12.4,6.5,5.9,4.2 "Satellite",2.7,0.5,0.9,0.4,0.3,0.5 "DSLFiber Optic",33.7,6.6,10.8,6.1,5.9,4.3 "Dial-Up",5.4,1.4,2.1,0.6,0.7,0.6 "Not...

338

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Satellite",2.7,2.1,0.6,1.9,0.2,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N",0.2,0.1,"Q" "DSLFiber Optic",33.7,25.8,7.9,22.4,2.2,1.2,0.7,0.5,1.4,0.7,3.6,1,0.1 "Dial-Up",5.4,4.3,1.2,3.7,0.3,0....

339

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Hispanic or Latino",99,18.3,5,2.2,2.8,13.2,6,4.5,2.8 "Race of Householder6" "White",89.6,16.9,4.6,2,2.5,12.3,5.5,4.3,2.5 "Hispanic",12.8,2,0.2,0.2,0.1,1.7,1.1,0.4,0.3...

340

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Hispanic or Latino",99,29.1,32.8,15.4,12.9,8.9 "Race of Householder6" "White",89.6,24.7,29.5,13.9,12,9.5 "Hispanic",12.8,2,2.7,2.3,2.5,3.4 "Non-Hispanic",76.8,22.7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Hispanic or Latino",99,18.3,24.6,36.9,19.3 "Race of Householder6" "White",89.6,16.9,21.3,31.5,20 "Hispanic",12.8,2,1.1,4.8,5 "Non-Hispanic",76.8,14.9,20.2,26.7...

342

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Hispanic or Latino",99,35.7,32.3,9.9,15.7,5.4 "Race of Householder7" "White",89.6,32.5,26.6,11.1,14.5,4.9 "Hispanic",12.8,2.5,2.6,3.9,3.2,0.8...

343

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hispanic or Latino",99,19.8,22.9,18.5,12.7,8.5,5.3,11.3,12.9 "Race of Householder6" "White",89.6,16.8,21.4,17.1,11.7,7.6,4.9,10,11.5 "Hispanic",12.8,3.5,4,2.4,1.3,0.6,0.4,0.6,3....

344

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Hispanic or Latino",99,64.9,5.7,7.1,15.7,5.6 "Race of Householder6" "White",89.6,59.6,4.9,6,12.9,6.2 "Hispanic",12.8,6.2,0.8,1.6,3.1,1.1 "Non-Hispanic",76.8,53.3...

345

DOE-HDBK-1169-2003; DOE Handbook Nuclear Air Cleaning Handbook  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4-1 4-1 CHAPTER 4 HOUSING DESIGN AND LAYOUT 4.1 Introduction This chapter discusses housing design and requirements for air cleaning units in which filters and/or adsorbers are installed (see Chapter 6, "Small Air Cleaning Units," for single filter housing design information). Two basic designs are addressed in this section: man-entry and side-access (see Figures 4.1 and 4.2). In addition, two side-access housing types are addressed-one utilizing square filters and the other radial flow/round filters (Figure 4.3). Both side-access designs are for housings with two or more filters and for system capacities greater than 2,000 cubic feet per minute (cfm). Single-filter inline housings, man-entry housings larger than 30 high- efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and

346

Synergization of air handling units for high energy efficiency in office buildings: The theory and analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An air handling unit (AHU) along with its downstream terminals is considered as the primary independent thermal processing and air distribution system in buildings. The outside air intake, supply air temperature control, and fan modulation are performed within the individual AHU for an associated region to integrally achieve the energy efficiency and indoor air quality (IAQ). The conventional zoning and AHU operation strategy in office buildings lowers the energy waste probability due to the heating and cooling mode compromising among the zones. However, this AHU oriented practice limits the utilization of heat surplus in building regions and operation difference across the AHUs. To break the frame and bring in synergization among them in office buildings, an integrated AHU (IAHU) control is proposed in this study. The theory is revealed in three steps: (1) the critical ventilation constraints of the new control are quantitatively defined; (2) the supervisory decision making schema for optimum energy efficiency are provided analytically; (3) the parameters are briefly discussed in terms of their influences on the system performance. This innovative operation of IAHU could notably improve the building level energy efficiency through significant heat gain transferring, and sensible and latent load decoupling.

Yuebin Yu; Mingsheng Liu; Haorong Li; Daihong Yu; Vivian Loftness

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

An assessment of the potential of the United States stick-built house for self-help construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis initially focuses on the development of the U.S. stick-built house. The material and construction methods of the structure remain simple and unchanged, whereas the non-structural elements offer an enormous ...

Takase, Yutaka

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Exploring Maximum Humidity Control and Energy Conservation Opportunities with Single Duct Single Zone Air-Handling Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Humidity control for single-duct single-zone (SDSZ) constant volume air handling units is known to be a challenge. The operation of these systems is governed by space temperature only. Under mild weather conditions, discharge air temperature can get...

Zhou, J.; Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

A study on the control method of single duct VAV terminal unit through the determination of proper minimum air flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The objective of this study was proposed a control method for the minimum air flow rate of a VAV terminal unit at an office building. The minimum air flow rate of the VAV terminal unit is the key factor affecting the thermal comfort, indoor air quality (IAQ), stratification and energy consumption, depending on the operating mode of the VAV system. Therefore, selecting the proper minimum air flow is very important. In this study, an algorithm was proposed considering the IAQ and stratification. The vertical air temperature was analyzed to find the supply air temperature that did not cause stratification. The integrated control algorithm with an air flow increase model in the VAV terminal unit and outdoor air intake rate increase model in the AHU was developed by comparing the energy consumption. Finally, the existing and proposed control algorithms were compared through a simulation. The proposed method was found to be more effective than the existing control method. The proposed VAV terminal unit control method satisfies all the conditions of indoor thermal comfort, IAQ and stratification issue. As a result of the energy comparison with the existing control method, the method satisfies not only the indoor thermal comfort, IAQ and stratification issue, but also reduces the energy consumption.

Su-Hyun Kang; Hyo-Jun Kim; Young-Hum Cho

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Relationship between the merit factor of thermoelectric materials and the air conditioning unit of urban electric cars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main benefit of electric cars is to reduce air pollution in cities that is thus desirable to equip them with non polluting air conditioning units and this rules out frigorific compressors operating with CFC. The planned replacement of CFC by HFC is at best an interim solution. The best solution is certainly to use thermoelectric air conditioning units, which are inherently pollution-free. However, these have a fairly low COPF when compared to traditional compressor units. We study the relationship between the cooling of the interior of urban electric cars and the merit factor of the thermoelectric material in their Peltier unit. This should help provide concrete target properties of future T E materials. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

Buffet, J. [Counsulting Engineer, 2 av. DODE de la BRUNERIE 75016 Paris (France)

1994-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

351

Houses for Dorchester  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The intent of this thesis is to develop a design for thirty units of housing responding to the development objectives of the Nuestra Comunidad Development Corporation (NCDC) in the Upham Corner district of Dorchester. It ...

Chalmers, Thomas C. (Thomas Clark)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Computational and experimental test of self starting regimes for the in-house needs of the PGU-450 steam-gas unit at the Kaliningrad TÉTs-2 Heating and Power Plant during supply disruptions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The major stages of a computational test of the self starting regimes for the in-house needs of unit No. 1 of the 450 MW steam-gas unit at the Kaliningrad TÉTs-2 Heating and Electric Power Plant during supply ...

S. N. Sakharov; V. A. Kuz’michev

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Otis Air National Guard (USAF), Operable Unit 3, Falmouth, MA, September 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, lies within the boundaries of the towns of Falmouth, Mashpee, Sandwich, and Bourne. The Area of Contamination (AOC) known as Chemical Spill 3 United States Coast Guard (CS-3 (USCG)) is located on Lee Road, in the south central portion of the MMR. The Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE) Installation Restoration Program Office at Otis Air National Guard (ANG) Base, Massachusetts.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols, Islip, New York (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 1 million HUD-supported public housing units provide rental housing for eligible low-income families across the country. A survey of over 100 PHAs across the country indicated that there is a high level of interest in developing low cost solutions that improve energy efficiency and can be seamlessly included in the refurbishment process. Further, PHAs, have incentives (both internal and external) to reduce utility bills. ARIES worked with two public housing authorities (PHAs) to develop packages of energy efficiency retrofit measures the PHAs can cost effectively implement with their own staffs in the normal course of housing operations at the time when units are refurbished between occupancies. The energy efficiency turnover protocols emphasized air infiltration reduction, duct sealing and measures that improve equipment efficiency. ARIES documented implementation in ten housing units. Reductions in average air leakage were 16-20% and duct leakage reductions averaged 38%. Total source energy consumption savings was estimated at 6-10% based on BEopt modeling with a simple payback of 1.7 to 2.2 years. Implementation challenges were encountered mainly related to required operational changes and budgetary constraints. Nevertheless, simple measures can feasibly be accomplished by PHA staff at low or no cost. At typical housing unit turnover rates, these measures could impact hundreds of thousands of unit per year nationally.

Not Available

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Integrated solar heating unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an integral solar heating unit with an integral solar collector and hot water storage system, the unit comprising: (a) a housing; (b) a flat plate solar collector panel mounted in the housing and having a generally horizontal upper edge and an uninsulated, open back surface; (c) a cylindrical hot water tank operatively connected to the solar collector panel and mounted in the housing generally parallel to and adjacent to the upper edge; (d) the housing comprising a hood around the tank a pair of side skirts extending down at the sides of the panel. The hood and side skirts terminate at lower edges which together substantially define a plane such that upon placing the heating unit on a generally planar surface, the housing substantially encapsulates the collector panel and hot water tank in a substantially enclosed air space; (e) the collector including longitudinally extended U-shaped collector tubes and a glazed window to pass radiation through to the collector tubes, and a first cold water manifold connected to the tubes for delivering fresh water thereto and a second hot water manifold connected to the tubes to remove heated water therefrom. The manifolds are adjacent and at least somewhat above and in direct thermal contact with the tank; and, (f) the skirts and hood lapping around the collector panel, exposing only the glazed window, such that everything else in the heating unit is enclosed by the housing such that heat emanating from the uninsulated, open back face of the collector and tank is captured and retained by the housing to warm the manifolds.

Larkin, W.J.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

356

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » Blog Archive » Solar Decathlon Houses on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Houses on the Move Houses on the Move Wednesday, September 4, 2013 By Alexis Powers One of the most challenging aspects of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon is something very few people, including the team members, see. Each of the student-built, solar-powered houses must travel from collegiate campuses across the United States and around the world to the competition site in Irvine, California. As the decathletes watch two years of hard work being hauled away, they are left to hope that everything arrives safely at Orange County Great Park later this month. Czech Technical University's AIR House has one of the longest journeys to Solar Decathlon 2013. On Aug. 5, the house began its 32-day trip. Packed in seven standard 40-foot shipping containers, the house traveled from Prague

357

Energy House  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Students learn about energy conservation and efficiency by using various materials to insulate a cardboard house.

358

The effect of an enclosure retrofit on air leakage rates for a multi-unit residential case-study building  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a relatively new, simple and robust, method for air leakage testing. A thirteen-story multi-unit residential building was tested for air leakage before and after an enclosure retrofit. The building suites had a pre-retrofit NLA50 average of 6.77 cm2/m2 and an average post-retrofit NLA50 of 2.82 cm2/m2—a 58% betterment. The effect of the retrofit on air leakage rates was assessed and compared to other multi-unit residential buildings across Canada and USA. The case study building was significantly tighter than other multi-unit residential buildings included in published studies. Recommendations were made for field-testing procedures in order to maximize the potential for accurate measured flow characteristics. Field-testing for air-tightness needs to be standardized in order for useful comparative results to be generated in order to inform future research and operational considerations for the multi-unit residential building stock across North America.

Robin Urquhart; Russell Richman; Graham Finch

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Indoor air environment and night cooling energy efficiency of a southern German passive public school building operated by the heat recovery air conditioning unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The recently built school building has adopted a novel heat recovery air conditioning system. Heat recovery efficiency of the heat recovery facility and energy conservation ratio of the air conditioning unit were analytically modeled, taking the ventilation networks into account. Following that, school classroom displacement ventilation and its thermal stratification have been numerically investigated concerning the effects of the heat flow flux of passive cooling within the ceiling concrete in the classroom due to night ventilation in summer which could result in cooling energy storage. Numerical results indicate that the promotion of passive cooling can simultaneously decrease the volume averaged indoor temperatures and the non-uniformity of indoor thermal distributions. Subsequent energy performance analysis demonstrates that classroom energy demands for ventilation and cooling could be reduced with the promotion of heat recovery efficiency of the ventilation facility, and the energy conservation ratio of the air-cooling unit decreases with the increasing temperatures of exhaust air and the heat flux value for passive cooling within the classroom ceiling concrete. Fitting correlations of heat recovery ventilation and cooling energy conservation have been presented.

Yang Wang; Fu-Yun Zhao; Jens Kuckelkorn; Xiao-Hong Li; Han-Qing Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Uncertainty Analysis for a Virtual Flow Meter Using an Air-Handling Unit Chilled Water Valve  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A virtual water flow meter is developed that uses the chilled water control valve on an air-handling unit as a measurement device. The flow rate of water through the valve is calculated using the differential pressure across the valve and its associated coil, the valve command, and an empirically determined valve characteristic curve. Thus, the probability of error in the measurements is significantly greater than for conventionally manufactured flow meters. In this paper, mathematical models are developed and used to conduct uncertainty analysis for the virtual flow meter, and the results from the virtual meter are compared to measurements made with an ultrasonic flow meter. Theoretical uncertainty analysis shows that the total uncertainty in flow rates from the virtual flow meter is 1.46% with 95% confidence; comparison of virtual flow meter results with measurements from an ultrasonic flow meter yielded anuncertainty of 1.46% with 99% confidence. The comparable results from the theoretical uncertainty analysis and empirical comparison with the ultrasonic flow meter corroborate each other, and tend to validate the approach to computationally estimating uncertainty for virtual sensors introduced in this study.

Song, Li; Wang, Gang; Brambley, Michael R.

2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A Novel Procedure to Determine Optimal Air Static Pressure Set-points and Reset Schedules in VAV Air Handling Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air static pressure set-point or schedule for VAV AHLJ systems is one of the most crucial operational parameters for satisfy lug the building load, maintaining the room comfort level and saving energy costs. This paper presents a novel procedure...

Zhu, Y.; Liu, M.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Powell, T.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Construction Statistics of New Homes Completed/Placed Year Thousand Units Average SF Thousand Units Average SF 1980 234 1981 229 1982 234 1983 278 1984 288 1985 283 1986 256 1987 239 1988 224 1989 203 1990 195 1991 174 1992 212 1993 243 1994 291 1995 319 1996 338 1997 336 1998 374 1999 338 2000 281 2001 196 2002 174 2003 140 2004 124 2005 123 2006 112 2007 95 2008 81 2009 55 2010 50 Source(s): 496 2,392 155 1,172 701 DOC, 2010 Characteristics of New Housing, 2010, "Median and Average Square Feet of Floor Area in New Single-Family Houses Completed by Location", "Presence of Air-Conditioning in New Single Family Houses", "Number of Multifamily Units Completed by Number of Units Per Building", "Median and Average Square Feet of Floor Area in Units in New Multifamily Buildings Completed", "Placements of New Manufactured Homes by Region and Size of Home, 1980-

363

Scalability and Evolutionary Dynamics of Air Transportation Networks in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the growing demand for air transportation and the limited ability to increase capacity at key points in the air transportation system, there are concerns that, in the future, the system will not scale to meet demand. ...

Bonnefoy, Philippe

2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

364

Performance Analysis of Dual-Fan, Dual-Duct Constant Volume Air-Handling Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,d) or the mixed air temperature (Tm,c). The value of the air leaving cooling coil (Tc,o) is the smaller of either the cold deck set point or the mixed air temperature (Tm,c). The value of the air leaving heating coil (Th,o) is the larger of either the hot deck...,d) or the mixed air temperature (Tm,c). The value of the air leaving cooling coil (Tc,o) is the smaller of either the cold deck set point or the mixed air temperature (Tm,c). The value of the air leaving heating coil (Th,o) is the larger of either the hot deck...

Joo, I. S.; Liu, M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 25, 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 25, 2014, to discuss the President’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 budget for the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE).

366

Synergization of air handling units for high energy efficiency in office buildings: Implementation methodology and performance evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An integrating air-handling unit (IAHU) control theory has been proposed to improve the energy efficiency in office buildings by utilizing the regional and operation differences among multiple AHUs. Unlike the conventional AHU operation, where the units are controlled as independent systems without interaction, IAHU coordinates the \\{AHUs\\} based on the dynamic outside air conditions and system operation modes to achieve synergized energy performance and maintain the indoor air quality. The synergization strategy allows the outside air intake and the airflows to be orderly re-allocated among the \\{AHUs\\} when conditions are appropriate. This paper presents the implementation methodology and performance evaluation of IAHU in an open-plan office building with multiple AHUs. The allocation of airflows among the \\{AHUs\\} is described first to illustrate how IAHU deals with multiple \\{AHUs\\} in a building. The supervisory level control algorithm is then detailed and easy-to-follow flowcharts are provided based on the decision-making schema. A two-step hourly evaluation method and the energy simulation model are introduced. An office building with multiple \\{AHUs\\} is selected to assess the performance of IAHU. The study concludes that the innovative IAHU with the easy-to-implement strategy can be readily implemented to achieve high energy efficiency in open space office buildings.

Yuebin Yu; Mingsheng Liu; Haorong Li; Daihong Yu; Vivian Loftness

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Energy Efficiency Upgrades for Little Rock Air Force Base  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Little Rock Air Force Base (LRAFB), in partnership with the local utility, Entergy Services, Inc., has reduced energy costs and used savings from investments in high-efficiency equipment to maintain and improve the condition of base housing and other facilities. Three projects were completed, with over $10 million invested. Major accomplishments include replacing air-to-air heat pumps with high-efficiency ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs) in more than 1,500 base housing units, lighting modifications to 10 buildings, upgrade of HVAC equipment in the base's enlisted club, and energy-efficient lighting retrofits for LRAFB's flight simulator.

Goldman, C.; Dunlap, M.A.

2000-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

368

Effectiveness of Germicidal UV Radiation for Reducing Fungal Contamination within Air-Handling Units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems and is a potential...been found growing on air filters, insulation, and cooling...bioaerosols or when the HVAC system itself is contaminated...maintained high-quality filters within HVAC systems as well as portable...

Estelle Levetin; Richard Shaughnessy; Christine A. Rogers; Robert Scheir

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Leveraging Limited Scope for Maximum Benefit in Occupied Renovation of Uninsulated Cold Climate Multifamily Housing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project examines a large-scale renovation project within a 500 unit, 1960's era subsidized urban housing community. This research focuses on the airflow control and window replacement measures implemented as part of the renovations to the low-rise apartment buildings. The window replacement reduced the nominal conductive loss of the apartment enclosure by approximately 15%; air sealing measures reduced measured air leakage by approximately 40% on average.

Neuhauser, K.; Bergey, D.; Osser, R.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Case Study: The Effective Use of an Extensive Logical rule Based Data Analytics Approach in Establishing Root Cause of Performance Issues in Widespread Deployments of Unitary Space Air Conditioning Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Today a significant percentage of office spaces are air conditioned using widely deployed unitary systems, either Fan Coil Units (FCU) or Variable Air Volume (VAV) boxes, to achieve high degrees of air conditioned zonal control. However establishing...

Brady, N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The European Passive House Concept  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The European Passive House Concept The European Passive House Concept Speaker(s): Nabih Tahan Date: January 13, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Nabih will describe the European Passive House concept and modern, home manufacturing methods in Austria. The Passive House is a European standard for a specific way to build a house that consumes very little energy, is comfortable and has a high indoor air quality. It is a cost effective method of building, where conventional heating systems are eliminated, and their cost is reinvested in super insulation, super air-tightness and heat recovery. Free heat generated from electrical and gas appliances and lighting is recycled through the heat recovery ventilator. This results in buildings that consume 80% to 90% less heating energy while constantly

372

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: In-House R&D  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In-House R&D In-House R&D The scrutiny of mercury (Hg) emissions from coal-fired utilities that began with the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) resulted in a determination by the U.S. EPA that such emissions should be regulated. A number of techniques for control of mercury emissions from power plants have been evaluated at various scales. One technique that received a great deal of attention by the EPA, utilities, and technology developers was dry sorbent injection upstream of an existing particulate control device. The in-house, air toxics research effort at NETL consisted of two distinct efforts: the first was aimed at characterizing an existing pilot unit for distribution and fate of hazardous air pollutants, including mercury ; the second was examining sorbents and photochemical oxidation as means for mercury removal from flue gas at laboratory-scale.

373

Postdoc Housing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Housing Housing Postdoc Housing Point your career towards LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Email Housing in Los Alamos, nearby communities If you are interested in posting a housing opportunity, email the pertinent information to postdocprogram@lanl.gov. Housing listings will be posted for one month. If you wish for the listing to remain on the website longer, please contact the Postdoc Program Office by email. 12/18/2013 Available - Los Alamos, NM Rare top floor Iris Street Condo. Wake up & walk across the street to grab your morning bagel & latte. Stroll a bit further to enjoy the NM sunshine at the Ashley Pond! Spend your day in the heart of downtown, sweat it out

374

Student Housing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Housing Housing Student Housing Point your career towards LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. If you are interested in posting a housing opportunity, email the pertinent information to Student Housing. Housing listings will be posted for two months. If you wish for the listing to remain on the website longer, please contact the Student Program Office by email. 01/09/2014 Available 1/10/2014 - Los Alamos, NM 35th Street Duplex - 3 Bedroom/1 bath; Very clean and very nice; All storm windows, furnace and water boiler were replaced in FY 2012; Kitchen and bathroom equipment was all replaced in FY2012 as well; Large fenced back yard with a storage shed; Within walking distance of Aspen Elementary

375

Meadowlark House  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This poster describes the energy efficiency features and sustainable materials used in the Greensburg GreenTown Chain of Eco-Homes Meadowlark House in Greensburg, Kansas.

376

Cooling with a Whole House Fan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cooling with a Whole House Fan Cooling with a Whole House Fan Cooling with a Whole House Fan May 30, 2012 - 6:54pm Addthis Whole house fan installed as part of a home retrofit project in California. | Photo courtesy of Lieko Earle, NREL. Whole house fan installed as part of a home retrofit project in California. | Photo courtesy of Lieko Earle, NREL. What does this mean for me? A whole-house fan may be sufficient to cool your house, at least for part of the year. In many climates, a whole-house fan can save you money and maintain comfort during the cooling season. How does it work? A whole-house fan works by pulling air in through windows and exhausting it through the attic and roof. Whole house cooling using a whole house fan can substitute for an air conditioner most of the year in most climates. Whole house fans combined

377

Controlling House Sparrows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T he English or house sparrow is a very common resident in urban and suburban areas. Introduced from Europe, the sparrow has spread over the entire United States and is found almost everywhere in Texas. It is an aggressive, adaptable bird that nests...

Texas Wildlife Services

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Fuel Oil",0.2,2365,2071,308,966,846,126 "Kerosene",0.2,1913,1729,751,640,579,251 "Solar",0.5,2530,1924,1084,963,732,413 "Main Space Heating Fuel" "Natural...

379

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Northeast Divisions and States" "New England",5.5,2232,1680,625,903,680,253 "Massachusetts",2.5,2076,1556,676,850,637,277 "CT, ME, NH, RI, VT",3,2360,1781,583,946,714,...

380

Public funding of airport incentives in the United States: The efficacy of the Small Community Air Service Development Grant program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As U.S. airlines began to restrict available domestic capacity at smaller airports in 2008 as a result of higher fuel prices and an economic downturn, these airports have increasingly started to rely on incentive packages composed of revenue guarantees, waived or reduced airport use fees, marketing support, or direct subsidies to attract new service. There are two main federal programs that provide funding for such incentives for small U.S. airports: the Essential Air Service (EAS) program and the Small Community Air Service Development Grant (SCASDG) program. While the EAS program has received considerable academic attention, there has been no comprehensive analysis of the success of SCASDG recipients in attracting and retaining their targeted air service. Using a metric of SCASD grant success, this paper evaluates the outcomes of 115 SCASD grantees from 2006 to 2011. In each year, fewer than half of the grant recipients were ultimately successful in meeting the goals of their proposal. Several case studies suggest that successful grantees often had significant community or airline support prior to submitting their grant and were located in slightly larger-than-average communities. Further careful consideration is necessary to determine whether reform of the SCASDG program is warranted to more effectively support the development of small community air service in the United States.

Michael D. Wittman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

PLUTONIUM-URANIUM EXTRACTION (PUREX) FACILITY ALARACT DEMONSTRATION FOR FILTER HOUSING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents an As Low As Reasonably Achievable Control Technology (ALARACT) demonstration for evaluating corrosion on the I-beam supporting filter housing No.9 for the 291-A-l emission unit of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility, located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The PUREX facility is currently in surveillance and maintenance mode. During a State of Washington, Department of Health (WDOH) 291-A-l emission unit inspection, a small amount of corrosion was observed at the base of a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter housing. A series of internal and external inspections identified the source of the corrosion material as oxidation of a small section of one of the carbon steel I-beams that provides support to the stainless steel filter housing. The inspections confirmed the corrosion is isolated to one I-beam support location and does not represent any compromise of the structural support or filter housing integrity. Further testing and inspections of the support beam corrosion and its cause were conducted but did not determine the cause. No definitive evidence was found to support any degradation of the housing. Although no degradation of the housing was found, a conservative approach will be implemented. The following actions will be taken: (1) The current operating filter housing No.9 will be removed from service. (2) The only remaining available filter housings (No.1, No.2, and No.3) will be placed in service. These filter housings have new HEPA filters fitted with stainless steel frames and faceguards which were installed in the spring of 2007. (3) Filter housings No.5 and No.10 will be put on standby as backups. To document the assessment of the unit, a draft ALARACT filter housing demonstration for the PUREX filter housing was prepared, and informally provided to WDOH on August 7, 2008. A follow up WDOH response to the draft ALARACT filter housing demonstration for the PUREX filter housing questioned whether deteriorated galvanized filter faceguards discovered during an internal filter housing inspection met American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) AG-l or Military Specification (MIL) 51068 standards. The filter system was designed and installed prior to the issuance of AG-l, February 1986; however, MIL 51068 did require galvanized faceguards. The faceguards are not necessary for filtration or structural purposes; it is concluded that the system is in compliance with the intent of the applicable standard. Appendix B provides supporting information to address this issue.

LEBARON GJ

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

382

Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Cascade Apartments- Deep Energy Multifamily Retrofit (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In December of 2009-10, King County Housing Authority implemented energy retrofit improvements in the Cascade multifamily community, located in Kent, Washington, which resulted in annual energy cost savings of 22%, improved comfort and air quality for residents, and increased durability of the units.

383

Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Refrigerant Choices in Room Air Conditioner Units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, potential replacement refrigerants for window-mounted room air conditioners (RACs) in the U.S. have been evaluated using a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions analysis. ... De Kleine, R. D.; Keoleian, G. A.; Kelly, J. C.Optimal replacement of residential air conditioning equipment to minimize energy, greenhouse gas emissions, and consumer cost in the US Energy Policy 2011, 39, 3144– 3153 ... Most of the inventory data have been collected from Thailand, except for the upstream of fuel oil and fuel transmission, which have been computed from Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation version 1.7 and Global Emission Model for Integrated Systems version 4.3. ...

Michael D. Galka; James M. Lownsbury; Paul Blowers

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

384

Air Permit Compliance for Hanford Waste Retrieval Operations Involving Multi-Unit Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1970, approximately 38,000 suspect-transuranic and transuranic waste containers have been placed in retrievable storage on the Hanford Site in the 200 Areas burial grounds. Hanford's Waste Retrieval Project is retrieving these buried containers and processing them for safe storage and disposition. Container retrieval activities require an air emissions permit to account for potential emissions of radionuclides. The air permit covers the excavation activities as well as activities associated with assaying containers and installing filters in the retrieved transuranic containers lacking proper venting devices. Fluor Hanford, Inc. is required to track radioactive emissions resulting from the retrieval activities. Air, soil, and debris media contribute to the emissions and enabling assumptions allow for calculation of emissions. Each of these activities is limited to an allowed annual emission (per calendar year) and contributes to the overall total emissions allowed for waste retrieval operations. Tracking these emissions is required to ensure a permit exceedance does not occur. A tracking tool was developed to calculate potential emissions in real time sense. Logic evaluations are established within the tracking system to compare real time data against license limits to ensure values are not exceeded for either an individual activity or the total limit. Data input are based on field survey and workplace air monitoring activities. This tracking tool is used monthly and quarterly to verify compliance to the license limits. Use of this tool has allowed Fluor Hanford, Inc. to successfully retrieve a significant number of containers in a safe manner without any exceedance of emission limits. (authors)

Faulk, D.E.; Simmons, F.M. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Optimal Terminal Box Control for Single Duct Air-Handling Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T QV ?= ? (1) For VAV reheat terminal boxes that serve exterior zones, the minimum airflow setpoint is typically selected to be the largest of the following: #0;?#0;? The airflow required by the room... Building Commissioning for Energy Efficiency and Comfort, Vol.VI-8-5 heating load can be calculated by the following equation: ),min, rhtgsp hh T QV ?= ? ? (2) The airflow rate that satisfies the outside air...

Cho, Y.; Vondal, J.; Wang, G.; Liu, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Whole-House Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Whole-House Ventilation Whole-House Ventilation Whole-House Ventilation May 30, 2012 - 2:37pm Addthis A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. What does this mean for me? Whole-house ventilation is critical in an energy-efficient home to maintain adequate indoor air quality and comfort. The whole-house ventilation system you choose will depend upon your climate, budget, and the availability of experienced contractors in your area. Energy-efficient homes -- both new and existing -- require mechanical ventilation to maintain indoor air quality. There are four basic mechanical

387

Development of models for series and parallel fan variable air volume terminal units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the series and parallel units, with coefficients varying by size and manufacturer. Statistical modeling utilized SAS software (2002). Fan power and airflow data were collected at downstream static pressures over a range from 0.1 to 0.5 in. w.g. (25 to 125 Pa...

Furr, James C., Jr

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

388

On-site Housing Rates | Staff Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rates Rates Effective February 1, 2013 Rates for Occupancy < 30-Days Guest House* Single/Double: US $105.00/day Housekeeping service is provided on all working days. *Alternatives to the Guest House - When family-type accommodations are assigned to temporary or transient personnel, Guest House rates as set forth above will apply. The total will not exceed one months' rent for a unit occupied for 30 days or less. When such assignment is necessary due to lack of adequate Guest House accommodations, housekeeping service is provided on working days; for reservations staying seven days or less. Residence Houses Curie House: US $42.00/day Cavendish House: US $42.00/day Compton House: US $42.00/day Housekeeping service for all residence houses are provided three times per

389

Effects of Air Pollution on Respiratory Disease Asthma, closely associated with air pollution, affects nearly 15 million people in the United States, one-third of them  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dimension to our understanding the health effects of air pollution. Contact: Trina Wood, (530) 752-5257 3Effects of Air Pollution on Respiratory Disease Asthma, closely associated with air pollution as a greater understanding of the types of air pollutants that cause the most harm. Seminal findings

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

390

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 486: Double Tracks RADSAFE Area Nellis Air Force Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 486, the Double Tracks Radiological Safety (RADSAFE) Area (DTRSA) which is located on the Nellis Air Force Range 71North (N), west of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range Complex, is approximately 255 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 486 is comprised of CAS 71-23-001-71DT consisting of two areas of concern referred to as the vehicle decontamination area and the animal burial pit. The DTRSA is located on the west side of the Cactus Range approximately 8 km (5 mi) southwest of the Cactus Spring gate at the intersection of the Cactus Spring Road and the Double Tracks Control Point Road (Figure 1-2). The DTRSA was used during May 1963 to decontaminate vehicles, equipment, personnel, and animals from the Double Tracks test. The DTRSA is one of three areas identified as a potential location for the disposal of radioactively contaminated materials from the Double Tracks experiment. The other two locations are the Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (CAU 426) and the Roller Coaster RADSAFE Area (CAU 407), both of which have been investigated. The surface and subsurface soils are likely to have been impacted by plutonium and other contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) associated with decontamination activities at this site.

IT Las Vegas

1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

House Snakes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

House Snakes House Snakes Name: LOIS Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How do you get rid of snakes in a house? Do mothballs work? Replies: The snake is the most misunderstood and most abused of all animals. If you cannot overcome your abhorrence or fear of them, leave them alone. Do not kill them. They are valuable destroyers of mice, rats, gophers and many insects. Perhaps the following links could be of some assistance in keeping people from indiscriminately killing snakes? Snake-A-Way is the same product used by the pest control industry and currently the only registered snake repellent. Snake-A-Way links: http://www.animalrepellents.com/snakeinfo.html http://www.animalrepellents.com/ustudies/saw.html http://www.animalrepellents.com/editorials/naturel.html

392

OpenEI Community - White House  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

/0 en New report from White /0 en New report from White House outlines largest problems facing United States energy grid http://en.openei.org/community/blog/new-report-white-house-outlines-largest-problems-facing-united-states-energy-grid house-outlines-largest-problems-facing-united-states-energy-grid" target="_blank">read more http://en.openei.org/community/blog/new-report-white-house-outlines-largest-problems-facing-united-states-energy-grid#comments energy grid OpenEI President Smart Grid United States White House Fri, 16

393

1. -HOUSING AND ENVIRONMENT Colostrum consumption, thermoregulation and heat production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Comparison of four air conditioning systems in fattening pig-houses C. TEXIER, R. GRANIER B. DE LA FARGE tested with each air conditioning system. The animals were housed by groups of ten on a surface of 0.8 M2) the statical system seems to be better, while air conditioning by overpressure is not recommended in winter

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

394

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988–Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

Barnett, J. M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

395

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988–Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

Barnett, J. M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

396

Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Association of Alaska Housing Authorities is holding a 3-day training event for housing development professionals titled Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing (DASH). This is a unique...

397

Sod Houses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Houses Houses Nature Bulletin No. 620 December 3, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist SOD HOUSES In the 1860's and 70's, when pioneer settlers came to homestead free land on the vast lonely prairies of Kansas and Nebraska, they found a country that, except for fringes of cottonwoods and willows along the streams, was treeless. There was no rock and mighty little timber for building houses and barns. Lumber was very expensive and scarce. So was money. However, the prairies were thickly covered with short, drought- enduring buffalo and blue grama grasses. Some of the Indian tribes which not only hunted buffalo but also grew corn -- notably the Pawnee, Osage and Hidatsa -- had large earthlodges. They used sod in the walls and the conical or dome-like roofs had pole rafters covered with willow brush, slough hay, sod, and finally clay. So the homesteaders were inspired to build their homes with slabs of the remarkably thick and tough prairie sod: "Nebraska marble".

398

Remotely serviced filter and housing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A filter system for a hot cell comprises a housing adapted for input of air or other gas to be filtered, flow of the air through a filter element, and exit of filtered air. The housing is tapered at the top to make it easy to insert a filter cartridge holds the filter element while the air or other gas is passed through the filter element. Captive bolts in trunnion nuts are readily operated by electromechanical manipulators operating power wrenches to secure and release the filter cartridge. The filter cartridge is adapted to make it easy to change a filter element by using a master-slave manipulator at a shielded window station. 6 figs.

Ross, M.J.; Zaladonis, L.A.

1987-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

399

Remotely serviced filter and housing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A filter system for a hot cell comprises a housing adapted for input of air or other gas to be filtered, flow of the air through a filter element, and exit of filtered air. The housing is tapered at the top to make it easy to insert a filter cartridge using an overhead crane. The filter cartridge holds the filter element while the air or other gas is passed through the filter element. Captive bolts in trunnion nuts are readily operated by electromechanical manipulators operating power wrenches to secure and release the filter cartridge. The filter cartridge is adapted to make it easy to change a filter element by using a master-slave manipulator at a shielded window station.

Ross, Maurice J. (Pocatello, ID); Zaladonis, Larry A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1988-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

400

Ventilation Effectiveness Research at UT-Typer Lab Houses  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation Effectiveness Research Ventilation Effectiveness Research at UT-Tyler Lab Houses Source Of Outside Air, Distribution, Filtration Armin Rudd Twin (almost) Lab Houses at UT-Tyler House 2: Unvented attic, House 1: Vented attic lower loads + PV Ventilation Effectiveness Research 30 April 2013 2 * 1475 ft 2 , 3-bedroom houses * House 2 was mirrored plan * 45 cfm 62.2 ventilation rate * Garage connected to house on only one wall * Access to attic via pull-down stairs in garage * Further access to House 2 unvented attic through gasket sealed door Ventilation Effectiveness Research 30 April 2013 3 Testing Approach  Building enclosure and building mechanical systems characterization by measurement of building enclosure air leakage, central air distribution system airflows, and ventilation system airflows.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Challenges...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings, Upstate New York Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC...

402

Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Evluating...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

the bedrooms.The relative ability of this system was considered with respect to relevant Air Conditioning Contractors of America and ASHRAE standards for house temperature...

403

Economic Passive Solar Warm-Air Heating and Ventilating System Combined with Short Term Storage within Building Components for Residential Houses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Warm-air heating systems are very suitable for the exploitation of solar energy. A relatively low temperature level combined ... used for transportation and distribution equipment or as storage elements.

K. Bertsch; E. Boy; K.-D. Schall

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-to-air heat pumps Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

conditions... data on the seasonal performance of air-to-air residential heat pump systems. The purpose of this paper... of operation 10, 197778, the Control House ......

405

Expanding the housing supply through conversions of the existing stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A large share of households remain poorly housed in the United States despite the steady improvement in overall housing conditions throughout the postwar period. Households that face the greatest difficulty in gaining ...

Pogharian, Sevag V. (Sevag Vasken)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Meadowlark House  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Large windows and open floor Large windows and open floor plan in main living area provide natural daylight * LED light bulbs reduce energy consumption * East-west orientation optimizes natural lighting and passive heating * Energy recovery ventilator reduces energy requirements for interior heating and cooling * Air-tight building envelope prevents air leakage and moisture infiltration * Superinsulation in walls, ceilings, and floor slab with R-value for walls (R-40), foundation floor slab (R-50),

407

Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Passive...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Passive Room-to-Room Air Transfer, Fresno, California (Fact Sheet) Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Passive Room-to-Room Air Transfer, Fresno, California...

408

Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed. For houses employing whole-house supply ventilation (positive pressure) or balanced ventilation (same pressure effect as the Baseline condition), adherence to the EPA Indoor airPLUS house-to-garage air sealing requirements should be sufficient to expect little to no garage-to-house air transfer.

Rudd, A.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings, Upstate New York  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings team sought to create a well-documented design and implementation strategy for air sealing in low-rise multifamily buildings that would assist in compliance with new building infiltration requirements of the 2012 IECC.

410

Air-Side Energy Use Calculations for Four HVAC Systems: Dual Duct Constant Volume (DDCAV), Dual Duct Variable Volume (DDVAV), Constant Volume with Reheat (CAVRH), Variable Volume with Reheat (VAVRH), Four Pipe Fan Coil Unit (FC), Four Pipe Induction Unit (FI), and Single Zone (SZ) Systems, Revised June 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CAVRH), and variable volume with reheat (VAVRH), four pipe fan coil unit (FC), four pipe induction unit (FI), and a single zone air conditioning system (SZ). These calculations are presented in spreadsheets that include a running commentary so...

Haberl, J. S.; Bou-Saada, T. E.; Saman, N. F.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

"Table HC11.6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,4,2.4,1.7 "Have Coolling Equipment",93.3,16.5,12.8,3.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,16.3,12.6,3.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.3,"Q","Q" "Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2 " "Central System",65.9,6,5.2,0.8 "Without a Heat Pump",53.5,5.5,4.8,0.7

412

"Table HC13.6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,1.4,0.8,0.2,0.3 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,39.3,20.9,6.7,11.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,38.9,20.7,6.6,11.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.5,"Q","Q","Q" "Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2 "

413

Next Generation Rooftop Unit | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Generation Rooftop Unit A typical commercial rooftop air-conditioning unit (RTU) Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab A typical commercial rooftop air-conditioning unit (RTU) Credit:...

414

Transportation accounts for a quarter of the United States green house gases. With this statistic being so high and the need for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ethanol.... 11 acres to power one car for 1 year) Solutions: One possible answer to the ethanol combustion ethanol only yields carbon dioxide, heat, and water (mainly vapor). Nitrogen fertilizer for the crops is produced from air, water, and natural gas in a process that releases 3.6 tons of carbon dioxide

Toohey, Darin W.

415

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

416

House Spiders  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Spiders Spiders Nature Bulletin No. 206-A November 13, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation HOUSE SPIDERS Nothing humiliates a housewife more than to spy a dusty streamer of cobwebs dangling from the ceiling when she has "company". With a cloth on the end of her broom, or a vacuum cleaner, she wages continual war on spiders. The spider itself frequently escapes by darting into a hide-away or dropping by a thread of silk to the floor where it may play "possum" until things have quieted down. But in basements, in unused rooms, in attics, between windows and screens, beneath porches, and in garages or other out buildings, many small spiders live their interesting lives.

417

Buffalo Pushes Energy-Efficient Affordable Housing in New York  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Better Buildings Residential Network member PUSH (People United for Sustainable Housing) Buffalo broke ground in March 2014 on its Massachusetts Avenue Sustainable Homes (MASH) project. The...

418

Written Statement of David Huizenga Senior Advisor for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Armed Services Committee United States House of Representatives (May 9, 2013)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Senior Advisor David Huizenga represented the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Armed Services Committee United States...

419

National primary standard for the unit of air kerma, air kerma rate, exposure, exposure rate, and x- and gamma-ray energy flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

According to the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) [2], as well as government decrees of the Russian Federation [3...], at present the basic physical quant...

A. V. Oborin; A. Yu. Villevalde; S. G. Trofimchuk

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

HVAC Improvements for Existing Houses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HVAC Improvements for Existing Houses HVAC Improvements for Existing Houses Speaker(s): Chryséis Bovagnet Date: September 5, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Many older houses in the US are either not well designed from a thermal point of view or have HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning) systems in need of repairs or improvements. The building envelopes tend to have poor insulation and lots of leakage, and the HVAC systems are inefficient. The cooling/heating equipment is often located outside of the conditioned space (e.g. in attics or crawlspaces) with ducts that leak and have poor insulation, which cause energy loss and bad occupant comfort on peak days or in extreme climates. We developed a series of retrofits that will allow us to reduce the energy consumption of residential HVAC

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

United States Air and Radiation EPA 402-R-97-006 Environmental Protection Agency (6601J) July 1997  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Office of Radiation and Indoor Air/Center for Remediation Technology and Tools (EPA/ORIA/CRTT) is to bring innovative for Remediation Technology and Tools Washington, DC #12;Disclaimer Although this document has been published remediation technologies for radioactive and hazardous mixed wastes to the Office of Air and Radiation

422

White House | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

White House White House Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 16 August, 2013 - 12:21 New report from White House outlines largest problems facing United States energy grid energy grid OpenEI President Smart Grid United States White House Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 30 August, 2012 - 15:16 Historic Fuel Standards auto fuel efficiency obama standards vehicle White House On Tuesday, Ray Lahood, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Transportation, and Lisa P. Jackson, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator, unveiled the joint effort, along with the Obama Administration, to create record fuel standards for vehicles built between 2017 and 2025. Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

423

On-site Housing | Staff Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

On-site Housing On-site Housing Note: All guests wishing to stay on-site must be registered and approved in the BNL Guest Information System (GIS). Welcome to Brookhaven National Laboratory. BNL attracts more than 4,500 visiting scientists from all over the world each year to perform scientific research and work with our staff. To support our guests, there are 333 on-site housing units. These units are comprised of 66 family-style apartments, 39 efficiency apartments, 213 dormitory rooms, 13 Guest House rooms, and 2 year round private houses. Location: Hours of Operation: Research Support Building (400A), 20 Brookhaven Avenue Monday - Friday: 8:00 am to Midnight Reservations: (631) 344-2541 or 344-2551 Saturday: Closed* Fax: (631) 344-3098 Sunday: 4:00 pm to Midnight

424

AIR SEALING Seal air leaks and save energy!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AIR SEALING Seal air leaks and save energy! W H A T I S A I R L E A K A G E ? Ventilation is fresh at stopping air leakage. It is critical to seal all holes and seams between these sheet goods with durable air that enters a house in a controlled manner to exhaust excess moisture and reduce odors

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

425

Air pollution and early deaths in the United States : attribution of PM?.? exposure to emissions species, time, location and sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combustion emissions constitute the largest source of anthropogenic emissions in the US. They lead to the degradation of air quality and human health, by contributing to the formation of fine particulate matter (PM2 .5 ), ...

Dedoussi, Irene Constantina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

427

"Table HC15.6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,1.8,"Q","Q",4.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,5.3,7,7.8,7.2 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,5.3,7,7.7,6.6 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,"Q","N","Q",0.6 "Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2 " "Central System",65.9,1.1,6.4,6.4,5.4

428

"Table HC11.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,4,2.4,1.7 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,16.5,12.8,3.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,16.3,12.6,3.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.3,"Q","Q" "Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2" "Central System",65.9,6,5.2,0.8 "Without a Heat Pump",53.5,5.5,4.8,0.7

429

"Table HC15.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,1.8,"Q","Q",4.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,5.3,7,7.8,7.2 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,5.3,7,7.7,6.6 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,"Q","N","Q",0.6 "Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2" "Central System",65.9,1.1,6.4,6.4,5.4

430

"Table HC10.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,4,2.1,1.4,10.3 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,16.5,23.5,39.3,13.9 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,16.3,23.4,38.9,12.9 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.3,"Q",0.5,1 "Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2" "Central System",65.9,6,17.3,32.1,10.5 "Without a Heat Pump",53.5,5.5,16.2,23.2,8.7

431

"Table HC13.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,1.4,0.8,0.2,0.3 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,39.3,20.9,6.7,11.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,38.9,20.7,6.6,11.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.5,"Q","Q","Q" "Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2"

432

Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Air Conditioners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Window air conditioners are the dominant cooling product for residences, in terms of annual unit sales. They are inexpensive, portable and can be installed by the owner. For this reason, they are an attractive solution for supplemental cooling, for retrofitting air conditioning into a home which lacks ductwork, and for renters. Window air conditioners for sale in the United States are required to meet very modest minimum efficiency standards. Four window air conditioners' performance were tested in the Advanced HVAC Systems Laboratory on NREL's campus in Golden, CO. In order to separate and study the refrigerant system's performance, the unit's internal leakage pathways, the unit's fanforced ventilation, and the leakage around the unit resulting from installation in a window, a series of tests were devised that focused on each aspect of the unit's performance. These tests were designed to develop a detailed performance map to determine whole-house performance in different climates. Even though the test regimen deviated thoroughly from the industry-standard ratings test, the results permit simple calculation of an estimated rating for both capacity and efficiency that would result from a standard ratings test. Using this calculation method, it was found that the three new air conditioners' measured performance was consistent with their ratings. This method also permits calculation of equivalent SEER for the test articles. Performance datasets were developed across a broad range of indoor and outdoor operating conditions, and used them to generate performance maps.

Winkler, J.; Booten, C.; Christensen, D.; Tomerlin, J.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Source evaluation report phase 2 investigation: Limited field investigation. Final report: United States Air Force Environmental Restoration Program, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the limited field investigation work done to address issues and answer unresolved questions regarding a collection of potential contaminant sources at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), near Fairbanks, Alaska. These sources were listed in the Eielson AFB Federal Facility Agreement supporting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of the base. The limited field investigation began in 1993 to resolve all remaining technical issues and provide the data and analysis required to evaluate the environmental hazard associated with these sites. The objective of the limited field investigation was to allow the remedial project managers to sort each site into one of three categories: requiring remedial investigation/feasibility study, requiring interim removal action, or requiring no further remedial action.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Low-Income Housing Tax Credits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) programme is the primary subsidy mechanism used to support the development of rental housing for low-income households in the United States. The programme adds about 1300 projects and 91 000 units per year. These projects are privately owned. The owners of the projects receive tax credits each year for 10 years in exchange for a commitment to maintain the units at affordable rents for occupancy by low-income households for a period of at least 15 years. The programme is proving to be popular with developers, but it is vulnerable to fluctuations in credit markets.

K. McClure

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

House Retirement Timeline  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

House Retirement House Retirement Timeline House is retiring December 20,2013 Fix your pipelines, move data and get help now! /house is POWERED OFF. 12/20/2013 Questions? Contact Kjiersten & Doug; consult@nersc.gov Office hours: MWThF 10:00-12:00 400-413 The link to /house will be permanently changed; all pipelines that have not removed /house dependencies will break. 11/15/2013 Your actions: Find anything that is still broken and let the developers know. Check houseHunter Continue data migration. We DO NOT GUARANTEE that you will be able to get data off /house after this date. 12/1/2013 Your action: Contact your group lead if you still need data /jgi/tools will no longer be in the default path 10/1/2013 Timeline & Important Dates The link to /house will be temporarily

436

Analysis of the Energy-Saving Potential of a Three-Rotary Wheel Fresh Air-Handling Unit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, TRWFAHU can save 10.2% of primary energy and greatly decrease the energy consumption of chiller. If waste heat is available for regenerating the desiccant, the system can achieve greater energy savings. It is feasible to improve indoor air quality (IAQ...

Hao, X.; Zhang, G.; Zou, S.; Liu, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Portable oven air circulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable air circulating apparatus for use in cooking ovens which is used to create air currents in the oven which transfer heat to cooking foodstuffs to promote more rapid and more uniform cooking or baking, the apparatus including a motor, fan blade and housing of metallic materials selected from a class of heat resistant materials.

Jorgensen, Jorgen A. (Bloomington, MN); Nygren, Donald W. (Minneapolis, MN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 30, 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and...

439

Radon in Syrian houses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A nationwide investigation of radon levels in Syrian houses was carried out during the period 1991 - 1993. Passive radon diffusion dosemeters using polycarbonate detectors were distributed in houses all over Syria. Detectors were subjected to electrochemical etching to reveal latent tracks of alpha particles. The mean radon concentration in Syrian houses was found to be with some values several times higher. This investigation indicated that there were a few houses in Syria that require remedial action. Most houses that have high levels of radon were found in the southern area, especially in the Damascus governorate. The study also indicated that radon concentrations were higher in old houses built from mud with no tiling.

I Othman; M Hushari; G Raja; A Alsawaf

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Pacific Housing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Housing Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pacific Housing Place: Sacramento, CA Website: http:www.pacifichousing.com References: Pacific Housing1 Information About Partnership...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

100% petroleum house  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I am designing a Case Study House to be sponsored by Royal Dutch Shell which utilizes the by-product of oil extraction, petroleum gas, to produce a zero waste, 100% petroleum based house. The motivation of the Case Study ...

Costanza, David (David Nicholas)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Houses undergoing psychoanalysis :  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this thesis is to explore the relationship between the self and the house. In approaching the subject, my assumptions were that the basic condition of the house-self relationship is of tension and animosity ...

Palmon, Ruth, 1970-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Insulator for laser housing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member.

Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Insulator for laser housing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member. 3 figs.

Duncan, D.B.

1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

445

THE WHITE HOUSE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

_______________________________________________________________ For Immediate Release STATEMENT BY THE PRESIDENT Today I am pleased to announce that the United States will sponsor a $1 billion, 10-year demonstration project to create the world's first coal-based, zero-emissions electricity and hydrogen power plant. This project will be undertaken with international partners and power and advanced technology providers to dramatically reduce air pollution and capture and store emissions of greenhouse gases. We will work together on this important effort to meet the world's growing energy needs, while protecting the health of our people and our environment. Secretaries Powell and Abraham will also initiate an international Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum, to

446

Optimization Control Strategy for an Air Handling Unit with Dedicated Rotary Desiccant Dehumidification Wheel in Hot and Humid Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.7 53.5 Error 0.94% 0.42% 1.03% 0.47% DESCRIPTION?OF?DEDICATED?HUMIDITY? CONTROL?UNITS?(HCU) Run#?1?DESIGN R A W B C D E Summer SCFM 0 8750 8750 8750 8750 8750 8278 DB?(?F) 83 60 50 69 70 83 WB?(?F) 79.3 59.5 50 53.2 53.7 79.3 GR/LB 147 76 54 35... 35 147 Diagram?of?the?AHUs?system HCU OA DB????70??F Dew. 39??F CD:?55?F CD:?55?F CD:?55?F SIMULATION?MODEL?PARAMETERS Parameters Value Unit The?lighting?load? 0.93 W/ft2 The?internal?electrical?equipment?load? 1.4 W/ft2 Zone...

Watt, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Otis Air National Guard (USAF), Operable Unit 5, Falmouth, MA, September 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This decision document presents the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE) selected remedial action decisions for contaminant source areas at the following Areas of Contamination (AOCs) at the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) in Barnstable County on Cape Cod, Massachusetts: Fire Training Area No. 2 and Landfill No. 2 (FTA-2/LF-2); Petroleum Fuels Storage Area, Fuel Spill No. 10, and Fuel Spill No. 11 (PFSA/FS-10/FS-11); Storm Drainage Ditch No. 2, Fuel Spill No. 6, and Fuel Spill No. 8 (SD-2/FS-6/FS-8); Storm Drainage Ditch No. 2, Fire Training Area No. 3, and Coal Storage Yard No. 4 (SF-3/FTA-3/CY-4); Storm Drainage Ditch No. 4 (SD-4); and Storm Drainage Ditch No. 5 and Fuel Spill No. 5 (SD-5/FS-5). The selected remedy for AOC FTA-2/LF-2 is Biosparging with Ambient Air Monitoring. This remedial action is a source control action that addresses leaching of organic compounds to groundwater, the principal known threat at AOC FTA-2/LF-2. It consists of designing, constructing, and operating a biosparging treatment system, maintaining institutional controls, and five-year reviews of remedy protectiveness. The remedy reduces the release of contaminants from subsurface soils by treating subsurface soils to meet protective cleanup levels.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

EcoHouse Program Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Provides an overview of the Indianapolis Better Buildings program, the EcoHouse program, and Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing partnership (INHP).

449

Toward new tracts for America : the house and its serial deployment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is a proposition for suburban tract housing in the United States. A brief critical history of the production of suburban housing and some precedents for architecturally motivated responses to its shortcomings ...

Slate, Björn Robert

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

NREL: Housing Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Housing Information Housing Information Suggestions for where to start looking for short-term housing or apartments in the Golden, Colorado area are provided below. Short-term Housing Biz-Stay: Lakewood, Golden, Evergreen Housing Features: Short term furnished apartments to extended stay hotels Locations throughout the Lakewood-Golden-Evergreen area. Candlewood Suites 895 Tabor Street Golden, CO 80401 303-232-7171, ask for NREL rates or email Lisa.kennedy@ihg.com Housing Features: Pet friendly Free on-site laundry facilities All suites have kitchens Free high speed internet connections in all suites. University Housing Campus Village Apartments at the Auraria Campus University of Colorado Denver, Metro State College campus (May, June, July only) 318 Walnut St. Denver, CO 80204 303-573-5272

451

Total U.S. Housing Units........................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Heating Equipment........................... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Space Heating Equipment............................ 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Space Heating Equipment............................. 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.......................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None................................................................. 3.6 Q 0.5 0.8 2.1 1 to 499............................................................. 6.1 1.3 0.9 1.9 2.1 500 to 999......................................................... 27.7 5.6 5.7 10.5 6.0 1,000 to 1,499................................................... 26.0 4.3 5.2 11.3 5.2 1,500 to 1,999...................................................

452

Million U.S. Housing Units Total............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer......................... 35.5 3.2 8.3 8.9 7.7 7.5 Use a Personal Computer...................................... 75.6 7.8 17.8 18.4 16.3 15.3 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model................................................. 58.6 6.2 14.3 14.2 12.1 11.9 Laptop Model.................................................... 16.9 1.6 3.5 4.3 4.2 3.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours............................................. 13.6 1.3 3.6 3.0 3.1 2.6 2 to 15 Hours.................................................... 29.1 3.2 6.8 7.1 6.0 6.0 16 to 40 Hours................................................... 13.5 1.6 3.3 3.6 2.5 2.5 41 to 167 Hours................................................. 6.3 0.6 1.2 1.4 1.8 1.3 On All the Time.................................................

453

Total U.S. Housing Units........................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Heating Equipment........................... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Space Heating Equipment............................ 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Space Heating Equipment............................. 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.......................... 0.8 N N N Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None................................................................. 3.6 Q Q Q 1 to 499............................................................. 6.1 1.3 0.9 0.4 500 to 999......................................................... 27.7 5.6 4.2 1.4 1,000 to 1,499................................................... 26.0 4.3 3.3 1.1 1,500 to 1,999................................................... 17.6 3.0 2.3 0.7 2,000 to 2,499...................................................

454

Million U.S. Housing Units Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.......................................... 8.2 1.0 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.2 1.0 0.6 2 Times A Day....................................................... 24.6 3.6 1.7 2.3 2.9 4.6 3.8 3.9 1.9 Once a Day............................................................ 42.3 5.4 2.5 4.7 4.5 7.0 7.9 6.6 3.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 3.6 1.6 3.4 2.8 4.7 4.5 4.4 2.3 About Once a Week............................................... 3.9 0.4 0.3 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.4 0.4 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 Q No Hot Meals Cooked............................................ 0.9 0.2 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven..........................................................

455

Million U.S. Housing Units Total............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 0.4 1.7 2.1 2.2 1.7 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 2.3 6.0 5.9 5.5 5.0 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 5.6 10.3 9.7 8.1 8.7 A Few Times Each Week..................................... 27.2 2.1 6.1 7.2 6.0 5.7 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.3 0.7 1.0 1.1 0.8 Less Than Once a Week...................................... 4.1 Q 0.9 1.1 1.0 0.8 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 10.9 25.7 27.1 23.4 22.4 More Than Once a Day.....................................

456

Total U.S. Housing Units........................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Heating Equipment........................... 1.2 Q Q N Have Space Heating Equipment............................ 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Space Heating Equipment............................. 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.......................... 0.8 N N N Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None................................................................. 3.6 0.5 Q Q 1 to 499............................................................. 6.1 0.9 0.6 0.2 500 to 999......................................................... 27.7 5.7 3.6 2.1 1,000 to 1,499................................................... 26.0 5.2 3.9 1.3 1,500 to 1,999................................................... 17.6 3.9 2.7 1.2 2,000 to 2,499...................................................

457

Total U.S. Housing Units..................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Equipment..................... Equipment..................... 1.2 0.4 Q Q 0.4 Q Have Space Heating Equipment...................... 109.8 71.7 7.5 7.6 16.3 6.8 Use Space Heating Equipment....................... 109.1 71.5 7.4 7.4 16.0 6.7 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.................... 0.8 Q Q Q Q Q Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None............................................................ 3.6 1.1 Q 0.5 1.3 0.4 1 to 499....................................................... 6.1 2.0 0.4 1.1 2.1 0.6 500 to 999................................................... 27.7 9.8 2.0 3.7 9.0 3.3 1,000 to 1,499............................................. 26.0 16.4 2.1 1.8 3.6 2.1 1,500 to 1,999............................................. 17.6 15.2 1.1 0.4 0.5 0.4 2,000 to 2,499.............................................

458

Million U.S. Housing Units Total............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer......................... 35.5 15.3 3.0 1.9 3.1 6.4 0.8 Use a Personal Computer...................................... 75.6 17.7 5.0 1.6 2.8 8.0 0.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model................................................. 58.6 12.8 4.0 1.1 2.0 5.4 0.3 Laptop Model.................................................... 16.9 4.9 1.0 0.4 0.8 2.6 Q Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours............................................. 13.6 3.3 0.8 0.3 0.7 1.3 Q 2 to 15 Hours.................................................... 29.1 6.6 1.9 0.6 0.9 3.1 Q 16 to 40 Hours................................................... 13.5 3.3 1.2 0.2 0.6 1.3 Q 41 to 167 Hours................................................. 6.3 1.4

459

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

12.0 Have But Do Not Use Equipment... 0.8 Q Q N N Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None......

460

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.5 2.5 2.3 2.4 0.9 1950 to 1959 1960 to 1969 1970 to 1979 Table HC5.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005 Year of Construction 1980 to 1989 1990 to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Have But Do Not Use Equipment... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None......

462

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.9 Have But Do Not Use Equipment... 0.8 N N N Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None......

463

Total U.S. Housing Units.................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Have But Do Not Use Equipment... 0.8 Q Q Q Q 0.3 Q N Q Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None......

464

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Have But Do Not Use Equipment... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None......

465

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5.4 Have But Do Not Use Equipment... 0.8 N N N Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None......

466

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Non-Hispanic Descent",96.3,17.3,24.7,35.8,18.4 "Race of Householder2, 3" "White",79.1,14.7,21,27.4,16 "Hispanic",5,0.8,"Q",2.1,2.1 "Non-Hispanic",74.1,13.9,20.9,25.4,...

467

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Non-Hispanic Descent",96.3,18.4,5.9,12.5 "Race of Householder2, 3" "White",79.1,16,5.9,10.1 "Hispanic",5,2.1,0.7,1.4 "Non-Hispanic",74.1,13.9,5.2,8.7...

468

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Non-Hispanic Descent",96.3,70.6,58.5,3.7,1.6,2,4.8 "Race of Householder2, 3" "White",79.1,61.1,50.5,3.1,1.2,1.7,4.7 "Hispanic",5,2.6,1.9,"Q","Q","Q",0.4...

469

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ............... 35.5 20.3 14.8 1.2 0.6 0.9 2.8 Use a Personal Computer............................. 75.6 57.8 49.2 2.9 1.2 1.4 3.0 Number of Desktop PCs 1.............................................................. 50.3 37.0 30.5 2.2 0.8 1.1 2.4 2.............................................................. 16.2 13.1 11.6 0.6 0.2 Q 0.4 3 or More................................................. 9.0 7.7 7.2 Q Q Q Q Number of Laptop PCs 1.............................................................. 22.5 17.0 14.7 1.0 0.4 0.4 0.5 2.............................................................. 4.0 3.3 3.0 Q Q Q Q 3 or More................................................. 0.7 0.5 0.5 Q N N Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor).......................

470

Million U.S. Housing Units Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 4.7 3.8 Q Q Q 0.6 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 16.0 13.3 0.8 0.4 Q 1.3 Once a Day.................................................................. 42.3 32.1 26.5 1.6 0.7 1.1 2.2 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 19.3 15.8 1.3 0.4 0.6 1.3 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 2.8 2.2 Q N Q 0.3 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.7 2.3 Q Q Q Q No Hot Meals Cooked.................................................. 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................

471

Total U.S. Housing Units.............................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Heating Equipment................ 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Space Heating Equipment................. 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have But Do Not Use Equipment............... 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.2 1.2 0.4 0.3 0.5 0.9 1.9 1 to 499.................................................. 6.1 2.9 1.7 0.8 0.3 0.5 1.7 3.5 500 to 999.............................................. 27.7 11.7 8.5 4.1 1.7 1.6 7.2 14.4 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 26.0 6.3 7.8 5.7 2.8 3.4 4.0 9.4 1,500 to 1,999........................................

472

Million U.S. Housing Units Total......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................... 35.5 5.7 3.3 4.6 4.7 5.8 5.7 4.0 1.7 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 9.0 4.1 7.9 7.8 13.1 12.9 13.3 7.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model........................................... 58.6 6.7 3.5 6.3 6.2 10.3 9.9 10.2 5.6 Laptop Model............................................... 16.9 2.3 0.7 1.7 1.5 2.8 2.9 3.1 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours....................................... 13.6 1.6 0.6 1.8 1.8 2.5 2.0 2.2 1.1 2 to 15 Hours............................................... 29.1 3.0 1.6 3.3 3.0 5.6 5.0 5.0 2.7 16 to 40 Hours............................................. 13.5 1.9 0.9 1.4 1.4 1.9 2.2 2.2 1.5 41 to 167 Hours...........................................

473

Total U.S. Housing Units............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Heating Equipment............................... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Space Heating Equipment................................ 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Space Heating Equipment................................. 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.............................. 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................................... 3.6 Q 0.7 Q 1.3 1 to 499................................................................. 6.1 0.5 0.4 0.5 1.4 500 to 999............................................................. 27.7 2.7 1.4 2.4 3.4 1,000 to 1,499....................................................... 26.0 1.4 2.2 1.6 2.5 1,500 to 1,999.......................................................

474

Total U.S. Housing Units...................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 Do Not Have Heating Equipment...................... 1.2 0.6 Q Q Q 0.3 Have Space Heating Equipment....................... 109.8 32.3 8.0 3.3 5.8 14.1 Use Space Heating Equipment........................ 109.1 31.8 8.0 3.2 5.6 13.9 Have But Do Not Use Equipment..................... 0.8 0.5 N Q Q Q Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None............................................................. 3.6 2.1 Q Q 0.4 1.1 1 to 499........................................................ 6.1 3.3 0.4 Q 0.8 1.8 500 to 999.................................................... 27.7 15.9 2.1 1.4 3.4 8.2 1,000 to 1,499.............................................. 26.0 7.6 2.5 1.0 1.1 2.9 1,500 to 1,999.............................................. 17.6 2.3 1.5 0.3 0.2 0.3

475

Million U.S. Housing Units Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.4 1.0 0.4 0.6 1.2 Q 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 8.6 2.3 1.0 1.6 3.5 0.2 Once a Day.................................................................. 42.3 10.1 2.3 1.1 2.1 4.3 0.4 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 7.8 2.0 0.7 1.3 3.6 Q About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.1 Q Q Q 0.6 Q Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 1.4 Q Q Q 1.0 N No Hot Meals Cooked.................................................. 0.9 0.4 Q N Q 0.3 Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................

476

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ............... 35.5 15.3 3.0 1.9 3.1 6.4 0.8 Use a Personal Computer............................. 75.6 17.7 5.0 1.6 2.8 8.0 0.4 Number of Desktop PCs 1.............................................................. 50.3 13.3 3.4 0.9 2.2 6.5 0.3 2.............................................................. 16.2 3.1 1.1 0.3 0.5 1.2 Q 3 or More................................................. 9.0 1.3 0.5 0.3 Q 0.3 N Number of Laptop PCs 1.............................................................. 22.5 5.5 1.3 0.4 0.9 2.7 Q 2.............................................................. 4.0 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 N 3 or More................................................. 0.7 Q N Q Q Q N Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor).......................

477

Total U.S. Housing Units........................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Heating Equipment........................... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Space Heating Equipment............................ 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Space Heating Equipment............................. 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.......................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None................................................................. 3.6 2.4 0.3 0.4 0.4 1 to 499............................................................. 6.1 3.9 0.9 0.5 0.8 500 to 999......................................................... 27.7 14.3 5.0 4.1 4.4 1,000 to 1,499................................................... 26.0 11.8 4.5 4.5 5.2 1,500 to 1,999...................................................

478

Energy performance of air distribution systems part II: room air stratification full scale testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and are connected to a fan coil unit by flexible ductwork asvariable air volume fan coil units typically used in

Webster, Tom; Lukaschek, Wolfgang; Dickeroff, Darryl; Bauman, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

The creation of a courtyard microclimate thermal model for the analysis of courtyard houses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the air change rates, solar absorptivity, and ambient air (rooftop) temperatures. The courtyard microclimate model was then used in combination with thermal simulation software (DOE-2) to analyze the thermal performance of the case study house, which...

Bagneid, Amr

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

List of Whole House Fans Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Whole House Fans Incentives Whole House Fans Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 26 Whole House Fans Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 26) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Farm Equipment Energy Efficiency Incentives (Iowa) Utility Rebate Program Iowa Agricultural Agricultural Equipment Ceiling Fan Clothes Washers Custom/Others pending approval Dishwasher Doors Heat recovery Lighting Motor VFDs Motors Refrigerators Water Heaters Windows Whole House Fans Room Air Conditioners Ground Source Heat Pumps Yes Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - Farm Equipment Energy Efficiency Incentives (Minnesota) Utility Rebate Program Minnesota Agricultural Agricultural Equipment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "housing units air" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Detecting Human Movement by Differential Air Pressure Sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. We have developed an approach for whole-house gross movement and room transition detection through sensing at only one point in the home. We consider this system to be one member of an important new class of human activity monitoring approaches based on what we call infrastructure mediated sensing, or "home bus snooping. " Our solution leverages the existing ductwork infrastructure of central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems found in many homes. Disruptions in airflow, caused by human interroom movement, result in static pressure changes in the HVAC air handler unit. This is particularly apparent for room-to-room transitions and door open/close events involving full or partial blockage of doorways and thresholds. We detect and record this pressure variation from sensors mounted on the air filter and classify where certain movement events are occurring in the house, such as an adult walking through a particular doorway or the opening and closing of a particular door. In contrast to more complex distributed sensing approaches for motion detection in the home, our method requires the installation of only a single sensing unit (i.e., an instrumented air filter) connected to an embedded or personal computer that performs the classification function. Preliminary results show we can classify unique transition events with up to 75-80 % accuracy. 1

Shwetak N. Patel; Matthew S. Reynolds; Gregory D. Abowd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

The smartest house in Los Alamos  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Smartest House In Los Alamos The Smartest House In Los Alamos Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit The smartest house in Los Alamos The first project in the United States to demonstrate how "smart grid" technology could provide residential customers with a significant amount of their electricity from renewable resources is open and getting ready for visitors. October 1, 2012 dummy image Read our archives Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email The first project in the United States to demonstrate how "smart grid" technology could provide residential customers with a significant amount of their electricity from renewable resources is open and getting ready for

483

HOUSE PASSES ENERGY BILLS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Among the dissimilarities, the House bill would require that, by 2020, utilities generate 15% of their electricity from renewable sources—wind, solar, and hydropower. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2007-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

484

CHICAGO HOUSE PARTIES SHOW WAYS TO UPGRADE | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

created Energy Impact Illinois (EI2) to promote home energy upgrades in single-family homes, multifamily housing units, and commercial buildings to help the region meet its 2008...

485

White House Solar Champions of Change- Watch Now  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On April 17, 2014 the White House honored solar energy deployment Champions of Change from across the United States. The honorees include several current and former SunShot awardees.

486

Immigrant characteristics and Hispanic-Anglo housing inequality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper seeks to explain why Hispanic households in the United States live in housing ... Anglos’. I argue that immigrant characteristics of Hispanic households and...the metropolitan areas in which Hispanics ...

Lauren J. Krivo

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Thermal Insulation of Houses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Thermal Insulation (Dwellings) Bill which Mr. G. Nabarro introduced into the House of Commons on ... , sponsored by members of both major political parties, extends the principle of the Thermal Insulation (Industrial Buildings) Act of July 1957 to all new dwelling houses built in the ...

1958-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

488

Multiple pump housing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fluid delivery system includes a first pump having a first drive assembly, a second pump having a second drive assembly, and a pump housing. At least a portion of each of the first and second pumps are located in the housing.

Donoho, II, Michael R. (Edelstein, IL); Elliott, Christopher M. (Metamora, IL)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

489

Comfort and HVAC Performance for a New Construction Occupied Test House in Roseville, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

K. Hovnanian(R) Homes(R) constructed a 2,253-ft2 single-story slab-on-grade ranch house for an occupied test house (new construction) in Roseville, California. One year of monitoring and analysis focused on the effectiveness of the space conditioning system at maintaining acceptable temperature and relative humidity levels in several rooms of the home, as well as room-to-room differences and the actual measured energy consumption by the space conditioning system. In this home, the air handler unit (AHU) and ducts were relocated to inside the thermal boundary. The AHU was relocated from the attic to a mechanical closet, and the ductwork was located inside an insulated and air-sealed bulkhead in the attic. To describe the performance and comfort in the home, the research team selected representative design days and extreme days from the annual data for analysis. To ensure that temperature differences were within reasonable occupant expectations, the team followed Air Conditioning Contractors of America guidance. At the end of the monitoring period, the occupant of the home had no comfort complaints in the home. Any variance between the modeled heating and cooling energy and the actual amounts used can be attributed to the variance in temperatures at the thermostat versus the modeled inputs.

Burdick, A.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols, Islip, New York  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In this project, ARIES worked with two public housing authorities (PHA) to develop packages of energy efficiency retrofit measures the PHAs can cost effectively implement at the time when units are refurbished between occupancies. T

491

Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hosted by the Association of Alaska Housing Authorities (AAHA), this three-day training event covers strategies and technical issues related to sustainable housing development.

492

Pet House Sparrow  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pet House Sparrow Pet House Sparrow Name: mary Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I found a Baby House Sparrow and raised it. This Sparrow is a female and is about 5 months old and very tame. We are keeping this bird as a pet. We are interested in possibly breeding this bird and was wondering if you can mix breed the House Sparrow with a Finch or type of Sparrow that you could purchase at a pet store? What is the life expectancy of the House Sparrow? Replies: In the wild most small birds only live a year or two; well cared for in captivity they might be able to make it twice that long, but don't count on it. There are some records of exceptional life lengths for some species of small birds, 8 or 10 years, but I haven't heard of any for house sparrows. I don't think you would be able to cross breed house sparrows with any of the others, but I couldn't say for sure. Hybridization normally occurs only between very closely related species; I don't know enough about genetics.

493

ORNL Guest House  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The ORNL Guest House is located in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory campus, within 5 minutes by car to any part of the campus, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Conference Center and short walk to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The Guest House is a three story, 47 room, 71 bed facility (23 rooms with king beds and 24 rooms with 2 ex-long double beds). All rooms have a flat screen satellite TV, mini fridge, microwave, coffeemaker, iron & ironing board, and hair dryer. The entire Guest House has high speed wireless internet access with printing capabilities. The ORNL Guest House is located in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory campus, within 5 minutes by car to any part of the campus, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Conference Center and short walk to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The Guest House is a three story, 47 room, 71 bed facility (23 rooms with king beds and 24 rooms with 2 ex-long double beds). All rooms have a flat screen satellite TV, mini fridge, microwave, coffeemaker, iron & ironing board, and hair dryer. The entire Guest House has high speed wireless internet access with printing capabilities. ORNL Guest House Oak Ridge National Laboratory Address - 8640 Nano Center Drive Oak Ridge, Tn 37830 Phone: 865-576-8101 Fax: 865-576-8102 Operated by Paragon Hotel Company This Convenient and Modern Facility Offers:

494

High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners - Building America Top...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Window Air Conditioners - Building America Top Innovation This photo shows a window air conditioning unit in place in a window frame. Window air conditioners are inexpensive,...

495

Incremental densification auctions : A politically viable method of producing infill housing in existing single-family neighborhoods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper examines the problem of convincing homeowners to accept new housing density in their neighborhoods. This paper proposes that densification that places additional housing units in preexisting single-family ...

Baker, Karl Phillip

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Principles of Passive House  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Principles of Passive House Principles of Passive House Speaker(s): Wolfgang Feist Date: November 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Alan Meier The Passive House ("Passivhaus") concept is a rigorous, voluntary energy performance standard for buildings that reduces heating requirements by up to 90% and overall energy use by up to 80% over standard construction. Developed in Germany in the early 1990s and drawing on Super-insulated and Passive Solar ideas from North America and "Low Energy" European building standards, the concept of a building that could be practically constructed to maintain a comfortable interior climate without conventional heating or cooling systems was devised, tested and proven. The Passive House remains comfortable without large "active"

497

Cost Effective Sustainable Housing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cost Effective Sustainable Housing The topic of research which was discussed throughout this study was an analysis of sustainable development between single-family and multi-family structures.… (more)

Morton, Joshua

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Indian Housing Training Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This four-day conference will provide housing professionals with the tools to maintain good homes, build affordable homes, improve public safety, and provide essential building blocks to a healthy...

499

Aire Valley Environmental | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name: Aire Valley Environmental Place: United Kingdom Product: Leeds-based waste-to-energy project developer. References: Aire Valley Environmental1 This article...

500

Application of linear multiple model predictive control (MMPC) framework towards dynamic maximazation of oxygen yield in an elevated-pressure air separation unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a typical air separation unit (ASU) utilizing either a simple gaseous oxygen (GOX) cycle or a pumped liquid oxygen (PLOX) cycle, the flowrate of liquid nitrogen (LN2) stream connecting high-pressure and low-pressure ASU columns plays an important role in the total oxygen yield. It has been observed that this yield reaches a maximum at a certain optimal flowrate of LN2 stream. At nominal full-load operation, the flowrate of LN2 stream is maintained near this optimum value, whereas at part-load conditions this flowrate is typically modified in proportion with the load-change (oxygen demand) through a ratio/feed-forward controller. Due to nonlinearity in the entire ASU process, the ratio-modified LN2 flowrate does not guarantee an optimal oxygen yield at part-load conditions. This is further exacerbated when process disturbances in form of “cold-box” heat-leaks enter the system. To address this problem of dynamically maximizing the oxygen yield while the ASU undergoes a load-change and/or a process disturbance, a multiple model predictive control (MMPC) algorithm is proposed. This approach has been used in previous studies to handle large ramp-rates of oxygen demand posed by the gasifier in an IGCC plant. In this study, the proposed algorithm uses linear step-response “blackbox” models surrounding the operating points corresponding to maximum oxygen yield points at different loads. It has been shown that at any operating point of the ASU, the MMPC algorithm, through model-weight calculation based on plant measurements, naturally and continuously selects the dominant model(s) corresponding to the current plant state, while making control-move decisions that approach the maximum oxygen yield point. This dynamically facilitates less energy consumption in form of compressed feed-air compared to a simple ratio control during load-swings. In addition, since a linear optimization problem is solved at each time step, the approach involves much less computational cost compared to a firstprinciple based nonlinear MPC. Introduction

Mahapatra, P.; Zitney, S.; Bequette, B. Wayne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z