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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Residential Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 4 Total Square Feet of U.S. Housing Units

2

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities > Table 8b Glossary U.S. Residential Buildings Primary Energy Intensity

3

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities >Table 7a Glossary U.S. Residential Housing Primary Page Last Revised: July 2009

4

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities > Table 5c Glossary U.S. Residential Housing Site Page Last Revised: July 2009

5

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities >Table 7b Glossary U.S. Residential Housing Primary Energy Intensity

6

Industrial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Industrial Industrial / Manufacturing Buildings Industrial/manufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). See the MECS home page for further information. Commercial buildings found on a manufacturing industrial complex, such as an office building for a manufacturer, are not considered to be commercial if they have the same owner and operator as the industrial complex. However, they would be counted in the CBECS if they were owned and operated independently of the manufacturing industrial complex. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/industrial.html

7

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry >Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Contact Us * Feedback *...

8

Number of U.S. Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 2

9

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 5b

10

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 5a

11

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 7a

12

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table7c

13

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 7b

14

Total Floorspace of Commercial Buildings - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities >Table 4

15

Energy Savings in Industrial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The industrial sector accounts for more than one-third of total energy use in the United States and emits 28.7 percent of the country’s greenhouse gases. Energy use in the industrial sector is largely for steam and process heating systems, and electricity for equipment such as pumps, air compressors, and fans. Lesser, yet significant, amounts of energy are used for industrial buildings – heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), lighting and facility use (such as office equipment). Due to economic growth, energy consumption in the industrial sector will continue to increase gradually, as will energy use in industrial buildings. There is a large potential for energy saving and carbon intensity reduction by improving HVAC, lighting, and other aspects of building operation and technologies. Analyses show that most of the technologies and measures to save energy in buildings would be cost-effective with attractive rates of return. First, this paper will investigate energy performance in buildings within the manufacturing sector, as classified in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). Energy use patterns for HVAC and lighting in industrial buildings vary dramatically across different manufacturing sectors. For example, food manufacturing uses more electricity for HVAC than does apparel manufacturing because of the different energy demand patterns. Energy saving opportunities and potential from industrial buildings will also be identified and evaluated. Lastly, barriers for deployment of energy savings technologies will be explored along with recommendations for policies to promote energy efficiency in industrial buildings.

Zhou, A.; Tutterow, V.; Harris, J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Table 1a. U.S. Commercial Buildings Site Energy Consumption b  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 1a

17

Industrial Buildings Tools and Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rolf Butters Rolf Butters Industrial Technologies Program Industrial Buildings Tools and Resources Webinar - June 11, 2009 Michael MacDonald Agenda  Introduction to Industrial Buildings Opportunity and Tools  EERE Funding, Opportunities, and Resources  Next Steps 6/11/2009 2 Facilities Energy  ITP has been working for a couple years now to develop tools to address facilities energy use, present in most plants, and about 8% of total sector energy use  First tool is a Score Card, implemented both as a stand- alone Excel file and for QuickPEP - Score Card has to be simple, so is approximate - But it can be a very important tool for scoping facilities energy use at a plant  Second tool is an adaptation of the BCHP Screening Tool, originally developed by the Distributed Energy program but

18

U.S. Residential Buildings Weather-Adjusted Primary Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities > Table 8c Glossary U.S. Residential Buildings ...

19

Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...

20

Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the work conducted by the Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (www.baihp.org) for the period 9/1/99-6/30/06. BAIHP is led by the Florida Solar Energy Center of the University of Central Florida and focuses on factory built housing. In partnership with over 50 factory and site builders, work was performed in two main areas--research and technical assistance. In the research area--through site visits in over 75 problem homes, we discovered the prime causes of moisture problems in some manufactured homes and our industry partners adopted our solutions to nearly eliminate this vexing problem. Through testing conducted in over two dozen housing factories of six factory builders we documented the value of leak free duct design and construction which was embraced by our industry partners and implemented in all the thousands of homes they built. Through laboratory test facilities and measurements in real homes we documented the merits of 'cool roof' technologies and developed an innovative night sky radiative cooling concept currently being tested. We patented an energy efficient condenser fan design, documented energy efficient home retrofit strategies after hurricane damage, developed improved specifications for federal procurement for future temporary housing, compared the Building America benchmark to HERS Index and IECC 2006, developed a toolkit for improving the accuracy and speed of benchmark calculations, monitored the field performance of over a dozen prototype homes and initiated research on the effectiveness of occupancy feedback in reducing household energy use. In the technical assistance area we provided systems engineering analysis, conducted training, testing and commissioning that have resulted in over 128,000 factory built and over 5,000 site built homes which are saving their owners over $17,000,000 annually in energy bills. These include homes built by Palm Harbor Homes, Fleetwood, Southern Energy Homes, Cavalier and the manufacturers participating in the Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Home program. We worked with over two dozen Habitat for Humanity affiliates and helped them build over 700 Energy Star or near Energy Star homes. We have provided technical assistance to several show homes constructed for the International builders show in Orlando, FL and assisted with other prototype homes in cold climates that save 40% over the benchmark reference. In the Gainesville Fl area we have several builders that are consistently producing 15 to 30 homes per month in several subdivisions that meet the 30% benchmark savings goal. We have contributed to the 2006 DOE Joule goals by providing two community case studies meeting the 30% benchmark goal in marine climates.

McIlvaine, Janet; Chandra, Subrato; Barkaszi, Stephen; Beal, David; Chasar, David; Colon, Carlos; Fonorow, Ken; Gordon, Andrew; Hoak, David; Hutchinson, Stephanie; Lubliner, Mike; Martin, Eric; McCluney, Ross; McGinley, Mark; McSorley, Mike; Moyer, Neil; Mullens, Mike; Parker, Danny; Sherwin, John; Vieira, Rob; Wichers, Susan

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data and Trends - Table A04  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Buildings & Industry > Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy ... U.S. Vehicles by Model ... Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate ...

22

Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory Burden RFI (Federal Register August 8, 2012) Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory...

23

Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP II)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work conducted by the Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP - www.baihp.org) during the final budget period (BP5) of our contract, January 1, 2010 to November 30, 2010. Highlights from the four previous budget periods are included for context. BAIHP is led by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) of the University of Central Florida. With over 50 Industry Partners including factory and site builders, work in BP5 was performed in six tasks areas: Building America System Research Management, Documentation and Technical Support; System Performance Evaluations; Prototype House Evaluations; Initial Community Scale Evaluations; Project Closeout, Final Review of BA Communities; and Other Research Activities.

Abernethy, Bob; Chandra, Subrato; Baden, Steven; Cummings, Jim; Cummings, Jamie; Beal, David; Chasar, David; Colon, Carlos; Dutton, Wanda; Fairey, Philip; Fonorow, Ken; Gil, Camilo; Gordon, Andrew; Hoak, David; Kerr, Ryan; Peeks, Brady; Kosar, Douglas; Hewes, Tom; Kalaghchy, Safvat; Lubliner, Mike; Martin, Eric; McIlvaine, Janet; Moyer, Neil; Liguori, Sabrina; Parker, Danny; Sherwin, John; Stroer, Dennis; Thomas-Rees, Stephanie; Daniel, Danielle; McIlvaine, Janet

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

24

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2007 Building Industry Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

team Puerto Rico student stands over the team's gray-water pool, which is filled with green plants, and explains to visitors surrounding the pool how it recycles water for reuse. team Puerto Rico student stands over the team's gray-water pool, which is filled with green plants, and explains to visitors surrounding the pool how it recycles water for reuse. Universidad de Puerto Rico student Wilfredo Rodriguez explains the team's gray-water pool to visitors at the 2007 Solar Decathlon. The pool is used to filter wash water for reuse. Solar Decathlon 2007 Building Industry Workshops Below are descriptions of the workshops offered at the 2007 Solar Decathlon on Building Industry Day, Thursday, October 18, 2007. Solar Applications for Homes Revised Title: Translating Sustainability to Affordable Housing 9:00 a.m. Presenter: ASHRAE and John Quale, Assistant Professor, University of Virginia School of Architecture The focus of the workshop is translating sustainability to affordable

25

Solar America Initiative--In Focus: The Building Industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet introduces the building industry to the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar America Initiative (SAI) and describes how the building industry can benefit from and contribute to the SAI.

Not Available

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Solar America Initiative--In Focus: The Building Industry  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet introduces the building industry to the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar America Initiative (SAI) and describes how the building industry can benefit from and contribute to the SAI.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Residential Building Industry Consulting Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Jump to: navigation, search Name Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Place New York, NY Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Residential Building Industry Consulting Services is a company located in New York, NY. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Residential_Building_Industry_Consulting_Services&oldid=381757" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations What links here Related changes Special pages

28

2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption - What is an RSE  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > 2003 Detailed Tables > What is an RSE? What is an RSE? The estimates in the...

29

ConSol (Building Industry Research Alliance) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ConSol (Building Industry Research Alliance) ConSol (Building Industry Research Alliance) Jump to: navigation, search Name ConSol (Building Industry Research Alliance) Place Stockton, CA Website http://www.consol.com References ConSol (Building Industry Research Alliance)[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Incubator Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration Partnership Year 2004 Link to project description http://www.nrel.gov/news/press/2004/382.html LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! ConSol (Building Industry Research Alliance) is a company located in Stockton, CA. References ↑ "ConSol (Building Industry Research Alliance)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=ConSol_(Building_Industry_Research_Alliance)&oldid=379316

30

Arizona Map for Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Documents%20and%20SettingsLPJEMEUstyleseiasitewideF.css" rel"stylesheet" type"textcss" > Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Background Information on CBECS > 2003...

31

Brochure: ENERGY STAR for Commercial Buildings and Industrial Plants |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brochure: ENERGY STAR for Commercial Buildings and Industrial Brochure: ENERGY STAR for Commercial Buildings and Industrial Plants Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

32

ENERGY STAR industrial partnership | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR industrial partnership ENERGY STAR industrial partnership Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance ENERGY STAR industrial partnership New ENERGY STAR industrial partners Energy guides Energy efficiency and air regulation

33

The Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP) is one of five competitively selected U.S. DOE Building America teams and began work on 9/1/99. BAIHP focuses on improving the energy efficiency, durability and indoor air quality in manufactured homes. Team members, Cavalier Homes, Fleetwood Homes, Palm Harbor Homes, Southern Energy Homes, and manufacturers in the Super Good Cents/Natural Choice program produce over 100,000 manufactured homes/yr currently. In addition, the BAIHP team provides technical assistance to about 30 site builders and modular home manufacturers including Habitat for Humanity affiliates throughout the nation. BAIHP is also charged with enhancing the energy efficiency and learning environment in portable classrooms in the northwestern states of WA, OR and ID. This paper summarizes the multifaceted work being performed by BAIHP and provides specific data on 310 homes constructed in the Gainesville FL area with technical assistance from Florida Home Energy and Resources Organization. The paper also summarizes typical causes and cures for moisture problems in manufactured homes.

Chandra, S.; McCloud, M.; Moyer, N.; Beal, D.; Chasar, D.; McIlvaine, J.; Parker, D.; Sherwin, J.; Martin, E.; Fonorow, K.; Mullens, M.; Lubliner, M.; McSorley, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Tools for Assessing Building Energy Use in Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This presentation will cover a brief history of building energy measures savings potential for industrial plants and briefly characterize building energy measures and their savings identified over approximately the past 15 years in energy audits. The nature and extent of building energy assessment tools will then be profiled, and the beneficial use of an appropriate subset of these tools for assessing energy savings in buildings at industrial plants will be described. Possible future tools that may be useful will also be mentioned.

Martin, M.; MacDonald, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » Blog Archive » Building Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(far left), Rob Minnick, and members of their company's green team attended Building Industry Day. (Credit: Alexis PowersU.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon) Consumer...

36

Brochure: ENERGY STAR for Commercial Buildings and Industrial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brochure: ENERGY STAR for Commercial Buildings and Industrial Plants Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing...

37

About ENERGY STAR for commercial and industrial buildings | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR for commercial and industrial buildings ENERGY STAR for commercial and industrial buildings Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Find out who's partnered with ENERGY STAR Become an ENERGY STAR partner Find ENERGY STAR certified buildings and plants ENERGY STAR certification Featured research and reports Facts and stats Climate change and buildings

38

Industrial/manufacturing resources | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial/manufacturing resources Industrial/manufacturing resources Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

39

Industrial energy management information center | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy management information center energy management information center Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance Industrial service and product providers Earn recognition Market impacts: Improvements in the industrial sector

40

Media FAQs about ENERGY STAR for commercial and industrial buildings |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Media FAQs about ENERGY STAR for commercial and industrial Media FAQs about ENERGY STAR for commercial and industrial buildings Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section News and announcements ENERGY STAR in the news Media FAQs Photos and graphics Media FAQs about ENERGY STAR for commercial and industrial buildings Tip: To search by keyword, hit Ctrl+F (Windows) or Cmd+F (Mac). To browse

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Industries in focus | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Energy Performance Indicators for plants ENERGY STAR Energy Performance Indicators for plants » Industries in focus Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Tools for benchmarking energy management practices Tools for tracking and benchmarking facility energy performance

42

Workshop proceeding of the industrial building energy use  

SciTech Connect

California has a large number of small and medium sized industries which have a major impact on the demand growth of California utilities. Energy use in building services (lighting, HVAC, office equipment, computers, etc.). These industries constitute an important but largely neglected fraction of the total site energy use. The ratio of energy use in building service to the total site energy use is a function of the industrial activity, its size, and the climate at the site of the facility. Also, energy use in building services is more responsive to weather and occupant schedules than the traditional base-load'' industrial process energy. Industrial energy use is considered as a base-load'' by utility companies because it helps to increase the utilities' load factor. To increase this further, utilities often market energy at lower rates to industrial facilities. Presently, the energy use in the building services of the industrial sector is often clubbed together with industrial process load. Data on non-process industrial energy use are not readily available in the literature. In cases where the major portion of the energy is used in the building services (with daily and seasonal load profiles that in fact peak at the same time as systemwide load peaks), the utility may be selling below cost at peak power times. These cases frequently happen with electric utilities. 30 figs., 6 tabs.

Akbari, H.; Gadgil, A. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory Burden  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory Burden RFI (Federal Register August 8, 2012) Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory Burden RFI (Federal Register August 8, 2012) On behalf of the Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association, I am providing the following comments and information in response to DOE's request. The Association represents residential builders, developers and associated professionals and service firms. Final Letter to DOE Regulatory Burden 9_7_2012.pdf More Documents & Publications National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) Ex Parte Memorandum Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Frederick County (Maryland) Department of Permits and Inspections (FCDPI

44

The building materials industry in China: An overview  

SciTech Connect

The present study of China`s building materials industry is a collaborative work between the Energy Research Institute (ERI) of the State Planning Commission of China and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) of the US Department of Energy (USDOE).

Liu, Feng [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Wang, Shumao [State Planning Commission, People`s Republic of China, (China). Energy Research Institute

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A normative approach to the evaluation of industrialized building systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rapid development of the building industry within the last 10-15 years involved the adaptation of a more. specialized and advanced system of construction and management. And, with the expanding alternatives of ...

Alhasani, Nadia Mehdi

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders December 7, 2010 - 4:23pm Addthis Zach Heir , a recent hire in the electric vehicle field Zach Heir , a recent hire in the electric vehicle field Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities It's no secret that when it comes to advanced vehicle technologies, the Department of Energy is kicking into high gear. We're investing more than $12 billion in grants and loans for research, development and deployment of advanced technology vehicles. These investments are helping to create a clean energy workforce. If we want to continue a leadership role in the global automotive industry, it is crucial that we take the long view and invest heavily in the next generation of innovators and critical thinkers

47

Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Manufacturing Other Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Commercial Weatherization Water Heating Maximum Rebate Retrofit: 50% of cost of upgraded equipment, or an amount that buys down the cost of the project to a 1.5 year simple payback. New Construction: 70% of incremental cost of higher efficiency equipment, or an amount that buys down the incremental investment to a 1.5 year simple

48

Building a More Efficient Industrial Supply Chain | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Efficient Industrial Supply Chain More Efficient Industrial Supply Chain Building a More Efficient Industrial Supply Chain November 7, 2011 - 3:06pm Addthis This infographic highlights some of the ways businesses can save money at each step of the energy supply chain. Many companies can identify low-cost ways to reduce energy costs in electricity generation, electricity transmission, industrial processes, product delivery, and retail sales. This infographic highlights some of the ways businesses can save money at each step of the energy supply chain. Many companies can identify low-cost ways to reduce energy costs in electricity generation, electricity transmission, industrial processes, product delivery, and retail sales. Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs

49

Buildings, Energy, Greenhouse Gas, Industrial and Policy Modeling and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings, Energy, Greenhouse Gas, Industrial and Policy Modeling and Buildings, Energy, Greenhouse Gas, Industrial and Policy Modeling and Simulation Tools Available from Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Tools header image January 2014 Tools and models to find the best way to save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in cities and industries, to follow the transport of pollutants through the environment, and to calculate the cost of power interruptions are among those available on a new Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) web site. The site brings together models and simulation tools developed by the Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts (EAEI) Department of the Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. "Our hope is that the site will facilitate greater technical awareness of

50

Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership II Expert Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GTI PROJECT NUMBER 20970 GTI PROJECT NUMBER 20970 Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership II Subtask 1.8: Building America Expert Meeting Report Issued: December 20, 2010 Prepared For: Philip Fairey Deputy Director Florida Solar Energy Center 1679 Clearlake Road Cocoa, FL 32922-5703 (321) 638-1434 pfairey@fsec.ucf.edu GTI Technical Contacts: Ryan Kerr Douglas Kosar R&D Market Analyst Institute Engineer 847-768-0941 847-768-0725 ryan.kerr@gastechnology.org douglas.kosar@gastechnology.org Gas Technology Institute 1700 S. Mount Prospect Rd. Des Plaines, Illinois 60018 www.gastechnology.org FINAL EXPERT MEETING REPORT Building America Expert Meeting Final Report Page i Legal Notice This information was prepared by Gas Technology Institute ("GTI") for the Florida Solar

51

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

52

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

53

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

54

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

55

Better Buildings, Better Plants: How You Can Benefit, plus New Executive Order on Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Better Buildings, Better Plants: How You Can Benefit, plus New Executive Order on Industrial Energy Efficiency Advanced Manufacturing Office October 9, 2012 Andre de Fontaine Katrina Pielli 2 Today * Better Buildings, Better Plants Overview - Better Buildings, Better Plants Program - Better Buildings, Better Plants Challenge * Looking Ahead to 2013 - In-Plant Trainings - Enhanced energy intensity baselining and tracking tool - New communication materials * Executive Order on Industrial Energy Efficiency and Combined Heat and Power - DOE Activities in Support of Executive Order * Regional Industrial Energy Efficiency & Combined Heat and Power Dialogue Meetings * Better Buildings, Better Plants * "CHP as a Clean Energy Resource" new report

56

Pages that link to "ConSol (Building Industry Research Alliance...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| 500) Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwikiSpecial:WhatLinksHereConSol(BuildingIndustryResearchAlliance)" Special pages About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Developer...

57

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Building Americas Top Innovations Propel the Home Building Industry toward Higher Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building America program and its teams of building science experts continue to have a transforming impact, leading our nation's home building industry to high-performance homes. The U.S. home building industry represents a significant opportunity for energy savings, accounting for nearly one-fourth of U.S. energy consumption, but the industry as a whole has been slow to adopt new energy-saving technologies. This is largely due to the industry's unique disaggregation, with thousands of small business owners lacking adequate resources and capabilities to invest in research and development. DOE established the Building America program in 1995 to address both the huge energy-saving opportunity and the critical research gap

58

[Your Industrial Plant] Earns the ENERGY STAR | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Plant] Earns the ENERGY STAR Industrial Plant] Earns the ENERGY STAR Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories

59

SPP sales flyer for manufacturing and industry | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing and industry manufacturing and industry Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

60

Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership II Expert Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is the summary report for the Building America expert meeting held on November 16, 2010, in Chicago, Illinois.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Analysis of energy use in building services of the industrial sector in California: Two case studies  

SciTech Connect

Energy-use patterns in many of California's fastest-growing industries are not typical of the existing mix of industries in the US. Many California firms operate small- and medium-sized facilities housed in buildings used simultaneously or interchangeably over time for commercial (office, retail, warehouse) and industrial activities. In these industrial subsectors, the energy required for building services (providing occupant comfort and necessities like lighting, HVAC, office equipment, computers, etc.) may be at least as important as the more familiar process energy requirements -- especially for electricity and on-peak demand. Electricity for building services is sometimes priced as if it were base loaded like process uses; in reality this load varies significantly according to occupancy schedules and cooling and heating loads, much as in any commercial building. Using informal field surveys, simulation studies, and detailed analyses of existing data (including utility commercial/industrial audit files), we studied the energy use of this industrial subsector through a multi-step procedure: (1) characterizing non-process building energy and power use in California industries, (2) identifying conservation and load-shaping opportunities in industrial building services, and (3) investigating industrial buildings and system design methodologies. In an earlier report, we addressed these issues by performing an extensive survey of the existing publicly available data, characterizing and comparing the building energy use in this sector. In this report, we address the above objectives by examining and analyzing energy use in two industrial case-study facilities in California. Based on the information for the case studies, we discuss the design consideration for these industrial buildings, characterize their energy use, and review their conservation and load-shaping potentials. In addition, we identify and discuss some research ideas for further investigation.

Akbari, H.; Sezgen, O.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Workshop Proceedings of the Industrial Building Energy Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial Data Base? PURCHASED, SITE, IDENTIFIED ENERGY END USES PG&EEUA DATABASE ELECTRICITY LIGHTING AIR CONDITIONING REFRIGERATION

Akbari, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Air conditioners, Chillers, Compressed air, CustomOthers pending approval, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Furnaces, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting Controls...

64

Changes related to "ConSol (Building Industry Research Alliance...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Wiki Browse Latinoamrica Buildings Clean Energy Economy Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network Geothermal Incentives and Policies International Clean Energy...

65

Moving energy-conserving design into the mainstream of the US buildings industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two programs discussed that are greatly accelerating the rate at which the US buildings industry is moving towards mass production of energy conserving solar buildings are: the Passive Solar Manufactured Buildings Program and the Solar Home Builders Program in the Denver metropolitan area. These programs provide a useful model for other efforts in accelerating private industry's rate of change. The concepts discussed on which this model is based include: industry participation in planning; incremental change; builders and architects; technical assistance (not money); large volume builders; competitive selection; simplified contractual procedures; public exposure; sensitive, concerned management. Progress of the programs are discussed. (MCW)

Baccei, B. C.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Overview of Commercial Buildings Print Report: PDF Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction | Trends | Major Characteristics Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: total nearly 4.9 million buildings comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1)

67

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.7 Industrialized Housing (IH)  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 2004 Number of Industrialized Housing Manufacturers Versus Production (Stick-Builders) Companies Type Panelized Modular (1) HUD-Code Production Builders Component Manufacturers...

68

2013 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry | Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center 2013 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE)...

69

Breakthrough: MFiX: Building Industry-Scale Machines in a Virtual World |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Breakthrough: MFiX: Building Industry-Scale Machines in a Virtual Breakthrough: MFiX: Building Industry-Scale Machines in a Virtual World Breakthrough: MFiX: Building Industry-Scale Machines in a Virtual World July 11, 2012 - 1:34pm Addthis Mfix is open-source, virtual modeling software that makes coal gasification processes more efficient than was ever possible through lab tests. Modeling reduces the cost and time of testing and building actual systems and ultimately results in lower costs, improved power plant efficiency, and new energy systems that meet or even exceed current or proposed environmental regulations. View the entire Lab Breakthrough playlist. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What is the future of MFiX? Ultimately, we see MFiX being used to solve industrial-scale

70

Workshop Proceedings of the Industrial Building Energy Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Edison Co. Customer Energy Services P.O. Box 800 Rosemead,up in the building energy services. The Hagler-Bailey reportIn addition, our energy- service representatives contacted

Akbari, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

BUILDING SUSTAINABLY CHALLENGES IN THE HOME RENOVATION INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................................................................................26 Kitchen and Bath Designer/Appliance and Material Selection ................28 NJ Clean Energy .......................................................................................12 Incentives in the Residential Building Market.............................................13 ..................................................................................................14 International Energy Conservation Code Committee ................15 International Green

Rainforth, Emma C.

72

DAMAGE TO COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS EXPOSED TO NUCLEAR EFFECTS  

SciTech Connect

One equipment control building designed to be blast resistant and two each of three standardized types of metal warehouse or utility buildings were exposed to the effects of a nuclear device detonation. One of the utility buildings was frameless, with deeply corrugated wall and roof sections; a second was very largely frameless, utilizing interlocking channel sections; and in the third the aluininum-panel wall and roof covering was supported by girts and purlins, which in turn were supported by steel frames. Because of atmospheric conditions at the time of an earlier detonation in the test series, one of each of the three types of utility buildings was exposed to approximately 0.7 psi overpressure before the planned test. In the planned test one of each of the three types was exposed to approximately 3.0 psi overpressure and one to 1.3 psi, with the intention of bracketing their overpressure survival range and obtaining data for possible economic redesign for improved blast resistance. The equipment control building utilized continuous-welded steel frames and reinforced-gypsum curtain-wall construction. The control building was exposed to approximately 4.1 psi, in the anticipated fringe zone of major structural damage, to determine its protective capabilities. The blast-resistant equipment control building was nat structurally damaged by the blast, thus exceeding the expectations of the design. Each of the three utility buildings received severe damage at the near range, one being completely destroyed, whereas at the far range the damage in every case was repairable. The test results are discussed, and recommendations for improved designs are made. Damage records during the unexpected test and at the far range in the planned test are correlated by means of dynamic analyses with pressuretime data and studies of structural resintance. Pressure-time information is appended. (auth)

Johnston, B.G.

1956-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Nationwide Survey on Household Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4 ~ Apartment in house or building divided into 2, 3, or 4 apartments ... of your family (living in your household). Include income from all sources--before taxes

74

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.7 Industrialized Housing (IH)  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2004 Top Five Manufacturers of Factory-Fabricated Components (1) Company Carpenter Contractors 175.0 1,130 Automated Building Company 102.5 702 Landmark Truss 45.0 425 Southern Building Products 25.9 180 Dolan Lumber & Truss 25.1 260 Note(s): Source(s): Automated Builder Magazine, Sept. 2005, p. 40-41. 26% 15% 7% 4% 4% 1) Factory-fabricated components include trusses, wall panels, and doors. Data based on mail-in surveys from manufacturers, which may not be entirely complete. 2) Market shares based on total gross sales volume of producers of only components included in the list of the top 26 IH producers responding to the survey. In 2004, surveyed component sales was estimated at $665.1 million. 3) The top 26 companies employ over 4,970 people at their plants. Gross Sales

75

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

76

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

77

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

78

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

79

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

80

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

82

Application of solar thermal energy to buildings and industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flat plate collectors and evacuated tube collectors are described, as are parabolic troughs, Fresnel lenses, and compound parabolic concentrators. Use of solar energy for domestic hot water and for space heating and cooling are discussed. Some useful references and methods of system design and sizing are given. This includes mention of the importance of economic analysis. The suitability of solar energy for industrial use is discussed, and solar ponds, point-focus receivers and central receivers are briefly described. The use of solar energy for process hot water, drying and dehydration, and process steam are examined, industrial process heat field tests by the Department of Energy are discussed, and a solar total energy system in Shenandoah, GA is briefly described. (LEW)

Kutscher, C. F.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Approximating the Seismic Amplification Effects Experienced by Solar Towers Mounted on the Rooftops of Low-Rise Industrial Buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis investigates the acceleration amplification experienced by solar towers mounted on the rooftops of low-rise industrial buildings during a seismic event. Specifically, this… (more)

Balla, Peter Luiz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Exploring project collaboration systems in the building industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of Web-Based-Collaboration-Systems (WBCS) continues to grow as part of information technology development in the Architecture-Engineering-Construction (AEC) industry. WBCS provide different media channels to support collaboration across geographical distributed teams. However, many companies are still hesitant to integrate WBCS. This research provides an understanding of how WBCS are used in practice. Most distinctively, it obtained practice data from several major US architecture firms and examined about 30,000 transactions produced during actual design and planning projects as practicing architects, engineers and consultants used WBCS. The study investigated what information was used and exchanged among participants during the different design stages. This was related to the different media channels of WBCS. The raw project data has been coded and transformed into secondary data through computer-supported content analysis. Based upon categories from previous literature, such as communication, coordination and design theories, the data has been analyzed for sender, receiver, channel and content of information transmitted. The content has been characterized into work tasks, information handling behavior and design activities. Additional interviews with industry professionals produced information that had not been documented through WBCS and that corroborated the analytical findings. The combination of theory, quantitative, and qualitative analysis has been synthesized into a portrait of WBCS usage that was validated through triangulation. The analysis of digital records of design communication from practice through content analysis is a new research methodology in AEC. The evidence supporting design methods theory shows the changes in tasks and information handling in regards to the project phases. It indicates that the most frequent loops of design activity are Evaluation- Analysis-Synthesis and Evaluation-Synthesis-Evaluation. It documents the actual usage of WBCS based on descriptive statistics and Markov models. WBCS was used primarily as a document repository and calendaring tool. The remote team members used it more frequently than centrally located participants. The study shows the limitations of WBCS: none of the verbal communication was captured. More significant, the entire email exchange took place outside the WBCS. WBCS was used very extensively, if the implementation of the system supported the organizational structure and vice versa.

Laepple, Eberhard Sebastian

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Making Green Building Units By Using Some Wastes of Ceramic Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ceramic tiles industry produces a lot of wastes such as ceramic sludge, broken under quality tiles and the ceramic dust. The accumulated wastes comprise a great pollution problem on the surrounded environment. The ceramic properties of Egyptian clays show that they are highly plastic and very sensitive upon drying. Accordingly, they are continuously in need to some additives for adjusting such properties. The environmental impact of this work is producing a green building unit has a zero waste energy. The recycling of ceramic solid waste industry in building operations contributes with minimizing the energy consumption and the cost of building to achieve building sustainability. In this work each of 15, 25 and 50% ceramic sludge solid waste were mixed with a chosen clayey raw material for making green building bricks. The mix contains 15% sludge and 85% clay shows a lower plasticity coefficient and an insensitive behaviour upon drying in addition to suitable physico-mechanical properties for the fired clay articles. This suggested mix was applied within a common brick fabric in Egypt for studying the possibility of its industrial application.

Abd El-Ghafour, N.G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This report, Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends, provides details on the nation's energy use for household passenger travel. A primary purpose of ...

87

Analysis of energy use in building services of the industrial sector in California: Two case studies. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Energy-use patterns in many of California`s fastest-growing industries are not typical of the existing mix of industries in the US. Many California firms operate small- and medium-sized facilities housed in buildings used simultaneously or interchangeably over time for commercial (office, retail, warehouse) and industrial activities. In these industrial subsectors, the energy required for building services (providing occupant comfort and necessities like lighting, HVAC, office equipment, computers, etc.) may be at least as important as the more familiar process energy requirements -- especially for electricity and on-peak demand. Electricity for building services is sometimes priced as if it were base loaded like process uses; in reality this load varies significantly according to occupancy schedules and cooling and heating loads, much as in any commercial building. Using informal field surveys, simulation studies, and detailed analyses of existing data (including utility commercial/industrial audit files), we studied the energy use of this industrial subsector through a multi-step procedure: (1) characterizing non-process building energy and power use in California industries, (2) identifying conservation and load-shaping opportunities in industrial building services, and (3) investigating industrial buildings and system design methodologies. In an earlier report, we addressed these issues by performing an extensive survey of the existing publicly available data, characterizing and comparing the building energy use in this sector. In this report, we address the above objectives by examining and analyzing energy use in two industrial case-study facilities in California. Based on the information for the case studies, we discuss the design consideration for these industrial buildings, characterize their energy use, and review their conservation and load-shaping potentials. In addition, we identify and discuss some research ideas for further investigation.

Akbari, H.; Sezgen, O.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Expanding the Industrial Assessment Center Program: Building an Industrial Efficiency Workforce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy efficiency provides an unequaled opportunity for manufacturing companies to reduce operating costs. Energy efficiency improvements not only lead to reduced energy costs, they can lead to even greater improved productivity and decreased waste. However, many cost-effective projects are not being implemented. Manufacturing companies have indicated that this is often due not to a lack of funds but rather to a lack of access to technical information and trained workforce. One of the most successful programs for achieving energy efficiency savings in the manufacturing sector is the US Department of Energy (DOE)'s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) program. In addition to significant energy savings, the IAC program produces a steady stream of energy engineers who are in high demand as plant energy managers, energy efficiency consultants, and energy efficient design engineers. This paper proposes a strategy for expanding the IAC program in both size and scope to better meet the workforce and energy assessment needs of US manufacturers. The expansion would be accomplished by establishing Centers of Excellence at current IAC locations, and then partnering with other universities, community colleges, and trade schools to create satellite centers to educate students at all technical levels. This would provide additional assistance to industrial customers over larger regions than is currently possible. Further partnerships with other organizations that already service manufacturing facilities would take advantage of existing infrastructure to enable the most efficient distribution of energy efficiency services.

Trombley, D.; Elliott, R. N.; Chittum, A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Analysis of Energy Use in Building Services of the Industrial Sector in California: A Literature Review and a Preliminary Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industrial facilities use boilers and/or furnaces that burnare: 1) space heat, 2) hot water, 3) boiler for building-heat, 4) boiler for process 5) direct process heat, 6)

Akbari, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

1997 Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures per Household ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Return to: Residential Home Page . Changes in the 1997 RECS: Housing Unit Type Per Household Member Per Building Increase. Residential Energy Consumption ...

91

Research utilization in the building industry: decision model and preliminary assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Research Utilization Program was conceived as a far-reaching means for managing the interactions of the private sector and the federal research sector as they deal with energy conservation in buildings. The program emphasizes a private-public partnership in planning a research agenda and in applying the results of ongoing and completed research. The results of this task support the hypothesis that the transfer of R and D results to the buildings industry can be accomplished more efficiently and quickly by a systematic approach to technology transfer. This systematic approach involves targeting decision makers, assessing research and information needs, properly formating information, and then transmitting the information through trusted channels. The purpose of this report is to introduce elements of a market-oriented knowledge base, which would be useful to the Building Systems Division, the Office of Buildings and Community Systems and their associated laboratories in managing a private-public research partnership on a rational systematic basis. This report presents conceptual models and data bases that can be used in formulating a technology transfer strategy and in planning technology transfer programs.

Watts, R.L.; Johnson, D.R.; Smith, S.A.; Westergard, E.J.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

FIERAsystem: A Fire Risk Assessment Model for Light Industrial Building Fire Safety Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this report. The current report describes the framework for the new model, individual submodels used for calculations, and the information that the model provides to the design engineer or building official. The framework that FIERAsystem uses to conduct a hazard analysis and the process used to perform a risk analysis are also discussed in the report. 2. FRAMEWORK OF FIERAsystemMODEL The FIERAsystem model allows the user to perform a number of fire protection engineering calculations in order to evaluate fire protection systems in industrial buildings. At start-up, FIERAsystem provides several calculation options, which allow the user to: use standard engineering correlations, run individual submodels, conduct a hazard analysis, or conduct a risk analysis

N. Kashef; A. Torvi; G. Reid; Noureddine Benichou; Ahmed Kashef; David Torvi; George Hadjisophocleous; Irene Reid

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Sequestering carbon dioxide in industrial polymers: Building materials for the 21st century  

SciTech Connect

This study was undertaken to determine the possibility of developing beneficial uses for carbon dioxide as a key component for a large-volume building product. Such a use may provide an alternative to storing the gas in oceanic sinks or clathrates as a way to slow the rate of global warming. The authors investigated the concept that carbon dioxide might be used with other chemicals to make carbon-dioxide-based polymers which would be lightweight, strong, and economical alternatives to some types of wood and silica-based building materials. As a construction-grade material, carbon dioxide would be fixed in a solid, useful form where it would not contribute to global warming. With the probable imposition of a fuel carbon tax in industrialized countries, this alternative would allow beneficial use of the carbon dioxide and could remove it from the tax basis if legislation were structured appropriately. Hence, there would be an economic driver towards the use of carbon-dioxide-based polymers which would enhance their future applications. Information was obtained through literature searches and personal contacts on carbon dioxide polymers which showed that the concept (1) is technically feasible, (2) is economically defensible, and (3) has an existing industrial infrastructure which could logically develop it. The technology exists for production of building materials which are strong enough for use by industry and which contain up to 90% by weight of carbon dioxide, both chemically and physically bound. A significant side-benefit of using this material would be that it is self-extinguishing in case of fire. This report is the first stage in the investigation. Further work being proposed will provide details on costs, specific applications and volumes, and potential impacts of this technology.

Molton, P.M.; Nelson, D.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Section J: HOUSEHOLD CHARACTERISTICS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Form EIA-457A (2001)--Household Questionnaire OMB No.: 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 42 Section J: HOUSEHOLD ...

95

Geothermal Program Review XVII: proceedings. Building on 25 years of Geothermal Partnership with Industry  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy's Office (DOE) of Geothermal Technologies conducted its annual Program Review XVII in Berkeley, California, on May 18--20, 1999. The theme this year was "Building on 25 Years of Geothermal Partnership with Industry". In 1974, Congress enacted Public Law 93-410 which sanctioned the Geothermal Energy Coordination and Management Project, the Federal Government's initial partnering with the US geothermal industry. The annual program review provides a forum to foster this federal partnership with the US geothermal industry through the presentation of DOE-funded research papers from leaders in the field, speakers who are prominent in the industry, topical panel discussions and workshops, planning sessions, and the opportunity to exchange ideas. Speakers and researchers from both industry and DOE presented an annual update on research in progress, discussed changes in the environment and deregulated energy market, and exchanged ideas to refine the DOE Strategic Plan for research and development of geothermal resources in the new century. A panel discussion on Climate Change and environmental issues and regulations provided insight into the opportunities and challenges that geothermal project developers encounter. This year, a pilot peer review process was integrated with the program review. A team of geothermal industry experts were asked to evaluate the research in progress that was presented. The evaluation was based on the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) criteria and the goals and objectives of the Geothermal Program as set forth in the Strategic Plan. Despite the short timeframe and cursory guidance provided to both the principle investigators and the peer reviewers, the pilot process was successful. Based on post review comments by both presenters and reviewers, the process will be refined for next year's program review.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Geothermal Program Review XVII: proceedings. Building on 25 years of Geothermal Partnership with Industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy's Office (DOE) of Geothermal Technologies conducted its annual Program Review XVII in Berkeley, California, on May 18--20, 1999. The theme this year was "Building on 25 Years of Geothermal Partnership with Industry". In 1974, Congress enacted Public Law 93-410 which sanctioned the Geothermal Energy Coordination and Management Project, the Federal Government's initial partnering with the US geothermal industry. The annual program review provides a forum to foster this federal partnership with the US geothermal industry through the presentation of DOE-funded research papers from leaders in the field, speakers who are prominent in the industry, topical panel discussions and workshops, planning sessions, and the opportunity to exchange ideas. Speakers and researchers from both industry and DOE presented an annual update on research in progress, discussed changes in the environment and deregulated energy market, and exchanged ideas to refine the DOE Strategic Plan for research and development of geothermal resources in the new century. A panel discussion on Climate Change and environmental issues and regulations provided insight into the opportunities and challenges that geothermal project developers encounter. This year, a pilot peer review process was integrated with the program review. A team of geothermal industry experts were asked to evaluate the research in progress that was presented. The evaluation was based on the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) criteria and the goals and objectives of the Geothermal Program as set forth in the Strategic Plan. Despite the short timeframe and cursory guidance provided to both the principle investigators and the peer reviewers, the pilot process was successful. Based on post review comments by both presenters and reviewers, the process will be refined for next year's program review.

NONE

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Doing Good? Green Office Buildings. American Economic ReviewEnergy Effriciency in Commercial Buildings in Operation.Energy and Buildings. 43(11): 3106-3111. Ezovski, Derek.

Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Operation. Energy and Buildings. 43(11): 3106-3111.and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of theand Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program. Key

Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

A new database of residential building measures and estimated costs helps the U.S. building industry determine the most  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new database of residential building measures and estimated costs helps the U.S. building at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed the National Residential Efficiency Measures with using various measures to improve the efficiency of residential buildings. This database offers

100

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.9 2.5 Total Rented Units ........................ 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 12.3 2.5 2.6 7.0 0.3 10.0 2 Persons ...................................... 9.2 2.5 2.5 4.1 Q 11.8 3 Persons ...................................... 5.4 2.0 1.1 2.0 0.4 13.9 4 Persons ...................................... 3.8 1.6 0.7 1.4 Q 17.7 5 Persons ...................................... 2.0 0.9 0.4 0.6 Q 24.1 6 or More Persons ........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Homes Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.4 2.0 2.9 1.3 Total Owner-Occupied Units ....... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 15.8 12.5 0.8 0.9 1.6 10.3 2 Persons ...................................... 25.9 23.4 0.5 0.5 1.5 10.1 3 Persons ...................................... 11.6 9.6 0.5 Q 1.3 12.1 4 Persons ...................................... 11.8 10.9 Q Q 0.7 15.7 5 Persons ...................................... 5.1 4.5 Q Q 0.4 24.2 6 or More Persons

102

Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Pricesand Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the electricity consumption of commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities) during Demand Response (DR) events are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models. Model error makes it difficult to precisely quantify these changes in consumption and understand if C&I facilities exhibit event-to-event variability in their response to DR signals. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and DR variability in C&I facilities facing dynamic electricity prices. Using a regression-based baseline model, we present a method to compute the error associated with estimates of several DR parameters. We also develop a metric to determine how much observed DR variability results from baseline model error rather than real variability in response. We analyze 38 C&I facilities participating in an automated DR program and find that DR parameter errors are large. Though some facilities exhibit real DR variability, most observed variability results from baseline model error. Therefore, facilities with variable DR parameters may actually respond consistently from event to event. Consequently, in DR programs in which repeatability is valued, individual buildings may be performing better than previously thought. In some cases, however, aggregations of C&I facilities exhibit real DR variability, which could create challenges for power system operation.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

104

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from refrigeration equipment used in industrial processesfrom refrigeration equipment used in industrial processesfrom refrigeration equipment used in industrial processes

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Household Tables Household Tables (Million U.S. Households; 24 pages, 122 kb) Contents Pages HC2-1a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-4a. Household Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-7a. Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2

106

char_household2001.pdf  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

9a. Household Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row...

107

Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the larger diffusion of green and energy efficient buildingsowners, the costs of green and energy efficient buildings,market. Demand for Green and Energy Efficient Buildings The

Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Forest products industry of the future: Building a sustainable technology advantage for America`s forest products industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US forest, wood, and paper industry ranks as one of the most competitive forest products industries in the world. With annual shipments valued at nearly $267 billion, it employs over 1.3 million people and is currently among the top 10 manufacturing employers in 46 out of 50 states. Retaining this leadership position will depend largely on the industry`s success in developing and using advanced technologies. These technologies will enable manufacturing plants and forestry enterprises to maximize energy and materials efficiency and reduce waste and emissions, while producing high-quality, competitively priced wood and paper products. In a unique partnership, leaders in the forest products industry have teamed with the US Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) to encourage cooperative research efforts that will help position the US forest products industry for continuing prosperity while advancing national energy efficiency and environmental goals.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Breaking new ground in building green : the role of city policy and regulation in a building industry market transformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With a growing awareness of the need for a widespread reduction in the use of natural resources, including energy and water, buildings have been identified as a key component of America's, and the world's, drain on these ...

Prakash, Shiva R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxide emission reductions in industry in the EU. Europeanissues: Annual survey of industries. Central StatisticalDesiccated coconut industry of Sri- Lanka’s opportunities

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) advances building energy performance through the development and promotion of efficient, affordable, and high impact technologies, systems, and practices. The...

112

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

113

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

114

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

90 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

115

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

116

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

117

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

118

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

119

Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disaggregation of sectoral energy use and greenhouse gas emissions trends reveals striking differences between sectors and regions of the world. Understanding key driving forces in the energy end-use sectors provides insights for development of projections of future greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial, buildings, transport, and agriculture sectors, with a more detailed focus on industry and buildings. Activity and economic drivers as well as trends in energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. The authors show that macro-economic indicators, such as GDP, are insufficient for comprehending trends and driving forces at the sectoral level. These indicators need to be supplemented with sector-specific information for a more complete understanding of future energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

National program plan for research and development in solar heating and cooling for building, agricultural, and industrial applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main feature of the directed program is the focus on specific approaches, called paths, to the application of solar energy. A path is the linking of a method of energy collection or rejection with a particular application. Eleven such paths are identified for building applications and eleven for agricultural and industrial process applications. Here, an overview is given of the program plan. The 11 paths to the solar heating and cooling of buildings and the 11 paths for agricultural and industrial process applications are described. Brief descriptions of these tasks and of the non-engineering tasks are included. The importance of each non-engineering task to the overall R and D program is indicated. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry (Fact Sheet), Building America: Technical Highlight, Building Technologies Program (BTP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, a public database that characterizes the performance and costs of common residential energy efficiency measures. The data are available for use in software programs that evaluate cost- effective retrofit measures to improve the energy efficiency of residential buildings. This database: * Provides information in a standardized format. * Improves the technical consistency and accuracy of the results of software programs. * Enables experts and stakeholders to view the retrofit information and provide comments to improve data

122

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the paper, glass or ceramics industry) making it difficulttechnology in the ceramic manufacturing industry. industries: iron and steel, non-ferrous metals, chemicals (including fertilisers), petroleum refining, minerals (cement, lime, glass and ceramics) and

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the iron and steel industry: a global model. Energy, 30,report of the world steel industry 2005. International Irontrends in the iron and steel industry. Energy Policy, 30,

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Doing Well by Doing Good? Green Office Buildings. AmericanWhy Do Companies Rent Green? Real Property and Corporatepaper? ] Kahn, Matthew. 2006. “Green Cities, Urban Grown and

Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modeling,” Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, vol. 120,buildings,” Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, vol. 120,t savings,” Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, vol. 120,

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.5 1.5 1.4 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 59.5 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 5.2 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 1.2 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 23.3 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 58.2 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 5.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 44.7 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 7.0 Without a Heat Pump .................. 35.6 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 7.7 With a Heat Pump .......................

127

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.8 0.5 1.4 1.2 1.6 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 23.4 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 6.1 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 0.9 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 23.0 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 22.5 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 6.2 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 12.7 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 8.5 Without a Heat Pump .................. 10.6 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 9.3 With a Heat Pump ....................... 2.2 8.6 0.8 1.0

128

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.6 1.5 1.4 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 4.9 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 21.8 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 80.8 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 4.9 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 57.5 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 6.7 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 7.7 With a Heat Pump ....................... 11.3 8.6 0.8 1.0 0.8 19.7 Room Air-Conditioning

129

EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Transportation logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 August 1997 Release Next Update: EIA has discontinued this series. Based on the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) - survey series has been discontinued Only light-duty vehicles and recreational vehicles are included in this report. EIA has excluded motorcycles, mopeds, large trucks, and buses. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use

130

Car Sharing within Households –  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this paper was to analyse two activities: who rents a car and why? Which households share the driving of their cars? In order to do that, the Parc-Auto (Car-Fleet) database, built from annual postal surveys conducted with a panel of 10,000 French households, has been processed. Among approximately one hundred questions in the survey, two key questions have been crossed against many social, economic, demographic, geographic or time variables. KQ1: “During the last 12 months, did you — or another person from your home — rent a car in France for personal purposes? ” KQ2: “Is this car occasionally used by other persons?” Here are the main findings. Renting households are mainly working, high income households, living in the core of big cities, and in particular in Paris. Most of them have two wage-sheets and two cars, one of which is generally a recent, high power, high quality car. Car rental is mainly an occasional practice. Yet for a minority of renters, it is a sustained habit. Households with more licence holders than cars share the most: about three quarters of them share their cars. On the contrary, single driver-single car households have less opportunity to share: only 15 % share. Household car sharing shed light on the gender role within households: while 58 % of the main users of the shared cars are male, 55 % of secondary users are female. Household car sharing is mainly a regular practice. Finally, without diminishing the merits of innovative transport solutions proposed here and there, it is not a waste of time to give some insight on self established behaviour within households. This reveals that complex patterns have been built over time by the people themselves, to cope with diverse situations that cannot be easily handled by straightforward classifications. The car cannot be reduced to a personal object. Household car sharing also carries strong links with the issue of car dependency. Sifting car availability and choice

Francis Papon; Laurent Hivert

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Profile of the wood furniture and fixtures industry. EPA Office of Compliance sector notebook project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The furniture and fixtures industry encompasses companies that manufacture household, office, store, public building, and restaurant furniture and fixtures. The second section provides background information on the size, geographic distribution, employment, production, sales, and economic condition of the Wood Furniture and Fixtures industry. The type of facilities described within the document are also described in terms of their Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes. Additionally, this section contains a list of the largest companies in terms of sales.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

PRELIMINARY DATA Housing Unit and Household Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PRELIMINARY DATA Housing Unit and Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Households (million) Households With Fans (million) Percent of Households With Fans Number of...

133

Building Technologies Office: Building America: Bringing Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market Building America logo The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program has been a source of innovations in residential building energy performance, durability, quality, affordability, and comfort for more than 15 years. This world-class research program partners with industry (including many of the top U.S. home builders) to bring cutting-edge innovations and resources to market. For example, the Solution Center provides expert building science information for building professionals looking to gain a competitive advantage by delivering high performance homes. At Building America meetings, researchers and industry partners can gather to generate new ideas for improving energy efficiency of homes. And, Building America research teams and DOE national laboratories offer the building industry specialized expertise and new insights from the latest research projects.

134

Improving the environmental performance of a small-scale industrial building project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investor-owned utility built three line crew centers to meet the requirements of its environmentally oriented new construction DSM program. The new locations are distributed around a region to replace a large central facility. Each facility includes an office building, a garage area, a warehouse, covered parking, and a fueling station. The office buildings were designed to use 43% less energy than if constructed according to Oregon code minimum. The facility as a whole uses resource-efficient building products. A quality indoor environment is achieved through the use of low toxicity building materials. Environmental responsibility was demonstrated by using water-efficient fixtures, recycling of construction materials and creating a bioswale, or retention pond, to receive runoff water. One site also includes 2.8 acres of wetland creation and enhancement where habitat was created for the northern red-legged frog, which has been designated as a species of concern.

Peterson, J.C.; Good, N.L.; Parr, R.W.; Nicolay, R.D.; Millican, R.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A Framework for Corporate Householding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous research on corporate household and corporate householding has presented examples, literature review, and working definitions. In this paper, we first improve our ...

Madnick, Stuart

2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

136

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and power in US industry. Energy Policy, 29, pp. 1243-1254.Paris. IEA, 2004: Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Finlandand steel industry. Energy Policy, 30, pp. 827-838. Kim, Y.

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Solar Photovoltaic Economic Development: Building and Growing a Local PV Industry, August 2011 (Book)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. photovoltaic (PV) industry is forecast to grow, and it represents an opportunity for economic development and job creation in communities throughout the United States. This report helps U.S. cities evaluate economic opportunities in the PV industry. It serves as a guide for local economic development offices in evaluating their community?s competitiveness in the solar PV industry, assessing the viability of solar PV development goals, and developing strategies for recruiting and retaining PV companies to their areas.

Not Available

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Profiling energy use in households and office spaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy consumption is largely studied in the context of different environments, such as domestic, corporate, industrial, and public sectors. In this paper, we discuss two environments, households and office spaces, where people have an especially ...

Salman Taherian; Marcelo Pias; George Coulouris; Jon Crowcroft

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in an Appliance Industry Abstract This report provides a starting point for appliance energy efficiency policy to be informed by an understanding of: the baseline rate and...

140

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Department of Energy Quadrennial Technology Review Building ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building & Industrial Efficiency Workshop Department of Energy Quadrennial Technology Review Building & Industrial Efficiency Workshop Public release of the documents and...

142

housingunit_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Tables Housing Unit Tables (Million U.S. Households; 49 pages, 210 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-4a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-6a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-7a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4

143

usage_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Usage Indicators Tables Usage Indicators Tables (Million U.S. Households; 60 pages, 247 kb) Contents Pages HC6-1a. Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-2a. Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-4a. Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-5a. Usage Indicators by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-6a. Usage Indicators by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-7a. Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5

144

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home Office Equipment Tables Home Office Equipment Tables (Million U.S. Households; 12 pages, 123 kb) Contents Pages HC7-1a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-4a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-7a. Home Office Equipment by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1

145

Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Exploration of Innovation and An Exploration of Innovation and Energy Efficiency in an Appliance Industry Prepared by Margaret Taylor, K. Sydny Fujita, Larry Dale, and James McMahon For the European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy March 29, 2012 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL - 5689E An Exploration of Innovation and Energy Efficiency in an Appliance Industry Abstract This report provides a starting point for appliance energy efficiency policy to be informed by an understanding of: the baseline rate and direction of technological change of product industries; the factors that underlie the outcomes of innovation in these industries; and the ways the innovation system might respond to any given intervention. The report provides an overview of the dynamics of energy efficiency policy and innovation in the appliance

146

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

milling industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantcement mak- ing - An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantre- fineries - An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Building on Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building on Efficiency Building on Efficiency Building on Efficiency May 4, 2012 - 3:59pm Addthis Heather Zichal Deputy Assistant to the President for Energy and Climate Change Ed. Note: This entry is cross-posted from the White House blog. We're excited about the expansion of the Green Button program, and developers should be sure to check out Apps for Energy, our Green Button app development challenge. Two administration-led, industry-driven efforts marked milestones today. The first will put Americans to work on more than $2 billion in energy upgrades for federal buildings. The second will offer 30 million households and businesses more control over their energy bills. And together, these efforts will support an economy that's built to last, one that makes use of every source of American energy - more efficiently.

148

Other Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other Other Characteristics by Activity... Other Other buildings are those that do not fit into any of the specifically named categories. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Other Buildings... Other buildings include airplane hangars; laboratories; buildings that are industrial or agricultural with some retail space; buildings having several different commercial activities that, together, comprise 50 percent or more of the floorspace, but whose largest single activity is agricultural, industrial/manufacturing, or residential; and all other miscellaneous buildings that do not fit into any other CBECS category. Since these activities are so diverse, the data are probably less meaningful than for other activities; they are provided here to complete

149

Energy Market Profiles: Volume 3: 1998 Industrial Buildings, Equipment, and Energy Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy use and equipment profiles at the region, segment, and end-use levels provide key information required to lay the groundwork for major marketing decisions. These decisions include how desirable a market is for utility entry, how quickly to enter a market, and how best to narrow the research focus. This study provides utility managers and decision makers with industrial market profiles for 10 regions of the United States. This report is available only to funders of Program 101A or 101.001. Funders ...

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

150

Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Analysis of Energy Use in Building Services of the Industrial Sector in California: A Literature Review and a Preliminary Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1972. In the food industry, electricity for lights and HVACof the Electronics Industry electricity. Motors require fromand Meat Packing Industries, electricity use intensity for

Akbari, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Trends in Household Vehicle Stock The 1991 RTECS counted more than 150 million vehicles in use by U.S. households. This chapter examines recent trends in the vehicle stock, as measured by the RTECS and other reputable vehicle surveys. It also provides some details on the type and model year of the household vehicle stock, and identifies regional differences in vehicle stock. Because vehicles are continuously being bought and sold, this chapter also reports findings relating to turnover of the vehicle stock in 1991. Finally, it examines the average vehicle stock in 1991 (which takes into account the acquisition and disposal of household vehicles over the course of the year) and identifies variations in the average number of household vehicles based on differences in household characteristics. Number of Household Vehicles Over the past 8 years, the stock of household vehicles has

153

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aggregate Aggregate Ratio: See Mean and Ratio Estimate. AMPD: Average miles driven per day. See Appendix B, "Estimation Methodologies." Annual Vehicle Miles Traveled: See Vehicle Miles Traveled. Automobile: Includes standard passenger car, 2-seater car and station wagons; excludes passenger vans, cargo vans, motor homes, pickup trucks, and jeeps or similar vehicles. See Vehicle. Average Household Energy Expenditures: A ratio estimate defined as the total household energy expenditures for all RTECS households divided by the total number of households. See Ratio Estimate, and Combined Household Energy Expenditures. Average Number of Vehicles per Household: The average number of vehicles used by a household for personal transportation during 1991. For this report, the average number of vehicles per household is computed as the ratio of the total number of vehicles to the

154

Householder’s Perceptions of Insulation Adequacy and Drafts in the Home in 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to improve the estimation of end-use heating consumption, the Energy Information Administration's (EIA), 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), for the first time, asked respondents to judge how drafty they perceived their homes to be as a measure of insulation quality. The analysis of the 2001 RECS data shows that householders in newlyconstructed homes perceived their homes to be better insulated and less drafty than do householders in older homes. Single-family homes are perceived to be better insulated and less drafty than are apartments in buildings with two to four units. Cross-variable comparisons also provide the associations between the level of insulation and winter drafts in the homes with household characteristics and location of the home.

Behjat Hojjati

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A Critical Analysis of Technological Innovation and Economic Development in Southern California's Urban Water Reuse And Recycling Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and commercial and industrial refrigeration and freezerrefrigeration equipment (except household-type refrigerators, freezers, and air-conditioners) Industrial

Pilip-Florea, Shadrach Jay

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances  

SciTech Connect

With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses.The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

Sparn, B.; Jin, X.; Earle, L.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products containing toxic chemicals. These wastes CANNOT be disposed of in regular garbage. Any should be considered hazardous. You cannot treat hazardous wastes like other kinds of garbage

de Lijser, Peter

158

Figure 30. Decomposition 4941 of Energy Use by Effect, 1988-1994 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry >Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy Use > Figure 30

159

Figure ES4. Sales-Weighted Inertia Weight and On-Road Fuel Mileage ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry >Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy Use > Figure ES4

160

Figure ES3. Sales-Weighted Horsepower and On-Road Fuel Mileage for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry >Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy Use > Figure ES3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Figure ES1. Schema for Estimating Energy and Energy-Related ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry >Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy Use > Figure ES1

162

Analysis of Energy Use in Building Services of the Industrial Sector in California: A Literature Review and a Preliminary Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

achievable energy savings from building systems integrationnon-process energy consumption. System integration,

Akbari, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Industrial 8,870,422 44.3% Commercial 3,158,244 15.8% Electric Utilities 2,732,496 13.7% Residential 5,241,414 26.2% Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." T e x a s L o u i s i a n a C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Industrial Billion Cubic Meters T e x a s C a l i f o r n i a F l o r i d a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Utilities Billion Cubic Meters N e w Y o r k C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Commercial Billion Cubic Meters I l l i n o i s C a l i f o r n i a N e w Y o r k A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Billion Cubic Meters 11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1996 Figure Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Energy Information Administration

164

High Performance Homes and Buildings: State-of-the-Art Review of Multifamily Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multifamily households constitute a quarter of the U.S. households, including a majority of low-income households. However, energy performance of multifamily buildings has been hindered due to both technical and market barriers. This report investigates a comprehensive whole-building approach to reduce energy use in multifamily buildings, with a discussion of market barriers such as lack of energy knowledge, lack of motivation, and shortage of skilled workforce for deep energy upgrades in ...

2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

165

Buildings Energy Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office building windows, clean room, infrared thermograph, data graphic Buildings Energy Efficiency Researchers, in close cooperation with industry, develop technologies for...

166

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... will build an instrument that will provide the building industry with better measurement capabilities to judge the effectiveness of thermal insulation ...

167

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Air Conditioning Tables Air Conditioning Tables (Million U.S. Households; 24 pages, 138 kb) Contents Pages HC4-1a. Air Conditioning by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-7a. Air Conditioning by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2

168

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. 3. Vehicle Miles Traveled This chapter presents information on household vehicle usage, as measured by the number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT). VMT is one of the two most important components used in estimating household vehicle fuel consumption. (The other, fuel efficiency, is discussed in Chapter 4). In addition, this chapter examines differences in driving behavior based on the characteristics of the household and the type of vehicle driven. Trends in household driving patterns are also examined using additional information from the Department of Transportation's Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). Household VMT is a measure of the demand for personal transportation. Demand for transportation may be viewed from either an economic or a social perspective. From the economic point-of-view, the use of a household vehicle represents the consumption of one

169

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.5 1.7 1.6 1.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 69.1 9.4 16.7 6.6 4.3 1 ................................................ 95.2 63.7 8.9 16.2 6.3 4.3 2 or More .................................. 6.5 5.4 0.4 0.4 0.2 15.9 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 69.1 9.4 16.7 6.6 4.3 Electric ...................................... 63.0 43.3 5.2 10.9 3.6

170

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.4 1.9 3.0 1.3 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Heat Home ..................................... 72.4 63.0 2.0 1.7 5.7 6.7 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 0.4 0.2 Q Q Q 46.2 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.3 0.2 Q Q Q 39.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ Q Q Q Q Q NF Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 72.4 63.0 2.0 1.7 5.7 6.7 Natural Gas

171

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.4 2.1 3.1 1.3 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 68.3 59.1 2.0 1.7 5.4 7.0 1 ................................................ 62.9 54.1 2.0 1.6 5.2 7.1 2 or More .................................. 5.4 5.0 Q Q 0.2 22.1 Most Used Oven ........................ 68.3 59.1 2.0 1.7 5.4 7.0 Electric ......................................

172

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.5 1.5 1.4 1.7 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.4 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 73.4 9.4 16.4 6.8 4.5 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 0.3 Q 0.6 Q 19.0 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 0.2 Q 0.3 Q 24.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q 0.3 Q 28.1 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 73.4 9.4 16.4 6.8 4.5 Natural Gas ...................................

173

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Space Heating by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Space Heating by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.9 2.5 Total ............................................... 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Heat Home ..................................... 33.7 10.4 7.4 14.8 1.1 6.9 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 0.6 Q Q 0.5 Q 21.4 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.2 Q Q Q Q 84.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q 0.3 Q 36.4 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 33.7 10.4 7.4 14.8 1.1 6.9 Natural Gas ...................................

174

Energy Spending and Vulnerable Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

 off than before. In particular large households with low  incomes seem to have been adversely affected by the new tariff structures since  they have comparably large energy expenditure (Bennet et al., 2002).    5. Vulnerable Households and Energy Spending  The...  tariffs can play an important part in the public debate  on  eradicating  fuel  poverty  and  helping  the  vulnerable  households.  Smart  metering  can  provide  consumers  with  information  on  the  actual  energy  consumption and might  lead  to...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Meier, Helena

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

175

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DOEEIA-0464(91) Distribution Category UC-950 Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 December 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S....

176

Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents information about household end use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

Information Center

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a regular basis at the time of the 1990 RECS personal interviews. Electricity: See Main Heating Fuel. Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991...

178

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 110 Electricity: See Main Heating Fuel. Energy Used in the Home: For electricity or natural gas, the quantity is the...

179

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, 3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 9.7 -- -- -- 6.5 11.3 5.7 2 Persons ...................................... 35.1 4.3 -- -- -- 2.0 7.8 5.8 3 Persons ...................................... 17.0 -- 3.3 -- -- 2.2 5.2 7.3 4 Persons ...................................... 15.6 -- 2.2 -- -- -- 4.3 8.1 5 Persons ...................................... 7.1

180

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Household Characteristics by West Census Region, 2a. Household Characteristics by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.8 1.1 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 5.6 1.8 3.8 5.4 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 7.3 1.9 5.5 4.9 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 3.5 0.9 2.6 7.6 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 3.5 1.1 2.4 6.4 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 2.0 0.6 1.4 9.7 6 or More Persons

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Vehicle Fuel Efficiency and Consumption Fuel consumption is estimated from RTECS data on the vehicle stock (Chapter 2) and miles traveled (Chapter 3), in combination with vehicle fuel efficiency ratings, adjusted to account for individual driving circumstances. The first two sections of this chapter present estimates of household vehicle fuel efficiency and household fuel consumption calculated from these fuel efficiency estimates. These sections also discuss variations in fuel efficiency and consumption based on differences in household and vehicle characteristics. The third section presents EIA estimates of the potential savings from replacing the oldest (and least fuel-efficient) household vehicles with new (and more fuel-efficient) vehicles. The final section of this chapter focuses on households receiving (or eligible to receive) supplemental income under

182

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Household Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Household Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.7 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 6.7 4.7 2.0 6.2 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 8.0 5.4 2.6 5.0 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 3.8 2.7 1.1 7.9 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 3.5 2.5 1.0 8.1 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 1.7

183

A study of building procurement process as a potential tool to enhance safety practice in the construction industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Building procurement involves many different parties and resources. It is very common that requires project participants involved to work within budget, on time and according… (more)

Sulaiman, K

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures 2.4 Residential Environmental Data 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market 2.6 Residential Home Improvements 2.7 Multi-Family Housing 2.8 Industrialized Housing 2.9 Low-Income Housing 3Commercial Sector 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 2 focuses on energy use in the U.S. residential buildings sector. Section 2.1 provides data on energy consumption by fuel type and end use, as well as energy consumption intensities for different housing categories. Section 2.2 presents characteristics of average households and changes in the U.S. housing stock over time. Sections 2.3 and 2.4 address energy-related expenditures and residential sector emissions, respectively. Section 2.5 contains statistics on housing construction, existing home sales, and mortgages. Section 2.6 presents data on home improvement spending and trends. Section 2.7 describes the industrialized housing industry, including the top manufacturers of various manufactured home products. Section 2.8 presents information on low-income housing and Federal weatherization programs. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

185

Appliance Commitment for Household Load Scheduling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel appliance commitment algorithm that schedules thermostatically-controlled household loads based on price and consumption forecasts considering users comfort settings to meet an optimization objective such as minimum payment or maximum comfort. The formulation of an appliance commitment problem was described in the paper using an electrical water heater load as an example. The thermal dynamics of heating and coasting of the water heater load was modeled by physical models; random hot water consumption was modeled with statistical methods. The models were used to predict the appliance operation over the scheduling time horizon. User comfort was transformed to a set of linear constraints. Then, a novel linear, sequential, optimization process was used to solve the appliance commitment problem. The simulation results demonstrate that the algorithm is fast, robust, and flexible. The algorithm can be used in home/building energy-management systems to help household owners or building managers to automatically create optimal load operation schedules based on different cost and comfort settings and compare cost/benefits among schedules.

Du, Pengwei; Lu, Ning

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

186

Better Buildings | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Better Buildings Last year, commercial and industrial buildings used roughly 50% of the energy in the U.S. economy at a cost of over 400 billion. These buildings...

187

Extending Efficiency Services to Underserved Households: NYSERDA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extending Efficiency Services to Underserved Households: NYSERDA's Assisted Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Program Title Extending Efficiency Services to Underserved Households:...

188

Household vehicles energy consumption 1994  

SciTech Connect

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use some 6,000 vehicles provided information to describe vehicle stock, vehicle-miles traveled, energy end-use consumption, and energy expenditures for personal vehicles. The survey results represent the characteristics of the 84.9 million households that used or had access to vehicles in 1994 nationwide. (An additional 12 million households neither owned or had access to vehicles during the survey year.) To be included in then RTECS survey, vehicles must be either owned or used by household members on a regular basis for personal transportation, or owned by a company rather than a household, but kept at home, regularly available for the use of household members. Most vehicles included in the RTECS are classified as {open_quotes}light-duty vehicles{close_quotes} (weighing less than 8,500 pounds). However, the RTECS also includes a very small number of {open_quotes}other{close_quotes} vehicles, such as motor homes and larger trucks that are available for personal use.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy Use:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends November 2005 Release (Next Update: Discontinued) Based on the 2001 National Household Travel Survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Transportation and augmented by EIA Only light-duty vehicles and recreational vehicles are included in this report. EIA has excluded motorcycles, mopeds, large trucks, and buses in an effort to maintain consistency with its past residential transportation series, which was discontinued after 1994. This report, Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends, provides details on the nation's energy use for household passenger travel. A primary purpose of this report is to release the latest consumer-based data

190

Analysis of Energy Use in Building Services of the Industrial Sector in California: A Literature Review and a Preliminary Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report submitted to California Energy Commission, AprilDepartment of Energy, the California Energy Commission, andFuel Source Figure 9. California Energy Use in Industrial

Akbari, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Building Technologies Office: Workforce Guidance Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Workforce Guidance Development: By Industry, For Industry to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Workforce...

192

Analysis of Energy Use in Building Services of the Industrial Sector in California: A Literature Review and a Preliminary Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use for building energy services. Another way of statingHtg. L3 L3 % Total Service Energy '-J m I % of Non-Process7 shows the percent of service energy which is electricity

Akbari, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends...

194

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

W as hi ng to n, DC DOEEIA-0464(94) Distribution Category UC-950 Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 August 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets...

195

ac_household2001.pdf  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2a. Air Conditioning by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total...

196

Household vehicles energy consumption 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted during 1991 and early 1992. The 1991 RTECS represents 94.6 million households, of which 84.6 million own or have access to 151.2 million household motor vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

Not Available

1993-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

197

Household savings and portfolio choice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis consists of three essays that examine household savings and portfolio choice behavior. Chapter One analyses the effects of employer matching contributions and tax incentives on participation and contribution ...

Klein, Sean Patrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, 3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.5 1.4 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.5 0.9 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 12.3 17.4 21.5 31.7 9.6 23.4 3.9 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 0.4 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.9 20.8 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 .......................... 80.8 11.9 16.7 21.0 31.2 9.1 22.6 3.9 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 3 .............. 57.5 6.2 10.7 15.2 25.3 4.5 12.4 5.3 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 4.9 9.1 12.1 20.1 3.6 10.4 6.1 With a Heat Pump

199

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Title Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Zimring, Mark, Merrian Borgeson, Ian M. Hoffman, Charles A. Goldman, Elizabeth Stuart, Annika Todd, and Megan A. Billingsley Pagination 102 Date Published 12/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract The question posed in this report is: How can programs motivate these middle income single family households to seek out more comprehensive energy upgrades, and empower them to do so? Research methods included interviews with more than 35 program administrators, policy makers, researchers, and other experts; case studies of programs, based on interviews with staff and a review of program materials and data; and analysis of relevant data sources and existing research on demographics, the financial status of Americans, and the characteristics of middle income American households. While there is no 'silver bullet' to help these households overcome the range of barriers they face, this report describes outreach strategies, innovative program designs, and financing tools that show promise in increasing the attractiveness and accessibility of energy efficiency for this group. These strategies and tools should be seen as models that are currently being honed to build our knowledge and capacity to deliver energy improvements to middle income households. However, the strategies described in this report are probably not sufficient, in the absence of robust policy frameworks, to deliver these improvements at scale. Instead, these strategies must be paired with enabling and complementary policies to reach their full potential.

200

Politics, jobs and workforce development : the role of workforce intermediaries in building career pathways within Boston's health care industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research study examines the role that workforce intermediaries within Boston play in creating career pathways for economically disadvantaged, under-skilled residents in the local health care industry. Using a case ...

Hutson, Malo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Intensity in the Iron and Steel Industry: A Comparison of Physical and Economic Indicators”,energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. We show that macro-economic indicators,

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Analysis of Energy Use in Building Services of the Industrial Sector in California: A Literature Review and a Preliminary Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reports of Energy Utilization Audit (EUA) from PG&E, madeincluded in PG&E's Energy Utilization Audits (EUA), 67% ofWORK WITH THE PG&E ENERGY UTILIZATION AUDIT (EUA) INDUSTRIAL

Akbari, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Modeling of Plume Downwash and Enhanced Diffusion near Buildings: Comparison to Wind Tunnel Observations for in Arctic Industrial Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of a modified Industrial Source Complex model to simulate concentration distributions resulting from high wind speeds (neutral conditions) has been evaluated by comparison to data from a wind tunnel study of a Prudhoe Bay, AK oil-...

Alex Guenther; Brian Lamb; Ronald Petersen

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

In-vessel composting of household wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of composting has been studied using five different types of reactors, each simulating a different condition for the formation of compost; one of which was designed as a dynamic complete-mix type household compost reactor. A lab-scale study was conducted first using the compost accelerators culture (Trichoderma viridae, Trichoderma harzianum, Trichorus spirallis, Aspergillus sp., Paecilomyces fusisporus, Chaetomium globosum) grown on jowar (Sorghum vulgare) grains as the inoculum mixed with cow-dung slurry, and then by using the mulch/compost formed in the respective reactors as the inoculum. The reactors were loaded with raw as well as cooked vegetable waste for a period of 4 weeks and then the mulch formed was allowed to maturate. The mulch was analysed at various stages for the compost and other environmental parameters. The compost from the designed aerobic reactor provides good humus to build up a poor physical soil and some basic plant nutrients. This proves to be an efficient, eco-friendly, cost-effective, and nuisance-free solution for the management of household solid wastes.

Iyengar, Srinath R. [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, V.J. Technological Institute, H.R. Mahajani Road, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India)]. E-mail: srinathrangamani@yahoo.com; Bhave, Prashant P. [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, V.J. Technological Institute, H.R. Mahajani Road, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India)]. E-mail: drppbhave@vsnl.net

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.8 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 2.5 8.1 6.5 4.8 6.2 9.9 2 Persons ...................................... 35.1 3.1 9.4 8.2 6.5 7.9 8.7 3 Persons ...................................... 17.0 1.3 4.3 4.0 3.3 4.1 10.7 4 Persons ...................................... 15.6 1.4 3.9 3.4 3.4 3.5 10.5 5 Persons ......................................

206

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Household Characteristics by South Census Region, 1a. Household Characteristics by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.1 1.5 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 9.9 5.0 1.8 3.1 6.3 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 13.0 6.7 2.5 3.8 4.2 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 6.6 3.7 1.2 1.7 8.8 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 6.0 3.3 0.8 1.9 10.7 5 Persons ....................................................

207

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.5 0.8 1.4 1.3 1.4 Total .............................................................. 107.0 49.9 18.0 21.2 17.9 4.1 Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 14.6 5.3 4.8 3.6 6.4 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 15.7 5.7 6.9 6.8 5.4 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 7.6 2.8 3.5 3.1 7.2 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 6.8 2.3 4.1 2.4 8.1 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 3.1 1.3 1.3 1.4 12.3 6 or More Persons

208

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, 3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.4 1.9 1.2 1.0 0.6 1.9 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 47.6 3.0 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 13.2 19.8 25.5 37.7 10.7 38.8 3.2 Personal Computers 2 ................... 60.0 3.7 8.7 16.0 31.6 3.7 17.4 4.6 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 2.8 7.1 12.8 22.4 2.8 13.6 5.1 2 or more .................................... 9.1 0.6 0.7 1.7 6.2 0.6 2.2 13.0 Number of Laptop PCs

209

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.0 1.2 1.2 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 2.5 4.5 5.1 4.0 3.7 8.3 7.5 2 Persons ...................................... 35.1 4.8 6.2 6.6 4.5 5.3 7.8 5.8 3 Persons ...................................... 17.0 2.5 3.3 2.9 2.3 1.9 4.1 8.4 4 Persons ...................................... 15.6 3.4 2.8 2.3 1.9 1.8 3.4 9.6 5 Persons ...................................... 7.1 1.6 1.2 1.3 0.6 0.7 1.6 14.3 6 or More Persons

210

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advancing Building Energy Codes Advancing Building Energy Codes The Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports greater adoption of residential and commercial building energy codes through collaborative efforts with local governments and industry groups, and by providing key tools and assistance for code development, adoption, and implementation. Through advancing building codes, we aim to improve building energy efficiency by 50%, and to help states achieve 90% compliance with their energy codes. 75% of U.S. Buildings will be New or Renovated by 2035, Building Codes will Ensure They Use Energy Wisely. Learn More 75% of U.S. Buildings will be New or Renovated by 2035; Building Codes will Ensure They Use Energy Wisely Learn More Energy Codes Ensure Efficiency in Buildings We offer guidance and technical resources to policy makers, compliance verification professionals, architects, engineers, contractors, and other stakeholders who depend on building energy codes.

211

The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HOW MANY HYBRID HOUSEHOLDS IN THE CALIFORNIA NEW CAR MARKET?average 2.43 cars per household, then the hybrid householdnumber of multi-car households that fit our hybrid household

Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Home | Better Buildings Workforce  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Logo EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Search form Search Search Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Workforce Home Framework Resources Projects Participate Home Framework Resources Projects Better Buildings Workforce Guidelines Buildings Re-tuning Training ANSI Energy Efficiency Standards Collaborative Energy Performance-Based Acquisition Training Participate For a detailed project overview, download the Better Buildings Workforce Guidelines Fact Sheet Home The Better Buildings Initiative is a broad, multi-strategy initiative to make commercial and industrial buildings 20% more energy efficient over the next 10 years. DOE is currently pursuing strategies across five pillars to catalyze change and accelerate private sector investment in energy

213

Household energy in South Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research study on the use of energy in South Asis (India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh) was sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN, the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (the World Bank), and the Directorate-General for Development of the Commission of the European Communities. The aim of this book is to improve the understanding of household energy and its linkages, by reviewing the data resources on household energy use, supply, prices and other relevant factors that exist in South Asia.

Leach, G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Data Collection Forms - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Technical Information > Data Collection Forms: Data ...

215

2003 CBECS RSE Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

detailedtables20032003rsetablesfilesplainlink.css" typetextcss relstylesheet> Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey...

216

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Household Expenditures...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Expenditures Module The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and...

217

Table WH1. Total Households Using Water Heating Equipment, 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table WH1. Total Households Using Water Heating Equipment, 2005 Million U.S. Households Fuels Used (million U.S. households) Number of Water Heaters Used

218

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Space Heating by Household Income, 3a. Space Heating by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 18.4 22.7 26.8 38.1 14.6 33.4 3.3 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 0.3 Q 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 23.4 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 Q Q Q 0.2 Q Q 35.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.3 22.8 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 18.4 22.7

219

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Appliances by Household Income, 3a. Appliances by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.5 1.4 1.1 1.0 0.8 1.6 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 18.0 22.0 26.1 35.6 14.4 32.6 3.2 1 ................................................ 95.2 17.3 21.1 24.8 32.0 13.8 31.1 3.4 2 or More .................................. 6.5 0.8 0.9 1.3 3.6 0.6 1.5 13.1 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 18.0 22.0 26.1 35.6 14.4 32.6 3.2

220

Better Buildings for a Brighter Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

million annually on their energy bills Building a Brighter Future The average American household spends nearly 2,000 per year on energy used in the home, but 200 to 400 of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1993 -- Executive ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

national level data on energy-related issues on households and energy expenditures in the residential sector.

222

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 9.4 9.2 19.6 41 19 40.2 16 607 0.29 598 231 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.7 1.7 4.5 31 11 29.8 11 538 0.20 519 186 New England 0.7 0.7 2.2 34 11 33.1 12 580 0.19 569 209 Middle Atlantic 1.0 0.9 2.4 29 11 27.4 10 506 0.20 482 169

223

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 54.2 41.0 91.8 116 52 87.6 32 658 0.29 498 183 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.6 7.3 21.1 132 46 82.6 31 951 0.33 598 221 New England 2.0 1.3 4.5 126 35 77.9 28 1,062 0.30 658 235 Middle Atlantic 9.6 6.0 16.5 133 49 83.6 31 928 0.34 585 217

224

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 57.3 42.5 99.4 114 49 84.3 33 615 0.26 456 176 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.7 7.4 21.2 139 49 88.5 34 898 0.31 571 221 New England 1.7 1.0 3.0 155 49 86.8 33 1,044 0.33 586 223 Middle Atlantic 10.0 6.5 18.2 137 49 88.8 35 877 0.31 568 221

225

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 58.7 46.0 111.9 115 47 89.9 34 696 0.29 546 206 Census Region and Division Northeast 12.2 7.7 23.3 145 48 90.9 35 1,122 0.37 703 272 New England 2.2 1.2 4.2 154 45 85.7 34 1,298 0.38 722 290 Middle Atlantic 10.0 6.4 19.1 143 48 92.0 35 1,089 0.37 699 269

226

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Oil/Kerosene, 2001 Fuel Oil/Kerosene, 2001 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 11.2 9.4 26.0 80 29 67.1 26 723 0.26 607 236 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.1 5.4 16.8 111 36 84.7 33 992 0.32 757 297 New England 2.9 2.5 8.0 110 35 96.3 39 1,001 0.32 875 350 Middle Atlantic 4.2 2.8 8.8 112 36 76.6 30 984 0.32 675 260

227

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 57.7 44.8 106.3 109 46 84.2 32 609 0.26 472 181 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.9 7.7 23.6 134 44 86.8 33 952 0.31 615 232 New England 2.0 1.1 3.5 146 45 76.0 29 1,135 0.35 592 227 Middle Atlantic 9.9 6.6 20.1 133 44 89.1 34 923 0.30 620 234

228

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 55.4 41.3 93.2 121 53 89.9 33 722 0.32 537 198 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.7 7.5 21.1 125 44 79.2 30 925 0.33 588 221 New England 2.0 1.3 4.2 122 39 80.3 29 955 0.30 626 224 Middle Atlantic 9.7 6.1 16.9 125 45 78.9 30 919 0.33 580 220

229

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 7.3 7.2 12.2 44 26 42.8 15 389 0.23 382 133 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.2 1.1 2.7 29 11 26.2 9 318 0.13 288 94 New England 0.5 0.4 1.0 25 11 22.5 8 282 0.12 250 91 Middle Atlantic 0.7 0.7 1.7 31 12 28.6 9 341 0.13 312 96

230

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.4 14.0 33.3 87 37 70.3 27 513 0.22 414 156 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.1 6.3 17.8 140 49 96.0 37 808 0.28 556 212 New England 2.6 2.0 5.8 130 46 102.1 39 770 0.27 604 233 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.2 12.1 144 51 93.6 36 826 0.29 537 204

231

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 7.8 7.7 12.0 41 26 40.1 15 406 0.26 398 146 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.4 1.2 2.7 23 10 20.1 7 295 0.13 264 91 New England 0.5 0.4 1.0 31 14 27.6 9 370 0.17 330 114 Middle Atlantic 0.9 0.8 1.8 18 8 15.9 6 253 0.11 226 79

232

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

90 90 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 16.3 13.5 33.2 77 31 63.9 23 609 0.25 506 181 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.9 6.4 19.3 121 40 87.7 32 950 0.32 690 253 New England 2.5 2.1 5.9 121 43 99.0 39 956 0.34 784 307 Middle Atlantic 6.3 4.4 13.4 121 39 83.2 30 947 0.31 652 234

233

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 14.6 11.0 28.9 116 44 87.9 32 1,032 0.39 781 283 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.9 5.9 18.0 158 51 103.5 36 1,405 0.46 923 323 New England 2.4 1.7 5.1 148 50 105.3 36 1,332 0.45 946 327 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.8 161 52 102.9 36 1,435 0.46 915 322

234

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.4 11.6 29.7 131 51 99.0 36 1,053 0.41 795 287 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.2 6.0 18.2 176 59 116.2 42 1,419 0.47 934 335 New England 2.7 2.0 6.0 161 53 118.3 42 1,297 0.43 954 336 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.2 184 61 115.3 42 1,478 0.49 926 335

235

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, 1997 Natural Gas, 1997 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 61.9 51.3 106.1 103 50 85.3 32 698 0.34 579 218 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.8 8.3 19.9 123 52 86.9 35 1,097 0.46 772 310 New England 1.9 1.4 3.3 123 50 87.0 32 1,158 0.48 819 301 Middle Atlantic 9.9 6.9 16.6 124 52 86.9 36 1,085 0.45 763 312

236

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 96.6 76.4 181.2 43 18 34.0 13 1,061 0.45 840 321 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.5 13.8 40.1 34 12 24.1 9 1,144 0.39 809 309 New England 5.1 3.7 10.6 33 11 24.1 9 1,089 0.38 797 311 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.1 29.4 35 12 24.2 9 1,165 0.40 814 309

237

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.2 11.0 23.2 97 46 81.1 31 694 0.33 578 224 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.2 6.2 14.5 136 57 101.3 40 950 0.40 710 282 New England 3.1 2.7 5.8 126 60 111.5 45 902 0.43 797 321 Middle Atlantic 5.2 3.4 8.8 143 56 95.1 38 988 0.39 657 260

238

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.8 11.6 29.8 92 36 77.5 28 604 0.23 506 186 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.9 5.9 17.2 133 45 98.7 36 854 0.29 636 234 New England 2.8 2.4 6.6 125 45 105.6 40 819 0.30 691 262 Middle Atlantic 5.0 3.5 10.6 138 45 94.8 34 878 0.29 605 219

239

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 66.9 53.8 137.2 90 35 72.4 27 873 0.34 702 265 Census Region and Division Northeast 12.5 7.8 25.4 126 39 78.3 33 1,434 0.44 889 372 New England 2.3 1.5 5.5 128 34 82.5 35 1,567 0.42 1,014 428 Middle Atlantic 10.3 6.3 19.9 126 40 77.4 32 1,403 0.45 861 360

240

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.5 13.8 32.0 91 39 71.9 27 697 0.30 550 203 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.5 6.6 18.2 141 51 97.3 35 1,066 0.38 734 266 New England 2.5 1.9 5.6 140 49 108.8 39 1,105 0.38 856 306 Middle Atlantic 7.0 4.6 12.6 142 52 93.2 34 1,050 0.38 690 252

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, 1980 Natural Gas, 1980 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 51.6 39.7 88.5 125 56 96.2 34 497 0.22 383 137 Census Region and Division Northeast 10.9 6.5 18.8 144 50 86.6 31 771 0.27 463 168 New England 1.9 0.9 3.1 162 47 78.9 28 971 0.28 472 169 Middle Atlantic 9.0 5.6 15.7 141 51 88.1 32 739 0.27 461 168

242

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.5 12.2 30.0 98 40 77.1 27 829 0.34 650 231 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.8 6.0 17.4 138 48 94.5 34 1,163 0.40 796 283 New England 2.5 1.9 5.9 131 43 101.9 36 1,106 0.36 863 309 Middle Atlantic 6.3 4.1 11.5 142 50 91.5 32 1,191 0.42 769 272

243

A Mixed Nordic Experience: Implementing Competitive Retail Electricity Markets for Household Customers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the Nordic countries were among the first to develop competition in the electricity industry, it took a long time to make retail competition work. In Norway and Sweden a considerable number of households are actively using the market but very few households are active in Finland and Denmark. One problem has been institutional barriers involving metering, limited unbundling of distribution and supply, and limited access to reliable information on contracts and prices. (author)

Olsen, Ole Jess; Johnsen, Tor Arnt; Lewis, Philip

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. 1. Introduction The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is mandated by Congress to collect, analyze, and disseminate impartial, comprehensive data about energy--how much is produced, who uses it, and the purposes for which it is used. To comply with this mandate, EIA collects energy data from a variety of sources covering a range of topics 1 . Background The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted

245

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Detailed Tables The following tables present detailed characteristics of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the tables. Table Organization The "Detailed Tables" section consists of three types of tables: (1) Tables of totals such as number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) or gallons consumed; (2) Tables of per household statistics such as VMT per household; and (3) Tables of per vehicle statistics such as vehicle fuel consumption per vehicle. The tables have been grouped together by specific topics such as model year data, or family income data to facilitate finding related information. The Quick-Reference Guide to the detailed tables indicates major topics of each table. Row and Column Factors These tables present estimates

246

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Home Office Equipment by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Home Office Equipment by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.1 1.4 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 17.9 12.8 5.0 1.3 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 10.9 7.7 3.3 3.1 Number of Desktop PCs 1 ................................................................ 45.1 8.7 6.2 2.5 3.7 2 or more ................................................... 9.1 1.4 0.9 0.5 12.9 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ................................................................

247

Energy and household expenditure patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since households account, either directly or indirectly, for two-thirds of the energy consumed in the US, changes in household activities will affect energy use. Expected changes in prices, personal income, and family spending over the next 20 years are looked at as well as the implications for energy consumption. The analysis shows that direct energy purchases will break with past trends, dropping from 2.6% to 0.2% annual growth for the rest of the century. Growth in spending on energy-using goods is also likely to slow down. The year 2000 will see a marked decrease in the growth of national energy consumption. 58 references, 3 figures, 35 tables.

Lareau, T.J.; Darmstadter, J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Home Office Equipment by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Home Office Equipment by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 22.4 15.7 6.7 1.3 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 14.1 9.9 4.2 3.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1 ................................................................ 45.1 10.4 7.2 3.2 3.7 2 or more ................................................... 9.1 2.3 1.6 0.7 10.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ................................................................

249

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2001 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.0 1.5 1.5 Total .............................................................. 107.0 7.1 12.3 7.7 6.3 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 2.2 2.4 1.8 1.7 7.3 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 2.2 4.0 2.4 2.0 6.9 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 1.1 2.0 1.2 1.2 9.5 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 0.8 1.9 1.3 0.9 11.2 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 0.4 1.1 0.4 0.5 19.8 6 or More Persons ....................................... 4.0 0.4 0.9 0.4 0.1 16.4 2001 Household Income Category

250

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Air Conditioning by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Air Conditioning by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 20.5 13.6 6.8 2.2 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.3 Q Q 27.5 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 20.2 13.4 6.7 2.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 14.3 9.5 4.8 3.8 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 13.6 9.0 4.6 3.9 With a Heat Pump .....................................

251

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.5 0.8 1.4 1.3 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 36.8 13.6 18.9 13.6 4.3 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 1.2 0.2 0.4 0.3 21.4 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 ........................................ 80.8 35.6 13.4 18.6 13.3 4.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 3 ............................ 57.5 23.6 8.6 15.8 9.4 5.1 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 19.3 7.4 13.1 6.4 6.3 With a Heat Pump ..................................... 11.3 4.4

252

Inconsistent pathways of household waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to provide policy-makers and waste management planners with information about how recycling programs affect the quantities of specific materials recycled and disposed of. Two questions were addressed: which factors influence household waste generation and pathways? and how reliable are official waste data? Household waste flows were studied in 35 Swedish municipalities, and a wide variation in the amount of waste per capita was observed. When evaluating the effect of different waste collection policies, it was found to be important to identify site-specific factors influencing waste generation. Eleven municipal variables were investigated in an attempt to explain the variation. The amount of household waste per resident was higher in populous municipalities and when net commuting was positive. Property-close collection of dry recyclables led to increased delivery of sorted metal, plastic and paper packaging. No difference was seen in the amount of separated recyclables per capita when weight-based billing for the collection of residual waste was applied, but the amount of residual waste was lower. Sixteen sources of error in official waste statistics were identified and the results of the study emphasize the importance of reliable waste generation and composition data to underpin waste management policies.

Dahlen, Lisa [Division of Waste Science and Technology, Lulea University of Technology, SE, 971 87 Lulea (Sweden)], E-mail: lisa.dahlen@ltu.se; Aberg, Helena [Department of Food, Health and Environment, University of Gothenburg, P.O. Box 12204, SE, 402 42 Gothenburg (Sweden); Lagerkvist, Anders [Division of Waste Science and Technology, Lulea University of Technology, SE, 971 87 Lulea (Sweden); Berg, Per E.O. [HB Anttilator, Stagnellsgatan 3, SE, 652 23, Karlstad (Sweden)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Air Conditioning by South Census Region, 1a. Air Conditioning by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.3 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 37.2 19.3 6.4 11.5 1.5 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.4 Q Q Q 28.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 36.9 19.0 6.4 11.5 1.6 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 30.4 16.1 5.0 9.2 2.8 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 22.1 10.4 3.4 8.3 5.6 With a Heat Pump

254

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Air Conditioning by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Air Conditioning by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 14.5 11.3 3.2 3.3 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.3 0.3 Q 28.3 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 14.2 11.1 3.2 3.4 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 5.7 4.9 0.8 8.9 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 5.2 4.5 0.7 9.2 With a Heat Pump .....................................

255

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, 2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 13.6 16.0 14.7 10.4 10.5 17.6 4.7 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 Q 0.3 0.5 0.3 0.4 0.5 27.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 .......................... 80.8 13.4 15.8 14.2 10.1 10.2 17.1 4.7 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 3 .............. 57.5 12.6 13.7 11.0 7.1 6.6 6.4 5.9 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 10.1 10.4 8.0 6.1 5.9 5.7 7.0 With a Heat Pump ....................... 11.3 2.5 3.3

256

Apartments in buildings with 5 or more units use less energy than ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Households in the larger apartment buildings in 1980 consumed almost as much energy for space heating ... than older apartments—more air conditioning ...

257

RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained relatively stable for many years as increased energy efficiency has offset the increase in the number and average size of housing units, according to the newly released data from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The average household consumed 90 million British thermal units (Btu) in 2009 based on RECS. This continues the downward trend in average residential energy consumption of the last 30 years. Despite increases in the number and the average size of homes plus increased use of electronics, improvements in efficiency for space heating, air conditioning, and major appliances have all led to decreased consumption per household. Newer homes also tend to feature better insulation and other characteristics, such as double-pane windows, that improve the building envelope.

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

258

Beyond Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

without compromising future generations SUSTAINABLE INL Buildings Beyond Buildings Sustainability Beyond Buildings INL is taking sustainability efforts "beyond buildings" by...

259

NREL: Buildings Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities NREL provides industry, government, and university researchers with access to state-of-the-art and unique equipment for analyzing a wide spectrum of building energy efficiency technologies and innovations. NREL engineers and researchers work closely with industry partners to research and develop advanced technologies. NREL's existing facilities have been used to test and develop many award-winning building technologies and innovations that deliver significant energy savings in buildings, and the new facilities further extend those capabilities. In addition, the NREL campus includes living laboratories, buildings that researchers and other NREL staff use every day. Researchers monitor real-time building performance data in these facilities to study energy use

260

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SolArch  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

industry building designers, government agencies, technical press and media, public utilities energy supply industry, professional and trade associations, consultants,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Better Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Better Buildings Better Buildings Better Buildings Last year, commercial and industrial buildings used roughly 50% of the energy in the U.S. economy at a cost of over $400 billion. These buildings and operations can be made much more efficient using a variety of cost effective efficiency improvements while creating jobs and building a stronger economy. We have similar opportunities in our homes. In February 2011, President Obama, building upon the investments of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, announced the Better Buildings Initiative to make commercial and industrial buildings 20% more energy efficient over the next 10 years and accelerate private sector investment in energy efficiency. Better Buildings strategies include: Last year, commercial and industrial buildings used roughly 50% of the

262

Build an energy management program | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Build an energy management program Build an energy management program Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Advance your energy program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance Industrial service and product providers Earn recognition Market impacts: Improvements in the industrial sector

263

Measuring Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

leading the effort to decipher MELs impacts on buildings Understanding and reducing the energy use of MELs is a significant problem. The buildings industry is working towards...

264

Build an energy program | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Build an energy program Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial...

265

Building technology roadmaps  

SciTech Connect

DOE's Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS) is facilitating an industry-led initiative to develop a series of technology roadmaps that identify key goals and strategies for different areas of the building and equipment industry. This roadmapping initiative is a fundamental component of the BTS strategic plan and will help to align government resources with the high-priority needs identified by industry.

1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

266

Alston S. Householder Fellowship | Careers | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Scientific Computing honors Dr. Alston S. Householder, founding Director of the Mathematics Division (now Computer Science and Mathematics Division) at the Oak Ridge National...

267

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 - PDF Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1 U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 1994 Table 2 U.S. per Household Vehicle Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel ...

268

Residential Energy Usage by Origin of Householder  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Energy Users > Residential Home Page > Energy Usage by Origin of Householder. Consumption and Expenditures. NOTE: To View and/or Print PDF's ...

269

Household energy use in urban Venezuela: Implications from surveys in Maracaibo, Valencia, Merida, and Barcelona-Puerto La Cruz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies the most important results of a comparative analysis of household commercial energy use in Venezuelan urban cities. The use of modern fuels is widespread among all cities. Cooking consumes the largest share of urban household energy use. The survey documents no use of biomass and a negligible use of kerosene for cooking. LPG, natural gas, and kerosene are the main fuels available. LPG is the fuel choice of low-income households in all cities except Maracaibo, where 40% of all households use natural gas. Electricity consumption in Venezuela`s urban households is remarkably high compared with the levels used in households in comparable Latin American countries and in households of industrialized nations which confront harsher climatic conditions and, therefore, use electricity for water and space heating. The penetration of appliances in Venezuela`s urban households is very high. The appliances available on the market are inefficient, and there are inefficient patterns of energy use among the population. Climate conditions and the urban built form all play important roles in determining the high level of energy consumption in Venezuelan urban households. It is important to acknowledge the opportunities for introducing energy efficiency and conservation in Venezuela`s residential sector, particularly given current economic and financial constraints, which may hamper the future provision of energy services.

Figueroa, M.J.; Sathaye, J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Home Office Equipment by South Census Region, 1a. Home Office Equipment by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.3 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 34.6 18.4 6.0 10.1 1.2 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 20.7 11.7 3.2 5.8 4.0 Number of Desktop PCs 1 ................................................................ 45.1 15.5 8.6 2.6 4.3 4.9 2 or more ................................................... 9.1 3.1 2.0 0.4 0.7 9.6 Number of Laptop PCs

271

Electricity Prices for Households - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Households for Selected Countries1 Households for Selected Countries1 (U.S. Dollars per Kilowatthour) Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Argentina NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.023 NA NA Australia 0.091 0.092 0.094 0.098 NA NA NA NA NA Austria 0.144 0.154 0.152 0.163 0.158 0.158 0.178 0.201 NA Barbados NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Belgium NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Bolivia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Brazil NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.145 0.171 NA Canada 0.067 0.069 0.070 0.071 0.076 0.078 NA NA NA Chile NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.140 0.195 NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) 0.075 0.071 0.074 0.076 0.079 0.079 0.080 0.086 NA Colombia NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.111 0.135 NA

272

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, 2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.4 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 14.9 16.7 17.0 12.2 13.0 22.4 4.4 Personal Computers 2 ................... 60.0 11.0 11.6 10.3 7.2 7.8 12.0 5.3 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 8.0 9.0 7.7 5.3 6.1 9.1 5.8 2 or more .................................... 9.1 1.8 1.6 2.0 1.1 1.0 1.6 11.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

273

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2001 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.7 1.2 1.2 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 4.9 6.0 7.4 6.2 2.4 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.1 0.8 Q 0.1 23.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 4.7 5.2 7.4 6.1 2.6 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 1.3 3.9 6.2 5.7 6.7 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 1.2 3.2 5.5 3.8 8.1 With a Heat Pump ..................................... 11.3 Q 0.8 0.6 1.9 14.7 Room Air-Conditioning ................................ 23.3 3.4 1.2 1.2 0.3 13.6 1 Unit

274

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.9 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 8.4 26.2 21.1 19.0 21.5 7.8 Personal Computers 2 ................... 60.0 5.7 16.7 13.1 12.1 12.6 7.4 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 4.2 12.8 9.6 8.8 9.6 7.8 2 or more .................................... 9.1 0.8 2.4 2.3 2.0 1.7 12.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

275

Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Building Energy Technologies NREL's New Energy-Efficient "RSF" Building Buildings provide shelter for nearly everything we do-we work, live, learn, govern, heal, worship, and play in buildings-and they require enormous energy resources. According to the U.S. Energy Information Agency, homes and commercial buildings use nearly three quarters of the electricity in the United States. Opportunities abound for reducing the huge amount of energy consumed by buildings, but discovering those opportunities requires compiling substantial amounts of data and information. The Buildings Energy Technologies gateway is your single source of freely accessible information on energy usage in the building industry as well as tools to improve

276

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Household Expenditures Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Household Expenditures Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division (see

277

Climate change and buildings | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate change and buildings Climate change and buildings Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Find out who's partnered with ENERGY STAR Become an ENERGY STAR partner Find ENERGY STAR certified buildings and plants ENERGY STAR certification Featured research and reports Facts and stats Climate change and buildings Climate change and buildings

278

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 86.3 67.4 144.3 37 17 28.8 11 808 0.38 632 234 Census Region and Division Northeast 18.3 13.0 35.0 31 12 22.3 8 938 0.35 665 245 New England 4.3 3.1 9.0 31 11 22.6 8 869 0.30 635 227 Middle Atlantic 14.0 9.9 26.0 32 12 22.2 8 959 0.36 674 251

279

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 90.5 70.4 156.8 39 18 30.5 12 875 0.39 680 262 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.0 13.2 36.8 34 12 23.3 9 934 0.34 648 251 New England 4.3 3.0 8.4 33 12 22.9 9 864 0.30 600 234 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.2 28.4 34 12 23.4 9 954 0.34 661 256

280

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 107.0 85.2 211.2 46 18 36.0 14 1,178 0.48 938 366 Census Region and Division Northeast 20.3 14.1 43.7 37 12 26.0 11 1,268 0.41 883 362 New England 5.4 4.1 13.2 32 10 24.0 10 1,121 0.35 852 358 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.0 30.5 40 13 27.0 11 1,328 0.44 894 364

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

97 97 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 101.4 83.2 168.8 42 21 35.0 13 1,061 0.52 871 337 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.7 15.1 34.6 32 14 25.0 10 1,130 0.49 863 345 New England 5.3 4.2 9.3 31 14 24.0 9 1,081 0.49 854 336 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.9 25.3 33 14 25.0 10 1,149 0.49 867 349

282

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 83.1 66.1 144.2 37 17 29.1 10 678 0.31 539 192 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.9 12.1 35.1 33 11 22.1 8 830 0.29 561 195 New England 4.3 2.9 8.3 31 11 21.3 8 776 0.27 531 189 Middle Atlantic 13.7 9.2 26.7 33 11 22.4 8 847 0.29 571 197

283

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 81.6 65.3 142.5 38 17 30.3 11 625 0.29 500 178 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.7 12.2 34.8 33 12 23.0 8 742 0.26 514 181 New England 4.3 2.9 8.9 34 11 23.1 8 747 0.25 508 177 Middle Atlantic 13.4 9.3 26.0 33 12 22.9 8 740 0.27 516 183

284

The construction industry is comprised of a wide range of businesses involved in engineering standards, building design, and the construction of various types of materials and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal characteristics of buildings for insulation purposes, and to determine heating, cooling in engineering standards, building design, and the construction of various types of materials and structures-related impacts, such as high winds and flooding, influence the choice of site construction, building techniques

285

Earthquake Risk Reduction in Buildings and Infrastructure ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... building and fire safety industries in ways ... supported by the fragmented US construction industry. ... Seismic Design of Steel Special Moment Frames ...

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

286

Characterization of household waste in Greenland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The composition of household waste in Greenland was investigated for the first time. About 2 tonnes of household waste was sampled as every 7th bag collected during 1 week along the scheduled collection routes in Sisimiut, the second largest town in Greenland with about 5400 inhabitants. The collection bags were sorted manually into 10 material fractions. The household waste composition consisted primarily of biowaste (43%) and the combustible fraction (30%), including anything combustible that did not belong to other clean fractions as paper, cardboard and plastic. Paper (8%) (dominated by magazine type paper) and glass (7%) were other important material fractions of the household waste. The remaining approximately 10% constituted of steel (1.5%), aluminum (0.5%), plastic (2.4%), wood (1.0%), non-combustible waste (1.8%) and household hazardous waste (1.2%). The high content of biowaste and the low content of paper make Greenlandic waste much different from Danish household waste. The moisture content, calorific value and chemical composition (55 elements, of which 22 were below detection limits) were determined for each material fraction. These characteristics were similar to what has been found for material fractions in Danish household waste. The chemical composition and the calorific value of the plastic fraction revealed that this fraction was not clean but contained a lot of biowaste. The established waste composition is useful in assessing alternative waste management schemes for household waste in Greenland.

Eisted, Rasmus, E-mail: raei@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Factors influencing county level household fuelwood use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study explains household fuelwood consumption behavior at the county level by linking it to economic and demographic conditions in counties. Using this link, counties are identified where potential fuelwood use problems and benefits are greatest. A probit equation estimates household probability of wood use (percent woodburners in a county heating degree days, household income, nonwood fuel price, fuelwood price, percent forest land, population density, and fraction of households using various types of heating equipment. A linear-in-parameters equation estimates average wood consumed by a woodburner based on county heating degree days, household income, percent forest land, and price of nonwood fuel divided by fuelwood price. Parameters are estimated using fuelwood use data for individual households from a 1908-81 nationwide survey. The probit equation predicts percentage of wood burns well over a wide range of county conditions. The wood consumption equation overpredicts for counties with high income and high population density (over 6000 persons per square mile). The model shows average woodburning per household over all households decreases with increasing population density, and the influence of county economic characteristics varies with density.

Skog, K.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Appliances by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Appliances by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.3 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 19.6 14.5 5.2 1.1 1 .............................................................. 95.2 18.2 13.3 4.9 1.1 2 or More ................................................. 6.5 1.4 1.1 0.3 11.7 Most Used Oven ...................................... 101.7 19.6 14.5 5.2 1.1 Electric .....................................................

289

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Space Heating by South Census Region, 1a. Space Heating by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.9 1.2 1.4 1.3 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 38.8 20.2 6.8 11.8 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q Q 20.1 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q Q Q Q 39.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 Q Q Q Q 39.0 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0

290

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Space Heating by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Space Heating by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.7 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 20.1 14.7 5.4 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q 19.9 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q Q Q 39.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 Q Q Q 38.7 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 20.1 14.7 5.4 NE Natural Gas .................................................

291

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Space Heating by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Space Heating by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q 19.8 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q Q Q 39.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 Q Q Q 38.4 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Natural Gas

292

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Space Heating by West Census Region, 2a. Space Heating by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.6 1.0 1.6 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 22.6 6.7 15.9 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 0.7 Q 0.7 10.6 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 0.4 Q 0.4 18.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 0.2 Q 0.2 27.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 22.6 6.7 15.9 NE Natural Gas .................................................

293

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Appliances by West Census Region, 2a. Appliances by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.7 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 22.1 6.6 15.5 1.1 1 .............................................................. 95.2 20.9 6.4 14.5 1.1 2 or More ................................................. 6.5 1.2 0.2 1.0 14.6 Most Used Oven ...................................... 101.7 22.1 6.6 15.5 1.1 Electric .....................................................

294

1999 CBECS Principal Building Activities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview A Look at Building Activities in the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey, or CBECS, covers a wide variety of building types—office buildings, shopping malls, hospitals, churches, and fire stations, to name just a few. Some of these buildings might not traditionally be considered "commercial," but the CBECS includes all buildings that are not residential, agricultural, or industrial. For an overview of definitions and examples of the CBECS building types, see Description of Building Types. Compare Activities by... Number of Buildings Building size Employees Building Age Energy Conservation Number of Computers Electricity Generation Capability

295

LCA for household waste management when planning a new urban settlement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Household waste management of a new carbon neutral settlement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EASEWASTE as a LCA tool to compare different centralised and decentralised solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental benefit or close to zero impact in most of the categories. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Paper and metal recycling important for the outcome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discusses the challenges of waste prevention planning. - Abstract: When planning for a new urban settlement, industrial ecology tools like scenario building and life cycle assessment can be used to assess the environmental quality of different infrastructure solutions. In Trondheim, a new greenfield settlement with carbon-neutral ambitions is being planned and five different scenarios for the waste management system of the new settlement have been compared. The results show small differences among the scenarios, however, some benefits from increased source separation of paper and metal could be found. The settlement should connect to the existing waste management system of the city, and not resort to decentralised waste treatment or recovery methods. However, as this is an urban development project with ambitious goals for lifestyle changes, effort should be put into research and initiatives for proactive waste prevention and reuse issues.

Slagstad, Helene, E-mail: helene.slagstad@ntnu.no [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Brattebo, Helge [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Building a Successful Biodiesel Business  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This second edition of Building a Successful Biodiesel Business includes three completely new chapters, and comes at an exciting time for everyone in the biodiesel industry Building a Successful Biodiesel Business Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel B

297

Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program logo. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program logo. The Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is helping over 40 competitively selected state and local governments develop sustainable programs to upgrade the energy efficiency of more than 100,000 buildings. These leading communities are using innovation and investment in energy efficiency to expand the building improvement industry, test program delivery business models, and create jobs. New Materials and Resources January 2014 Read the January issue of the Better Buildings Network View See the new story about Austin Energy Read the new Focus Series with Chicago's EI2 See the new webcast Read the latest DOE blog posts Get Inspired! Hear why Better Buildings partners are excited to bring the benefits of energy upgrades to their neighborhoods.

298

Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meetings Meetings Photo of people watching a presentation on a screen; the foreground shows a person's hands taking notes on a notepad. The Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program hosts open meetings and webinars for industry partners and stakeholders that provide a forum to exchange information about various aspects of residential building research. Upcoming Meetings Past Technical and Stakeholder Meetings Webinars Expert Meetings Upcoming Meetings There are no Building America meetings scheduled at this time. Please subscribe to Building America news and updates to receive notification of future meetings. Past Technical and Stakeholder Meetings Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting: April 2013 This meeting showcased world-class building science research for high performance homes in a dynamic new format. Researchers from Building America teams and national laboratories presented on key issues that must be resolved to deliver homes that reduce whole house energy use by 30%-50%. View the presentations.

299

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline ... representing a variety of industries ... Following the suspension of the 2011 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption ...

300

A Look at Principal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Commercial Buildings Home> Special Topics > 1995 Principal Home > Commercial Buildings Home> Special Topics > 1995 Principal Building Activities Office Education Health Care Retail and Service Food Service Food Sales Lodging Religious Worship Public Assembly Public Order and Safety Warehouse and Storage Vacant Other Summary Comparison Table (All Activities) More information on the: Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey A Look at ... Principal Building Activities in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) When you look at a city skyline, most of the buildings you see are commercial buildings. In the CBECS, commercial buildings include office buildings, shopping malls, hospitals, churches, and many other types of buildings. Some of these buildings might not traditionally be considered "commercial," but the CBECS includes all buildings that are not residential, agricultural, or industrial.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

An Exploration of Innovation and Energy Efficiency in an Appliance Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Innovation Process at Appliance Manufacturer, seen throughinnovation in the residential appliance industries. Ecology.Offer (1994). "Household Appliances and the Use of Time: The

Taylor, Margaret

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Probit Model Estimation Revisited: Trinomial Models of Household Car Ownership  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Household Ownership of Car Davidon, W. C. (1959) VariableStudy Report 9: Models of Car Ownership and License Holding.Trinomial Models of Household Car Ownership. Transportation

Bunch, David S.; Kitamura, Ryuichi

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Modeling patterns of hot water use in households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 No Dishwashers . . . . . . . .to households without dishwashers. no_cw is only applied towasher; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting

Lutz, James D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, James E.; Dunham, Camilla; Shown, Leslie J.; McCure, Quandra T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

New Industry Commitments to Give 15 Million Households ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a sufficiently large market to support the creation of innovative applications that can help consumers make the most of their energy information. ...

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

305

Leaking electricity: Standby and off-mode power consumption in consumer electronics and household appliances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses ``leaking`` electricity from consumer electronics and small household appliances when they are in standby mode or turned off, and examines the impacts of these losses. The report identifies trends in relevant product industries and gives technical and policy options for reducing standby and off-mode power loss.

Thorne, J.; Suozzo, M.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy Working with industry representatives and partners is critical to achieving significant improvements in the energy efficiency of new and existing commercial buildings. Here you will learn more about the government-industry partnerships that move us toward that goal. Key alliances and partnerships include: Photo of downtown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a municipal Better Buildings Challenge partner, at dusk. Credit: iStockphoto Better Buildings Challenge This national leadership initiative calls on corporate officers, university presidents, and local leaders to progess towards the goal of making American buildings 20 percent more energy-efficient by 2020. Photo of Jim McClendon of Walmart speaking during the CBEA Executive Exchange with Commercial Building Stakeholders forum at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado, on May 24, 2012.

307

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

SciTech Connect

The term ?household carbon footprint? refers to the total annual carbon emissions associated with household consumption of energy, goods, and services. In this project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a carbon footprint modeling framework that characterizes the key underlying technologies and processes that contribute to household carbon footprints in California and the United States. The approach breaks down the carbon footprint by 35 different household fuel end uses and 32 different supply chain fuel end uses. This level of end use detail allows energy and policy analysts to better understand the underlying technologies and processes contributing to the carbon footprint of California households. The modeling framework was applied to estimate the annual home energy and supply chain carbon footprints of a prototypical California household. A preliminary assessment of parameter uncertainty associated with key model input data was also conducted. To illustrate the policy-relevance of this modeling framework, a case study was conducted that analyzed the achievable carbon footprint reductions associated with the adoption of energy efficient household and supply chain technologies.

Kramer, Klaas Jan; Homan, Greg; Brown, Rich; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Events | The Better Buildings Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

participants to share insights, ideas, and updates about energy efficiency in commercial buildings. Webinars and team conference calls feature experts from industry as well...

309

Building Technologies Office: Webinar Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

titles: Industry Review: Low-Cost Cold Climate Solar Water Heating Roadmap Saving Energy in Multifamily Buildings An Introduction to the EnergyValue Housing Awards (EVHA) -...

310

Urban household energy use in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

Changes in household fuel and electricity use that accompany urbanization in Third World countries bear large economic and environmental costs. The processes driving the fuel transition, and the policy mechanisms by which it can be influenced, need to be better understood for the sake of forecasting and planning, especially in the case of electricity demand. This study examines patterns of household fuel use and electrical appliance utilization in Bangkok, Chieng Mai and Ayutthaya, Thailand, based on the results of a household energy survey. Survey data are statistically analyzed using a variety of multiple regression techniques to evaluate the relative influence of various household and fuel characteristics on fuel and appliance choice. Results suggest that changes to the value of women's time in urban households, as women become increasingly active in the labor force, have a major influence on patterns of household energy use. The use of the home for small-scale commercial activities, particularly food preparation, also has a significant influence on fuel choice. In general, household income does not prove to be an important factor in fuel and appliance selection in these cities, although income is closely related to total electricity use. The electricity use of individual household appliances is also analyzed using statistical techniques as well as limited direct metering. The technology of appliance production in Thailand is evaluated through interviews with manufacturers and comparisons of product performance. These data are used to develop policy recommendations for improving the efficiency of electrical appliances in Thailand by relying principally on the dynamism of the consumer goods market, rather than direct regulation. The annual electricity savings from the recommended program for fostering rapid adoption of efficient technologies are estimated to reach 1800 GWh by the year 2005 for urban households alone.

Tyler, S.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Did Household Consumption Become More Volatile?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I show that after accounting for predictable variation arising from movements in real interest rates, preferences, income shocks, liquidity constraints and measurement errors, volatility of household consumption in the US increased between 1970 and 2004. For households headed by nonwhite and/or poorly educated individuals, this rise was significantly larger. This stands in sharp contrast with the dramatic fall in instability of the aggregate U.S. economy over the same period. Thus, while aggregate shocks affecting households fell over time, idiosyncratic shocks increased. This finding may lead to significant welfare implications.

Olga Gorbachev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Building Technologies | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Envelope Equipment Building Technologies Deployment System/Building Integration Climate & Environment Manufacturing Fossil Energy Sensors & Measurement Sustainable Electricity Systems Biology Transportation Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Buildings SHARE Building Technologies Reducing the energy consumption of the nation's buildings and resulting carbon emissions is essential to achieving a sustainable clean energy future. To address the enormous challenge, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is focused on helping develop new building technologies, whole-building and community integration, improved energy management in buildings and industrial facilities during their operational phase, and market transformations in all of these areas.

313

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Appliances by Climate Zone, a. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.1 Total .................................................. 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.8 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven .............................................. 101.7 9.1 27.9 23.1 19.4 22.2 7.8 1 ................................................... 95.2 8.7 26.0 21.6 17.7 21.2 7.9 2 or More ..................................... 6.5 0.4 1.9 1.5 1.7 1.0 14.7 Most Used Oven ........................... 101.7 9.1 27.9 23.1 19.4 22.2

314

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Space Heating by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Space Heating by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.6 0.9 1.3 1.3 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 49.9 18.0 21.2 17.9 4.3 Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 49.1 18.0 21.2 17.8 4.3 Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 0.7 0.1 0.1 0.1 25.8 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 0.4 0.1 Q 0.1 33.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 0.3 Q Q Q 30.2 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 49.1 18.0 21.2 17.8 4.3 Natural Gas

315

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Space Heating by Year of Construction, 2a. Space Heating by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.5 1.5 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.3 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 15.4 18.2 18.6 13.6 13.9 26.4 4.3 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 Q Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q 23.2 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 Q Q Q 0.2 Q Q 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q Q Q Q Q 37.8 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 15.4 18.2 18.6 13.6 13.9 26.4 4.3 Natural Gas ...................................

316

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Appliances by Year of Construction, 2a. Appliances by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.5 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 14.3 17.2 17.8 12.9 13.7 25.9 4.2 1 ................................................ 95.2 13.1 16.3 16.6 12.1 12.7 24.3 4.4 2 or More .................................. 6.5 1.2 0.9 1.1 0.7 1.0 1.6 14.8 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 14.3 17.2 17.8 12.9 13.7 25.9 4.2 Electric ......................................

317

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.1 Building Materials/Insulation  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 Industry Use Shares of Mineral Fiber (GlassWool) Insulation (1) 1997 1999 2001 2003 2004 2005 Insulating Buildings (2) Industrial, Equipment, and Appliance Insulation Unknown...

318

2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption - What is an RSE  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > 2003 Detailed Tables > What is an RSE? What is an RSE? The estimates in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are based on data reported by representatives of a statistically-designed subset of the entire commercial building population in the United States, or a "sample". Consequently, the estimates differ from the true population values. However, the sample design permits us to estimate the sampling error in each value. It is important to understand: CBECS estimates should not be considered as finite point estimates, but as estimates with some associated error in each direction. The standard error is a measure of the reliability or precision of the survey statistic. The value for the standard error can be used to construct confidence intervals and to perform hypothesis tests by standard statistical methods. Relative Standard Error (RSE) is defined as the standard error (square root of the variance) of a survey estimate, divided by the survey estimate and multiplied by 100.

319

Buildings Technologies Deployment | Clean energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Technologies Deployment Building Technologies Deployment SHARE Building Technologies Deployment benchmarking commercial buildings Once building technologies emerge and become commercially available, only in exceptional cases does robust market uptake automatically follow. Additional efforts remain to ensure that emerging and under-utilized technologies are successfully deployed to the fullest extent possible. ORNL helps optimize the energy performance of buildings and industrial processes by moving technologies to full use in residential, commercial, and industrial sectors through applications research, technical assistance, and a variety of deployment strategies. The team's comprehensive knowledge of buildings and energy use spans multi-building sites, whole-buildings, systems, components, and multi-level

320

Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US PAC CA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household  California households use 62 million Btu of energy per home, 31% less than the U.S. average. The lower than average site consumption results in households spending 30% less for energy than the U.S. average.  Average site electricity consumption in California homes is among the lowest in the nation, as the mild climate in much of the state leads to less reliance on

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US PAC CA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household  California households use 62 million Btu of energy per home, 31% less than the U.S. average. The lower than average site consumption results in households spending 30% less for energy than the U.S. average.  Average site electricity consumption in California homes is among the lowest in the nation, as the mild climate in much of the state leads to less reliance on

322

U.S. Household Electricity Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Brief analysis reports on the amount of electricity consumed annually by U.S. households for each of several end uses, including space heating and cooling, water heating, lighting, and the operation of more than two dozen appliances.

Barbara Fichman

2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

323

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

NONE

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

324

Do Disaster Expectations Explain Household Portfolios?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use the American Consumer Expenditure Survey (CEX) for consumption ex- penditure information. The data covers the period between 1983 and 2004. The expenditure information is recorded quarterly with approximately 5000 households in each wave. Every...

Alan, Sule

325

Household gasoline demand in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuing rapid growth in U.S. gasoline consumption threatens to exacerbate environmental and congestion problems. We use flexible semiparametric and nonparametric methods to guide analysis of household gasoline consumption, ...

Schmalensee, Richard

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Building Technologies Office: Building Science Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Education Science Education Photo of students investigating building enclosure moisture problems at a field testing facility in British Columbia. Students study moisture building enclosure issues at the Coquitlam Field Test facility in Vancouver, British Columbia. Credit: John Straube The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program recognizes that the education of future design/construction industry professionals in solid building science principles is critical to widespread development of high performance homes that are energy efficient, healthy, and durable. In November 2012, DOE met with leaders in the building science community to develop a strategic Building Science Education Roadmap that will chart a path for training skilled professionals who apply proven innovations and recognize the value of high performance homes. The roadmap aims to:

327

Performance Metrics for Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial building owners and operators have requested a standard set of key performance metrics to provide a systematic way to evaluate the performance of their buildings. The performance metrics included in this document provide standard metrics for the energy, water, operations and maintenance, indoor environmental quality, purchasing, waste and recycling and transportation impact of their building. The metrics can be used for comparative performance analysis between existing buildings and industry standards to clarify the impact of sustainably designed and operated buildings.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Wang, Na; Romero, Rachel L.; Deru, Michael P.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

The systems approach to building : a study of systems building development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The new demand for building and the problems generated by this demand confronting the building industry have become more complex as a result of increasing social change, evolution of industrialization and inadequacy of ...

Sittipunt, Preechaya

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

330

Local Option - Industrial Facilities and Development Bonds |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Commercial, Industrial, Institutional, Local Government Eligible Technologies Boilers, Building Insulation, CaulkingWeather-stripping, Central Air conditioners, Chillers,...

331

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Experimental Evidence Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Experimental Evidence Focus Area: Crosscutting Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.hks.harvard.edu/hepg/Papers/2009/The%20Power%20of%20Experimentatio Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/household-response-dynamic-pricing-el Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation Regulations: "Mandates/Targets,Cost Recovery/Allocation,Enabling Legislation" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

332

Industrial energy management | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify...

333

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? June 21, 2011 - 11:37am Addthis A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus’ DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus' DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. Ben Squires Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? The Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are working to harness the natural process that spoils fruits and vegetables as a way to make fuel and other petroleum substitutes from the parts of plants that we can't eat. The genetic bases of the behaviors and abilities of these two industrially relevant fungal strains will allow researchers to exploit

334

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? June 21, 2011 - 11:37am Addthis A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus’ DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus' DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. Ben Squires Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? The Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are working to harness the natural process that spoils fruits and vegetables as a way to make fuel and other petroleum substitutes from the parts of plants that we can't eat. The genetic bases of the behaviors and abilities of these two industrially relevant fungal strains will allow researchers to exploit

335

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heating Elec: Industrial refrigeration Petr: Agricultural estimates for industrial HVAC, refrigeration, and  lighting Commercial Refrigeration NG: Industrial process heating

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The impact of the Persian Gulf crisis on household energy consumption and expenditure patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Iraqi invasion of the Kingdom of Kuwait on August 2, 1990, and the subsequent war between Iraq and an international alliance led by the United States triggered first immediate and then fluctuating world petroleum prices. Increases in petroleum prices and in U.S. petroleum imports resulted in increases in the petroleum prices paid by U.S. residential, commercial, and industrial consumers. The result was an immediate price shock that reverberated throughout the U.S. economy. The differential impact of these price increases and fluctuations on poor and minority households raised immediate, significant, and potentially long-term research, policy, and management issues for a variety of federal, state, and local government agencies, including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Among these issues are (1) the measurement of variations in the impact of petroleum price changes on poor, nonpoor, minority, and majority households; (2) how to use the existing policy resources and policy innovation to mitigate regressive impacts of petroleum price increases on lower-income households; and (3) how to pursue such policy mitigation through government agencies severely circumscribed by tax and expenditure limitations. Few models attempt to assess household energy consumption and energy expenditure under various alternative price scenarios and with respect to the inclusion of differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. This paper provides a preliminary analysis of the nature and extent of potential impacts of petroleum price changes attributable to the Persian Gulf War and its aftermath on majority, black, and Hispanic households and on overlapping poor and nonpoor households. At the time this was written, the Persian Gulf War had concluded with Iraq`s total surrender to all of the resolutions and demands of the United Nations and United States.

Henderson, L. [Univ. of Baltimore, MD (United States); Poyer, D.; Teotia, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

High Technology and Industrial Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semiconductor clean room Semiconductor clean room High Technology and Industrial Systems EETD's research on high technology buildings and industrial systems is aimed at reducing energy consumed by the industrial sector in manufacturing facilities, including high technology industries such as data centers, cleanrooms in the such industries as electronics and pharmaceutical manufacturing, and laboratories, improving the competitiveness of U.S. industry. Contacts William Tschudi WFTschudi@lbl.gov (510) 495-2417 Aimee McKane ATMcKane@lbl.gov (518) 782-7002 Links High-Performance Buildings for High-Tech Industries Industrial Energy Analysis Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends

338

ENERGY STAR certification for your building | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

certification for your building certification for your building Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager Save energy Find financing Earn recognition 20-percent recognition ENERGY STAR certification How to apply for ENERGY STAR certification Tips for low-cost verifications Submit a profile of your building

339

Design commercial buildings | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Why you should design to earn the ENERGY STAR Follow EPA's step-by-step process ENERGY STAR Challenge for Architects Design commercial buildings Photo of several people congregated around a building design plan. The climate is changing. Commercial buildings in the United States consume 17 percent of the

340

Building Upgrade Manual | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Upgrade Manual Building Upgrade Manual Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Household and environmental characteristics related to household energy-consumption change: A human ecological approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focused on the family household as an organism and on its interaction with the three environments of the human ecosystem (natural, behavioral, and constructed) as these influence energy consumption and energy-consumption change. A secondary statistical analysis of data from the US Department of Energy Residential Energy Consumption Surveys (RECS) was completed. The 1980 and 1983 RECS were used as the data base. Longitudinal data, including household, environmental, and energy-consumption measures, were available for over 800 households. The households were selected from a national sample of owner-occupied housing units surveyed in both years. Results showed a significant( p = household, cooling degree days, heating degree days, year the housing unit was built, and number of stories in the housing unit.

Guerin, D.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings...

343

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Energy Technologies   Transportation   Assessment Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program, Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program, 

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Teams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Teams Teams Building America research projects are completed by industry consortia (teams) comprised of leading experts from across the country. The research teams design, test, upgrade and build high performance homes using strategies that significantly cut energy use. Building America research teams are selected through a competitive process initiated by a request for proposals. Team members are experts in the field of residential building science, and have access to world-class research facilities, partners, and key personnel, ensuring successful progress toward U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goals. This page provides a brief description of the teams, areas of focus, and key team members. Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Alliance for Residential Building Innovation

345

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Activities Building Activities The Department of Energy (DOE) is leading several different activities to develop, demonstrate, and deploy cost-effective solutions to reduce energy consumption across the residential building sector by at least 50%. The U.S. DOE Solar Decathlon is a biennial contest which challenges college teams to design and build energy efficient houses powered by the sun. Each team competes in 10 contests designed to gauge the performance, livability and affordability of their house. The Building America program develops market-ready energy solutions that improve the efficiency of new and existing homes while increasing comfort, safety, and durability. Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals foster the growth of a high quality residential energy upgrade industry and a skilled and credentialed workforce.

346

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: January 8, 1: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on AddThis.com... Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips In a day, the average household traveled 32.7 miles in 2001 (the latest

347

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: October 3, 2: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on AddThis.com... Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership Household vehicle ownership has changed significantly over the last 40

348

Building America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

America: Bringing Building America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market Building America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market INNOVATIONS Advanced technologies and whole-house solutions for saving energy and costs. Read more SOLUTION CENTER Solutions for improving the energy performance and quality of new and existing homes. Read more RESEARCH TOOLS Tools to ensure consistent research results for new and existing homes. Read more MARKET PARTNERSHIPS Resources and partnering opportunities for the U.S. building industry. Read more Learn about how this world-class research program can help the U.S. building industry promote and construct homes that are better for business, homeowners, and the nation. Building America logo The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program has been a

349

City of San Antonio - Green Building Requirement | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

San Antonio - Green Building Requirement City of San Antonio - Green Building Requirement Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings For Heating...

350

Building the Intelligent City - Integrating Mobility and Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems...

351

LBNL Building 90 Monitoring: Status Update and New Energy Information...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings...

352

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Commercial Building Ventilation and Indoor Environmental Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

353

Design for Energy Efficiency in Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the thermal design and heating design of an energy saving residential building in Beijing where the owners lived until 2004. Results show the advantages and disadvantages of a household-based heating mode by natural gas. Based on the quantity of natural gas by field tests in 2005, we conclude that thermal design influences heating design calculations.

Song, M.; Zhang, Y.; Yang, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Table 2. Number of U.S. Housing Units by Census Region and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Residential Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 2. Number of U.S. ...

355

Data Collection Forms - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Buildings & Industry > Residential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey ... Household Fuel Oil Usage EIA ... Specific questions on this product ...

356

Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industries Industry Bricks Cement Lime Plate Glass CeramicsIndustry furnaces for household glass, enamel, and ceramicsindustry waste heat from blast furnaces is used to dry primary ceramic and

Zhiping, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Model documentation: household model of energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Household Model of Energy is an econometric model, meaning that energy use is determined quantitatively with the use of economic variables such as fuel prices and income. HOME is also primarily a structural model, meaning that energy use is determined as the result of interactions of intermediate components such as the number of households, the end use fuel shares and the energy use per household. HOME forecasts energy consumption in all occupied residential structures (households) in the United States on an annual basis through 1990. The forecasts are made based upon a number of initial conditions in 1980, various estimated elasticities, various parameters and assumptions, and a set of forecasted fuel prices and income. In addition to the structural detail, HOME operates on a more disaggregated level. This includes four end-use services (space heating, water heating, air conditioning, and others), up to seven fuel/technology types (dependent upon the end use service), two housing types, four structure vintages, and four Census regions. When the model is run as a module in IFFS, a sharing scheme further disaggregates the model to 10 Federal regions.

Holte, J.A.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Operation Redwing. Project 3. 1. Effect of length of positive phase of blast on drag-type and semidrag-time industrial buildings  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the project was to obtain information regarding the effect of the length of the positive phase of blast on the response of drag and semidrag structures. A total of six steel-frame buildings were tested during this operation. The structure of each type nearest ground zero was located such that if the yield of the weapon was near the lower limit of its predicted range, it would probably undergo considerable inelastic deformation. Conversely, those structures farthest from ground zero were located such that if the yield of the nuclear device was near the upper limit of its predicted range, they would be substantially deformed, but would not collapse. The third building of each type was located at an intermediate point between these two extremes. Instrumentation was provided to obtain records of the transient structural deflections, strains, and accelerations, as well as of overpressure and dynamic pressure versus time at the sites of the various test structures.

Sinnamon, G.K.; Haltiwanger, J.D.; Newmark, N.M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: February 5, 5: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on AddThis.com... Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles The graphs below show the average vehicle miles of travel (VMT) - daily

360

Competition Helps Kids Learn About Energy and Save Their Households...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competition Helps Kids Learn About Energy and Save Their Households Some Money Competition Helps Kids Learn About Energy and Save Their Households Some Money May 21, 2013 - 2:40pm...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: January 22, 3: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on AddThis.com... Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership

362

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #259: March 17, 2003 Household...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9: March 17, 2003 Household Travel by Gender to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 259: March 17, 2003 Household Travel by Gender on Facebook Tweet about...

363

Essays on household decision making in developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation contains three essays on household decision making in the areas of education and health in developing countries. The first chapter explores intra-household decision making in the context of conditional ...

Berry, James W. (James Wesley)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler...

365

ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY NATIONAL AWARENESS OF ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY NATIONAL AWARENESS OF ENERGY STAR ® FOR 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements .................................................................................. ii Executive Summary ............................................................................ ES-1 Introduction ............................................................................................... 1 Methodology Overview ............................................................................. 2 Key Findings ............................................................................................. 5 Recognition .................................................................................................................. 5 Understanding ........................................................................................................... 12

366

Building Technologies Office | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office and You Working together to empower energy efficiency where you live, work, and play. Building Technologies Office and You Working together to empower energy efficiency where you live, work, and play. About the Building Technologies Office The Energy Department's Building Technologies Office leads a network of research and industry partners to continually develop innovative, cost-effective energy-saving solutions for homes and buildings. Learn more about the Building Technologies Office. How We Help Homes & Buildings Save Energy Value-Driven Applications Advanced energy efficiency technologies like lighting, HVAC, windows, appliances, and commercial equipment. Practical Standards

367

Household energy and consumption and expenditures, 1990. Supplement, Regional  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this supplement to the Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990 report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential housing units, specifically at the four Census regions and nine Census division levels. This report includes household energy consumption, expenditures, and prices for natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and kerosene as well as household wood consumption. For national-level data, see the main report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990.

Not Available

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

368

ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager Save energy Stamp out energy waste Find cost-effective investments Engage occupants Purchase energy-saving products Put computers to sleep Get help from an expert Take a comprehensive approach

369

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Jose  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

San Jose to San Jose to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Jose on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Jose on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Jose on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Jose on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Jose on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: San Jose on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY NC | OH | OR | PA | SC TN | TX | VT | VI | VA WA | WI San Jose, California San Jose Leverages Partnerships to Improve Low-Income Households' Energy

370

Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge Challenge Photo of the Atlanta skyline on a sunny day, including the gold dome of the state capitol. The City of Atlanta has committed 16 million square feet of public and private space to substantive upgrades as part of the Better Buildings Challenge. Credit: iStockphoto The Better Buildings Challenge is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Better Buildings Initiative, which aims to make U.S. commercial and industrial buildings at least 20% more efficient during the next decade. To achieve this aggressive target, DOE is working with public and private sector partners that commit to being leaders in energy efficiency. These partners will implement energy savings practices that improve energy efficiency and save money, and will showcase effective strategies and the results of their efforts.

371

Building Energy Modeling Library  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling (BEM) Modeling (BEM) Library TDM - Amir Roth Ellen Franconi Rocky Mountain Institute Efranconi@rmi.org 303-567-8609 April 2, 2013 Photo by : Dennis Schroeder, NREL 23250 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Project Overview Building Energy Modeling (BEM) Library * Define and develop a best-practices BEM knowledge repository to improve modeling consistency and address training gaps * Raise energy modeling industry "techniques" to the same

372

Household carbon dioxide production in relation to the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

A survey of 655 households from eastern suburbs of Melbourne was undertaken to determine householders[prime] attitudes to, and understanding of, the greenhouse effect. Carbon dioxide emissions resulting from car, electricity and gas use were computed and household actions which could reduce CO[sub 2] emissions were addressed. Preliminary analysis of the results indicates that householders in this area are aware of, and concerned about, the greenhouse effect, although their understanding of its causes is often poor. Many appreciate the contribution of cars, but are unclear about the relative importance of other household activities. Carbon dioxide emissions from the three sources examined averaged 21[center dot]2 tonnes/year per household and 7[center dot]4 tonnes/year per person. Electricity was the largest contributor (8[center dot]6 tonnes/year), cars the next largest (7[center dot]7 tonnes/year) and gas third (5[center dot] tonnes/year) per household. Emissions varied considerably from household to household. There was a strong positive correlation between availability of economic resources and household CO[sub 2] output from all sources. Carbon dioxide production, particularly from car use, was greater from households which were most distant from a railway station, and from larger households, and numbers of children in the household had little effect on emissions. There were also some economics of scale for households containing more adults. Understanding the causes of the greenhouse bore little relation to change in CO[sub 2] emissions; being concerned about it was associated with a small reduction; but actual actions to reduce car use and household heating, however motivated, produced significant reductions. 12 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Stokes, D.; Lindsay, A.; Marinopoulos, J.; Treloar, A.; Wescott, G. (Deakin Univ., Clayton (Australia))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiency of Household Appliances in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency of Household Appliances in China Jiang Lin8 Appliance Market inEfficiency of Household Appliances in China Executive

Lin, Jiang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities on Delicious...

375

Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database on Delicious...

376

ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings College Course: Week 4 Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program...

377

ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings College Course | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program...

378

ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings College Course: About the Course...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program...

379

ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings College Course: Week 3 Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program...

380

Tips for effective energy analysis of commercial building designs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures 1.3 Value of Construction and Research 1.4 Environmental Data 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison 1.6 Embodied Energy of Building Assemblies 2The Residential Sector 3Commercial Sector 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 1 provides an overview of energy use in the U.S. buildings sector, which includes single- and multi-family residences and commercial buildings. Commercial buildings include offices, stores, restaurants, warehouses, other buildings used for commercial purposes, and government buildings. Section 1.1 presents data on primary energy consumption, as well as energy consumption by end use. Section 1.2 focuses on energy and fuel expenditures in U.S. buildings. Section 1.3 provides estimates of construction spending, R&D, and construction industry employment. Section 1.4 covers emissions from energy use in buildings, construction waste, and other environmental impacts. Section 1.5 discusses key measures used throughout the Data Book, such as a quad, primary versus delivered energy, and carbon emissions. Section 1.6 provides estimates of embodied energy for various commercial building assemblies. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

382

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

383

Around Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Around Buildings W h y startw i t h buildings and w o r k o u t wa r d ? For one, buildings are difficult t o a v o i d these

Treib, Marc

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Strategic Energy Management Through Optimizing the Energy Performance of Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1/12/2007 Strategic Energy Management Through Optimizing the Energy Performance of Buildings Oak ambitious federal energy goals and achieve energy independence. The energy engineers, building equipment Buildings and Industrial Energy Efficiency areas has engendered a unique, comprehensive capability

385

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 83.8 66.1 142.2 130 60 102.3 37 1,309 0.61 1,033 377 Census Region and Division Northeast 18.0 12.5 34.4 175 64 121.7 44 1,942 0.71 1,353 490 New England 4.2 3.0 9.1 173 56 121.9 43 1,991 0.65 1,402 498 Middle Atlantic 13.7 9.5 25.2 175 66 121.7 44 1,926 0.73 1,338 487

386

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 94.0 74.2 169.2 124 54 98.1 38 1,485 0.65 1,172 450 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.2 13.9 40.3 165 57 119.6 45 2,038 0.70 1,471 556 New England 4.5 3.2 9.3 164 56 113.9 45 2,028 0.69 1,408 562 Middle Atlantic 14.7 10.7 31.1 166 57 121.3 45 2,041 0.70 1,491 555

387

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space(2) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 101.5 83.2 168.8 123 61 101.0 39 1,633 0.80 1,338 517 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.7 15.1 34.6 158 69 121.0 48 2,153 0.94 1,644 658 New England 5.3 4.2 9.3 156 70 123.0 48 2,085 0.94 1,647 648 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.9 25.3 159 68 120.0 48 2,179 0.94 1,643 662

388

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 107.0 85.2 211.3 116 47 92.2 36 1,875 0.76 1,493 583 Census Region and Division Northeast 20.3 14.1 43.7 153 49 106.6 44 2,501 0.81 1,741 715 New England 5.4 4.1 13.2 152 47 115.3 48 2,403 0.75 1,825 768 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.0 30.5 154 50 103.4 42 2,541 0.83 1,710 696

389

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 96.6 76.5 181.2 131 55 103.6 40 1,620 0.68 1,282 491 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.5 13.8 40.1 173 60 122.4 47 2,157 0.74 1,526 583 New England 5.1 3.7 10.6 168 59 123.1 48 2,094 0.73 1,532 598 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.1 29.4 175 60 122.1 46 2,180 0.75 1,523 578

390

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 86.3 67.5 144.4 134 63 104.7 39 1,437 0.67 1,123 417 Census Region and Division Northeast 18.3 13.0 35.0 176 65 125.2 46 2,033 0.75 1,443 533 New England 4.3 3.1 9.0 174 61 127.6 46 2,010 0.70 1,471 527 Middle Atlantic 14.0 9.9 26.0 177 67 124.5 46 2,040 0.77 1,435 535

391

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 90.5 70.4 156.8 130 58 100.8 39 1,388 0.62 1,080 416 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.0 13.2 36.8 179 64 124.4 48 1,836 0.66 1,276 494 New England 4.3 3.0 8.4 174 61 121.0 47 1,753 0.62 1,222 475 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.3 28.4 181 65 125.4 48 1,860 0.67 1,292 499

392

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (millionBtu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 83.1 66.1 144.2 141 64 111.7 40 1,256 0.58 998 356 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.9 12.1 35.1 194 67 131.6 46 2,016 0.70 1,365 475 New England 4.3 2.9 8.3 181 63 123.9 44 2,018 0.71 1,384 492 Middle Atlantic 13.7 9.2 26.7 199 68 134.0 46 2,016 0.69 1,359 470

393

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per per per per Total Total Floorspace per Square per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion Building Foot Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 81.6 65.4 142.5 143 65 114.1 41 1,156 0.53 926 330 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.7 12.3 34.8 199 70 138.3 49 1,874 0.66 1,301 459 New England 4.3 2.9 8.9 197 65 134.4 47 1,964 0.65 1,341 466 Middle Atlantic 13.4 9.3 26.0 200 72 139.5 49 1,846 0.66 1,288 456

394

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 94.0 74.2 169.2 124 54 98.1 38 1,485 0.65 1,172 450 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.2 13.9 40.3 165 57 119.6 45 2,034 0.70 1,471 556 New England 4.5 3.2 9.3 164 56 113.9 45 2,023 0.69 1,408 562 Middle Atlantic 14.7 10.7 31.1 166 57 121.3 45 2,037 0.70 1,491 555

395

BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation City of Redwood City 1017 Middlefield Sacramento, Ca 95814-5514 Re: Green Building Ordinance and the Building Energy Efficiency Standards Per of Redwood City enforce the current Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards as part

396

The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by electric and hybrid vehicles", SAE Technical Papers No.household response to hybrid vehicles. Finally, we suggestas electric or hybrid vehicles. Transitions in choices of

Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Virtual building environments (VBE) - Applying information modeling to buildings  

SciTech Connect

A Virtual Building Environment (VBE) is a ''place'' where building industry project staffs can get help in creating Building Information Models (BIM) and in the use of virtual buildings. It consists of a group of industry software that is operated by industry experts who are also experts in the use of that software. The purpose of a VBE is to facilitate expert use of appropriate software applications in conjunction with each other to efficiently support multidisciplinary work. This paper defines BIM and virtual buildings, and describes VBE objectives, set-up and characteristics of operation. It informs about the VBE Initiative and the benefits from a couple of early VBE projects.

Bazjanac, Vladimir

2004-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

398

Building Science Education | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Buildings » Building America » Building Science Residential Buildings » Building America » Building Science Education Building Science Education The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program recognizes that the education of future design/construction industry professionals in solid building science principles is critical to widespread development of high performance homes that are energy efficient, healthy, and durable. In November 2012, DOE met with leaders in the building science community to develop a strategic Building Science Education Roadmap that will chart a path for training skilled professionals who apply proven innovations and recognize the value of high performance homes. The roadmap aims to: Increase awareness of high performance home benefits Build a solid infrastructure for delivering building science

399

Building Technologies Office: Technology Research, Standards...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

buildings in a cost-effective manner. By working with teams of researchers, industry, and organizations, DOE has developed innovative solutions to helping the United...

400

Building Energy Efficiency Success Stories - Energy Innovation ...  

Building Energy Efficiency Success Stories These success stories highlight some of the effective licensing and partnership activity between laboratories and industry ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Snapshot (Spring 2013) | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snapshot (Spring 2013) Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial...

402

NREL: Energy Analysis - Building Technologies Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy efficiency, working closely with the building industry and manufacturers; promotes energy and money-saving opportunities to builders and consumers; and works with state and...

403

Education Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Education Education Characteristics by Activity... Education Education buildings are buildings used for academic or technical classroom instruction, such as elementary, middle, or high schools, and classroom buildings on college or university campuses. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Education Buildings... Seventy percent of education buildings were part of a multibuilding campus. Education buildings in the South and West were smaller, on average, than those in the Northeast and Midwest. Almost two-thirds of education buildings were government owned, and of these, over three-fourths were owned by a local government. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

404

Lodging Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a nursing home, assisted living center, or other residential care building a half-way house some other type of lodging Lodging Buildings by Subcategory Figure showing lodging...

405

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior glass windows of office tower Commercial Buildings Commercial building systems research explores different ways to integrate the efforts of research in windows, lighting,...

406

EERE: Buildings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Commercial Building Initiative works with commercial builders and owners to reduce energy use and optimize building performance, comfort, and savings. Solid-State Lighting...

407

The Relation between Lean Construction and Performance in the Korean Construction Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report 234-11, Construction Industry Institute, UniversityDepartment of Trade and Industry, London, UK. Retrieved MayBuilding a world class industry: Motivators and Enabler.

Cho, Seongkyun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Building Technologies Office: Building America Market Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market Partnerships Market Partnerships This photo shows two men silhouetted against a sky shaking hands, with the frame of a building under construction in the background. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) offers partnership opportunities, educational curricula, meetings, and webinars that help industry professionals bring research results to the market. DOE Challenge Home Through the DOE Challenge Home, the Building Technologies Office offers recognition to leading edge builders meeting extraordinary levels of excellence. Builders taking the challenge gain competitive advantage in the marketplace by providing their customers with unparalleled energy savings, quality, comfort, health, durability, and much more. Learn more about the DOE Challenge Home. ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3

409

Poultry Industry: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Industry Brief provides an overview of the U.S. poultry industry and ways in which electric-powered processes and technologies can be used in poultry and egg production and processing. The poultry industry, which consists of poultry production for meat as well as egg production and processing, is one of the fastest growing segments of the U.S. food manufacturing industry. It is also an energy-intensive industry. In fact, a 2010 report by the USDA illustrates ...

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

410

Building Technologies Office: Building America's Top Innovations Advance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

America's Top Innovations Advance High Performance Homes America's Top Innovations Advance High Performance Homes Building America Top Innovations. Recognizing top innovations in building science. Innovations sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program and its teams of building science experts continue to have a transforming impact, leading our nation's home building industry to high-performance homes. Building America researchers have worked directly with more than 300 U.S. production home builders and have boosted the performance of more than 42,000 new homes. Learn more about Building America Top Innovations. 2013 Top Innovations New Top Innovations are awarded annually for outstanding Building America research achievements. Learn more about the 2013 Top Innovations recently awarded by selecting a category or award recipient below.

411

Building Energy Codes ENFORCEMENT TOOLKIT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENFORCEMENT TOOLKIT ENFORCEMENT TOOLKIT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Building Energy Codes ACE LEARNING SERIES i Building Energy Codes ENFORCEMENT TOOLKIT Prepared by: Building Energy Codes Program The U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Codes Program is an information resource on energy codes and standards for buildings. They work with other government agencies, state and local jurisdictions, organizations that develop model codes and standards, and building industry to promote codes that will provide for energy and environmental benefits and help foster adoption of, compliance with, and enforcement of those codes. September 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 PNNL-SA-90467 LEARNING SERIES OVERVIEW Building Energy Codes ACE

412

Building Energy Codes COMPLIANCE TOOLKIT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COMPLIANCE TOOLKIT COMPLIANCE TOOLKIT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Building Energy Codes ACE LEARNING SERIES III Building Energy Codes COMPLIANCE TOOLKIT Prepared by: Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) is an information resource on energy codes and standards for buildings. They work with other government agencies, state and local jurisdictions, organizations that develop model codes and standards, and building industry to promote codes that will provide for energy and environmental benefits and help foster adoption of, compliance with, and enforcement of those codes. September 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 PNNL-SA-90466 LEARNING SERIES OVERVIEW Building Energy Codes

413

Building Energy Codes ADOPTION TOOLKIT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ADOPTION TOOLKIT ADOPTION TOOLKIT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Building Energy Codes ACE LEARNING SERIES I Building Energy Codes ADOPTION TOOLKIT Prepared by: Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) is an information resource on energy codes and standards for buildings. They work with other government agencies, state and local jurisdictions, organizations that develop model codes and standards, and building industry to promote codes that will provide for energy and environmental benefits and help foster adoption of, compliance with, and enforcement of those codes. September 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 PNNL-SA-89963 LEARNING SERIES OVERVIEW Building Energy Codes

414

Commercial Building Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Activities Building Activities Commercial Building Activities The Building Technologies Office commercial buildings effort researches and deploys advanced technologies and systems to reduce energy consumption in commercial buildings. Industry partners and national laboratories help identify market needs and solutions to accelerate the development of highly energy-efficient buildings. This page outlines some of BTO's key projects. 179d Tax Calculator The 179d Calculator can help determine whether improvements qualify for a Federal tax deduction, and allows owners and managers to estimate energy cost savings of efficiency improvements. Advanced Energy Design Guides These recommendations can help designers achieve between 30% and 50% energy savings in a new commercial building.

415

Semantic Building Blocks for 21st Century Building Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semantic Building Blocks for 21st Century Building Engineering Semantic Building Blocks for 21st Century Building Engineering Speaker(s): Mark Palmer Date: October 2, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The Building and Fire Research Laboratory (BFRL) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) works to advance innovation and competitiveness of the U.S. building and fire safety industries. This presentation will introduce some of the work at BFRL to improve the design, construction and operation of the built environment and to advance the semantic infrastructure for integrated project design and delivery. With this context established, the presentation will examine research challenges and next steps for developing reference information models, industry data dictionaries and rule libraries for multidisciplinary collaboration to

416

Buildings Performance Database Helps Building Owners, Investors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Performance Database Helps Building Owners, Investors Evaluate Energy Efficient Buildings Buildings Performance Database June 2013 A new database of building features and...

417

Building Technologies Office: Buildings NewsDetail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NewsDetail on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings NewsDetail on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings NewsDetail on Delicious Rank Building...

418

Find ENERGY STAR certified buildings and plants | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» Buildings & Plants » Buildings & Plants » About us » Find ENERGY STAR certified buildings and plants Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Find out who's partnered with ENERGY STAR Become an ENERGY STAR partner Find ENERGY STAR certified buildings and plants Registry of ENERGY STAR certified buildings and plants

419

Improve energy use in commercial buildings | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improve energy use in commercial buildings Improve energy use in commercial buildings Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Build an energy program Improve building and plant performance Improve energy use in commercial buildings Find guidance for energy-efficient design projects Manage energy use in manufacturing Develop programs and policies

420

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

building sector by at least 50%. Photo of people walking around a new home. Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Better Buildings Challenge | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings » Better Buildings Challenge Commercial Buildings » Better Buildings Challenge Better Buildings Challenge Photo of the Atlanta skyline on a sunny day, including the gold dome of the state capitol. The Better Buildings Challenge is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Better Buildings Initiative, which aims to make U.S. commercial and industrial buildings at least 20% more efficient during the next decade. To achieve this aggressive target, DOE is working with public and private sector partners that commit to being leaders in energy efficiency. These partners will implement energy savings practices that improve energy efficiency and save money, and will showcase effective strategies and the results of their efforts. The Better Buildings Challenge supports commercial and industrial building

422

Industrial Demand Module (IDM) - 2002 EIA Models Directory  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Industrial Demand Module incorporates three components: buildings; process and assembly; and boiler, steam, and cogeneration. Last Model Update:

423

Building Technologies Residential Survey  

SciTech Connect

Introduction A telephone survey of 1,025 residential occupants was administered in late October for the Building Technologies Program (BT) to gather information on residential occupant attitudes, behaviors, knowledge, and perceptions. The next section, Survey Results, provides an overview of the responses, with major implications and caveats. Additional information is provided in three appendices as follows: - Appendix A -- Summary Response: Provides summary tabular data for the 13 questions that, with subparts, comprise a total of 25 questions. - Appendix B -- Benchmark Data: Provides a benchmark by six categories to the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey administered by EIA. These were ownership, heating fuel, geographic location, race, household size and income. - Appendix C -- Background on Survey Method: Provides the reader with an understanding of the survey process and interpretation of the results.

Secrest, Thomas J.

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

424

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F (2001) -- Household Natural Gas Usage Form F (2001) -- Household Natural Gas Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Natural Gas Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

425

Towards sustainable household energy use in the Netherlands, Int  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Households consume direct energy, using natural gas, heating oil, gasoline and electricity, and consume indirect energy, the energy related to the production of goods and the delivery of services for the households. Past trends and present-day household energy use (direct and indirect) are analysed and described. A comparison of these findings with objectives concerning ecological sustainability demonstrates that present-day household energy use is not sustainable. A scenario towards sustainable household energy use is designed containing far-reaching measures with regard to direct energy use. Scenario evaluation shows a substantial reduction of direct energy use; however, this is not enough to meet the sustainability objectiv es. Based on these results, the possibilities and the limitations are discussed to enable households to make their direct and indirect energy use sustainable on the long run.

Jack Van Der Wal; Henri C. Moll

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E (2001) - Household Electricity Usage Form E (2001) - Household Electricity Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Electricity Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

427

Building Energy Use Benchmarking Guidance | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use Benchmarking Guidance Use Benchmarking Guidance Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

428

Improving the Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Commercial Buildings Improving the Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings Engaging Industry Leaders to Deploy Energy Saving Tools, Technologies and Best Practices Learn More Engaging Industry Leaders to Deploy Energy Saving Tools, Technologies and Best Practices Learn More The Building Technologies Office (BTO) works with the commercial building industry to accelerate the uptake of energy efficiency technologies and techniques in both existing and new commercial buildings. By developing, demonstrating, and deploying cost-effective solutions, BTO strives to reduce energy consumption across the commercial building sector by at least 1,600 TBtu. Key Tools and Resources Use the guides, case studies, and other tools developed by the DOE

429

Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Service Service buildings are those in which some type of service is provided, other than food service or retail sales of goods. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Service Buildings... Most service buildings were small, with almost ninety percent between 1,001 and 10,000 square feet. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Category Figure showing number of service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Service Buildings

430

Industrial service and product providers | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify...

431

A Reliable Natural Language Interface to Household Appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

“I have always wished that my computer would be as easy to use as my telephone. My wish has come true. I no longer know how to use my telephone.” – Bjarne Stroustrop (originator of C++) As household appliances grow in complexity and sophistication, they become harder and harder to use, particularly because of their tiny display screens and limited keyboards. This paper describes a strategy for building natural language interfaces to appliances that circumvents these problems. Our approach leverages decades of research on planning and natural language interfaces to databases by reducing the appliance problem to the database problem; the reduction provably maintains desirable properties of the database interface. The paper goes on to describe the implementation and evaluation of the EXACT interface to appliances, which is based on this reduction. EXACT maps each English user request to an SQL query, which is transformed to create a PDDL goal, and uses the Blackbox planner [13] to map the planning problem to a sequence of appliance commands that satisfy the original request. Both theoretical arguments and experimental evaluation show that EXACT is highly reliable.

Alexander Yates

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Mercantile Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mercantile Mercantile Characteristics by Activity... Mercantile Mercantile buildings are those used for the sale and display of goods other than food (buildings used for the sales of food are classified as food sales). This category includes enclosed malls and strip shopping centers. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Mercantile Buildings... Almost half of all mercantile buildings were less than 5,000 square feet. Roughly two-thirds of mercantile buildings housed only one establishment. Another 20 percent housed between two and five establishments, and the remaining 12 percent housed six or more establishments. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

433

A Model of Household Demand for Activity Participation and Mobility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

household car ownership, car usage, and travel by differentownership demand, and car usage demand. Modal travel demand,mode), car ownership, and car usage for spatial aggregations

Golob, Thomas F.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Crime and the Nation’s Households, 2000 By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experienced 1 or more violent or property crimes in 2000, according to data from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). About 4.3 million households had members who experienced 1 or more nonfatal violent crimes, including rape, sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated or simple assault. About 14.8 million households experienced 1 or more property crimes — household burglary, motor vehicle theft, or theft. Vandalism, presented for the first time in a Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) report, victimized about 6.1 million households. The households that sustained vandalism were counted separately from those experiencing other crimes. Because vandalism is included for the first time, findings are presented in a box on page 4. Beginning in 2001, NCVS victimizations will be measured both with and without vandalism. Measuring the extent to which households are victimized by crime One measure of the impact of crime throughout the Nation is gained through estimating the number and percentage of households victimized Highlights During 2000, 16 % of U.S. households had a member who experienced a crime, with 4 % having a member victimized by violent crime. During 1994, 25 % of households experienced at least one crime; 7 % a violent crime.

Patsy A. Klaus

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Barriers to household investment in residential energy conservation: preliminary assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general assessment of the range of barriers which impede household investments in weatherization and other energy efficiency improvements for their homes is provided. The relationship of similar factors to households' interest in receiving a free energy audits examined. Rates of return that underly household investments in major conservation improvements are assessed. A special analysis of household knowledge of economically attractive investments is provided that compares high payback improvements specified by the energy audit with the list of needed or desirable conservation improvements identified by respondents. (LEW)

Hoffman, W.L.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Household Responses to the Financial Crisis in Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on farm households in Indonesia and Thailand,” World Bank20. Cameron, Lisa. (1999). “Indonesia: a quarterly review,”The Real Costs of Indonesia's Economic Crisis: Preliminary

Thomas, Duncan; Frankenberg, Elizabeth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Bottled ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Form EIA-457D (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

438

SUPPLEMENTAL ENERGY-RELATED DATA FOR THE 2001 NATIONAL HOUSEHOLD ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... vehicle manufacturer, vehicle model, vehicle model year, and vehicle type – several ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION/2001 NATIONAL HOUSEHOLD TRAVEL SURVEY K-23 ...

439

Essays on the effects of demographics on household consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??My dissertation analyses the relationship between households' consumption behavior and changes in family demographic characteristics. The first paper studies consumption over the period of the… (more)

Stepanova, Ekaterina, 1977-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Table 1. Household Characteristics by Ceiling Fans, 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A reporting of the number of housing units using ceiling fans in U.S. households as reported in the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

U.S. households are incorporating energy–efficient features ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... area of increased efficiency: about 60% of households use at least some energy-efficient compact fluorescent (CFL) or light-emitting diode (LED) ...

442

Analysis of the energy requirement for household consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Humans in households use energy for their activities. This use is both direct, for example electricity and natural gas, but also indirect, for the production,… (more)

Vringer, Kees

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Householder's Perceptions of Insulation Adequacy and Drafts in the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The 2001 RECS was the first RECS to request household perceptions regarding the presence of winter drafts in the home. The data presented in this report ...

444

Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Form EIA-457E (2001) – Household Electricity Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

445

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Community Partners reEnergize  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Community Community Partners reEnergize Industry in Nebraska to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Community Partners reEnergize Industry in Nebraska on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Community Partners reEnergize Industry in Nebraska on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Community Partners reEnergize Industry in Nebraska on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Community Partners reEnergize Industry in Nebraska on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Community Partners reEnergize Industry in Nebraska on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Community Partners reEnergize Industry in Nebraska on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network

446

Upgrade energy building standards and develop rating system for existing low-income housing  

SciTech Connect

The city of Memphis Division of Housing and Community Development (HCD) receives grant funding each year from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to provide local housing assistance to low-income residents. Through the years, HCD has found that many of the program recipients have had difficulty in managing their households, particularly in meeting monthly financial obligations. One of the major operating costs to low-income households is the utility bill. Furthermore, HCD`s experience has revealed that many low-income residents are simply unaware of ways to reduce their utility bill. Most of the HCD funds are distributed to low-income persons as grants or no/low interest loans for the construction or rehabilitation of single-family dwellings. With these funds, HCD builds 80 to 100 new houses and renovates about 500 homes each year. Houses constructed or renovated by HCD must meet HUD`s minimum energy efficiency standards. While these minimum standards are more than adequate to meet local building codes, they are not as aggressive as the energy efficiency standards being promoted by the national utility organizations and the home building industry. Memphis Light, Gas and Water (MLGW), a city-owned utility, has developed an award-winning program named Comfort Plus which promotes energy efficiency{open_quote} in new residential construction. Under Comfort Plus, MLGW models house plans on computer for a fee and recommends cost-effective alterations which improve the energy efficiency of the house. If the builder agrees to include these recommendations, MLGW will certify the house and guarantee a maximum annual heating/cooling bill for two years. While the Comfort Plus program has received recognition in the new construction market, it does not address the existing housing stock.

Muller, D.; Norville, C. [Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report is the third in the series of reports presenting data from the 1987 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The 1987 RECS, seventh in a series of national surveys of households and their energy suppliers, provides baseline information on household energy use in the United States. Data from the seven RECS and its companion survey, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), are made available to the public in published reports such as this one, and on public use data files. This report presents data for the four Census regions and nine Census divisions on the consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil and kerosene (as a single category), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Data are also presented on consumption of wood at the Census region level. The emphasis in this report is on graphic depiction of the data. Data from previous RECS surveys are provided in the graphics, which indicate the regional trends in consumption, expenditures, and uses of energy. These graphs present data for the United States and each Census division. 12 figs., 71 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

448

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes and Standards Codes and Standards Photo of two inspectors looking at a clipboard on a commercial building site with the steel frame of a commercial building in the background. Local code officials enforce building energy codes. Credit: iStockphoto Once an energy-efficient technology or practice is widely available in the market, it can become the baseline of performance through building energy codes and equipment standards. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) provides support to states and local governments as they adopt and monitor commercial building code as well as builders working to meet and exceed code. BTO also develops test procedures and minimum efficiency standards for commercial equipment. Building Energy Codes DOE encourages using new technologies and better building practices to improve energy efficiency. Mandating building energy efficiency by including it in state and local codes is an effective strategy for achieving that goal. The Building Energy Codes Program works with the International Code Council (ICC), American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA), American Institute of Architects (AIA), the building industry, and state and local officials to develop and promote more stringent and easy-to-understand building energy codes and to assess potential code barriers to new energy-efficient technologies.

449

Building Technology and Urban Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office building exterior and infrared thermograph Office building exterior and infrared thermograph Building Technology and Urban Systems Building Technology and Urban Systems application/pdf icon btus-org-chart-03-2013.pdf In the areas of Building Technology and Urban Systems, EETD researchers conduct R&D and develop physical and information technologies to make buildings and urban areas more energy- and resource-efficient. These technologies create jobs and products for the marketplace in clean technology industries. They improve quality of life, and reduce the emissions of pollutants, including climate-altering greenhouse gases. BTUSD's goal is to provide the technologies needed to operate buildings at 50 to 70 percent less energy use than average today. BTUS develops, demonstrates and deploys: Information technologies for the real-time monitoring and control of

450

Building Technologies Program Planning Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Technologies Program Planning Summary Building Technologies Program Planning Summary Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Technologies Program (BTP) works in partnership with industry, state, municipal, and other federal organizations to achieve the goals of marketable net-zero energy buildings. Such buildings are extremely energy efficient, ideally producing as much energy as they use over the course of a year. BTP also works with stakeholders and federal partners to meet any remaining energy needs for their buildings through on-site renewable energy systems. Drivers Population growth and economic expansion, along with an accompanying increase in energy demand, are expected to drive energy consumption in buildings to more than 50 quadrillion Btu (quads)

451

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1258,1999,282,63 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,699,955,171,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,233,409,58,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,211,372,32,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,225,63,140,8,9

452

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Other a" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1766,2165,360,65,372,113 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,888,1013,196,"Q",243,72 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,349,450,86,"Q",72,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,311,409,46,18,38,"Q"

453

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3472,1910,1445,94,27,128 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,1715,1020,617,41,"N",66 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,725,386,307,"Q","Q",27 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,607,301,285,16,"Q",27

454

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Photo of NREL senior engineer Eric Kozubal examining a prototype airflow channel of the desiccant enhanced evaporative (DEVap) air conditioner with a graph superimposed on the photo that shows how hot humid air, in red, changes to cool dry air, in blue, as the air passes through the DEVap core. National Renewable Energy Laboratory senior engineer Eric Kozubal examines a prototype airflow channel of the desiccant enhanced evaporative (DEVap) air conditioner, an example of the advanced technology research the Building Technologies Office supports. The superimposed graph shows hot humid air (red) changing to cool dry air (blue) as the air passes through the DEVap core. Credit: Pat Corkery, NREL PIX 17437 The Building Technologies Office (BTO) researches advanced technologies, systems, tools, and strategies to improve the energy performance of commercial buildings. Industry partners and national laboratories help identify market needs and solutions that accelerate the development of highly energy-efficient buildings. This page outlines some of BTO's principal research projects. For more BTO research results, visit the Commercial Buildings Resource Database.

455

U.S. Department of Energy Commercial Reference Building Models of the National Building Stock  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Program has set the aggressive goal of producing marketable net-zero energy buildings by 2025. This goal will require collaboration between the DOE laboratories and the building industry. We developed standard or reference energy models for the most common commercial buildings to serve as starting points for energy efficiency research. These models represent fairly realistic buildings and typical construction practices. Fifteen commercial building types and one multifamily residential building were determined by consensus between DOE, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and represent approximately two-thirds of the commercial building stock.

Deru, M.; Field, K.; Studer, D.; Benne, K.; Griffith, B.; Torcellini, P.; Liu, B.; Halverson, M.; Winiarski, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Yazdanian, M.; Huang, J.; Crawley, D.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

BuildingPI: A future tool for building life cycle analysis  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally building simulation models are used at the design phase of a building project. These models are used to optimize various design alternatives, reduce energy consumption and cost. Building performance assessment for the operational phase of a buildings life cycle is sporadic, typically working from historical metered data and focusing on bulk energy assessment. Building Management Systems (BMS) do not explicitly incorporate feedback to the design phase or account for any changes, which have been made to building layout or fabric during construction. This paper discusses a proposal to develop an Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) compliant data visualization tool Building Performance Indicator (BuildingPI) for performance metric and performance effectiveness ratio evaluation.

O' Donnell, James; Morrissey, Elmer; Keane, Marcus; Bazjanac,Vladimir

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

457

Model of home heating and calculation of rates of return to household energy conservation investment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study attempts to find out if households' investments on energy conservation yield expected returns. It first builds a home-heating regression model, then uses the results of the model to calculate the rates of return for households' investments on the energy conservation. The home heating model includes housing characteristics, economic and demographic variables, appliance related variables, and regional dummy variables. Housing characteristic variables are modeled according to the specific physical relationship between the house and its heating requirement. Data from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) of 1980-1981 is used for the empirical testing of the model. The model is estimated for single-detached family houses separately for three major home-heating fuel types: electricity, natural gas and fuel oil. Four scenarios are used to calculate rates of return for each household. The results show in the Northern areas the rates of return in most of the cases are a lot higher than market interest rates. In the Western and Southern areas, with few exceptions, the rates of return are lower than market interest rates. The variation of heating degree days and energy prices can affect the rates of return up to 20 percentage points.

Hsueh, L.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Vacant Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of 275 thousand cubic feet per building, 29.9 cubic feet per square foot, at an average cost of 475 per thousand cubic feet. Energy Consumption in Vacant Buildings by Energy...

459

Building America  

SciTech Connect

IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

Brad Oberg

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

Advancing Building Energy Codes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Advancing Building Energy Codes Advancing Building Energy Codes 75% of U.S. buildings will be new or renovated by 2035. Building codes will ensure they use energy wisely. 75% of U.S. buildings will be new or renovated by 2035. Building codes will ensure they use energy wisely. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports greater adoption of residential and commercial building energy codes through collaborative efforts with local governments and industry groups, and by providing key tools and assistance for code development, adoption, and implementation. Through advancing building codes, we aim to improve building energy efficiency by 50%, and to help states achieve 90% compliance with their energy codes. Energy Codes Ensure Efficiency in Buildings

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Prototype Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The SDC D buildings, designed for Seattle, Washington, used special moment frames (SMFs) with reduced beam section (RBS) connections. ...

2013-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

462

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy,  Industrial Technologies Program, Washington, D.C.    GlossaryEnergy Efficient Technology Potentials. 31 Conclusions and Recommendations 42 References. 45 Glossary .

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Creative graphics | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How can we help you? How can we help you? » Communicate and educate » ENERGY STAR communications toolkit » Motivate with a competition » ENERGY STAR National Building Competition » Competitor resources » Creative graphics Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Build an energy program Improve building and plant performance

464

Energy guides | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

guides guides Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance ENERGY STAR industrial partnership Energy guides Energy efficiency and air regulation Plant energy auditing Industrial service and product providers

465

Dairy Industry: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Industry Brief provides an overview of the U.S. dairy industry and ways in which electric-powered processes and technologies can be used in milk production and processing. Because of the different processes involved, the characteristics of energy consumption at milk production and processing facilities vary by facility. Most energy used in milk production is in the form of diesel fuel, followed by electricity and then by petroleum products such as gasoline an...

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

466

Figure 2. Energy Consumption of Vehicles, Selected Survey Years  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry >Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy Use > Figure 2 Figure 2. Energy Consumption of Vehicles, Selected Survey Years...

467

A REVIEW OF ASSUMPTIONS AND ANALYSIS IN EPRI EA-3409, "HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCE CHOICE: REVISION OF REEPS BEHAVIORAL MODELS"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPRI EA-3409, "Household Appliance Choice: Revision of REEPSEA",3409: "HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCE CHOICE: REVISION OF REEPSreport EA-3409, "Household Appliance Choice: Revi- sion of

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Search Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Search Search Help Better Buildings Neighborhood Program HOME ABOUT BETTER BUILDINGS PARTNERS INNOVATIONS RUN A PROGRAM TOOLS & RESOURCES NEWS EERE » Building Technologies Office » Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Delicious

469

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Codes Building Energy Codes Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat.

470

Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building America Building America Meetings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR

471

Cranfield University Building 41 (Stafford Cripps Building)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cranfield University Building 41 (Stafford Cripps Building) Building 41, formally known as the Stafford Cripps Building, has been transformed into a new Learning and Teaching Facility. Proposed ground

472

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Building Residential Building Activities to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals

473

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Residential Network to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings...

474

Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge on Delicious Rank...

475

Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Building Energy Optimization Software to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance

476

Household attitudes toward energy conservation in the Pacific Northwest: overview and comparisons  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an overview of a baseline residential energy conservation study for the Pacific Northwest conducted in November 1983 by RMH Research, Inc. It also compares the study results with available data from other surveys. The primary focus of the RMH study is conservation marketing. As such it assesses the attitudes, perceptions, and past conservation actions of the region's residents and provides market segmentation based upon past conservation actions and the propensity to invest in conservation in the future. Excluding renters, who account for about 24% of the region's households, three prospect groups for marketing conservation investments are identified: First Tier Prospects who are very likely to invest in additional conservation measures requiring larger sums of money (estimated at about 547,000 households, or 18 percent of the region's households); Second Tier Prospects who are somewhat likely to invest in full weatherization (estimated at about 22% of the region's households or 695,700); and Non-Prospects who are unlikely to invest in energy conservation in the near future (estimated to be 1,113,400 or 36% of the regional total). A summary comparison of the most important distinguishing attributes of the three prospect groups is presented. Considering the current surplus status of the region's electricity supply situation and the overall strategy in capability building, implications include (1) using public information programs through utilities and the news media to maintain the conservation interests of the first-tier prospects and (2) exploring ways to move the second-tier prospects into the first tier and to reach the so-called non-prospect and rental housing groups.

Fang, J.M.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Building Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science The "Enclosure" Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng, ASHRAE Fellow www.buildingscience.com * Control heat flow * Control airflow * Control water vapor flow * Control rain * Control ground water * Control light and solar radiation * Control noise and vibrations * Control contaminants, environmental hazards and odors * Control insects, rodents and vermin * Control fire * Provide strength and rigidity * Be durable * Be aesthetically pleasing * Be economical Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 2 Water Control Layer Air Control Layer Vapor Control Layer Thermal Control Layer Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 3 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 4 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 5 Building Science Corporation

478

Buildings Blog  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

blog Office of Energy Efficiency & blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en EnergyPlus Boosts Building Efficiency with Help from Autodesk http://energy.gov/eere/articles/energyplus-boosts-building-efficiency-help-autodesk building-efficiency-help-autodesk" class="title-link">EnergyPlus Boosts Building Efficiency with Help from Autodesk

479

Simulating household activities to lower consumption peaks: demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy experts need fine-grained dynamics oriented tools to investigate household activities in order to improve power management in the residential sector. This paper presents the SMACH framework for modelling, simulating and analy- sis of household ... Keywords: agent-based modelling, energy, social simulation

Edouard Amouroux, Francois Sempé, Thomas Huraux, Nicolas Sabouret, Yvon Haradji

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Elements of consumption: an abstract visualization of household consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To promote sustainability consumers must be informed about their consumption behaviours. Ambient displays can be used as an eco-feedback technology to convey household consumption information. Elements of Consumption (EoC) demonstrates this by visualizing ... Keywords: a-life, eco-feedback, household consumption, sustainability

Stephen Makonin; Philippe Pasquier; Lyn Bartram

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "households buildings industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... energy consumption. ... Healy, WM; Effect of Usage Conditions on Household Refrigerator-Freezer and Freezer Energy Consumption. ...

482

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Effect of Usage Conditions on Household Refrigerator-Freezer and Freezer Energy Consumption. Effect of Usage Conditions ...

483

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior and interior of apartment building Exterior and interior of apartment building Residential Buildings The study of ventilation in residential buildings is aimed at understanding the role that air leakage, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, natural ventilation and building use have on providing acceptable indoor air quality so that energy and related costs can be minimized without negatively impacting indoor air quality. Risks to human health and safety caused by inappropriate changes to ventilation and air tightness can be a major barrier to achieving high performance buildings and must be considered.This research area focuses primarily on residential and other small buildings where the interaction of the envelope is important and energy costs are dominated by space conditioning energy rather than air

484

U.S. Energy Department, Pay-Television Industry and Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Set-Top Box Energy Conservation Agreement; Will Cut Energy Use for 90 Million U.S. Households, Save Consumers Billions U.S. Energy Department, Pay-Television Industry and Energy...

485

Table CE2-3e. Space-Heating Energy Expenditures in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE2-3e. Space-Heating Energy Expenditures in U.S. Households by Household Income, 2001 RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty

486

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Building Energy Analyzer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Analyzer Building Energy Analyzer Building Energy Analyzer logo. Provides quick economic analysis for commercial and industrial buildings. Building Energy Analyzer (BEA) estimates annual and monthly loads and costs associated with air-conditioning, heating, on-site power generation, thermal storage, and heat recovery systems for a given building and location. The user can compare the performance of standard and high efficiency electric chillers, variable speed electric chillers, absorption chillers, engine chillers, thermal storage, on-site generators, heat recovery, or desiccant systems. The user can also prepare side-by-side economic comparisons of different energy options and equipment life cycle cost analysis. The BEA is a system screening tool. It is a tool that is

487

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Reference Commercial Reference Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score

488

Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings to Grid Buildings to Grid Integration to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research

489

Comparison of National Programs for Industrial Energy Efficiency: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report looks at the Better Buildings, Better Plants program from the Department of Energy; E3, an initiative of five U.S. federal agencies; ENERGY STAR for Industry from the Environmental Protection Agency; and Superior Energy Performance, a product of the U.S. Council for Energy-Efficient Manufacturing. By comparing the goals of several energy-efficiency programs that have been established to support industry, this report hopes to help industrial facilities find the right fit for their own ...

2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

490

Table AC1. Total Households Using Air-Conditioning Equipment, 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table AC1. Total Households Using Air-Conditioning Equipment, 2005 Million U.S. Households Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment (millions) Central System

491

Table SH1. Total Households Using a Space Heating Fuel, 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Households Using a Space Heating Fuel, 2005 Million U.S. Households Using a Non-Major Fuel 5 ... Space Heating (millions) Energy Information Administration

492

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in `Hybrid Households' Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1994) Demand for Electric Vehicles in Hybrid Households: A nand the Household Electric Vehicle Market: A Constraintsthe mar- ket for electric vehicles in California. Presented

Kurani, Kenneth; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Table CE2-3c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Physical Units (PU) per Household4,a Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,3 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

494

Table CE2-7c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Physical Units (PU) per Household3,a Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,2 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

495

Table CE2-12c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Physical Units (PU) per Household3,a Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,2 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

496

Table CE2-4c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Physical Units (PU) per Household3,a Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,2 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

497

Table CE2-7c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Physical Units (PU) per Household3 Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,2 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

498

Material World: Forecasting Household Appliance Ownership in a Growing Global Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Household Income and Appliance Ownership. ECEEE Summerof decreasing prices of appliances, if price data becomesForecasting Household Appliance Ownership in a Growing

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Appendix C-1 C-1.1 Buildings Appendix C-1: Technology data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Consumption and Market Segments for Existing Residential Building HVAC Policies, Moderate Case C-1.2.mod Average Household Energy Consumption and Market Segments for Existing Residential Building HVAC/or in homes with higher than average energy consumption. We applied such technologies only to the market

500

Better Buildings Summit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Summit Recognition photo with Kristen Taddonio and Kathleen Hogan Recognition photo with Kristen Taddonio and Kathleen Hogan Recognition photo with Kristen Taddonio and Kathleen Hogan Save the Date! DOE Better Buildings Summit May 7-May 9, 2014 Washington, D.C. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is holding a national Summit to catalyze investment in energy efficiency across the public, private, commercial, industrial, and multifamily sectors. We look forward to recognizing leaders and highlighting innovative market solutions and best practices. Registration will be opening in February 2014. See what attendees had to say about last year's event: "I was very impressed with the amount of practical information that was