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1

ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY NATIONAL AWARENESS OF ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY NATIONAL AWARENESS OF ENERGY STAR ® FOR 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements .................................................................................. ii Executive Summary ............................................................................ ES-1 Introduction ............................................................................................... 1 Methodology Overview ............................................................................. 2 Key Findings ............................................................................................. 5 Recognition .................................................................................................................. 5 Understanding ........................................................................................................... 12

2

Transferring 2001 National Household Travel Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Policy makers rely on transportation statistics, including data on personal travel behavior, to formulate strategic transportation policies, and to improve the safety and efficiency of the U.S. transportation system. Data on personal travel trends are needed to examine the reliability, efficiency, capacity, and flexibility of the Nation's transportation system to meet current demands and to accommodate future demand. These data are also needed to assess the feasibility and efficiency of alternative congestion-mitigating technologies (e.g., high-speed rail, magnetically levitated trains, and intelligent vehicle and highway systems); to evaluate the merits of alternative transportation investment programs; and to assess the energy-use and air-quality impacts of various policies. To address these data needs, the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) initiated an effort in 1969 to collect detailed data on personal travel. The 1969 survey was the first Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990, 1995, and 2001. Data on daily travel were collected in 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. In 2001, the survey was renamed the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) and it collected both daily and long-distance trips. The 2001 survey was sponsored by three USDOT agencies: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The primary objective of the survey was to collect trip-based data on the nature and characteristics of personal travel so that the relationships between the characteristics of personal travel and the demographics of the traveler can be established. Commercial and institutional travel were not part of the survey. Due to the survey's design, data in the NHTS survey series were not recommended for estimating travel statistics for categories smaller than the combination of Census division (e.g., New England, Middle Atlantic, and Pacific), MSA size, and the availability of rail. Extrapolating NHTS data within small geographic areas could risk developing and subsequently using unreliable estimates. For example, if a planning agency in City X of State Y estimates travel rates and other travel characteristics based on survey data collected from NHTS sample households that were located in City X of State Y, then the agency could risk developing and using unreliable estimates for their planning process. Typically, this limitation significantly increases as the size of an area decreases. That said, the NHTS contains a wealth of information that could allow statistical inferences about small geographic areas, with a pre-determined level of statistical certainty. The question then becomes whether a method can be developed that integrates the NHTS data and other data to estimate key travel characteristics for small geographic areas such as Census tract and transportation analysis zone, and whether this method can outperform other, competing methods.

Hu, Patricia S [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [ORNL; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Nationwide Survey on Household Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4 ~ Apartment in house or building divided into 2, 3, or 4 apartments ... of your family (living in your household). Include income from all sources--before taxes

4

Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",85.5450237,89.00343643,88.75545852,89.42917548,87.25590956,92.08566108 "Household Characteristics" "Census Region and Division" " Northeast",77.22222222,"NA",79.16666667,82.9015544,75.38461538,85.09615385 " New England",88.37209302,"NA",81.81818182,82.9787234,82,88.52459016 " Middle Atlantic ",73.72262774,"NA",78.37837838,82.31292517,74.30555556,83.67346939 " Midwest ",85.51401869,"NA",90.66666667,90.17094017,92.30769231,91.47286822 " East North Central",82,"NA",88.81987578,89.88095238,91.51515152,90.55555556

5

The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HOW MANY HYBRID HOUSEHOLDS IN THE CALIFORNIA NEW CAR MARKET?average 2.43 cars per household, then the hybrid householdnumber of multi-car households that fit our hybrid household

Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Feed the Future Bangladesh: Baseline Integrated Household Survey | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed the Future Bangladesh: Baseline Integrated Household Survey Feed the Future Bangladesh: Baseline Integrated Household Survey Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Feed the Future Bangladesh: Baseline Integrated Household Survey Dataset Summary Description The Bangladesh Integrated Household Survey dataset is a thorough assessment of current standard of food security in Bangladesh taken from 2011-2012. The dataset includes all baseline household surveys made under the USAID-led Feed the Future initiative, a collaborative effort that supports country-owned processes and plans for improving food security and promoting transparency, and within the Zones of Influence as outlined by the Feed the Future Bangladesh plan .The BIHS sample is statistically representative at the following levels: (a) nationally representative of rural Bangladesh; (b) representative of rural areas of each of the seven administrative divisions of the country; and, (c) representative of the Feed the Future (FTF) zone of influence.

7

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

property. This report surveys evidence from 15 recent experiments with dynamic pricing of electricity in the United States and Canada. The report suggests conclusive evidence that...

8

HOUSEHOLD RESPONSE TO DYNAMIC PRICING OF ELECTRICITY A SURVEY OF SEVENTEEN PRICING EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(DOE) defines demand response as "changes in electric usage by end-use customers from their normalHOUSEHOLD RESPONSE TO DYNAMIC PRICING OF ELECTRICITY A SURVEY OF SEVENTEEN PRICING EXPERIMENTS response in electricity markets. One of the best ways to let that happen is to let customers see

9

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Experimental Evidence Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Experimental Evidence Focus Area: Crosscutting Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.hks.harvard.edu/hepg/Papers/2009/The%20Power%20of%20Experimentatio Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/household-response-dynamic-pricing-el Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation Regulations: "Mandates/Targets,Cost Recovery/Allocation,Enabling Legislation" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

10

The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by electric and hybrid vehicles", SAE Technical Papers No.household response to hybrid vehicles. Finally, we suggestas electric or hybrid vehicles. Transitions in choices of

Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Own-price and income elasticities for household electricity demand : a survey of literature using meta-regression analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Maria Wist Langmoen Own-price and income elasticities for household electricity demand -A Literature survey using meta-regression analysis Economists have been modelling the electricity demand for (more)

Langmoen, Maria Wist

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Section J: HOUSEHOLD CHARACTERISTICS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Form EIA-457A (2001)--Household Questionnaire OMB No.: 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 42 Section J: HOUSEHOLD ...

13

Household energy use in urban Venezuela: Implications from surveys in Maracaibo, Valencia, Merida, and Barcelona-Puerto La Cruz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies the most important results of a comparative analysis of household commercial energy use in Venezuelan urban cities. The use of modern fuels is widespread among all cities. Cooking consumes the largest share of urban household energy use. The survey documents no use of biomass and a negligible use of kerosene for cooking. LPG, natural gas, and kerosene are the main fuels available. LPG is the fuel choice of low-income households in all cities except Maracaibo, where 40% of all households use natural gas. Electricity consumption in Venezuela`s urban households is remarkably high compared with the levels used in households in comparable Latin American countries and in households of industrialized nations which confront harsher climatic conditions and, therefore, use electricity for water and space heating. The penetration of appliances in Venezuela`s urban households is very high. The appliances available on the market are inefficient, and there are inefficient patterns of energy use among the population. Climate conditions and the urban built form all play important roles in determining the high level of energy consumption in Venezuelan urban households. It is important to acknowledge the opportunities for introducing energy efficiency and conservation in Venezuela`s residential sector, particularly given current economic and financial constraints, which may hamper the future provision of energy services.

Figueroa, M.J.; Sathaye, J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in `Hybrid Households' Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1994) Demand for Electric Vehicles in Hybrid Households: A nand the Household Electric Vehicle Market: A Constraintsthe mar- ket for electric vehicles in California. Presented

Kurani, Kenneth; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Characterizing Walk Trips in communities by Using Data from 2009 National Household Travel Survey, American Community Survey, and Other Sources  

SciTech Connect

Non-motorized travel (i.e. walking and bicycling) are of increasing interest to the transportation profession, especially in context with energy consumption, reducing vehicular congestion, urban development patterns, and promotion of healthier life styles. This research project aimed to identify factors impacting the amount of travel for both walk and bike trips at the Census block group or tract level, using several public and private data sources. The key survey of travel behavior is the 2009 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) which had over 87,000 walk trips for persons 16 and over, and over 6000 bike trips for persons 16 and over. The NHTS, in conjunction with the Census Bureau s American Community Survey, street density measures using Census Bureau TIGER, WalkScore , Nielsen Claritas employment estimates, and several other sources were used for this study. Stepwise Logistic Regression modeling techniques as well as Discriminant Analysis were applied using the integrated data set. While the models performed reasonably well for walk trips, travel by bike was abandoned due to sparseness of data. This paper discusses data sources utilized and modeling processes conducted under this study. It also presents a summary of findings and addresses data challenges and lesson-learned from this research effort.

Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [Macrosys; Wilson, Daniel W [ORNL; Murakami, Elaine [FHWA USDOT

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry >Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Contact Us * Feedback *...

17

Residential energy use and conservation in Venezuela: Results and implications of a household survey in Caracas  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the final report of a study of residential energy use in Caracas, the capital of Venezuela. It contains the findings of a household energy-use survey held in Caracas in 1988 and examines options for introducing energy conservation measures in the Venezuelan residential sector. Oil exports form the backbone of the Venezuelan economy. Improving energy efficiency in Venezuela will help free domestic oil resources that can be sold to the rest of the world. Energy conservation will also contribute to a faster recovery of the economy by reducing the need for major investments in new energy facilities, allowing the Venezuelan government to direct its financial investments towards other areas of development. Local environmental benefits will constitute an important additional by-product of implementing energy-efficiency policies in Venezuela. Caracas`s residential sector shows great potential for energy conservation. The sector is characterized by high saturation levels of major appliances, inefficiency of appliances available in the market, and by careless patterns of energy use. Household energy use per capita average 6.5 GJ/per year which is higher than most cities in developing countries; most of this energy is used for cooking. Electricity accounts for 41% of all energy use, while LPG and natural gas constitute the remainder. Specific options for inducing energy conservation and energy efficiency in Caracas`s residential sector include energy-pricing policies, fuel switching, particularly from electricity to gas, improving the energy performance of new appliances and customer information. To ensure the accomplishment of an energy-efficiency strategy, a concerted effort by energy users, manufacturers, utility companies, government agencies, and research institutions will be needed.

Figueroa, M.J.; Ketoff, A.; Masera, O.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Electricity displacement by wood used for space heating in PNWRES (Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey) (1983) households  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates the amount of electricity for residential space heating displaced by the use of wood in a sample of single-family households that completed the 1983 Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey. Using electricity bills and daily weather data from the period of July 1981 to July 1982, it was determined that the average household used 21,800 kWh per year, normalized with respect to weather. If no households had used any wood, electricity use would have increased 9%, to 23,700 kWh; space heating electricity use would also have increased, by 21%, to 47% of total electricity use. In the unlikely event that all households had used a great deal of wood for space heating, electricity use could have dropped by 23.5% from the average use, to 16,700 kWh; space heating electricity use would have dropped by 56%, to 24% of total electricity use. Indications concerning future trends regarding the displacement of electricity by wood use are mixed. On one hand, continuing to weatherize homes in the Pacific Northwest may result in less wood use as households find using electricity more economical. On the other hand, historical trends in replacement decisions regarding old space heating systems show a decided preference for wood. 11 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

White, D.L.; Tonn, B.E.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in "Hybrid Households" Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In contrast to a hybrid vehicle whichcombines multiple1994) "Demand Electric Vehicles in Hybrid for Households:or 180 mile hybrid electric vehicle. Natural gas vehicles (

Kurani, Kenneth S.; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

1 HOUSEHOLD RESPONSE TO DYNAMIC PRICING OF ELECTRICITYA SURVEY OF THE EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the energy crisis of 2000-2001 in the western United States, much attention has been given to boosting demand response in electricity markets. One of the best ways to let that happen is to pass through wholesale energy costs to retail customers. This can be accomplished by letting retail prices vary dynamically, either entirely or partly. For the overwhelming majority of customers, that requires a changeout of the metering infrastructure, which may cost as much as $40 billion for the US as a whole. While a good portion of this investment can be covered by savings in distribution system costs, about 40 percent may remain uncovered. This investment gap could be covered by reductions in power generation costs that could be brought about through demand response. Thus, state regulators in many states are investigating whether customers will respond to the higher prices by lowering demand and if so, by how much. To help inform this assessment, we survey the evidence from the 15 most recent experiments with dynamic pricing of electricity. We find conclusive evidence that households (residential customers) respond to higher prices by lowering usage. The magnitude of price response depends on several factors, such as the magnitude of the price increase, the presence of central air conditioning and the availability of enabling technologies such as two-way

Ahmad Faruqui; Sanem Sergici

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Residential energy consumption survey. Consumption patterns of household vehicles, supplement: January 1981-September 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information on the fuel consumption characteristics on household vehicles in the 48 contiguous States and the District of Columbia is presented by monthly statistics of fuel consumption, expenditures, miles per gallon, and miles driven.

Not Available

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in `Hybrid Households' Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or 180 mile hybrid electric vehicle. Natural gas vehicles (1994) Demand for Electric Vehicles in Hybrid Households: A nof Electric, Hybrid and Other Alternative Vehicles. A r t h

Kurani, Kenneth; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Household Expenditures...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Expenditures Module The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and...

24

EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Transportation logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 August 1997 Release Next Update: EIA has discontinued this series. Based on the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) - survey series has been discontinued Only light-duty vehicles and recreational vehicles are included in this report. EIA has excluded motorcycles, mopeds, large trucks, and buses. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use

25

Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents information about household end use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

Information Center

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Car Sharing within Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this paper was to analyse two activities: who rents a car and why? Which households share the driving of their cars? In order to do that, the Parc-Auto (Car-Fleet) database, built from annual postal surveys conducted with a panel of 10,000 French households, has been processed. Among approximately one hundred questions in the survey, two key questions have been crossed against many social, economic, demographic, geographic or time variables. KQ1: During the last 12 months, did you or another person from your home rent a car in France for personal purposes? KQ2: Is this car occasionally used by other persons? Here are the main findings. Renting households are mainly working, high income households, living in the core of big cities, and in particular in Paris. Most of them have two wage-sheets and two cars, one of which is generally a recent, high power, high quality car. Car rental is mainly an occasional practice. Yet for a minority of renters, it is a sustained habit. Households with more licence holders than cars share the most: about three quarters of them share their cars. On the contrary, single driver-single car households have less opportunity to share: only 15 % share. Household car sharing shed light on the gender role within households: while 58 % of the main users of the shared cars are male, 55 % of secondary users are female. Household car sharing is mainly a regular practice. Finally, without diminishing the merits of innovative transport solutions proposed here and there, it is not a waste of time to give some insight on self established behaviour within households. This reveals that complex patterns have been built over time by the people themselves, to cope with diverse situations that cannot be easily handled by straightforward classifications. The car cannot be reduced to a personal object. Household car sharing also carries strong links with the issue of car dependency. Sifting car availability and choice

Francis Papon; Laurent Hivert

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

27-ID and 35-ID Construction Schedule | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

27-ID and 35-ID Past 27-ID and 35-ID Long Range Schedule (pdf) 27-ID and 35-ID, Construction Schedule Electrical and PSS work continues on 35-ID-B and C. Will not run the main...

28

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Trends in Household Vehicle Stock The 1991 RTECS counted more than 150 million vehicles in use by U.S. households. This chapter examines recent trends in the vehicle stock, as measured by the RTECS and other reputable vehicle surveys. It also provides some details on the type and model year of the household vehicle stock, and identifies regional differences in vehicle stock. Because vehicles are continuously being bought and sold, this chapter also reports findings relating to turnover of the vehicle stock in 1991. Finally, it examines the average vehicle stock in 1991 (which takes into account the acquisition and disposal of household vehicles over the course of the year) and identifies variations in the average number of household vehicles based on differences in household characteristics. Number of Household Vehicles Over the past 8 years, the stock of household vehicles has

29

Household vehicles energy consumption 1994  

SciTech Connect

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use some 6,000 vehicles provided information to describe vehicle stock, vehicle-miles traveled, energy end-use consumption, and energy expenditures for personal vehicles. The survey results represent the characteristics of the 84.9 million households that used or had access to vehicles in 1994 nationwide. (An additional 12 million households neither owned or had access to vehicles during the survey year.) To be included in then RTECS survey, vehicles must be either owned or used by household members on a regular basis for personal transportation, or owned by a company rather than a household, but kept at home, regularly available for the use of household members. Most vehicles included in the RTECS are classified as {open_quotes}light-duty vehicles{close_quotes} (weighing less than 8,500 pounds). However, the RTECS also includes a very small number of {open_quotes}other{close_quotes} vehicles, such as motor homes and larger trucks that are available for personal use.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. 3. Vehicle Miles Traveled This chapter presents information on household vehicle usage, as measured by the number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT). VMT is one of the two most important components used in estimating household vehicle fuel consumption. (The other, fuel efficiency, is discussed in Chapter 4). In addition, this chapter examines differences in driving behavior based on the characteristics of the household and the type of vehicle driven. Trends in household driving patterns are also examined using additional information from the Department of Transportation's Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). Household VMT is a measure of the demand for personal transportation. Demand for transportation may be viewed from either an economic or a social perspective. From the economic point-of-view, the use of a household vehicle represents the consumption of one

31

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Household Expenditures Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Household Expenditures Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division (see

32

EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This report, Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends, provides details on the nation's energy use for household passenger travel. A primary purpose of ...

33

EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy Use:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends November 2005 Release (Next Update: Discontinued) Based on the 2001 National Household Travel Survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Transportation and augmented by EIA Only light-duty vehicles and recreational vehicles are included in this report. EIA has excluded motorcycles, mopeds, large trucks, and buses in an effort to maintain consistency with its past residential transportation series, which was discontinued after 1994. This report, Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends, provides details on the nation's energy use for household passenger travel. A primary purpose of this report is to release the latest consumer-based data

34

Do Disaster Expectations Explain Household Portfolios?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use the American Consumer Expenditure Survey (CEX) for consumption ex- penditure information. The data covers the period between 1983 and 2004. The expenditure information is recorded quarterly with approximately 5000 households in each wave. Every...

Alan, Sule

35

Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Bottled ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Form EIA-457D (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

36

SUPPLEMENTAL ENERGY-RELATED DATA FOR THE 2001 NATIONAL HOUSEHOLD ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... vehicle manufacturer, vehicle model, vehicle model year, and vehicle type several ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION/2001 NATIONAL HOUSEHOLD TRAVEL SURVEY K-23 ...

37

Table 1. Household Characteristics by Ceiling Fans, 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A reporting of the number of housing units using ceiling fans in U.S. households as reported in the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

38

Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Form EIA-457E (2001) Household Electricity Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

39

Figure 2. Energy Consumption of Vehicles, Selected Survey Years  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry >Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy Use > Figure 2 Figure 2. Energy Consumption of Vehicles, Selected Survey Years...

40

BLDG. ID NAME  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a: main site Building Inventory 2006 appendices BLDG. ID NAME (B)UILDING (T)RAILER MAP GRID REF SIzE (GSF) 002 Advanced Materials Lab B D&24; &24;5,506 002A Central Chemical Storage B D&24;...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data and Trends - Table A04  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Buildings & Industry > Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy ... U.S. Vehicles by Model ... Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate ...

42

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Household Tables Household Tables (Million U.S. Households; 24 pages, 122 kb) Contents Pages HC2-1a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-4a. Household Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-7a. Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2

43

char_household2001.pdf  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

9a. Household Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row...

44

Household and environmental characteristics related to household energy-consumption change: A human ecological approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focused on the family household as an organism and on its interaction with the three environments of the human ecosystem (natural, behavioral, and constructed) as these influence energy consumption and energy-consumption change. A secondary statistical analysis of data from the US Department of Energy Residential Energy Consumption Surveys (RECS) was completed. The 1980 and 1983 RECS were used as the data base. Longitudinal data, including household, environmental, and energy-consumption measures, were available for over 800 households. The households were selected from a national sample of owner-occupied housing units surveyed in both years. Results showed a significant( p = household, cooling degree days, heating degree days, year the housing unit was built, and number of stories in the housing unit.

Guerin, D.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

NONE

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

46

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F (2001) -- Household Natural Gas Usage Form F (2001) -- Household Natural Gas Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Natural Gas Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

47

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E (2001) - Household Electricity Usage Form E (2001) - Household Electricity Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Electricity Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

48

Factors influencing county level household fuelwood use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study explains household fuelwood consumption behavior at the county level by linking it to economic and demographic conditions in counties. Using this link, counties are identified where potential fuelwood use problems and benefits are greatest. A probit equation estimates household probability of wood use (percent woodburners in a county heating degree days, household income, nonwood fuel price, fuelwood price, percent forest land, population density, and fraction of households using various types of heating equipment. A linear-in-parameters equation estimates average wood consumed by a woodburner based on county heating degree days, household income, percent forest land, and price of nonwood fuel divided by fuelwood price. Parameters are estimated using fuelwood use data for individual households from a 1908-81 nationwide survey. The probit equation predicts percentage of wood burns well over a wide range of county conditions. The wood consumption equation overpredicts for counties with high income and high population density (over 6000 persons per square mile). The model shows average woodburning per household over all households decreases with increasing population density, and the influence of county economic characteristics varies with density.

Skog, K.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey -- Two Decades  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey presents two decades of changes in energy consumption related Household Characteristics

50

DOE/ID-Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INL/EXT-08-13979 INL/EXT-08-13979 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Enhancing control systems security in the energy sector NSTB National SCADA Test Bed Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by the INL NSTB Program November 2008 November 2008 INL/EXT-08-13979 Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by the INL NSTB Program November 2008 Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 http://www.inl.gov Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under DOE Idaho Operations Office Contract DE-AC07-05ID14517 Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by the INL NSTB

51

DOE/ID-Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INEEL/EXT-04-02423 INEEL/EXT-04-02423 ABB SCADA/EMS System INEEL Baseline Summary Test Report J. R. Davidson M. R. Permann B. L. Rolston S. J. Schaeffer November 2004 Prepared by: Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory INEEL/EXT-04-02423 ABB SCADA/EMS System INEEL Baseline Summary Test Report J. R. Davidson M. R. Permann B. L. Rolston S. J. Schaeffer November 2004 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory INEEL National Security Division Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Assurance Under DOE Idaho Operations Office Contract DE-AC07-99ID13727 ABB SCADA/EMS System INEEL Baseline Summary Test Report INEEL/EXT-04-02423 November 2004 ABSTRACT The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

52

Urban household energy use in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

Changes in household fuel and electricity use that accompany urbanization in Third World countries bear large economic and environmental costs. The processes driving the fuel transition, and the policy mechanisms by which it can be influenced, need to be better understood for the sake of forecasting and planning, especially in the case of electricity demand. This study examines patterns of household fuel use and electrical appliance utilization in Bangkok, Chieng Mai and Ayutthaya, Thailand, based on the results of a household energy survey. Survey data are statistically analyzed using a variety of multiple regression techniques to evaluate the relative influence of various household and fuel characteristics on fuel and appliance choice. Results suggest that changes to the value of women's time in urban households, as women become increasingly active in the labor force, have a major influence on patterns of household energy use. The use of the home for small-scale commercial activities, particularly food preparation, also has a significant influence on fuel choice. In general, household income does not prove to be an important factor in fuel and appliance selection in these cities, although income is closely related to total electricity use. The electricity use of individual household appliances is also analyzed using statistical techniques as well as limited direct metering. The technology of appliance production in Thailand is evaluated through interviews with manufacturers and comparisons of product performance. These data are used to develop policy recommendations for improving the efficiency of electrical appliances in Thailand by relying principally on the dynamism of the consumer goods market, rather than direct regulation. The annual electricity savings from the recommended program for fostering rapid adoption of efficient technologies are estimated to reach 1800 GWh by the year 2005 for urban households alone.

Tyler, S.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Detailed Tables The following tables present detailed characteristics of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the tables. Table Organization The "Detailed Tables" section consists of three types of tables: (1) Tables of totals such as number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) or gallons consumed; (2) Tables of per household statistics such as VMT per household; and (3) Tables of per vehicle statistics such as vehicle fuel consumption per vehicle. The tables have been grouped together by specific topics such as model year data, or family income data to facilitate finding related information. The Quick-Reference Guide to the detailed tables indicates major topics of each table. Row and Column Factors These tables present estimates

54

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Key Assumptions Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2000 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2000 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and transportation sectors as inputs to the disaggregation algorithm that results in the direct fuel expenditure analysis. Household end-use and personal transportation service consumption are obtained by HEM from the NEMS Residential and Transportation Demand Modules. Household disposable income is adjusted with forecasts of total disposable income from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module.

55

Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Version No: 2013.01 Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: http://www.eia.gov/survey/form/eia_14/instructions.pdf Mailing Address: Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) https://signon.eia.doe.gov/upload/noticeoog.jsp Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Zip Code - Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov - - - - Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey Email address: U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 PADD 4 Type of Report (Check One ): (Thousands of dollars) (Thousands of barrels) PADD 2 PADD 3 PAD DISTRICT (a) Revision to Report:

56

Household carbon dioxide production in relation to the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

A survey of 655 households from eastern suburbs of Melbourne was undertaken to determine householders[prime] attitudes to, and understanding of, the greenhouse effect. Carbon dioxide emissions resulting from car, electricity and gas use were computed and household actions which could reduce CO[sub 2] emissions were addressed. Preliminary analysis of the results indicates that householders in this area are aware of, and concerned about, the greenhouse effect, although their understanding of its causes is often poor. Many appreciate the contribution of cars, but are unclear about the relative importance of other household activities. Carbon dioxide emissions from the three sources examined averaged 21[center dot]2 tonnes/year per household and 7[center dot]4 tonnes/year per person. Electricity was the largest contributor (8[center dot]6 tonnes/year), cars the next largest (7[center dot]7 tonnes/year) and gas third (5[center dot] tonnes/year) per household. Emissions varied considerably from household to household. There was a strong positive correlation between availability of economic resources and household CO[sub 2] output from all sources. Carbon dioxide production, particularly from car use, was greater from households which were most distant from a railway station, and from larger households, and numbers of children in the household had little effect on emissions. There were also some economics of scale for households containing more adults. Understanding the causes of the greenhouse bore little relation to change in CO[sub 2] emissions; being concerned about it was associated with a small reduction; but actual actions to reduce car use and household heating, however motivated, produced significant reductions. 12 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Stokes, D.; Lindsay, A.; Marinopoulos, J.; Treloar, A.; Wescott, G. (Deakin Univ., Clayton (Australia))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

PRELIMINARY DATA Housing Unit and Household Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PRELIMINARY DATA Housing Unit and Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Households (million) Households With Fans (million) Percent of Households With Fans Number of...

58

Being surveyed can change later behavior and related parameter estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Does completing a household survey change the later behavior of those surveyed? In three field studies of health and two of microlending, we randomly assigned subjects to be surveyed about health and/or household finances ...

Zwane, Alix Peterson

59

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Below are historical data tables from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). These tables cover the total number of households ...

60

4-ID-D Instrumentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4-ID-D Instrumentation Detectors Integrating Counting Area Diffractometors 8-Circle 4Tesla Magnet 13 Tesla Magnet Focussing Zone Plate Optics K-B Mirror System Temperature Control...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DOE-ID Operations Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 10, 2013 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period August 12, 2013 through August 26, 2013 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho...

62

A Framework for Corporate Householding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous research on corporate household and corporate householding has presented examples, literature review, and working definitions. In this paper, we first improve our ...

Madnick, Stuart

2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

63

Energy Consumption of Refrigerators in Ghana - Outcomes of Household...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Consumption of Refrigerators in Ghana - Outcomes of Household Surveys Speaker(s): Essel Ben Hagan Date: July 12, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of...

64

Table WH2. Total Households by Water Heating Fuels Used, 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Households by Water Heating Fuels Used, 2005 ... 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables. Table WH2.

65

Table SH2. Total Households by Space Heating Fuels Used, 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Households by Space Heating Fuels Used, 2005 ... 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: ... Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG Other

66

Survey Expectations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Michigan and is known as the Michigan survey, with many other similar surveys conducted across OECD countries so as to provide up to date information on consumer expectations. Questions on expectations are also sometimes included in panel surveys... be formed, do of course make it possible to assess whether, or how far, such expectations are well-founded by comparing the experiences of individual households with their prior expectations. A key aspect of the Michigan survey, and of many other more recent...

Pesaran, M Hashem; Weale, Martin

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

67

Category:Boise, ID | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ID ID Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Boise, ID" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Boise ID Idaho Power Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 61 KB SVHospital Boise ID Idaho Power Co.png SVHospital Boise ID Id... 62 KB SVLargeHotel Boise ID Idaho Power Co.png SVLargeHotel Boise ID ... 66 KB SVLargeOffice Boise ID Idaho Power Co.png SVLargeOffice Boise ID... 58 KB SVMediumOffice Boise ID Idaho Power Co.png SVMediumOffice Boise I... 63 KB SVMidriseApartment Boise ID Idaho Power Co.png SVMidriseApartment Boi... 61 KB SVOutPatient Boise ID Idaho Power Co.png SVOutPatient Boise ID ... 62 KB SVPrimarySchool Boise ID Idaho Power Co.png SVPrimarySchool Boise ... 62 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Boise ID Idaho Power Co.png

68

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Completed Copy in PDF Format Completed Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Household Expenditures Module Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2001 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2001 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and

69

Crime and the Nations Households, 2000 By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experienced 1 or more violent or property crimes in 2000, according to data from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). About 4.3 million households had members who experienced 1 or more nonfatal violent crimes, including rape, sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated or simple assault. About 14.8 million households experienced 1 or more property crimes household burglary, motor vehicle theft, or theft. Vandalism, presented for the first time in a Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) report, victimized about 6.1 million households. The households that sustained vandalism were counted separately from those experiencing other crimes. Because vandalism is included for the first time, findings are presented in a box on page 4. Beginning in 2001, NCVS victimizations will be measured both with and without vandalism. Measuring the extent to which households are victimized by crime One measure of the impact of crime throughout the Nation is gained through estimating the number and percentage of households victimized Highlights During 2000, 16 % of U.S. households had a member who experienced a crime, with 4 % having a member victimized by violent crime. During 1994, 25 % of households experienced at least one crime; 7 % a violent crime.

Patsy A. Klaus

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

housingunit_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Tables Housing Unit Tables (Million U.S. Households; 49 pages, 210 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-4a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-6a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-7a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4

71

usage_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Usage Indicators Tables Usage Indicators Tables (Million U.S. Households; 60 pages, 247 kb) Contents Pages HC6-1a. Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-2a. Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-4a. Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-5a. Usage Indicators by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-6a. Usage Indicators by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-7a. Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5

72

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home Office Equipment Tables Home Office Equipment Tables (Million U.S. Households; 12 pages, 123 kb) Contents Pages HC7-1a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-4a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-7a. Home Office Equipment by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1

73

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage  

SciTech Connect

In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage  

SciTech Connect

In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

DOE-ID Operations Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 5, 2013 June 5, 2013 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period May 16, through May 30, 2013 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory, managed by DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC - Shannon Brennan, DOE-ID, (208) 526-3993. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) [No items to Report] Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) May 15 - 30, 2013: CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC discovered three instances of new information at the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) which have the potential to impact the nuclear safety analysis

76

Document ID Number: RL-721  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Document ID Number: Document ID Number: RL-721 REV 4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00066 I. Project Title: Nesting Bird Deterrent Study at the 241-C Tank Farm CX B3.8, "Outdoor Terrestrial Ecological and Environmental Research" II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions - e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) will perform an outdoor, terrestrial ecological research study to attempt to control and deter nesting birds at the 241-C Tank Farm. This will be a preventative study to test possible methods for controlling &/or minimizing the presence and impacts of nesting birds inside the tank farm. A nesting bird

77

RL·721 Document ID Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Document ID Number: Document ID Number: REV 3 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00045 . J.proj(;l~t Titl~: - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- --------- ------_. . _ - - - - - - - - - - - - - . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - LIMITED FIREBREAK MAINTENANCE ON THE HANFORD SITE DURING CALENDAR YEAR 2012 II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions· e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, etc.): The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to perform firebreak maintenance in selected areas of the Hanford Site during calendar year 2012 with limited use of physical, chemical, and prescribed burning methods. Prescribed burning will be performed by the Hanford Fire Department under approved burn plans and permits; and only in previously disturbed

78

EIA - Gasoline and Diesel Fuel report: Household Vehicles Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Transportation logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 December 1993 Release Next Update: August 1997. Based on the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) - survey series has been discontinued after EIA's 1994 survey. Only light-duty vehicles and recreational vehicles are included in this report. EIA has excluded motorcycles, mopeds, large trucks, and buses. This report, Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991, is based on data from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). Focusing on vehicle miles traveled (VMT) and energy enduse consumption and expenditures by households for personal transportation, the 1991 RTECS is

79

Energy Consumption of Refrigerators in Ghana - Outcomes of Household  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Consumption of Refrigerators in Ghana - Outcomes of Household Energy Consumption of Refrigerators in Ghana - Outcomes of Household Surveys Speaker(s): Essel Ben Hagan Date: July 12, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Robert Van Buskirk Galen Barbose As part of activities to develop refrigerator efficiency standards regulations in Ghana, a national survey on the energy consumption of refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers has been conducted. The survey covered 1000 households in urban, peri-urban and rural communities in various parts of the country. The survey found that, on average, refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers in Ghana use almost three times what is allowed by minimum efficiency standards in the U.S., and a few refrigerators had energy use at levels almost ten times the U.S.

80

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aggregate Aggregate Ratio: See Mean and Ratio Estimate. AMPD: Average miles driven per day. See Appendix B, "Estimation Methodologies." Annual Vehicle Miles Traveled: See Vehicle Miles Traveled. Automobile: Includes standard passenger car, 2-seater car and station wagons; excludes passenger vans, cargo vans, motor homes, pickup trucks, and jeeps or similar vehicles. See Vehicle. Average Household Energy Expenditures: A ratio estimate defined as the total household energy expenditures for all RTECS households divided by the total number of households. See Ratio Estimate, and Combined Household Energy Expenditures. Average Number of Vehicles per Household: The average number of vehicles used by a household for personal transportation during 1991. For this report, the average number of vehicles per household is computed as the ratio of the total number of vehicles to the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Racial and demographic differences in household travel and fuel purchase behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly fuel purchase logs from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey's Household Transportation Panel (TP) were analyzed to determine the relationship between various household characteristics and purchase frequency, tank inventories, vehicle-miles traveled, and fuel expenditures. Multiple classification analysis (MCA) was used to relate observed differences in dependent variables to such index-type household characteristics as income and residence location, and sex, race and age of household head. Because it isolates the net effect of each parameter, after accounting for the effects of all other parameters, MCA is particularly appropriate for this type of analysis. Results reveal clear differences in travel and fuel purchase behavior for four distinct groups of vehicle-owning households. Black households tend to own far fewer vehicles with lower fuel economy, to use them more intensively, to purchase fuel more frequently, and to maintain lower fuel inventories than white households. Similarly, poor households own fewer vehicles with lower fuel economy, but they drive them less intensively, purchase fuel more frequently, and maintain lower fuel inventories than nonpoor households. Elderly households also own fewer vehicles with lower fuel economy. But since they drive them much less intensively, their fuel purchases are much less frequent and their fuel inventories are higher than nonelderly households. Female-headed households also own fewer vehicles but with somewhat higher fuel economy. They drive them less intensively, maintain higher fuel inventories, and purchase fuel less frequently than male-headed households. 13 refs., 8 tabs.

Gur, Y.; Millar, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Federal ID Credential Security Standard Strengthens ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal ID Credential Security Standard Strengthens Authentication, Extends To Mobile Devices. From NIST Tech Beat: September 5, 2013. ...

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

83

Householders Perceptions of Insulation Adequacy and Drafts in the Home in 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to improve the estimation of end-use heating consumption, the Energy Information Administration's (EIA), 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), for the first time, asked respondents to judge how drafty they perceived their homes to be as a measure of insulation quality. The analysis of the 2001 RECS data shows that householders in newlyconstructed homes perceived their homes to be better insulated and less drafty than do householders in older homes. Single-family homes are perceived to be better insulated and less drafty than are apartments in buildings with two to four units. Cross-variable comparisons also provide the associations between the level of insulation and winter drafts in the homes with household characteristics and location of the home.

Behjat Hojjati

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report is the third in the series of reports presenting data from the 1987 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The 1987 RECS, seventh in a series of national surveys of households and their energy suppliers, provides baseline information on household energy use in the United States. Data from the seven RECS and its companion survey, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), are made available to the public in published reports such as this one, and on public use data files. This report presents data for the four Census regions and nine Census divisions on the consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil and kerosene (as a single category), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Data are also presented on consumption of wood at the Census region level. The emphasis in this report is on graphic depiction of the data. Data from previous RECS surveys are provided in the graphics, which indicate the regional trends in consumption, expenditures, and uses of energy. These graphs present data for the United States and each Census division. 12 figs., 71 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

85

Characteristics, Welfare Use and Material Hardship Among California AFDC Households with Disabled and Chronically Ill Family Members  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

completed telephone survey o f AFDC-recipient households tocare for disabled members. When AFDC and SSI are consideredfamilies in this sample of AFDC recipient families were very

Meyers, Marcia k.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

New York Household Travel Patterns: A Comparison Analysis  

SciTech Connect

In 1969, the U. S. Department of Transportation began collecting detailed data on personal travel to address various transportation planning issues. These issues range from assessing transportation investment programs to developing new technologies to alleviate congestion. This 1969 survey was the birth of the Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. Longer-distance travel was collected in 1977 and 1995. In 2001, the survey was renamed to the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) and collected both daily and longer-distance trips in one survey. In addition to the number of sample households that the national NPTS/NHTS survey allotted to New York State (NYS), the state procured an additional sample of households in both the 1995 and 2001 surveys. In the 1995 survey, NYS procured an addition sample of more than 9,000 households, increasing the final NY NPTS sample size to a total of 11,004 households. Again in 2001, NYS procured 12,000 additional sample households, increasing the final New York NHTS sample size to a total of 13,423 households with usable data. These additional sample households allowed NYS to address transportation planning issues pertinent to geographic areas significantly smaller than for what the national NPTS and NHTS data are intended. Specifically, these larger sample sizes enable detailed analysis of twelve individual Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs). Furthermore, they allowed NYS to address trends in travel behavior over time. In this report, travel data for the entire NYS were compared to those of the rest of the country with respect to personal travel behavior and key travel determinants. The influence of New York City (NYC) data on the comparisons of the state of New York to the rest of the country was also examined. Moreover, the analysis examined the relationship between population density and travel patterns, and the similarities and differences among New York MPOs. The 1995 and 2001 survey data make it possible to examine and identify travel trends over time. This report does not address, however, the causes of the differences and/or trends.

Hu, Patricia S [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products containing toxic chemicals. These wastes CANNOT be disposed of in regular garbage. Any should be considered hazardous. You cannot treat hazardous wastes like other kinds of garbage

de Lijser, Peter

88

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Air Conditioning Tables Air Conditioning Tables (Million U.S. Households; 24 pages, 138 kb) Contents Pages HC4-1a. Air Conditioning by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-7a. Air Conditioning by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2

89

DOE-ID Operations Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

26, 2013 26, 2013 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period July 29, 2013 through August 12, 2013 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory, managed by DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC -Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) July 31, 2013: The Idaho Treatment Group, LLC (ITG), the managing contractor for the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project received a warning letter from the State of Idaho's Department of Environmental quality regarding self- reported RCRA permit violations which

90

DOE-ID Operations Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 6, 2014 January 6, 2014 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period November 01, 2013 through November 30, 2013 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory, managed by DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC -Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) Nothing to Report Notable Accomplishments: Contracting companies supporting EM's cleanup program and the Office of Nuclear Energy at the Idaho site volunteered to be among the first to use a new DOE

91

II.CONTRACT ID CODE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 1 II.CONTRACT ID CODE ~AGE 1 of AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT PAGES AC 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 3. EFFECTNE DATE 2. AMENDMENTfMODIFICA TION NO. 4. REQUISITIONIPURCHASE REQ. NO. See Block 16c. NOPR 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 05008 6. ISSUED BY CODE 05008 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration P.O. Box 2050 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 P.O. Box 2050 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC P.O. Box 2009 MS 8014 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8014 lOA. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ORDER NO.

92

DOE-ID Operations Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18, 2013 18, 2013 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period September 30, 2013 through October 31, 2013 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory, managed by DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC -Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) October 15, 2013: A manager at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) determined that the AMWTP Safety Analysis process required review due to an operational trend of fire/combustion events in the Treatment Facility (TF) box lines. Safety analysis for the TF is

93

Energy Spending and Vulnerable Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

offthanbefore.Inparticularlargehouseholdswithlow incomesseemtohavebeenadverselyaffectedbythenewtariffstructuressince theyhavecomparablylargeenergyexpenditure(Bennetetal.,2002). 5. VulnerableHouseholdsandEnergySpending The... tariffscanplayanimportantpartinthepublicdebate on eradicating fuel poverty and helping the vulnerable households. Smart metering can provide consumers with information on the actual energy consumptionandmight lead to...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Meier, Helena

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

94

APS Beamline 6-ID-D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MM-Group Home MM-Group Home MMG Advisory Committees 6-ID-D Home Recent Publications Beamline Info Optics Instrumentation Software User Info Beamline 6-ID-D Beamline 6-ID-D is operated by the Magnetic Materials Group in the X-ray Science Division (XSD) of the Advanced Photon Source. This is a high energy (50 - 130 keV) beamline used for structural studies primarily on single crystal materials. Recent Research Highlights LuFeO Unlikely route to ferroelectricity May 16, 2012 A new type of ferroelectric, LuO2Fe4, has been investigated at the APS by a research team from Julich research center. XAS & XMCD studies on beamline 4-ID-C determined the Fe magnetism and valence, while single crystal x-ray scattering measurements at 6-ID-B & 6-ID-D probed the associated structural and charge ordering.

95

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DOEEIA-0464(91) Distribution Category UC-950 Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 December 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S....

96

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a regular basis at the time of the 1990 RECS personal interviews. Electricity: See Main Heating Fuel. Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991...

97

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 110 Electricity: See Main Heating Fuel. Energy Used in the Home: For electricity or natural gas, the quantity is the...

98

Energy Information Administration/Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

, , Energy Information Administration/Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 ix Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 presents statistics about energy-related characteristics of highway vehicles available for personal use by members of U.S. households. The data were collected in the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, the final cycle in a series of nationwide energy consumption surveys conducted during the 1980's and 1990's by the Energy Information Administrations. Engines Became More Powerful . . . Percent Distribution of Total Residential Vehicle Fleet by Number of Cylinders, 1988 and 1994 Percent Distribution of Vehicle Fleet by Engine Size, 1988 and 1994 Percent Percent 4 cyl Less than 2.50 liters 6 cyl 2.50- 4.49 liters 8 cyl 4.50 liters or greater 20 20 40 40 Vehicle

99

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, 3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 9.7 -- -- -- 6.5 11.3 5.7 2 Persons ...................................... 35.1 4.3 -- -- -- 2.0 7.8 5.8 3 Persons ...................................... 17.0 -- 3.3 -- -- 2.2 5.2 7.3 4 Persons ...................................... 15.6 -- 2.2 -- -- -- 4.3 8.1 5 Persons ...................................... 7.1

100

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Household Characteristics by West Census Region, 2a. Household Characteristics by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.8 1.1 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 5.6 1.8 3.8 5.4 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 7.3 1.9 5.5 4.9 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 3.5 0.9 2.6 7.6 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 3.5 1.1 2.4 6.4 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 2.0 0.6 1.4 9.7 6 or More Persons

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Vehicle Fuel Efficiency and Consumption Fuel consumption is estimated from RTECS data on the vehicle stock (Chapter 2) and miles traveled (Chapter 3), in combination with vehicle fuel efficiency ratings, adjusted to account for individual driving circumstances. The first two sections of this chapter present estimates of household vehicle fuel efficiency and household fuel consumption calculated from these fuel efficiency estimates. These sections also discuss variations in fuel efficiency and consumption based on differences in household and vehicle characteristics. The third section presents EIA estimates of the potential savings from replacing the oldest (and least fuel-efficient) household vehicles with new (and more fuel-efficient) vehicles. The final section of this chapter focuses on households receiving (or eligible to receive) supplemental income under

102

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Household Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Household Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.7 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 6.7 4.7 2.0 6.2 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 8.0 5.4 2.6 5.0 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 3.8 2.7 1.1 7.9 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 3.5 2.5 1.0 8.1 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 1.7

103

APS Beamline 6-ID-B,C  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B,C Home B,C Home Recent Publications Beamline Info Optics Instrumentation Software User Info Beamline 6-ID-B,C Beamline 6-ID-B,C is operated by the Magnetic Materials Group in the X-ray Science Division (XSD) of the Advanced Photon Source. Research on this beamline centers on general x-ray scattering studies of materials. The beamline has 2 end-stations: 6-ID-B: Psi -Diffractomter & In-Field Studies 6-ID-C: UHV in-situ growth Recent Research Highlights LSMO pictures Searching for Next-Generation Electronic Materials December 14, 2009 A new class of layered oxide materials discovered thanks to research at the beamline 6-ID-B offers scientists unprecedented opportunities for creating the next generation of electronic devices. Local Contact: Phil Ryan Local Contacts: Philip Ryan (Surface Diffraction) 630.252.0252 ryan@aps.anl.gov

104

Residential energy consumption and expenditure patterns of black and nonblack households in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential energy consumption and expenditures by black and nonblack households are presented by Census region and for the nation based on the Energy Information Administration's 1982-83 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Black households were found to have significantly lower levels of electricity consumption at both the national and regional level. Natural gas is the dominant space heating fuel used by black households. Natural gas consumption was typically higher for black households. However, when considering natural gas consumption conditional on natural gas space heating no significant differences were found. 10 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

Vyas, A.D.; Poyer, D.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Household waste disposal in Mekelle city, Northern Ethiopia  

SciTech Connect

In many cities of developing countries, such as Mekelle (Ethiopia), waste management is poor and solid wastes are dumped along roadsides and into open areas, endangering health and attracting vermin. The effects of demographic factors, economic and social status, waste and environmental attributes on household solid waste disposal are investigated using data from household survey. Household level data are then analyzed using multinomial logit estimation to determine the factors that affect household waste disposal decision making. Results show that demographic features such as age, education and household size have an insignificant impact over the choice of alternative waste disposal means, whereas the supply of waste facilities significantly affects waste disposal choice. Inadequate supply of waste containers and longer distance to these containers increase the probability of waste dumping in open areas and roadsides relative to the use of communal containers. Higher household income decreases the probability of using open areas and roadsides as waste destinations relative to communal containers. Measures to make the process of waste disposal less costly and ensuring well functioning institutional waste management would improve proper waste disposal.

Tadesse, Tewodros [Agricultural Economics and Rural Policy Group, Wageningen University, Hollandseweg 1 6706 KN Wageningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: tewodroslog@yahoo.com; Ruijs, Arjan [Environmental Economics and Natural Resources Group, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 8130, 6700 EW Wageningen (Netherlands); Hagos, Fitsum [International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Subregional Office for the Nile Basin and East Africa, P.O. Box 5689, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Ventilation Behavior and Household Characteristics in NewCalifornia Houses  

SciTech Connect

A survey was conducted to determine occupant use of windows and mechanical ventilation devices; barriers that inhibit their use; satisfaction with indoor air quality (IAQ); and the relationship between these factors. A questionnaire was mailed to a stratified random sample of 4,972 single-family detached homes built in 2003, and 1,448 responses were received. A convenience sample of 230 houses known to have mechanical ventilation systems resulted in another 67 completed interviews. Some results are: (1) Many houses are under-ventilated: depending on season, only 10-50% of houses meet the standard recommendation of 0.35 air changes per hour. (2) Local exhaust fans are under-utilized. For instance, about 30% of households rarely or never use their bathroom fan. (3) More than 95% of households report that indoor air quality is ''very'' or ''somewhat'' acceptable, although about 1/3 of households also report dustiness, dry air, or stagnant or humid air. (4) Except households where people cook several hours per week, there is no evidence that households with significant indoor pollutant sources get more ventilation. (5) Except households containing asthmatics, there is no evidence that health issues motivate ventilation behavior. (6) Security and energy saving are the two main reasons people close windows or keep them closed.

Price, Phillip N.; Sherman, Max H.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Source separation of household waste: A case study in China  

SciTech Connect

A pilot program concerning source separation of household waste was launched in Hangzhou, capital city of Zhejiang province, China. Detailed investigations on the composition and properties of household waste in the experimental communities revealed that high water content and high percentage of food waste are the main limiting factors in the recovery of recyclables, especially paper from household waste, and the main contributors to the high cost and low efficiency of waste disposal. On the basis of the investigation, a novel source separation method, according to which household waste was classified as food waste, dry waste and harmful waste, was proposed and performed in four selected communities. In addition, a corresponding household waste management system that involves all stakeholders, a recovery system and a mechanical dehydration system for food waste were constituted to promote source separation activity. Performances and the questionnaire survey results showed that the active support and investment of a real estate company and a community residential committee play important roles in enhancing public participation and awareness of the importance of waste source separation. In comparison with the conventional mixed collection and transportation system of household waste, the established source separation and management system is cost-effective. It could be extended to the entire city and used by other cities in China as a source of reference.

Zhuang Ying; Wu Songwei; Wang Yunlong [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Wu Weixiang [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)], E-mail: weixiang@zju.edu.cn; Chen Yingxu [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Extending Efficiency Services to Underserved Households: NYSERDA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extending Efficiency Services to Underserved Households: NYSERDA's Assisted Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Program Title Extending Efficiency Services to Underserved Households:...

109

Comparative analysis of energy data bases for household residential and transportation energy use  

SciTech Connect

Survey data bases covering household residential and transportation energy use were reviewed from the perspective of energy policy analysts and data base users. Twenty-three surveys, taken from 1972 to 1985, collected information on household energy consumption and expenditures, energy-using capital stock, and conservation activities. Ten of the surveys covered residential energy use only, including that for space heating and cooling, cooking, water heating, and appliances. Six surveys covered energy use only for household travel in personal vehicles. Seven surveys included data on both of these household energy sectors. Complete energy use data for a household in one year can be estimated only for 1983, using two surveys (one residential and one transportation) taken in the same households. The last nine surveys of the 23 were recent (1983--1985). Review of those nine was based on published materials only. The large-scale surveys generally had less-comprehensive data, while the comprehensive surveys were based on small samples. The surveys were timely and useful for analyzing four types of energy policies: economic regulation, environmental regulation, federal energy production, and direct regulation of energy consumption or production. Future surveys of energy use, such as those of residential energy consumption, should try to link their energy-use questions to large surveys, such as the American Housing Survey, to allow more accurate analysis of comparative impacts of energy policies among population categories of interest (e.g., minority/majority, metropolitan/nonmetropolitan area, census regions, and income class). 78 refs., 9 figs., 29 tabs.

Teotia, A.; Klein, Y.; LaBelle, S.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Household Energy Expenditure and Income Groups: Evidence from Great Britain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and 0.024 for districtheatingHowever,asincomeisnotobserveditseffectcannotbeanalysed. Wuetal.(2004)examinethedemandforspaceheatinginArmenia,Moldova,and Kyrgyz Republic using household survey data. In these countries... andinsomeregionsincomesarenotsufficientto affordspaceheatingfromdistrictheatingsystemsmakingthesesystemsunviable. We analyse electricity, gas and overall energy spending for a large sample of households in Great Britain. We discern inflection points and discuss...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Meier, H

111

Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends...

112

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

W as hi ng to n, DC DOEEIA-0464(94) Distribution Category UC-950 Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 August 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets...

113

ac_household2001.pdf  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2a. Air Conditioning by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total...

114

Household vehicles energy consumption 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted during 1991 and early 1992. The 1991 RTECS represents 94.6 million households, of which 84.6 million own or have access to 151.2 million household motor vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

Not Available

1993-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

115

Household savings and portfolio choice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis consists of three essays that examine household savings and portfolio choice behavior. Chapter One analyses the effects of employer matching contributions and tax incentives on participation and contribution ...

Klein, Sean Patrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Property:WFSPTurbineID | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WFSPTurbineID WFSPTurbineID Jump to: navigation, search Property Name WFSPTurbineID Property Type Number This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "WFSPTurbineID" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alleghany High School Wind Project + 110,608 + Appanoose Elementary School Wind Project + 108,442 + Auburn-Washburn Wind Project + 105,237 + Avery County High School Wind Project + 110,607 + B Bancroft-Rosalie Public Schools Wind Project + 108,812 + Bloomfield Public Schools Wind Project + 110,699 + Burlington High School Wind Project + 107,678 + C CAES Wind Project + 105,329 + Cedar Rapids Wind Project + 105,272 + Cherry Valley Elementary School Wind Project + 120,342 + Concordia High School Wind Project + 108,482 +

117

1-ID: Sector 1, Insertion Device Beamline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-ID beamline schematic 1-ID beamline schematic ID on-axis brilliance values 1-ID - Sector 1, Insertion Device Beamline Responsible Scientists Jon Almer, phone: (630) 252-1049, e-mail: almer@aps.anl.gov Sarvjit Shastri, phone: (630) 252-0129, e-mail: shastri@aps.anl.gov John Okasinski, phone: (630) 252-0162, e-mail: okasinski@aps.anl.gov Peter Kenesei, phone: (630) 252-0133, e-mail: kenesei@aps.anl.gov Scientific Programs Coupled high-energy SAXS/WAXS studies (HE-SAXS/WAXS) High-energy diffraction microscopy (HEDM) Single-grain studies Stress/strain/texture studies Pair-distribution function (PDF) measurements High-energy fluorescence Source Characteristics Upstream insertion device: APS Undulator A No. of Poles 72 Undulator Period 3.3 cm Device Length 2.4 m Minimum Gap 11 mm Downstream insertion device

118

IPS: IDS or IPS: what is best?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intrusion detection systems (IDS) have become one of the most common countermeasures in the network security arsenal. But while other technologies such as firewalls and anti-virus provide proactive protection, most current IDSs are passive; detection ...

Maria Papadaki; Steven Furnell

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, 3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.5 1.4 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.5 0.9 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 12.3 17.4 21.5 31.7 9.6 23.4 3.9 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 0.4 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.9 20.8 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 .......................... 80.8 11.9 16.7 21.0 31.2 9.1 22.6 3.9 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 3 .............. 57.5 6.2 10.7 15.2 25.3 4.5 12.4 5.3 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 4.9 9.1 12.1 20.1 3.6 10.4 6.1 With a Heat Pump

120

Econometric analysis of energy use in urban households  

SciTech Connect

This article analyzes the pattern of energy carrier consumption in the residential sector of Bangalore, a major city in south India. A 1,000-household survey was used to study the type of energy carrier used by households in different income groups for different end-uses, such as cooking, water heating, and lighting. The dependence of income on the carrier utilized is established using a carrier dependence index. Using regression analysis, the index analyses the impact of different explanatory variables such as family income, family size, and price of energy carrier on consumption. The results show that income plays an important role not only in the selection of an energy carrier but also on the quantity of consumption per household. Also, a source-service matrix is prepared for Bangalore`s residential sector, which shows the disaggregation of energy consumption by the type of energy carrier and end-use.

Reddy, B.S. [Indira Gandhi Inst. of Development Research, Bombay (India)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Department of Energy Idaho - Inside DOE-ID  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE-ID Mission and Vision Brief History of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Strategic Plan Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) - 888 KB DOE-ID Agreement in Principle...

122

Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as markers of epithelial cancer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for detection and prognosis of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises detecting expression, if any, for both an Id-1 and an Id-2 genes, or the ratio thereof, of gene products in samples of breast tissue obtained from a patient. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are invasive and metastatic, whereas Id-2 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are localized and noninvasive in the breast tissue.

Desprez, Pierre-Yves (El Cerrito, CA); Campisi, Judith (Berkeley, CA)

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

Annual Planning Summaries: Idaho Operations Office (ID) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Annual Planning Summaries: Idaho Operations Office (ID) Annual Planning Summaries: Idaho Operations Office (ID)...

124

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.8 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 2.5 8.1 6.5 4.8 6.2 9.9 2 Persons ...................................... 35.1 3.1 9.4 8.2 6.5 7.9 8.7 3 Persons ...................................... 17.0 1.3 4.3 4.0 3.3 4.1 10.7 4 Persons ...................................... 15.6 1.4 3.9 3.4 3.4 3.5 10.5 5 Persons ......................................

125

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.9 2.5 Total Rented Units ........................ 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 12.3 2.5 2.6 7.0 0.3 10.0 2 Persons ...................................... 9.2 2.5 2.5 4.1 Q 11.8 3 Persons ...................................... 5.4 2.0 1.1 2.0 0.4 13.9 4 Persons ...................................... 3.8 1.6 0.7 1.4 Q 17.7 5 Persons ...................................... 2.0 0.9 0.4 0.6 Q 24.1 6 or More Persons ........................

126

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Homes Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.4 2.0 2.9 1.3 Total Owner-Occupied Units ....... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 15.8 12.5 0.8 0.9 1.6 10.3 2 Persons ...................................... 25.9 23.4 0.5 0.5 1.5 10.1 3 Persons ...................................... 11.6 9.6 0.5 Q 1.3 12.1 4 Persons ...................................... 11.8 10.9 Q Q 0.7 15.7 5 Persons ...................................... 5.1 4.5 Q Q 0.4 24.2 6 or More Persons

127

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Household Characteristics by South Census Region, 1a. Household Characteristics by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.1 1.5 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 9.9 5.0 1.8 3.1 6.3 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 13.0 6.7 2.5 3.8 4.2 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 6.6 3.7 1.2 1.7 8.8 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 6.0 3.3 0.8 1.9 10.7 5 Persons ....................................................

128

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.5 0.8 1.4 1.3 1.4 Total .............................................................. 107.0 49.9 18.0 21.2 17.9 4.1 Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 14.6 5.3 4.8 3.6 6.4 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 15.7 5.7 6.9 6.8 5.4 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 7.6 2.8 3.5 3.1 7.2 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 6.8 2.3 4.1 2.4 8.1 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 3.1 1.3 1.3 1.4 12.3 6 or More Persons

129

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, 3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.4 1.9 1.2 1.0 0.6 1.9 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 47.6 3.0 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 13.2 19.8 25.5 37.7 10.7 38.8 3.2 Personal Computers 2 ................... 60.0 3.7 8.7 16.0 31.6 3.7 17.4 4.6 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 2.8 7.1 12.8 22.4 2.8 13.6 5.1 2 or more .................................... 9.1 0.6 0.7 1.7 6.2 0.6 2.2 13.0 Number of Laptop PCs

130

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.0 1.2 1.2 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 2.5 4.5 5.1 4.0 3.7 8.3 7.5 2 Persons ...................................... 35.1 4.8 6.2 6.6 4.5 5.3 7.8 5.8 3 Persons ...................................... 17.0 2.5 3.3 2.9 2.3 1.9 4.1 8.4 4 Persons ...................................... 15.6 3.4 2.8 2.3 1.9 1.8 3.4 9.6 5 Persons ...................................... 7.1 1.6 1.2 1.3 0.6 0.7 1.6 14.3 6 or More Persons

131

Location-based security for ID document and ID card enrollment stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of today's security for financial assets, services, facilities, personal information, immigration, employment and travel is provided in the form of a variety of ID instruments such as passports, credit cards, ID badges, access cards, and other similar ... Keywords: RFID, identity management systems, identity verification, location-based security, physical unclonable functions

Eugene P. Gerety; Khaled M. Elleithy

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

APS Beamline 6-ID-D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D Home D Home Recent Publications Beamline Info Optics Instrumentation Software User Info Beamline 6-ID-D Beamline 6-ID-D is operated by the Magnetic Materials Group in the X-ray Science Division (XSD) of the Advanced Photon Source. This is a high energy (50 - 130 keV) beamline used for structural studies primarily on single crystal materials. Recent Research Highlights A New Family of Quasicrystals A New Family of Quasicrystals June 24, 2013 Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University have used the high energy x-rays available on beamline 6-ID-D, to confirm the structure of the only known magnetic rare earth icosahedral binary quasicrystals. Contacts: Alan Goldman & Paul Canfield - Iowa State Univ. & Ames Lab Local Contacts:

133

Requesting a Digital ID | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requesting a Digital ID Requesting a Digital ID Requesting a Digital ID Step One - Registering with MIS To request a DOE Digital Identity you must first register in DOE's Management Information System (MIS) by going to https://mis.doe.gov, selecting "Requesting Access" and following the onscreen instructions. Note: DOE Federal employees are already registered and do not need to complete this step, they may skip to step 2. During the registration process you will be required to search for, and select, a DOE sponsor. Your DOE sponsor is the DOE federal employee that is certifying that you have a recognized relationship with the Department and have a valid need for a DOE Digital Identity. For contractors this person is often your Contract Task Manager, Contracting Officer's Representatives

134

Household energy in South Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research study on the use of energy in South Asis (India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh) was sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN, the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (the World Bank), and the Directorate-General for Development of the Commission of the European Communities. The aim of this book is to improve the understanding of household energy and its linkages, by reviewing the data resources on household energy use, supply, prices and other relevant factors that exist in South Asia.

Leach, G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Table WH1. Total Households Using Water Heating Equipment, 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table WH1. Total Households Using Water Heating Equipment, 2005 Million U.S. Households Fuels Used (million U.S. households) Number of Water Heaters Used

136

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Appendix A How the Survey Was Conducted Introduction The Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) was designed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA)...

137

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Space Heating by Household Income, 3a. Space Heating by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 18.4 22.7 26.8 38.1 14.6 33.4 3.3 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 0.3 Q 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 23.4 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 Q Q Q 0.2 Q Q 35.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.3 22.8 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 18.4 22.7

138

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Appliances by Household Income, 3a. Appliances by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.5 1.4 1.1 1.0 0.8 1.6 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 18.0 22.0 26.1 35.6 14.4 32.6 3.2 1 ................................................ 95.2 17.3 21.1 24.8 32.0 13.8 31.1 3.4 2 or More .................................. 6.5 0.8 0.9 1.3 3.6 0.6 1.5 13.1 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 18.0 22.0 26.1 35.6 14.4 32.6 3.2

139

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Quality Profile  

SciTech Connect

The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a periodic national survey that provides timely information about energy consumption and expenditures of U.S. households and about energy-related characteristics of housing units. The survey was first conducted in 1978 as the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS), and the 1979 survey was called the Household Screener Survey. From 1980 through 1982 RECS was conducted annually. The next RECS was fielded in 1984, and since then, the survey has been undertaken at 3-year intervals. The most recent RECS was conducted in 1993.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

National ID project of Nepal: future challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nepal is a small, landlocked and developing country in South Asia. It is bordered by China at North and India at South, East and West. The Government of Nepal, in order to achieve good governance and social-economic development, has initiated the e-Government ... Keywords: Nepal, challenges, government, national ID

Ganesh Prasad Adhikari

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1993 -- Executive ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

national level data on energy-related issues on households and energy expenditures in the residential sector.

142

Residential energy use and conservation actions: analysis of disaggregate household data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration recently published data they collected from the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS). NIECS includes detailed information on 4081 individual households: demographic characteristics, energy-related features of the structure, heating equipment and appliances therein, recent conservation actions taken by the household, and fuel consumption and cost for the April 1978 to March 1979 one-year period. This data set provides a new and valuable resource for analysis. The NIECS data on household energy consumption - total energy use, electricity use, and use of the primary space heating fuel, are summarized and analyzed. The regression equations constructed explain roughly half the variation in energy use among households. These equations contain ten or fewer independent variables, the most important of which are fuel price, year house was built, floor area, and heating degree days. Regression equations were developed that estimate the energy saving achieved by each household based on their recent retrofit actions. These equations predict 20 to 40% of the variation among households. Total annual energy use is the most important determinant of retrofit energy saving; other significant variables include age of household head, household income, year house was built, housing tenure, and proxies for the cost of heating and air conditioning the house.

Hirst, E.; Goeltz, R.; Carney, J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Fuelwood Use by Rural Households in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuelwood is an important source of domestic energy in rural regions of Brazil. In the Zona da Mata of Minas Gerais, native species from the Atlantic Forest are an important source of fuelwood, supplemented by wood from eucalyptus and coffee plantations. The use of native species is complicated by their increasing scarcity and the recent enforcement of forest policies that prohibit the felling of even dead natives trees without a permit. In this study, the factors contributing to the use of fuelwood in this region, despite the simultaneous use of liquid petroleum gas in most households, are explored by examining fuelwood use patterns in four small rural communities in the Zona da Mata Mineira using household surveys and semi-structured interviews. Two hypotheses were tested using a Jacknife regression. The first hypothesis, based on the energy ladder model, tested the predictive power of socioeconomic status in relation to fuelwood use. Two dependent variables were used to represent the importance of fuelwood to a household: the amount of time a household spent collecting fuelwood (Effort) and the number of purposes a household used fuelwood for (Class of Fuelwood Use). Socioeconomic status did explain a statistically significant percentage of the variance in Effort, but not in Class of Fuelwood Use. The second hypothesis tested for a moderating effect of the availability of fuelwood on the relationship between the socioeconomic status of a household and the dependent variables. The interaction between access to fuelwood and socioeconomic status was shown to explain a significant percentage of the variance in Effort, thereby indicating that the effect of socioeconomic status on time spent collecting fuelwood depends on access to fuelwood. However, there was no statistically significant interaction found between Class of Fuelwood Use and fuelwood availability. The Atlantic Forest Policy was found to have little influence on domestic energy decisions made by surveyed households. Few research subjects had a good understanding of the basic tenets of this policy and the Forest Police do not have adequate resources to enforce the policy at this level.

Wilcox-Moore, Kellie J.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Improving Demographic Components of Integrated Assessment Models: The Effect of Changes in Population Composition by Household Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This report describes results of the research project on "Improving Demographic Components of Integrated Assessment Models: The Effect of Changes in Population Composition by Household Characteristics". The overall objective of this project was to improve projections of energy demand and associated greenhouse gas emissions by taking into account demographic factors currently not incorporated in Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) of global climate change. We proposed to examine the potential magnitude of effects on energy demand of changes in the composition of populations by household characteristics for three countries: the U.S., China, and Indonesia. For each country, we planned to analyze household energy use survey data to estimate relationships between household characteristics and energy use; develop a new set of detailed household projections for each country; and combine these analyses to produce new projections of energy demand illustrating the potential importance of consideration of households.

Brian C. O'Neill

2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

145

Elasticities of Electricity Demand in Urban Indian Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy demand, and in particular electricity demand in India has been growing at a very rapid rate over the last decade. Given, current trends in population growth, industrialisation, urbanisation, modernisation and income growth, electricity consumption is expected to increase substantially in the coming decades as well. Tariff reforms could play a potentially important role as a demand side management tool in India. However, the effects of any price revisions on consumption will depend on the price elasticity of demand for electricity. In the past, electricity demand studies for India published in international journals have been based on aggregate macro data at the country or sub-national / state level. In this paper, price and income elasticities of electricity demand in the residential sector of all urban areas of India are estimated for the first time using disaggregate level survey data for over thirty thousand households. Three electricity demand functions have been estimated using monthly data for the following seasons: winter, monsoon and summer. The results show electricity demand is income and price inelastic in all three seasons, and that household, demographic and geographical variables are important in determining electricity demand, something that is not possible to determine using aggregate macro models alone. Key Words Residential electricity demand, price elasticity, income elasticity Short Title Electricity demand in Indian households Acknowledgements: The authors would like to gratefully acknowledge the National Sample Survey Organisation, Department of Statistics of the Government of India, for making available to us the unit level, household survey data. We would also like to thank Prof. Daniel Spreng for his support of our research. 2 1.

Shonali Pachauri

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. 1. Introduction The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is mandated by Congress to collect, analyze, and disseminate impartial, comprehensive data about energy--how much is produced, who uses it, and the purposes for which it is used. To comply with this mandate, EIA collects energy data from a variety of sources covering a range of topics 1 . Background The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted

147

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Home Office Equipment by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Home Office Equipment by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.1 1.4 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 17.9 12.8 5.0 1.3 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 10.9 7.7 3.3 3.1 Number of Desktop PCs 1 ................................................................ 45.1 8.7 6.2 2.5 3.7 2 or more ................................................... 9.1 1.4 0.9 0.5 12.9 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ................................................................

148

Energy and household expenditure patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since households account, either directly or indirectly, for two-thirds of the energy consumed in the US, changes in household activities will affect energy use. Expected changes in prices, personal income, and family spending over the next 20 years are looked at as well as the implications for energy consumption. The analysis shows that direct energy purchases will break with past trends, dropping from 2.6% to 0.2% annual growth for the rest of the century. Growth in spending on energy-using goods is also likely to slow down. The year 2000 will see a marked decrease in the growth of national energy consumption. 58 references, 3 figures, 35 tables.

Lareau, T.J.; Darmstadter, J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Home Office Equipment by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Home Office Equipment by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 22.4 15.7 6.7 1.3 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 14.1 9.9 4.2 3.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1 ................................................................ 45.1 10.4 7.2 3.2 3.7 2 or more ................................................... 9.1 2.3 1.6 0.7 10.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ................................................................

150

Property:DSIRE/Id | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:DSIRE/Id Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. DSIRE Incentive Code. Pages using the property "DSIRE/Id" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2003 Climate Change Fuel Cell Buy-Down Program (Federal) + US04F + 3 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) + VT31F + A AEP (Central and North) - CitySmart Program (Texas) + TX141F + AEP (Central and North) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) + TX116F + AEP (Central and SWEPCO) - Coolsaver A/C Tune Up (Texas) + TX119F + AEP (Central, North and SWEPCO) - Commercial Solutions Program (Texas) + TX141F + AEP (SWEPCO) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) + TX138F +

151

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2001 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.0 1.5 1.5 Total .............................................................. 107.0 7.1 12.3 7.7 6.3 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 2.2 2.4 1.8 1.7 7.3 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 2.2 4.0 2.4 2.0 6.9 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 1.1 2.0 1.2 1.2 9.5 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 0.8 1.9 1.3 0.9 11.2 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 0.4 1.1 0.4 0.5 19.8 6 or More Persons ....................................... 4.0 0.4 0.9 0.4 0.1 16.4 2001 Household Income Category

152

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Air Conditioning by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Air Conditioning by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 20.5 13.6 6.8 2.2 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.3 Q Q 27.5 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 20.2 13.4 6.7 2.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 14.3 9.5 4.8 3.8 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 13.6 9.0 4.6 3.9 With a Heat Pump .....................................

153

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.5 0.8 1.4 1.3 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 36.8 13.6 18.9 13.6 4.3 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 1.2 0.2 0.4 0.3 21.4 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 ........................................ 80.8 35.6 13.4 18.6 13.3 4.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 3 ............................ 57.5 23.6 8.6 15.8 9.4 5.1 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 19.3 7.4 13.1 6.4 6.3 With a Heat Pump ..................................... 11.3 4.4

154

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.5 1.5 1.4 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 59.5 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 5.2 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 1.2 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 23.3 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 58.2 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 5.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 44.7 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 7.0 Without a Heat Pump .................. 35.6 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 7.7 With a Heat Pump .......................

155

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.8 0.5 1.4 1.2 1.6 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 23.4 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 6.1 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 0.9 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 23.0 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 22.5 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 6.2 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 12.7 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 8.5 Without a Heat Pump .................. 10.6 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 9.3 With a Heat Pump ....................... 2.2 8.6 0.8 1.0

156

Inconsistent pathways of household waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to provide policy-makers and waste management planners with information about how recycling programs affect the quantities of specific materials recycled and disposed of. Two questions were addressed: which factors influence household waste generation and pathways? and how reliable are official waste data? Household waste flows were studied in 35 Swedish municipalities, and a wide variation in the amount of waste per capita was observed. When evaluating the effect of different waste collection policies, it was found to be important to identify site-specific factors influencing waste generation. Eleven municipal variables were investigated in an attempt to explain the variation. The amount of household waste per resident was higher in populous municipalities and when net commuting was positive. Property-close collection of dry recyclables led to increased delivery of sorted metal, plastic and paper packaging. No difference was seen in the amount of separated recyclables per capita when weight-based billing for the collection of residual waste was applied, but the amount of residual waste was lower. Sixteen sources of error in official waste statistics were identified and the results of the study emphasize the importance of reliable waste generation and composition data to underpin waste management policies.

Dahlen, Lisa [Division of Waste Science and Technology, Lulea University of Technology, SE, 971 87 Lulea (Sweden)], E-mail: lisa.dahlen@ltu.se; Aberg, Helena [Department of Food, Health and Environment, University of Gothenburg, P.O. Box 12204, SE, 402 42 Gothenburg (Sweden); Lagerkvist, Anders [Division of Waste Science and Technology, Lulea University of Technology, SE, 971 87 Lulea (Sweden); Berg, Per E.O. [HB Anttilator, Stagnellsgatan 3, SE, 652 23, Karlstad (Sweden)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Air Conditioning by South Census Region, 1a. Air Conditioning by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.3 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 37.2 19.3 6.4 11.5 1.5 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.4 Q Q Q 28.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 36.9 19.0 6.4 11.5 1.6 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 30.4 16.1 5.0 9.2 2.8 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 22.1 10.4 3.4 8.3 5.6 With a Heat Pump

158

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Air Conditioning by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Air Conditioning by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 14.5 11.3 3.2 3.3 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.3 0.3 Q 28.3 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 14.2 11.1 3.2 3.4 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 5.7 4.9 0.8 8.9 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 5.2 4.5 0.7 9.2 With a Heat Pump .....................................

159

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, 2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 13.6 16.0 14.7 10.4 10.5 17.6 4.7 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 Q 0.3 0.5 0.3 0.4 0.5 27.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 .......................... 80.8 13.4 15.8 14.2 10.1 10.2 17.1 4.7 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 3 .............. 57.5 12.6 13.7 11.0 7.1 6.6 6.4 5.9 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 10.1 10.4 8.0 6.1 5.9 5.7 7.0 With a Heat Pump ....................... 11.3 2.5 3.3

160

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.6 1.5 1.4 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 4.9 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 21.8 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 80.8 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 4.9 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 57.5 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 6.7 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 7.7 With a Heat Pump ....................... 11.3 8.6 0.8 1.0 0.8 19.7 Room Air-Conditioning

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DOI-BLM-ID-I020-2012-0017-CX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOI-BLM-ID-I020-2012-0017-CX DOI-BLM-ID-I020-2012-0017-CX Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-ID-I020-2012-0017-CX CX at Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant Idaho Geological Survey Geothermal Area Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Project Location Utah Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Time Frame (days) Application Time 272 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office BLM Idaho Falls District Office Managing Field Office BLM Pocatello Field Office Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates Application Date 10/21/2011

162

Property:GBIG/GreenButtonID | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GreenButtonID Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:GBIGGreenButtonID&oldid509348" What...

163

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-11-005.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

protective equipment (PPE) where practical. DOE-ID NEPA CX DETERMINATION IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY Page 2 of 2 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-11-005 Releasing Contaminants - Diesel...

164

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-015.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

direction of Waste Generator Services (WGS). DOE-ID NEPA CX DETERMINATION IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY Page 2 of 2 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-015 Releasing Contaminants - The...

165

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-028.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and therefore, waste associated DOE-ID-NEPA CX DETERMINATION Idaho National Laboratory Page 2 of 2 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-028 with project activities is...

166

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

This page left blank. This page left blank. E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION/HOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST DATA & TRENDS ENERGY OVERVIEW E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W INTRODUCTION Author's Note Estimates of gallons of fuel consumed, type of fuel used, price paid for fuel, and fuel economy are based on data imputed by EIA, using vehicle characteristics and vehicle-miles traveled data collected during the interview process for the 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS). Rather than obtaining that information directly from fuel purchase diaries, EIA exploited its experience and expertise with modeling techniques for transportation studies, filling missing and uncollected data with information reported to other federal agencies, as described in Appendices

167

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B B : E S T I M AT I O N M E T H O D O L O G I E S APPENDIX B A P P E N D I X B ESTIMATION METHODOLOGIES INTRODUCTION The National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) is the nation's inventory of local and long distance travel, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation. Between April 2001 and May 2002, roughly 26 thousand households 41 were interviewed about their travel, based on the use of over 53 thousand vehicles. Using confidential data collected during those interviews, coupled with EIA's retail fuel prices, external data sources of test 42 fuel economy, and internal procedures for modifying test fuel economy to on-road, in-use fuel economy, EIA has extended this inventory to include the energy used for travel, thereby continuing a data series that was discontinued by EIA in 1994. This appendix presents the methods used for each eligible sampled

168

RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained relatively stable for many years as increased energy efficiency has offset the increase in the number and average size of housing units, according to the newly released data from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The average household consumed 90 million British thermal units (Btu) in 2009 based on RECS. This continues the downward trend in average residential energy consumption of the last 30 years. Despite increases in the number and the average size of homes plus increased use of electronics, improvements in efficiency for space heating, air conditioning, and major appliances have all led to decreased consumption per household. Newer homes also tend to feature better insulation and other characteristics, such as double-pane windows, that improve the building envelope.

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

169

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION/HOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST DATA & TRENDS ENERGY OVERVIEW E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W INTRODUCTION Author's Note Estimates of gallons of fuel consumed, type of fuel used, price paid for fuel, and fuel economy are based on data imputed by EIA, using vehicle characteristics and vehicle-miles traveled data collected during the interview process for the 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS). Rather than obtaining that information directly from fuel purchase diaries, EIA exploited its experience and expertise with modeling techniques for transportation studies, filling missing and uncollected data with information reported to other federal agencies, as described in Appendices B and C of this report.

170

Guided Summarization Results GOOGLE Google Inc Run ID ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Guided Summarization Results GOOGLE Google Inc Run ID: GOOGLE1 Overall Responsiveness 1.000 Overall ...

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

171

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-025.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 of 4 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-025 DOE-ID-NEPA CX DETERMINATION Idaho National Laboratory Page 3 of 4 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-025 All conduit located on the...

172

Entity Name: ABC Company Entity ID:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Entity Name: Entity Name: ABC Company Entity ID: 00000 Data Year: 2013 State Include or exclude pre-arranged interruptions? 1 2 3 Do you capture outage records for events that initiate outside your system (customer system that causes di 4 5 6 7 8 Point to calculation in P1782: use percentages weighted based upon the classification of the circuit. 9 10 11 12 REWORD: The percent of customers automatically reported when they have lost power? e.g. SCADA, AMI, Etc. 13 SAIDI value (w/o Major Events included) FORM EIA-861 OMB No. 1905-0129 ANNUAL ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY REPORT

173

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities >Table 7a Glossary U.S. Residential Housing Primary Page Last Revised: July 2009

174

Alston S. Householder Fellowship | Careers | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Scientific Computing honors Dr. Alston S. Householder, founding Director of the Mathematics Division (now Computer Science and Mathematics Division) at the Oak Ridge National...

175

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 - PDF Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1 U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 1994 Table 2 U.S. per Household Vehicle Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel ...

176

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Residential Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 4 Total Square Feet of U.S. Housing Units

177

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities > Table 5c Glossary U.S. Residential Housing Site Page Last Revised: July 2009

178

Residential Energy Usage by Origin of Householder  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Energy Users > Residential Home Page > Energy Usage by Origin of Householder. Consumption and Expenditures. NOTE: To View and/or Print PDF's ...

179

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities >Table 7b Glossary U.S. Residential Housing Primary Energy Intensity

180

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities > Table 8b Glossary U.S. Residential Buildings Primary Energy Intensity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

methodology used to estimate these statistics relied on data from the 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption...

182

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Home Office Equipment by South Census Region, 1a. Home Office Equipment by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.3 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 34.6 18.4 6.0 10.1 1.2 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 20.7 11.7 3.2 5.8 4.0 Number of Desktop PCs 1 ................................................................ 45.1 15.5 8.6 2.6 4.3 4.9 2 or more ................................................... 9.1 3.1 2.0 0.4 0.7 9.6 Number of Laptop PCs

183

Electricity Prices for Households - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Households for Selected Countries1 Households for Selected Countries1 (U.S. Dollars per Kilowatthour) Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Argentina NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.023 NA NA Australia 0.091 0.092 0.094 0.098 NA NA NA NA NA Austria 0.144 0.154 0.152 0.163 0.158 0.158 0.178 0.201 NA Barbados NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Belgium NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Bolivia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Brazil NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.145 0.171 NA Canada 0.067 0.069 0.070 0.071 0.076 0.078 NA NA NA Chile NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.140 0.195 NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) 0.075 0.071 0.074 0.076 0.079 0.079 0.080 0.086 NA Colombia NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.111 0.135 NA

184

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, 2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.4 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 14.9 16.7 17.0 12.2 13.0 22.4 4.4 Personal Computers 2 ................... 60.0 11.0 11.6 10.3 7.2 7.8 12.0 5.3 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 8.0 9.0 7.7 5.3 6.1 9.1 5.8 2 or more .................................... 9.1 1.8 1.6 2.0 1.1 1.0 1.6 11.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

185

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2001 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.7 1.2 1.2 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 4.9 6.0 7.4 6.2 2.4 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.1 0.8 Q 0.1 23.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 4.7 5.2 7.4 6.1 2.6 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 1.3 3.9 6.2 5.7 6.7 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 1.2 3.2 5.5 3.8 8.1 With a Heat Pump ..................................... 11.3 Q 0.8 0.6 1.9 14.7 Room Air-Conditioning ................................ 23.3 3.4 1.2 1.2 0.3 13.6 1 Unit

186

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.9 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 8.4 26.2 21.1 19.0 21.5 7.8 Personal Computers 2 ................... 60.0 5.7 16.7 13.1 12.1 12.6 7.4 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 4.2 12.8 9.6 8.8 9.6 7.8 2 or more .................................... 9.1 0.8 2.4 2.3 2.0 1.7 12.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

187

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form D (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

188

Beamline 6-ID-D Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 2011 2010 2009 2008 All Sector 6 Pubs. APS Pubs. Database Recent 6-ID-D Publications Publications 2013:(24) "Controlling Size-Induced Phase Transformations Using Chemically Designed Nanolaminates," Matt Beekman, Sabrina Disch, Sergei Rouvimov, Deepa Kasinathan, Klaus Koepernik, Helge Rosner, Paul Zschack, Wolfgang S. Neumann, David C. Johnson, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52, 13211 (2013). "Thermophysical and Structural Measurements of Liquid Metallic Alloys Using Electrostatic Levitation," James Christopher Bendert, Ph.D.-Thesis, Washington University , 2013. "Pair distribution function analysis of X-ray diffraction from amorphous spheres in an asymmetric transmission geometry: application to a Zr58.5Cu15.6Ni12.8Al10.3Nb2.8 glass," J.C. Bendert, N.A. Mauro, K.F. Kelton, J. Appl. Crystallogr. 46, 999

189

Beamline 4-ID-D Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 All Sector 4 Pubs. APS Pubs. Database Recent 4-ID-D Publications Publications 2013:(13) "Classical and quantum phase transitions revealed using transport and x-ray measurements," Arnab Banerjee, Ph.D.-Thesis, University of Chicago, 2013. "Charge transfer and multiple density waves in the rare earth tellurides," A. Banerjee, Yejun Feng, D.M. Silevitch, Jiyang Wang, J.C. Lang, H.-H. Kuo, I.R. Fisher, T.F. Rosenbaum, Phys. Rev. B 87, 155131 (2013). "Local structure, stripe pinning, and superconductivity in La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 at high pressure," G. Fabbris, M. Hücker, G.D. Gu, J.M. Tranquada, D. Haskel, Phys. Rev. B 88, 060507(R) (2013). "Different routes to pressure-induced volume collapse transitions in

190

SLAC Dosimeter / ID Request Form A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feb 2009 (updated 13 May 2010) SLAC-I-760-0A07J-006-R010 1 of 2 Feb 2009 (updated 13 May 2010) SLAC-I-760-0A07J-006-R010 1 of 2 SLAC Dosimeter / ID Request Form A (For applicants who have completed SLAC Environment, Safety, and Health Training) Sections 1-5 completed by applicant. Section 1: Contact Information Last name: First name: MI: Male Female Birth year (yyyy): Job title: Contact information/mailing address: City: State: Zip code: Country: Dept/Group: Phone number: Mail stop: Users or non-SLAC employees only: List employer, company, or university : Section 2: Identification Badge Request I am applying for my first SLAC identification badge; I have successfully completed the following ES&H training (indicate all that apply): SON SOC EOESH GERT RWT I RWT II

191

Characterization of household waste in Greenland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The composition of household waste in Greenland was investigated for the first time. About 2 tonnes of household waste was sampled as every 7th bag collected during 1 week along the scheduled collection routes in Sisimiut, the second largest town in Greenland with about 5400 inhabitants. The collection bags were sorted manually into 10 material fractions. The household waste composition consisted primarily of biowaste (43%) and the combustible fraction (30%), including anything combustible that did not belong to other clean fractions as paper, cardboard and plastic. Paper (8%) (dominated by magazine type paper) and glass (7%) were other important material fractions of the household waste. The remaining approximately 10% constituted of steel (1.5%), aluminum (0.5%), plastic (2.4%), wood (1.0%), non-combustible waste (1.8%) and household hazardous waste (1.2%). The high content of biowaste and the low content of paper make Greenlandic waste much different from Danish household waste. The moisture content, calorific value and chemical composition (55 elements, of which 22 were below detection limits) were determined for each material fraction. These characteristics were similar to what has been found for material fractions in Danish household waste. The chemical composition and the calorific value of the plastic fraction revealed that this fraction was not clean but contained a lot of biowaste. The established waste composition is useful in assessing alternative waste management schemes for household waste in Greenland.

Eisted, Rasmus, E-mail: raei@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Appliances by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Appliances by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.3 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 19.6 14.5 5.2 1.1 1 .............................................................. 95.2 18.2 13.3 4.9 1.1 2 or More ................................................. 6.5 1.4 1.1 0.3 11.7 Most Used Oven ...................................... 101.7 19.6 14.5 5.2 1.1 Electric .....................................................

193

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Space Heating by South Census Region, 1a. Space Heating by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.9 1.2 1.4 1.3 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 38.8 20.2 6.8 11.8 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q Q 20.1 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q Q Q Q 39.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 Q Q Q Q 39.0 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0

194

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Space Heating by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Space Heating by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.7 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 20.1 14.7 5.4 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q 19.9 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q Q Q 39.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 Q Q Q 38.7 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 20.1 14.7 5.4 NE Natural Gas .................................................

195

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Space Heating by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Space Heating by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q 19.8 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q Q Q 39.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 Q Q Q 38.4 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Natural Gas

196

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Space Heating by West Census Region, 2a. Space Heating by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.6 1.0 1.6 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 22.6 6.7 15.9 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 0.7 Q 0.7 10.6 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 0.4 Q 0.4 18.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 0.2 Q 0.2 27.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 22.6 6.7 15.9 NE Natural Gas .................................................

197

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Appliances by West Census Region, 2a. Appliances by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.7 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 22.1 6.6 15.5 1.1 1 .............................................................. 95.2 20.9 6.4 14.5 1.1 2 or More ................................................. 6.5 1.2 0.2 1.0 14.6 Most Used Oven ...................................... 101.7 22.1 6.6 15.5 1.1 Electric .....................................................

198

The Determinants of Homeonwership in Presence of Shocks Experienced by Mexican Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homeownership is both an individual and society objective, because of the positive neighborhood effects associated with areas of higher homeownership. To help realize these positive effects, the Mexican government has several programs directed to increasing homeownership. Many factors, however, may influence homeownership including shocks experienced by households. Shocks such as death in family, illness or accidents, unemployment, and business, crop, or livestock loss affect homeownership if households are unable to cushion the impact of the shock. Government income support programs, however, may help cushion the effect of a shock. The main objective is to determine how shocks that households experience and government income support programs influence homeownership in Mexico. A secondary objective is to determine how socio-demographic variables influence homeownership in Mexico. Based on the Random Utility Model, logit models of homeownership are estimated using data are from the 2002 Mexican National Survey on Living Levels of Households. Two models are estimated; with and without income. Income is excluded because of a large number of households that did not report income. Generally, inferences from the two models are similar. Homeownership appears to not be affected by shocks experienced by households. It appears households are able to cushion the impact of shocks. The two income support programs, the Program of Direct Rural Support of Mexico (PROGRESA) and the Program of Direct Rural Support of Mexico (PROCAMPO), appear to be increasing homeownership. These social welfare programs provide cash transfers to households. For whatever reason, PROGRESA has a larger effect on homeownership than PROCAMPO. Households with older heads have a larger probability of being a homeowner than households with younger heads. No statistically significance relationship exists between education and homeownership. Regional differences are seen in homeownership, with households located in the northwest region having a higher probability of homeownership than other regions. Differences in the significance of variable representing the household heads gender, marital status, and occupation on homeownership exist between logit models that include and do not include current income. The most likely reason for these differences is interactions between the variables and a wealth effect.

Lopez Cabrera, Jesus 1977-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The household energy transition in India and China Shonali Pachauri a,, Leiwen Jiang b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

household surveys. The two countries differ sharply in several respects. Residential energy consumption of national primary energy consumption statistics shows clearly that both India and China are countries energy consumption remains low in both countries, particularly in India. Average energy use is low

200

Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program ID Selects Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative of the Year. John Martin was selected as DOE-ID's Facility Representative of the Year and the office's nominee for the 2007 DOE Facility Representative of the Year Award. John was selected from an exceptional field of candidates to represent DOE-ID at the Facility Representative Annual Workshop in Las Vegas this May. Each year the Department of Energy recognizes the Facility Representative whose achievements during the calendar year are most exemplary. A panel of senior personnel representing the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Environmental Management (EM), Science (SC), Nuclear Energy (NE) and at least five

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-015.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15 15 SECTION A. Project Title: Materials and Fuels Complex Underground and Aboveground Storage Tank Replacement SECTION B. Project Description: The purpose of this project is to permanently close and remove the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) 4,000 gallon bio-diesel underground storage tank (UST) [Site ID# 7230/Facility ID # 6-120614/Tank ID # 99ANL00013] and remove the 1,000 gallon E-85 aboveground storage tank (AST) [Site ID# 7230/Facility ID# 6-120614/Tank ID# 05MFC00035] and replace the two tanks with a 10,000 gallon aboveground storage tank (AST) split tank (5,000 gallons for bio-diesel/5,000 gallons for E-85). The 4,000 gallon bio-diesel UST and the 1,000 gallon E-85 AST are located in the parking lot area near building MFC-701.

202

Probit Model Estimation Revisited: Trinomial Models of Household Car Ownership  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Household Ownership of Car Davidon, W. C. (1959) VariableStudy Report 9: Models of Car Ownership and License Holding.Trinomial Models of Household Car Ownership. Transportation

Bunch, David S.; Kitamura, Ryuichi

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Modeling patterns of hot water use in households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 No Dishwashers . . . . . . . .to households without dishwashers. no_cw is only applied towasher; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting

Lutz, James D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, James E.; Dunham, Camilla; Shown, Leslie J.; McCure, Quandra T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Mobile ID Device Best Practice Recommendation Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Mobile ID Device Best Practice Recommendation Version 1.0 Shahram Orandi R. Michael McCabe Information Access Division ...

2012-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

205

,"Eastport, ID Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Eastport, ID Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","172014" ,"Next...

206

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ResidentialApplianceSaturationSurvey Database. ResidentialApplianceSaturation Survey(RASS)database(

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

SciTech Connect

The term ?household carbon footprint? refers to the total annual carbon emissions associated with household consumption of energy, goods, and services. In this project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a carbon footprint modeling framework that characterizes the key underlying technologies and processes that contribute to household carbon footprints in California and the United States. The approach breaks down the carbon footprint by 35 different household fuel end uses and 32 different supply chain fuel end uses. This level of end use detail allows energy and policy analysts to better understand the underlying technologies and processes contributing to the carbon footprint of California households. The modeling framework was applied to estimate the annual home energy and supply chain carbon footprints of a prototypical California household. A preliminary assessment of parameter uncertainty associated with key model input data was also conducted. To illustrate the policy-relevance of this modeling framework, a case study was conducted that analyzed the achievable carbon footprint reductions associated with the adoption of energy efficient household and supply chain technologies.

Kramer, Klaas Jan; Homan, Greg; Brown, Rich; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Did Household Consumption Become More Volatile?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I show that after accounting for predictable variation arising from movements in real interest rates, preferences, income shocks, liquidity constraints and measurement errors, volatility of household consumption in the US increased between 1970 and 2004. For households headed by nonwhite and/or poorly educated individuals, this rise was significantly larger. This stands in sharp contrast with the dramatic fall in instability of the aggregate U.S. economy over the same period. Thus, while aggregate shocks affecting households fell over time, idiosyncratic shocks increased. This finding may lead to significant welfare implications.

Olga Gorbachev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C C Quality of the Data Appendix C Quality of the Data Introduction This appendix discusses several issues relating to the quality of the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) data and to the interpretation of conclusions based on these data. The first section discusses under- coverage of the vehicle stock in the residential sector. The second section discusses the effects of using July 1991 as a time reference for the survey. The remainder of this appendix discusses the treatment of sampling and nonsampling errors in the RTECS, the quality of specific data items such as the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) and fuel prices, and poststratification procedures used in the 1991 RTECS. The quality of the data collection and the processing of the data affects the accuracy of estimates based on survey data. All the statistics published in this report such as total

210

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F (2005) - Household Natural Gas Usage Form F (2005) - Household Natural Gas Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Natural Gas Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown above, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and provide the requested information for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality and sanctions. Use the enclosed self-addressed envelope and return the completed form to:

211

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

G (2005) - Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form G (2005) - Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown on the label, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and answer the seven questions for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality and sanctions.

212

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D (2005) - Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form D (2005) - Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown on the label, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and answer the seven questions for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality

213

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Appliances by Climate Zone, a. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.1 Total .................................................. 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.8 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven .............................................. 101.7 9.1 27.9 23.1 19.4 22.2 7.8 1 ................................................... 95.2 8.7 26.0 21.6 17.7 21.2 7.9 2 or More ..................................... 6.5 0.4 1.9 1.5 1.7 1.0 14.7 Most Used Oven ........................... 101.7 9.1 27.9 23.1 19.4 22.2

214

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.5 1.7 1.6 1.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 69.1 9.4 16.7 6.6 4.3 1 ................................................ 95.2 63.7 8.9 16.2 6.3 4.3 2 or More .................................. 6.5 5.4 0.4 0.4 0.2 15.9 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 69.1 9.4 16.7 6.6 4.3 Electric ...................................... 63.0 43.3 5.2 10.9 3.6

215

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Space Heating by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Space Heating by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.6 0.9 1.3 1.3 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 49.9 18.0 21.2 17.9 4.3 Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 49.1 18.0 21.2 17.8 4.3 Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 0.7 0.1 0.1 0.1 25.8 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 0.4 0.1 Q 0.1 33.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 0.3 Q Q Q 30.2 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 49.1 18.0 21.2 17.8 4.3 Natural Gas

216

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.4 1.9 3.0 1.3 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Heat Home ..................................... 72.4 63.0 2.0 1.7 5.7 6.7 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 0.4 0.2 Q Q Q 46.2 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.3 0.2 Q Q Q 39.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ Q Q Q Q Q NF Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 72.4 63.0 2.0 1.7 5.7 6.7 Natural Gas

217

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Space Heating by Year of Construction, 2a. Space Heating by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.5 1.5 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.3 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 15.4 18.2 18.6 13.6 13.9 26.4 4.3 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 Q Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q 23.2 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 Q Q Q 0.2 Q Q 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q Q Q Q Q 37.8 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 15.4 18.2 18.6 13.6 13.9 26.4 4.3 Natural Gas ...................................

218

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.4 2.1 3.1 1.3 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 68.3 59.1 2.0 1.7 5.4 7.0 1 ................................................ 62.9 54.1 2.0 1.6 5.2 7.1 2 or More .................................. 5.4 5.0 Q Q 0.2 22.1 Most Used Oven ........................ 68.3 59.1 2.0 1.7 5.4 7.0 Electric ......................................

219

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.5 1.5 1.4 1.7 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.4 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 73.4 9.4 16.4 6.8 4.5 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 0.3 Q 0.6 Q 19.0 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 0.2 Q 0.3 Q 24.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q 0.3 Q 28.1 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 73.4 9.4 16.4 6.8 4.5 Natural Gas ...................................

220

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Appliances by Year of Construction, 2a. Appliances by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.5 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 14.3 17.2 17.8 12.9 13.7 25.9 4.2 1 ................................................ 95.2 13.1 16.3 16.6 12.1 12.7 24.3 4.4 2 or More .................................. 6.5 1.2 0.9 1.1 0.7 1.0 1.6 14.8 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 14.3 17.2 17.8 12.9 13.7 25.9 4.2 Electric ......................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Space Heating by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Space Heating by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.9 2.5 Total ............................................... 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Heat Home ..................................... 33.7 10.4 7.4 14.8 1.1 6.9 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 0.6 Q Q 0.5 Q 21.4 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.2 Q Q Q Q 84.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q 0.3 Q 36.4 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 33.7 10.4 7.4 14.8 1.1 6.9 Natural Gas ...................................

222

ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY NATIONAL AWARENESS OF ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 to four percent in 2012 and the proportion informed by their lender increased from zero percent in 2011 to one percent in 2012. All other responses were statistically...

223

National Household Travel Survey (2009)

The 2009 National...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

level, etc.); and

  • vehicle attributes (make, model, model year, amount of miles driven in a year).
      • These data are collected for:

        ...

  • 224

    National Household Travel Survey (2009) | OpenEI  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    education level, etc.); and vehicle attributes (make, model, model year, amount of miles driven in a year). These data are collected for: all trips, all modes, all purposes,...

    225

    Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1997 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 1997 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables Table Titles (Released: February 2004) Entire Section Percents Tables: HC1 Housing Unit Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF NOTE: As of 10/31/01, numbers in the "Housing Units" TABLES section for stub item: "Number of Floors in Apartment Buildings" were REVISED. These numbers will differ from the numbers in the published report. Tables: HC2 Household Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF Tables: HC3 Space Heating, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF Tables: HC4 Air-Conditioning, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF Tables: HC5 Appliances, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF

    226

    Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 3 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables Topical Sections Entire Section All Detailed Tables PDF Tables: HC1 Household Characteristics, Million U.S. Households Presents data relating to location, type, ownership, age, size, construction, and householder demographic and income characteristics. PDF Tables: HC2 Space Heating, Million U.S. Households Presents data describing the types of heating fuel and equipment used for main and secondary heating purposes. PDF Tables: HC3 Air-Conditioning, Million U.S. Households Presents data describing selected household characteristics including location, number of rooms and area cooled and air-conditioning usage. PDF

    227

    A database of anomalous traffic for assessing profile based IDS  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This paper aims at proposing a methodology for evaluating current IDS capabilities of detecting attacks targeting the networks and their services. This methodology tries to be as realistic as possible and reproducible, i.e. it works with real attacks ... Keywords: KDD'99, ROC curves, attack traces, statistical evaluation of IDS

    Philippe Owezarski

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    228

    Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US PAC CA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household  California households use 62 million Btu of energy per home, 31% less than the U.S. average. The lower than average site consumption results in households spending 30% less for energy than the U.S. average.  Average site electricity consumption in California homes is among the lowest in the nation, as the mild climate in much of the state leads to less reliance on

    229

    Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA  

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US PAC CA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household  California households use 62 million Btu of energy per home, 31% less than the U.S. average. The lower than average site consumption results in households spending 30% less for energy than the U.S. average.  Average site electricity consumption in California homes is among the lowest in the nation, as the mild climate in much of the state leads to less reliance on

    230

    U.S. Household Electricity Report  

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    Brief analysis reports on the amount of electricity consumed annually by U.S. households for each of several end uses, including space heating and cooling, water heating, lighting, and the operation of more than two dozen appliances.

    Barbara Fichman

    2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    231

    Household gasoline demand in the United States  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Continuing rapid growth in U.S. gasoline consumption threatens to exacerbate environmental and congestion problems. We use flexible semiparametric and nonparametric methods to guide analysis of household gasoline consumption, ...

    Schmalensee, Richard

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    232

    IDS Climate Change and Development Centre Resources | Open Energy  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IDS Climate Change and Development Centre Resources IDS Climate Change and Development Centre Resources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IDS Climate Change and Development Centre Resources Agency/Company /Organization: Institute of Development Studies Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Workshop, Publications, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices References: Institute of Development Studies CCDC[1] Logo: IDS Climate Change and Development Centre Resources CCDC promotes "collaborative research and policy analysis, delivering high quality research programmes, knowledge services, teaching and training." References ↑ "Institute of Development Studies CCDC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=IDS_Climate_Change_and_Development_Centre_Resources&oldid=375095"

    233

    2 The Financial and Economic Crises: Implications for Consumer Finance and for Households in Michigan  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    IPPSR and MSUE at Michigan State University for financial support. This paper was partially written while a Visiting Scholar at the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan, and its Michigan is an epicenter of the recent economic and financial crises. Median personal income was 8 percent above the national average at the beginning of the decade and was 8 percent below the national average by the end of it. Between 2008 and 2009, personal income fell for the first time since 1958. Rates of unemployment and foreclosure activity remain high and above the national average. Indeed, the Michigan economy is changing in dramatic and important ways, but there is little information on household responses to this changing environment. How are Michigan households responding to economic and financial shocks? Are they smoothing income, consumption, or both? What mechanisms are they using to achieve these outcomes? On which factors does the degree of adjustment depend? Using data collected from recent household surveys,

    Lisa D. Cook; Lisa D. Cook; Ann Marie Schneider; Lauren Meunier; Lisa D. Cook

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    234

    Building Technologies Residential Survey  

    SciTech Connect

    Introduction A telephone survey of 1,025 residential occupants was administered in late October for the Building Technologies Program (BT) to gather information on residential occupant attitudes, behaviors, knowledge, and perceptions. The next section, Survey Results, provides an overview of the responses, with major implications and caveats. Additional information is provided in three appendices as follows: - Appendix A -- Summary Response: Provides summary tabular data for the 13 questions that, with subparts, comprise a total of 25 questions. - Appendix B -- Benchmark Data: Provides a benchmark by six categories to the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey administered by EIA. These were ownership, heating fuel, geographic location, race, household size and income. - Appendix C -- Background on Survey Method: Provides the reader with an understanding of the survey process and interpretation of the results.

    Secrest, Thomas J.

    2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    235

    Patterns of rural household energy use: a study in the White Nile province - the Sudan  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The study investigates rural household domestic energy consumption patterns in a semiarid area of the Sudan. It describes the socioeconomic and evironmental context of energy use, provides an estimation of local woody biomass production and evaluates ecological impacts of increased energy demand on the local resource base. It is based on findings derived from field surveys, a systematic questionnaire and participant observations. Findings indicate that households procure traditional fuels by self-collection and purchases. Household members spent on average 20% of their working time gathering fuels. Generally per caput and total annual expenditure and consumption of domestic fuels are determined by household size, physical availability, storage, prices, income, conservation, substitution and competition among fuel resource uses. Households spend on average 16% of their annual income on traditional fuels. Aggregation of fuels on heat equivalent basis and calculation of their contribution shows that on average firewood provides 63%, charcoal 20.7%, dung 10.4%, crop residues 3.4% and kerosene/diesel 2.5% of the total demand for domestic purposes. Estimated total household woodfuel demand exceeds woody biomass available from the local forests. This demand is presently satisfied by a net depletion of the local forests and purchases from other areas. Degradation of the resource base is further exacerbated by development of irrigation along the White Nile River, increasing livestock numbers (overgrazing) and forest clearance for rainfed cultivation. The most promising relevant and appropriate strategies to alleviate rural household domestic energy problems include: conservation of the existing forest, augmentation through village woodlots and community forestry programmes and improvements in end-use (stoves) and conversion (wood to charcoal) technologies.

    Abdu, A.S.E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    236

    Residential energy consumption and expenditure patterns of low-income households in the United States  

    SciTech Connect

    The principal objective of this study is to compare poor and non-poor households with respect to energy consumption and expenditures, housing characteristics, and energy-related behavior. We based our study on an analysis of a national data base created by the US Department of Energy, the 1982-1983 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). RECS includes detailed information on individual households: demographic characteristics, energy-related features of the structure, heating equipment and appliances, recent conservation actions taken by the household, and fuel consumption and costs for April 1982-March 1983. We found a number of statistically significant (at the 0.05 level) differences between the two income groups in terms of demographics, heating/cooling/water heating systems, appliance saturation, the thermal integrity of their home, energy conservation behavior, energy consumption, energy expenditures, and the percentage of income spent on energy costs. For example, the non-poor used 22% more energy and paid 25% more money on utilities than the poor; however, the poor spent 20% more energy per square foot than the non-poor and spent about 25% of their income on energy expenditures, compared to 7% for the non-poor. These differences suggest different approaches that might be taken for targeting energy conservation programs to low-income households. Since the poor's ''energy burden'' is large, informational, technical, and financial assistance to low-income households remains an urgent, national priority. 13 refs., 26 tabs.

    Vine, E.L.; Reyes, I.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    237

    Property:HPBD/ProjectId | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ProjectId ProjectId Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "HPBD/ProjectId" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) H High Performance Buildings Database + 203 + High Performance Buildings Database + 358 + High Performance Buildings Database + 71 + High Performance Buildings Database + 833 + High Performance Buildings Database + 247 + High Performance Buildings Database + 20 + High Performance Buildings Database + 498 + High Performance Buildings Database + 132 + High Performance Buildings Database + 194 + High Performance Buildings Database + 323 + High Performance Buildings Database + 50 + High Performance Buildings Database + 785 + High Performance Buildings Database + 223 +

    238

    2010 Annual Planning Summary for Idaho Operations Office (ID...  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    to be prepared in the next 24 months, and the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review identified. 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Idaho Operations Office (ID) More...

    239

    Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    1: January 8, 1: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on AddThis.com... Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips In a day, the average household traveled 32.7 miles in 2001 (the latest

    240

    Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    2: October 3, 2: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on AddThis.com... Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership Household vehicle ownership has changed significantly over the last 40

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    241

    Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C C : Q U A L I T Y O F T H E D ATA APPENDIX C A P P E N D I X C QUALITY OF THE DATA INTRODUCTION This section discusses several issues relating to the quality of the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) data and to the interpretation of conclusions based on these data. In particular, the focus of our discussion is on the quality of specific data items, such as the fuel economy and fuel type, that were imputed to the NHTS via a cold-decking imputation procedure. This imputation procedure used vehicle-level information from the NHTSA Corporate Average Fuel Economy files for model year's 1978 through 2001. It is nearly impossible to quantify directly the quality of this imputation procedure because NHTS does not collect the necessary fuel economy information for comparison. At best, we have indirect evidence on the quality of our

    242

    DOETEIAO32l/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; Consumption  

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    sample custom-designed to meet the analytic objectives for surveys of residential energy use; sample as many as 5,500 households; provide 2-day personal training sessions...

    243

    Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite)  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Report Period: Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite) Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. Zip Code: - If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 - - Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey - - U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov Contact Name: Version No.: 2013.01 Date of this Report: Mo Day State: Year Phone No.: DOMESTIC CRUDE OIL FIRST PURCHASE REPORT Company Name: A completed form must be filed by the 30th calendar day following the end of the report

    244

    Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Appendix A: Mailing Address: Appendix B:  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Report Period: Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Appendix A: Mailing Address: Appendix B: Zip Code - Secure File Transfer option available at: - - - - Email form to: OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 Email address: Oil & Gas Survey U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 1. Total Acquisitions (Enter the total volume of foreign crude oil acquired during the report month for importation into the United States. This is the sum of column (l), Part III, excluding resubmission.) 2. Offshore Inventories (Enter the total volume of foreign oil owned by the firm, for eventual importation into the United States which is held in storage outside the United States and/or is enroute to the United States as of the

    245

    Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2001 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 2001 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables + EXPAND ALL Tables HC1: Housing Unit Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF (all tables) Climate Zone PDF Year of Construction PDF Household Income PDF Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit PDF Four Most Populated States PDF Urban/Rural Location PDF Northeast Census Region PDF Midwest Census Region PDF South Census Region PDF West Census Region PDF Tables HC2: Household Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF (all tables) Climate Zone PDF Year of Construction PDF Household Income PDF Type of Housing Unit PDF Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit PDF Type of Rented Housing Unit PDF

    246

    Model documentation: household model of energy  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The Household Model of Energy is an econometric model, meaning that energy use is determined quantitatively with the use of economic variables such as fuel prices and income. HOME is also primarily a structural model, meaning that energy use is determined as the result of interactions of intermediate components such as the number of households, the end use fuel shares and the energy use per household. HOME forecasts energy consumption in all occupied residential structures (households) in the United States on an annual basis through 1990. The forecasts are made based upon a number of initial conditions in 1980, various estimated elasticities, various parameters and assumptions, and a set of forecasted fuel prices and income. In addition to the structural detail, HOME operates on a more disaggregated level. This includes four end-use services (space heating, water heating, air conditioning, and others), up to seven fuel/technology types (dependent upon the end use service), two housing types, four structure vintages, and four Census regions. When the model is run as a module in IFFS, a sharing scheme further disaggregates the model to 10 Federal regions.

    Holte, J.A.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    247

    Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    5: February 5, 5: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on AddThis.com... Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles The graphs below show the average vehicle miles of travel (VMT) - daily

    248

    Competition Helps Kids Learn About Energy and Save Their Households...  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Competition Helps Kids Learn About Energy and Save Their Households Some Money Competition Helps Kids Learn About Energy and Save Their Households Some Money May 21, 2013 - 2:40pm...

    249

    Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    3: January 22, 3: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on AddThis.com... Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership

    250

    Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #259: March 17, 2003 Household...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    9: March 17, 2003 Household Travel by Gender to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 259: March 17, 2003 Household Travel by Gender on Facebook Tweet about...

    251

    Essays on household decision making in developing countries  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    This dissertation contains three essays on household decision making in the areas of education and health in developing countries. The first chapter explores intra-household decision making in the context of conditional ...

    Berry, James W. (James Wesley)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    252

    Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler...

    253

    Residential energy consumption survey: housing characteristics 1984  

    SciTech Connect

    Data collected in the 1984 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the sixth national survey of households and their fuel suppliers, provides baseline information on how households use energy. Households living in all types of housing units - single-family homes (including townhouses), apartments, and mobile homes - were chosen to participate. Data from the surveys are available to the public. The housing characteristics this report describes include fuels and the uses they are put to in the home; appliances; square footage of floorspace; heating (and cooling) equipment; thermal characteristics of housing structures; conservation features and measures taken; the consumption of wood; temperatures indoors; and regional weather. These data are tabulated in sets, first showing counts of households and then showing percentages. Results showed: Fewer households are changing their main heating fuel. More households are air conditioned than before. Some 50% of air-conditioned homes now use central systems. The three appliances considered essential are the refrigerator, the range, and the television set. At least 98% of US homes have at least one television set; but automatic dishwashers are still not prevalent. Few households use the budget plans tht are available from their utility companies to ease the payment burden of seasonal surges in fuel bills. The most common type of heating equipment in the United States is the natural-gas forced-air furnace. About 40% ofthose furnaces are at least 15 years old. The oldest water heaters are those that use fuel oil. The most common conservation feature in 1984 is ceiling or attic insulation - 80% of homes report having this item. Relatively few households claimed tax credits in 1984 for energy-conservation improvements.

    Not Available

    1986-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    254

    Household energy and consumption and expenditures, 1990. Supplement, Regional  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The purpose of this supplement to the Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990 report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential housing units, specifically at the four Census regions and nine Census division levels. This report includes household energy consumption, expenditures, and prices for natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and kerosene as well as household wood consumption. For national-level data, see the main report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990.

    Not Available

    1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    255

    Property:EiaUtilityId | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EiaUtilityId EiaUtilityId Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "EiaUtilityId" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 3 3 Phases Energy Services + 21093 + 4 4-County Electric Power Assn + 6641 + A A & N Electric Coop + 84 + A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) + 84 + AEP Generating Company + 343 + AEP Texas Central Company + 3278 + AEP Texas North Company + 20404 + AES Eastern Energy LP + 134 + AGC Division of APG Inc + 261 + AP Holdings LLC + 56571 + AP Holdings LLC (New York) + 56571 + APN Starfirst, L.P. + 50153 + APN Starfirst, L.P. (Illinois) + 50153 + APN Starfirst, L.P. (Ohio) + 50153 + APN Starfirst, L.P. (Texas) + 50153 + APNA Energy + 55841 + ARCO Products Co-Watson + 867 +

    256

    Building Energy Software Tools Directory: ID-Spec Large  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    ID-Spec Large ID-Spec Large ID-Spec Large is software for the electrical installation design of industrial and tertiary buildings. It helps to design a green electrical installation by enabling the user to: - Assess the impact of selecting energy efficiency solutions like power factor correction and low losses transformers in terms of cost savings - Reduce power losses and consequently carbon emissions in the electrical installation by optimizing equipment locations - Reduce investment cost while using less raw materials by optimizing length and cross-section of cables - Assess the percentage of recyclable materials for cables and busbar trunking systems. Screen Shots Keywords Electrical installation design, power losses assessment, CO2 emissions, quantity of conductors

    257

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-006.docx  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    ID-NEPA CX DETERMINATION ID-NEPA CX DETERMINATION Idaho National Laboratory Page 1 of 3 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-006 SECTION A. Project Title: Power Line Configuration 2013-1 SECTION B. Project Description: This project will install temporary distribution-level power lines between Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (CITRC) to support research and development and testing using electric power infrastructure. Two circuits of three-phase distribution lines will be installed from Power Burst Facility (PBF)-613 to the MFC test pad. Standard new crossarms and insulators will be installed on the existing 138kV H structures (underbuild) to support standard aluminum conductors steel reinforced (ACSR) conductors for the majority of the configuration change (approximately from Pole 40E to Pole 127E - an

    258

    Intergral Drive Systems AG IDS | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Intergral Drive Systems AG IDS Intergral Drive Systems AG IDS Jump to: navigation, search Name Intergral Drive Systems AG (IDS) Place Zurich, Swaziland Zip CH-8005 Sector Wind energy Product Zurich based producer of power electronics systems for wind turbines, PV plants, and propulsion systems. Coordinates 47.37706°, 8.53955° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.37706,"lon":8.53955,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

    259

    Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiency of Household Appliances in China  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Efficiency of Household Appliances in China Jiang Lin8 Appliance Market inEfficiency of Household Appliances in China Executive

    Lin, Jiang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    260

    DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Lowman Mill Site - ID 01  

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Lowman, Idaho, Disposal Site Documents Related to Lowman Mill Site Historical documents may contain...

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    261

    Balanced binary trees for ID management and load balance in distributed hash tables  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    We present a low-cost, decentralized algorithm for ID management in distributed hash tables (DHTs) managed by a dynamic set of hosts. Each host is assigned an ID in the unit interval [0, 1). At any time, the set of IDs splits the interval into disjoint ... Keywords: DHT, ID management, P2P, binary tree, distributed hash table, load balance, peer to peer

    Gurmeet Singh Manku

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    262

    Housing Diversity and Consolidation in Low-Income Colonias: Patterns of House Form and Household Arrangements in Colonias of the US-Mexico Border  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Colonias are low-income settlements on the US-Mexico border characterized by poor infrastructure, minimum services, and an active housing construction with a high self-help and self-management component. Housing in colonias is very diverse showing house forms that include temporary and permanent structures, campers, trailers or manufactured houses and conventional homes. Most of this housing does not meet construction standards and codes and is considered substandard. Colonias households are also of diverse nature and composition including single households, nuclear and extended families, as well as multiple households sharing lots. This wide variety of house forms and households in colonias fits poorly within the nuclear household, single family detached housing idealized by conventional low-income housing projects, programs and policies. As a result, colonias marginally benefit from the resources available to them and continue to depend mostly on the individual efforts of their inhabitants. This research identifies the housing diversity and the process of housing consolidation in colonias of the US-Mexico border by looking at the patterns of house form and household arrangements in colonias of South Texas. Ten colonias located to the east of the city of Laredo along Highway 359 in Webb County, Texas were selected based on their characteristics, data availability and accessibility. Data collected included periodic aerial images of the colonias spanning a period of 28 years, household information from the 2000 census disaggregated at the block level for these colonias, and information from a field survey and a semi structured interview made to a random sample of 123 households between February and June 2007. The survey collected information about house form and household characteristics. The survey also incorporated descriptive accounts on how households completed their house from the initial structure built or set on the lot until the current house form. Data was compiled and analyzed using simple statistical methods looking for identifiable patterns on house form and household characteristics and changes over time. Findings showed that housing in colonias is built and consolidated following identifiable patterns of successive changes to the house form. Findings also showed that households in colonias share characteristics that change over time in similar ways. These results suggest similarities of colonias with extra-legal settlements in other developing areas. Based on these findings, the study reflects on possible considerations that could improve the impact of projects, programs and policies directed to support colonias and improve colonias housing.

    Reimers-Arias, Carlos Alberto

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    263

    ORNL 2011-G00219/jcn UT-B ID 201002414  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    ORNL 2011-G00219/jcn UT-B ID 201002414 08.2011 Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons dilute bio-mass produced alcohols, such as those found in a biomass fermentation reactor. Conventional of traditional ethanol fermentation into fungible fuel applications Potential Applications · Hydrocarbon products

    Pennycook, Steve

    264

    An adaptive architecture of applying vulnerability analysis to IDS alerts  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    With increasing intrusions and attacks on the Internet, there is an urgent need to develop techniques for network security. Current standalone network security products, such as the firewall systems, the Intrusion Detection System (IDS), the anti-virus ... Keywords: alert, intrusion detection, network security, predicate-based evaluation, vulnerability analysis

    Xuejiao Liu; Xin Zhuang; Debao Xiao

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    265

    ORNL 2010-G00390/jcn UT-B ID 200802041  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    from Water Technology Summary Developing the technology to generate energy from waste and renewableORNL 2010-G00390/jcn UT-B ID 200802041 Microbial Fuel Cells Generate Energy While Clearing Biowaste materials is becoming an increasingly important priority in the United States, as energy derived from fossil

    Pennycook, Steve

    266

    ORNL 2011-G00218/jcn UT-B ID 200701859  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    be wasted energy inside a hybrid electric vehicle engine. The invention, a mechanical flywheel coupledORNL 2011-G00218/jcn UT-B ID 200701859 07.2011 Flywheel Energy Storage Device for Hybrid to a rotor inside the engine, stores rotational energy during engine performance, subsequently feeding

    Pennycook, Steve

    267

    ORNL 2010-G00385/jcn UT-B ID 200301297  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    billion annually in lost productivity. Waste energy from deceleration could be captured and storedORNL 2010-G00385/jcn UT-B ID 200301297 Nanostructured Carbon Shows Promise for Energy Storage energy storage demands of modern supercapacitors. Short power interruptions cost U.S. industry $80

    Pennycook, Steve

    268

    ORNL 2010-G00405 UT-B ID 200902330  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Industrial Effluents Technology Summary A vast amount of energy is wasted in the United States from of such previously wasted energy from relatively low temperature (ORNL 2010-G00405 UT-B ID 200902330 Novel Nanopore Membrane Technology Recovers Energy from

    Pennycook, Steve

    269

    ID-based proxy signature scheme with message recovery  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A proxy signature scheme, introduced by Mambo, Usuda and Okamoto, allows an entity to delegate its signing rights to another entity. Identity based public key cryptosystems are a good alternative for a certificate based public key setting, especially ... Keywords: Bilinear pairing, ID-based signature, Mobile agent, Proxy signature, Signature with message recovery

    Harendra Singh; Girraj Kumar Verma

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    270

    UW China Hong Kong Entrance Scholarship University of Waterloo ID#  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    UW ­ China Hong Kong Entrance Scholarship Name: University of Waterloo ID#: Program Applied of Waterloo who currently lives in or who previously lived in Hong Kong or mainland China. Candidates must also intend to return to Hong Kong or China after graduation. Selection will be based on academic

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    271

    Energy, the Environment and Behaviour Change: A survey of insights from behavioural economics  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    frameworks are imperfect, participation can establish credibility and good will (Gowdy 2008). Given that the North got rich by burning fossil fuels is it fair to tell the developing world to stop using them? Stiglitz (2006) argues that a fair solution could... upfront/sunk costs may constrain for households, particularly those facing fuel poverty. Brutscher (2011a) analyses liquidity constraints on households in Northern Ireland Continuous Household Survey (NICHS) and finds that, whilst there is a positive...

    Baddeley, Michelle

    272

    Biolog(TM) ID as compared to 16S ribosomal RNA ID for environmental isolates from the deep subsurface  

    SciTech Connect

    The U.S. Dept of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Microbial Culture Collection (SMCC) contains nearly 10,000 strains of microorganisms isolated from terrestrial subsurface environments. Many of the aerobic, gram-negative, chemoheterotrophs isolated from the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) have previously been identified by phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene nucleotide sequences. These SMCC isolates are currently being examined using Biolog GN Microplates and the Biolog Microstation System in order to gain knowledge of their metabolic capabilities and to compare Biolog IDs with 16S IDs. To accommodate the particular needs of these subsurface isolates, which are often incapable of growing under high-nutrient conditions, Biolog's recommendations for inoculating isolates into Biolog GN Microplates have been altered. The isolates are grown on low nutrient media, sodium thioglycolate (3mM) is added to the culture media to inhibit capsule formation, and a low density of bacteria is inoculated into the microplate. Using these altered inoculation criteria, 60 percent of these SMCC isolates have a Biolog genus ID that matches the 16S rRNA ID. These results indicate that the Biolog System can be a good means of identifying unusual environmental isolates, even when recommended inoculation procedures are altered to accommodate particular isolate needs.

    McKinsey, P.C.

    2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    273

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-006 R1-(INL-13-019 R1-redline).docx  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-006 R1 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-006 R1 SECTION A. Project Title: Power Line Configuration - 2013-1 R1 SECTION B. Project Description: Rev 1 Based on recommendations by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office, the route of the insulated cables on the ground has been changed. The new route replaces Fig 1 in the original Environmental Checklist (EC) and is shown in the figure, below. The new route has been surveyed by both the INL CRM Office and Biological Resources personnel. All Environmental Aspects and Work Activities identified in the original EC remain valid. All requirements and conditions identified in the original EC remain effective. Original EC This project will install temporary distribution-level power lines between Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and Critical Infrastructure

    274

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-007_INL-12-033_.doc  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Page 1 of 2 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-007 SECTION A. Project Title: Geotechnical Core Drilling for USGS 138 SECTION B. Project Description: . The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) proposes to drill a 1,000-foot deep geotechnical corehole (USGS 138) into the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. The location of the corehole will be about 4.0 mile(s) east of the city Howe and about 8.5 mile(s) north of the Naval Reactors Facility at the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, Section 7, Township 5 North, Range 30 East; lattitude/longitude (WGS84) 43 46 16.1 N / 112 55 27.7W (fig. 1). The purpose of this geotechnical borehole is to obtain geologic, stratigraphic, and hydraulic data to characterize flow in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer.

    275

    Towards sustainable household energy use in the Netherlands, Int  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Abstract: Households consume direct energy, using natural gas, heating oil, gasoline and electricity, and consume indirect energy, the energy related to the production of goods and the delivery of services for the households. Past trends and present-day household energy use (direct and indirect) are analysed and described. A comparison of these findings with objectives concerning ecological sustainability demonstrates that present-day household energy use is not sustainable. A scenario towards sustainable household energy use is designed containing far-reaching measures with regard to direct energy use. Scenario evaluation shows a substantial reduction of direct energy use; however, this is not enough to meet the sustainability objectiv es. Based on these results, the possibilities and the limitations are discussed to enable households to make their direct and indirect energy use sustainable on the long run.

    Jack Van Der Wal; Henri C. Moll

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    276

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-018.doc  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    8 8 SECTION A. Project Title: Rexburg Bus Lot (B60-1789-D-NE) Lease Termination SECTION B. Project Description: The proposed activity will terminate the lease of approximately four bus spaces at the Rexburg Parking Lot (B60-1789-D-NE) at South 5 th West in Rexburg, ID on or about July 31, 2012 for cost savings and consolidation to the existing lot at Rigby, ID. A facility walkthrough by BEA personnel will be performed in order to ensure the facility is ready for turnover back to the owner. Approximate cost associated with the activity is estimated at $1,500.00. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects / Potential Sources of Impact: Transacting real property in Rexburg, Idaho and moving four buses to a lot in Rigby, Idaho will not affect any INL environmental

    277

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-021.docx  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    DOE-ID-INL-12-021 DOE-ID-INL-12-021 SECTION A. Project Title: High Frequency Sounder - Permanent Installation at Water Reactor Research Test Facility (WRRTF) SECTION B. Project Description: The scope of this project is to construct and operate a 150-watt high frequency (HF) radio antenna (both transmit and receive) within the fenced area of the former Water Reactor Research Test Facility (WRRTF) to support various wireless test bed (WTB) activities and increase WTB capabilities by measuring the ionospheric characteristics of the region. The measurements are used to generate propagation maps of the ionosphere to graphically illustrate what HF frequencies are effective for communications. Construction is scheduled to take place in the August-September 2012 timeframe with operation beginning in October 2012.

    278

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-003.docx  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-003 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-003 SECTION A. Project Title: Auxiliary Canal Fill Project at Test Reactor Area (TRA)-670 SECTION B. Project Description: Although the ATR canal meets all design basis criteria, lessons learned following the earthquake and tsunami events at the Fukushima- Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in March of 2011 indicate that an auxiliary water supply to the fuel storage canal with a fill connection located outside of the facility would have been valuable following the beyond design basis event. As a result of these lessons learned, the Department of Energy (DOE) has allocated additional funding to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to mitigate beyond design basis events similar to the Fukushima-Daiichi disaster. The Auxiliary Canal Fill Project is one of the projects being funded from this

    279

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-012.docx  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    ECX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-012 ECX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-012 SECTION A. Project Title: Film Processing Project at Test Reactor Area (TRA)-678 SECTION B. Project Description The proposed action is to install a silver recovery unit to the film processor in the film processing area at TRA-678 for the purpose of minimizing waste generation and implementing pollution prevention. The proposed film processor (Kodak M-35A) generates approximately 90 ml of developer and 140 ml of fixer effluents per 17 inch film and approximately 40 gallons per hour of rinse water effluent. Developer and fixer effluents from the current film processing equipment are being collected in a Satellite Accumulation Area (SAA). The new equipment would eliminate the need for storing the effluent in the SAA by filtering silver from the effluent for recycling. The remaining

    280

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-10-020.doc  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    DOE-ID-INL-10-020 DOE-ID-INL-10-020 SECTION A. Project Title: Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Routine Maintenance Activities (Overarching) SECTION B. Project Description: The purpose of this overarching Environmental Checklist (EC) is to address activities that would meet the intent of the categorical exclusion (CX) B1.3 as described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendix B to Subpart D. These activities would consist of typical and non-typical types of actions, such as routine maintenance, minor modifications, and custodial service activities required to support safe and efficient plant operation, even if performed on an infrequent basis, and would occur on the INL Site and at those in town (Idaho Falls) facilities. These activities would be performed by INL Facility and Site Services personnel or off-site contractors. None of these activities would

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    281

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-007.doc  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    8 8 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-007 SECTION A. Project Title: Seismic Monitoring for Seismic Hazards Analyses SECTION B. Project Description: The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Probabilistic Seismic Hazards Analysis (PSHA) Phase I - Data Collection and Evaluation project is being conducted by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations office (DOE-ID) and INL Management. The project is being conducted from FY-2013 to FY-2017. Earthquake data will be collected at seismic stations located near INL facility areas for at least two years using seismometers and for the long-term using accelerometers. Installation of the seismic stations is being funded by the INL PSHA - Data Collection and Evaluation project and, following completion of this project,

    282

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-10-017.doc  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    DOE-ID-INL-10-017 DOE-ID-INL-10-017 SECTION A. Project Title: ATR Complex Dial Room. SECTION B. Project Description: The proposed project is to construct and operate a new dial room at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex (ATR Complex) (formerly known as the Test Reactor Area [TRA]) in order to meet the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy programmatic needs and to provide ongoing critical support at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The existing telecommunication and data systems located at the ATR Complex need to be updated to ensure the protection and continuity of telecommunications hardware and software property and provide reliability of communications and data connectivity. The new modular dial room facility will replace existing telecommunications systems equipment (telephony, optical transport, and data network infrastructure

    283

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-021.docx  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    DOE-ID-INL-12-021 DOE-ID-INL-12-021 SECTION A. Project Title: High Frequency Sounder - Permanent Installation at Water Reactor Research Test Facility (WRRTF) SECTION B. Project Description: The scope of this project is to construct and operate a 150-watt high frequency (HF) radio antenna (both transmit and receive) within the fenced area of the former Water Reactor Research Test Facility (WRRTF) to support various wireless test bed (WTB) activities and increase WTB capabilities by measuring the ionospheric characteristics of the region. The measurements are used to generate propagation maps of the ionosphere to graphically illustrate what HF frequencies are effective for communications. Construction is scheduled to take place in the August-September 2012 timeframe with operation beginning in October 2012.

    284

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-007.doc  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    8 8 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-007 SECTION A. Project Title: Seismic Monitoring for Seismic Hazards Analyses SECTION B. Project Description: The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Probabilistic Seismic Hazards Analysis (PSHA) Phase I - Data Collection and Evaluation project is being conducted by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations office (DOE-ID) and INL Management. The project is being conducted from FY-2013 to FY-2017. Earthquake data will be collected at seismic stations located near INL facility areas for at least two years using seismometers and for the long-term using accelerometers. Installation of the seismic stations is being funded by the INL PSHA - Data Collection and Evaluation project and, following completion of this project,

    285

    DOE-ID Procurement Services � the action team  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    DOE-ID Procurement Services � the action team DOE-ID Procurement Services � the action team Passage of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 included billions of dollars in additional funding for energy efficiency improvements to U.S. homes and businesses. By early July, the U.S. Department of Energy was hard pressed to get that funding to the communities who needed it to reduce their power bills. That�s when DOE�s Office of Energy Efficiency asked the department�s Idaho Operations Office for support from DOE-ID�s Procurement Services team. Rapid response Pat Alexander-Johnson (top) and Jeff Fogg (bottom) are two highly-trained and experienced contract specialists with the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho Operations Office. Within moments of receiving its orders, the 10-member team shifted into

    286

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-024..doc  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    PostingNo.: DOE-ID-INL-12-024 PostingNo.: DOE-ID-INL-12-024 SECTION A. Project Title: Rigby Bus Lot Northwest Entrance SECTION B. Project Description: The purpose of the proposed action is to provide an additional bus entrance to the Rigby Park and Ride Bus Lot. A portion of chain link fencing (running east to west) on the northwest corner of the Rigby Park and Ride Bus Lot would be relocated to allow an opening off of the City of Rigby dirt access road so that buses may enter the Rigby Park and Ride Lot from the northwest. The existing fence material would then be placed across the City of Rigby dirt access road (running north and south). The new entrance would be for buses only. Approximately 4 to 6 buses would use this entrance. No personnel vehicles will have access. Buses would start using the new

    287

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-012.docx  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    ECX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-012 ECX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-012 SECTION A. Project Title: Film Processing Project at Test Reactor Area (TRA)-678 SECTION B. Project Description The proposed action is to install a silver recovery unit to the film processor in the film processing area at TRA-678 for the purpose of minimizing waste generation and implementing pollution prevention. The proposed film processor (Kodak M-35A) generates approximately 90 ml of developer and 140 ml of fixer effluents per 17 inch film and approximately 40 gallons per hour of rinse water effluent. Developer and fixer effluents from the current film processing equipment are being collected in a Satellite Accumulation Area (SAA). The new equipment would eliminate the need for storing the effluent in the SAA by filtering silver from the effluent for recycling. The remaining

    288

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-018.doc  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    8 8 SECTION A. Project Title: Rexburg Bus Lot (B60-1789-D-NE) Lease Termination SECTION B. Project Description: The proposed activity will terminate the lease of approximately four bus spaces at the Rexburg Parking Lot (B60-1789-D-NE) at South 5 th West in Rexburg, ID on or about July 31, 2012 for cost savings and consolidation to the existing lot at Rigby, ID. A facility walkthrough by BEA personnel will be performed in order to ensure the facility is ready for turnover back to the owner. Approximate cost associated with the activity is estimated at $1,500.00. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects / Potential Sources of Impact: Transacting real property in Rexburg, Idaho and moving four buses to a lot in Rigby, Idaho will not affect any INL environmental

    289

    File:INL-geothermal-id.pdf | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    id.pdf id.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Idaho Geothermal Resources Size of this preview: 380 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(3,458 × 5,456 pixels, file size: 1.67 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Idaho Geothermal Resources Sources Idaho National Laboratory Authors Patrick Laney; Julie Brizzee Related Technologies Geothermal Creation Date 2003-11-01 Extent State Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Idaho File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:24, 16 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 12:24, 16 December 2010 3,458 × 5,456 (1.67 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated upload from NREL's "mapsearch" data

    290

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-10-020.doc  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    DOE-ID-INL-10-020 DOE-ID-INL-10-020 SECTION A. Project Title: Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Routine Maintenance Activities (Overarching) SECTION B. Project Description: The purpose of this overarching Environmental Checklist (EC) is to address activities that would meet the intent of the categorical exclusion (CX) B1.3 as described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendix B to Subpart D. These activities would consist of typical and non-typical types of actions, such as routine maintenance, minor modifications, and custodial service activities required to support safe and efficient plant operation, even if performed on an infrequent basis, and would occur on the INL Site and at those in town (Idaho Falls) facilities. These activities would be performed by INL Facility and Site Services personnel or off-site contractors. None of these activities would

    291

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-016.doc  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-016 No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-016 SECTION A. Project Title: Reverse Osmosis System Removal SECTION B. Project Description: The project will remove a reverse osmosis water treatment system (FU-HA-101) from TAN 681 room 182. The system is out-of-service, with no intent of future use. Work will involve removal of the reverse osmosis system, and associated plumbing/piping and electrical lines and conduit. The project will clear the area of obstacles and tripping hazards associated with unused/unnecessary equipment and utilities. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects / Potential Sources of Impact: Generating and Managing Waste: Project activities will result in generation of an estimated 90 cubic ft. of low-level radioactive waste. Wastes will be characterized and dispositioned through Waste Generator Services. Reuse and recycling of materials will be practiced

    292

    Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Consumption Survey : Sample Selection Activities.  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The primary purpose of the 1983 Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Consumption Survey is to obtain a comprehensive data base regarding household energy usage patterns incorporating not only general behavioral indicators of usage (e.g., temperature at which the dwelling is maintained at different times of day during the months of the year in which heating systems are activated or conservation measures effected) but also those characteristics lying further beyond the realm of immediate influence of the household dwellers which directly effect energy consumption (e.g., housing and household characteristics including square footage, number of floors or levels, the number and characteristics of the appliances in the household and household demographics/composition). The data base to be assembled as part of this research effort is also to include households' actual level of energy use for two major fuels (i.e., electricity and natural gas) obtained, with the consent of respondents, from their servicing utility(ies). Two samples have been incorporated in the study. The primary sample - the Regional Sample - will generate a large and comprehensive data base from a representative cross-section of individual households in the Pacific Northwest. A second, Supplementary Sample was incorporated in the survey design to ensure that a sufficient number of households not participating in qualified loan or grant programs, but comparable to participant households on a number of key descriptive characteristics, were included in the assessment. Inclusion of such households in the assessment will permit a formal evaluation of the loan/grant programs to be accomplished. Sampling procedures are described thoroughly.

    Louis Harris and Associates

    1983-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    293

    A Model of Household Demand for Activity Participation and Mobility  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    household car ownership, car usage, and travel by differentownership demand, and car usage demand. Modal travel demand,mode), car ownership, and car usage for spatial aggregations

    Golob, Thomas F.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    294

    Barriers to household investment in residential energy conservation: preliminary assessment  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A general assessment of the range of barriers which impede household investments in weatherization and other energy efficiency improvements for their homes is provided. The relationship of similar factors to households' interest in receiving a free energy audits examined. Rates of return that underly household investments in major conservation improvements are assessed. A special analysis of household knowledge of economically attractive investments is provided that compares high payback improvements specified by the energy audit with the list of needed or desirable conservation improvements identified by respondents. (LEW)

    Hoffman, W.L.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    295

    Household Responses to the Financial Crisis in Indonesia  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    on farm households in Indonesia and Thailand, World Bank20. Cameron, Lisa. (1999). Indonesia: a quarterly review,The Real Costs of Indonesia's Economic Crisis: Preliminary

    Thomas, Duncan; Frankenberg, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    296

    Essays on the effects of demographics on household consumption.  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    ??My dissertation analyses the relationship between households' consumption behavior and changes in family demographic characteristics. The first paper studies consumption over the period of the (more)

    Stepanova, Ekaterina, 1977-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    297

    U.S. households are incorporating energyefficient features ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    ... area of increased efficiency: about 60% of households use at least some energy-efficient compact fluorescent (CFL) or light-emitting diode (LED) ...

    298

    Analysis of the energy requirement for household consumption.  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    ??Humans in households use energy for their activities. This use is both direct, for example electricity and natural gas, but also indirect, for the production, (more)

    Vringer, Kees

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    299

    Householder's Perceptions of Insulation Adequacy and Drafts in the ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    The 2001 RECS was the first RECS to request household perceptions regarding the presence of winter drafts in the home. The data presented in this report ...

    300

    1997 Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures per Household ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Return to: Residential Home Page . Changes in the 1997 RECS: Housing Unit Type Per Household Member Per Building Increase. Residential Energy Consumption ...

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    301

    Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    What's new in our home energy use? What's new in our home energy use? RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 First results from EIA's 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) The 2009 RECS collected home energy characteristics data from over 12,000 U.S. households. This report highlights findings from the survey, with details presented in the Household Energy Characteristics tables. How we use energy in our homes has changed substantially over the past three decades. Over this period U.S. homes on average have become larger, have fewer occupants, and are more energy-efficient. In 2005, energy use per household was 95 million British thermal units (Btu) of energy compared with 138 million Btu per household in 1978, a drop of 31 percent. Did You Know? Over 50 million U.S. homes have three or more televisions.

    302

    Appliance Commitment for Household Load Scheduling  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This paper presents a novel appliance commitment algorithm that schedules thermostatically-controlled household loads based on price and consumption forecasts considering users comfort settings to meet an optimization objective such as minimum payment or maximum comfort. The formulation of an appliance commitment problem was described in the paper using an electrical water heater load as an example. The thermal dynamics of heating and coasting of the water heater load was modeled by physical models; random hot water consumption was modeled with statistical methods. The models were used to predict the appliance operation over the scheduling time horizon. User comfort was transformed to a set of linear constraints. Then, a novel linear, sequential, optimization process was used to solve the appliance commitment problem. The simulation results demonstrate that the algorithm is fast, robust, and flexible. The algorithm can be used in home/building energy-management systems to help household owners or building managers to automatically create optimal load operation schedules based on different cost and comfort settings and compare cost/benefits among schedules.

    Du, Pengwei; Lu, Ning

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    303

    In-vessel composting of household wastes  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The process of composting has been studied using five different types of reactors, each simulating a different condition for the formation of compost; one of which was designed as a dynamic complete-mix type household compost reactor. A lab-scale study was conducted first using the compost accelerators culture (Trichoderma viridae, Trichoderma harzianum, Trichorus spirallis, Aspergillus sp., Paecilomyces fusisporus, Chaetomium globosum) grown on jowar (Sorghum vulgare) grains as the inoculum mixed with cow-dung slurry, and then by using the mulch/compost formed in the respective reactors as the inoculum. The reactors were loaded with raw as well as cooked vegetable waste for a period of 4 weeks and then the mulch formed was allowed to maturate. The mulch was analysed at various stages for the compost and other environmental parameters. The compost from the designed aerobic reactor provides good humus to build up a poor physical soil and some basic plant nutrients. This proves to be an efficient, eco-friendly, cost-effective, and nuisance-free solution for the management of household solid wastes.

    Iyengar, Srinath R. [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, V.J. Technological Institute, H.R. Mahajani Road, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India)]. E-mail: srinathrangamani@yahoo.com; Bhave, Prashant P. [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, V.J. Technological Institute, H.R. Mahajani Road, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India)]. E-mail: drppbhave@vsnl.net

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    304

    Household appliance choice: revision of REEPS behavioral models. Final report  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This report describes the analysis of household decisions to install space heating, central cooling, and water heating in new housing as well as decisions to own freezers and second refrigerators. This analysis was conducted as part of the enhancements to the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS) under EPRI project RP1918-1. The empirical models used in this analysis were the multinomial logit and its generalization the nested logit. The choice model parameters were estimated statistically on national and regional survey data. The results show that capital and operating costs are significant determinants of appliance market penetrations, and the relative magnitudes of the cost coefficients imply discount rates ranging from 3.4 to twenty-one percent. Several tests were conducted to examine the temporal and geographical stability of the key parameters. The estimated parameters have been incorporated into the REEPS computer code. The revised version of REEPS is now available on a limited release basis to EPRI member utilities for testing on their system.

    Goett, A.A.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    305

    RENEWABLE ENERGY FROM SWINE WASTE Bingjun He, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 1  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    RENEWABLE ENERGY FROM SWINE WASTE Bingjun He, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 1 Yuanhui Zhang, Ted of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844. Phone: 208.885.7714, fax: 208.885.7908, email: . 2Yuanhui Zhang

    He, Brian

    306

    GRR/Section 13-ID-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ID-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-ID-a - Land Use...

    307

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-002 _INL-13-008_.docx  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    DOE-ID NEPA CX DETERMINATION Idaho National Laboratory Page 2 of 2 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-002 If objects of potential archaeological or historical significance (e.g.,...

    308

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-025-1.doc  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    would be recycled to the extent practicable. DOE-ID NEPA CX DETERMINATION Idaho National Laboratory Page 2 of 2 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-025 SECTION D. Determine the...

    309

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-007_INL-12-033_.doc  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    personal protective equipment (PPE) where practical. DOE-ID NEPA CX DETERMINATION IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY Page 2 of 2 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-007 Releasing...

    310

    U-063: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error...  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    3: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-063: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote...

    311

    A REVIEW OF ASSUMPTIONS AND ANALYSIS IN EPRI EA-3409, "HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCE CHOICE: REVISION OF REEPS BEHAVIORAL MODELS"  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    EPRI EA-3409, "Household Appliance Choice: Revision of REEPSEA",3409: "HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCE CHOICE: REVISION OF REEPSreport EA-3409, "Household Appliance Choice: Revi- sion of

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    312

    Model of home heating and calculation of rates of return to household energy conservation investment  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This study attempts to find out if households' investments on energy conservation yield expected returns. It first builds a home-heating regression model, then uses the results of the model to calculate the rates of return for households' investments on the energy conservation. The home heating model includes housing characteristics, economic and demographic variables, appliance related variables, and regional dummy variables. Housing characteristic variables are modeled according to the specific physical relationship between the house and its heating requirement. Data from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) of 1980-1981 is used for the empirical testing of the model. The model is estimated for single-detached family houses separately for three major home-heating fuel types: electricity, natural gas and fuel oil. Four scenarios are used to calculate rates of return for each household. The results show in the Northern areas the rates of return in most of the cases are a lot higher than market interest rates. In the Western and Southern areas, with few exceptions, the rates of return are lower than market interest rates. The variation of heating degree days and energy prices can affect the rates of return up to 20 percentage points.

    Hsueh, L.M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    313

    Simulating household activities to lower consumption peaks: demonstration  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Energy experts need fine-grained dynamics oriented tools to investigate household activities in order to improve power management in the residential sector. This paper presents the SMACH framework for modelling, simulating and analy- sis of household ... Keywords: agent-based modelling, energy, social simulation

    Edouard Amouroux, Francois Semp, Thomas Huraux, Nicolas Sabouret, Yvon Haradji

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    314

    Elements of consumption: an abstract visualization of household consumption  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    To promote sustainability consumers must be informed about their consumption behaviours. Ambient displays can be used as an eco-feedback technology to convey household consumption information. Elements of Consumption (EoC) demonstrates this by visualizing ... Keywords: a-life, eco-feedback, household consumption, sustainability

    Stephen Makonin; Philippe Pasquier; Lyn Bartram

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    315

    Residential Energy Consumption Survey: housing characteristics, 1982  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Data in this report cover fuels and their use in the home, appliances, square footage of floor space, heating equipment, thermal characteristics of the housing unit, conservation activities, wood consumption, indoor temperatures, and weather. The 1982 survey included a number of questions on the reasons households make energy conservation improvements to their homes. Results of these questions are presented. Discussion also highlights data pertaining to: trends in home heating fuels, trends in conservation improvements, and characteristics of households whose energy costs are included in their rent.

    Thompson, W.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    316

    The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis -- A Reflexively Designed Survey of New-Car-Buying Multi-Vehicle California Households  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Gromer, C Newage of the electric car. Popular Mechanics.VEHICLES strongly favor electric cars, but on the other,electric vehicles, if an electric car wasavailable to buy

    Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth S.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    317

    The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Gromer, C. New age of the electric car. Popular Mechanics.VEHICLES strongly favor electric cars, but on the other,electric vehicles, if an electric car was available to buy

    Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    318

    The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    of electric vehicles the safety of compressed gas vehicleselectric vehicles the practicality of home recharging or the safety

    Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    319

    The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis -- A Reflexively Designed Survey of New-Car-Buying Multi-Vehicle California Households  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    and the demand electric vehicles", Transportation ResearchA,Critical Review Electric Vehicle MarketStudies", ReleasableR. (1993) Report of the Electric Vehicle at-HomeRefi~ehng

    Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth S.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    320

    The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    a sidebar to a longer article on electric vehicles. ) Cogan,R. Electric vehicles: Powerplay on the auto circuit. MotorA Critical Review of Electric Vehicle Market Studies",

    Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    321

    The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    even after purchase incentives for natural gas and electricnatural gas, and gasoline vehicles. The use of purchase incentives

    Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    322

    The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis -- A Reflexively Designed Survey of New-Car-Buying Multi-Vehicle California Households  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    by electric and hybrid vehicles", SAETechmcal Papers No.may response to hybrid vehicles Finally, we suggest thatsamebetweenvehicle tyoes. Hybrid Vehicles for examplecost a

    Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth S.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    323

    The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    size styles) 5. Compressed natural gas, ranges 80 or 120,Hybrid electric: Compressed natural gas: Reformulatedof electric, compressed natural gas and methanol fueled

    Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    324

    The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis -- A Reflexively Designed Survey of New-Car-Buying Multi-Vehicle California Households  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    B. C. D. E. F. Compressed natural gas Reformulated gasolineelectric ~]1 compressed natural gas [~1 reformulatedgasolinefull size styles) Compressed natural gas, ranges 80 or 120,

    Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth S.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    325

    The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    gas vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles, in addition toof range, and hybrid electric vehicles with 140 and 180possible designs of hybrid electric vehicles pose complex

    Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    326

    The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis -- A Reflexively Designed Survey of New-Car-Buying Multi-Vehicle California Households  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    gas vebacles and hybrid electric vehicles, maddition tocontrast to a hybrid electric vehicle that combines electrichousehold.In contrast to a hybrid electric vehicle that of

    Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth S.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    327

    Table CE2-3e. Space-Heating Energy Expenditures in U.S. Households ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Table CE2-3e. Space-Heating Energy Expenditures in U.S. Households by Household Income, 2001 RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty

    328

    Household attitudes toward energy conservation in the Pacific Northwest: overview and comparisons  

    SciTech Connect

    This report presents an overview of a baseline residential energy conservation study for the Pacific Northwest conducted in November 1983 by RMH Research, Inc. It also compares the study results with available data from other surveys. The primary focus of the RMH study is conservation marketing. As such it assesses the attitudes, perceptions, and past conservation actions of the region's residents and provides market segmentation based upon past conservation actions and the propensity to invest in conservation in the future. Excluding renters, who account for about 24% of the region's households, three prospect groups for marketing conservation investments are identified: First Tier Prospects who are very likely to invest in additional conservation measures requiring larger sums of money (estimated at about 547,000 households, or 18 percent of the region's households); Second Tier Prospects who are somewhat likely to invest in full weatherization (estimated at about 22% of the region's households or 695,700); and Non-Prospects who are unlikely to invest in energy conservation in the near future (estimated to be 1,113,400 or 36% of the regional total). A summary comparison of the most important distinguishing attributes of the three prospect groups is presented. Considering the current surplus status of the region's electricity supply situation and the overall strategy in capability building, implications include (1) using public information programs through utilities and the news media to maintain the conservation interests of the first-tier prospects and (2) exploring ways to move the second-tier prospects into the first tier and to reach the so-called non-prospect and rental housing groups.

    Fang, J.M.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    329

    Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption,  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) Dataset Summary Description The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The 2005 survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the U.S. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the Consumption & Expenditures data. The Consumption & Expenditures and Intensities data is divided into two parts: Part 1 provides energy consumption and expenditures by census region, population density, climate zone, type of housing unit, year of construction and ownership status; Part 2 provides the same data according to household size, income category, race and age. The next update to the RECS survey (2009 data) will be available in 2011.

    330

    Institute of Development Studies (IDS) | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute of Development Studies (IDS) Institute of Development Studies (IDS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Institute of Development Studies Name Institute of Development Studies Address Library Road, Brighton, East Sussex Place Brighton, UK Zip BN1 9RE Number of employees 201-500 Year founded 1966 Phone number +44 (0)1273 606261 Coordinates 50.8659583°, -0.0901136° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":50.8659583,"lon":-0.0901136,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

    331

    Coal Survey Frequently Asked Questions  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Survey FAQ Survey FAQ Available FAQ: Q. Whom do I contact if I need assistance completing a survey form? Q. Whom do I contact if I require assistance with the registration process, log-in process, instructions pertaining to JavaScript or cookies? Q. What unit of measurement should be used to calculate Btu? Q. How do I update the information that appears under Item I on IDC? Q. Under "Item II: Coal Receipts, Consumption and Stocks," can a value be negative? Q. How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? Vice Versa. Q. How do I convert between pounds to short tons? Vice Versa. Q. How do I correct a mistake on the Survey Form once I have submitted the data? Q. How do I log in if forgot my password? Q. If I accidently deleted the registration letters, how can I get my Mail ID and Code?

    332

    U-063: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    3: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error 3: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-063: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code December 16, 2011 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: RSA SecurID Software Token 4.1 for Microsoft Windows ABSTRACT: A remote user can cause the target application to execute arbitrary code on the target user's system. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026426 ESA-2011-039 Secunia Advisory: SA45665 Securityfocus Advisory CVE-2011-4141 RSA Online Fraud Resource Center IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in RSA SecurID Software Token. A remote user

    333

    U-063: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    63: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error 63: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-063: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code December 16, 2011 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: RSA SecurID Software Token 4.1 for Microsoft Windows ABSTRACT: A remote user can cause the target application to execute arbitrary code on the target user's system. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026426 ESA-2011-039 Secunia Advisory: SA45665 Securityfocus Advisory CVE-2011-4141 RSA Online Fraud Resource Center IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in RSA SecurID Software Token. A remote user

    334

    RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No. Multiple  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Smart and Calibrated Pig Surveys of SPR Raw Water/Crude Oil Pipelines, 2013-2018 Smart and Calibrated Pig Surveys of SPR Raw Water/Crude Oil Pipelines, 2013-2018 Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, materials, supervision, equipment and transportation required to perform a 360 o internal high resolution instrumented corrosiontoo survey (smart survey) and a 360 o internal high electronic caliper pig survey of raw water and crude oil pipelines at all SPR sites from 2013-2018, as required. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions).

    335

    Table AC1. Total Households Using Air-Conditioning Equipment, 2005 ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Table AC1. Total Households Using Air-Conditioning Equipment, 2005 Million U.S. Households Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment (millions) Central System

    336

    Table SH1. Total Households Using a Space Heating Fuel, 2005 ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Total Households Using a Space Heating Fuel, 2005 Million U.S. Households Using a Non-Major Fuel 5 ... Space Heating (millions) Energy Information Administration

    337

    Table CE2-3c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Physical Units (PU) per Household4,a Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,3 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

    338

    Table CE2-7c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Physical Units (PU) per Household3,a Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,2 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

    339

    Table CE2-12c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Physical Units (PU) per Household3,a Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,2 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

    340

    Table CE2-4c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Physical Units (PU) per Household3,a Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,2 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    341

    Table CE2-7c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Physical Units (PU) per Household3 Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,2 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

    342

    Material World: Forecasting Household Appliance Ownership in a Growing Global Economy  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    of Household Income and Appliance Ownership. ECEEE Summerof decreasing prices of appliances, if price data becomesForecasting Household Appliance Ownership in a Growing

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    343

    Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework  

    SciTech Connect

    Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

    Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    344

    Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

    Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    345

    The Impact of Carbon Control on Low-Income Household Electricity and Gasoline Expenditures  

    SciTech Connect

    In July of 2007 The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA) released its impact analysis of 'The Climate Stewardship And Innovation Act of 2007,' known as S.280. This legislation, cosponsored by Senators Joseph Lieberman and John McCain, was designed to significantly cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions over time through a 'cap-and-trade' system, briefly described below, that would gradually but extensively reduce such emissions over many decades. S.280 is one of several proposals that have emerged in recent years to come to grips with the nation's role in causing human-induced global climate change. EIA produced an analysis of this proposal using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to generate price projections for electricity and gasoline under the proposed cap-and-trade system. Oak Ridge National Laboratory integrated those price projections into a data base derived from the EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 2001 and the EIA public use files from the National Household Transportation Survey (NHTS) for 2001 to develop a preliminary assessment of impact of these types of policies on low-income consumers. ORNL will analyze the impacts of other specific proposals as EIA makes its projections for them available. The EIA price projections for electricity and gasoline under the S.280 climate change proposal, integrated with RECS and NHTS for 2001, help identify the potential effects on household electric bills and gasoline expenditures, which represent S.280's two largest direct impacts on low-income household budgets in the proposed legislation. The analysis may prove useful in understanding the needs and remedies for the distributive impacts of such policies and how these may vary based on patterns of location, housing and vehicle stock, and energy usage.

    Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    346

    The Impact of Carbon Control on Low-Income Household Electricity and Gasoline Expenditures  

    SciTech Connect

    In July of 2007 The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA) released its impact analysis of 'The Climate Stewardship And Innovation Act of 2007,' known as S.280. This legislation, cosponsored by Senators Joseph Lieberman and John McCain, was designed to significantly cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions over time through a 'cap-and-trade' system, briefly described below, that would gradually but extensively reduce such emissions over many decades. S.280 is one of several proposals that have emerged in recent years to come to grips with the nation's role in causing human-induced global climate change. EIA produced an analysis of this proposal using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to generate price projections for electricity and gasoline under the proposed cap-and-trade system. Oak Ridge National Laboratory integrated those price projections into a data base derived from the EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 2001 and the EIA public use files from the National Household Transportation Survey (NHTS) for 2001 to develop a preliminary assessment of impact of these types of policies on low-income consumers. ORNL will analyze the impacts of other specific proposals as EIA makes its projections for them available. The EIA price projections for electricity and gasoline under the S.280 climate change proposal, integrated with RECS and NHTS for 2001, help identify the potential effects on household electric bills and gasoline expenditures, which represent S.280's two largest direct impacts on low-income household budgets in the proposed legislation. The analysis may prove useful in understanding the needs and remedies for the distributive impacts of such policies and how these may vary based on patterns of location, housing and vehicle stock, and energy usage.

    Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    347

    Household energy conservation attitudes and behaviors in the Northwest: Tracking changes between 1983 and 1985  

    SciTech Connect

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has analyzed the changes in consumer energy conservation attitudes and behaviors in the Pacific Northwest between 1983 and 1985. The information was collected through stratified random telephone surveys on 2000 and 1058 households, respectively, for 1983 and 1985 in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) service area in Idaho, Oregon, Washington and Western Montana. This report covers four topic areas and tests two hypotheses. The topics are as follows: consumer perceptions and attitudes of energy use and conservation in the home; consumer perceptions of energy institutions and other entities; past and intended conservation actions and investments; and segmentation of homeowners into market prospect groups. The hypotheses tested are as follows: (1) There has been no change in the size and psychographic make-up of the original three market segments found in the 1983 survey analysis; and (2) image profiles of institutions with respect to familiarity, overall impression, and believability as sources of energy conservation information remain unchanged since 1983.

    Fang, J.M.; Hattrup, M.P.; Nordi, R.T.; Shankle, S.A.; Ivey, D.L.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    348

    Residential energy consumption of low-income and elderly households: how non-discretionary is it  

    SciTech Connect

    The energy literature is replete with opinions that the poor and elderly have cut their residential energy consumption to a minimum. This paper challenges such conclusions through an analysis of data on a sample of 319 Decatur, Illinois homeowners. The data include utility bill histories and survey information on housing characteristics, energy-related behaviors, attitudes, and socio-economic and demographic characteristics. It shows that residential energy consumption per square foot of living space is significantly higher for the elderly and poor than for other groups of Decatur homeowners. By breaking energy use into seasonal components, the paper estimates consumption for various household uses. This information, combined with the survey data, suggests that both subgroups heat and cool their homes inefficiently, due in part to the conditions of their homes, but also due to energy-related behaviors. The public policy implications of the findings are discussed.

    Brown, M.A.; Rollinson, P.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    349

    Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 - Appendix C  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Introduction This appendix discusses several issues relating to the quality of the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) data and to the interpretation of conclusions based on these data. The first section discusses undercoverage of the vehicle stock in the residential sector. The second section discusses the effects of using July 1994 as a time reference for the survey. The remainder of this appendix discusses the treatment of sampling and nonsampling errors in the RTECS, the quality of specific data items such as the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) and fuel prices, and poststratification procedures used in the 1994 RTECS. The quality of the data collection and the processing of the data affects the accuracy of estimates based on survey data. All the statistics

    350

    Measurement of nicotine in household dust  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    An analytical method of measuring nicotine in house dust was optimized and associations among three secondhand smoking exposure markers were evaluated, i.e., nicotine concentrations of both house dust and indoor air, and the self-reported number of cigarettes smoked daily in a household. We obtained seven house dust samples from self-reported nonsmoking homes and 30 samples from smoking homes along with the information on indoor air nicotine concentrations and the number of cigarettes smoked daily from an asthma cohort study conducted by the Johns Hopkins Center for Childhood Asthma in the Urban Environment. House dust nicotine was analyzed by isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Using our optimized method, the median concentration of nicotine in the dust of self-reported nonsmoking homes was 11.7 ng/mg while that of smoking homes was 43.4 ng/mg. We found a substantially positive association (r=0.67, P<0.0001) between house dust nicotine concentrations and the numbers of cigarettes smoked daily. Optimized analytical methods showed a feasibility to detect nicotine in house dust. Our results indicated that the measurement of nicotine in house dust can be used potentially as a marker of longer term SHS exposure.

    Kim, Sungroul [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Institute for Global Tobacco Control, 627 N. Washington Street, 2nd Floor Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)], E-mail: srkim@jhsph.edu; Aung, Ther; Berkeley, Emily [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Diette, Gregory B. [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Breysse, Patrick N. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    351

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-022.docx  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY Page 1 of 3 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-022 SECTION A. Project Title: Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD)/Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) Material Training Activities and Evaluations Using Radiation Emitting Sources/Material/Devices - Overarching SECTION B. Project Description This Environmental Checklist (EC) will be an overarching EC for future training as described in this EC. Work Description The purpose of this overarching EC is to plan, prepare, coordinate, ship materials off-site, observe, and conduct training for response to radiological incidents at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) locations and non-INL customer-hosted locations (such as Armed Forces installations). Only work performed at the INL is covered under this EC. Training at non-INL customer-hosted locations may be subject

    352

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-008.doc  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    DOEID NEPA CX DETERMINATION DOEID NEPA CX DETERMINATION Idaho National Laboratory Page 1 of 2 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-008 SECTION A. Project Title: Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Diversion Dam SECTION B. Project Description: There is a flood control dam about 2000 ft south of MFC. The dam is at risk of failure during a large runoff event. This project will reinforce the flood control dam with additional earthen material and a concrete headwall around the culvert inlet. The workscope consists of 1) Removing riprap from the existing slope around the culvert area. 2) Installing a concrete headwall structure around the culvert inlet. 3) Increase the slope of the dam at the culvert inlet and around the headwall to a 3:1 slope. 4) Replace riprap around headwall.

    353

    AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I '. CONTRACT ID CODE  

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I '. SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I '. CONTRACT ID CODE BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, VA 24506 PAGE I OF 12 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 871 85-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 I I 90. DATED (SEE ITEM 1 1 ) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) I 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. MI67 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. I 1 DE-AC04-00AL66620 100. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the

    354

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-008.doc  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    DOEID NEPA CX DETERMINATION DOEID NEPA CX DETERMINATION Idaho National Laboratory Page 1 of 2 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-008 SECTION A. Project Title: Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Diversion Dam SECTION B. Project Description: There is a flood control dam about 2000 ft south of MFC. The dam is at risk of failure during a large runoff event. This project will reinforce the flood control dam with additional earthen material and a concrete headwall around the culvert inlet. The workscope consists of 1) Removing riprap from the existing slope around the culvert area. 2) Installing a concrete headwall structure around the culvert inlet. 3) Increase the slope of the dam at the culvert inlet and around the headwall to a 3:1 slope. 4) Replace riprap around headwall.

    355

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID_INL-13-010.doc  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    0 0 SECTION A. Project Title: North Boulevard Annex Lease Termination SECTION B. Project Description: The proposed activity would terminate the current lease of the North Boulevard Annex (IF-613) at 2095 North Boulevard in Idaho Falls, ID on or about July 31, 2013 for cost savings and footprint reduction purposes. A facility walkthrough by BEA personnel will occur prior to the lease termination to ensure the facility is ready for turnover back to the owner. Approximate cost associated with these activities is estimated at $2,000.00. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects or Potential Sources of Impact: Generating and Managing Waste: Various quantities of industrial waste (non-hazardous, non-radioactive) such as office trash are removed from the building for pickup and transportation by garbage collection services prior to lease termination.

    356

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-019.doc  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    9 9 SECTION A. Project Title: University Boulevard Water Meter Installation SECTION B. Project Description: This project would install water meters for the purpose of measuring water use at each of four University Boulevard (UB) buildings at 535, 655, 625, and 595 University Boulevard (IF-680 (UB1), IF-681 (UB2), IF-682 (UB3), and IF-684 (UB4)) in Idaho Falls, ID during the projected time period of August and September, 2013 at an approximate cost of $20 K - $95 K depending upon whether the work can be completed from inside the building(s) or must be performed exterior to the building(s). SECTION C. Environmental Aspects or Potential Sources of Impact: Air Emissions: If excavation is required, the activity has the potential to generate fugitive dust. All reasonable precautions shall be

    357

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-012.docx  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    4 4 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-012 SECTION A. Project Title: Water Security Test Bed (WSTB) SECTION B. Project Description: This project was extensively described in Environmental Checklists (ECs) Idaho National Laboratory (INL)-13-014 (Overarching [OA] 5) and INL-13-014 Revision (R) 1 (OA 5). Upon review, it was determined that additional planning and detail was required to fully describe the project and associated activities. Both INL-13-014 and R1 to that EC are canceled; this EC will replace them. Future revisions may address additional project details regarding design, construction, and operational details and limitations as they become known through the project planning process. Background Since its inception, the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Homeland Security Research Program (Sponsor) has been providing

    358

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-006.docx  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    3 3 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-006 SECTION A. Project Title: Power Line Configuration 2013-1 SECTION B. Project Description: This project will install temporary distribution-level power lines between Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (CITRC) to support research and development and testing using electric power infrastructure. Two circuits of three-phase distribution lines will be installed from Power Burst Facility (PBF)-613 to the MFC test pad. Standard new crossarms and insulators will be installed on the existing 138kV H structures (underbuild) to support standard aluminum conductors steel reinforced (ACSR) conductors for the majority of the configuration change (approximately from Pole 40E to Pole 127E - an

    359

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-022.docx  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY Page 1 of 3 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-022 SECTION A. Project Title: Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD)/Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) Material Training Activities and Evaluations Using Radiation Emitting Sources/Material/Devices - Overarching SECTION B. Project Description This Environmental Checklist (EC) will be an overarching EC for future training as described in this EC. Work Description The purpose of this overarching EC is to plan, prepare, coordinate, ship materials off-site, observe, and conduct training for response to radiological incidents at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) locations and non-INL customer-hosted locations (such as Armed Forces installations). Only work performed at the INL is covered under this EC. Training at non-INL customer-hosted locations may be subject

    360

    IdJOO2 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    6/2004 13:39 FAX 6/2004 13:39 FAX IdJOO2 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 MAR 26 2004 OFFICE OF AIR AND RADIATION R. Paul Detwiler, Acting Manager Carlsbad Field Office U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, NM 88221-3090 Dear Dr. Detwiler: This letter announces the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) final decision to approve the Department of Energy's (DOE's) remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program Implementation Plan (WCPIP), Revision aD, and the RH TRU Waste Characterization Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). We have detenDined that these documents provide an adeql.late general framework for the characterization ofRH waste for disposal at WIPP, while allowing flexibility for DOE to develop characterization programs

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    361

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-022.docx  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Idaho National Laboratory Idaho National Laboratory Page 1 of 2 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-022 SECTION A. Project Title: Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Irradiated Experiment Shipping Capability SECTION B. Project Description: The General Electric (GE) 2000 Model Cask is currently used to support the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) irradiated experiment shipments from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory's (INL) ATR Complex to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at INL's Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). However, due to changes in GE-Hitachi's business model, the continued availability of the GE Model 2000 cask is not guaranteed. Furthermore, the internal cavity of the GE Model 2000 cask is too short to support shipment of some larger GTRI experiments. The purpose of the proposed action is to develop and implement a

    362

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-023.doc  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Environmental Checklist Environmental Checklist Page 1 of 1 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-023 SECTION A. Project Title: Idaho Falls Power - Willow Creek Building (WCB) Conduit Installation SECTION B. Project Description: The purpose of this project is to provide the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) a communications pathway from the Willow Creek Building (WCB) northeast parking lot handhole to the handhole north of Research and Education Campus (REC)-617. INL and the City of Idaho Falls have an existing easement agreement that allows INL to place private telecommunications infrastructure in the City easement. Idaho Falls Power would provide and install a 1" conduit with pull rope for future INL use. Idaho Falls Power would provide and install a fiber patch panel, pull the fiber coiled in the WCB northeast parking lot handhole, and terminate and test the fiber to provide connectivity

    363

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-006.doc  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    6 6 SECTION A. Project Title: International Way Office Building Lease Termination SECTION B. Project Description: The proposed activity will terminate the current lease of the International Way Office Building (IF-674, IWB) at 1690 International Way in Idaho Falls, ID on or about March 28, 2012 for cost savings and footprint reduction purposes. A facility walkthrough by BEA personnel will occur on or about March 26 to ensure the building is ready for turnover back to the owner. Approximate cost associated with these activities is estimated at $2,500.00. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects / Potential Sources of Impact: Generating and Managing Waste: Small amounts of industrial waste (non-hazardous, non-radioactive) such as office trash are

    364

    Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS ID NO.: 0137SPE012  

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

    Material Safety Data Sheet Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS ID NO.: 0137SPE012 Revision date: 05/25/2011 1. CHEMICAL PRODUCT AND COMPANY INFORMATION Product name: Speedway E85 Synonym: Speedway ED75/ED85; E-75; E75; E-85; E85; Ethanol/Gasoline Fuel Blend; Fuel Ethanol ED75/ED85 Chemical Family: Gasoline/Ethanol Formula: Mixture Manufacturer: Speedway LLC P.O. Box 1500 Enon, OH 45501 Other information: 419-421-3070 Emergency telephone number: 877-627-5463 2. COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS E85 is a mixture of ethyl alcohol and gasoline that is approved for use in an automobile spark ignition engine. Can contain small amounts of dye and other additives (>0.02%) which are not considered hazardous at the concentrations used. Product information: Name CAS Number

    365

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-023.doc  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Environmental Checklist Environmental Checklist Page 1 of 1 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-023 SECTION A. Project Title: Idaho Falls Power - Willow Creek Building (WCB) Conduit Installation SECTION B. Project Description: The purpose of this project is to provide the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) a communications pathway from the Willow Creek Building (WCB) northeast parking lot handhole to the handhole north of Research and Education Campus (REC)-617. INL and the City of Idaho Falls have an existing easement agreement that allows INL to place private telecommunications infrastructure in the City easement. Idaho Falls Power would provide and install a 1" conduit with pull rope for future INL use. Idaho Falls Power would provide and install a fiber patch panel, pull the fiber coiled in the WCB northeast parking lot handhole, and terminate and test the fiber to provide connectivity

    366

    Automatic ID heat load generation in ANSYS code  

    SciTech Connect

    Detailed power density profiles are critical in the execution of a thermal analysis using a finite element (FE) code such as ANSYS. Unfortunately, as yet there is no easy way to directly input the precise power profiles into ANSYS. A straight-forward way to do this is to hand-calculate the power of each node or element and then type the data into the code. Every time a change is made to the FE model, the data must be recalculated and reentered. One way to solve this problem is to generate a set of discrete data, using another code such as PHOTON2, and curve-fit the data. Using curve-fitted formulae has several disadvantages. It is time consuming because of the need to run a second code for generation of the data, curve-fitting, and doing the data check, etc. Additionally, because there is no generality for different beamlines or different parameters, the above work must be repeated for each case. And, errors in the power profiles due to curve-fitting result in errors in the analysis. To solve the problem once and for all and with the capability to apply to any insertion device (ID), a program for ED power profile was written in ANSYS Parametric Design Language (APDL). This program is implemented as an ANSYS command with input parameters of peak magnetic field, deflection parameter, length of ID, and distance from the source. Once the command is issued, all the heat load will be automatically generated by the code.

    Wang, Zhibi

    1992-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    367

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-017.docx  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    will have a locking wellhead installed after completion, will be marked with a brass survey marker, and will have a well pad poured at the surface. The purpose of this...

    368

    Using Multiple Household Food Inventories to Measure Food Availability in the Home  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of conducting multiple household food inventories over the course of 30 days to examine weekly food variability. Household food availability influences the foods individuals choose to consume; therefore, by assessing the home food environment a better understanding of what people are eating can be obtained. Methods of measuring home food availability have been developed and tested in recent years; however most of these methods assess food availability on one occasion only. This study aimed to capture "usual" availability by using multiple assessments. After the development and pre-testing of the 171-item home observation guide to determine the presence and amount of food items in the home (refrigerator, freezer, pantry, elsewhere), two trained researchers recruited a convenience sample of 9 households (44.4% minority), administered a baseline questionnaire (personal info, shopping habits, food resources, and food security), and conducted 5 in-home assessments (5-7 day interval) over a 30-day period. Each in-home assessment included shopping and fast food activities since the last assessment and an observational survey of types and amounts of foods present. The final in-home assessment included an audio recorded interview on food habits and beliefs. Complete data were collected from all 9 women (32.8 y +/- 6.0; 3 married; 4 +/- 1.6 adults/children in household; 4 SNAP; 6 food insecure) and their households. Weekly grocery purchases (place, amount, and purpose) use (frequency) varied from once (n=1) to every week (n=5); 4 used fast food 2-3 times/wk for 4 weeks. Quantity and types of fresh and processed fruits and vegetables varied by week and by family. The feasibility of conducting multiple in-home assessments was confirmed with 100% retention from all participants. This methodology is important in that it provided detailed information on intra-monthly variation in food availability. The findings suggest the inadequacy of a single measure to assess food availability in the home.

    Sisk, Cheree L.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    369

    Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households Focus Area: Appliances & Equipment Topics: Policy Impacts Website: active.cput.ac.za/energy/web/DUE/DOCS/422/Paper%20-%20Shuma-Iwisi%20M. Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/appliance-standby-power-and-energy-co Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance A modified engineering model is proposed to estimate standby power and energy losses in households. The modified model accounts for the randomness of standby power and energy losses due to unpredicted user appliance operational behavior.

    370

    Profiling energy use in households and office spaces  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Energy consumption is largely studied in the context of different environments, such as domestic, corporate, industrial, and public sectors. In this paper, we discuss two environments, households and office spaces, where people have an especially ...

    Salman Taherian; Marcelo Pias; George Coulouris; Jon Crowcroft

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    371

    Household Preferences for Supporting Renewable Energy, and Barriers...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Household Preferences for Supporting Renewable Energy, and Barriers to Green Power Demand Speaker(s): Ryan Wiser Date: May 9, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Nearly 40% of the...

    372

    Smoothing consumption across households and time : essays in development economics  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    This thesis studies two strategies that households may use to keep their consumption smooth in the face of fluctuations in income and expenses: credit (borrowing and savings) and insurance (state contingent transfers between ...

    Kinnan, Cynthia Georgia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    373

    A Theoretical Basis for Household Energy Conservation UsingProduct...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    A Theoretical Basis for Household Energy Conservation Using Product-Integrated Feedback Speaker(s): Teddy McCalley Date: October 11, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

    374

    Characterizing Household Plug Loads through Self-Administered Load Research  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Household miscellaneous loads, which include consumer electronics, are the fastest growing segment of household energy use in the United States. Although the relative energy intensity of applications such as heating and cooling is declining, the DOEAnnual Energy Outlook forecasts that the intensity of residential miscellaneous end uses will increase substantially by 2030. Studies by TIAX and Ecos Consulting reveal that miscellaneous devices8212smaller devices in terms of energy draw but growing in usage8...

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    375

    U-120: RSA SecurID Software Token Converter Unspecified Buffer Overflow  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    0: RSA SecurID Software Token Converter Unspecified Buffer 0: RSA SecurID Software Token Converter Unspecified Buffer Overflow Vulnerability U-120: RSA SecurID Software Token Converter Unspecified Buffer Overflow Vulnerability March 8, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: RSA SecurID Software Token Converter Unspecified Buffer Overflow Vulnerability PLATFORM: RSA SecurID Software Token Converter 2.x ABSTRACT: Successful exploitation may allow execution of arbitrary code. reference LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA48297 CVE-2012-0397 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A vulnerability has been reported in RSA SecurID Software Token Converter, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system. Impact: An unspecified error can be exploited to cause a buffer overflow. Solution: Update to version 2.6.1. Addthis Related Articles

    376

    Idaho National Laboratory Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Intrusion Detection System (SCADA IDS)  

    SciTech Connect

    Current Intrusion Detection System (IDS) technology is not suited to be widely deployed inside a Supervisory, Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) environment. Anomaly- and signature-based IDS technologies have developed methods to cover information technology-based networks activity and protocols effectively. However, these IDS technologies do not include the fine protocol granularity required to ensure network security inside an environment with weak protocols lacking authentication and encryption. By implementing a more specific and more intelligent packet inspection mechanism, tailored traffic flow analysis, and unique packet tampering detection, IDS technology developed specifically for SCADA environments can be deployed with confidence in detecting malicious activity.

    Jared Verba; Michael Milvich

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    377

    A Role for Id-1 in the Aggressive Phenotype and Steroid ...  

    Desprez, P. Y., Hara E., Bissell, M. J., and Campisi, J. Suppression of mammary epithelial cell differentiation by the helix-loop-helix protein Id-1. Mol. Cell.

    378

    AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I '. CONTRACT ID CODE  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    I '. I '. CONTRACT ID CODE BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, VA 24506 PAGE I OF 12 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 871 85-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 I I 90. DATED (SEE ITEM 1 1 ) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) I 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. MI67 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. I 1 DE-AC04-00AL66620 100. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR

    379

    Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Title Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Zimring, Mark, Merrian Borgeson, Ian M. Hoffman, Charles A. Goldman, Elizabeth Stuart, Annika Todd, and Megan A. Billingsley Pagination 102 Date Published 12/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract The question posed in this report is: How can programs motivate these middle income single family households to seek out more comprehensive energy upgrades, and empower them to do so? Research methods included interviews with more than 35 program administrators, policy makers, researchers, and other experts; case studies of programs, based on interviews with staff and a review of program materials and data; and analysis of relevant data sources and existing research on demographics, the financial status of Americans, and the characteristics of middle income American households. While there is no 'silver bullet' to help these households overcome the range of barriers they face, this report describes outreach strategies, innovative program designs, and financing tools that show promise in increasing the attractiveness and accessibility of energy efficiency for this group. These strategies and tools should be seen as models that are currently being honed to build our knowledge and capacity to deliver energy improvements to middle income households. However, the strategies described in this report are probably not sufficient, in the absence of robust policy frameworks, to deliver these improvements at scale. Instead, these strategies must be paired with enabling and complementary policies to reach their full potential.

    380

    Household solid waste characteristics and management in Chittagong, Bangladesh  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Solid waste management (SWM) is a multidimensional challenge faced by urban authorities, especially in developing countries like Bangladesh. We investigated per capita waste generation by residents, its composition, and the households' attitudes towards waste management at Rahman Nagar Residential Area, Chittagong, Bangladesh. The study involved a structured questionnaire and encompassed 75 households from five different socioeconomic groups (SEGs): low (LSEG), lower middle (LMSEG), middle (MSEG), upper middle (UMSEG) and high (HSEG). Wastes, collected from all of the groups of households, were segregated and weighed. Waste generation was 1.3 kg/household/day and 0.25 kg/person/day. Household solid waste (HSW) was comprised of nine categories of wastes with vegetable/food waste being the largest component (62%). Vegetable/food waste generation increased from the HSEG (47%) to the LSEG (88%). By weight, 66% of the waste was compostable in nature. The generation of HSW was positively correlated with family size (r{sub xy} = 0.236, p management initiative. Of the respondents, an impressive 44% were willing to pay US$0.3 to US$0.4 per month to waste collectors and it is recommended that service charge be based on the volume of waste generated by households. Almost a quarter (22.7%) of the respondents preferred 12-1 pm as the time period for their waste to be collected. This study adequately shows that household solid waste can be converted from burden to resource through segregation at the source, since people are aware of their role in this direction provided a mechanism to assist them in this pursuit exists and the burden is distributed according to the amount of waste generated.

    Sujauddin, Mohammad [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: mohammad.sujauddin@gmail.com; Huda, S.M.S. [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh); Hoque, A.T.M. Rafiqul [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh); Laboratory of Ecology and Systematics (Plant Ecophysiology Section), Faculty of Science, Biology Division, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    381

    Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    EIA household energy use data now includes detail on 16 States EIA household energy use data now includes detail on 16 States RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 EIA is releasing new benchmark estimates for home energy use for the year 2009 that include detailed data for 16 States, 12 more than in past EIA residential energy surveys. EIA has conducted the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) since 1978 to provide data on home energy characteristics, end uses of energy, and expenses for the four Census Regions and nine Divisions. In 1997, EIA produced additional tabulations for the four most populous States (California, New York, Texas, and Florida). A threefold increase in the number of households included in the 2009 RECS offers more accuracy and coverage for understanding energy usage for all estimated States, Regions and Divisions.

    382

    Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience  

    SciTech Connect

    The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the normal'' municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan's programs. Focusing on the Plan's household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    383

    Last Revision Date: 8/16/2010 Last Merged Filing ID:  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Revision Date: 8/16/2010 Last Merged Filing ID: Revision Date: 8/16/2010 Last Merged Filing ID: Tariffs, Rate Schedules, and Other Tariff Documents Southwestern Power Administration Tariffs, Rate Schedules, and Other Tariff Documents Document Generated On: 10/1/2010 Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS ....................................................................................................................................1 PREAMBLE: AUTHORITIES AND OBLIGATIONS .............................................................................................1

    384

    SAT(ID): satisfiability of propositional logic extended with inductive definitions  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    We investigate the satisfiability problem, SAT(ID), of an extension of propositional logic with inductive definitions. We demonstrate how to extend existing SAT solvers to become SAT(ID) solvers, and provide an implementation on top of MiniSat. We also ...

    Maarten Marin; Johan Wittocx; Marc Denecker; Maurice Bruynooghe

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    385

    GRR/Section 3-ID-d - Land Use Permit | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    d - Land Use Permit d - Land Use Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-ID-d - Land Use Permit 03-ID-d - Land Use Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Lands Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03-ID-d - Land Use Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Idaho Department of Lands issues Land Use Permits for non-invasive exploration on a case by case basis. 3-ID-d.1 to 3-ID-d.2 - Will Non-Invasive Exploration Be Preformed on State Lands? A Land Use Permit is required to preform non-invasive exploration on state

    386

    Finding Utility Companies Under a Given Utility ID | OpenEI Community  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Finding Utility Companies Under a Given Utility ID Finding Utility Companies Under a Given Utility ID Home > Groups > Developer Jayhuggins's picture Submitted by Jayhuggins(15) Member 22 June, 2012 - 09:39 Utility+Utility Access Map Here's a quick way to find all the utility company pages under a given utility id. From the Special Ask page, in the query box enter the following: [[Category:Utility Companies]][[EiaUtilityId::15248]] substituting your utility id of interest for 15248, and click "Find results". Groups: Developer Login to post comments Jayhuggins's blog Latest blog posts Rmckeel The utility rate database version 1 API is now deprecated Posted: 6 Sep 2013 - 14:00 by Rmckeel Jweers New Robust References! Posted: 7 Aug 2013 - 18:23 by Jweers 1 comment(s) 1 of 10 ›› Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group.

    387

    T-642: RSA SecurID update to Customers | Department of Energy  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    2: RSA SecurID update to Customers 2: RSA SecurID update to Customers T-642: RSA SecurID update to Customers June 9, 2011 - 12:45am Addthis PROBLEM: Certain characteristics of the attack on RSA indicated that the perpetrator's most likely motive was to obtain an element of security information that could be used to target defense secrets and related IP, rather than financial gain, PII, or public embarrassment. PLATFORM: RSA SecurID implementations ABSTRACT: RSA investigation has revealed that the attack resulted in certain information being extracted from RSA's systems. Some of that information is related to RSA's SecurID two-factor authentication products. reference LINKS: Open Letter to RSA Customers (update) CVE-2011-0322 RSA Fraud Resource Center RSA Security Practice DOE-CIRC T-640: RSA Access Manager Server CVE-2011-0322 Update

    388

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-017.docx  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    7 7 SECTION A. Project Title: United States Geological Survey (USGS) Geotechncial Drilling for USGS 139 SECTION B. Project Description: The USGS proposes to drill an approximate 1,000-foot deep geotechnical corehole (USGS 139) into the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. The location of the corehole will be 7.4 mile(s) (approximate) east of the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) complex at the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 28, Township 4 North, Range 31 East (Figure 1); latitude/longitude (World Geodetic System [WGS] 1984 Datum) 43deg 38min 25.0sec N / 112deg 46min 06.7sec W, respectively. The borehole will be 5 inches in diameter, will have a locking wellhead installed after completion, will be marked with a brass survey marker,

    389

    DOE/EIA-0193/P PRELIMINARY CONSERVATION TABLES FROM THE NATIONAL INTERIM ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    193/P 193/P PRELIMINARY CONSERVATION TABLES FROM THE NATIONAL INTERIM ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY OFFICE OF THE CONSUMPTION DATA SYSTEM OFFICE OF PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION AUGUST 1, 1979 PRELIMINARY CONSERVATION TABLES FROM THE NATIONAL INTERIM ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Attached is the first report of the Office of the Consumption Data System, Office of Program Development, Energy Information Administration, presenting preliminary data from the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS). The focus of this report is the conservation activities performed by households since January 1977, and the status of households with respect to insulation, storm windows, and other energy conserving characteristics. These tables are from preliminary data files.

    390

    1997 Survey Methods -- Residential Energy Consumption Survey ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    ... of local sources of information, such as building-permit-issuing agencies, ... The FSA is interested in households living below the poverty level. ...

    391

    Water Related Energy Use in Households and Cities - an Australian  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Water Related Energy Use in Households and Cities - an Australian Water Related Energy Use in Households and Cities - an Australian Perspective Speaker(s): Steven Kenway Date: May 12, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Anita Estner James McMahon This presentation covers the content of recent journal papers and reports focused on the water-energy nexus and the related theory of urban metabolism. This includes (i) a review of the water-energy nexus focused on cities (ii) quantifying water-related energy in cities (iii) modeling household water-related energy use including key factors, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, and (iv) relevance and implications of the urban metabolism theoretical framework. Steven's work focuses on understanding the indirect connections between urban water management, energy use and

    392

    The welfare effects of raising household energy prices in Poland  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    We examine the welfare effects from increasing household energy prices in Poland. Subsidizing household energy prices, common in the transition economies, is shown to be highly regressive. The wealthy spend a larger portion of their income on energy and consume more energy in absolute terms. We therefore rule out the oft-used social welfare argument for delaying household energy price increases. Raising prices, while targeting relief to the poor through a social assistance program is the first-best response. However, if governments want to ease the adjustment, several options are open, including: in-kind transfers to the poor, vouchers, in-cash transfers, and lifeline pricing for electricity. Our simulations show that if raising prices to efficient levels is not politically feasible at present and social assistance targeting is sufficiently weak, it may be socially better to use lifeline pricing and a large price increase than an overall, but smaller, price increase.

    Freund, C.L. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Wallich, C.I. [World Bank, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    393

    Modeling patterns of hot water use in households  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual household. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies. 21 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

    Lutz, J.D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, J.E. [and others

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    394

    Modeling patterns of hot water use in households  

    SciTech Connect

    This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual households. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies.

    Lutz, James D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, James E.; Dunham, Camilla; Shown, Leslie J.; McCure, Quandra T.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    395

    A Glance at Chinas Household Consumption  

    SciTech Connect

    Known for its scale, China is the most populous country with the worlds third largest economy. In the context of rising living standards, a relatively lower share of household consumption in its GDP, a strong domestic market and globalization, China is witnessing an unavoidable increase in household consumption, related energy consumption and carbon emissions. Chinese policy decision makers and researchers are well aware of these challenges and keen to promote green lifestyles. China has developed a series of energy policies and programs, and launched a wide?range social marketing activities to promote energy conservation.

    Shui, Bin

    2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    396

    Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and expenditures, April 1984 through March 1985: Part 1, National data  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This report presents data collected in the 1984 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The 1984 RECS was the sixth national survey of US households and their energy suppliers. The purpose of these surveys is to provide baseline information on how households use energy. Households in all types of housing units - single family homes (including townhouses), apartments, and mobile homes - were chosen to participate. Data from the surveys are available to the public in published reports such as this one and on public-use data tapes. The report presents data on the US consumption and expenditures for residential use of these ''major fuels'' - natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, kerosene, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) - from April 1984 through March 1985. These data are presented in tables in the Detailed Statistics section of this report. Except for kerosene and wood fuel, the consumption and expenditures data are based on actual household bills obtained, with the permission of the household, from the companies supplying energy to the household. Purchases of kerosene are based on respondent reports because records of ''cash and carry'' purchases of kerosene for individual households are usually unavailable. Data on the consumption of wood fuel (Table 27) covers the 12-month period ending November 1984 and are based on respondent recall of the amount of wood burned during the 12-month period. Both the kerosene and wood consumption data are subject to memory errors and other reporting errors. This report does not cover household use of motor fuel, which is reported separately.

    Not Available

    1987-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    397

    EvoNILM: evolutionary appliance detection for miscellaneous household appliances  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    To improve the energy awareness of consumers, it is necessary to provide them with information about their energy demand, not just on the household level. Non-intrusive load monitoring (NILM) gives the consumer the opportunity to disaggregate their consumed ... Keywords: evolutionary algorithm, load disaggregation, non-intrusive load monitoring

    Dominik Egarter; Wilfried Elmenreich

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    398

    Modelling the Energy Demand of Households in a Combined  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    . Emissions from passenger transport, households'electricity and heat consumption are growing rapidly despite demand analysis for electricity (e.g. Larsen and Nesbakken, 2004; Holtedahl and Joutz, 2004; Hondroyiannis, 2004) and passenger cars (Meyer et al., 2007). Some recent studies cover the whole residential

    Steininger, Karl W.

    399

    Survey Statisticians  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Survey Statisticians Survey Statisticians The U.S.Energy Information Administration (EIA) within the Department of Energy has forged a world-class information program that stresses quality, teamwork, and employee growth. In support of our program, we offer a variety of profes- sional positions, including the Survey Statistician, who measures the amounts of energy produced and consumed in the United States. Responsibilities: Survey Statisticians perform or participate in one or more of the following important functions: * Design energy surveys by writing questions, creating layouts and testing questions for clarity and accuracy. * Conduct energy surveys to include sending out and tracking survey responses, editing and analyzing data submis- sions and communicating with respondents to verify data.

    400

    Model development for household waste prevention behaviour  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model waste prevention behaviour using structure equation modelling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We merge attitude-behaviour theories with wider models from environmental psychology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Personal norms and perceived behaviour control are the main behaviour predictors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental concern, moral obligation and inconvenience are the main influence on the behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Waste prevention and recycling are different dimensions of waste management behaviour. - Abstract: Understanding waste prevention behaviour (WPB) could enable local governments and decision makers to design more-effective policies for reducing the amount of waste that is generated. By merging well-known attitude-behaviour theories with elements from wider models from environmental psychology, an extensive cognitive framework that provides new and valuable insights is developed for understanding the involvement of individuals in waste prevention. The results confirm the usefulness of the theory of planned behaviour and of Schwartz's altruistic behaviour model as bases for modelling participation in waste prevention. A more elaborate integrated model of prevention was shown to be necessary for the complete analysis of attitudinal aspects associated with waste prevention. A postal survey of 158 respondents provided empirical support for eight of 12 hypotheses. The proposed structural equation indicates that personal norms and perceived behaviour control are the main predictors and that, unlike the case of recycling, subjective norms have a weak influence on WPB. It also suggests that, since social norms have not presented a direct influence, WPB is likely to be influenced by a concern for the environment and the community as well by perceptions of moral obligation and inconvenience. Results also proved that recycling and waste prevention represent different dimensions of waste management behaviour requiring particular approaches to increase individuals' engagement in future policies.

    Bortoleto, Ana Paula, E-mail: a.bortoleto@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Urban Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kurisu, Kiyo H.; Hanaki, Keisuke [Department of Urban Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    401

    Using unlabeled Wi-Fi scan data to discover occupancy patterns of private households  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This poster presents the homeset algorithm, a lightweight approach to estimate occupancy schedules of private households. The algorithm relies on the mobile phones of households' occupants to collect Wi-Fi scans. The scans are then used to determine ...

    Wilhelm Kleiminger, Christian Beckel, Anind Dey, Silvia Santini

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    402

    Californias Immigrant Households and Public-Assistance Participation in the 1990s - Policy Brief  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    with Dependent Children (AFDC)/California Work Opportunitystate households participating in AFDC/ CalWORKs pro- grams.of noncitizen households received AFDC, compared to 4.5% of

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    403

    Table 1. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by Origin ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Wood (million cords) ..... 21.4 19.8 0.8 0.6 0.3 19.3 Million Btu per Household3 Total Btu Consumption per Household, Fuels Used: Electricity Primary ...

    404

    An Analysis of the Price Elasticity of Demand for Household Appliances  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Customers Choice of Appliance Efficiency Level: CombiningThe Effect of Income on Appliances in U.S. Households. U.S.Households Choice of Appliance Efficiency Level. Review of

    Dale, Larry

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    405

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-11-006.doc  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    6 6 SECTION A. Project Title: INL - USGS Geotechnical Drilling Program (USGS 131A) SECTION B. Project Description: The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) proposes to use an existing well pad to construct a replacement well, USGS131A, about 25 ft north of the original well head (USGS 131). USGS 131A will be drilled to about 1,300 ft below surface level (BSL) then instrumented with a multilevel monitoring system in FY 2012. The new well will replace USGS 131, which will be abandoned or used as a water level monitoring well. USGS 131 has casing stuck in it that does not allow for multilevel instrumentation, therefore, a replacement well is necessary. The drilling scope for USGS 131A is an addendum to the 2003 approved Environmental Checklist (INEL-03-001) for USGS

    406

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-10-019.doc  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    9 9 SECTION A. Project Title: Idaho National Laboratory (INL) - United States Geological Survey (USGS) Geotechnical Drilling Program (USGS 136) SECTION B. Project Description: The USGS proposes to drill a 1,000-foot deep geotechnical corehole (USGS 136) into the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. The location of the corehole will be approximately 0.5 mile(s) southwest of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex at the Idaho National Laboratoy. The purpose of this geotechnical corehole is to obtain geologic, stratigraphic, and hydraulic data to characterize flow in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. The project will need to extend a road to the new well location making use of the existing road to well TRA-07. Potential impact to cultural and biological resources will be minimized by making use of existing INL roads wherever possible. Any soil disturbance would

    407

    Household energy and consumption and expenditures, 1990. [Contains Division, Census Region, and Climate Zone maps  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The purpose of this supplement to the Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990 report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential housing units, specifically at the four Census regions and nine Census division levels. This report includes household energy consumption, expenditures, and prices for natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and kerosene as well as household wood consumption. For national-level data, see the main report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990.

    Not Available

    1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    408

    GRR/Section 8-ID-a - State Transmission | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8-ID-a - State Transmission 8-ID-a - State Transmission < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 8-ID-a - State Transmission 08IDAStateTransmission.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Public Utilities Commission Regulations & Policies IC §67-6508: Local Land Use Planning Duties IC §61-526: Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 08IDAStateTransmission.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative 8-ID-a.1 - Will the Transmission Project Be Undertaken by a Public Utility?

    409

    GRR/Section 6-ID-b - Construction Storm Water Permit | Open Energy  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    6-ID-b - Construction Storm Water Permit 6-ID-b - Construction Storm Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-ID-b - Construction Storm Water Permit 06IDBConstructionStormwaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Environmental Protection Agency Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06IDBConstructionStormwaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative 6-ID-b.1 - EPA Construction General Permit Idaho does not have authority from the United States Environmental Protection Agency to issue a construction storm water permit. See Flowchart

    410

    GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations 01IDALandUseConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01IDALandUseConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Add Text Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Section_1-ID-a_-_Land_Use_Considerations&oldid=685536" Categories: Regulatory Roadmap State Sections Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Sections

    411

    Comments on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 | Department of Energy  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 Comments on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 This letter comprises the comments of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), Southern California Gas Company (SCGC), San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E), and Southern California Edison (SCE) in response to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Request for Information on Regulatory Burden. The signatories of this letter, collectively referred to herein as the California Investor Owned Utilities (CA IOUs) represent some of the largest utility companies in the Western United States, serving over 35 million customers. Comments on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 More Documents & Publications FINAL CA IOU Comment Letter RFI Regulatory Burden O:\IM-20\E-Government Program Office\FDMS\FDMS

    412

    GRR/Section 4-ID-a - State Exploration Process | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4-ID-a - State Exploration Process 4-ID-a - State Exploration Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-ID-a - State Exploration Process 04IDAStateExplorationProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Water Resources Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 04IDAStateExplorationProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative _ 4-ID-a.1 - Has the Environmental Process been Completed for Exploration? If an EA/EIS has not yet been completed for this portion of the project, the developer must first complete the applicable environmental process.

    413

    Comments on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 | Department of Energy  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Comments on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 Comments on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 Comments on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 This letter comprises the comments of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), Southern California Gas Company (SCGC), San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E), and Southern California Edison (SCE) in response to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Request for Information on Regulatory Burden. The signatories of this letter, collectively referred to herein as the California Investor Owned Utilities (CA IOUs) represent some of the largest utility companies in the Western United States, serving over 35 million customers. Comments on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 More Documents & Publications FINAL CA IOU Comment Letter RFI Regulatory Burden O:\IM-20\E-Government Program Office\FDMS\FDMS

    414

    Microsoft Word - 2013 (05-22-13) DOE-ID Operations Summary-13...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    was restored to the E-3 diesel bus from commercial power, and equipment lost due to the power outage was restored. NE-ID--BEA-ATR-2013-0012 3 April 17: (Notification) As a...

    415

    RL-721 Document ID Number: REV4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    of InitiatorEGO signed NRSF to DOE NCO for information only. DOE NCO Page 1 of2 RL-721 Document ID Number: REV4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM (continued) DOECX-00126, Rev 0 V....

    416

    RL-721 REV4 Document ID Number: NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    9405630, HCRC2003-200-044, & DOERL-97-56 R1 Additional Attachments: Page 1 of 2 RL-721 Document ID Number: REV4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM (continued) DOECX-00094 Rev 0 IV....

    417

    (SE-33)Intelligent ID-Based threshold system by an encryption and decryption from bilinear pairing  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    We suggest a new intelligent ID-based threshold secure system by an encryption and decryption protocol using (k, n)-threshold scheme which only k agents or more are engaged to reconstruct an encrypted data for a mobile intelligent ...

    Young Whan Lee; Byung Mun Choi

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    418

    Microsoft Word - 2013 (05-22-13) DOE-ID Operations Summary-13...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    May 16, 2013 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period April 1 to May 16, 2013 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory,...

    419

    GRR/Section 14-ID-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification...  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GRRSection 14-ID-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of...

    420

    Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists | Open Energy  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Author Directional Surveying Specialists Published Publisher Not Provided, 2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Citation Directional Surveying Specialists. Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists [Internet]. 2012. [cited 2013/10/08]. Available from: http://www.digitalsurveying.co.za/services/geophysical-borehole-surveying/overview/optical-televiewer/ Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Digital_Surveying_Directional_Surveying_Specialists&oldid=690244"

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    421

    U.S. Climate Zones-Households - - Energy Information Administration  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Residential Sector energy Intensities for 1978-1997 using data from EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey.

    422

    International Degree (ID) and Engineering For complete information and admission requirements for the ID, refer to the "Passport to the International  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    credits which apply toward the degree. The ID program advisor works closely with each student to help develop a unique program that meets their needs and future goals. Students will also work with a thesis a structural engineer on the Hanford vitrification design-build project How can I get started

    Escher, Christine

    423

    SCO Survey  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Survey on Future of NIST's Standards Information Services. June 5, 2013. *. Bookmark and Share. Contact: Clare Allocca 301-975-4359. ...

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    424

    Residential Housing Survey  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    PCs, Modems and Laser Printers: Main Heating Fuels: Household PC Usage : Use of Central Heating Systems: Stoves, Ovens and Microwaves: Main Central ...

    425

    Survey Consumption  

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

    426

    Energy conservation for household refrigerators and water heaters  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    An energy conservation arrangement for household refrigerators and water heaters, in which the source of cold water to the hot water heater is divided and part is caused to flow through and be warmed in the condenser of the refrigerator. The warmed water is then further heated in the oil cooling loop of the refrigerator compressor, and proceeds then to the top of the hot water tank.

    Speicher, T. L.

    1984-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    427

    Sizing Wind/Photovoltaic Hybrids for Households in Inner Mongolia  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Approximately 140,000 wind turbines currently provide electricity to about one-third of the non-grid-connected households in Inner Mongolia. However, these households often suffer from a lack of power during the low-wind summer months. This report describes an analysis of hybrid wind/photovoltaic (PV) systems for such households. The sizing of the major components is based on a subjective trade-off between the cost of the system and the percent unmet load, as determined by the Hybrid 2 software in conjunction with a simplified time-series model. Actual resource data (wind speed and solar radiation) from the region are processed so as to best represent the scenarios of interest. Small wind turbines of both Chinese and U.S. manufacture are considered in the designs. The results indicate that combinations of wind and PV are more cost-effective than either one alone, and that the relative amount of PV in the design increases as the acceptable unmet load decreases and as the average wind sp eed decreases.

    Barley, C. D.; Lew, D. J.; Flowers, L. T.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    428

    National Household Travel Survey (NHTS): Travel Trends, Analysis and Data Tools  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    of the nation's transportation system to meet current demands and accommodate future demands; to assess of alternative transportation investment programs; and to assess the energy-use and air-quality impacts Analysis Data, Statistical Analysis Geo-Spatial Information Tools Defense Transportation Energy Policy

    429

    Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in `Hybrid Households' Using a Reflexive Survey  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    of activity space to be associated with propulsion systemactivity spaces are related to choices of propulsion systems

    Kurani, Kenneth; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    430

    Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in "Hybrid Households" Using a Reflexive Survey  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    the demand electric vehicles, TransportationResearchA,1994) ~tive NewsCalifornia Electric Vehicle ConsumerStudy.1995) Forecasting Electric Vehicle Ownership Use in the

    Kurani, Kenneth S.; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    431

    Household activities through various lenses: crossing surveys, diaries and electric consumption  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    comparison between electricity consumption and behavioralK. 2013. Domestic energy consumption-What role do comfort,residential electricity consumption Energy Policy, 42(2012)

    Durand-Daubin, Mathieu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    432

    Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in `Hybrid Households' Using a Reflexive Survey  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    travel by electric and hybrid vehicles. SAE Technical PapersIn contrast to a hybrid vehicle which combines multipleElectric, Hybrid and Other Alternative Vehicles. A r t h u r

    Kurani, Kenneth; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    433

    Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in "Hybrid Households" Using a Reflexive Survey  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    new feanlres of compressed natural gas. battery poweredgasoline, compressed natural gas, hybrid dectdc, two typesNatural gas vehicles (NGVs) were available with one two compressed

    Kurani, Kenneth S.; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    434

    Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in `Hybrid Households' Using a Reflexive Survey  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    new features of compressed natural gas, battery poweredgasoline, compressed natural gas, hybrid electric, two typesNatural gas vehicles (NGVs) were available with one or two compressed

    Kurani, Kenneth; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    435

    Household activities through various lenses: crossing surveys, diaries and electric consumption  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    changes differ from one appliance to another. Referencespeople activities, appliances use, and electric consumption.of use of the three appliances studied. However, variations

    Durand-Daubin, Mathieu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    436

    Climate Survey  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Operations Employee Operations Employee Climate Survey March 2009 Acknowledgements The Berkeley Lab Survey Team consisted of the following: Jim Krupnick, Sponsor Vera Potapenko, Project Lead Karen Ramorino, Project Manager Chris Paquette, MOR Associates Alexis Bywater, MOR Associates MOR Associates, an external consulting firm, acted as project manager for this effort, analyzing the data and preparing this report. MOR Associates specializes in continuous improve- ment, strategic thinking and leadership development. MOR Associates has conducted a number of large-scale surveys for organizations in higher education, including MIT, Stanford, the University of Chicago, and others. MOR Associates, Inc. 462 Main Street, Suite 300 Watertown, MA 02472 tel: 617.924.4501

    437

    VLBI surveys  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Systematic surveys of astronomical objects often lead to discoveries, but always provide invaluable information for statistical studies of well-defined samples. They also promote follow-up investigations of individual objects or classes. Surveys using a yet unexplored observing wavelength, a novel technique or a new instrument are of special importance. Significantly improved observing parameters (e.g. sensitivity, angular resolution, monitoring capability) provide new insight into the morphological and physical properties of the objects studied. I give a brief overview of the important Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) imaging surveys conducted in the past. A list of surveys guides us through the developments up until the present days. I also attempt to show directions for the near future.

    S. Frey

    2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    438

    GRR/Section 3-ID-a - State Lands Commercial Geothermal Lease | Open Energy  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3-ID-a - State Lands Commercial Geothermal Lease 3-ID-a - State Lands Commercial Geothermal Lease < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-ID-a - State Lands Commercial Geothermal Lease 03IDAStateLandsCommercialGeothermalLease (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Lands Idaho State Board of Land Commissioners Regulations & Policies Original Administrative Rule Draft Rules Leasing of Public Lands 58-301 et seq Geothermal Resources 47-1605 IX, Section 8 of Idaho's Constitution Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03IDAStateLandsCommercialGeothermalLease (1).pdf 03IDAStateLandsCommercialGeothermalLease (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

    439

    GRR/Section 12-ID-a - State Flora & Fauna Considerations | Open Energy  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GRR/Section 12-ID-a - State Flora & Fauna Considerations GRR/Section 12-ID-a - State Flora & Fauna Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-ID-a - State Flora & Fauna Considerations 12IDAFloraFaunaConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Fish & Game Regulations & Policies Idaho Statutes 36.103 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12IDAFloraFaunaConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Idaho Department of Fish & Game preserves wildlife against any direct take, including wild animals, birds, and fish under Idaho Statutes 36.103.

    440

    GRR/Section 14-ID-c - Underground Injection Control | Open Energy  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4-ID-c - Underground Injection Control 4-ID-c - Underground Injection Control < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-ID-c - Underground Injection Control 14IDCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Water Resources Regulations & Policies IDAPA 37.03.04 IDAPA 37.03.03 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Potential Roadblocks Extensive public comments can stretch the timeline since IDWR must respond to all comments, potentially hold a Fact Finding Hearing, and thoroughly review the input received in these processes prior to making a decision to issue or deny the permit. 14IDCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    441

    GRR/Section 18-ID-d - Solid Waste Management Facilities | Open Energy  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8-ID-d - Solid Waste Management Facilities 8-ID-d - Solid Waste Management Facilities < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-ID-d - Solid Waste Management Facilities 18IDDSolidWasteManagementFacilities (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies IDAPA 58.01.06 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18IDDSolidWasteManagementFacilities (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Idaho considers transfer stations, composting operations, incinerators and landfills solid waste management facilities. The state does not require a

    442

    GRR/Section 18-ID-a - Underground Storage Tank Systems | Open Energy  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GRR/Section 18-ID-a - Underground Storage Tank Systems GRR/Section 18-ID-a - Underground Storage Tank Systems < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-ID-a - Underground Storage Tank Systems 18IDAUndergroundStorageTankSystems.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies IDAPA 58.01.07 Rules Regulating Underground Storage Tank Systems Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18IDAUndergroundStorageTankSystems.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) requires notification

    443

    GRR/Section 14-ID-f - 401 NPDES Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ID-f - 401 NPDES Water Quality Certification ID-f - 401 NPDES Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-ID-f - 401 NPDES Water Quality Certification 14IDFSection401NPDESWaterQualityCertification.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Environmental Quality United States Environmental Protection Agency U S Army Corps of Engineers Regulations & Policies Idaho Environmental Protection and Health Act Idaho Administrative Procedure Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14IDFSection401NPDESWaterQualityCertification.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

    444

    GRR/Section 3-ID-c - Encroachment Permit | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3-ID-c - Encroachment Permit 3-ID-c - Encroachment Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-ID-c - Encroachment Permit 03IDCEncroachmentPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Transportation Department Regulations & Policies IDAPA 39.03.42 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03IDCEncroachmentPermit.pdf 03IDCEncroachmentPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A developer needs an Encroachment Permit from the Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) to add, modify, relocate, maintain, or remove an encroachment on the state highway or within the state highway rights-of way

    445

    GRR/Section 5-ID-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ID-a - Drilling and Well Development ID-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-ID-a - Drilling and Well Development 05IDADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Water Resources Regulations & Policies IC §42-233: Appropriation of Water, Geothermal IC §42-4003: Permits IC §42-4004: Processing Applications IC §42-4011: Name of Owner Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Best Practices Community outreach Talk to the local county Potential Roadblocks Incomplete applications result in longer approval times by IDWR 05IDADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

    446

    GRR/Section 7-ID-c - Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity | Open  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GRR/Section 7-ID-c - Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity GRR/Section 7-ID-c - Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-ID-c - Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity 07IDCCertificateOfPublicConvenienceAndNecessity (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Public Utilities Commission Regulations & Policies Idaho Code 61-526 IDAPA 31.01.01 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07IDCCertificateOfPublicConvenienceAndNecessity (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Electrical corporations must receive a Certificate of Public Convenience

    447

    GRR/Section 9-ID-a - State Environmental Process | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    9-ID-a - State Environmental Process 9-ID-a - State Environmental Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 9-ID-a - State Environmental Process 09IDAStateEnvironmentalProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Environmental Quality Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 09IDAStateEnvironmentalProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Idaho has no state-specific EA/EIS equivalent for renewable energy projects. Idaho does have an environmental assessment process for proposed wastewater and drinking water construction projects, but only when grant

    448

    DOI-BLM-ID-T020-2012-0003-CX | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DOI-BLM-ID-T020-2012-0003-CX DOI-BLM-ID-T020-2012-0003-CX Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-ID-T020-2012-0003-CX CX at Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant Agua Caliente LLC Geothermal Area Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Project Location Utah Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Seismic Techniques Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office BLM Twin Falls District Office Managing Field Office BLM Burley Field Office Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates

    449

    GRR/Section 14-ID-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GRR/Section 14-ID-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification GRR/Section 14-ID-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-ID-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14IDDSection401WaterQualityCertificationProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Environmental Quality United States Environmental Protection Agency U S Army Corps of Engineers Regulations & Policies Idaho Environmental Protection and Health Act Idaho Administrative Procedure Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14IDDSection401WaterQualityCertificationProcess.pdf 14IDDSection401WaterQualityCertificationProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

    450

    GRR/Section 18-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit | Open Energy  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit 8-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit 18IDCWastewaterPretreatmentPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18IDCWastewaterPretreatmentPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Industrial wastewater permits are issued at the local level. If wastewater is not discharged into a municipal sewer system, the nonpoint source and NPDES permit inquiries are sufficient. A common approach to wastewater treatment is to treat on-site. See Idaho's

    451

    GRR/Section 11-ID-a - State Cultural Considerations | Open Energy  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    -ID-a - State Cultural Considerations -ID-a - State Cultural Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-ID-a - State Cultural Considerations 11IDAStateCulturalConsiderations (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho State Historical Society Regulations & Policies Idaho's Protection of Graves Statute IS 27-503 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 11IDAStateCulturalConsiderations (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Idaho has a statute that provides state law protection to cairns and grave sites. The Idaho State Historical Society administers the protections

    452

    GRR/Section 14-ID-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GRR/Section 14-ID-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution GRR/Section 14-ID-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-ID-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution 14IDANonpointSourcePollution.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Environmental Quality United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies Clean Water Act Idaho Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14IDANonpointSourcePollution.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (IDEQ) developed Idaho's

    453

    GRR/Section 15-ID-b - Air Quality Permit - Tier II Operating Permit | Open  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GRR/Section 15-ID-b - Air Quality Permit - Tier II Operating Permit GRR/Section 15-ID-b - Air Quality Permit - Tier II Operating Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-ID-b - Air Quality Permit - Tier II Operating Permit 15IDBAirQualityPermitTierIIOperatingPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies IDAPA 58.01.01 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15IDBAirQualityPermitTierIIOperatingPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Tier II Operating Permits are issued to facilities or stationary sources

    454

    GRR/Section 15-ID-a - Air Quality Permit - Permit to Construct | Open  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    15-ID-a - Air Quality Permit - Permit to Construct 15-ID-a - Air Quality Permit - Permit to Construct < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-ID-a - Air Quality Permit - Permit to Construct 15IDAAirQualityPermitPermitToConstruct (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies IDAPA 58.01.01 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15IDAAirQualityPermitPermitToConstruct (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) requires an air quality

    455

    DOI-BLM-ID-110-2009-3825-CE | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DOI-BLM-ID-110-2009-3825-CE DOI-BLM-ID-110-2009-3825-CE Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-ID-110-2009-3825-CE CX at Crane Creek Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant Agua Caliente LLC Geothermal Area Crane Creek Geothermal Area Project Location Idaho Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Time Frame (days) Application Time 113 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Boise Managing Field Office BLM Four Rivers Field Office Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager none provided Selected Dates Application Date 6/4/2009

    456

    GRR/Section 19-ID-a - Water Access and Water Rights | Open Energy  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    19-ID-a - Water Access and Water Rights 19-ID-a - Water Access and Water Rights < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-ID-a - Water Access and Water Rights 19IDAWaterAccessAndWaterRightsIssues.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Water Resources Regulations & Policies Idaho Code Title 42 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19IDAWaterAccessAndWaterRightsIssues.pdf 19IDAWaterAccessAndWaterRightsIssues.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR) has the exclusive authority for regulation of appropriation of the public surface and ground waters of

    457

    GRR/Section 18-ID-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process | Open Energy  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GRR/Section 18-ID-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process GRR/Section 18-ID-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-ID-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process 18IDBHazardousWastePermitProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act IDAPA 58.01.05 Rules and Standards for Hazardous Waste 40 CFR 124.31 Pre-application public meeting and notice 40 CRF 124.10 Public notice of permit actions and public comment period 40 CFR 124.12 Public hearings 40 CFR 270.13 Contents of Part A of the permit application Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18IDBHazardousWastePermitProcess.pdf 18IDBHazardousWastePermitProcess.pdf

    458

    DOI-BLM-ID-B010-2010-0083-CX | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ID-B010-2010-0083-CX ID-B010-2010-0083-CX Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-ID-B010-2010-0083-CX CX at {{{GeothermalArea}}} for Geothermal/Exploration, {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant Agua Caliente Geothermal Area {{{GeothermalArea}}}"{{{GeothermalArea}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. Project Location Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Thermal Gradient Holes Comments ROW across BLM managed lands for access to TGH locations Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency Idaho Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Boise Managing Field Office BLM Four Rivers Field Office

    459

    GRR/Section 20-ID-a - Well Abandonment Process | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GRR/Section 20-ID-a - Well Abandonment Process GRR/Section 20-ID-a - Well Abandonment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 20-ID-a - Well Abandonment Process 20IDAWellAbandonmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies [[Idaho Department of Water Resources]] Regulations & Policies Drilling for Geothermal Resources Rule 45 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 20IDAWellAbandonmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart illustrates the well abandonment procedures in the state of Idaho. The director of the Idaho Department of Water Resources

    460

    Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-028-1.doc  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-028 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-028 SECTION A. Project Title: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Birch Creek Canyon Wind Study SECTION B. Project Description: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Birch Creek Valley Wind Study would be conducted under the umbrella of the NOAA/Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Meteorological Research Partnership Memorandum of Agreement between NOAA and the Idaho Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE-ID). The project would use a location near the northeast corner of the Test Area North (TAN) perimeter fence just north of the old TAN parking lot adjacent to the road to the Initial Engine Test (IET) facility and a remote site along Birch Creek near the point where Birch Creek crosses Idaho Highway 22. Field setup would occur as

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    461

    DOI-BLM-ID-220-2009-EA-3709 | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ID-220-2009-EA-3709 ID-220-2009-EA-3709 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-ID-220-2009-EA-3709 EA at Raft River Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration Raft River Geothermal Drilling Project General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Agua Caliente, LLC Consultant EMPSi Geothermal Area Raft River Geothermal Area Project Location Idaho Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Exploration Drilling Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office BLM Twin Falls District Office Managing Field Office Burley Field Office Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM

    462

    GRR/Section 14-ID-b - NPDES Permitting Process | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GRR/Section 14-ID-b - NPDES Permitting Process GRR/Section 14-ID-b - NPDES Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-ID-b - NPDES Permitting Process 14IDBNPDESPermittingProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Environmental Quality United States Environmental Protection Agency Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14IDBNPDESPermittingProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative 'National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permits' The NPDES program requires facilities discharging from a point source into

    463

    GRR/Section 6-ID-a - Transportation Permit | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GRR/Section 6-ID-a - Transportation Permit GRR/Section 6-ID-a - Transportation Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-ID-a - Transportation Permit 06IDATransportationPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Transportation Department Regulations & Policies IDAPA 39.03.21 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06IDATransportationPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Overlegal permits are issued to protect the "safety and convenience of the general public." The Idaho Transportation Department is also concerned with

    464

    RL-721 Document ID Number: REV4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    ID Number: ID Number: REV4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00125, Rev 0 I. Project Title: MSA Annual Categorical Exclusion for Actions to Conserve Energy or Water under 10 CFR 1021, Subpart D, Appendix B, B5.1 II. Project Description and location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions - e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): Mission Support Alliance (MSA) and its subcontractors perform actions to conserve energy or

    465

    Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study Title Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-58785 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Destaillats, Hugo, Melissa M. Lunden, Brett C. Singer, Beverly K. Coleman, Alfred T. Hodgson, Charles J. Weschler, and William W. Nazaroff Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 4421-4428 Abstract Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 × 105 molecules cm-3 were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1 - 25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products

    466

    Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301: January 5, 2004 Number of Household  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    1: January 5, 1: January 5, 2004 Number of Household Vehicles has Grown Significantly to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301: January 5, 2004 Number of Household Vehicles has Grown Significantly on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301: January 5, 2004 Number of Household Vehicles has Grown Significantly on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301: January 5, 2004 Number of Household Vehicles has Grown Significantly on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301: January 5, 2004 Number of Household Vehicles has Grown Significantly on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301: January 5, 2004 Number of Household Vehicles has Grown Significantly on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301:

    467

    th e american bir d conse rvan c y g u id e to bird conservation  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    th e american bir d conse rvan c y g u id e to bird conservation by daniel j. lebbin, michael j CONSERVATION 1886 George Grinnell founds the first Audubon So- ciety. 1896 Harriet Hemenway, her cousin Minna conservation for waterfowl and other birds. 1934 Roger Tory Peterson publishes his landmark Field Guide

    McReynolds, Ben

    468

    TEXAS GRANT Statement of Student Eligibility Last Name First Name UT Arlington Student ID  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    TEXAS GRANT Statement of Student Eligibility 2012-2013 Last Name First Name UT Arlington Student ID Effective September 1, 2010, all institutions are required to collect a statement from each TEXAS Grant. TEXAS Grant funds will not disburse to your student account until the statement below is signed

    Huang, Haiying

    469

    TEXAS GRANT Statement of Student Eligibility Last Name First Name UT Arlington Student ID  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    TEXAS GRANT Statement of Student Eligibility 2010-2011 Last Name First Name UT Arlington Student ID Effective September 1, 2010, all institutions are required to collect a statement from each TEXAS Grant. TEXAS Grant funds will not disburse to your student account until the statement below is signed

    Corley, Bill

    470

    TEXAS GRANT Statement of Student Eligibility Last Name First Name UT Arlington Student ID  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    TEXAS GRANT Statement of Student Eligibility 2011-2012 Last Name First Name UT Arlington Student ID Effective September 1, 2010, all institutions are required to collect a statement from each TEXAS Grant. TEXAS Grant funds will not disburse to your student account until the statement below is signed

    Corley, Bill

    471

    IDS: Thermodynamic-kinetic-empirical tool for modelling of solidification, microstructure and material properties  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    IDS (InterDendritic Solidification) is a thermodynamic-kinetic-empirical tool for simulation of solidification phenomena of steels including phase transformations from melt down to room temperature. In addition, important thermophysical material properties ... Keywords: Continuous casting, Inclusions, Material properties, Microstructure, Solidification

    J. Miettinen; S. Louhenkilpi; H. Kytnen; J. Laine

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    472

    Exemplifying Business Opportunities for Improving Data Quality From Corporate Household Research  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Corporate household (CHH) refers to the organizational information about the structure within the corporation and a variety of inter-organizational relationships. Knowledge derived from this data is ...

    Madnick, Stuart

    2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    473

    U.S. households forecast to use more heating fuels this ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    What is the role of coal in the United States? ... 2012 U.S. households ... many located in rural areas. Propane inventories totaled almost 76 million ...

    474

    Methodology and Estimation of the Welfare Impact of Energy Reforms on Households in Azerbaijan.  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    ??ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: METHODOLOGY AND ESTIMATION OF THE WELFARE IMPACT OF ENERGY REFORMS ON HOUSEHOLDS IN AZERBAIJAN Irina Klytchnikova, Doctor of Philosophy, 2006 Dissertation (more)

    Klytchnikova, Irina

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    475

    Table CE1-4c. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by Type ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by Type of Housing Unit, 2001 RSE Column Factor: Total ... where the end use is electric air-conditioning, ...

    476

    The Other Energy Crisis: Managing Urban Household Energy Use in Senegal  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    for 62 percent of national energy consumption, or over 1 .1energy consumption, and (2) residential, because of the dominant role that households play in national

    Leitmann, Josef

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    477

    Table HC6.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household...  

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total... 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9...

    478

    Table 1. Consumption and Expenditures in U.S. Households, 1997  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year average annual degree-days for an appropriate nearby weather station. (5) ...

    479

    In the UNITED STATES there are 96.6 million households  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    In the UNITED STATES there are 96.6 million households 69% are single-family homes; 25% are apartments; and 6% are mobile homes. Housing stock is ...

    480

    Table 1. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    This write-up presents 1997 Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Origin of Householder. In 1997, there were 101.5 million residential ho ...

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    481

    Table CE1-7c. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by Four ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Other Appliances and Lighting ... It does include the small number of households where the fuel for central air-conditioning equipment was something other than ...

    482

    Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data and Trends - Table A01  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Per Household Vehicle-Miles Traveled ... and Alternate Fuels, Form EIA-826, "Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions."

    483

    Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data and Trends - Table A01  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Table A1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicles-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001: 2001 Household and Vehicle Characteristics

    484

    The impact of physical planning policy on household energy use and greenhouse emissions .  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    ??This thesis investigates the impact of physical planning policy on combined transport and dwelling-related energy use by households. Separate analyses and reviews are conducted into (more)

    Rickwood, Peter

    485

    Table AP1. Total Households Using Home Appliances and Lighting by ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Total Consumption for Home Appliances and Lighting by Fuels Used, 2005 Quadrillion British Thermal Units (Btu) U.S. Households (millions) Electricity

    486

    Table 2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expeditures in U.S. Households ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Fuel Oil Consumption and Expeditures in U.S. Households ... Space Heating - Main or Secondary ... Forms EIA-457 A-G of the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption

    487

    Effect of Income on Appliances in U.S. Households, The  

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    This web page page entails how people live, the factors that cause the most differences in home lifestyle, including energy use in Geographic Location, Socioeconomics and Household Income.

    Michael Laurence

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    488

    U.S. household expenditures for gasoline account for nearly 4% of ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Electricity. Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, ... a rise in average gasoline prices has led to higher overall household gasoline expenditures.

    489

    Assessing the Environmental Costs and Benefits of Households Electricity Consumption Management.  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    ?? In this study the environmental costs and benefits of smart metering technology systems installed in households in Norway have been assessed. Smart metering technology (more)

    Segtnan, Ida Lund

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    490

    Material World: Forecasting Household Appliance Ownership in a Growing Global Economy  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    and V. Letschert (2005). Forecasting Electricity Demand in8364 Material World: Forecasting Household ApplianceMcNeil, 2008). Forecasting Diffusion Forecasting Variables

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    491

    An Analysis of the Price Elasticity of Demand for Household Appliances  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Refrigerators Clothes Washers Dishwashers Economic VariablesWASHERS, AND DISHWASHERS3 Physical Household andclothes washers and dishwashers. In the context of

    Dale, Larry

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    492

    Table 3. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    This write-up presents 1997 Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Origin of Householder. In 1997, there were 101.5 million residential ...

    493

    U.S. household expenditures for gasoline account for nearly 4% ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline expenditures in 2012 for the average U.S. household reached $2,912, or just under 4% of income before taxes, according to EIA estimates.

    494

    202-328-5000 www.rff.orgA New Look at Residential Electricity Demand Using Household Expenditure Data  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    We estimate residential electricity demand for different regions of the country, assuming that consumers respond to average electricity prices. We circumvent the need for individual billing information by developing a novel generalized method of moments approach that allows us to estimate demand based on household electricity expenditure data from the Consumer Expenditure Survey, which does not have quantity and price information. We find that price elasticity estimates vary across the four census regionsthe South at 1.02 is the most price-elastic region and the Northeast at 0.82 is the leastand are essentially equivalent across income quartiles. In general, these price elasticity estimates are considerably larger in magnitude than those found in other studies using household-level data that assume that consumers respond to marginal prices. We also apply our elasticity estimates in a U.S. climate policy simulation to determine how these elasticity estimates alter consumption and price outcomes compared to the more conservative elasticity estimates commonly used in policy analysis.

    Harrison Fell; Shanjun Li; Anthony Paul; Harrison Fell; Shanjun Li; Anthony Paul; Monte Carlo Analysis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    495

    Household Electricity Usage Form - U.S. Energy Information ...  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Sponsored by the Energy Information Administration . U.S. Department of Energy . Washington, DC 20585 . Form EIA-457E ...

    496

    Household Markets for Neighborhood Electric Vehicles in California  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    A Statewide ELECTRIC ELECTRIC and VEHICLES: Survey Sandrafor Neighborhood Electric Vehicles. Report prepared for theD. (1994). Future Drive: Electric Vehicles and Sustainable

    Kurani, Kenneth S.; Sperling, Daniel; Lipman, Timothy; Stanger, Deborah; Turrentine, Thomas; Stein, Aram

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    497

    Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

    Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

    Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the...

    498

    Estimating household fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and LPG prices by census region  

    SciTech Connect

    The purpose of this research is to estimate individual fuel prices within the residential sector. The data from four US Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration, residential energy consumption surveys were used to estimate the models. For a number of important fuel types - fuel oil, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas - the estimation presents a problem because these fuels are not used by all households. Estimates obtained by using only data in which observed fuel prices are present would be biased. A correction for this self-selection bias is needed for estimating prices of these fuels. A literature search identified no past studies on application of the selectivity model for estimating prices of residential fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas. This report describes selectivity models that utilize the Dubin/McFadden correction method for estimating prices of residential fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas in the Northeast, Midwest, South, and West census regions. Statistically significant explanatory variables are identified and discussed in each of the models. This new application of the selectivity model should be of interest to energy policy makers, researchers, and academicians.

    Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    499

    Consumption patterns and household hazardous solid waste generation in an urban settlement in Mexico  

    SciTech Connect

    Mexico is currently facing a crisis in the waste management field. Some efforts have just commenced in urban and in rural settlements, e.g., conversion of open dumps into landfills, a relatively small composting culture, and implementation of source separation and plastic recycling strategies. Nonetheless, the high heterogeneity of components in the waste, many of these with hazardous properties, present the municipal collection services with serious problems, due to the risks to the health of the workers and to the impacts to the environment as a result of the inadequate disposition of these wastes. A generation study in the domestic sector was undertaken with the aim of finding out the composition and the generation rate of household hazardous waste (HHW) produced at residences. Simultaneously to the generation study, a socioeconomic survey was applied to determine the influence of income level on the production of H