Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Trip rate comparison of workplace and household surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Available vs. Trip Rate) 14 El Paso Household Survey (Household Income vs. Trip Rate) . 15 El Paso Workplace Survey (Household Income vs. Trip Rate) . 52 52 53 53 54 54 16 BPA Household Survey (Household Size vs. Trip Rate) . . 17 BPA Workplace... Survey (Household Size vs. Trip Rate) . . 56 56 18 BPA Household Survey (No. of Employees vs. Trip Rate) . . 19 BPA Workplace Survey (No. of Employees vs. Trip Rate) . . 20 BPA Household Survey (Vehicles Available vs. Trip Rate) . . 21 BPA Workplace...

Endres, Stephen Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

2

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Experimental Evidence Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Household Response To Dynamic...

3

Survey of Household Energy Use (SHEU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Household Energy Use (SHEU) 2003 Detailed Statistical Report #12;To obtain additional copies of this or other free publications on energy efficiency, please contact: Energy Publications Office of Energy Efficiency Natural Resources Canada c/o St. Joseph Communications Order Processing Unit

4

ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY NATIONAL AWARENESS OF ENERGY STAR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY NATIONAL AWARENESS OF ENERGY STAR ® FOR 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements .................................................................................. ii Executive Summary ............................................................................ ES-1 Introduction ............................................................................................... 1 Methodology Overview ............................................................................. 2 Key Findings ............................................................................................. 5 Recognition .................................................................................................................. 5 Understanding ........................................................................................................... 12

5

Transferring 2001 National Household Travel Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Policy makers rely on transportation statistics, including data on personal travel behavior, to formulate strategic transportation policies, and to improve the safety and efficiency of the U.S. transportation system. Data on personal travel trends are needed to examine the reliability, efficiency, capacity, and flexibility of the Nation's transportation system to meet current demands and to accommodate future demand. These data are also needed to assess the feasibility and efficiency of alternative congestion-mitigating technologies (e.g., high-speed rail, magnetically levitated trains, and intelligent vehicle and highway systems); to evaluate the merits of alternative transportation investment programs; and to assess the energy-use and air-quality impacts of various policies. To address these data needs, the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) initiated an effort in 1969 to collect detailed data on personal travel. The 1969 survey was the first Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990, 1995, and 2001. Data on daily travel were collected in 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. In 2001, the survey was renamed the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) and it collected both daily and long-distance trips. The 2001 survey was sponsored by three USDOT agencies: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The primary objective of the survey was to collect trip-based data on the nature and characteristics of personal travel so that the relationships between the characteristics of personal travel and the demographics of the traveler can be established. Commercial and institutional travel were not part of the survey. Due to the survey's design, data in the NHTS survey series were not recommended for estimating travel statistics for categories smaller than the combination of Census division (e.g., New England, Middle Atlantic, and Pacific), MSA size, and the availability of rail. Extrapolating NHTS data within small geographic areas could risk developing and subsequently using unreliable estimates. For example, if a planning agency in City X of State Y estimates travel rates and other travel characteristics based on survey data collected from NHTS sample households that were located in City X of State Y, then the agency could risk developing and using unreliable estimates for their planning process. Typically, this limitation significantly increases as the size of an area decreases. That said, the NHTS contains a wealth of information that could allow statistical inferences about small geographic areas, with a pre-determined level of statistical certainty. The question then becomes whether a method can be developed that integrates the NHTS data and other data to estimate key travel characteristics for small geographic areas such as Census tract and transportation analysis zone, and whether this method can outperform other, competing methods.

Hu, Patricia S [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [ORNL; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Handling Frame Problems When Address-Based Sampling Is Used for In-Person Household Surveys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......use as the sampling frame for household surveys. This subset includes...However, around 90 percent of households with PO box addresses also have...recent growth, new construction, Hispanic households, non-English-speaking households......

Graham Kalton; Jennifer Kali; Richard Sigman

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",85.5450237,89.00343643,88.75545852,89.42917548,87.25590956,92.08566108 "Household Characteristics" "Census Region and Division" " Northeast",77.22222222,"NA",79.16666667,82.9015544,75.38461538,85.09615385 " New England",88.37209302,"NA",81.81818182,82.9787234,82,88.52459016 " Middle Atlantic ",73.72262774,"NA",78.37837838,82.31292517,74.30555556,83.67346939 " Midwest ",85.51401869,"NA",90.66666667,90.17094017,92.30769231,91.47286822 " East North Central",82,"NA",88.81987578,89.88095238,91.51515152,90.55555556

8

Logistic regression models for predicting trip reporting accuracy in GPS-enhanced household travel surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a methodology for conducting logistic regression modeling of trip and household information obtained from household travel surveys and vehicle trip information obtained from global positioning systems (GPS) to better understand...

Forrest, Timothy Lee

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

9

Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

or More","NA","NA",93.75,96.42857143,91.27516779,97.46835443 "Race of Householder1" " White",88.61111111,"NA",91.54929577,91.68704156,90.27093596,92.77845777 " Black...

10

Feed the Future Bangladesh: Baseline Integrated Household Survey | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feed the Future Bangladesh: Baseline Integrated Household Survey Feed the Future Bangladesh: Baseline Integrated Household Survey Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Feed the Future Bangladesh: Baseline Integrated Household Survey Dataset Summary Description The Bangladesh Integrated Household Survey dataset is a thorough assessment of current standard of food security in Bangladesh taken from 2011-2012. The dataset includes all baseline household surveys made under the USAID-led Feed the Future initiative, a collaborative effort that supports country-owned processes and plans for improving food security and promoting transparency, and within the Zones of Influence as outlined by the Feed the Future Bangladesh plan .The BIHS sample is statistically representative at the following levels: (a) nationally representative of rural Bangladesh; (b) representative of rural areas of each of the seven administrative divisions of the country; and, (c) representative of the Feed the Future (FTF) zone of influence.

11

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Experimental Evidence Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Experimental Evidence Focus Area: Crosscutting Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.hks.harvard.edu/hepg/Papers/2009/The%20Power%20of%20Experimentatio Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/household-response-dynamic-pricing-el Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation Regulations: "Mandates/Targets,Cost Recovery/Allocation,Enabling Legislation" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

12

A Juxtaposition of rational choice and socio-cultural approaches to explain changes in family size throughout the process of economic development using household survey data from Brazil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This research juxtaposes empirical approaches to analyze the relationship between fertility and economic development. Using household survey data from Brazil in the mid 1990s, separate (more)

Delfino, Daniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis -- A Reflexively Designed Survey of New-Car-Buying Multi-Vehicle California Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EV,then we expect 13.3 to 15.2% of all light-duty vehicle sales,EV marketpotential for smaller and shorter range velucles represented by our sampleis about 7%of annual, newhght duty vehicle sales.EV body styles" EVs ICEVs Total PAGE 66 THE HOUSEHOLD MA RKET FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES percent mandatein the year 2003will dependon sales

Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry >Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Contact Us * Feedback *...

15

Who is eating seafood? On an annual basis, results from the survey screener showed that 65% of U.S. households purchased  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Who is eating seafood? On an annual basis, results from the survey screener showed that 65% of U.S. households purchased seafood for at-home consumption at least once in the previous year while 83% of households purchased seafood in a restaurant during the same period. As shown in Figures 1a-c, retail seafood

16

The Travel Behavior of Immigrants and Race/Ethnicity Groups: An Analysis of the 2001 National Household Transportation Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the average household size for Hispanic respondents isper year, while households of black and Hispanic respondentsHispanic versus settled and native born residents. Vehicle ownership is highly correlated with mode choice as households

Handy, Susan L; Tal, Gil

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Transportation logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 August 1997 Release Next Update: EIA has discontinued this series. Based on the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) - survey series has been discontinued Only light-duty vehicles and recreational vehicles are included in this report. EIA has excluded motorcycles, mopeds, large trucks, and buses. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use

18

Collecting program planning and evaluation data from low-income, minority households: A case study baseline survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Wisconsin Demand Side Demonstrations (WDSD) collaborative effort, Wisconsin Electric Power Company (WEPCo) is implementing a direct-install lighting program in two minority low-income communities in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. One of the communities has a very high proportion of Hispanic residents, many of whom speak only Spanish, while the other is a predominantly African-American neighborhood. This demonstration is designed to test the use of community based organizations (CBOs) to contact, market and recruit program participants. As a matter of policy WDSD requires that all programs be evaluated and that whenever feasible, baseline studies be conducted. This paper describes the methods used to conduct the baseline studies in these neighborhoods. The methods are important for evaluators because they demonstrate a very effective way of surveying a hard to reach population. They may also be useful for marketers and program staff who may find the approach useful for working with similar populations. The methods presented in this paper resulted in a 94% completion rate for a baseline survey that averaged twenty-two minutes. The survey probed household activities, appliance mix, appliance use, and community social activities. The paper demonstrates what can be achieved in minority communities when resources located in the neighborhoods are mobilized to obtain market, program or evaluation information.

Hall, N. [RCG/Hagler, Bailly, Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Wintersberger, J. [Wisconsin Electric Power Co., Milwaukee, WI (United States); Reed, J.; Maggiore, A.; Pinkowski, C. [Wisconsin Demand Side Demonstration, Inc., Madison, WI (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Maternal work conditions, socioeconomic and educational status, and vaccination of children: A community-based household survey in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective This study examined how maternal work-related factors, including the availability of paid maternal leave, affect childhood vaccination status. Relatively little is known about the association between the employment status of mothers and the vaccination status of their children. Method We examined data from the Japanese Study on Stratification, Health, Income, and Neighborhood (J-SHINE), an ongoing epidemiologic household panel study in Japan. We used surveys taken in 20102011 in this study. Results We found that mothers who returned to work after giving birth were much less likely to follow recommended vaccine schedules for their children compared with mothers who stayed at home and those who had left the workforce by the time of childbirth. However, taking parental leave significantly reduced the risk of not being up-to-date with the vaccination schedule at 36months of age. We also found that children whose mother was younger and less educated, and those from an economically deprived family were at a high risk of not being up-to-date with the vaccination status at 36months of age. Conclusion Because vaccination is free and widely available in Japan, our findings indicate that provision of free vaccinations is not sufficient to achieve high vaccination rates.

Michiko Ueda; Naoki Kondo; Misato Takada; Hideki Hashimoto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Trends in Household Vehicle Stock The 1991 RTECS counted more than 150 million vehicles in use by U.S. households. This chapter examines recent trends in the vehicle stock, as measured by the RTECS and other reputable vehicle surveys. It also provides some details on the type and model year of the household vehicle stock, and identifies regional differences in vehicle stock. Because vehicles are continuously being bought and sold, this chapter also reports findings relating to turnover of the vehicle stock in 1991. Finally, it examines the average vehicle stock in 1991 (which takes into account the acquisition and disposal of household vehicles over the course of the year) and identifies variations in the average number of household vehicles based on differences in household characteristics. Number of Household Vehicles Over the past 8 years, the stock of household vehicles has

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Communications on energy Household energy conservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study assesses the influence of attitudinal and socio-economic factors on household energy conservation actions. A household interview survey in Regina, Saskatchewan found that respondents perceive an energy problem, although no association with energy conservation actions was determined. Two attitudinal and five socio-economic variables influence household energy conservation. Energy and monetary savings are available to households through energy conservation. Public awareness of household energy conservation through the media can reinforce existing energy conservation actions and encourage new actions.

Fred A. Curtis; P. Simpson-Housley; S. Drever

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Household vehicles energy consumption 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use some 6,000 vehicles provided information to describe vehicle stock, vehicle-miles traveled, energy end-use consumption, and energy expenditures for personal vehicles. The survey results represent the characteristics of the 84.9 million households that used or had access to vehicles in 1994 nationwide. (An additional 12 million households neither owned or had access to vehicles during the survey year.) To be included in then RTECS survey, vehicles must be either owned or used by household members on a regular basis for personal transportation, or owned by a company rather than a household, but kept at home, regularly available for the use of household members. Most vehicles included in the RTECS are classified as {open_quotes}light-duty vehicles{close_quotes} (weighing less than 8,500 pounds). However, the RTECS also includes a very small number of {open_quotes}other{close_quotes} vehicles, such as motor homes and larger trucks that are available for personal use.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Household Expenditures Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Household Expenditures Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division (see

24

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. 3. Vehicle Miles Traveled This chapter presents information on household vehicle usage, as measured by the number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT). VMT is one of the two most important components used in estimating household vehicle fuel consumption. (The other, fuel efficiency, is discussed in Chapter 4). In addition, this chapter examines differences in driving behavior based on the characteristics of the household and the type of vehicle driven. Trends in household driving patterns are also examined using additional information from the Department of Transportation's Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). Household VMT is a measure of the demand for personal transportation. Demand for transportation may be viewed from either an economic or a social perspective. From the economic point-of-view, the use of a household vehicle represents the consumption of one

25

Household portfolios in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I provide a detailed description and in-depth analysis of household portfolios in Japan. (1) It is shown that the share of equities in financial wealth and the stock market participation of Japanese households decreased throughout the 1990s. (2) Using survey data, age-related variations in the share of stocks in financial wealth are analyzed. The equity share and stock market participation increase with age among young households, peaking when people reach their 50s, and then stabilizing. However, the share of equities conditional on ownership exhibits no significant age-related pattern, implying that age-related patterns are primarily explained by the decision to hold stocks. A similar mechanism operates to that found in previous studies of Western countries. (3) Owner-occupied housing has a significantly positive effect on stock market participation and on the share of stocks in financial wealth.

Tokuo Iwaisako

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy Use:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends November 2005 Release (Next Update: Discontinued) Based on the 2001 National Household Travel Survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Transportation and augmented by EIA Only light-duty vehicles and recreational vehicles are included in this report. EIA has excluded motorcycles, mopeds, large trucks, and buses in an effort to maintain consistency with its past residential transportation series, which was discontinued after 1994. This report, Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends, provides details on the nation's energy use for household passenger travel. A primary purpose of this report is to release the latest consumer-based data

27

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Household Tables Household Tables (Million U.S. Households; 24 pages, 122 kb) Contents Pages HC2-1a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-4a. Household Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-7a. Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2

28

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

NONE

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

29

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F (2001) -- Household Natural Gas Usage Form F (2001) -- Household Natural Gas Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Natural Gas Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

30

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E (2001) - Household Electricity Usage Form E (2001) - Household Electricity Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Electricity Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

31

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Detailed Tables The following tables present detailed characteristics of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the tables. Table Organization The "Detailed Tables" section consists of three types of tables: (1) Tables of totals such as number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) or gallons consumed; (2) Tables of per household statistics such as VMT per household; and (3) Tables of per vehicle statistics such as vehicle fuel consumption per vehicle. The tables have been grouped together by specific topics such as model year data, or family income data to facilitate finding related information. The Quick-Reference Guide to the detailed tables indicates major topics of each table. Row and Column Factors These tables present estimates

32

Towards sustainable consumption: do green households have smaller ecological footprints?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The need for households in rich countries to develop more sustainable consumption patterns is high on the political agenda. An increased awareness of environmental issues among the general public is often presented as an important prerequisite for this change. This article describes how the study team compared the ecological footprints of ''green'' and ''ordinary'' households. These footprint calculations are based on a number of consumption categories that have severe environmental consequences, such as energy and material use in the home, and transport. The comparison is based on a survey of 404 households in the city of Stavanger, where 66 respondents were members of the Environmental Home Guard in Norway. The analysis suggests that, even if the green households have a smaller ecological footprint per household member, this is not caused by their participation in the Home Guard. It merely reflects the fact that green households are larger than ordinary households.

Erling Holden

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Key Assumptions Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2000 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2000 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and transportation sectors as inputs to the disaggregation algorithm that results in the direct fuel expenditure analysis. Household end-use and personal transportation service consumption are obtained by HEM from the NEMS Residential and Transportation Demand Modules. Household disposable income is adjusted with forecasts of total disposable income from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module.

34

Households and Pension  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter deals with two economic issues. First, we examine Japans household structure. In the previous chapter ( Chapter 10 ...), we recognized the importance of the ...

Mitsuhiko Iyoda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

HOUSEHOLD SOLAR POWER SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Photovoltaic power has become one of the most popular research area in new energy field. In this report, the case of household solar power (more)

Jiang, He

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Household equipment of Canadians -- features of the 1993 stock and the 1994 and 1995 purchases: Analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the results of three surveys that collected information on household equipment: The 1994 and 1995 Household Equipment Surveys and the 1993 Survey of Household Energy Use. The goal of the report is to highlight the features of energy-consuming equipment bought by Canadian households in 1994 and 1995 in comparison to those owned by households in 1993. Results are presented by type of equipment: Refrigerators, stoves, dishwashers, freezers, automatic washers, automatic dryers, air conditioning systems, heating systems, and water heaters. Appendices include information on survey methodology and a copy of the survey questionnaire.

Not Available

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

homes, pickup trucks, and jeeps or similar vehicles. See Vehicle. Average Household Energy Expenditures: A ratio estimate defined as the total household energy expenditures for...

38

The Household Pie  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The discussion of theoretical, conceptual, and methodological concerns in the last three chapters has set the stage for an examination of the total effort that households devote to domestic and market activiti...

Sarah Fenstermaker Berk

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Community Rating, Cross Subsidies and Underinsurance: Why so many Households in Japan do not Purchase Earthquake Insurance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Japan is famous for its earthquakes. According to ... survey, however, only 20% of Japanese households purchased an earthquake insurance policy in 2005. Why do so many households in Japan not purchase earthquake ...

Michio Naoi; Miki Seko; Kazuto Sumita

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Completed Copy in PDF Format Completed Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Household Expenditures Module Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2001 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2001 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

usage_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Usage Indicators Tables Usage Indicators Tables (Million U.S. Households; 60 pages, 247 kb) Contents Pages HC6-1a. Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-2a. Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-4a. Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-5a. Usage Indicators by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-6a. Usage Indicators by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-7a. Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5

44

housingunit_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Tables Housing Unit Tables (Million U.S. Households; 49 pages, 210 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-4a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-6a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-7a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4

45

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home Office Equipment Tables Home Office Equipment Tables (Million U.S. Households; 12 pages, 123 kb) Contents Pages HC7-1a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-4a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-7a. Home Office Equipment by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1

46

"Keeping Up" or "Keeping Afloat"? : how American households accumulate wealth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

having a Black or Hispanic household head, and experiencingBlack households, Hispanic households, poor households, etc.that Black- and Hispanic- headed households appear to be at

Lundy, Jeffrey Dalton

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Energy Consumption of Refrigerators in Ghana - Outcomes of Household  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Consumption of Refrigerators in Ghana - Outcomes of Household Energy Consumption of Refrigerators in Ghana - Outcomes of Household Surveys Speaker(s): Essel Ben Hagan Date: July 12, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Robert Van Buskirk Galen Barbose As part of activities to develop refrigerator efficiency standards regulations in Ghana, a national survey on the energy consumption of refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers has been conducted. The survey covered 1000 households in urban, peri-urban and rural communities in various parts of the country. The survey found that, on average, refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers in Ghana use almost three times what is allowed by minimum efficiency standards in the U.S., and a few refrigerators had energy use at levels almost ten times the U.S.

48

EIA - Gasoline and Diesel Fuel report: Household Vehicles Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Transportation logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 December 1993 Release Next Update: August 1997. Based on the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) - survey series has been discontinued after EIA's 1994 survey. Only light-duty vehicles and recreational vehicles are included in this report. EIA has excluded motorcycles, mopeds, large trucks, and buses. This report, Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991, is based on data from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). Focusing on vehicle miles traveled (VMT) and energy enduse consumption and expenditures by households for personal transportation, the 1991 RTECS is

49

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aggregate Aggregate Ratio: See Mean and Ratio Estimate. AMPD: Average miles driven per day. See Appendix B, "Estimation Methodologies." Annual Vehicle Miles Traveled: See Vehicle Miles Traveled. Automobile: Includes standard passenger car, 2-seater car and station wagons; excludes passenger vans, cargo vans, motor homes, pickup trucks, and jeeps or similar vehicles. See Vehicle. Average Household Energy Expenditures: A ratio estimate defined as the total household energy expenditures for all RTECS households divided by the total number of households. See Ratio Estimate, and Combined Household Energy Expenditures. Average Number of Vehicles per Household: The average number of vehicles used by a household for personal transportation during 1991. For this report, the average number of vehicles per household is computed as the ratio of the total number of vehicles to the

50

Income inequality and carbon dioxide emissions: The case of Chinese urban households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper draws on Chinese survey data to investigate variations in carbon dioxide emissions across households with different income levels. Rich households generate more emissions per capita than poor households via both their direct energy consumption and their higher expenditure on goods and services that use energy as an intermediate input. An econometric analysis confirms a positive relationship between emissions and income and establishes a slightly increasing marginal propensity to emit (MPE) over the relevant income range. The redistribution of income from rich to poor households is therefore shown to reduce aggregate household emissions, suggesting that the twin pursuits of reducing inequality and emissions can be achieved in tandem.

Jane Golley; Xin Meng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be damaged when corrosive chemicals are put down the drain. Burning hazardous wastes simply distributes themHousehold Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products containing toxic chemicals. These wastes CANNOT be disposed of in regular garbage. Any

de Lijser, Peter

52

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Air Conditioning Tables Air Conditioning Tables (Million U.S. Households; 24 pages, 138 kb) Contents Pages HC4-1a. Air Conditioning by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-7a. Air Conditioning by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2

53

The impact of retirement on household consumption in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using monthly data from the Japanese Family Income and Expenditure Survey, we examine the impact of retirement on household consumption. We find little evidence of an immediate change in consumption at retirement, on average, in Japan. However, we find a decrease in consumption at retirement for low income households that is concentrated in food and work-related consumption. The availability of substantial retirement bonuses to a large share of Japanese retirees may help smooth consumption at retirement. We find that those households that are more likely to receive such bonuses experience a short-run consumption increase at retirement. However, among households that are less likely to receive a retirement bonus, we find that consumption decreases at retirement.

Melvin Stephens Jr.; Takashi Unayama

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Standby electricity consumption and saving potentials of Turkish households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The share of the residential sector currently accounts for about 25% of the national electricity consumption in Turkey. Due to increase in household income levels and decrease in the costs of appliances; significant increases in appliance ownerships and residential electricity consumption levels have been observed in recent years. Most domestic appliances continue consuming electricity when they are not performing their primary functions, i.e. at standby mode, which can constitute up 15% of the total household electricity consumption in some countries. Although the demand in Turkish residential electricity consumption is increasing, there are limited studies on the components of the residential electricity consumption and no studies specifically examining the extent and effects of standby electricity consumption using a surveying/measurement methodology. Thus, determining the share of standby electricity consumption in total home electricity use and the ways of reducing it are important issues in residential energy conservation strategies. In this study, surveys and standby power measurements are conducted at 260 households in Ankara, Turkey, to determine the amount, share, and saving potentials of the standby electricity consumption of Turkish homes. The survey is designed to gather information on the appliance properties, lights, electricity consumption behavior, economic and demographics of the occupants, and electricity bills. A total of 1746 appliances with standby power are measured in the surveyed homes. Using the survey and standby power measurements data, the standby, active, and lighting end-use electricity consumptions of the surveyed homes are determined. The average Turkish household standby power and standby electricity consumption are estimated as 22W and 95kWh/yr, respectively. It was also found that the standby electricity consumption constitutes 4% of the total electricity consumption in Turkish homes. Two scenarios are then applied to the surveyed homes to determine the potentials in reducing standby electricity consumption of the households.

Mustafa Cagri Sahin; Merih Aydinalp Koksal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

vehicle aging have an additional but unknown effect on the MPG of individual vehicles. Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 27 Of the...

56

Energy Information Administration/Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

, , Energy Information Administration/Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 ix Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 presents statistics about energy-related characteristics of highway vehicles available for personal use by members of U.S. households. The data were collected in the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, the final cycle in a series of nationwide energy consumption surveys conducted during the 1980's and 1990's by the Energy Information Administrations. Engines Became More Powerful . . . Percent Distribution of Total Residential Vehicle Fleet by Number of Cylinders, 1988 and 1994 Percent Distribution of Vehicle Fleet by Engine Size, 1988 and 1994 Percent Percent 4 cyl Less than 2.50 liters 6 cyl 2.50- 4.49 liters 8 cyl 4.50 liters or greater 20 20 40 40 Vehicle

57

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, 3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 9.7 -- -- -- 6.5 11.3 5.7 2 Persons ...................................... 35.1 4.3 -- -- -- 2.0 7.8 5.8 3 Persons ...................................... 17.0 -- 3.3 -- -- 2.2 5.2 7.3 4 Persons ...................................... 15.6 -- 2.2 -- -- -- 4.3 8.1 5 Persons ...................................... 7.1

58

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Vehicle Fuel Efficiency and Consumption Fuel consumption is estimated from RTECS data on the vehicle stock (Chapter 2) and miles traveled (Chapter 3), in combination with vehicle fuel efficiency ratings, adjusted to account for individual driving circumstances. The first two sections of this chapter present estimates of household vehicle fuel efficiency and household fuel consumption calculated from these fuel efficiency estimates. These sections also discuss variations in fuel efficiency and consumption based on differences in household and vehicle characteristics. The third section presents EIA estimates of the potential savings from replacing the oldest (and least fuel-efficient) household vehicles with new (and more fuel-efficient) vehicles. The final section of this chapter focuses on households receiving (or eligible to receive) supplemental income under

59

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Household Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Household Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.7 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 6.7 4.7 2.0 6.2 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 8.0 5.4 2.6 5.0 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 3.8 2.7 1.1 7.9 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 3.5 2.5 1.0 8.1 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 1.7

60

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Household Characteristics by West Census Region, 2a. Household Characteristics by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.8 1.1 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 5.6 1.8 3.8 5.4 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 7.3 1.9 5.5 4.9 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 3.5 0.9 2.6 7.6 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 3.5 1.1 2.4 6.4 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 2.0 0.6 1.4 9.7 6 or More Persons

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Asset Pricing with Countercyclical Household Consumption Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Asset Pricing with Countercyclical Household Consumption Risk George M. Constantinides that shocks to household consumption growth are negatively skewed, persistent, and countercyclical and play that drives the conditional cross-sectional moments of household consumption growth. The estimated model

Sadeh, Norman M.

62

Household energy consumption and its demand elasticity in Thailand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study concentrates on the analysis of energy consumption, expenditure on oil and LPG use in cars and aims to examine the elasticity effect of various types of oil consumption. By using the Deaton's analysis framework, the cross-sectional data of Thai households economic survey 2009 were used. By defining energy goods in the scope of automobile fuel, the results reflect the low importance of high-quality automobile fuel on all income level households. Thai households tend to vary the quality rather than the quantity of thermal energy. All income groups have a tendency to switch to lower quality fuel. Middle and high-middle households (Q3 and Q4) are the income groups with the greatest tendency to switch to lower-quality fuel when a surge in the price of oil price occurs. The poorest households (Q1) are normally insensitive to a change of energy expenditure in terms of quality and quantity. This finding illustrates the LPG price subsidy policy favours middle and high-middle income households. The price elasticity of energy quantity demand is negative in all income levels. High to middle income families are the most sensitive to changes in the price of energy.

Montchai Pinitjitsamut

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Ventilation Behavior and Household Characteristics in NewCalifornia Houses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey was conducted to determine occupant use of windows and mechanical ventilation devices; barriers that inhibit their use; satisfaction with indoor air quality (IAQ); and the relationship between these factors. A questionnaire was mailed to a stratified random sample of 4,972 single-family detached homes built in 2003, and 1,448 responses were received. A convenience sample of 230 houses known to have mechanical ventilation systems resulted in another 67 completed interviews. Some results are: (1) Many houses are under-ventilated: depending on season, only 10-50% of houses meet the standard recommendation of 0.35 air changes per hour. (2) Local exhaust fans are under-utilized. For instance, about 30% of households rarely or never use their bathroom fan. (3) More than 95% of households report that indoor air quality is ''very'' or ''somewhat'' acceptable, although about 1/3 of households also report dustiness, dry air, or stagnant or humid air. (4) Except households where people cook several hours per week, there is no evidence that households with significant indoor pollutant sources get more ventilation. (5) Except households containing asthmatics, there is no evidence that health issues motivate ventilation behavior. (6) Security and energy saving are the two main reasons people close windows or keep them closed.

Price, Phillip N.; Sherman, Max H.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends...

65

Household vehicles energy consumption 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted during 1991 and early 1992. The 1991 RTECS represents 94.6 million households, of which 84.6 million own or have access to 151.2 million household motor vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

Not Available

1993-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

66

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, 3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.5 1.4 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.5 0.9 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 12.3 17.4 21.5 31.7 9.6 23.4 3.9 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 0.4 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.9 20.8 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 .......................... 80.8 11.9 16.7 21.0 31.2 9.1 22.6 3.9 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 3 .............. 57.5 6.2 10.7 15.2 25.3 4.5 12.4 5.3 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 4.9 9.1 12.1 20.1 3.6 10.4 6.1 With a Heat Pump

67

An exploratory study of Spanish households' WEEE disposal behaviour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the findings of an exploratory study based on a survey of 1,537 households in Spain. The questionnaire included 23 key questions regarding the number of appliances in use, previous appliances lifetimes, reasons for buying each new appliance and end-of-life handling of discarded appliances. The distribution of the households along a number of relevant factors was analysed and a prototypical household was identified. A non-parametric analysis of the duration of each type of appliance has also been carried out and it was found that television sets are the most durable of the appliances considered. Survival rates for irons fall more rapidly than for microwaves. Moreover, television sets are the most durable of the appliances considered. Replacement rates of personal computers rapidly increase after approximately six to eight years. Finally, a statistical analysis of the respondents motivations for recycling the appliances considered in this study was carried out.

Ester Gutiérrez; Belarmino Adenso-Díaz; Sebastián Lozano; Plácido Moreno

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

DOE/ID-Number  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

www.inl.gov Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Under DOE Idaho Operations Office Contract DE-AC07-05ID14517 ii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The U.S....

69

Data ID Service  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ID Service First DOI for a DOE dataset was minted by OSTI and registered with DataCite on 8102011 from the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility...

70

Minority and poor households: patterns of travel and transportation fuel use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the travel behavior and transportation fuel use of minority and poor households in the US, using information from numerous national-level sources. The resulting data base reveals distinctive patterns of household vehicle availability and use, travel, and fuel use and enables us to relate observed differences between population groups to differences in their demographic characteristics and in the attributes of their household vehicles. When income and residence location are controlled, black (and to a lesser extent, Hispanic and poor) households have fewer vehicles regularly available than do comparable white or nonpoor households; moreover, these vehicles are older and larger and thus have significantly lower fuel economy. The net result is that average black, Hispanic, and poor households travel fewer miles per year but use more fuel than do average white and nonpoor households. Certain other findings - notably, that of significant racial differences in vehicle availability and use by low-income households - challenge the conventional wisdom that such racial variations arise solely because of differences in income and residence location. Results of the study suggest important differences - primarily in the yearly fluctuation of income - between black and white low-income households even when residence location is controlled. These variables are not captured by cross-sectional data sets (either the national surveys used in our analysis or the local data sets that are widely used for urban transportation planning).

Millar, M.; Morrison, R.; Vyas, A.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

us for a R F survey to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fish ID C REEF Fish ID C REEF Fish ID C To reg No prior ex swimm EEF survey o record th earn mor List Watc www.re First, at Educati The clas followe and spe After th y. You will he differen re about

Holland, Kim N.

72

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Homes Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.4 2.0 2.9 1.3 Total Owner-Occupied Units ....... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 15.8 12.5 0.8 0.9 1.6 10.3 2 Persons ...................................... 25.9 23.4 0.5 0.5 1.5 10.1 3 Persons ...................................... 11.6 9.6 0.5 Q 1.3 12.1 4 Persons ...................................... 11.8 10.9 Q Q 0.7 15.7 5 Persons ...................................... 5.1 4.5 Q Q 0.4 24.2 6 or More Persons

73

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Household Characteristics by South Census Region, 1a. Household Characteristics by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.1 1.5 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 9.9 5.0 1.8 3.1 6.3 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 13.0 6.7 2.5 3.8 4.2 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 6.6 3.7 1.2 1.7 8.8 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 6.0 3.3 0.8 1.9 10.7 5 Persons ....................................................

74

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.5 0.8 1.4 1.3 1.4 Total .............................................................. 107.0 49.9 18.0 21.2 17.9 4.1 Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 14.6 5.3 4.8 3.6 6.4 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 15.7 5.7 6.9 6.8 5.4 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 7.6 2.8 3.5 3.1 7.2 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 6.8 2.3 4.1 2.4 8.1 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 3.1 1.3 1.3 1.4 12.3 6 or More Persons

75

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.8 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 2.5 8.1 6.5 4.8 6.2 9.9 2 Persons ...................................... 35.1 3.1 9.4 8.2 6.5 7.9 8.7 3 Persons ...................................... 17.0 1.3 4.3 4.0 3.3 4.1 10.7 4 Persons ...................................... 15.6 1.4 3.9 3.4 3.4 3.5 10.5 5 Persons ......................................

76

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.9 2.5 Total Rented Units ........................ 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 12.3 2.5 2.6 7.0 0.3 10.0 2 Persons ...................................... 9.2 2.5 2.5 4.1 Q 11.8 3 Persons ...................................... 5.4 2.0 1.1 2.0 0.4 13.9 4 Persons ...................................... 3.8 1.6 0.7 1.4 Q 17.7 5 Persons ...................................... 2.0 0.9 0.4 0.6 Q 24.1 6 or More Persons ........................

77

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, 3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.4 1.9 1.2 1.0 0.6 1.9 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 47.6 3.0 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 13.2 19.8 25.5 37.7 10.7 38.8 3.2 Personal Computers 2 ................... 60.0 3.7 8.7 16.0 31.6 3.7 17.4 4.6 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 2.8 7.1 12.8 22.4 2.8 13.6 5.1 2 or more .................................... 9.1 0.6 0.7 1.7 6.2 0.6 2.2 13.0 Number of Laptop PCs

78

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.0 1.2 1.2 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 2.5 4.5 5.1 4.0 3.7 8.3 7.5 2 Persons ...................................... 35.1 4.8 6.2 6.6 4.5 5.3 7.8 5.8 3 Persons ...................................... 17.0 2.5 3.3 2.9 2.3 1.9 4.1 8.4 4 Persons ...................................... 15.6 3.4 2.8 2.3 1.9 1.8 3.4 9.6 5 Persons ...................................... 7.1 1.6 1.2 1.3 0.6 0.7 1.6 14.3 6 or More Persons

79

Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Households with Children Households...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 6.1 0.8 2.7 2.6 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 23.2 Race of Householder White ... 54.8 14.4 27.6 12.8 83.7 3.2 6.7 7.2...

80

Physical activity of adults in households with and without children  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

whites, fewer Hispanics, and higher household incomes thanWhites, fewer Hispanics, and higher household incomes thanWhites, fewer Hispanics, and higher household incomes than

Candelaria, Jeanette Irene

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Space Heating by Household Income, 3a. Space Heating by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 18.4 22.7 26.8 38.1 14.6 33.4 3.3 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 0.3 Q 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 23.4 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 Q Q Q 0.2 Q Q 35.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.3 22.8 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 18.4 22.7

82

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Appliances by Household Income, 3a. Appliances by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.5 1.4 1.1 1.0 0.8 1.6 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 18.0 22.0 26.1 35.6 14.4 32.6 3.2 1 ................................................ 95.2 17.3 21.1 24.8 32.0 13.8 31.1 3.4 2 or More .................................. 6.5 0.8 0.9 1.3 3.6 0.6 1.5 13.1 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 18.0 22.0 26.1 35.6 14.4 32.6 3.2

83

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

or More...... 23.1 15.2 197 12.3 10.7 13.0 1.3 12.8 13.0| 6.7 | Race of Householder | White... 135.3 89.5 1,429 89.2 73.9 89.2 9.1 87.5 89.1| 2.0...

84

The World Distribution of Household Wealth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Japan is not a remote prospect. In summary, it is clear that householdJapan Korea, South New Zealand Norway Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Year Unit share of top 2002 household

DAVIES, JAMES B; Shorrocks, Anthony; Sandstrom, Susanna; WOLFF, EDWARD N

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Impact of the Earned Income Tax Credit on Economic Well-Being: A Comparison Across Household Types  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using survey data from Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) recipients in Madison County, New ... of the EITC across household types. For tax years 2002 through 2004, we find that ... of EITC amounts, poverty rates, u...

Nicole B. Simpson; Jill Tiefenthaler; Jameson Hyde

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Home Office Equipment by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Home Office Equipment by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.1 1.4 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 17.9 12.8 5.0 1.3 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 10.9 7.7 3.3 3.1 Number of Desktop PCs 1 ................................................................ 45.1 8.7 6.2 2.5 3.7 2 or more ................................................... 9.1 1.4 0.9 0.5 12.9 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ................................................................

87

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. 1. Introduction The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is mandated by Congress to collect, analyze, and disseminate impartial, comprehensive data about energy--how much is produced, who uses it, and the purposes for which it is used. To comply with this mandate, EIA collects energy data from a variety of sources covering a range of topics 1 . Background The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted

88

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Home Office Equipment by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Home Office Equipment by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 22.4 15.7 6.7 1.3 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 14.1 9.9 4.2 3.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1 ................................................................ 45.1 10.4 7.2 3.2 3.7 2 or more ................................................... 9.1 2.3 1.6 0.7 10.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ................................................................

89

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Air Conditioning by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Air Conditioning by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 20.5 13.6 6.8 2.2 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.3 Q Q 27.5 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 20.2 13.4 6.7 2.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 14.3 9.5 4.8 3.8 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 13.6 9.0 4.6 3.9 With a Heat Pump .....................................

90

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.5 0.8 1.4 1.3 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 36.8 13.6 18.9 13.6 4.3 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 1.2 0.2 0.4 0.3 21.4 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 ........................................ 80.8 35.6 13.4 18.6 13.3 4.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 3 ............................ 57.5 23.6 8.6 15.8 9.4 5.1 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 19.3 7.4 13.1 6.4 6.3 With a Heat Pump ..................................... 11.3 4.4

91

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.5 1.5 1.4 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 59.5 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 5.2 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 1.2 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 23.3 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 58.2 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 5.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 44.7 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 7.0 Without a Heat Pump .................. 35.6 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 7.7 With a Heat Pump .......................

92

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.8 0.5 1.4 1.2 1.6 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 23.4 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 6.1 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 0.9 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 23.0 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 22.5 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 6.2 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 12.7 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 8.5 Without a Heat Pump .................. 10.6 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 9.3 With a Heat Pump ....................... 2.2 8.6 0.8 1.0

93

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2001 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.0 1.5 1.5 Total .............................................................. 107.0 7.1 12.3 7.7 6.3 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 2.2 2.4 1.8 1.7 7.3 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 2.2 4.0 2.4 2.0 6.9 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 1.1 2.0 1.2 1.2 9.5 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 0.8 1.9 1.3 0.9 11.2 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 0.4 1.1 0.4 0.5 19.8 6 or More Persons ....................................... 4.0 0.4 0.9 0.4 0.1 16.4 2001 Household Income Category

94

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Air Conditioning by South Census Region, 1a. Air Conditioning by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.3 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 37.2 19.3 6.4 11.5 1.5 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.4 Q Q Q 28.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 36.9 19.0 6.4 11.5 1.6 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 30.4 16.1 5.0 9.2 2.8 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 22.1 10.4 3.4 8.3 5.6 With a Heat Pump

95

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Air Conditioning by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Air Conditioning by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 14.5 11.3 3.2 3.3 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.3 0.3 Q 28.3 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 14.2 11.1 3.2 3.4 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 5.7 4.9 0.8 8.9 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 5.2 4.5 0.7 9.2 With a Heat Pump .....................................

96

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, 2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 13.6 16.0 14.7 10.4 10.5 17.6 4.7 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 Q 0.3 0.5 0.3 0.4 0.5 27.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 .......................... 80.8 13.4 15.8 14.2 10.1 10.2 17.1 4.7 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 3 .............. 57.5 12.6 13.7 11.0 7.1 6.6 6.4 5.9 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 10.1 10.4 8.0 6.1 5.9 5.7 7.0 With a Heat Pump ....................... 11.3 2.5 3.3

97

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.6 1.5 1.4 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 4.9 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 21.8 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 80.8 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 4.9 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 57.5 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 6.7 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 7.7 With a Heat Pump ....................... 11.3 8.6 0.8 1.0 0.8 19.7 Room Air-Conditioning

98

Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Version No: 2013.01 Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: http://www.eia.gov/survey/form/eia_14/instructions.pdf Mailing Address: Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) https://signon.eia.doe.gov/upload/noticeoog.jsp Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Zip Code - Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov - - - - Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey Email address: U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 PADD 4 Type of Report (Check One ): (Thousands of dollars) (Thousands of barrels) PADD 2 PADD 3 PAD DISTRICT (a) Revision to Report:

99

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B B : E S T I M AT I O N M E T H O D O L O G I E S APPENDIX B A P P E N D I X B ESTIMATION METHODOLOGIES INTRODUCTION The National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) is the nation's inventory of local and long distance travel, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation. Between April 2001 and May 2002, roughly 26 thousand households 41 were interviewed about their travel, based on the use of over 53 thousand vehicles. Using confidential data collected during those interviews, coupled with EIA's retail fuel prices, external data sources of test 42 fuel economy, and internal procedures for modifying test fuel economy to on-road, in-use fuel economy, EIA has extended this inventory to include the energy used for travel, thereby continuing a data series that was discontinued by EIA in 1994. This appendix presents the methods used for each eligible sampled

100

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

This page left blank. This page left blank. E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION/HOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST DATA & TRENDS ENERGY OVERVIEW E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W INTRODUCTION Author's Note Estimates of gallons of fuel consumed, type of fuel used, price paid for fuel, and fuel economy are based on data imputed by EIA, using vehicle characteristics and vehicle-miles traveled data collected during the interview process for the 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS). Rather than obtaining that information directly from fuel purchase diaries, EIA exploited its experience and expertise with modeling techniques for transportation studies, filling missing and uncollected data with information reported to other federal agencies, as described in Appendices

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

RECS Data Show Decreased Energy Consumption per Household  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained relatively stable for many years as increased energy efficiency has offset the increase in the number and average size of housing units, according to the newly released data from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The average household consumed 90 million British thermal units (Btu) in 2009 based on RECS. This continues the downward trend in average residential energy consumption of the last 30 years. Despite increases in the number and the average size of homes plus increased use of electronics, improvements in efficiency for space heating, air conditioning, and major appliances have all led to decreased consumption per household. Newer homes also tend to feature better insulation and other characteristics, such as double-pane windows, that improve the building envelope.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION/HOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST DATA & TRENDS ENERGY OVERVIEW E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W INTRODUCTION Author's Note Estimates of gallons of fuel consumed, type of fuel used, price paid for fuel, and fuel economy are based on data imputed by EIA, using vehicle characteristics and vehicle-miles traveled data collected during the interview process for the 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS). Rather than obtaining that information directly from fuel purchase diaries, EIA exploited its experience and expertise with modeling techniques for transportation studies, filling missing and uncollected data with information reported to other federal agencies, as described in Appendices B and C of this report.

103

Melissa Allardyce GT ID# 902536182  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the necessary chemicals to treat the water and thus allow the business model to be self sustaining! my village for the polytank. Finally we distributed smaller 5 gallon buckets to all the villagers (about 110 households amount of money, clean water for household use! The #12;funds raised allow the women to purchase

Jacobs, Laurence J.

104

9 - Chinese healthcare system reforms and household saving patterns: some stylised facts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter aims to evaluate the relationship between one of the recent healthcare reforms in the Peoples Republic of China and household decisions both in terms of out-of-pocket expenditure and saving. Evidence on the results achieved by reforms of the health insurance sector in terms of reducing out-of-pocket medical expenditure is still uncertain and contradictory, and very little is known about the effect of these measures on the consumption and saving behaviour of the Chinese population. To shed light on this issue we use data collected by Chinese Household Income Project surveys (CHIPs), through a series of questionnaire-based interviews conducted in urban areas in 1995 and 2002. Our descriptive analysis suggests that there is a positive relationship between public health insurance coverage and household saving. This empirical evidence suggests that public insurance coverage is ineffective as a source of protection against income losses and might induce households to save more.

Vincenzo Atella; Agar Brugiavini; Hao Chen; Noemi Pace

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

STUDENT ID Page 2 m  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Write your name, student ID number, recitation instructor's name and recitation time in the space provided above. Also write your name at the top of pages 2, 3,...

106

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

methodology used to estimate these statistics relied on data from the 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption...

107

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, 2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.4 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 14.9 16.7 17.0 12.2 13.0 22.4 4.4 Personal Computers 2 ................... 60.0 11.0 11.6 10.3 7.2 7.8 12.0 5.3 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 8.0 9.0 7.7 5.3 6.1 9.1 5.8 2 or more .................................... 9.1 1.8 1.6 2.0 1.1 1.0 1.6 11.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

108

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2001 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.7 1.2 1.2 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 4.9 6.0 7.4 6.2 2.4 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.1 0.8 Q 0.1 23.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 4.7 5.2 7.4 6.1 2.6 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 1.3 3.9 6.2 5.7 6.7 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 1.2 3.2 5.5 3.8 8.1 With a Heat Pump ..................................... 11.3 Q 0.8 0.6 1.9 14.7 Room Air-Conditioning ................................ 23.3 3.4 1.2 1.2 0.3 13.6 1 Unit

109

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Home Office Equipment by South Census Region, 1a. Home Office Equipment by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.3 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 34.6 18.4 6.0 10.1 1.2 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 20.7 11.7 3.2 5.8 4.0 Number of Desktop PCs 1 ................................................................ 45.1 15.5 8.6 2.6 4.3 4.9 2 or more ................................................... 9.1 3.1 2.0 0.4 0.7 9.6 Number of Laptop PCs

110

Electricity Prices for Households - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Households for Selected Countries1 Households for Selected Countries1 (U.S. Dollars per Kilowatthour) Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Argentina NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.023 NA NA Australia 0.091 0.092 0.094 0.098 NA NA NA NA NA Austria 0.144 0.154 0.152 0.163 0.158 0.158 0.178 0.201 NA Barbados NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Belgium NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Bolivia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Brazil NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.145 0.171 NA Canada 0.067 0.069 0.070 0.071 0.076 0.078 NA NA NA Chile NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.140 0.195 NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) 0.075 0.071 0.074 0.076 0.079 0.079 0.080 0.086 NA Colombia NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.111 0.135 NA

111

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.9 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 8.4 26.2 21.1 19.0 21.5 7.8 Personal Computers 2 ................... 60.0 5.7 16.7 13.1 12.1 12.6 7.4 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 4.2 12.8 9.6 8.8 9.6 7.8 2 or more .................................... 9.1 0.8 2.4 2.3 2.0 1.7 12.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

112

A comparative evaluation of household preferences for solar photovoltaic standalone and mini-grid system: An empirical study in a costal village of Indian Sundarban  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar PhotoVoltaic (SPV) based systems have been widely accepted technology for rural electrification in developing countries. The standalone SPV home lighting system has increasingly been popular among rural households, while SPV mini-grid supply system is being promoted for rural electrification schemes. This study uses data from household survey to explore the impact of household characteristics on the preference for electrical energy from SPV systems. Econometric evidence shows heterogeneity in behavioural pattern for these two SPV systems. The flexibility in use and cost of systems might explain this difference. Household characteristics such as monthly household income, household size, occupational status of household head, number of room and type of house significantly influence households decision for SPV standalone home lighting systems. For SPV mini-grid supply households income and monthly expenditure on kerosene are significant predictors. The result reported in this paper might be a valuable input for policy makers to frame right policy mix with regard to provide subsidy on rural electrification programmes.

Amit K. Bhandari; Chinmoy Jana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form D (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

114

DOE/ID-Number  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

INEEL/EXT-04-02423 INEEL/EXT-04-02423 ABB SCADA/EMS System INEEL Baseline Summary Test Report J. R. Davidson M. R. Permann B. L. Rolston S. J. Schaeffer November 2004 Prepared by: Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory INEEL/EXT-04-02423 ABB SCADA/EMS System INEEL Baseline Summary Test Report J. R. Davidson M. R. Permann B. L. Rolston S. J. Schaeffer November 2004 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory INEEL National Security Division Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Assurance Under DOE Idaho Operations Office Contract DE-AC07-99ID13727 ABB SCADA/EMS System INEEL Baseline Summary Test Report INEEL/EXT-04-02423 November 2004 ABSTRACT The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

115

DOE/ID-Number  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

INL/EXT-08-13979 INL/EXT-08-13979 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Enhancing control systems security in the energy sector NSTB National SCADA Test Bed Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by the INL NSTB Program November 2008 November 2008 INL/EXT-08-13979 Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by the INL NSTB Program November 2008 Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 http://www.inl.gov Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under DOE Idaho Operations Office Contract DE-AC07-05ID14517 Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by the INL NSTB

116

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Appliances by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Appliances by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.3 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 19.6 14.5 5.2 1.1 1 .............................................................. 95.2 18.2 13.3 4.9 1.1 2 or More ................................................. 6.5 1.4 1.1 0.3 11.7 Most Used Oven ...................................... 101.7 19.6 14.5 5.2 1.1 Electric .....................................................

117

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Space Heating by South Census Region, 1a. Space Heating by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.9 1.2 1.4 1.3 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 38.8 20.2 6.8 11.8 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q Q 20.1 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q Q Q Q 39.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 Q Q Q Q 39.0 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0

118

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Space Heating by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Space Heating by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.7 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 20.1 14.7 5.4 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q 19.9 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q Q Q 39.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 Q Q Q 38.7 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 20.1 14.7 5.4 NE Natural Gas .................................................

119

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Space Heating by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Space Heating by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q 19.8 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q Q Q 39.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 Q Q Q 38.4 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Natural Gas

120

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Space Heating by West Census Region, 2a. Space Heating by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.6 1.0 1.6 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 22.6 6.7 15.9 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 0.7 Q 0.7 10.6 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 0.4 Q 0.4 18.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 0.2 Q 0.2 27.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 22.6 6.7 15.9 NE Natural Gas .................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Appliances by West Census Region, 2a. Appliances by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.7 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 22.1 6.6 15.5 1.1 1 .............................................................. 95.2 20.9 6.4 14.5 1.1 2 or More ................................................. 6.5 1.2 0.2 1.0 14.6 Most Used Oven ...................................... 101.7 22.1 6.6 15.5 1.1 Electric .....................................................

122

Category:Boise, ID | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ID ID Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Boise, ID" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Boise ID Idaho Power Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 61 KB SVHospital Boise ID Idaho Power Co.png SVHospital Boise ID Id... 62 KB SVLargeHotel Boise ID Idaho Power Co.png SVLargeHotel Boise ID ... 66 KB SVLargeOffice Boise ID Idaho Power Co.png SVLargeOffice Boise ID... 58 KB SVMediumOffice Boise ID Idaho Power Co.png SVMediumOffice Boise I... 63 KB SVMidriseApartment Boise ID Idaho Power Co.png SVMidriseApartment Boi... 61 KB SVOutPatient Boise ID Idaho Power Co.png SVOutPatient Boise ID ... 62 KB SVPrimarySchool Boise ID Idaho Power Co.png SVPrimarySchool Boise ... 62 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Boise ID Idaho Power Co.png

123

Cognitive Science Minor Approval Form Name __________________________________________ ID # _________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cognitive Science Minor Approval Form Name __________________________________________ ID: ___________________________________________________ _______________ Cognitive Science Minor Committee Date

Gering, Jon C.

124

Integrated Datasets (IDs) Wood/Bretherton proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Datasets (IDs) Wood/Bretherton proposal ID Rationale Space/Time scale; Location; Platforms Parameters Combined Drizzle Dataset (CD ID) Collocated precipitation, aerosol and cloud micro, precip. rate, cloud Cross- Section Dataset (XS-ID) Data on E-W cross- section along 20°S from coast

Wood, Robert

125

DOE-ID Operations Summary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in to service. NE-ID-BEA-TSD- 2013-0001 July 16, 2013: BEA discovered that a proper lockouttagout had not been installed for work being performed on the Advanced Test Reactor....

126

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C C Quality of the Data Appendix C Quality of the Data Introduction This appendix discusses several issues relating to the quality of the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) data and to the interpretation of conclusions based on these data. The first section discusses under- coverage of the vehicle stock in the residential sector. The second section discusses the effects of using July 1991 as a time reference for the survey. The remainder of this appendix discusses the treatment of sampling and nonsampling errors in the RTECS, the quality of specific data items such as the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) and fuel prices, and poststratification procedures used in the 1991 RTECS. The quality of the data collection and the processing of the data affects the accuracy of estimates based on survey data. All the statistics published in this report such as total

127

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Appliances by Climate Zone, a. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.1 Total .................................................. 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.8 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven .............................................. 101.7 9.1 27.9 23.1 19.4 22.2 7.8 1 ................................................... 95.2 8.7 26.0 21.6 17.7 21.2 7.9 2 or More ..................................... 6.5 0.4 1.9 1.5 1.7 1.0 14.7 Most Used Oven ........................... 101.7 9.1 27.9 23.1 19.4 22.2

128

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.5 1.7 1.6 1.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 69.1 9.4 16.7 6.6 4.3 1 ................................................ 95.2 63.7 8.9 16.2 6.3 4.3 2 or More .................................. 6.5 5.4 0.4 0.4 0.2 15.9 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 69.1 9.4 16.7 6.6 4.3 Electric ...................................... 63.0 43.3 5.2 10.9 3.6

129

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Space Heating by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Space Heating by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.6 0.9 1.3 1.3 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 49.9 18.0 21.2 17.9 4.3 Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 49.1 18.0 21.2 17.8 4.3 Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 0.7 0.1 0.1 0.1 25.8 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 0.4 0.1 Q 0.1 33.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 0.3 Q Q Q 30.2 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 49.1 18.0 21.2 17.8 4.3 Natural Gas

130

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.4 1.9 3.0 1.3 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Heat Home ..................................... 72.4 63.0 2.0 1.7 5.7 6.7 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 0.4 0.2 Q Q Q 46.2 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.3 0.2 Q Q Q 39.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ Q Q Q Q Q NF Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 72.4 63.0 2.0 1.7 5.7 6.7 Natural Gas

131

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Space Heating by Year of Construction, 2a. Space Heating by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.5 1.5 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.3 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 15.4 18.2 18.6 13.6 13.9 26.4 4.3 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 Q Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q 23.2 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 Q Q Q 0.2 Q Q 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q Q Q Q Q 37.8 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 15.4 18.2 18.6 13.6 13.9 26.4 4.3 Natural Gas ...................................

132

More efficient household electricity use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy efficiency of electric appliances has increased markedly in OECD countries, according to data provided by utilities, appliance associations, appliance manufacturers, and independent analyses of each country we reviewed (US, Sweden, Norway, Holland, Japan, Germany, UK). These improvements have, in part, offset increases in electricity demand due to increasing saturation of appliances. However, we see evidence that the efficiency of new devices has hit a temporary plateau: Appliances sold in 1988, while far more efficient than similar ones sold in the early 1970s, may not be significantly more efficient than those sold in 1987. The reason for this plateau, according to manufacturers we interviewed, is that the simple energy-saving features have been incorporated; more sophisticated efficiency improvements are economically justified by five to ten year paybacks, but unattractive to consumers in most countries who appear to demand paybacks of less than three years. Manufacturers see features other than efficiency --- such as number of storage compartments and automatic ice-makers --- as more likely to boost sales, market share, or profits. If this efficiency plateau'' proves lasting, then electricity use for appliance could begin to grow again as larger and more fancy models appear in households. 38 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Schipper, L.; Hawk, D.V.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.4 2.1 3.1 1.3 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 68.3 59.1 2.0 1.7 5.4 7.0 1 ................................................ 62.9 54.1 2.0 1.6 5.2 7.1 2 or More .................................. 5.4 5.0 Q Q 0.2 22.1 Most Used Oven ........................ 68.3 59.1 2.0 1.7 5.4 7.0 Electric ......................................

134

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.5 1.5 1.4 1.7 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.4 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 73.4 9.4 16.4 6.8 4.5 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 0.3 Q 0.6 Q 19.0 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 0.2 Q 0.3 Q 24.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q 0.3 Q 28.1 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 73.4 9.4 16.4 6.8 4.5 Natural Gas ...................................

135

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Appliances by Year of Construction, 2a. Appliances by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.5 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 14.3 17.2 17.8 12.9 13.7 25.9 4.2 1 ................................................ 95.2 13.1 16.3 16.6 12.1 12.7 24.3 4.4 2 or More .................................. 6.5 1.2 0.9 1.1 0.7 1.0 1.6 14.8 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 14.3 17.2 17.8 12.9 13.7 25.9 4.2 Electric ......................................

136

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Space Heating by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Space Heating by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.9 2.5 Total ............................................... 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Heat Home ..................................... 33.7 10.4 7.4 14.8 1.1 6.9 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 0.6 Q Q 0.5 Q 21.4 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.2 Q Q Q Q 84.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q 0.3 Q 36.4 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 33.7 10.4 7.4 14.8 1.1 6.9 Natural Gas ...................................

137

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1997 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 1997 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables Table Titles (Released: February 2004) Entire Section Percents Tables: HC1 Housing Unit Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF NOTE: As of 10/31/01, numbers in the "Housing Units" TABLES section for stub item: "Number of Floors in Apartment Buildings" were REVISED. These numbers will differ from the numbers in the published report. Tables: HC2 Household Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF Tables: HC3 Space Heating, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF Tables: HC4 Air-Conditioning, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF Tables: HC5 Appliances, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF

138

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 3 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables Topical Sections Entire Section All Detailed Tables PDF Tables: HC1 Household Characteristics, Million U.S. Households Presents data relating to location, type, ownership, age, size, construction, and householder demographic and income characteristics. PDF Tables: HC2 Space Heating, Million U.S. Households Presents data describing the types of heating fuel and equipment used for main and secondary heating purposes. PDF Tables: HC3 Air-Conditioning, Million U.S. Households Presents data describing selected household characteristics including location, number of rooms and area cooled and air-conditioning usage. PDF

139

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D (2005) - Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form D (2005) - Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown on the label, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and answer the seven questions for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality

140

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F (2005) - Household Natural Gas Usage Form F (2005) - Household Natural Gas Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Natural Gas Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown above, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and provide the requested information for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality and sanctions. Use the enclosed self-addressed envelope and return the completed form to:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

G (2005) - Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form G (2005) - Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown on the label, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and answer the seven questions for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality and sanctions.

142

Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US PAC CA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household  California households use 62 million Btu of energy per home, 31% less than the U.S. average. The lower than average site consumption results in households spending 30% less for energy than the U.S. average.  Average site electricity consumption in California homes is among the lowest in the nation, as the mild climate in much of the state leads to less reliance on

143

Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US PAC CA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household  California households use 62 million Btu of energy per home, 31% less than the U.S. average. The lower than average site consumption results in households spending 30% less for energy than the U.S. average.  Average site electricity consumption in California homes is among the lowest in the nation, as the mild climate in much of the state leads to less reliance on

144

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EnergyEfficiencyPotentialStudy. TechnicalReportEnergyEfficiency PotentialStudy. TechnicalReportEnergyEfficiency RenewableEnergyTechnologies Transportation AssessmentofHouseholdCarbonFootprintReductionPotentialsisthefinalreport

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Household gasoline demand in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continuing rapid growth in U.S. gasoline consumption threatens to exacerbate environmental and congestion problems. We use flexible semiparametric and nonparametric methods to guide analysis of household gasoline consumption, ...

Schmalensee, Richard

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Survey of mercury, cadmium and lead content of household batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: A well selected sample of 146 batteries was analysed for its heavy metals content. A comparison was made between heavy metals contents in batteries in 2006 and 2011. No significant change after implementation of the new EU Batteries Directive. Severe differences in heavy metal contents were found in different battery-types. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to provide updated information on the development of the potential impact of heavy metal containing batteries on municipal waste and battery recycling processes following transposition of the new EU Batteries Directive 2006/66/EC. A representative sample of 146 different types of commercially available dry and button cells as well as lithium-ion accumulators for mobile phones were analysed for their mercury (Hg)-, cadmium (Cd)- and lead (Pb)-contents. The methods used for preparing the cells and analysing the heavy metals Hg, Cd, and Pb were either developed during a former study or newly developed. Several batteries contained higher mass fractions of mercury or cadmium than the EU limits. Only half of the batteries with mercury and/or lead fractions above the marking thresholds were labelled. Alkalinemanganese mono-cells and Li-ion accumulators, on average, contained the lowest heavy metal concentrations, while zinccarbon batteries, on average, contained the highest levels.

Recknagel, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.recknagel@bam.de [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Reference Materials, Richard-Willsttter-Strae 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Radant, Hendrik [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Reference Materials, Richard-Willsttter-Strae 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Kohlmeyer, Regina [German Federal Environment Agency (UBA), Section III 1.6 Extended Producer Responsibility, Wrlitzer Platz 1, D-06844 Dessau-Rolau (Germany)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

California Household Transportation Survey - Datasets - OpenEI...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

work schedules and flexibility, use of toll lanes priced facilities, and walk and bicycle trips-to support advanced model development. GPS Data Logger On-Board Diagnostic...

148

Nevada: Kingston Creek Hydro Project Powers 100 Households  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hydropower project produces enough electricity to annually power nearly 100 typical American households.

149

Building Technologies Residential Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Introduction A telephone survey of 1,025 residential occupants was administered in late October for the Building Technologies Program (BT) to gather information on residential occupant attitudes, behaviors, knowledge, and perceptions. The next section, Survey Results, provides an overview of the responses, with major implications and caveats. Additional information is provided in three appendices as follows: - Appendix A -- Summary Response: Provides summary tabular data for the 13 questions that, with subparts, comprise a total of 25 questions. - Appendix B -- Benchmark Data: Provides a benchmark by six categories to the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey administered by EIA. These were ownership, heating fuel, geographic location, race, household size and income. - Appendix C -- Background on Survey Method: Provides the reader with an understanding of the survey process and interpretation of the results.

Secrest, Thomas J.

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

Environmental attitudes and household consumption: an ambiguous relationship  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article analyses the relationship between environmental attitudes and energy use in the home and for transport by Norwegian households. Quantitative surveys were used to find statistical correlations, and qualitative analyses to reveal mechanisms that influence the ability to behave in an environmentally friendly way. Three theses about attitudes, mechanisms and household consumption are presented. Firstly, a desire to project an environmentally friendly image has little influence on energy use in the home and for transport. Secondly, a sense of powerlessness prevents people from translating positive environmental attitudes into low energy use in the home and for everyday transport. Thirdly, a desire to self-indulge prevents people from translating positive environmental attitudes into low energy use for long distance leisure travel. These results have important implications for environmental policy. Public information and awareness campaigns can give consumers information on how to behave in an environmentally responsible way, but tend only to influence categories of consumption with little environmental impact. Structural change can be used to mitigate the effect of the sense of powerlessness and encourage environmentally friendly behaviour, but the desire to self-indulge is much more difficult to deal with.

Erling Holden; Kristin Linnerud

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Household demand and willingness to pay for hybrid vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper quantitatively evaluates consumers' willingness to pay for hybrid vehicles by estimating the demand of hybrid vehicles in the U.S. market. Using micro-level data on consumer purchases of hybrid and non-hybrid vehicles from National Household Travel Survey 2009, this paper formulates a mixed logit model of consumers' vehicle choices. Parameter estimates are then used to evaluate consumers' willingness to pay for hybrids. Results suggest that households' willingness to pay for hybrids ranges from $963 to $1718 for different income groups, which is significantly lower than the average price premium (over $5000) of hybrid vehicles, even when taking the fuel costs savings of hybrid vehicles into consideration. The differences reveal that although the market has shown increasing interest in hybrid vehicles, consumers' valuation of the hybrid feature is still not high enough to compensate for the price premium when they make new purchases. Policy simulations are conducted to examine the effects of raising federal tax incentives on the purchase of hybrid vehicles.

Yizao Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1: January 8, 1: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on AddThis.com... Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips In a day, the average household traveled 32.7 miles in 2001 (the latest

153

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2: October 3, 2: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on AddThis.com... Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership Household vehicle ownership has changed significantly over the last 40

154

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C C : Q U A L I T Y O F T H E D ATA APPENDIX C A P P E N D I X C QUALITY OF THE DATA INTRODUCTION This section discusses several issues relating to the quality of the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) data and to the interpretation of conclusions based on these data. In particular, the focus of our discussion is on the quality of specific data items, such as the fuel economy and fuel type, that were imputed to the NHTS via a cold-decking imputation procedure. This imputation procedure used vehicle-level information from the NHTSA Corporate Average Fuel Economy files for model year's 1978 through 2001. It is nearly impossible to quantify directly the quality of this imputation procedure because NHTS does not collect the necessary fuel economy information for comparison. At best, we have indirect evidence on the quality of our

155

Copyright 2004 Auto-ID Labs, All Rights Reserved The Auto-ID Labs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004 Auto-ID Labs, All Rights Reserved Research Projects ­ Seven Major Categories · Auto-ID Technology to create a free flow of models in a network (Internet or Intranet) #12;©Copyright 2004 Auto-ID Labs, All depends on the flow of data for effective management. · Auto-ID and other technologies will increase

Brock, David

156

Table 5.17. U.S. Number of Households by Vehicle Fuel Expenditures...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

5.17. U.S. Number of Households by Vehicle Fuel Expenditures, 1994 (Continued) (Million Households) 1993 Household and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor: All...

157

Using census aggregates to proxy for household characteristics: an application to vehicle ownership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instead, Asian and Hispanic households were undersampled byhousehold Age of the householder/Average age of residents Hispanichousehold Age of the householder/Average age of residents Hispanic

Adjemian, Michael; Williams, Jeffrey

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Examining the Variation of Household Vehicles Holding Behavior in the Chukyo Region in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Japan began initial stage of motorization in 1960s. The motorization made life of human highly dependent on private cars. As a result, vehicle holding behavior in the household might have a change during this process. This study examines the variation of the household vehicles owning behavior in the Chukyo region in Japan. The vehicle type is classified into the light motor car and the ordinary motor one. Meanwhile, the impact of the ownership of trucks is not taken into consideration. The person trip survey data in 1971 and 2001 are used as the sample. A bivariate ordered probit model is proposed for analyzing the ownership of two types of private cars. Since the maximal likelihood estimation method was found to be low efficient, the Gibbs sampler algorithm is implemented in this study. The conclusions of this study are listed as follows. Firstly, age of the householder, numbers of workers and number of members (>= 25 years old) were significant factors with same effects both in 1971 and 2001. Secondly, gender of the householder, district, population density and density of railway stations changed their effects from 1971 to 2001. The households with female householder were unwilling to own the light motor car only in 1971.The residents living in Nagoya would not like to own the ordinary motor car in 2001. Population density and density of railway stations affected ownership of the light motor car only in 2001. Lastly, there was a substitution effect on ownership between the light motor car and the ordinary motor one only in 2001.

Jia Yang; Mimi Tian; Tomio Miwa; Takayuki Morikawa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2001 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 2001 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables + EXPAND ALL Tables HC1: Housing Unit Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF (all tables) Climate Zone PDF Year of Construction PDF Household Income PDF Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit PDF Four Most Populated States PDF Urban/Rural Location PDF Northeast Census Region PDF Midwest Census Region PDF South Census Region PDF West Census Region PDF Tables HC2: Household Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF (all tables) Climate Zone PDF Year of Construction PDF Household Income PDF Type of Housing Unit PDF Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit PDF Type of Rented Housing Unit PDF

160

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3: January 22, 3: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on AddThis.com... Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5: February 5, 5: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on AddThis.com... Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles The graphs below show the average vehicle miles of travel (VMT) - daily

162

Opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from households in Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efforts to mitigate climate threats should not exclude the household as the household is a major driver of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through its consumption...2) emissions from kerosene combustion for lighting

O. Adeoti; S. O. Osho

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Household Wealth in a Cross-Country Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides a comparative analysis of household wealth in the United States, the United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Spain, and Italy. ... wealth, looking at the instruments in which households invest...

Laura Bartiloro; Massimo Coletta

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

On the consumption insurance effects of long-term care insurance in Japan: Evidence from micro-level household data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using micro-level household data in the 2001 Comprehensive Survey of the Living Conditions of the People on Health and Welfare compiled by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, this paper examines how having a household member in need of long-term nursing care can result in welfare losses measured in terms of consumption. In so doing, this study evaluates the role of the public long-term care insurance scheme implemented in Japan in April 2000. The results indicate that when households include a disabled family member, household consumption net of long-term care costs do not decrease as much as before the introduction of long-term care insurance. Further, when compared with the surveys conducted in 1998, the adverse effects on consumption net of long-term care costs have become much weaker. These findings suggest that the introduction of social insurance in 2000 helped Japanese households to reduce the welfare losses associated with a disabled family member.

Yasushi Iwamoto; Miki Kohara; Makoto Saito

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Home Prices and Household Callan Windsor, Jarkko Jskel and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Discussion Paper Home Prices and Household Spending Callan Windsor, Jarkko Jääskelä. ISSN 1320-7729 (Print) ISSN 1448-5109 (Online) #12;Home Prices and Household Spending Callan Windsor Abstract This paper explores the positive relationship between home prices and household spending

166

DOE-ID Operations Summary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

June 5, 2013 June 5, 2013 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period May 16, through May 30, 2013 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory, managed by DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC - Shannon Brennan, DOE-ID, (208) 526-3993. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) [No items to Report] Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) May 15 - 30, 2013: CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC discovered three instances of new information at the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) which have the potential to impact the nuclear safety analysis

167

Document ID Number: RL-721  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Document ID Number: Document ID Number: RL-721 REV 4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00066 I. Project Title: Nesting Bird Deterrent Study at the 241-C Tank Farm CX B3.8, "Outdoor Terrestrial Ecological and Environmental Research" II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions - e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) will perform an outdoor, terrestrial ecological research study to attempt to control and deter nesting birds at the 241-C Tank Farm. This will be a preventative study to test possible methods for controlling &/or minimizing the presence and impacts of nesting birds inside the tank farm. A nesting bird

168

RL·721 Document ID Number:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Document ID Number: Document ID Number: REV 3 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00045 . J.proj(;l~t Titl~: - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- --------- ------_. . _ - - - - - - - - - - - - - . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - LIMITED FIREBREAK MAINTENANCE ON THE HANFORD SITE DURING CALENDAR YEAR 2012 II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions· e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, etc.): The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to perform firebreak maintenance in selected areas of the Hanford Site during calendar year 2012 with limited use of physical, chemical, and prescribed burning methods. Prescribed burning will be performed by the Hanford Fire Department under approved burn plans and permits; and only in previously disturbed

169

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing household solid Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Groundwater Contamination from Household Wastewater... 12;Glossary Household Wastewater Treatment These terms may help you make more accurate assessments......

170

APS Beamline 6-ID-D  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MM-Group Home MM-Group Home MMG Advisory Committees 6-ID-D Home Recent Publications Beamline Info Optics Instrumentation Software User Info Beamline 6-ID-D Beamline 6-ID-D is operated by the Magnetic Materials Group in the X-ray Science Division (XSD) of the Advanced Photon Source. This is a high energy (50 - 130 keV) beamline used for structural studies primarily on single crystal materials. Recent Research Highlights LuFeO Unlikely route to ferroelectricity May 16, 2012 A new type of ferroelectric, LuO2Fe4, has been investigated at the APS by a research team from Julich research center. XAS & XMCD studies on beamline 4-ID-C determined the Fe magnetism and valence, while single crystal x-ray scattering measurements at 6-ID-B & 6-ID-D probed the associated structural and charge ordering.

171

Information compression for remote readable ID tags  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Optical identity (ID) tags have been introduced and described to achieve remote target recognition and identification. Optical ID tags usually contain encrypted signatures to be read out, decrypted and verified. In this paper, new features are introduced so that ID tags can be reliably used for remote detection and verification even if the captured tag is extremely degraded by perspective or optical distortion. Optimization of the ID tag size as well as the number of bits required to display the complex-amplitude information are analysed and discussed. The highest compression of grey levels, which corresponds to binary ID tags, is studied. Decryption and verification results are provided to analyse the possibilities of the newly designed optical ID tags.

Sergi Horrillo; Elisabet Prez-Cabr; Mara S Milln

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Household transitions to energy efficient lighting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract New energy efficient lighting technologies can significantly reduce household electricity consumption, but adoption has been slow. A unique dataset of German households is used in this paper to examine the factors associated with the replacement of old incandescent lamps (ILs) with new energy efficient compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and light emitting diodes (LEDs). The rebound effect of increased lamp luminosity in the transition to energy efficient bulbs is analyzed jointly with the replacement decision to account for household self-selection in bulb-type choice. Results indicate that the EU ban on \\{ILs\\} accelerated the pace of transition to \\{CFLs\\} and LEDs, while storage of bulbs significantly dampened the speed of the transition. Higher lighting needs and bulb attributes like energy efficiency, environmental friendliness, and durability spur IL replacement with \\{CFLs\\} or LEDs. Electricity gains from new energy efficient lighting are mitigated by 23% and 47% increases in luminosity for CFL and LED replacements, respectively. Model results suggest that taking the replacement bulb from storage and higher levels of education dampen the magnitude of these luminosity rebounds in IL to CFL transitions.

Bradford Mills; Joachim Schleich

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A comparative multivariate analysis of household energy requirements in Australia, Brazil, Denmark, India and Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we appraise sustainable household consumption from a global perspective. Using per capita energy requirements as an indicator of environmental pressure, we focus on the importance of income growth in a cross-country analysis. Our analysis is supported by a detailed within-country analysis encompassing five countries, in which we assess the importance of various socioeconomic-demographic characteristics of household energy requirements. We bring together family expenditure survey data, inputoutput tables, and energy statistics in a multivariate analysis. Instead of a uniform Kuznet's curve, we find that the effect of increasing income varies considerably across countries, even when controlling for socioeconomic and demographic variations. The latter variables show similar influences, but differing importance across countries.

Manfred Lenzen; Mette Wier; Claude Cohen; Hitoshi Hayami; Shonali Pachauri; Roberto Schaeffer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

College of Design ID Interior Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Design ID Interior Design KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped University of Kentucky 2013-2014 Undergraduate Bulletin 1 ID 101 INTRODUCTION TO INTERIOR DESIGN. (1) An introduction to the profession of Interior Design: historical perspective, career specializations, and career

MacAdam, Keith

175

2/21/2014 terragreen.teriin.org/popup.php?section_id=1905&category_id=10 http://terragreen.teriin.org/popup.php?section_id=1905&category_id=10 1/2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2/21/2014 terragreen.teriin.org/popup.php?section_id=1905&category_id=10 http://terragreen.teriin.org/popup.php in the material because of the durable nickel alloy and smart aerodynamic design. #12;2/21/2014 terragreen.teriin.org/popup.php?section_id=1905&category_id=10 http://terragreen.teriin.org/popup.php?section_id=1905&category_id=10 2/2 "The

Chiao, Jung-Chih

176

APS Beamline 6-ID-B,C  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

B,C Home B,C Home Recent Publications Beamline Info Optics Instrumentation Software User Info Beamline 6-ID-B,C Beamline 6-ID-B,C is operated by the Magnetic Materials Group in the X-ray Science Division (XSD) of the Advanced Photon Source. Research on this beamline centers on general x-ray scattering studies of materials. The beamline has 2 end-stations: 6-ID-B: Psi -Diffractomter & In-Field Studies 6-ID-C: UHV in-situ growth Recent Research Highlights LSMO pictures Searching for Next-Generation Electronic Materials December 14, 2009 A new class of layered oxide materials discovered thanks to research at the beamline 6-ID-B offers scientists unprecedented opportunities for creating the next generation of electronic devices. Local Contact: Phil Ryan Local Contacts: Philip Ryan (Surface Diffraction) 630.252.0252 ryan@aps.anl.gov

177

Durability of Diesel Engine Particulate Filters (Agreement ID...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Durability of Diesel Engine Particulate Filters (Agreement ID:10461) Durability of Diesel Engine Particulate Filters (Agreement ID:10461) 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...

178

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neighborhood Program GETS Green Energy Training ServicesGJGEI Green Jobs, Green Energy Initiative CEWO Cleanincome households. The Green Energy Training Services (GETS)

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Barriers to household investment in residential energy conservation: preliminary assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general assessment of the range of barriers which impede household investments in weatherization and other energy efficiency improvements for their homes is provided. The relationship of similar factors to households' interest in receiving a free energy audits examined. Rates of return that underly household investments in major conservation improvements are assessed. A special analysis of household knowledge of economically attractive investments is provided that compares high payback improvements specified by the energy audit with the list of needed or desirable conservation improvements identified by respondents. (LEW)

Hoffman, W.L.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Economic theory and women's household status: The case of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economic development disadvantages wives. Conventional microeconomic theory predicts this. As household incomes rise, wives have incentives to specialize in intangible household production. This may raise total household production according to the theory of comparative advantage, but disproportionately favors husbands in distribution of the gains according to the marginal productivity theory of distribution. Wives may become better off in absolute terms but more dependent financially on their husbands and lose power within the household. Historically, Japanese gender roles became highly specialized and wives legal status declined, although other Meiji-era features protected wives. Policies to improve women's status should address the precise economic problem involved.

Barbara J. Redman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Confronting earthquake risk in Japanare private households underinsured?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite the fact that Japan is an earthquake-prone country and Japanese ... risk averse, less than half of Japanese households are insured against earthquake risk. Based on...

Franz Waldenberger

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Salmon consumption at the household level in Japan.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the salmon demand of Japanese households. The specific goals are to illuminate the substitutional relationship between (more)

Kikuchi, Akihiro

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Consumer perspectives on household hazardous waste management in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We give an overview of the management systems of household hazardous waste (HHW) in Japan and discuss the management systems and their...

Misuzu Asari; Shin-ichi Sakai

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

DOE-ID Operations Summary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January 6, 2014 January 6, 2014 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period November 01, 2013 through November 30, 2013 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory, managed by DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC -Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) Nothing to Report Notable Accomplishments: Contracting companies supporting EM's cleanup program and the Office of Nuclear Energy at the Idaho site volunteered to be among the first to use a new DOE

185

II.CONTRACT ID CODE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 1 II.CONTRACT ID CODE ~AGE 1 of AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT PAGES AC 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 3. EFFECTNE DATE 2. AMENDMENTfMODIFICA TION NO. 4. REQUISITIONIPURCHASE REQ. NO. See Block 16c. NOPR 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 05008 6. ISSUED BY CODE 05008 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration P.O. Box 2050 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 P.O. Box 2050 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC P.O. Box 2009 MS 8014 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8014 lOA. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ORDER NO.

186

DOE-ID Operations Summary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

26, 2013 26, 2013 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period July 29, 2013 through August 12, 2013 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory, managed by DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC -Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) July 31, 2013: The Idaho Treatment Group, LLC (ITG), the managing contractor for the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project received a warning letter from the State of Idaho's Department of Environmental quality regarding self- reported RCRA permit violations which

187

DOE-ID Operations Summary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

18, 2013 18, 2013 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period September 30, 2013 through October 31, 2013 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory, managed by DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC -Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) October 15, 2013: A manager at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) determined that the AMWTP Safety Analysis process required review due to an operational trend of fire/combustion events in the Treatment Facility (TF) box lines. Safety analysis for the TF is

188

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What's new in our home energy use? What's new in our home energy use? RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 First results from EIA's 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) The 2009 RECS collected home energy characteristics data from over 12,000 U.S. households. This report highlights findings from the survey, with details presented in the Household Energy Characteristics tables. How we use energy in our homes has changed substantially over the past three decades. Over this period U.S. homes on average have become larger, have fewer occupants, and are more energy-efficient. In 2005, energy use per household was 95 million British thermal units (Btu) of energy compared with 138 million Btu per household in 1978, a drop of 31 percent. Did You Know? Over 50 million U.S. homes have three or more televisions.

189

DOI-BLM-ID-I020-2012-0017-CX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOI-BLM-ID-I020-2012-0017-CX DOI-BLM-ID-I020-2012-0017-CX Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-ID-I020-2012-0017-CX CX at Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant Idaho Geological Survey Geothermal Area Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Project Location Utah Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Time Frame (days) Application Time 272 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office BLM Idaho Falls District Office Managing Field Office BLM Pocatello Field Office Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates Application Date 10/21/2011

190

Determinants of households inflation expectations in Japan and the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a VAR model that includes survey data on households inflation expectations for Japan and the US, we investigate their determinants and influences on the economy and compare their properties in two countries. Short-term non-recursive restrictions are imposed taking account of simultaneous co-dependence between realized and expected inflation. We find that responding to changes in exogenous prices and to monetary policy shocks, inflation expectations adjust more quickly than does realized inflation. Compared with Japan, the effects of exogenous prices on inflation and inflation expectations in the US are not only large but also long lasting and shocks to expectations have self-fulfilling effects on inflation.

Kozo Ueda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Voluntary electricity conservation of households after the Great East Japan Earthquake: A stated preference analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper examines the voluntary electricity-saving awareness of households after the Great East Japan Earthquake and the subsequent accident at the Fukushima nuclear power station. We conduct a conjoint analysis of consumer stated preferences for the settings of air conditioners, refrigerators, and the standby power of electrical appliances, based on a web questionnaire survey administered in the areas supplied by the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) and Kansai Electric Power Company (KEPCO). The main findings of this paper are as follows. First, we observe awareness of voluntary electricity conservation among the households in both the TEPCO and KEPCO areas after the disasters. Second, awareness of voluntary power saving is higher in the TEPCO area, which has been directly affected by the electric power shortages, in comparison with the KEPCO area, where there was no such direct impact. Third, if power prices are to be further raised, the consumer responses to the price changes would be small in both areas. Furthermore, we show that the potential voluntary reduction in electric power consumption of a household in the TEPCO area is 26% more than that in the KEPCO area during the summer peak periods.

Makoto Tanaka; Takanori Ida

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Intra-Household Inequality in Transitional Russia Ekaterina Kalugina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Intra-Household Inequality in Transitional Russia Ekaterina Kalugina Natalia Radtchenko Catherine and satisfaction. Using two different subjective questions of the Russian data RLMS (Russia Longitudinal Monitoring and social changes in Russia, we investigate the dynamics of household behavior. Keywords: subjective data

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

193

Controlling Households' Drilling Fever in France: an economic modeling approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to generate environmental benefits through reducing water use, has produced economic incentives for households; France; households; domestic boreholes; tube well; water pricing. Author-produced version Fourth World negative environmental impact of water price increase in the drinking water sector. Using primary data

Boyer, Edmond

194

Assimilation and differences between the settlement patterns of individual immigrants and immigrant households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...delineate directions for future household-scale investigations of...Categorization: Individuals or Households? The concentration on the...individual bodies. Of course, household structure and geographic context...children compared with non-Hispanic white children hinge on such...

Mark Ellis; Richard Wright

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Efficient Use of Commercial Lists in U.S. Household Sampling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......educational attainment, Hispanic ethnicity, household income, and home tenure...on the two persons in the household as well as the Hispanic ethnicity status of the head of household (assuming that the Hispanic ethnicity status of persons......

Richard Valliant; Frost Hubbard; Sunghee Lee; Chiungwen Chang

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

A theoretical and simulation-based examination of household vehicle choice through an adoption perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

=2 Senior h =3 Table 17: Japan household income distributionto 2005 Japan Census (millions of households)). CHAPTER 5.same shifts of household dynamics as Japan (i.e. lower birth

Liu, Jenny Hsing-I

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Household actions can provide a behavioral wedge to rapidly reduce US carbon emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ineffective in reducing household energy consumption. Mass media...10 years. The changes in household behavior outlined above result...European Union countries and Japan, where the household sector is less energy intensive. Analyses similar...

Thomas Dietz; Gerald T. Gardner; Jonathan Gilligan; Paul C. Stern; Michael P. Vandenbergh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

1-ID: Sector 1, Insertion Device Beamline  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1-ID beamline schematic 1-ID beamline schematic ID on-axis brilliance values 1-ID - Sector 1, Insertion Device Beamline Responsible Scientists Jon Almer, phone: (630) 252-1049, e-mail: almer@aps.anl.gov Sarvjit Shastri, phone: (630) 252-0129, e-mail: shastri@aps.anl.gov John Okasinski, phone: (630) 252-0162, e-mail: okasinski@aps.anl.gov Peter Kenesei, phone: (630) 252-0133, e-mail: kenesei@aps.anl.gov Scientific Programs Coupled high-energy SAXS/WAXS studies (HE-SAXS/WAXS) High-energy diffraction microscopy (HEDM) Single-grain studies Stress/strain/texture studies Pair-distribution function (PDF) measurements High-energy fluorescence Source Characteristics Upstream insertion device: APS Undulator A No. of Poles 72 Undulator Period 3.3 cm Device Length 2.4 m Minimum Gap 11 mm Downstream insertion device

199

Property:WFSPTurbineID | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WFSPTurbineID WFSPTurbineID Jump to: navigation, search Property Name WFSPTurbineID Property Type Number This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "WFSPTurbineID" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alleghany High School Wind Project + 110,608 + Appanoose Elementary School Wind Project + 108,442 + Auburn-Washburn Wind Project + 105,237 + Avery County High School Wind Project + 110,607 + B Bancroft-Rosalie Public Schools Wind Project + 108,812 + Bloomfield Public Schools Wind Project + 110,699 + Burlington High School Wind Project + 107,678 + C CAES Wind Project + 105,329 + Cedar Rapids Wind Project + 105,272 + Cherry Valley Elementary School Wind Project + 120,342 + Concordia High School Wind Project + 108,482 +

200

Winter Study Rebate Form 2012 Date______________________________ ID #________________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Winter Study Rebate Form 2012 Date______________________________ ID to receive your rebate? Credit term account______ EPH Dollars_______ WINTER STUDY REBATES ARE GIVEN 10 consecutive calendar days are entitled to a rebate Rebates will be calculated on a per day basis

Aalberts, Daniel P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Winter Study Rebate Form 2013 Date______________________________ ID #________________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Winter Study Rebate Form 2013 Date______________________________ ID to receive your rebate? Credit term account______ EPH Dollars_______ WINTER STUDY REBATES ARE GIVEN 10 consecutive calendar days are entitled to a rebate Rebates will be calculated on a per day basis

Aalberts, Daniel P.

202

Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as markers of epithelial cancer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for detection and prognosis of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises detecting expression, if any, for both an Id-1 and an Id-2 genes, or the ratio thereof, of gene products in samples of breast tissue obtained from a patient. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are invasive and metastatic, whereas Id-2 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are localized and noninvasive in the breast tissue.

Desprez, Pierre-Yves (El Cerrito, CA); Campisi, Judith (Berkeley, CA)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

203

Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as markers of epithelial cancer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for detection and prognosis of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises detecting expression, if any, for both an Id-1 and an Id-2 genes, or the ratio thereof, of gene products in samples of breast tissue obtained from a patient. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are invasive and metastatic, whereas Id-2 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are localized and noninvasive in the breast tissue.

Desprez, Pierre-Yves (El Cerrito, CA); Campisi, Judith (Berkeley, CA)

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) Dataset Summary Description The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The 2005 survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the U.S. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the Consumption & Expenditures data. The Consumption & Expenditures and Intensities data is divided into two parts: Part 1 provides energy consumption and expenditures by census region, population density, climate zone, type of housing unit, year of construction and ownership status; Part 2 provides the same data according to household size, income category, race and age. The next update to the RECS survey (2009 data) will be available in 2011.

205

The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gromer, C. New age of the electric car. Popular Mechanics.VEHICLES strongly favor electric cars, but on the other,electric vehicles, if an electric car was available to buy

Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis -- A Reflexively Designed Survey of New-Car-Buying Multi-Vehicle California Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gromer, C Newage of the electric car. Popular Mechanics.VEHICLES strongly favor electric cars, but on the other,electric vehicles, if an electric car wasavailable to buy

Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

16. Regional electric vehicles: rebate. high performanceCommunity electric vehicles: lower rebate. priced electric,luxury) * S m a l l Electric Vehicle T a x Rebate Subtract $

Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis -- A Reflexively Designed Survey of New-Car-Buying Multi-Vehicle California Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electric, $2000 (small vehicle) Zero Emissions Vehicle tax rebate.electric, 60 or miles of range, $4000 Zero Emissions Vehicle tax rebate.tax rebate on LEV). Page12, Hybrid electric vehicles: Both

Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

duty vehicle sales. Additional EV sales to commercial andfor limited range, projected EV sales are very low. Marketinclude any potential EV sales to commercial or government

Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis -- A Reflexively Designed Survey of New-Car-Buying Multi-Vehicle California Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

elude us until newelectric energystorage technologies can beelude us untd newelectric energystorage technologies can be

Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

"Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"...

212

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute household accidental Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluating the health benefits of transitions in household energy Summary: ; Household energy; Indoor air pollution; Intervention assessment; Kenya 1. Introduction Acute...

213

Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiency of Household Appliances in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of household refrigerators and freezers 2 . Therefore, thesales of the refrigerators and freezers are about 20.6for household refrigerators and freezers has been updated

Lin, Jiang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Modeling households decisions on reconstruction of houses damaged by earthquakesJapanese case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, households decisions on reconstruction of damaged houses were modeled, using questionnaire data in Japan. Characteristics of households decisions were investigated using parameter estimation resu...

H. Sakakibara; H. Murakami; S. Esaki; D. Mori; H. Nakata

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 - Appendix C  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction This appendix discusses several issues relating to the quality of the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) data and to the interpretation of conclusions based on these data. The first section discusses undercoverage of the vehicle stock in the residential sector. The second section discusses the effects of using July 1994 as a time reference for the survey. The remainder of this appendix discusses the treatment of sampling and nonsampling errors in the RTECS, the quality of specific data items such as the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) and fuel prices, and poststratification procedures used in the 1994 RTECS. The quality of the data collection and the processing of the data affects the accuracy of estimates based on survey data. All the statistics

218

Coal Survey Frequently Asked Questions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey FAQ Survey FAQ Available FAQ: Q. Whom do I contact if I need assistance completing a survey form? Q. Whom do I contact if I require assistance with the registration process, log-in process, instructions pertaining to JavaScript or cookies? Q. What unit of measurement should be used to calculate Btu? Q. How do I update the information that appears under Item I on IDC? Q. Under "Item II: Coal Receipts, Consumption and Stocks," can a value be negative? Q. How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? Vice Versa. Q. How do I convert between pounds to short tons? Vice Versa. Q. How do I correct a mistake on the Survey Form once I have submitted the data? Q. How do I log in if forgot my password? Q. If I accidently deleted the registration letters, how can I get my Mail ID and Code?

219

Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households Focus Area: Appliances & Equipment Topics: Policy Impacts Website: active.cput.ac.za/energy/web/DUE/DOCS/422/Paper%20-%20Shuma-Iwisi%20M. Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/appliance-standby-power-and-energy-co Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance A modified engineering model is proposed to estimate standby power and energy losses in households. The modified model accounts for the randomness of standby power and energy losses due to unpredicted user appliance operational behavior.

220

Smoothing consumption across households and time : essays in development economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis studies two strategies that households may use to keep their consumption smooth in the face of fluctuations in income and expenses: credit (borrowing and savings) and insurance (state contingent transfers between ...

Kinnan, Cynthia Georgia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

in gallons, of this household's storage tank(s)? Enter the capacity for the two largest tanks (if there is more than one) in the boxes below. If the capacity is not known, write...

222

Fact #614: March 15, 2010 Average Age of Household Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The average age of household vehicles has increased from 6.6 years in 1977 to 9.2 years in 2009. Pickup trucks have the oldest average age in every year listed. Sport utility vehicles (SUVs), first...

223

Fact #748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

but then declined until about 2004 when gasoline and motor oil expenditures began to rise again. The share of household expenditures on gasoline and oil was exactly the same...

224

Householder Symposium on Numerical Linear Algebra June 1721, 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for discussions. This year's symposium is held at Peebles Hotel Hydro in the small town of Peebles (populationHouseholder Symposium on Numerical Linear Algebra June 17­21, 2002 Peebles Hotel Hydro, Scotland

Higham, Nicholas J.

225

APS Beamline 6-ID-D  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D Home D Home Recent Publications Beamline Info Optics Instrumentation Software User Info Beamline 6-ID-D Beamline 6-ID-D is operated by the Magnetic Materials Group in the X-ray Science Division (XSD) of the Advanced Photon Source. This is a high energy (50 - 130 keV) beamline used for structural studies primarily on single crystal materials. Recent Research Highlights A New Family of Quasicrystals A New Family of Quasicrystals June 24, 2013 Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University have used the high energy x-rays available on beamline 6-ID-D, to confirm the structure of the only known magnetic rare earth icosahedral binary quasicrystals. Contacts: Alan Goldman & Paul Canfield - Iowa State Univ. & Ames Lab Local Contacts:

226

Requesting a Digital ID | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Requesting a Digital ID Requesting a Digital ID Requesting a Digital ID Step One - Registering with MIS To request a DOE Digital Identity you must first register in DOE's Management Information System (MIS) by going to https://mis.doe.gov, selecting "Requesting Access" and following the onscreen instructions. Note: DOE Federal employees are already registered and do not need to complete this step, they may skip to step 2. During the registration process you will be required to search for, and select, a DOE sponsor. Your DOE sponsor is the DOE federal employee that is certifying that you have a recognized relationship with the Department and have a valid need for a DOE Digital Identity. For contractors this person is often your Contract Task Manager, Contracting Officer's Representatives

227

A gap in formal long-term care use related to characteristics of caregivers and households, under the public universal system in Japan: 20012010  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We investigated whether the universal provision of long-term care (LTC) under Japan's public system has equalized its use across households with different socio-economic characteristics, with a special focus on the gender and marital status of primary caregivers, and income. We used repeated cross-sectional data from national household surveys (2001, 2004, 2007, 2010) and conducted multiple logistic regression analyses to obtain odds ratios of caregiver and household characteristics for service use, adjusting for recipients characteristics. The results showed that the patterns of service use have been consistently determined by caregivers gender and marital status over the period despite demographic changes among caregivers. The gap in service use first narrowed, then widened again across income levels after the global economic recession. The results indicate that the traditional gender-bound norms and capacity constraints on households informal care provision remained influential on decisions over service use, even after the universal provision of formal care. To improve equality of service utilization, the universal LTC system needs to meet diversifying needs of caregivers/recipients and their households, by overcoming barriers related to gender norms and economic disparity.

Mutsumi Tokunaga; Hideki Hashimoto; Nanako Tamiya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Title Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Zimring, Mark, Merrian Borgeson, Ian M. Hoffman, Charles A. Goldman, Elizabeth Stuart, Annika Todd, and Megan A. Billingsley Pagination 102 Date Published 12/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract The question posed in this report is: How can programs motivate these middle income single family households to seek out more comprehensive energy upgrades, and empower them to do so? Research methods included interviews with more than 35 program administrators, policy makers, researchers, and other experts; case studies of programs, based on interviews with staff and a review of program materials and data; and analysis of relevant data sources and existing research on demographics, the financial status of Americans, and the characteristics of middle income American households. While there is no 'silver bullet' to help these households overcome the range of barriers they face, this report describes outreach strategies, innovative program designs, and financing tools that show promise in increasing the attractiveness and accessibility of energy efficiency for this group. These strategies and tools should be seen as models that are currently being honed to build our knowledge and capacity to deliver energy improvements to middle income households. However, the strategies described in this report are probably not sufficient, in the absence of robust policy frameworks, to deliver these improvements at scale. Instead, these strategies must be paired with enabling and complementary policies to reach their full potential.

229

Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the normal'' municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan's programs. Focusing on the Plan's household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the ``normal`` municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan`s programs. Focusing on the Plan`s household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Applications of IDS: Mead's Challenge (What is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Orientation · Adaptability · Dynamic motor skill acquisition #12;Derek Harter IJCNN 2005, IDS Workshop Aug 5 Connectionism / NN · Better understand biological basis of computation Penrose Quantum Computation · Actual quantum computation at cell level Mead (IJCNN 2005 Plenary) · Structure supports exponential scaling

Andras, Peter

232

11. CONTRACT ID CODE IPAG~ OF PAGES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11. CONTRACT ID CODE IPAG~ OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I 2 2. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ ORDER NO. DUNS # 032987476 DE-AC05-76RL01830l8l 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) CODE ONLY TO MODIFICATIONS OF CONTRACTS/ORDERS. IT MODIFIES THE CONTRACT/ORDER NO. AS SET FORTH IN ITEM 14

233

Mercury Chamber NF-IDS Meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Mercury Chamber Update Oct 2011 Starting Point: Coil and Shielding Concept IDS120H #12;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Mercury Chamber Update Oct 2011 · Penetrations (ports) into chamber ­ Nozzle ­ Hg drains (overflow and maintenance) ­ Vents (in and out) ­ Beam

McDonald, Kirk

234

The 1986 residential occupant survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1986, Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed the Residential Occupant Survey-Spring '86, which was implemented. The overall purpose of the study was to collect demographic, attitudinal, and behavioral data related to the use and conservation of electricity in dwellings participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's End-Use Load and Conservation Assessment Program (ELCAP). Information was collected on the respondents' perceptions of the energy efficiency of their dwelling, temperature the dwelling was kept when people were at home and awake during the last heating season, which rooms, if any, were not heated during the last heating season, number of times the dwelling was unoccupied for at least one week, number of times pets were let out of the dwelling per day, attitudes toward energy use and conservation and several socio-demographic variables such as age, sex, and total household income. The results of the data analyses showed age to be an important factor for reported indoor temperature and perceived energy efficiency of the dwelling. The results also showed that almost 60% of the ELCAP occupants do not heat one or more rooms during the heating season, and almost 45% of the ELCAP dwellings were unoccupied for at least one week during the reporting period. In terms of the reported allocation of household income for household energy expenses, the results showed that the reported dollar amount spent for the expenses remained relatively constant over income levels.

Ivey, D.L.; Alley, P.K.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

ID3, SEQUENTIAL BAYES, NAIVE BAYES AND BAYESIAN NEURAL NETWORKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to ID3. ID3 learning algorithm (Quinlan 1979) and its successors ACLS (Paterson & Niblett 1982), C4#cient in many learning tasks. It is shown how Sequential Bayes can be transformed into ID3 by replacing of network's execution (Kononenko 1989) enables the us­ age of a neural network as an expert system shell

Kononenko, Igor

236

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

EIA household energy use data now includes detail on 16 States EIA household energy use data now includes detail on 16 States RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 EIA is releasing new benchmark estimates for home energy use for the year 2009 that include detailed data for 16 States, 12 more than in past EIA residential energy surveys. EIA has conducted the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) since 1978 to provide data on home energy characteristics, end uses of energy, and expenses for the four Census Regions and nine Divisions. In 1997, EIA produced additional tabulations for the four most populous States (California, New York, Texas, and Florida). A threefold increase in the number of households included in the 2009 RECS offers more accuracy and coverage for understanding energy usage for all estimated States, Regions and Divisions.

237

DOE/EIA-0193/P PRELIMINARY CONSERVATION TABLES FROM THE NATIONAL INTERIM ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

193/P 193/P PRELIMINARY CONSERVATION TABLES FROM THE NATIONAL INTERIM ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY OFFICE OF THE CONSUMPTION DATA SYSTEM OFFICE OF PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION AUGUST 1, 1979 PRELIMINARY CONSERVATION TABLES FROM THE NATIONAL INTERIM ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Attached is the first report of the Office of the Consumption Data System, Office of Program Development, Energy Information Administration, presenting preliminary data from the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS). The focus of this report is the conservation activities performed by households since January 1977, and the status of households with respect to insulation, storm windows, and other energy conserving characteristics. These tables are from preliminary data files.

238

Water Related Energy Use in Households and Cities - an Australian  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Related Energy Use in Households and Cities - an Australian Water Related Energy Use in Households and Cities - an Australian Perspective Speaker(s): Steven Kenway Date: May 12, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Anita Estner James McMahon This presentation covers the content of recent journal papers and reports focused on the water-energy nexus and the related theory of urban metabolism. This includes (i) a review of the water-energy nexus focused on cities (ii) quantifying water-related energy in cities (iii) modeling household water-related energy use including key factors, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, and (iv) relevance and implications of the urban metabolism theoretical framework. Steven's work focuses on understanding the indirect connections between urban water management, energy use and

239

Energy demand of German households and saving potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The implementation of the principles of sustainable development requires both using potentialities in saving resources and cutting down emissions (efficiency strategies) as well as more conscious patterns of behaviour of the actors involved (sufficiency strategies). Starting from the current situation of annual CO2 emissions of about 10 t and a sustainability goal of 1??2 t CO2 emissions per inhabitant and year, the question arises in how far households can contribute to achieve this goal. Therefore, in this paper, the environmental impacts of the energy demand of German households will be evaluated by means of describing its status quo and there from deriving saving potentials.

Anke Eber; Dominik Most; Otto Rentz; Thomas Lutzkendorf

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Household solid waste characteristics and management in Chittagong, Bangladesh  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid waste management (SWM) is a multidimensional challenge faced by urban authorities, especially in developing countries like Bangladesh. We investigated per capita waste generation by residents, its composition, and the households' attitudes towards waste management at Rahman Nagar Residential Area, Chittagong, Bangladesh. The study involved a structured questionnaire and encompassed 75 households from five different socioeconomic groups (SEGs): low (LSEG), lower middle (LMSEG), middle (MSEG), upper middle (UMSEG) and high (HSEG). Wastes, collected from all of the groups of households, were segregated and weighed. Waste generation was 1.3 kg/household/day and 0.25 kg/person/day. Household solid waste (HSW) was comprised of nine categories of wastes with vegetable/food waste being the largest component (62%). Vegetable/food waste generation increased from the HSEG (47%) to the LSEG (88%). By weight, 66% of the waste was compostable in nature. The generation of HSW was positively correlated with family size (r{sub xy} = 0.236, p < 0.05), education level (r{sub xy} = 0.244, p < 0.05) and monthly income (r{sub xy} = 0.671, p < 0.01) of the households. Municipal authorities are usually the responsible agencies for solid waste collection and disposal, but the magnitude of the problem is well beyond the ability of any municipal government to tackle. Hence dwellers were found to take the service from the local waste management initiative. Of the respondents, an impressive 44% were willing to pay US$0.3 to US$0.4 per month to waste collectors and it is recommended that service charge be based on the volume of waste generated by households. Almost a quarter (22.7%) of the respondents preferred 12-1 pm as the time period for their waste to be collected. This study adequately shows that household solid waste can be converted from burden to resource through segregation at the source, since people are aware of their role in this direction provided a mechanism to assist them in this pursuit exists and the burden is distributed according to the amount of waste generated.

Sujauddin, Mohammad [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: mohammad.sujauddin@gmail.com; Huda, S.M.S. [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh); Hoque, A.T.M. Rafiqul [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh); Laboratory of Ecology and Systematics (Plant Ecophysiology Section), Faculty of Science, Biology Division, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Property:DSIRE/Id | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:DSIRE/Id Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. DSIRE Incentive Code. Pages using the property "DSIRE/Id" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2003 Climate Change Fuel Cell Buy-Down Program (Federal) + US04F + 3 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) + VT31F + A AEP (Central and North) - CitySmart Program (Texas) + TX141F + AEP (Central and North) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) + TX116F + AEP (Central and SWEPCO) - Coolsaver A/C Tune Up (Texas) + TX119F + AEP (Central, North and SWEPCO) - Commercial Solutions Program (Texas) + TX141F + AEP (SWEPCO) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) + TX138F +

242

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data and Trends - Table...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 32.8 17.2 307 13.4 16.1 14.2 2.0 21.3 14.1 Race of Householder White... 149.5 78.3 1,774 77.6...

243

THE DESIRE TO ACQUIRE: FORECASTING THE EVOLUTION OF HOUSEHOLD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy-using devices in the average U.S. household that used over 4,700 kWh of electricity, natural gas.46]. The cost of these devices was also statistically significant. Keywords: electricity use; energy efficiency the Canadian Industrial Energy End Use Data and Analysis (CIEEDAC) for their financial support made possible

244

Household Segmentation in Food Insecurity and Soil Improving Practices in Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

secure household, and households farming medium quality soil increase the probability of adopting soil improving practices. Application of chemical fertilizers, commercial seeds, and pesticides, along with operating under a seasonal lease tenure...

Nata, Jifar T

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

245

Fact #747: October 1, 2012 Behind Housing, Transportation is the Top Household Expenditure  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Except for housing, transportation was the largest single expenditure for the average American household in 2010. The average household spends more on transportation in a year than on food. Vehicle...

246

Fact #727: May 14, 2012 Nearly Twenty Percent of Households Own Three or More Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Household vehicle ownership has changed over the last six decades. In 1960, over twenty percent of households did not own a vehicle, but by 2010, that number fell to less than 10%. The number of...

247

Fact #729: May 28, 2012 Secondary Household Vehicles Travel Fewer Miles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

When a household has more than one vehicle, the secondary vehicles travel fewer miles than the primary vehicle. In a two-vehicle household, the second vehicle travels less than half of the miles...

248

A Comparison of Household Budget Allocation Patterns Between Hispanic Americans and Non-Hispanic White Americans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The budget allocation patterns of Hispanic versus non-Hispanic White households are examined. Annual household expenditure data from 1980 to 1992 are ... Index (1990). The sample includes 588 Hispanic and 8,444 n...

Jessie X. Fan; Virginia Solis Zuiker

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The household production function approach to valuing climate: the case of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In fact ours is not the first attempt to use the household production function technique empirically to estimate the ... climate and the impact of climate change on households. But our analysis uses repeated cros...

David Maddison; Katrin Rehdanz; Daiju Narita

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Model development for household waste prevention behaviour  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model waste prevention behaviour using structure equation modelling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We merge attitude-behaviour theories with wider models from environmental psychology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Personal norms and perceived behaviour control are the main behaviour predictors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental concern, moral obligation and inconvenience are the main influence on the behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Waste prevention and recycling are different dimensions of waste management behaviour. - Abstract: Understanding waste prevention behaviour (WPB) could enable local governments and decision makers to design more-effective policies for reducing the amount of waste that is generated. By merging well-known attitude-behaviour theories with elements from wider models from environmental psychology, an extensive cognitive framework that provides new and valuable insights is developed for understanding the involvement of individuals in waste prevention. The results confirm the usefulness of the theory of planned behaviour and of Schwartz's altruistic behaviour model as bases for modelling participation in waste prevention. A more elaborate integrated model of prevention was shown to be necessary for the complete analysis of attitudinal aspects associated with waste prevention. A postal survey of 158 respondents provided empirical support for eight of 12 hypotheses. The proposed structural equation indicates that personal norms and perceived behaviour control are the main predictors and that, unlike the case of recycling, subjective norms have a weak influence on WPB. It also suggests that, since social norms have not presented a direct influence, WPB is likely to be influenced by a concern for the environment and the community as well by perceptions of moral obligation and inconvenience. Results also proved that recycling and waste prevention represent different dimensions of waste management behaviour requiring particular approaches to increase individuals' engagement in future policies.

Bortoleto, Ana Paula, E-mail: a.bortoleto@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Urban Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kurisu, Kiyo H.; Hanaki, Keisuke [Department of Urban Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program ID Selects Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative of the Year. John Martin was selected as DOE-ID's Facility Representative of the Year and the office's nominee for the 2007 DOE Facility Representative of the Year Award. John was selected from an exceptional field of candidates to represent DOE-ID at the Facility Representative Annual Workshop in Las Vegas this May. Each year the Department of Energy recognizes the Facility Representative whose achievements during the calendar year are most exemplary. A panel of senior personnel representing the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Environmental Management (EM), Science (SC), Nuclear Energy (NE) and at least five

252

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-015.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

15 15 SECTION A. Project Title: Materials and Fuels Complex Underground and Aboveground Storage Tank Replacement SECTION B. Project Description: The purpose of this project is to permanently close and remove the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) 4,000 gallon bio-diesel underground storage tank (UST) [Site ID# 7230/Facility ID # 6-120614/Tank ID # 99ANL00013] and remove the 1,000 gallon E-85 aboveground storage tank (AST) [Site ID# 7230/Facility ID# 6-120614/Tank ID# 05MFC00035] and replace the two tanks with a 10,000 gallon aboveground storage tank (AST) split tank (5,000 gallons for bio-diesel/5,000 gallons for E-85). The 4,000 gallon bio-diesel UST and the 1,000 gallon E-85 AST are located in the parking lot area near building MFC-701.

253

Frequency and longitudinal trends of household care product use Rebecca E. Moran a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUPERB Indoor environment d-limonene a b s t r a c t The use of household cleaning products and air, frequencies of use of eight types of household cleaning products and air fresheners and the performance. Introduction Household care products, such as cleaning products and air fresheners, are frequently used

Leistikow, Bruce N.

254

Survey Statisticians  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey Statisticians Survey Statisticians The U.S.Energy Information Administration (EIA) within the Department of Energy has forged a world-class information program that stresses quality, teamwork, and employee growth. In support of our program, we offer a variety of profes- sional positions, including the Survey Statistician, who measures the amounts of energy produced and consumed in the United States. Responsibilities: Survey Statisticians perform or participate in one or more of the following important functions: * Design energy surveys by writing questions, creating layouts and testing questions for clarity and accuracy. * Conduct energy surveys to include sending out and tracking survey responses, editing and analyzing data submis- sions and communicating with respondents to verify data.

255

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Idaho Operations Office (ID)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Idaho Operations Office (ID) (See Environmental Management).

256

RAPID/Roadmap/8-ID-c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Information Desktop Toolkit BETA RAPID Toolkit About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Solar Resources Contribute Contact Us 8-ID-c Certificate of Public Convenience and...

257

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-10-003.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Description The state of Idaho receives funding from the Department of Energy to conduct independent oversight and monitoring of DOE-ID operations. Oversight activities...

258

Hybrid application of biogas and solar resources to fulfill household energy needs: A potentially viable option in rural areas of developing countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The absence of clean cooking facilities and electricity means billions of rural people are deprived of much needed socioeconomic development. Livestock residues (dung) and solar radiation are two renewable energy resources that are abundantly available in rural areas of developing countries. Although it is not feasible for these two resources separately to meet both thermal (cooking) and electricity demands, hybrid applications have not been given due attention. To facilitate integrating these two resources in rural energy planning, and to promote their dissemination through hybrid applications, it is necessary to evaluate their economic merits, and assess their ability to deal with the demands. In this paper, we examine the techno-economic performance of hybrid applications of these two resources by applying a simulation technique using the HOMER tool, and by giving derived cost-saving equations. We also quantify the monetary savings from replacing traditional fuels, and perform a sensitivity analysis on a number of variables (e.g. dung cost, fuelwood cost) to see how they affect the performance of different energy supply alternatives. Furthermore, we examine the practical applicability of the biogas system in the households through a structured survey of 72 ongoing household biogas plants. This study finds that households that have between three and six cattle can potentially meet their cooking and electricity loads through a hybrid implementation of biogas and solar PV (Photovoltaic) system. By replacing conventional fuels households can achieve savings that are more than the total annualized costs incurred for installing new services.

Md. Mizanur Rahman; Mohammad Mahmodul Hasan; Jukka V. Paatero; Risto Lahdelma

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Entity Name: ABC Company Entity ID:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Entity Name: Entity Name: ABC Company Entity ID: 00000 Data Year: 2013 State Include or exclude pre-arranged interruptions? 1 2 3 Do you capture outage records for events that initiate outside your system (customer system that causes di 4 5 6 7 8 Point to calculation in P1782: use percentages weighted based upon the classification of the circuit. 9 10 11 12 REWORD: The percent of customers automatically reported when they have lost power? e.g. SCADA, AMI, Etc. 13 SAIDI value (w/o Major Events included) FORM EIA-861 OMB No. 1905-0129 ANNUAL ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY REPORT

260

Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Author Directional Surveying Specialists Published Publisher Not Provided, 2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Citation Directional Surveying Specialists. Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists [Internet]. 2012. [cited 2013/10/08]. Available from: http://www.digitalsurveying.co.za/services/geophysical-borehole-surveying/overview/optical-televiewer/ Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Digital_Surveying_Directional_Surveying_Specialists&oldid=690244"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as therapeutic targets for treatment of breast cancer and other types of carcinoma  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for treatment and amelioration of breast, cervical, ovarian, endometrial, squamous cells, prostate cancer and melanoma in a patient comprising targeting Id-1 or Id-2 gene expression with a delivery vehicle comprising a product which modulates Id-1 or Id-2 expression.

Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

Long-term behaviour of baled household waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study was carried out at the laboratory scale (approximately 15 l) and using real baled waste of industrial dimensions (about 1 m3), in order to assess the long-term behaviour of baled household waste. The laboratory assays were carried out with real household waste which was fractioned on site, reconstituted in the laboratory and then compacted into 15 l airtight containers (unless stated otherwise). These containers were incubated under different experimental conditions at a constant temperature (28C). Three assays were conducted over 34 months and two others over 27 months. For the assays incubated in conditions simulating those of real baled waste (confined medium, with no aeration or water flow), a very low microbial activity was observed. The assay incubated in the same conditions but with slight aeration during the first three months in order to simulate imperfectly airtight wrapping, revealed biodegradation which started in a significant manner after 800 days of incubation. The evolution of two real wrapped bales each containing 900 kg of household waste was monitored over 8 months. These bales were produced industrially, one in July 97 and the other in July 98 at the incinerator plant at Agde (France). The bales were then stored outside at the laboratory location and their evolution was monitored mainly by biogas analysis and temperature measurement. No methane formation was observed, revealing the absence of anaerobic biodegradation, thus confirming the laboratory assays.

Fabian Robles-Mart??nez; Rmy Gourdon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report Period: Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite) Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. Zip Code: - If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 - - Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey - - U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov Contact Name: Version No.: 2013.01 Date of this Report: Mo Day State: Year Phone No.: DOMESTIC CRUDE OIL FIRST PURCHASE REPORT Company Name: A completed form must be filed by the 30th calendar day following the end of the report

264

Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Appendix A: Mailing Address: Appendix B:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report Period: Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Appendix A: Mailing Address: Appendix B: Zip Code - Secure File Transfer option available at: - - - - Email form to: OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 Email address: Oil & Gas Survey U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 1. Total Acquisitions (Enter the total volume of foreign crude oil acquired during the report month for importation into the United States. This is the sum of column (l), Part III, excluding resubmission.) 2. Offshore Inventories (Enter the total volume of foreign oil owned by the firm, for eventual importation into the United States which is held in storage outside the United States and/or is enroute to the United States as of the

265

Usage Codes Observer code Vessel code Trip ID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Usage Codes 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 Sonar Observer code Vessel code Trip ID Additional Information KHz: RPM / Other _______________Global Registry ID:MMSI No. Permit expiration (dd-mm- yy): Y / N Present? Usage contact Diver / dive equipment Usage Manufacturer Hull mounted / towed Catch Y / N Other: Y / N Y / NOther

266

IDS Climate Change and Development Centre Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IDS Climate Change and Development Centre Resources IDS Climate Change and Development Centre Resources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IDS Climate Change and Development Centre Resources Agency/Company /Organization: Institute of Development Studies Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Workshop, Publications, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices References: Institute of Development Studies CCDC[1] Logo: IDS Climate Change and Development Centre Resources CCDC promotes "collaborative research and policy analysis, delivering high quality research programmes, knowledge services, teaching and training." References ↑ "Institute of Development Studies CCDC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=IDS_Climate_Change_and_Development_Centre_Resources&oldid=375095"

267

Household response to dynamic pricing of electricity: a survey of 15 experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the energy crisis of 20002001 in the western United States, much attention has been given to boosting demand response in electricity markets. One of the best ... generation costs that could be brought abou...

Ahmad Faruqui; Sanem Sergici

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

HOUSEHOLD RESPONSE TO DYNAMIC PRICING OF ELECTRICITY A SURVEY OF SEVENTEEN PRICING EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

factors, such as the magnitude of the price increase, the presence of central air conditioning form of direct load control of end-uses such as central air conditioning or electric water heating

269

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in "Hybrid Households" Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EV market studies In the absenceof data on actual sales,EV, then we expect 16 to 18% annual of of light-duty vehicle salesEV experiments indicate there is still more than adequatepotential marketsfor electric vehicles to have , exceededthe former 1998CARB mandatefor sales

Kurani, Kenneth S.; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in `Hybrid Households' Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EV market studies In the absence of data on actual sales,EV, then we expect that 16-18%) of annual light-duty vehicle sales

Kurani, Kenneth; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Household activities through various lenses: crossing surveys, diaries and electric consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparison between electricity consumption and behavioralU.S. residential electricity consumption Energy Policy, 42(of the residential electricity consumption. Energy Policy,

Durand-Daubin, Mathieu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

273

Identification of Staphylococcus species and subspecies with the MicroScan Pos ID and Rapid Pos ID panel systems.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hybridization. The Pos ID panel uses a battery of 18 tests, and the Rapid Pos ID panel uses a battery of 42 tests for the identification of Staphylococcus...Johnson. 1969. A batch procedure for thermal elution of DNA from hydroxyapatite. Anal...

W E Kloos; C G George

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Beamline 4-ID-D Publications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2012 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 All Sector 4 Pubs. APS Pubs. Database Recent 4-ID-D Publications Publications 2013:(13) "Classical and quantum phase transitions revealed using transport and x-ray measurements," Arnab Banerjee, Ph.D.-Thesis, University of Chicago, 2013. "Charge transfer and multiple density waves in the rare earth tellurides," A. Banerjee, Yejun Feng, D.M. Silevitch, Jiyang Wang, J.C. Lang, H.-H. Kuo, I.R. Fisher, T.F. Rosenbaum, Phys. Rev. B 87, 155131 (2013). "Local structure, stripe pinning, and superconductivity in La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 at high pressure," G. Fabbris, M. Hücker, G.D. Gu, J.M. Tranquada, D. Haskel, Phys. Rev. B 88, 060507(R) (2013). "Different routes to pressure-induced volume collapse transitions in

275

SLAC Dosimeter / ID Request Form A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feb 2009 (updated 13 May 2010) SLAC-I-760-0A07J-006-R010 1 of 2 Feb 2009 (updated 13 May 2010) SLAC-I-760-0A07J-006-R010 1 of 2 SLAC Dosimeter / ID Request Form A (For applicants who have completed SLAC Environment, Safety, and Health Training) Sections 1-5 completed by applicant. Section 1: Contact Information Last name: First name: MI: Male Female Birth year (yyyy): Job title: Contact information/mailing address: City: State: Zip code: Country: Dept/Group: Phone number: Mail stop: Users or non-SLAC employees only: List employer, company, or university : Section 2: Identification Badge Request I am applying for my first SLAC identification badge; I have successfully completed the following ES&H training (indicate all that apply): SON SOC EOESH GERT RWT I RWT II

276

Beamline 6-ID-D Publications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 2011 2010 2009 2008 All Sector 6 Pubs. APS Pubs. Database Recent 6-ID-D Publications Publications 2013:(24) "Controlling Size-Induced Phase Transformations Using Chemically Designed Nanolaminates," Matt Beekman, Sabrina Disch, Sergei Rouvimov, Deepa Kasinathan, Klaus Koepernik, Helge Rosner, Paul Zschack, Wolfgang S. Neumann, David C. Johnson, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52, 13211 (2013). "Thermophysical and Structural Measurements of Liquid Metallic Alloys Using Electrostatic Levitation," James Christopher Bendert, Ph.D.-Thesis, Washington University , 2013. "Pair distribution function analysis of X-ray diffraction from amorphous spheres in an asymmetric transmission geometry: application to a Zr58.5Cu15.6Ni12.8Al10.3Nb2.8 glass," J.C. Bendert, N.A. Mauro, K.F. Kelton, J. Appl. Crystallogr. 46, 999

277

Climate Survey  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operations Employee Operations Employee Climate Survey March 2009 Acknowledgements The Berkeley Lab Survey Team consisted of the following: Jim Krupnick, Sponsor Vera Potapenko, Project Lead Karen Ramorino, Project Manager Chris Paquette, MOR Associates Alexis Bywater, MOR Associates MOR Associates, an external consulting firm, acted as project manager for this effort, analyzing the data and preparing this report. MOR Associates specializes in continuous improve- ment, strategic thinking and leadership development. MOR Associates has conducted a number of large-scale surveys for organizations in higher education, including MIT, Stanford, the University of Chicago, and others. MOR Associates, Inc. 462 Main Street, Suite 300 Watertown, MA 02472 tel: 617.924.4501

278

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301: January 5, 2004 Number of Household  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1: January 5, 1: January 5, 2004 Number of Household Vehicles has Grown Significantly to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301: January 5, 2004 Number of Household Vehicles has Grown Significantly on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301: January 5, 2004 Number of Household Vehicles has Grown Significantly on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301: January 5, 2004 Number of Household Vehicles has Grown Significantly on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301: January 5, 2004 Number of Household Vehicles has Grown Significantly on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301: January 5, 2004 Number of Household Vehicles has Grown Significantly on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301:

279

Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study Title Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-58785 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Destaillats, Hugo, Melissa M. Lunden, Brett C. Singer, Beverly K. Coleman, Alfred T. Hodgson, Charles J. Weschler, and William W. Nazaroff Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 4421-4428 Abstract Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 × 105 molecules cm-3 were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1 - 25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products

280

Greenhouse Gas Implications of Household Energy Technology in Kenya  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy and Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-3050, Risk, Resource, and Environmental Management Division, Resources for the Future, 1616 P Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20036, and Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7320 ... Household energy policy is further complicated because charcoal markets in many sub-Saharan African countries operate within a complex political economy that can be hard to characterize and still more difficult to regulate. ... While charcoal consumption carries a larger burden of GHG emissions than firewood use, it also has more potential to attract investment in GHG mitigation activities. ...

Rob Bailis; Majid Ezzati; Daniel M. Kammen

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Enhanced naphthenic refrigeration oils for household refrigerator systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to industry concerns about the successful employment of hydrofluorocarbon-immiscible hydrocarbon oils in refrigeration systems, enhanced naphthenic refrigeration oils have been developed. These products have been designed to be more dispersible with hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants, such as R-134a, in order to facilitate lubricant return to the compressor and to ensure proper energy efficiency of the system. Bench tests and system performance evaluations indicate the feasibility of these oils for use in household refrigeration applications. Results of these evaluations are compared with those obtained with polyol esters and typical naphthenic mineral oils employed in chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) refrigeration applications.

Reyes-Gavilan, J.L.; Flak, G.T.; Tritcak, T.R. [Witco Corp., Oakland, NJ (United States); Barbour, C.B. [Americold, Cullman, AL (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-006 R1-(INL-13-019 R1-redline).docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-006 R1 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-006 R1 SECTION A. Project Title: Power Line Configuration - 2013-1 R1 SECTION B. Project Description: Rev 1 Based on recommendations by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office, the route of the insulated cables on the ground has been changed. The new route replaces Fig 1 in the original Environmental Checklist (EC) and is shown in the figure, below. The new route has been surveyed by both the INL CRM Office and Biological Resources personnel. All Environmental Aspects and Work Activities identified in the original EC remain valid. All requirements and conditions identified in the original EC remain effective. Original EC This project will install temporary distribution-level power lines between Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and Critical Infrastructure

283

Property:HPBD/ProjectId | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ProjectId ProjectId Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "HPBD/ProjectId" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) H High Performance Buildings Database + 203 + High Performance Buildings Database + 358 + High Performance Buildings Database + 71 + High Performance Buildings Database + 833 + High Performance Buildings Database + 247 + High Performance Buildings Database + 20 + High Performance Buildings Database + 498 + High Performance Buildings Database + 132 + High Performance Buildings Database + 194 + High Performance Buildings Database + 323 + High Performance Buildings Database + 50 + High Performance Buildings Database + 785 + High Performance Buildings Database + 223 +

284

U.S. Residential Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products: Results from Amazon Mechanical Turk Surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One-person households 5) Hispanic households 6) Low-incomewhite, more Hispanic, higher annual household income (?$white, more Hispanic, higher annual household income (?$

Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Table HC6.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total... 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4...

286

Socioeconomic Differences in Household Automobile Ownership Rates: Implications for Evacuation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Differences in 10 Household Automobile Ownership Rates:hauseltoldr lacking automobiles were mmit like! ) to be leftWithout 3 Access to an Automobile. Top Ten Metropolitan

Raphael, S; Berube, A; Deakin, Elizabeth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Assessing the Environmental Costs and Benefits of Households Electricity Consumption Management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In this study the environmental costs and benefits of smart metering technology systems installed in households in Norway have been assessed. Smart metering technology (more)

Segtnan, Ida Lund

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Household environmental monitoring a strategy to help homeowners reduce their environmental impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A group of 20 households was established to study whether we can motivate environmentally sustainable behaviour by providing homeowners with a clear picture of their impact, tangible reasons for improvement, and tailored solutions to follow. Reports for each household compared heating fuel, electricity, water, vehicle fuel/waste generation within the group and recommended cost-effective measures to reduce consumption. On average, 26% of the recommended measures were implemented, resulting in an estimated greenhouse gas reduction of about 2 tonnes per household. Wide variations were found between households, demonstrating the potential to reduce environmental impact through lifestyle, conservation, and energy conscious retrofits.

Jane Thompson; Magda Goemans; Peter C. Goemans; Andrzej Wisniowski

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Wealth: Determinants of Savings Net Worth and Housing Net Worth of Pre-Retired Households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objectives of this study are to determine effects of household members' characteristics, financial resources, and attitude ... Subsamples of White respondents, Black respondents, and Hispanic respondents were...

Satomi Wakita; Vicki Schram Fitzsimmons

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Nevada: Kingston Creek Hydro Project Powers 100 Households |...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable Power Geothermal Energy Growth Continues, Industry Survey Reports Project Overview Positive Impact...

291

Control of household refrigerators. Part 1: Modeling temperature control performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial household refrigerators use simple, cost-effective, temperature controllers to obtain acceptable control. A manually adjusted airflow damper regulates the freezer compartment temperature while a thermostat controls operation of the compressor and evaporator fan to regulate refrigerator compartment temperature. Dual compartment temperature control can be achieved with automatic airflow dampers that function independently of the compressor and evaporator fan thermostat, resulting in improved temperature control quality and energy consumption. Under dual control, freezer temperature is controlled by the thermostat while the damper controls refrigerator temperature by regulating airflow circulation. A simulation model is presented that analyzes a household refrigerator configured with a conventional thermostat and both manual and automatic dampers. The model provides a new paradigm for investigating refrigerator systems and temperature control performance relative to the extensive verification testing that is typically done by manufacturers. The effects of each type of control and damper configuration are compared with respect to energy usage, control quality, and ambient temperature shift criteria. The results indicate that the appropriate control configuration can have significant effects and can improve plant performance.

Graviss, K.J.; Collins, R.L.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-025.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-025 SECTION A. Project Title: Willow Creek Building Pedestrian Bridge Replacement SECTION B. Project Description: The purpose and need for the proposed...

293

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-14-044.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DETERMINATIO Idaho National Laboratory Page 1 of 2 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-14-044 SECTION A. Project Title: Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC)-752 Analytical Laboratory Water...

294

RAPID/Roadmap/6-ID-b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6-ID-b Construction Storm Water Permit 06IDBConstructionStormwaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Permit Overview Not provided Click "Edit With Form" above to add content...

295

RAPID/Roadmap/18-ID-c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8-ID-c Wastewater Pretreatment Permit 18IDCWastewaterPretreatmentPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Permit Overview Industrial wastewater permits are issued at the local level. If...

296

Eastport, ID Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 1302015 Next Release Date: 2272015 Referring Pages: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry Eastport, ID Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from...

297

Estimating household fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and LPG prices by census region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to estimate individual fuel prices within the residential sector. The data from four US Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration, residential energy consumption surveys were used to estimate the models. For a number of important fuel types - fuel oil, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas - the estimation presents a problem because these fuels are not used by all households. Estimates obtained by using only data in which observed fuel prices are present would be biased. A correction for this self-selection bias is needed for estimating prices of these fuels. A literature search identified no past studies on application of the selectivity model for estimating prices of residential fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas. This report describes selectivity models that utilize the Dubin/McFadden correction method for estimating prices of residential fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas in the Northeast, Midwest, South, and West census regions. Statistically significant explanatory variables are identified and discussed in each of the models. This new application of the selectivity model should be of interest to energy policy makers, researchers, and academicians.

Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Evolution of the household vehicle fleet: Anticipating fleet composition, PHEV adoption and GHG emissions in Austin, Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In todays world of volatile fuel prices and climate concerns, there is little study on the relationship between vehicle ownership patterns and attitudes toward vehicle cost (including fuel prices and feebates) and vehicle technologies. This work provides new data on ownership decisions and owner preferences under various scenarios, coupled with calibrated models to microsimulate Austins personal-fleet evolution. Opinion survey results suggest that most Austinites (63%, population-corrected share) support a feebate policy to favor more fuel efficient vehicles. Top purchase criteria are price, type/class, and fuel economy. Most (56%) respondents also indicated that they would consider purchasing a Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) if it were to cost $6000 more than its conventional, gasoline-powered counterpart. And many respond strongly to signals on the external (health and climate) costs of a vehicles emissions, more strongly than they respond to information on fuel cost savings. Twenty five-year simulations of Austins household vehicle fleet suggest that, under all scenarios modeled, Austins vehicle usage levels (measured in total vehicle miles traveled or VMT) are predicted to increase overall, along with average vehicle ownership levels (both per household and per capita). Under a feebate, HEVs, \\{PHEVs\\} and Smart Cars are estimated to represent 25% of the fleets VMT by simulation year 25; this scenario is predicted to raise total regional VMT slightly (just 2.32%, by simulation year 25), relative to the trend scenario, while reducing CO2 emissions only slightly (by 5.62%, relative to trend). Doubling the trend-case gas price to $5/gallon is simulated to reduce the year-25 vehicle use levels by 24% and CO2 emissions by 30% (relative to trend). Two- and three-vehicle households are simulated to be the highest adopters of \\{HEVs\\} and \\{PHEVs\\} across all scenarios. The combined share of vans, pickup trucks, sport utility vehicles (SUVs), and cross-over utility vehicles (CUVs) is lowest under the feebate scenario, at 35% (versus 47% in Austins current household fleet). Feebate-policy receipts are forecasted to exceed rebates in each simulation year. In the longer term, gas price dynamics, tax incentives, feebates and purchase prices along with new technologies, government-industry partnerships, and more accurate information on range and recharging times (which increase customer confidence in EV technologies) should have added effects on energy dependence and greenhouse gas emissions.

Sashank Musti; Kara M. Kockelman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

DOE/EIA-0207/3 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Conservation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Conservation February 1980 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Adminstration Assistant Administrater for Program Development Other NEICS Reports Preliminary Conservation Tables from the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey, August 1979, DOE/EIA-0193/P Characteristics of the Housing Stocks and Households: Preliminary Findings from the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey, October 1979, DOETllA-0199/P The above reports are available from the following address; U.S. Department of Energy Technical Information Center Attn:; EIA Coordinator P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; Characteristics of the Housing Stock and Households, DOE/EIA-0207/2, GPO Stock No,, 061-003-00093-2; $4.25

300

Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of household energy use behaviour in Japan and Norway.Japan (Wilhite, Nakagami, Masuda, Yamaga, & Haneda, 1996) reveals that less than 50% of Oslo's households

Meier, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A National Survey of Stress Reactions after the September 11, 2001, Terrorist Attacks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...population represented in the March 2001 Current Population Survey, our sample slightly overrepresented women, non-Hispanic whites, and persons with higher levels of education and household income, which is typical of samples selected by means of random-digit dialing. As a sensitivity analysis, we repeated... After the September 11 terrorist attacks, Americans experienced symptoms of psychological stress. This survey of U.S. adults performed just five days after the attacks quantifies the extent of the stress reactions.

Schuster M.A.; Stein B.D.; Jaycox L.H.

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Willingness to pay function for two fuel treatments to reduce wildfire acreage burned: A scope test and comparison of White and Hispanic households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This research uses the Contingent Valuation Method to test whether willingness to pay increases for larger reductions in acres of forests burned by wildfires across the states of California, Florida and Montana. This is known as a test of scope, a measure of internal validity of the contingent valuation method (CVM). The scope test is conducted separately for White households and Hispanic households to determine if cultural differences influences whether the scope test is passed. The public program to reduce acres burned involved prescribed burning and a mechanical fuel reduction program. The results of CVM logit regressions show that the acreage reduction variable is statistically significant at the 1% level for the two proposed fuel reduction programs, and the two types of households. The positive sign of this variable means that the more acreage reduction proposed in the survey the more likely people would pay for the fuel reduction program. Because of the significance of the acreage reduction variable in the willingness to pay function, this function can be used to evaluate the incremental benefits of different forest fire management plans that reduce acres burned by wildfires. These benefits would be part of the justification for prescribed burning and mechanical fire fuel reduction programs to protect forests from wildfires.

John B. Loomis; Le Trong Hung; Armando Gonzlez-Cabn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Using Multiple Household Food Inventories to Measure Food Availability in the Home  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-home assessment included an audio recorded interview on food habits and beliefs. Complete data were collected from all 9 women (32.8 y +/- 6.0; 3 married; 4 +/- 1.6 adults/children in household; 4 SNAP; 6 food insecure) and their households. Weekly grocery...

Sisk, Cheree L.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

304

Dimethyl ether (DME) from coal as a household cooking fuel in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies. Given China's rich coal resources, the production and use of coal-derived DME as a cooking fuelDimethyl ether (DME) from coal as a household cooking fuel in China Eric D. Larson Princeton gas (LPG) as a household cooking fuel. As such, DME is an attractive fuel for clean cooking. DME can

305

Socioeconomic Differences in Household Automobile Ownership Rates: Implications for Evacuation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Socioeconomic Differences in Household Automobile Ownership Rates: Implications for Evacuation's aftermath concerned the size and composition of the area's populations that lacked access to an automobile for all U.S. metropolitan areas that reside in a household without access to an automobile. Finally, we

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

306

The Driving Internal Beliefs of Household Internet Adoption among Jordanians and the Role of Cultural Values  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a comprehensive model for the determinants of household Internet adoption through identifying the driving internal beliefs of individuals and the effect of cultural values on behavioral intention to ... Keywords: Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions, Household Internet Adoption, Internal Beliefs, Micro Cultural Level, Perceived Risks, Technology Acceptance Model

Amin A. Shaqrah; Khaled Saleh Al Omoush; Raed Musbah Alqirem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Particle and Gas Emissions from a Simulated Coal-Burning Household Fire Pit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle and Gas Emissions from a Simulated Coal-Burning Household Fire Pit ... Chinese anthracite and bituminous coals produce different amounts of emissions when burned in a fire pit that simulates common rural household use of these fuels. ... Here we present emissions from burning 15 different fuels in a laboratory system designed to mimic the fire pits used in Xuan Wei County, China. ...

Linwei Tian; Donald Lucas; Susan L. Fischer; S. C. Lee; S. Katharine Hammond; Catherine P. Koshland

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

308

Journal: Ecological Applications1 Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus fluxes in household ecosystems in the3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;1 Journal: Ecological Applications1 2 Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus fluxes in household Resources Center, Saint Paul, MN 551089 3 University of Minnesota, Department of Ecology, Evolution with several29 components of household activities including air and motor vehicle travel, food consumption,30

Minnesota, University of

309

Flame Retardant Transfers from U.S. Households (Dust and Laundry Wastewater) to the Aquatic Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analytes were ionized by APPI; dopant (acetone) was introduced (150 ?L/min) by a liquid chromatography pump (LC-20AD, Shimadzu Corporation, Kyoto, Japan). ... We collected repeat dust samples from 292 households in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study during two sampling rounds (from 2001 to 2007 and during 2010) using household vacuum cleaners and measured 22 PBDEs using high resoln. ...

Erika D. Schreder; Mark J. La Guardia

2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

310

Passive sampling methods to determine household and personal care product use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Passive sampling methods to determine household and personal care product use DEBORAH H. BENNETTa, cleaning products, passive sampling, SUPERB, longitudinal. Introduction Personal care and household care products, such as cleaning products and pesticides, are frequently used in most house- holds although

Leistikow, Bruce N.

311

How Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? How Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? June 18, 2009 - 5:25pm Addthis Anyone who has decided to save energy at home knows that the entire household needs to be involved if you really want to see savings. Some people-be they roommates, spouses, children, or maybe even yourself-just seem to need some extra reminders to take simple energy-saving steps. How do you encourage everyone in your household to save energy? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a topic related to energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. Addthis Related Articles How Have You Helped Someone Else Save Energy?

312

How Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? How Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? June 18, 2009 - 5:25pm Addthis Anyone who has decided to save energy at home knows that the entire household needs to be involved if you really want to see savings. Some people-be they roommates, spouses, children, or maybe even yourself-just seem to need some extra reminders to take simple energy-saving steps. How do you encourage everyone in your household to save energy? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a topic related to energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. Addthis Related Articles How Have You Helped Someone Else Save Energy?

313

Lifestyle change and energy use in Japan: Household equipment and energy consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy use in the Japanese residential sector has more than doubled (on a per-household basis) during the post-war period. Important factors contributing to the increase include changes in the types of housing built, heating, cooling, water-heating equipment, and other appliances. In this paper, the developments of household equipment and living conditions in Japan are described, from their 1950s state to the present. Trends in energy consumption by fuel types and end uses are reviewed over the same period. The past trends are combined with expectations for future developments in household equipment and quality, as well as with international comparisons of household-energy use, to predict further increases in household-energy consumption. The results indicate the importance of a renewed emphasis on energy efficiency in the residential sector.

Hidetoshi Nakagami

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-007_INL-12-033_.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Page 1 of 2 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-007 SECTION A. Project Title: Geotechnical Core Drilling for USGS 138 SECTION B. Project Description: . The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) proposes to drill a 1,000-foot deep geotechnical corehole (USGS 138) into the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. The location of the corehole will be about 4.0 mile(s) east of the city Howe and about 8.5 mile(s) north of the Naval Reactors Facility at the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, Section 7, Township 5 North, Range 30 East; lattitude/longitude (WGS84) 43 46 16.1 N / 112 55 27.7W (fig. 1). The purpose of this geotechnical borehole is to obtain geologic, stratigraphic, and hydraulic data to characterize flow in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer.

315

Modeling household adoption of earthquake hazard adjustments: a longitudinal panel study of Southern California and Western Washington residents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research, aimed at advancing the theory of environmental hazard adjustment processes by contrasting households from three cities in a high seismic hazard area with households from three other cities in a moderate seismic hazard area...

Arlikatti, Sudha S

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University BSE-158NP Household Water Quality in Loudoun County, Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University BSE-158NP Household Water Quality in Loudoun County, Virginia OCTOBER 2013 VIRGINIA HOUSEHOLD WATER QUALITY PROGRAM Erin Ling, Water Quality Extension Associate, and Brian Benham, Extension Specialist and Professor

Liskiewicz, Maciej

317

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University BSE-151NP Household Water Quality in Albemarle County, Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University BSE-151NP Household Water Quality in Albemarle County, Virginia APRIL 2013 VIRGINIA HOUSEHOLD WATER QUALITY PROGRAM Erin Ling, Water Quality Extension Associate, and Brian Benham, Extension Specialist and Professor

Liskiewicz, Maciej

318

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University BSE-162NP Household Water Quality in Pittsylvania County, Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University BSE-162NP Household Water Quality in Pittsylvania County, Virginia OCTOBER 2013 VIRGINIA HOUSEHOLD WATER QUALITY PROGRAM Erin Ling, Water Quality Extension Associate, and Brian Benham, Extension Specialist and Professor

Liskiewicz, Maciej

319

EIA - Appendix B: Estimation Methodologies of Household Vehicles...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey (RTECS), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) fuel efficiency test results, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) retail pump price series, and the...

320

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: ID-Spec Large  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ID-Spec Large ID-Spec Large ID-Spec Large is software for the electrical installation design of industrial and tertiary buildings. It helps to design a green electrical installation by enabling the user to: - Assess the impact of selecting energy efficiency solutions like power factor correction and low losses transformers in terms of cost savings - Reduce power losses and consequently carbon emissions in the electrical installation by optimizing equipment locations - Reduce investment cost while using less raw materials by optimizing length and cross-section of cables - Assess the percentage of recyclable materials for cables and busbar trunking systems. Screen Shots Keywords Electrical installation design, power losses assessment, CO2 emissions, quantity of conductors

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-006.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ID-NEPA CX DETERMINATION ID-NEPA CX DETERMINATION Idaho National Laboratory Page 1 of 3 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-006 SECTION A. Project Title: Power Line Configuration 2013-1 SECTION B. Project Description: This project will install temporary distribution-level power lines between Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (CITRC) to support research and development and testing using electric power infrastructure. Two circuits of three-phase distribution lines will be installed from Power Burst Facility (PBF)-613 to the MFC test pad. Standard new crossarms and insulators will be installed on the existing 138kV H structures (underbuild) to support standard aluminum conductors steel reinforced (ACSR) conductors for the majority of the configuration change (approximately from Pole 40E to Pole 127E - an

322

Property:EiaUtilityId | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EiaUtilityId EiaUtilityId Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "EiaUtilityId" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 3 3 Phases Energy Services + 21093 + 4 4-County Electric Power Assn + 6641 + A A & N Electric Coop + 84 + A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) + 84 + AEP Generating Company + 343 + AEP Texas Central Company + 3278 + AEP Texas North Company + 20404 + AES Eastern Energy LP + 134 + AGC Division of APG Inc + 261 + AP Holdings LLC + 56571 + AP Holdings LLC (New York) + 56571 + APN Starfirst, L.P. + 50153 + APN Starfirst, L.P. (Illinois) + 50153 + APN Starfirst, L.P. (Ohio) + 50153 + APN Starfirst, L.P. (Texas) + 50153 + APNA Energy + 55841 + ARCO Products Co-Watson + 867 +

323

Intergral Drive Systems AG IDS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intergral Drive Systems AG IDS Intergral Drive Systems AG IDS Jump to: navigation, search Name Intergral Drive Systems AG (IDS) Place Zurich, Swaziland Zip CH-8005 Sector Wind energy Product Zurich based producer of power electronics systems for wind turbines, PV plants, and propulsion systems. Coordinates 47.37706°, 8.53955° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.37706,"lon":8.53955,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

324

EIA - Appendix B: Estimation Methodologies of Household Vehicles Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

If you have trouble viewing this page, contact the National Energy Informaiton Center at (202) 586-8800. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page If you have trouble viewing this page, contact the National Energy Informaiton Center at (202) 586-8800. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page EIA Home > Transportation Home Page > Appendix B Estimation MethodologiesIntroduction Appendix B Estimation Methodologies Introduction Statistics concerning vehicle miles traveled (VMT), vehicle fuel efficiency (given in terms of miles per gallon (MPG)), vehicle fuel consumption, and vehicle fuel expenditures are presented in this report. The methodology used to estimate these statistics relied on data from the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) fuel efficiency test results, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) retail pump price series, and the Lundberg Survey, Inc., price series for 1994.

325

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the RECS About the RECS RECS Survey Forms RECS Maps RECS Terminology Archived Reports State fact sheets Arizona household graph See state fact sheets › 2009 RECS Features Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use March 7, 2013 Newer U.S. homes are 30% larger but consume about as much energy as older homes February 12, 2013 Where does RECS square footage data come from? July 11, 2012 RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household June 6, 2012 The impact of increasing home size on energy demand April 19, 2012 Did you know that air conditioning is in nearly 100 million U.S. homes? August 19, 2011 See more > graph of U.S. electricity end use, as explained in the article text U.S. electricity sales have decreased in four of the past five years

326

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

About the RECS About the RECS RECS Survey Forms RECS Maps RECS Terminology Archived Reports State fact sheets Arizona household graph See state fact sheets › 2009 RECS Features Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use March 7, 2013 Newer U.S. homes are 30% larger but consume about as much energy as older homes February 12, 2013 Where does RECS square footage data come from? July 11, 2012 RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household June 6, 2012 The impact of increasing home size on energy demand April 19, 2012 Did you know that air conditioning is in nearly 100 million U.S. homes? August 19, 2011 See more > graph of U.S. electricity end use, as explained in the article text U.S. electricity sales have decreased in four of the past five years

327

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the RECS About the RECS RECS Survey Forms RECS Maps RECS Terminology Archived Reports State fact sheets Arizona household graph See state fact sheets › 2009 RECS Features Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use March 7, 2013 Newer U.S. homes are 30% larger but consume about as much energy as older homes February 12, 2013 Where does RECS square footage data come from? July 11, 2012 RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household June 6, 2012 The impact of increasing home size on energy demand April 19, 2012 Did you know that air conditioning is in nearly 100 million U.S. homes? August 19, 2011 See more > graph of U.S. electricity end use, as explained in the article text U.S. electricity sales have decreased in four of the past five years

328

Special Topics on Energy Use in Household Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home Page Welcome to the Energy Information Administration's Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Home Page. If you need assistance in viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800 Home Page Welcome to the Energy Information Administration's Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Home Page. If you need assistance in viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800 Home > Transportation Home Page > Special Topics Special Topics Change in Method for Estimating Fuel Economy for the 1988 and subsequent RTECS (Released 09/12/2000) Can Household Members Accurately Report How Many Miles Their Vehicles Are Driven? (Released 08/03/2000) Calculate your Regional Gasoline Costs of Driving using the “Transportation Calculator” updated for new model years! Choose your car or SUV and see the gasoline part of the cost of driving in various parts of the country using EIA's current weekly prices. This application uses DOE/EPA's Fuel Economy Guide to set the MPG, but you can change it to compare your estimate of your car's mpg to the average of everyone else who takes the test. (Released 04/11/2000; Updated Yearly for Fuel Economies and Weekly for Fuel Prices)

329

Analysis of household refrigerators for different testing standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study highlights the salient differences among various testing standards for household refrigerator-freezers and proposes a methodology for predicting the performance of a single evaporator-based vapor-compression refrigeration system (either refrigerator or freezer) from one test standard (where the test data are available-the reference case) to another (the alternative case). The standards studied during this investigation include the Australian-New Zealand Standard (ANZS), the International Standard (ISO), the American National Standard (ANSI), the Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS), and the Chinese National Standard (CNS). A simple analysis in conjunction with the BICYCLE model (Bansal and Rice 1993) is used to calculate the energy consumption of two refrigerator cabinets from the reference case to the alternative cases. The proposed analysis includes the effect of door openings (as required by the JIS) as well as defrost heaters. The analytical results are found to agree reasonably well with the experimental observations for translating energy consumption information from one standard to another.

Bansal, P.K. [Univ. of Auckland (New Zealand). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; McGill, I. [Fischer and Paykel Ltd., Auckland (New Zealand)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

SEARLE SCHOLARS PROGRAM (http://www.searlescholars.net/go.php?id=23)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEARLE SCHOLARS PROGRAM (http://www.searlescholars.net/go.php?id=23) The University of Pittsburgh at http://www.searlescholars.net/go.php?id=49. The University is invited to submit one nomination

Sibille, Etienne

331

Comparative evaluation of crop water use efficiency, economic analysis and net household profit simulation in arid Northwest China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Decreasing water availability for agricultural production has prompted researchers to focus on comparing and evaluating water use efficiency (WUE) of different crops in various water management strategies. A field survey was conducted to investigate the amount of irrigation water, inputs and yields of eight crops (spring wheat, maize, onion, cotton, hot pepper, sunflower, melons and fennel) grown under furrow irrigation systems in an arid region, Minqin county, Northwestern China (NWC). Previous publications reporting crop WUE were identified and major statistics of evapotranspiration (ET), yield (Y) and WUE were calculated for each crop. By comparing with literature reporting, the mean WUE of onion (8.71kgm?3), cotton (0.56kgm?3), sunflower seed (0.78kgm?3) and fennel (0.51kgm?3) grown in NWC were at the same high levels; while WUE of wheat (0.87kgm?3) and maize (1.17kgm?3) were slightly lower and WUE of hot pepper (2.68kgm?3) and melons (3.27kgm?3) were extremely low. Great potential of saving water could be achieved to realize increased or ideal WUE values for crops in NWC. The total net profit per household of cotton (1606.62$hh?1) was significantly larger and of onion (?3132.30$hh?1) significantly lower than that of other crops. Cotton, sunflower seed, melons and hot pepper had significantly higher crop production values per unit water than other crops, 0.39$m?3, 0.36$m?3, 0.32$m?3 and 0.31$m?3, respectively. The net household profits were significantly higher when excluding onion production for its extremely low price in 2011. With simulation based on different combinations of onion production and increase of migrant workers, the average net household profit could be optimized to provide benefits to local farmers and policy makers regarding income increase and rural policy design.

Yubing Fan; Chenggang Wang; Zhibiao Nan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE BAKER AND WILLIAMS WAREHOUSES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

~ *-,-' .r_~, ~ *-,-' .r_~, VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE BAKER AND WILLIAMS WAREHOUSES BUILDING 513-519 NEW YORK, NEW YORK Prepared by W. C. Adams Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 Prepared for the Office of Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy FINAL REPORT JUNE 1994 This report is based on work performed under contract number DE-AC05-760R00033 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Baker arId Wi,,iMI Wsrchouwl-Vcrification June 28, ,994 - ,I I_ ..I .- VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE BAKER AND W ILLIAMS WAREHOUSES BUILDING 513-519 NEW YORK, NEW YORK Prepared by: ' J .,,,~ ' . W . C. Adams, Project Leader Date: Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program

333

Solar disinfection: an approach for low-cost household water treatment technology in Southwestern Ethiopia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Disinfection of contaminated water using solar radiation (SODIS) is known to inactivate ... study was aiming to test the efficiency of solar disinfection using different water parameters as low-cost household wat...

Awrajaw Dessie; Esayas Alemayehu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Metering Campaign on All Cooking End-Uses in 100 Households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the findings of an experimental study performed in 100 French households on the end-use power demand and energy consumption of domestic appliances focusing on cooking appliances [1].

Olivier Sidler

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Monitoring effective use of household water treatment and safe storage technologies in Ethiopia and Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Household water treatment and storage (HWTS) technologies dissemination is beginning to scale-up to reach the almost 900 million people without access to an improved water supply (WHO/UNICEF/JMP, 2008). Without well-informed ...

Stevenson, Matthew M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Household technology adoption in a global marketplace: Incorporating the role of espoused cultural values  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While MATH and the extended MATH have done an excellent job in explaining household technology adoption, there is still room for advancing our understanding of this phenomenon in light of the complexities embo...

Xiaojun Zhang; Likoebe M. Maruping

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Distributional Impacts of Carbon Pricing: A General Equilibrium Approach with Micro-Data for Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many policies to limit greenhouse gas emissions have at their core efforts to put a price on carbon emissions. Carbon pricing impacts households both by raising the cost of carbon intensive products and by changing factor ...

Rausch, Sebastian

338

Fact #748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures on Transportation, 1984-2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The overall share of annual household expenditures for transportation was lower in 2010 than it was in 1984, reaching its lowest point in 2009 at 15.5%. In the early to mid-1980s when oil prices...

339

Essays on Price Dynamics, Welfare Analysis, Household Food Insecurity in Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prices, and determinants of household food insecurity are discussed and presented in three separate essays. In the first essay, the dynamic information flows among prices of important agricultural commodities in the United States (U.S.) and Mexico...

Magana Lemus, David

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

340

Race, median household income, and primary Grade IV glioma treatment patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...behaviors among a population of Hispanic origin. Daisy Gonzalez 1...population subgroups, including Hispanics. Objective: This study assessed...population-based sample of Hispanic women in PR. Methods: This...complex sampling design of households in the San Juan Metropolitan...

Jill S. Barnholtz-Sloan; Vonetta L. Williams; Marc Chamberlain; and Andrew E. Sloan

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Household structure and labor force participation of black, hispanic, and white mothers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates whether the inclusion of nonnuclear adults in a household facilitates the labor force participation of single and married mothers. Results based on a sample of extended and nuclear hous...

Marta Tienda; Jennifer Glass

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Drivers of U.S. Household Energy Consumption, 1980-2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Drivers of U.S. Household Energy Consumption, 1980-2009 February 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy...

343

A Dynamic household Alternative-fuel Vehicle Demand Model Using Stated and Revealed Transaction Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

market share for alternative-fuel vehicles drop from thePreferences for Alternative-Fuel Vehicles, Brownstone DavidA Dynamic Household Alternative-fuel Vehicle Demand Model

Sheng, Hongyan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

The effect of household characteristics on saving behaviour and the theory of savings in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to estimate the household saving functions based on cross-section data which contain fruitful informations of individual observations. The paper also attempts to test various theor...

T. Suruga; T. Tachibanaki

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

The Relationship Between Life Satisfaction Among Wives and Financial Preparedness of Households in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The wealth gap between the rich and poor is widening and contributing to Japans shrinking middle class. This study examined ... future and life satisfaction and their association with household financial prepare...

Yoko Mimura

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Modelling useful energy demand system as derived from basic needs in the household sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inter-fuel substitution in the household sector depends on whether their target energy use is similar or not. To account ... for the effect of end-use application on energy demand, the concept of useful energy is...

Zahra A. Barkhordar; Yadollah Saboohi

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Psychology Insight Taster Day with British Psychology Society (ID:325)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Psychology Insight Taster Day with British Psychology Society (ID:325) Outline The `Psychology and Lecturers aim to give a detailed picture of the various work within Psychology and the career/training options available. These are run in conjunction with the Welsh Branch of the British Psychological Society

Harman, Neal.A.

348

Psychology Taster Days in Schools and FE Colleges (ID:317)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Psychology Taster Days in Schools and FE Colleges (ID:317) Outline The University's Psychology department brings its students and staff to local schools and colleges to discuss studying psychology Psychology at Higher Education level. A pre-planned programme of events will focus on Psychology as a Science

Harman, Neal.A.

349

2012 -2013 BIRTH DATE VERIFICATION STUDENT NAME: SPU ID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an official copy of your Birth Certificate, Passport, or Driver's License with this form and we will update2012 - 2013 BIRTH DATE VERIFICATION STUDENT NAME: SPU ID: The date of birth reported on your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) does not match the date of birth reported in one of the following

Nelson, Tim

350

2013 -2014 BIRTH DATE VERIFICATION STUDENT NAME: SPU ID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an official copy of your Birth Certificate, Passport, or Driver's License with this form and we will update2013 - 2014 BIRTH DATE VERIFICATION STUDENT NAME: SPU ID: The date of birth reported on your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) does not match the date of birth reported in one of the following

Nelson, Tim

351

ORNL 2010-G00976/jcn UT-B ID 200802116  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORNL 2010-G00976/jcn UT-B ID 200802116 Detection of Latent Prints by Raman Imaging Technology, allowing the evidence to be visualized. The technology is capable of imaging latent prints on porous and non-porous surfaces, and is especially useful for prints that are low in oil (or "clean") and children

352

https://doyouliveunited.org 1. Enter you user ID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Search' button. 7. Enter you search terms for the agency of your choice and click on `Search'. #12;httpshttps://doyouliveunited.org 1. Enter you user ID: your email address Enter your password: welcome be different then the options listed here. 5. For a payroll pledge, enter the amount per pay or the total

353

Student ID Number Date of birth Cell Phone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Name Student ID Number Date of birth Cell Phone New Housing Student Current Housing Student All's phone Crime 2 Information about charges or crime convicted of Date of conviction Court convicted in Sentence received Probation dates Probation officer's name Probation officer's phone Consent: I authorize

Pantaleone, Jim

354

Usage Codes Observer code Vessel code Trip ID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Usage Codes 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 Observer code Vessel code Trip ID Permit holder name/address Permit / N MMSI No. Y / N Present? Usage Water capacity (m3): Fuel capacity: m3 / tonnes Other: Other: Kw all that apply & note types of materials for each) Capacity: Usage Incinerator: Net mensuration Y / N

355

UCRL-ID-119170 LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

June 1995 UCRL-ID-119170 LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY University of California · Livermore, California · 94550 Science on High-Energy Lasers: From Today to the NIF Richard W. Lee, Richard. WorkperformedundertheauspicesoftheU.S.DepartmentofEnergybyLawrenceLivermoreNationalLaboratoryunder Contract W-7405-Eng-48. #12

356

ORNL 2010-G00975/jcn UT-B ID 200802114  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater recycling ·· Electricity or hydrogen generation ·· Inexpensive ·· Versatile Potential Applications ·· Recycling of wastewater from cellulosic ethanol fermentation ·· Removal of inhibitors of the bioORNL 2010-G00975/jcn UT-B ID 200802114 Microbial Fuel Cells for Recycle of Process Water from

357

ORNL 2010-G00969/jcn UT-B ID 200802060  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORNL 2010-G00969/jcn UT-B ID 200802060 Carbon Nanotubes Grown on Various Fibers Technology Summary ORNL researchers invented a method for growing carbon nanotubes on the surfaces of various fiber materials, including quartz, carbon, and activated carbon fibers. These materials may have significant

358

, 1. CONTRACT ID CODE IPAG~ O F PAGES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

·' , 1. CONTRACT ID CODE IPAG~ O F PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I 2 2. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ ORDER NO. DUNS# 032987476 l8l DE-AC05-76RL01830 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) CODE ONLY TO MODIFICATIONS OF CONTRACTS/ORDERS, IT MODIFIES THE CONTRACT/ORDER NO. AS SET FORTH IN ITEM 14

359

401(a) Investment Provider Change Form Employee Name Employee ID #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

401(a) Investment Provider Change Form Employee Name Employee ID # Address City State Zip Code Home to an account in my name with the following Investment Provider(s): Investment Provider Percent Fidelity Investments % TIAA-CREF % The numbers above must be in whole percents only and must total 100%. If you wish

Provancher, William

360

Introduction to Health and Social Care (ID:250)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to Health and Social Care (ID:250) Outline This is a day event which will be designed will be given short talks from different staff about the various health and social care courses on offer details Learning outcomes: · The different health and social care courses offered at Swansea University

Harman, Neal.A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Aquatic Chemistry Course Id: CHEM 605 (3 cr.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic Chemistry Fall 2010 Course Id: CHEM 605 (3 cr.) Lecture: TR 3:40-5:20pm, REIC 165 of this course is to introduce students to the concepts and models used in aquatic chemistry while providing-base chemistry, complexation, precipitation-dissolution and reduction-oxidation reactions. Student Learning

Wagner, Diane

362

Article ID: Query Translation on the Fly in Deep Web  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Article ID: Query Translation on the Fly in Deep Web Integration Jiang Fangjiao, Jia Linlin, Meng users to access the desired information, many researches have dedicated to the Deep Web (i.e. Web databases) integration. We focus on query translation which is an important part of the Deep Web integration

363

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Title Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-55088 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Whitehead, Camilla Dunham, Victor H. Franco, Alexander B. Lekov, and James D. Lutz Document Number LBNL-55088 Pagination 22 Date Published May 31 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Residential household space heating energy use comprises close to half of all residential energy consumption. Currently, average space heating use by household is 43.9 Mbtu for a year. An average, however, does not reflect regional variation in heating practices, energy costs, or fuel type. Indeed, a national average does not capture regional or consumer group cost impacts from changing efficiency levels of heating equipment. The US Department of Energy sets energy standards for residential appliances in, what is called, a rulemaking process. The residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking process investigates the costs and benefits of possible updates to the current minimum efficiency regulations. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) selected the sample used in the residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking from publically available data representing United States residences. The sample represents 107 million households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler rulemaking. This paper describes the choice of criteria to select the sample of houses used in the rulemaking process. The process of data extraction is detailed in the appendices and is easily duplicated.The life-cycle cost is calculated in two ways with a household marginal energy price and a national average energy price. The LCC results show that using an national average energy price produces higher LCC savings but does not reflect regional differences in energy price.

364

A Mixed Nordic Experience: Implementing Competitive Retail Electricity Markets for Household Customers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the Nordic countries were among the first to develop competition in the electricity industry, it took a long time to make retail competition work. In Norway and Sweden a considerable number of households are actively using the market but very few households are active in Finland and Denmark. One problem has been institutional barriers involving metering, limited unbundling of distribution and supply, and limited access to reliable information on contracts and prices. (author)

Olsen, Ole Jess; Johnsen, Tor Arnt; Lewis, Philip

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

The Determinants of Homeonwership in Presence of Shocks Experienced by Mexican Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that households? experience and government income support programs influence homeownership in Mexico. A secondary objective is to determine how socio-demographic variables influence homeownership in Mexico. Based on the Random Utility Model, logit models... of Direct Rural Support of Mexico (PROGRESA) and the Program of Direct Rural Support of Mexico (PROCAMPO), appear to be increasing iii homeownership. These social welfare programs provide cash transfers to households. For whatever reason, PROGRESA...

Lopez Cabrera, Jesus Antonio 1977-

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

366

Applications of demand analysis for the dairy industry using household scanner data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Education 7 10 Martial Status 5 11 Male Head Occupation 12 12 Female Head Occupation 12 13 Household Composition 8 14 Race 4 15 Hispanic Origin 2 16 Region 4 17 Scantrack Market Identifier 53 18 Projection Factor 1... classified as either Hispanic or not Hispanic, with 18% being Hispanic and 82% not Hispanic. Since female household heads are considered primary to making food purchase decisions some key statistics about this demographic variable are included. Of all...

Stockton, Matthew C.

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

367

Household Light Makes Global Heat: High Black Carbon Emissions From Kerosene Wick Lamps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(3) Lighting is another component of this household energy challenge, with millions of households still relying on simple liquid-fueled lamps, but little is known of the associated environmental and health impacts. ... For laboratory tests, CO2 and CO concentrations were measured in real-time with a Li-COR 6252 (Li-COR Biosciences, Lincoln, NE) and Horiba AIA-220 (Horiba, Kyoto, Japan) nondispersive infrared (NDIR) analyzer, respectively. ...

Nicholas L. Lam; Yanju Chen; Cheryl Weyant; Chandra Venkataraman; Pankaj Sadavarte; Michael A. Johnson; Kirk R. Smith; Benjamin T. Brem; Joseph Arineitwe; Justin E. Ellis; Tami C. Bond

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

368

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater by Household Sand Filters:? Comparative Field Study, Model Calculations, and Health Benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater by Household Sand Filters:? Comparative Field Study, Model Calculations, and Health Benefits ... Simultaneously, raw groundwater from the same households and additional 31 tubewells was sampled to investigate arsenic coprecipitation with hydrous ferric iron from solution, i.e., without contact to sand surfaces. ... Concentra tions of total Fe, Mn, Na, K, Mg, and Ca were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy (Shimadzu AA-6800, Kyoto, Japan). ...

Michael Berg; Samuel Luzi; Pham Thi Kim Trang; Pham Hung Viet; Walter Giger; Doris Stben

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

369

UGA ID Number Last Name First MI Academic Term THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UGA ID Number Last Name First MI Academic Term THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA APPLICATION TO MAKE LATE's Office UGA ID Number Last Name First MI Academic Term THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA APPLICATION TO MAKE LATE's Office UGA ID Number Last Name First MI Academic Term THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA APPLICATION TO MAKE LATE

Arnold, Jonathan

370

ATLAS ID Upgrade R&D Plan: Development of a Short-Strip Silicon Detector Module  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATLAS ID Upgrade R&D Plan: Development of a Short-Strip Silicon Detector Module and a Frontend of the optimum technology and layout of the tracking detectors for the upgraded ATLAS ID. The goal for the intermediate tracking region in the upgraded ATLAS ID. We anticipate that much of the work would then also

California at Santa Cruz, University of

371

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the RECS About the RECS RECS Survey Forms RECS Maps RECS Terminology Archived Reports State fact sheets Arizona household graph See state fact sheets › graph of U.S. electricity end use, as explained in the article text U.S. electricity sales have decreased in four of the past five years December 20, 2013 Gas furnace efficiency has large implications for residential natural gas use December 5, 2013 EIA publishes state fact sheets on residential energy consumption and characteristics August 19, 2013 All 48 related articles › Other End Use Surveys Commercial Buildings - CBECS Manufacturing - MECS Transportation About the RECS EIA administers the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) to a nationally representative sample of housing units. Specially trained interviewers collect energy characteristics on the housing unit, usage

372

U-063: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error 3: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-063: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code December 16, 2011 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: RSA SecurID Software Token 4.1 for Microsoft Windows ABSTRACT: A remote user can cause the target application to execute arbitrary code on the target user's system. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026426 ESA-2011-039 Secunia Advisory: SA45665 Securityfocus Advisory CVE-2011-4141 RSA Online Fraud Resource Center IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in RSA SecurID Software Token. A remote user

373

U-063: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

63: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error 63: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-063: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code December 16, 2011 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: RSA SecurID Software Token 4.1 for Microsoft Windows ABSTRACT: A remote user can cause the target application to execute arbitrary code on the target user's system. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026426 ESA-2011-039 Secunia Advisory: SA45665 Securityfocus Advisory CVE-2011-4141 RSA Online Fraud Resource Center IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in RSA SecurID Software Token. A remote user

374

The impact of the Persian Gulf crisis on household energy consumption and expenditure patterns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Iraqi invasion of the Kingdom of Kuwait on August 2, 1990, and the subsequent war between Iraq and an international alliance led by the United States triggered first immediate and then fluctuating world petroleum prices. Increases in petroleum prices and in U.S. petroleum imports resulted in increases in the petroleum prices paid by U.S. residential, commercial, and industrial consumers. The result was an immediate price shock that reverberated throughout the U.S. economy. The differential impact of these price increases and fluctuations on poor and minority households raised immediate, significant, and potentially long-term research, policy, and management issues for a variety of federal, state, and local government agencies, including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Among these issues are (1) the measurement of variations in the impact of petroleum price changes on poor, nonpoor, minority, and majority households; (2) how to use the existing policy resources and policy innovation to mitigate regressive impacts of petroleum price increases on lower-income households; and (3) how to pursue such policy mitigation through government agencies severely circumscribed by tax and expenditure limitations. Few models attempt to assess household energy consumption and energy expenditure under various alternative price scenarios and with respect to the inclusion of differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. This paper provides a preliminary analysis of the nature and extent of potential impacts of petroleum price changes attributable to the Persian Gulf War and its aftermath on majority, black, and Hispanic households and on overlapping poor and nonpoor households. At the time this was written, the Persian Gulf War had concluded with Iraq`s total surrender to all of the resolutions and demands of the United Nations and United States.

Henderson, L. [Univ. of Baltimore, MD (United States); Poyer, D.; Teotia, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Evaluation of the soft measures' effects on ambient water quality improvement and household and industry economies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Various ecological footprint calculators, carbon footprint calculators and water footprint calculators have been developed in recent years. The basic concepts of ecological behaviour record notebooks and of carbon dioxide emission calculators have been developed since the late 20th century. The first carbon dioxide emission calculator was developed in 1991. Likewise, water pollutant discharge calculators have been developed to estimate the effects of soft measures introduced into households to reduce pollutant discharge since 2004. The soft measures which have been developed in Japan may consist of a wider framework, household sustainable consumption, which has been developed in Europe, and can be referred to cleaner consumption. In this research, summarisation of the short history of ecological behaviour record notebooks and ecological footprint calculators in Japan since the 1980s was conducted, and the soft measures in households to reduce pollutant discharge were evaluated for their effects on ambient water quality improvement as well as household and industry economies. Effects of the soft measures on related industry economies were investigated using an InputOutput Tableanalysis and the effects of the imported goods were evaluated with an import effect matrix, which was developed in this research. The effects of the soft measures on household expenditures were estimated to be a decrease by 2.5% or USD 285 person?1year?1 in 20032006. The results show that the soft measures positively affect the chemical fibre industry and significantly affect the detergent industry. Analysis of the import effect matrix proved that the six industries were tightly related through extensive amounts of imported goods. The soft measures in households may lead to household sustainable consumption and thus reduce disadvantageous human impacts on water environments. The effects of the measures introduced to improve the environment should be qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated to avoid redundant concerns and discord between the environment and the economy, which may be worried when the relationship is not well understood.

Yoshiaki Tsuzuki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Greenhouse gas emissions from home composting of organic household waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is a potential environmental disadvantage of home composting. Because of a lack of reliable GHG emission data, a comprehensive experimental home composting system was set up. The system consisted of six composting units, and a static flux chamber method was used to measure and quantify the GHG emissions for one year composting of organic household waste (OHW). The average OHW input in the six composting units was 2.6-3.5 kg week{sup -1} and the temperature inside the composting units was in all cases only a few degrees (2-10 {sup o}C) higher than the ambient temperature. The emissions of methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) were quantified as 0.4-4.2 kg CH{sub 4} Mg{sup -1} input wet waste (ww) and 0.30-0.55 kg N{sub 2}O Mg{sup -1} ww, depending on the mixing frequency. This corresponds to emission factors (EFs) (including only CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions) of 100-239 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww. Composting units exposed to weekly mixing had the highest EFs, whereas the units with no mixing during the entire year had the lowest emissions. In addition to the higher emission from the frequently mixed units, there was also an instant release of CH{sub 4} during mixing which was estimated to 8-12% of the total CH{sub 4} emissions. Experiments with higher loads of OHW (up to 20 kg every fortnight) entailed a higher emission and significantly increased overall EFs (in kg substance per Mg{sup -1} ww). However, the temperature development did not change significantly. The GHG emissions (in kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww) from home composting of OHW were found to be in the same order of magnitude as for centralised composting plants.

Andersen, J.K., E-mail: jka@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H.; Scheutz, C. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

2014 NERSC User Survey  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2014 NERSC User Survey 2014 NERSC User Survey December 17, 2014 by Francesca Verdier (0 Comments) Please take a few minutes to fill out NERSC's annual user survey. Your feedback is...

378

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-021.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE-ID-INL-12-021 DOE-ID-INL-12-021 SECTION A. Project Title: High Frequency Sounder - Permanent Installation at Water Reactor Research Test Facility (WRRTF) SECTION B. Project Description: The scope of this project is to construct and operate a 150-watt high frequency (HF) radio antenna (both transmit and receive) within the fenced area of the former Water Reactor Research Test Facility (WRRTF) to support various wireless test bed (WTB) activities and increase WTB capabilities by measuring the ionospheric characteristics of the region. The measurements are used to generate propagation maps of the ionosphere to graphically illustrate what HF frequencies are effective for communications. Construction is scheduled to take place in the August-September 2012 timeframe with operation beginning in October 2012.

379

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-007.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-007 SECTION A. Project Title: Seismic Monitoring for Seismic Hazards Analyses SECTION B. Project Description: The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Probabilistic Seismic Hazards Analysis (PSHA) Phase I - Data Collection and Evaluation project is being conducted by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations office (DOE-ID) and INL Management. The project is being conducted from FY-2013 to FY-2017. Earthquake data will be collected at seismic stations located near INL facility areas for at least two years using seismometers and for the long-term using accelerometers. Installation of the seismic stations is being funded by the INL PSHA - Data Collection and Evaluation project and, following completion of this project,

380

DOE-ID Procurement Services � the action team  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE-ID Procurement Services � the action team DOE-ID Procurement Services � the action team Passage of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 included billions of dollars in additional funding for energy efficiency improvements to U.S. homes and businesses. By early July, the U.S. Department of Energy was hard pressed to get that funding to the communities who needed it to reduce their power bills. That�s when DOE�s Office of Energy Efficiency asked the department�s Idaho Operations Office for support from DOE-ID�s Procurement Services team. Rapid response Pat Alexander-Johnson (top) and Jeff Fogg (bottom) are two highly-trained and experienced contract specialists with the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho Operations Office. Within moments of receiving its orders, the 10-member team shifted into

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-024..doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PostingNo.: DOE-ID-INL-12-024 PostingNo.: DOE-ID-INL-12-024 SECTION A. Project Title: Rigby Bus Lot Northwest Entrance SECTION B. Project Description: The purpose of the proposed action is to provide an additional bus entrance to the Rigby Park and Ride Bus Lot. A portion of chain link fencing (running east to west) on the northwest corner of the Rigby Park and Ride Bus Lot would be relocated to allow an opening off of the City of Rigby dirt access road so that buses may enter the Rigby Park and Ride Lot from the northwest. The existing fence material would then be placed across the City of Rigby dirt access road (running north and south). The new entrance would be for buses only. Approximately 4 to 6 buses would use this entrance. No personnel vehicles will have access. Buses would start using the new

382

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-012.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ECX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-012 ECX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-012 SECTION A. Project Title: Film Processing Project at Test Reactor Area (TRA)-678 SECTION B. Project Description The proposed action is to install a silver recovery unit to the film processor in the film processing area at TRA-678 for the purpose of minimizing waste generation and implementing pollution prevention. The proposed film processor (Kodak M-35A) generates approximately 90 ml of developer and 140 ml of fixer effluents per 17 inch film and approximately 40 gallons per hour of rinse water effluent. Developer and fixer effluents from the current film processing equipment are being collected in a Satellite Accumulation Area (SAA). The new equipment would eliminate the need for storing the effluent in the SAA by filtering silver from the effluent for recycling. The remaining

383

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-018.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 SECTION A. Project Title: Rexburg Bus Lot (B60-1789-D-NE) Lease Termination SECTION B. Project Description: The proposed activity will terminate the lease of approximately four bus spaces at the Rexburg Parking Lot (B60-1789-D-NE) at South 5 th West in Rexburg, ID on or about July 31, 2012 for cost savings and consolidation to the existing lot at Rigby, ID. A facility walkthrough by BEA personnel will be performed in order to ensure the facility is ready for turnover back to the owner. Approximate cost associated with the activity is estimated at $1,500.00. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects / Potential Sources of Impact: Transacting real property in Rexburg, Idaho and moving four buses to a lot in Rigby, Idaho will not affect any INL environmental

384

File:INL-geothermal-id.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

id.pdf id.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Idaho Geothermal Resources Size of this preview: 380 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(3,458 × 5,456 pixels, file size: 1.67 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Idaho Geothermal Resources Sources Idaho National Laboratory Authors Patrick Laney; Julie Brizzee Related Technologies Geothermal Creation Date 2003-11-01 Extent State Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Idaho File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:24, 16 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 12:24, 16 December 2010 3,458 × 5,456 (1.67 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated upload from NREL's "mapsearch" data

385

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-018.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 SECTION A. Project Title: Rexburg Bus Lot (B60-1789-D-NE) Lease Termination SECTION B. Project Description: The proposed activity will terminate the lease of approximately four bus spaces at the Rexburg Parking Lot (B60-1789-D-NE) at South 5 th West in Rexburg, ID on or about July 31, 2012 for cost savings and consolidation to the existing lot at Rigby, ID. A facility walkthrough by BEA personnel will be performed in order to ensure the facility is ready for turnover back to the owner. Approximate cost associated with the activity is estimated at $1,500.00. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects / Potential Sources of Impact: Transacting real property in Rexburg, Idaho and moving four buses to a lot in Rigby, Idaho will not affect any INL environmental

386

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-021.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-ID-INL-12-021 DOE-ID-INL-12-021 SECTION A. Project Title: High Frequency Sounder - Permanent Installation at Water Reactor Research Test Facility (WRRTF) SECTION B. Project Description: The scope of this project is to construct and operate a 150-watt high frequency (HF) radio antenna (both transmit and receive) within the fenced area of the former Water Reactor Research Test Facility (WRRTF) to support various wireless test bed (WTB) activities and increase WTB capabilities by measuring the ionospheric characteristics of the region. The measurements are used to generate propagation maps of the ionosphere to graphically illustrate what HF frequencies are effective for communications. Construction is scheduled to take place in the August-September 2012 timeframe with operation beginning in October 2012.

387

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-003.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-003 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-003 SECTION A. Project Title: Auxiliary Canal Fill Project at Test Reactor Area (TRA)-670 SECTION B. Project Description: Although the ATR canal meets all design basis criteria, lessons learned following the earthquake and tsunami events at the Fukushima- Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in March of 2011 indicate that an auxiliary water supply to the fuel storage canal with a fill connection located outside of the facility would have been valuable following the beyond design basis event. As a result of these lessons learned, the Department of Energy (DOE) has allocated additional funding to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to mitigate beyond design basis events similar to the Fukushima-Daiichi disaster. The Auxiliary Canal Fill Project is one of the projects being funded from this

388

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-012.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ECX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-012 ECX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-012 SECTION A. Project Title: Film Processing Project at Test Reactor Area (TRA)-678 SECTION B. Project Description The proposed action is to install a silver recovery unit to the film processor in the film processing area at TRA-678 for the purpose of minimizing waste generation and implementing pollution prevention. The proposed film processor (Kodak M-35A) generates approximately 90 ml of developer and 140 ml of fixer effluents per 17 inch film and approximately 40 gallons per hour of rinse water effluent. Developer and fixer effluents from the current film processing equipment are being collected in a Satellite Accumulation Area (SAA). The new equipment would eliminate the need for storing the effluent in the SAA by filtering silver from the effluent for recycling. The remaining

389

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-10-020.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE-ID-INL-10-020 DOE-ID-INL-10-020 SECTION A. Project Title: Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Routine Maintenance Activities (Overarching) SECTION B. Project Description: The purpose of this overarching Environmental Checklist (EC) is to address activities that would meet the intent of the categorical exclusion (CX) B1.3 as described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendix B to Subpart D. These activities would consist of typical and non-typical types of actions, such as routine maintenance, minor modifications, and custodial service activities required to support safe and efficient plant operation, even if performed on an infrequent basis, and would occur on the INL Site and at those in town (Idaho Falls) facilities. These activities would be performed by INL Facility and Site Services personnel or off-site contractors. None of these activities would

390

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-007.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-007 SECTION A. Project Title: Seismic Monitoring for Seismic Hazards Analyses SECTION B. Project Description: The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Probabilistic Seismic Hazards Analysis (PSHA) Phase I - Data Collection and Evaluation project is being conducted by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations office (DOE-ID) and INL Management. The project is being conducted from FY-2013 to FY-2017. Earthquake data will be collected at seismic stations located near INL facility areas for at least two years using seismometers and for the long-term using accelerometers. Installation of the seismic stations is being funded by the INL PSHA - Data Collection and Evaluation project and, following completion of this project,

391

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-10-017.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-ID-INL-10-017 DOE-ID-INL-10-017 SECTION A. Project Title: ATR Complex Dial Room. SECTION B. Project Description: The proposed project is to construct and operate a new dial room at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex (ATR Complex) (formerly known as the Test Reactor Area [TRA]) in order to meet the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy programmatic needs and to provide ongoing critical support at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The existing telecommunication and data systems located at the ATR Complex need to be updated to ensure the protection and continuity of telecommunications hardware and software property and provide reliability of communications and data connectivity. The new modular dial room facility will replace existing telecommunications systems equipment (telephony, optical transport, and data network infrastructure

392

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-10-020.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-ID-INL-10-020 DOE-ID-INL-10-020 SECTION A. Project Title: Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Routine Maintenance Activities (Overarching) SECTION B. Project Description: The purpose of this overarching Environmental Checklist (EC) is to address activities that would meet the intent of the categorical exclusion (CX) B1.3 as described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendix B to Subpart D. These activities would consist of typical and non-typical types of actions, such as routine maintenance, minor modifications, and custodial service activities required to support safe and efficient plant operation, even if performed on an infrequent basis, and would occur on the INL Site and at those in town (Idaho Falls) facilities. These activities would be performed by INL Facility and Site Services personnel or off-site contractors. None of these activities would

393

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-016.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-016 No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-016 SECTION A. Project Title: Reverse Osmosis System Removal SECTION B. Project Description: The project will remove a reverse osmosis water treatment system (FU-HA-101) from TAN 681 room 182. The system is out-of-service, with no intent of future use. Work will involve removal of the reverse osmosis system, and associated plumbing/piping and electrical lines and conduit. The project will clear the area of obstacles and tripping hazards associated with unused/unnecessary equipment and utilities. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects / Potential Sources of Impact: Generating and Managing Waste: Project activities will result in generation of an estimated 90 cubic ft. of low-level radioactive waste. Wastes will be characterized and dispositioned through Waste Generator Services. Reuse and recycling of materials will be practiced

394

U.S. Residential Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products: Results from Amazon Mechanical Turk Surveys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amazon Mechanical Turk was used, for the first time, to collect statistically representative survey data from U.S. households on the presence, number, type and usage of refrigerators, freezers, and various miscellaneous refrigeration products (wine/beverage coolers, residential icemakers and non-vapor compression refrigerators and freezers), along with household and demographic information. Such products have been poorly studied to date, with almost no information available about shipments, stocks, capacities, energy use, etc. A total of 9,981 clean survey responses were obtained from five distinct surveys deployed in 2012. General refrigeration product survey responses were weighted to demographics in the U.S. Energy Information Administrations Residential Energy Consumption Survey 2009 dataset. Miscellaneous refrigeration product survey responses were weighted according to demographics of product ownership found in the general refrigeration product surveys. Model number matching for a portion of miscellaneous refrigeration product responses allowed validation of refrigeration product characteristics, which enabled more accurate estimates of the penetrations of these products in U.S. households. We estimated that there were 12.31.0 million wine/beverage coolers, 5.5(3.5,+3.2) million residential icemakers and 4.4(2.7,+2.3) million non-vapor compression refrigerators in U.S. households in 2012. (All numerical results are expressed with ranges indicating the 95% confidence interval.) No evidence was found for the existence of non-vapor compression freezers. Moreover, we found that 15% of wine/beverage coolers used vapor compression cooling technology, while 85% used thermoelectric cooling technology, with the vast majority of thermoelectric units having capacities of less than 30 wine bottles (approximately 3.5 cubic feet). No evidence was found for the existence of wine/beverage coolers with absorption cooling technology. Additionally, we estimated that there were 3.61.0 million hybrid refrigerator-wine/beverage coolers and 0.90.5 million hybrid freezer-wine/beverage coolers in U.S. households. We also obtained estimates of miscellaneous refrigeration product capacities, lifetimes, purchase and installation costs, repair frequencies and costs, and maintenance costs. For wine/beverage coolers, we also obtained information on the penetration of built-in units, AC/DC operating capability, the use of internal lights, and distributions of door opening frequencies. This information is essential to develop detailed estimates of national energy usage and life-cycle costs, and would be helpful in obtaining information on other plug-load appliances. Additional information not highlighted in the main report was presented in Appendices.

Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Young, Scott J.; Yang, Hung-Chia; Long, Timothy; Beraki, Bereket; Price, Sarah K.; Pratt, Stacy; Willem, Henry; Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

395

Boeing issues smart ID cards to its employees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Boeing, one of the worlds leading aerospace companies, is embarking on an ambitious plan to roll out over 200,000 corporate smart ID cards to its staff globally. The project, once implemented, would be one of the worlds largest deployments of such technology by a private corporation. This is a short news story only. Visit www.compseconline.com for the latest computer security news.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Chemical Characterization and Source Apportionment of Household Fine Particulate Matter in Rural, Peri-urban, and Urban West Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In addition to households own fuel, HAP in urban households is affected by the extent of biomass use in the neighborhood, and by traffic-related sources. ... The elemental concentrations of the samples were quantified by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) using a Shimadzu EDX-700HS spectrometer (Shimadzu Corp., Japan) at the Institute of Astronomy, Geophysics and Atmospheric Science, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. ...

Zheng Zhou; Kathie L. Dionisio; Thiago G. Verissimo; Americo S. Kerr; Brent Coull; Stephen Howie; Raphael E. Arku; Petros Koutrakis; John D. Spengler; Kimberly Fornace; Allison F. Hughes; Jose Vallarino; Samuel Agyei-Mensah; Majid Ezzati

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

397

Pacific Northwest residential energy survey. Volume 6. Oregon cross-tabulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Responses for the state of Oregon to fifty questions asked during the survey (plus four variables computed from responses to several other questions) cross-tabulated against responses to nine quesions which represent key explanatory characteristics of residential energy use are presented. The nine key questions are: means of payment for housing; type of dwelling; year dwelling built; total square-footage of living space; type of fuel for main heating system; combined 1978 income; unit cost of electricity; annual electricity consumption; and annual natural gas consumption. The fifty questions and four computed variables which were cross-tabulated against the above, fall into six categories: dwelling characteristics; heating and air-conditioning system; water heating; appliances; demographic and dwelling characteristics; and insulation. The survey was conducted throughout the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana with a total of 4030 households samples; 1165 households were sampled in Oregon. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

"Table HC15.3 Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Household Characteristics",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,1.8,1.9,2,3.2 "2 Persons",34.8,2.2,2.3,2.4,3.2 "3 Persons",18.4,1.1,1.3,1.2,1.8 "4 Persons",15.9,1,0.9,1,2.3 "5 Persons",7.9,0.6,0.6,0.9,0.9 "6 or More Persons",4.1,0.4,"Q",0.5,0.7 "2005 Annual Household Income Category" "Less than $9,999",9.9,0.8,0.7,0.9,1 "$10,000 to $14,999",8.5,0.8,0.4,0.6,0.7

399

Development of the household sample for furnace and boilerlife-cycle cost analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential household space heating energy use comprises close to half of all residential energy consumption. Currently, average space heating use by household is 43.9 Mbtu for a year. An average, however, does not reflect regional variation in heating practices, energy costs, or fuel type. Indeed, a national average does not capture regional or consumer group cost impacts from changing efficiency levels of heating equipment. The US Department of Energy sets energy standards for residential appliances in, what is called, a rulemaking process. The residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking process investigates the costs and benefits of possible updates to the current minimum efficiency regulations. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) selected the sample used in the residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking from publically available data representing United States residences. The sample represents 107 million households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler rulemaking. This paper describes the choice of criteria to select the sample of houses used in the rulemaking process. The process of data extraction is detailed in the appendices and is easily duplicated. The life-cycle cost is calculated in two ways with a household marginal energy price and a national average energy price. The LCC results show that using an national average energy price produces higher LCC savings but does not reflect regional differences in energy price.

Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Franco, Victor; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, Jim

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

Effects of social participation and the emergence of voluntary social interactions on household power-saving practices in post-disaster Kanagawa, Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An online social survey was conducted to reveal household electricity-saving behaviour and its relationship with participation in social group activities, as well as face-to-face and online social interactions, i.e., information sources used and information dissemination through personal networks, in a disaster-affected region of Kanagawa, Japan, during the summer of 2011. The study confirms the positive contribution of respondents participation in social group activities to the number of power-saving practices conducted. It also reveals the emergence of voluntary social face-to-face and/or online interactions for power-saving. The study suggests it would be useful to provide effective information to proactive individuals who are closely engaged in power-saving in households and who are proactively disseminating power-saving information practices to others. Such individuals include (1) women who have school-children and who are proactively engaging in the social interactions of their childrens schools, other parents, neighbours, as well as their own parents and relatives; and (2) men and women who are using various kinds of online interaction tools and are also engaged in face-to-face social interactions.

Hidenori Nakamura

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Household transmission of pandemic 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus in Osaka, Japan in May 2009  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SummaryObjective To assess household transmission of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) and effectiveness of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) of antiviral drugs among household contacts of patients during the first pandemic influenza A (H1N1) outbreak in Osaka, Japan in May 2009. Methods Active surveillance of patients and their families was conducted. Public Health Center staff visited each home with an infected patient and advised every household member with regard to precautionary measures, and PEP was provided to household contacts to prevent secondary infection. We analyzed the effectiveness of PEP and characteristics of secondary infection. Results The secondary attack rate (SAR) among household contacts was 3.7%. The SAR among household contacts without PEP was 26.1%. However, the SAR among those with PEP was 0.6%. Only two of 331 household contacts with PEP became infected. One of the two was infected with an oseltamivir-resistant strain. Analysis of SAR by age group showed that those under 20 years of age were at higher risk than those over 20 (relative risk [RR]=7.9; 95% confidence interval [CI]=2.2427.8). Significant differences with respect to sex, number of household contacts, and use of antiviral medications in the index cases were not observed. Conclusions Our present results indicate that PEP is effective for preventing secondary H1N1 infection among household contacts.

N. Komiya; Y. Gu; H. Kamiya; Y. Yahata; Y. Yasui; K. Taniguchi; N. Okabe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Web: http://dust.ess.uci.edu/prp/prp ids/prp ids.pdf NASA International Polar Year (IPY) Proposal Submitted: April 17, 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Web: http://dust.ess.uci.edu/prp/prp ids/prp ids.pdf NASA International Polar Year (IPY) Proposal Researchers and Postdocs on CRY- OLIST and on ESS Website. 6. 20070723: Registered for SPAC Workshop for potential collaborators/contributors: 1. Use CVS to obtain source to this proposal: cvs -d :ext:esmf.ess

Zender, Charles

403

ID09969_01_UCA195_3302_030513.raw:1 ID09969_01_UCA195_3302_030513.raw : 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ID09969_01_UCA195_3302_030513.raw:1 ID09969_01_UCA195_3302_030513.raw : 1 INTRODUCTION-UPLC systems and ESI sources. To address these concerns, a prototype 150 um separation device was developed

Richardson, David

404

Robotic Surveying  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ZAPATA ENGINEERING challenged our engineers and scientists, which included robotics expertise from Carnegie Mellon University, to design a solution to meet our client's requirements for rapid digital geophysical and radiological data collection of a munitions test range with no down-range personnel. A prime concern of the project was to minimize exposure of personnel to unexploded ordnance and radiation. The field season was limited by extreme heat, cold and snow. Geographical Information System (GIS) tools were used throughout this project to accurately define the limits of mapped areas, build a common mapping platform from various client products, track production progress, allocate resources and relate subsurface geophysical information to geographical features for use in rapidly reacquiring targets for investigation. We were hopeful that our platform could meet the proposed 35 acres per day, towing both a geophysical package and a radiological monitoring trailer. We held our breath and crossed our fingers as the autonomous Speedrower began to crawl across the playa lakebed. We met our proposed production rate, and we averaged just less than 50 acres per 12-hour day using the autonomous platform with a path tracking error of less than +/- 4 inches. Our project team mapped over 1,800 acres in an 8-week (4 days per week) timeframe. The expertise of our partner, Carnegie Mellon University, was recently demonstrated when their two autonomous vehicle entries finished second and third at the 2005 Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Grand Challenge. 'The Grand Challenge program was established to help foster the development of autonomous vehicle technology that will some day help save the lives of Americans who are protecting our country on the battlefield', said DARPA Grand Challenge Program Manager, Ron Kurjanowicz. Our autonomous remote-controlled vehicle (ARCV) was a modified New Holland 2550 Speedrower retrofitted to allow the machine-actuated functions to be controlled by an onboard computer. The computer-controlled Speedrower was developed at Carnegie Mellon University to automate agricultural harvesting. Harvesting tasks require the vehicle to cover a field using minimally overlapping rows at slow speeds in a similar manner to geophysical data acquisition. The Speedrower had demonstrated its ability to perform as it had already logged hundreds of acres of autonomous harvesting. This project is the first use of autonomous robotic technology on a large-scale for geophysical surveying.

Suzy Cantor-McKinney; Michael Kruzic

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

"Table HC7.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Space Heating Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.5,0.3,0.2,"Q",0.2,0.3,0.6 "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,26.2,28.5,20.4,13,21.8,16.3,37.9 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,25.9,28.1,20.3,12.9,21.8,16,37.3

406

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? June 21, 2011 - 11:37am Addthis A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus’ DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus' DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. Ben Squires Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? The Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are working to harness the natural process that spoils fruits and vegetables as a way to make fuel and other petroleum substitutes from the parts of plants that we can't eat. The genetic bases of the behaviors and abilities of these two industrially relevant fungal strains will allow researchers to exploit

407

Competition Helps Kids Learn About Energy and Save Their Households Some  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Competition Helps Kids Learn About Energy and Save Their Households Competition Helps Kids Learn About Energy and Save Their Households Some Money Competition Helps Kids Learn About Energy and Save Their Households Some Money May 21, 2013 - 2:40pm Addthis Students can register now to save energy and win prizes with the Home Energy Challenge. Students can register now to save energy and win prizes with the Home Energy Challenge. Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Visit HomeEnergyChallenge.org to register for the competition. Third through eighth grade students and teachers will be excited to hear about a competition starting up for next school year that challenges students to learn about energy, develop techniques for saving energy, and

408

"Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,2.9,2.5,1.3,0.5,1,2.4,4.6 "2 Times A Day",24.6,6.5,7,4.3,3.2,3.6,4.8,10.3 "Once a Day",42.3,8.8,9.8,8.7,5.1,10,5,12.9

409

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? June 21, 2011 - 11:37am Addthis A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus’ DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus' DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. Ben Squires Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? The Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are working to harness the natural process that spoils fruits and vegetables as a way to make fuel and other petroleum substitutes from the parts of plants that we can't eat. The genetic bases of the behaviors and abilities of these two industrially relevant fungal strains will allow researchers to exploit

410

The causes of Japan's lost decade: The role of household consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, I analyze the causes of the prolonged slowdown of the Japanese economy in the 1990s and find that the stagnation of investment, especially private fixed investment, was the primary culprit. I then investigate the causes of the stagnation of household consumption during the 1990s and find that the stagnation of household disposable income, the decline in household wealth, and increased uncertainty about the future are among the contributing factors. Finally, I consider whether demand side factors or supply side factors were more important as causes of the prolonged slowdown of the Japanese economy in the 1990s and conclude that the former (especially misguided government policies) were probably more important.

Charles Yuji Horioka

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

412

STEP Participant Survey Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

STEP Participant Survey Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

413

Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

household energy use behaviour in Japan and Norway. Energycultural study of energy behavior in Norway and Japan (

Meier, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

U-120: RSA SecurID Software Token Converter Unspecified Buffer Overflow  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: RSA SecurID Software Token Converter Unspecified Buffer 0: RSA SecurID Software Token Converter Unspecified Buffer Overflow Vulnerability U-120: RSA SecurID Software Token Converter Unspecified Buffer Overflow Vulnerability March 8, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: RSA SecurID Software Token Converter Unspecified Buffer Overflow Vulnerability PLATFORM: RSA SecurID Software Token Converter 2.x ABSTRACT: Successful exploitation may allow execution of arbitrary code. reference LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA48297 CVE-2012-0397 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A vulnerability has been reported in RSA SecurID Software Token Converter, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system. Impact: An unspecified error can be exploited to cause a buffer overflow. Solution: Update to version 2.6.1. Addthis Related Articles

415

Quantitative evaluation of effects of the soft interventions or cleaner production in households and the hard interventions: A Social Experiment Programme in a large river basin in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efforts have been made to reduce municipal wastewater pollutant discharge and improve river water quality in the Yamato-gawa River basin since 2005, as part of a Social Experiment Programme. The Programme was the first one in Japan to disseminate soft interventions in households, measurements to reduce pollutant discharge, in a large river basin with more than two million population. The soft interventions in households are similar to cleaner production in industrial sector because they are not the wastewater treatment and changing of lifestyles. This paper presents several methods for quantification of the pollutant discharge reduction. Two hypothetical soft intervention combinations were defined, the effects of 16 soft interventions were estimated using their proliferation rates, and estimated pollutant discharge reduction was compared with changes in river water quality during the Programme events. For the first method, environmental accounting housekeeping (EAH) books were applied to estimate a 3853% reduction in biological oxygen demand (BOD), 2640% reduction in total nitrogen (TN), and 2132% reduction in total phosphorus (TP). These estimation results were comparable with the field survey results of approximately 100 person population, which were conducted in the late 1980s. Soft interventions were found to be several times more cost effective than hard interventions, such as development of municipal wastewater treatment and river water purification systems. The BOD discharge reduction effects of soft interventions initiated during Programme events increased from 0.32.3% in 20052007 to 2.44.7% in 20072009. The questionnaire surveys found that participants in the Programme events in average newly implemented three or four soft interventions in addition to those already implemented at normal times.

Yoshiaki Tsuzuki; Minoru Yoneda; Ryohei Tokunaga; Shinsuke Morisawa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Exploring nonresponse bias in a health survey using neighborhood characteristics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of non-Hispanic Whites, urban populations, and householdsof non-Hispanic Asians, sin- gles, 1-person households,Non-Hispanic Asian Never married, % 1-person household, %

Lee, Sunghee; Brown, E Richard; Grant, David; Belin, Thomas R; Brick, J Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Long Term Dynamics of Inequalities between French Households concerning Automobile COLLET, Roger; BOUCQ, Elise; MADRE, Jean-Loup; HIVERT, Laurent.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long Term Dynamics of Inequalities between French Households concerning Automobile COLLET, Roger TERM DYNAMICS OF INEQUALITIES BETWEEN FRENCH HOUSEHOLDS CONCERNING AUTOMOBILE Roger Collet, INRETS of automobile. As the curves representing car ownership (number of cars per adult) and car use (annual mileage

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

418

Abstract--Numerous studies have shown that households' consumption is an important part of the total energy consumed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

appropriate strategies of giving households' effective feedback on their energy consumption. This study, Energy efficiency. I. INTRODUCTION HE energy consumption of households in buildings attracts a lot in the housing sector. Energy consumption in buildings accounts for 39% of Sweden's total final energy

Beigl, Michael

419

Patterns of stove usage after introduction of an advanced cookstove: the long-term application of household sensors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Household air pollution generated from solid fuel use for cooking is one of the leading risk factors for ill-health globally. ... However, household usage of these stoves and resulting changes in usage of traditional polluting stoves is not well characterized. ...

Ajay Pillarisetti; Mayur Vaswani; Darby Jack; Kalpana Balakrishnan; Michael N. Bates; Narendra K. Arora; Kirk R. Smith

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

420

Effects on minority and low-income households of the EPA proposal to reduce leaded gasoline use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To reduce the potentially harmful environmental effects of lead in the environment, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a reduction in the amount of lead used in leaded gasoline. This report examines the potential impacts of such action on minority and low-income households in the US. The benefits of the EPA's proposal would presumably accrue primarily to households that contain small children and that are located in the central cities of metropolitan areas. This is because small children (under age seven) are particularly susceptible to the effects of lead and also because the automobile traffic density in central cities is higher than in any other area. Potential costs are examined in terms of households that own vehicles requiring leaded gasoline. Costs could accrue either because of higher gasoline prices due to reduced lead content or because of higher vehicle repair costs for engines that must use leaded gasoline to prevent excessive wear. Because of their location and number, minority and low-income households with small children would benefit more than the average US household. No costs would be incurred by the relatively large segment of minority and low-income households that own no vehicles. However, the Hispanic and other minority (except black) and low-income households that do own vehicles have a greater than average share of vehicles that require leaded gasoline; costs to these households because of the EPA's proposed action would be comparatively high.

Rose, K.; LaBelle, S.; Winter, R.; Klein, Y.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy use of US residential refrigerators and freezers: function derivation based on household and climate characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), U.S. Energyod for estimating field energy consumption of US residentialconsumption surveydetailed tables. Residential Energy Con- sumption Survey (RECS), U.S.

Greenblatt, Jeffery

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Implementation of the REAL ID Act | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

recommendations of the 911 Commission, passed the REAL ID Act in an effort to reduce fraud and deter acts of terrorism using fraudulent identification. This Act sets minimum...

423

Annales Geophysicae, 23, 16031610, 2005 SRef-ID: 1432-0576/ag/2005-23-1603  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annales Geophysicae, 23, 1603­1610, 2005 SRef-ID: 1432-0576/ag/2005-23-1603 © European Geosciences

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

424

Human Cardiac High-Energy Phosphate Metabolite Concentrationsby ID-Resolved NMR Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Cardiac High-Energy Phosphate Metabolite Concentrationsby ID-Resolved NMR Spectroscopy Paul A myocytes can contribute no metabolite signal to the observed spectrum, the hypoth- esis

Atalar, Ergin

425

The use of mobile phones as a data collection tool: A report from a household survey in South Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Open Access The use of mobile phones as a data collectionto collect data using mobile phones in a large baselineon standard entry level mobile phones. Results: The web-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The federal energy policy: An example of its potential impact on energy consumption and expenditures in minority and poor households  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of the relative impacts of the National Energy Strategy on majority and minority households and on nonpoor and poor households. (Minority households are defined as those headed by black or Hispanic persons; poor households are defined as those having combined household income less than or equal to 125% of the Office of Management and Budget`s poverty-income threshold.) Energy consumption and expenditures, and projected energy expenditures as a share of income, for the period 1987 to 2009 are reported. Projected consumptions of electricity and nonelectric energy over this period are also reported for each group. An analysis of how these projected values are affected under different housing growth scenarios is performed. The analysis in this report presents a preliminary set of projections generated under a set of simplifying assumptions. Future analysis will rigorously assess the sensitivity of the projected values to various changes in a number of these assumptions.

Poyer, D.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

User_LaunchSurvey  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Completing Assigned Survey and Completing Assigned Survey © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Launching and Completing Assigned Survey Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of launching and completing assigned surveys. Task A. Launch and Complete Assigned Survey From the Home page, filter the To-Do List to show only Surveys. Hover over the course evaluation title. Click Open. 1 2 3 3 2 1 Launch and Complete Assigned Survey 6 Steps Task A SuccessFactors Learning v 6.4 User Job Aid Launching and Completing Assigned Survey © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 2 - SuccessFactors Learning Complete the survey by selecting the radio button for the appropriate rating

428

Environmental and Resource Economics Household Energy Demand in Urban China: Accounting for regional prices and rapid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

growth, China's energy consumption is rising at one of the fastest rates in the world, almost 8% per year over the period 2000-2010. Residential energy consumption has grown even faster than the national total . Although household energy consumption per capita is still low compared to the developed countries

429

Characterizing probability density distributions for household electricity load profiles from high-resolution electricity use data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a high-resolution bottom-up model of electricity use in an average household based on fit to probability distributions of a comprehensive high-resolution household electricity use data set for detached houses in Sweden. The distributions used in this paper are the Weibull distribution and the Log-Normal distribution. These fitted distributions are analyzed in terms of relative variation estimates of electricity use and standard deviation. It is concluded that the distributions have a reasonable overall goodness of fit both in terms of electricity use and standard deviation. A KolmogorovSmirnov test of goodness of fit is also provided. In addition to this, the model is extended to multiple households via convolution of individual electricity use profiles. With the use of the central limit theorem this is analytically extended to the general case of a large number of households. Finally a brief comparison with other models of probability distributions is made along with a discussion regarding the model and its applicability.

Joakim Munkhammar; Jesper Rydn; Joakim Widn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Reforming Household Energy Markets: Some Welfare Effects in the United Catherine Waddams Price  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reforming Household Energy Markets: Some Welfare Effects in the United Kingdom by Catherine Waddams remain vulnerable. The implications of these findings for the future of energy markets both in the UK This paper summarises some early effects of deregulating the UK energy sector, focusing on the effects

Feigon, Brooke

431

Increased Levels of Markers of Microbial Exposure in Homes with Indoor Storage of Organic Household Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Levels of Markers of Microbial Exposure in Homes with Indoor Storage of Organic Household...might increase microbial exposure in the home environment. In this study we evaluated...House dust samples were collected in 99 homes in The Netherlands selected on the basis...

Inge M. Wouters; Jeroen Douwes; Gert Doekes; Peter S. Thorne; Bert Brunekreef; Dick J. J. Heederik

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Table 5.2. U.S. per Household Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Years or More ... 13.6 1.8 17.1 907 1,044 4.6 Race of Householder White ... 73.3 1.9 21.7 1,099 1,267 1.8 Black...

433

Table 5.12. U.S. Average Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Household...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 30.7 Q 26.3 37.2 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 20.7 Race of Householder White ... 26.0 23.2 25.2 32.6 19.3 16.4 13.3...

434

Home ownership as wealth over the life cycle European Household Motivation for Residential Assets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Home ownership as wealth over the life cycle European Household Motivation for Residential Assets Current situation and future prospects INTRODUCTION Encouraging Home Ownership Most countries encourage a country's wealth and the proportion of home owners. 44 Homeownership rates in Western Europe (Source: EMF

Birmingham, University of

435

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Consumption of Electric and Electronic Equipment by Norwegian Households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Consumption of Electric and Electronic Equipment by Norwegian Households ... Conventional wisdom holds that large appliances, in particular washers, dryers, refrigerators and freezers, dominate residential energy consumption apart from heat, hot water and light. ... (16) It excludes lighting, all professional equipment, space heating, hot water, garden or car equipment, fire alarms, and air conditioning. ...

Edgar G. Hertwich; Charlotte Roux

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

436

Using Circuit-Level Power Measurements in Household Energy Management Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Circuit-Level Power Measurements in Household Energy Management Systems Alan Marchiori and Qi to accurately measure en- ergy usage in the home. Measuring energy usage is not dif- ficult, however we must decide what to measure. Whole- home energy measurement is cheap and easy to setup be- cause only one

Han, Qi "Chee"

437

Energy Policy 30 (2002) 815826 Evaluating the health benefits of transitions in household energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the primary source of domestic energy, has put preventive measures to reduce exposure to indoor air pollutionEnergy Policy 30 (2002) 815­826 Evaluating the health benefits of transitions in household energy for the Future, 1616 P Street NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA b Epidemiology and Burden of Disease Unit, Global

Kammen, Daniel M.

438

Finding the creatures of habit; Clustering households based on their flexibility in using electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity Ian Dent, Uwe Aickelin and Tom Rodden School of Computer Science University of Nottingham, UK, AB15 8QH tony.craig@hutton.ac.uk ABSTRACT Changes in the UK electricity market, particularly to change households' electricity usage patterns for the benefit of the overall sys- tem. Users show

Aickelin, Uwe

439

Stranded Vehicles: How Gasoline Taxes Change the Value of Households' Vehicle Assets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stranded Vehicles: How Gasoline Taxes Change the Value of Households' Vehicle Assets Meghan Busse pollution caused by the burning of fossil fuels. Argu- ments against energy taxes, and gasoline taxes more incidence of the tax. We study the effect of a gasoline tax using changes in vehicle values. We construct

Rothman, Daniel

440

Fact #616: March 29, 2010 Household Vehicle-Miles of Travel by Trip Purpose  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In 2009, getting to and from work accounted for about 27% of household vehicle-miles of travel (VMT). Work-related business was 8.4% of VMT in 2001, but declined to 6.7% in 2009, possibly due to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Household use of paint and petroleum solvents and the risk of childhood leukemia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...African American, or non-Hispanic White according to their physician...Screening identified 1,253 Hispanic cases of whom 1,119 (89...random telephone numbers. A household enumeration was obtained for...controls, identified 1,668 Hispanics of whom 1,462 (88) completed...

Ghislaine Scelo; Catherine Metayer; Steve Selvin; Martyn Smith; Melinda Aldrich; Joseph Wiemels; Luoping Zhang; and Patricia Buffler

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Table HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 20.3 3.3 4.2 4.9 7.8 2.6 6.8 6.4 New England .............................. 5.4 0.8 1.1 1.3 2.3 0.6 1.6 9.9 Middle Atlantic ............................ 14.8 2.6 3.2 3.5 5.6 2.0 5.2 7.7 Midwest ......................................... 24.5 3.7 5.2 6.8 8.9 2.8 7.4 5.8 East North Central ......................

443

ORISE: Characterization surveys  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Characterization surveys Characterization surveys An ORISE technicians performs a characterization survey The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs independent, objective characterization surveys to define the extent of radiological contamination at sites scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). A fundamental aspect of all D&D projects, characterization surveys provide guidance to determine the best remediation procedures and are a cost-effective method of ensuring a site meets preliminary regulatory standards. ORISE designs characterization surveys using the data quality objectives process. This approach focuses on the particular objective of characterization, and ensures that only the data needed to address the characterization decisions are collected. Data collection efforts are

444

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No. Multiple  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Smart and Calibrated Pig Surveys of SPR Raw Water/Crude Oil Pipelines, 2013-2018 Smart and Calibrated Pig Surveys of SPR Raw Water/Crude Oil Pipelines, 2013-2018 Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, materials, supervision, equipment and transportation required to perform a 360 o internal high resolution instrumented corrosiontoo survey (smart survey) and a 360 o internal high electronic caliper pig survey of raw water and crude oil pipelines at all SPR sites from 2013-2018, as required. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions).

445

Institute of Development Studies (IDS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Institute of Development Studies (IDS) Institute of Development Studies (IDS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Institute of Development Studies Name Institute of Development Studies Address Library Road, Brighton, East Sussex Place Brighton, UK Zip BN1 9RE Number of employees 201-500 Year founded 1966 Phone number +44 (0)1273 606261 Coordinates 50.8659583°, -0.0901136° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":50.8659583,"lon":-0.0901136,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

446

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in gallons, of this household's storage tank(s)? Enter the capacity for the two largest tanks (if there is more than one) in the boxes below. If the capacity is not known, write...

447

Surveying and Cartography Packages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In attempting to meet the need for the very large number of different calculations that surveyors have to perform, surveying packages become collections of many diverse computation routines. For example, Survey S...

Howard Falk

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

AASG State Geological Survey  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.Contributions to the NGDSAASG State Geological Survey

449

Last Revision Date: 8/16/2010 Last Merged Filing ID:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Revision Date: 8/16/2010 Last Merged Filing ID: Revision Date: 8/16/2010 Last Merged Filing ID: Tariffs, Rate Schedules, and Other Tariff Documents Southwestern Power Administration Tariffs, Rate Schedules, and Other Tariff Documents Document Generated On: 10/1/2010 Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS ....................................................................................................................................1 PREAMBLE: AUTHORITIES AND OBLIGATIONS .............................................................................................1

450

UNCORRECTEDPROOF SPB-190570 Chapter ID 19 August 4, 2010 Time: 01:07pm Proof 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNCORRECTEDPROOF SPB-190570 Chapter ID 19 August 4, 2010 Time: 01:07pm Proof 1 01 02 03 04 05 06 07, LLC 2011 #12;UNCORRECTEDPROOF SPB-190570 Chapter ID 19 August 4, 2010 Time: 01:07pm Proof 1 46 47 48. Most studies supporting the DOHaD hypoth- esis are primarily nutritional in nature, thus the potential

Blumberg, Bruce

451

The visualization of data and the user-interface in the Auto-ID World  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis proposes a framework for user interface (UI) design in the Auto-ID world. The thesis includes the examination of issues related to visualizing data to the user from a top-down perspective in the Auto-ID World. ...

Chandrasekhar, Chaitra

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Liberty Alliance Project: Version: 1.0 Liberty ID-WSF Security and Privacy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liberty Alliance Project: Version: 1.0 Liberty ID-WSF Security and Privacy OverviewVersion: 1-idwsf-security-privacy-overview-v1.0.pdf Liberty Alliance Project 1 #12;Liberty Alliance Project: Version: 1.0 Liberty ID Alliance. Permission is hereby granted to11 use the document solely for the purpose of implementing

Landau, Susan

453

Surveying the dark side  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......next generation of imaging surveys driven by dark-energy science typically feature...specifications for both the Dark Energy Survey (DES, see Abbott et al...References Abbott T et al. 2005 Dark Energy Survey Collaboration arXiv:astro-ph......

Roberto Trotta; Richard Bower

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

GRR/Section 3-ID-d - Land Use Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d - Land Use Permit d - Land Use Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-ID-d - Land Use Permit 03-ID-d - Land Use Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Lands Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03-ID-d - Land Use Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Idaho Department of Lands issues Land Use Permits for non-invasive exploration on a case by case basis. 3-ID-d.1 to 3-ID-d.2 - Will Non-Invasive Exploration Be Preformed on State Lands? A Land Use Permit is required to preform non-invasive exploration on state

455

Finding Utility Companies Under a Given Utility ID | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finding Utility Companies Under a Given Utility ID Finding Utility Companies Under a Given Utility ID Home > Groups > Developer Jayhuggins's picture Submitted by Jayhuggins(15) Member 22 June, 2012 - 09:39 Utility+Utility Access Map Here's a quick way to find all the utility company pages under a given utility id. From the Special Ask page, in the query box enter the following: [[Category:Utility Companies]][[EiaUtilityId::15248]] substituting your utility id of interest for 15248, and click "Find results". Groups: Developer Login to post comments Jayhuggins's blog Latest blog posts Rmckeel The utility rate database version 1 API is now deprecated Posted: 6 Sep 2013 - 14:00 by Rmckeel Jweers New Robust References! Posted: 7 Aug 2013 - 18:23 by Jweers 1 comment(s) 1 of 10 ›› Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group.

456

T-642: RSA SecurID update to Customers | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: RSA SecurID update to Customers 2: RSA SecurID update to Customers T-642: RSA SecurID update to Customers June 9, 2011 - 12:45am Addthis PROBLEM: Certain characteristics of the attack on RSA indicated that the perpetrator's most likely motive was to obtain an element of security information that could be used to target defense secrets and related IP, rather than financial gain, PII, or public embarrassment. PLATFORM: RSA SecurID implementations ABSTRACT: RSA investigation has revealed that the attack resulted in certain information being extracted from RSA's systems. Some of that information is related to RSA's SecurID two-factor authentication products. reference LINKS: Open Letter to RSA Customers (update) CVE-2011-0322 RSA Fraud Resource Center RSA Security Practice DOE-CIRC T-640: RSA Access Manager Server CVE-2011-0322 Update

457

Id-1 gene and gene products as therapeutic targets for treatment of breast cancer and other types of carcinoma  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for treatment of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises targeting and modulating Id-1 gene expression, if any, for the Id-1 gene, or gene products in breast or other epithelial cancers in a patient by delivering products that modulate Id-1 gene expression. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that cancer cells are invasive and metastatic.

Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

458

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID_INL-13-010.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 SECTION A. Project Title: North Boulevard Annex Lease Termination SECTION B. Project Description: The proposed activity would terminate the current lease of the North Boulevard Annex (IF-613) at 2095 North Boulevard in Idaho Falls, ID on or about July 31, 2013 for cost savings and footprint reduction purposes. A facility walkthrough by BEA personnel will occur prior to the lease termination to ensure the facility is ready for turnover back to the owner. Approximate cost associated with these activities is estimated at $2,000.00. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects or Potential Sources of Impact: Generating and Managing Waste: Various quantities of industrial waste (non-hazardous, non-radioactive) such as office trash are removed from the building for pickup and transportation by garbage collection services prior to lease termination.

459

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-019.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 SECTION A. Project Title: University Boulevard Water Meter Installation SECTION B. Project Description: This project would install water meters for the purpose of measuring water use at each of four University Boulevard (UB) buildings at 535, 655, 625, and 595 University Boulevard (IF-680 (UB1), IF-681 (UB2), IF-682 (UB3), and IF-684 (UB4)) in Idaho Falls, ID during the projected time period of August and September, 2013 at an approximate cost of $20 K - $95 K depending upon whether the work can be completed from inside the building(s) or must be performed exterior to the building(s). SECTION C. Environmental Aspects or Potential Sources of Impact: Air Emissions: If excavation is required, the activity has the potential to generate fugitive dust. All reasonable precautions shall be

460

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-012.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-012 SECTION A. Project Title: Water Security Test Bed (WSTB) SECTION B. Project Description: This project was extensively described in Environmental Checklists (ECs) Idaho National Laboratory (INL)-13-014 (Overarching [OA] 5) and INL-13-014 Revision (R) 1 (OA 5). Upon review, it was determined that additional planning and detail was required to fully describe the project and associated activities. Both INL-13-014 and R1 to that EC are canceled; this EC will replace them. Future revisions may address additional project details regarding design, construction, and operational details and limitations as they become known through the project planning process. Background Since its inception, the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Homeland Security Research Program (Sponsor) has been providing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-006.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-006 SECTION A. Project Title: Power Line Configuration 2013-1 SECTION B. Project Description: This project will install temporary distribution-level power lines between Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (CITRC) to support research and development and testing using electric power infrastructure. Two circuits of three-phase distribution lines will be installed from Power Burst Facility (PBF)-613 to the MFC test pad. Standard new crossarms and insulators will be installed on the existing 138kV H structures (underbuild) to support standard aluminum conductors steel reinforced (ACSR) conductors for the majority of the configuration change (approximately from Pole 40E to Pole 127E - an

462

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-022.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY Page 1 of 3 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-022 SECTION A. Project Title: Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD)/Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) Material Training Activities and Evaluations Using Radiation Emitting Sources/Material/Devices - Overarching SECTION B. Project Description This Environmental Checklist (EC) will be an overarching EC for future training as described in this EC. Work Description The purpose of this overarching EC is to plan, prepare, coordinate, ship materials off-site, observe, and conduct training for response to radiological incidents at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) locations and non-INL customer-hosted locations (such as Armed Forces installations). Only work performed at the INL is covered under this EC. Training at non-INL customer-hosted locations may be subject

463

IdJOO2 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6/2004 13:39 FAX 6/2004 13:39 FAX IdJOO2 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 MAR 26 2004 OFFICE OF AIR AND RADIATION R. Paul Detwiler, Acting Manager Carlsbad Field Office U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, NM 88221-3090 Dear Dr. Detwiler: This letter announces the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) final decision to approve the Department of Energy's (DOE's) remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program Implementation Plan (WCPIP), Revision aD, and the RH TRU Waste Characterization Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). We have detenDined that these documents provide an adeql.late general framework for the characterization ofRH waste for disposal at WIPP, while allowing flexibility for DOE to develop characterization programs

464

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-022.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Idaho National Laboratory Idaho National Laboratory Page 1 of 2 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-022 SECTION A. Project Title: Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Irradiated Experiment Shipping Capability SECTION B. Project Description: The General Electric (GE) 2000 Model Cask is currently used to support the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) irradiated experiment shipments from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory's (INL) ATR Complex to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at INL's Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). However, due to changes in GE-Hitachi's business model, the continued availability of the GE Model 2000 cask is not guaranteed. Furthermore, the internal cavity of the GE Model 2000 cask is too short to support shipment of some larger GTRI experiments. The purpose of the proposed action is to develop and implement a

465

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-023.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Checklist Environmental Checklist Page 1 of 1 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-023 SECTION A. Project Title: Idaho Falls Power - Willow Creek Building (WCB) Conduit Installation SECTION B. Project Description: The purpose of this project is to provide the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) a communications pathway from the Willow Creek Building (WCB) northeast parking lot handhole to the handhole north of Research and Education Campus (REC)-617. INL and the City of Idaho Falls have an existing easement agreement that allows INL to place private telecommunications infrastructure in the City easement. Idaho Falls Power would provide and install a 1" conduit with pull rope for future INL use. Idaho Falls Power would provide and install a fiber patch panel, pull the fiber coiled in the WCB northeast parking lot handhole, and terminate and test the fiber to provide connectivity

466

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-006.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 SECTION A. Project Title: International Way Office Building Lease Termination SECTION B. Project Description: The proposed activity will terminate the current lease of the International Way Office Building (IF-674, IWB) at 1690 International Way in Idaho Falls, ID on or about March 28, 2012 for cost savings and footprint reduction purposes. A facility walkthrough by BEA personnel will occur on or about March 26 to ensure the building is ready for turnover back to the owner. Approximate cost associated with these activities is estimated at $2,500.00. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects / Potential Sources of Impact: Generating and Managing Waste: Small amounts of industrial waste (non-hazardous, non-radioactive) such as office trash are

467

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-022.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY Page 1 of 3 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-022 SECTION A. Project Title: Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD)/Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) Material Training Activities and Evaluations Using Radiation Emitting Sources/Material/Devices - Overarching SECTION B. Project Description This Environmental Checklist (EC) will be an overarching EC for future training as described in this EC. Work Description The purpose of this overarching EC is to plan, prepare, coordinate, ship materials off-site, observe, and conduct training for response to radiological incidents at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) locations and non-INL customer-hosted locations (such as Armed Forces installations). Only work performed at the INL is covered under this EC. Training at non-INL customer-hosted locations may be subject

468

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-008.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOEID NEPA CX DETERMINATION DOEID NEPA CX DETERMINATION Idaho National Laboratory Page 1 of 2 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-008 SECTION A. Project Title: Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Diversion Dam SECTION B. Project Description: There is a flood control dam about 2000 ft south of MFC. The dam is at risk of failure during a large runoff event. This project will reinforce the flood control dam with additional earthen material and a concrete headwall around the culvert inlet. The workscope consists of 1) Removing riprap from the existing slope around the culvert area. 2) Installing a concrete headwall structure around the culvert inlet. 3) Increase the slope of the dam at the culvert inlet and around the headwall to a 3:1 slope. 4) Replace riprap around headwall.

469

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I '. CONTRACT ID CODE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I '. SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I '. CONTRACT ID CODE BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, VA 24506 PAGE I OF 12 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 871 85-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 I I 90. DATED (SEE ITEM 1 1 ) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) I 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. MI67 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. I 1 DE-AC04-00AL66620 100. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the

470

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-008.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOEID NEPA CX DETERMINATION DOEID NEPA CX DETERMINATION Idaho National Laboratory Page 1 of 2 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-13-008 SECTION A. Project Title: Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Diversion Dam SECTION B. Project Description: There is a flood control dam about 2000 ft south of MFC. The dam is at risk of failure during a large runoff event. This project will reinforce the flood control dam with additional earthen material and a concrete headwall around the culvert inlet. The workscope consists of 1) Removing riprap from the existing slope around the culvert area. 2) Installing a concrete headwall structure around the culvert inlet. 3) Increase the slope of the dam at the culvert inlet and around the headwall to a 3:1 slope. 4) Replace riprap around headwall.

471

Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS ID NO.: 0137SPE012  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Material Safety Data Sheet Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS ID NO.: 0137SPE012 Revision date: 05/25/2011 1. CHEMICAL PRODUCT AND COMPANY INFORMATION Product name: Speedway E85 Synonym: Speedway ED75/ED85; E-75; E75; E-85; E85; Ethanol/Gasoline Fuel Blend; Fuel Ethanol ED75/ED85 Chemical Family: Gasoline/Ethanol Formula: Mixture Manufacturer: Speedway LLC P.O. Box 1500 Enon, OH 45501 Other information: 419-421-3070 Emergency telephone number: 877-627-5463 2. COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS E85 is a mixture of ethyl alcohol and gasoline that is approved for use in an automobile spark ignition engine. Can contain small amounts of dye and other additives (>0.02%) which are not considered hazardous at the concentrations used. Product information: Name CAS Number

472

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-023.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Checklist Environmental Checklist Page 1 of 1 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-023 SECTION A. Project Title: Idaho Falls Power - Willow Creek Building (WCB) Conduit Installation SECTION B. Project Description: The purpose of this project is to provide the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) a communications pathway from the Willow Creek Building (WCB) northeast parking lot handhole to the handhole north of Research and Education Campus (REC)-617. INL and the City of Idaho Falls have an existing easement agreement that allows INL to place private telecommunications infrastructure in the City easement. Idaho Falls Power would provide and install a 1" conduit with pull rope for future INL use. Idaho Falls Power would provide and install a fiber patch panel, pull the fiber coiled in the WCB northeast parking lot handhole, and terminate and test the fiber to provide connectivity

473

POST-DOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP IN HIGH ENERGY THEORY GROUP The BNL job link for BNL JOB ID#15942 is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POST-DOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP IN HIGH ENERGY THEORY GROUP The BNL job link for BNL JOB ID#15942 is" within the dropdown box -Click on Job ID #15942, "Research Associate, High Energy Theory (6482)" After: https://jobs.bnl.gov/psc/Jobs/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM.HRS_CE.GBL The description of BNL Job ID #15942

Johnson, Peter D.

474

Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID). Technology summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE complex currently has 332 underground storage tanks (USTs) that have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production. Very little of the over 100 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste has been treated and disposed of in final form. Two waste storage tank design types are prevalent across the DOE complex: single-shell wall and double-shell wall designs. They are made of stainless steel, concrete, and concrete with carbon steel liners, and their capacities vary from 5000 gallons (19 m{sup 3}) to 10{sup 6} gallons (3785 m{sup 3}). The tanks have an overburden layer of soil ranging from a few feet to tens of feet. Responding to the need for remediation of tank waste, driven by Federal Facility Compliance Agreements (FFCAs) at all participating sites, the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID) Program was created by the US DOE Office of Technology Development in February 1991. Its mission is to focus the development, testing, and evaluation of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat to concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in USTs at DOE facilities. The ultimate goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to the public and the regulators. The UST-ID has focused on five DOE locations: the Hanford Site, which is the host site, in Richland, Washington; the Fernald Site in Fernald, Ohio; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site in Savannah River, South Carolina.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Space-Heating energy used by households in the residential sector.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 The following 28 tables present detailed data describing the consumption of and expenditures for energy used by households in the residential sector. The data are presented at the national level, Census region and division levels, for climate zones and for the most populous States, as well as for other selected characteristics of households. This section provides assistance in reading the tables by explaining some of the headings for the categories of data. It also explains the use of the row and column factors to compute the relative standard error of the estimates given in the tables. Organization of the Tables The tables cover consumption and expenditures for six topical areas: Major Energy Source

476

Household electricity consumption and CO2 emissions in the Netherlands: A model-based analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Twenty percent of the total energy consumption in the Netherlands comes from household electricity consumption. This comes from household electric appliances whose number has grown in recent years. The paper explores the effect of smart meter introduction, appliance efficiency and consumer behaviour on reducing electricity consumption in the Netherlands. It does so by combining two perspectives: a sociotechnical approach and a bottom up simulation approach. The range of scenarios explored through simulation in the paper provides an understanding of the interplay between efficiency, smart meter diffusion and consumer behaviour. The results show their effect on electricity consumption and suggest that further effort is required to control and reduce it. Insights from the paper suggest that future studies should disaggregate with respect to a number of factors.

George Papachristos

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Household Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,13.5,8.5,4.3,2,1.8,5.9,13.1 "2 Persons",34.8,6,8.8,7.3,4.4,8.4,3.5,8.4 "3 Persons",18.4,3.1,4.7,3.4,2.5,4.6,2,5.8 "4 Persons",15.9,2.2,3.5,3.3,2.7,4.3,2.2,5.1

478

Extending Efficiency Services to Underserved Households: NYSERDAs Assisted Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

N April 4, 2012 Extending Efficiency Services to Underserved Households: NYSERDA's Assisted Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Program Since 2001, New York residents have completed over 39,000 energy upgrades through NYSERDA's Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (HPwES) initiative. Approximately one third of these projects have been completed through the Assisted HPwES track, which offers large incentives to middle income

479

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Household Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This publication covers the following topics: 1. Septic tanks/soil absorption systems 2. Quantity of wastewater 3. Quality of wastewater 4. Collection of wastewater 5. Treatment systems 6. Disposal system 7. Assistance with failing systems or new designs 8.... Evaluation table Septic Tanks/Soil Absorption Systems The most common form of on-site waste- water treatment is a septic tank/soil absorption system. In this system, wastewater flows from the household sewage lines into an under- ground septic tank...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

480

Household energy use: Applying behavioural economics to understand consumer decision-making and behaviour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Household energy conservation has emerged as a major challenge and opportunity for researchers, practitioners and policymakers. Consumers also seem to be gaining greater awareness of the value and need for sustainable energy practices, particularly amid growing public concerns over greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. Yet even with adequate knowledge of how to save energy and a professed desire to do so, many consumers still fail to take noticeable steps towards energy efficiency and conservation. There is often a sizeable discrepancy between peoples self-reported knowledge, values, attitudes and intentions, and their observable behaviourexamples include the well-known knowledge-action gap and value-action gap. But neither is household energy consumption driven primarily by financial incentives and the rational pursuit of material interests. In fact, people sometimes respond in unexpected and undesirable ways to rewards and sanctions intended to shift consumers costbenefit calculus in favour of sustainable behaviours. Why is this so? Why is household energy consumption and conservation difficult to predict from either core values or material interests? By drawing on critical insights from behavioural economics and psychology, we illuminate the key cognitive biases and motivational factors that may explain why energy-related behaviour so often fails to align with either the personal values or material interests of consumers. Understanding these psychological phenomena can make household and community responses to public policy interventions less surprising, and in parallel, can help us design more cost-effective and mass-scalable behavioural solutions to encourage renewable and sustainable energy use among consumers.

Elisha R. Frederiks; Karen Stenner; Elizabeth V. Hobman

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household survey id" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

UNCOVERING BASIC WANTS USING THE ROTTERDAM AND AIDS MODELS: THE US HOUSEHOLD ENERGY CONSUMPTION CASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

refers to these latent goods as transformed goods or T-goods. Leading researchers have explored this technique of incorporating characteristics. In this study, we revisit this technique by trying to uncover the basic wants behind the demand for gas..., distillate fuel oil, and the liquefied petroleum gases (LPG) by US households. To give some examples, electricity may be used for many basic wants such as lighting, cooking, and cooling. Similarly, without being exhaustive, gas may be used for heating...

Diallo, Ibrahima

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

482

Space Heating Scenarios for Ontario: a Demonstration of the Statistics Canada Household Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT This paper describes the analytical and simulation capabilities of the currently implemented version of the household model developed by the Structural Analysis Division, Statistics Canada. The household model, as described in A Design Framework for Long Term Energy Economic Analysis of Dwelling Related Demand [1], is a simulation framework and related data base of the Canadian housing stocks, residential construction, and end-use energy consumption in the residential sector. The purpose of the model is to provide an analytical tool for evaluating a variety of residential energy conservation strategies including insulation retrofitting and the introduction of new building standards, the possibilities for fuel substitution afforded by equipment retrofitting, and the impact of new technologies for space conditioning with respect to impacts on residential energy requirements and construction materials over time. The simulation results for Ontario that are presented in the paper are for demonstration purposes only and do not constitute a forecast. The choice of Ontario was arbitrary; similar calculations can be performed for other provinces, for Canada as a whole, and for selected subprovincial regions. At the time of preparation of this paper, the population and household formation block at the national level, the housing stock block, and the space heating part of the space conditioning block are implemented. Therefore simulation results are limited to these areas.

R.H.H. Moll; K.H. Dickinson

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Inefficient subsidy in Nigerian oil sector; implications for revenue generation and household welfare in Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Subsidy exists when consumers are assisted by the government to pay less than the prevailing market price of a given commodity. In respect of fuel subsidy, it means that consumers would pay below the market price per litre of petroleum product. This paper is aim at analysing the effects of the increase in energy prices on the social welfare of Nigerian households and comparing the consequences with the condition in which in concurrence with increase in energy prices, the government undertakes transfer payments to Nigerian households in order to protect their social welfare status. An analytical reasoning model was adopted and within the framework of this model the effects of increase in energy price on social welfare is discussed. Decrease in energy subsidies and a shift towards market prices will result in a lower budget deficit for the government and powerfully harness one of the main causes of inflation. However, if the elimination of subsidies be accompanied by transfer payments to households, the result is increase in the government budget deficit which in its turn will enhance inflation thus very negatively affecting social welfare.

Benjamin Anabori Mmadu; David Chuks Akan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

An economic assessment of the impact of two crude oil price scenarios on households  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of two possible future crude oil price scenarios -- high and low price cases -- is assessed for three population groups: majority (non-Hispanic and nonblack), black, and Hispanic. The two price scenarios were taken from the energy security'' report published by the US Department of Energy in 1987. Effects of the two crude oil price scenarios for the 1986--95 period are measured for energy demand and composition and for share of income spent on energy by the three population groups at both the national and census-region levels. The effects on blacks are marginally more adverse than on majority householders, while effects on Hispanics are about the same as those on the majority. Little change is seen in percentage of income spent on energy over the forecast period. Both Hispanic and black households would spend a larger share of their incomes on energy than would majority households. The relatively adverse effects in the higher price scenario shift from the South and West Census regions to the Northeast and Midwest. 24 refs., 7 figs., 22 tabs.

Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S.; Hemphill, R.C.; Hill, L.G.; Marinelli, J.L.; Rose, K.J.; Santini, D.J.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

An evaluation on the environmental consequences of residual CFCs from obsolete household refrigerators in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) contained in household refrigerators consist mainly of CFC-11 and CFC-12, which will be eventually released into the environment. Consequentially, environmental releases of these refrigerants will lead to ozone depletion and contribute significantly to the greenhouse effect, if waste refrigerators are not disposed of properly. In the present paper, the potential release of residual CFCs and their substitutes from obsolete household refrigerators in China is examined, and their contributions to ozone depletion and greenhouse effect are compared with those of other recognized ozone-depleting substances (ODS) and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The results imply that annual potential amounts of released residual CFC-11 and CFC-12 will reach their maximums at 4600 and 2300 tons, respectively in 2011, and then decrease gradually to zero until 2020. Meanwhile, the amounts of their most widely used substitutes HCFC-141b and HFC-134a will keep increasing. Subsequently, the contribution ratio of these CFCs and their substitutes to ozone depletion will remain at 25% through 2011, and reach its peak value of 34% by 2018. The contribution to greenhouse effect will reach its peak value of 0.57% by 2010. Moreover, the contribution ratio of these CFCs to the total global release of CFCs will steadily increase, reaching its peak of 15% by 2018. Thus, this period from 2010 to 2018 is a crucial time during which residual CFCs and their substitutes from obsolete household refrigerators in China will contribute significantly to ozone depletion.

Zhao Xiangyang; Duan Huabo [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Li Jinhui, E-mail: jinhui@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

486

An Analysis of the Price Elasticity of Demand for Household Appliances  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Price Elasticity of Demand for Household Appliances the Price Elasticity of Demand for Household Appliances Title An Analysis of the Price Elasticity of Demand for Household Appliances Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-326E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Dale, Larry L., and Sydny K. Fujita Document Number LBNL-326E Pagination 19 Date Published 02/2008 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract This article summarizes our study of the price elasticity of demand1 for home appliances, including refrigerators, clothes washers and dishwashers. In the context of increasingly stringent appliance standards, we are interested in what kind of impact the increased manufacturing costs caused by higher efficiency requirements will have on appliance sales. We chose to study this particular set of appliances because data for the elasticity calculation was more readily available for refrigerators, clothes washers, and dishwashers than for other appliances. We begin with a review of the existing economics literature describing the impact of economic variables on the sale of durable goods. We then describe the market for home appliances and changes in it over the past 20 years. We conclude with summary and interpretation of the results of our regression analysis and present estimates of the price elasticity of demand for the three appliances.

487

Development of program implementation, evaluation, and selection tools for household water treatment and safe storage systems in developing countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the past six years, the MIT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering's Master of Engineering program has undertaken various projects involved with the design and implementation of a wide range of household ...

Baffrey, Robert Michael Nuval, 1977-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Risk factors of functional disability among community-dwelling elderly people by household in Japan: a prospective cohort study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although the number of elderly people needing care is increasing rapidly in the home setting in Japan, family size and ability to provide such ... identify the risk factors of functional disability by household c...

Emiko Saito; Shouzoh Ueki; Nobufumi Yasuda; Sachiko Yamazaki

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

A short Id2 protein fragment containing the nuclear export signal forms amyloid-like fibrils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The negative regulator of DNA-binding/cell-differentiation Id2 is a small protein containing a central helix-loop-helix (HLH) motif and a C-terminal nuclear export signal (NES). Whereas the former is essential for Id2 dimerization and nuclear localization, the latter is responsible for the transport of Id2 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Whereas the isolated Id2 HLH motif is highly helical, large C-terminal Id2 fragments including the NES sequence are either unordered or aggregation-prone. To study the conformational properties of the isolated NES region, we synthesized the Id2 segment 103-124. The latter was insoluble in water and only temporarily soluble in water/alcohol mixtures, where it formed quickly precipitating {beta}-sheets. Introduction of a positively charged N-terminal tail prevented aggressive precipitation and led to aggregates consisting of long fibrils that bound thioflavin T. These results show an interesting structural aspect of the Id2 NES region, which might be of significance for both protein folding and function.

Colombo, Noemi [Fakultaet fuer Chemie und Pharmazie, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Schroeder, Josef [Institut fuer Pathologie, Zentrales EM-Labor, Fakultaet fuer Medizin, Universitaet Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Cabrele, Chiara [Fakultaet fuer Chemie und Pharmazie, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, 93053 Regensburg (Germany)]. E-mail: chiara.cabrele@chemie.uni-regensburg.de

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

490

Water Flows in the Spanish Economy: Agri-Food Sectors, Trade and Households Diets in an Input-Output Framework  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water Flows in the Spanish Economy: Agri-Food Sectors, Trade and Households Diets in an Input-Output Framework ... So although we use the information from a SAM, since we leave as exogenous accounts the household consumption and foreign trade; it is not a traditional SAM analysis, but more an extended input-output analysis. ... The countries concerned are France, Germany, Portugal, Italy, UK, Netherlands, U.S., Belgium, China, and Japan. ...

Ignacio Cazcarro; Rosa Duarte; Julio Snchez-Chliz

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

491

National Radon Database. Volume 5. The EPA/state residential radon surveys: AR, IL, MD, MT, MS, TX, VA, WA and the Eastern Cherokee Nation, 1990-1992 (5 1/4 inch 1. 2mb) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Radon Database (NRDB) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to distribute information in two recent radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys and the National Residential Radon Survey. The National Residential Radon Surveys collected annual average radon measurements on all levels of approximately 5,700 homes nationwide. Information collected during survey includes a detailed questionnaire on house characteristics, as well as radon measurements. The radon survey data for Volume 6 is contained on two diskettes. The data diskettes are accompanied by comprehensive documentation on the design and implementation of the survey, the development and use of sampling weights, a summary of survey results, and information concerning the household questionnaire.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

National Radon Database. Volume 5. The EPA/state residential radon surveys: AR, IL, MD, MT, MS, TX, VA, WA, and the Eastern Cherokee Nation, 1990-1992 (3 1/2 inch, 1. 44mb) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Radon Database (NRDB) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to distribute information in two recent radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys and the National Residential Radon Survey. The National Residential Radon Surveys collected annual average radon measurements on all levels of approximately 5,700 homes nationwide. Information collected during survey includes a detailed questionnaire on house characteristics, as well as radon measurements. The radon survey data for Volume 6 is contained on two diskettes. The data diskettes are accompanied by comprehensive documentation on the design and implementation of the survey, the development and use of sampling weights, a summary of survey results, and information concerning the household questionnaire.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

GRR/Section 6-ID-b - Construction Storm Water Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6-ID-b - Construction Storm Water Permit 6-ID-b - Construction Storm Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-ID-b - Construction Storm Water Permit 06IDBConstructionStormwaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Environmental Protection Agency Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06IDBConstructionStormwaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative 6-ID-b.1 - EPA Construction General Permit Idaho does not have authority from the United States Environmental Protection Agency to issue a construction storm water permit. See Flowchart

494

GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations 01IDALandUseConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01IDALandUseConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Add Text Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Section_1-ID-a_-_Land_Use_Considerations&oldid=685536" Categories: Regulatory Roadmap State Sections Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Sections

495

Comments on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 Comments on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 This letter comprises the comments of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), Southern California Gas Company (SCGC), San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E), and Southern California Edison (SCE) in response to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Request for Information on Regulatory Burden. The signatories of this letter, collectively referred to herein as the California Investor Owned Utilities (CA IOUs) represent some of the largest utility companies in the Western United States, serving over 35 million customers. Comments on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 More Documents & Publications FINAL CA IOU Comment Letter RFI Regulatory Burden O:\IM-20\E-Government Program Office\FDMS\FDMS

496

GRR/Section 4-ID-a - State Exploration Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-ID-a - State Exploration Process 4-ID-a - State Exploration Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-ID-a - State Exploration Process 04IDAStateExplorationProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Water Resources Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 04IDAStateExplorationProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative _ 4-ID-a.1 - Has the Environmental Process been Completed for Exploration? If an EA/EIS has not yet been completed for this portion of the project, the developer must first complete the applicable environmental process.

497

Comments on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Comments on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 Comments on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 Comments on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 This letter comprises the comments of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), Southern California Gas Company (SCGC), San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E), and Southern California Edison (SCE) in response to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Request for Information on Regulatory Burden. The signatories of this letter, collectively referred to herein as the California Investor Owned Utilities (CA IOUs) represent some of the largest utility companies in the Western United States, serving over 35 million customers. Comments on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 More Documents & Publications FINAL CA IOU Comment Letter RFI Regulatory Burden O:\IM-20\E-Government Program Office\FDMS\FDMS

498

GRR/Section 8-ID-a - State Transmission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8-ID-a - State Transmission 8-ID-a - State Transmission < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 8-ID-a - State Transmission 08IDAStateTransmission.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Public Utilities Commission Regulations & Policies IC §67-6508: Local Land Use Planning Duties IC §61-526: Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 08IDAStateTransmission.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative 8-ID-a.1 - Will the Transmission Project Be Undertaken by a Public Utility?

499

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT FORM Empl ID Name: Email  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT FORM Empl ID Name: Email Address City Programming Languages Databases Robotics & Artificial Intelligence Education Software Engineering and GIS Systems and Security Presenting a paper or poster at this conference which acknowledges the sponsored

Minnesota, University of

500

Product traceability in the pharmaceutical supply chain : an analysis of the auto-ID approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis analyzes how the Auto-ID technology and information infrastructure will change the management and distribution of pharmaceutical products within the health care industry by enabling item level product traceability ...

Bellman, Attilio, 1967-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z