National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for household members number

  1. Table HC6.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total...................................................................... 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 16.3 9.4 4.0 2.7 3.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 13.8 25.4 14.4 13.2 8.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.9 17.4 8.5 7.3 5.2

  2. Table HC6.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total.............................................................................. 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day........................................... 8.2 1.4 1.9 1.4 1.0 2.4 2 Times A Day........................................................ 24.6 4.3 7.6 4.3 4.8 3.7 Once a Day............................................................ 42.3 9.9

  3. Table HC6.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total................................................................................ 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer............................. 35.5 16.3 9.4 4.0 2.7 3.2 Use a Personal Computer.......................................... 75.6 13.8 25.4 14.4 13.2 8.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model.....................................................

  4. Table HC6.2 Living Space Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total...................................................................... 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 1.7 0.8 0.4 0.3 Q 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 10.2 6.4 3.4 2.3 1.5 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 5.5 6.3 3.0 3.3 2.6 1,500 to

  5. Table HC6.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total........................................................................ 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment.......................... 17.8 5.4 5.3 2.7 2.5 2.0 Have Cooling Equipment...................................... 93.3 24.6 29.6 15.7 13.4 10.0 Use Cooling Equipment....................................... 91.4 24.0 29.1 15.5 13.2 9.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it......................

  6. Table HC6.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    HC6.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total U.S.............................................................. 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Cooking Appliances Conventional Ovens Use an Oven.................................................. 109.6 29.5 34.4 18.2 15.7 11.8 1................................................................. 103.3 28.4 32.0 17.3 14.7 11.0 2 or More.................................................... 6.2 1.1 2.5 1.0 0.9 0.8 Do Not

  7. Table HC6.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Space Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total..................................................................... 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............ 1.2 0.3 0.3 Q 0.2 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment............... 109.8 29.7 34.5 18.2 15.6 11.8 Use Main Space Heating Equipment................. 109.1 29.5 34.4 18.1 15.5 11.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It................... 0.8 Q Q Q Q Q Main Heating Fuel and

  8. Table HC6.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total U.S. Housing Units.................................. 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Do Not Have Heating Equipment..................... 1.2 0.3 0.3 Q 0.2 0.2 Have Space Heating Equipment....................... 109.8 29.7 34.5 18.2 15.6 11.8 Use Space Heating Equipment........................ 109.1 29.5 34.4 18.1 15.5 11.6 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.................... 0.8 Q Q Q Q Q Space Heating Usage During 2005

  9. Residential Network Members Impact More Than 42,000 Households | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Impact More Than 42,000 Households Residential Network Members Impact More Than 42,000 Households Photo of a row of townhomes. Eligible Better Buildings Residential Network members reported completing 27,563 home energy upgrades during 2013 as part of the Residential Network's first reporting cycle. In addition, 13 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partners completed 12,166 home energy upgrades, and six Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® Sponsors completed 2,540 home energy

  10. Residential Network Members Impact More Than 42,000 Households...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    row of townhomes. Eligible Better Buildings Residential Network members reported completing 27,563 home energy upgrades during 2013 as part of the Residential Network's first ...

  11. Members

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Members Michael J. Anderson (Esmeralda County) â€" A resident of Goldfield, Nevada, Mr. Anderson is the public works/utilities director for Esmeralda County and volunteer fire chief. A veteran of the U.S. Navy, he attended schools in marine propulsion and has received certifications in welding from Mt. Hood Community College and water/wastewater treatment from the state of Nevada. Mr. Anderson is a member of the Masons and the National Rifle Association. His interests include public

  12. Household vehicles energy consumption 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use some 6,000 vehicles provided information to describe vehicle stock, vehicle-miles traveled, energy end-use consumption, and energy expenditures for personal vehicles. The survey results represent the characteristics of the 84.9 million households that used or had access to vehicles in 1994 nationwide. (An additional 12 million households neither owned or had access to vehicles during the survey year.) To be included in then RTECS survey, vehicles must be either owned or used by household members on a regular basis for personal transportation, or owned by a company rather than a household, but kept at home, regularly available for the use of household members. Most vehicles included in the RTECS are classified as {open_quotes}light-duty vehicles{close_quotes} (weighing less than 8,500 pounds). However, the RTECS also includes a very small number of {open_quotes}other{close_quotes} vehicles, such as motor homes and larger trucks that are available for personal use.

  13. Household magnets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Household magnets Chances are very good that you have experimented with magnets. People have been fascinated with magnetism for thousands of years. As familiar to us as they may be, magnets still have some surprises for us. Here is a small collection of some of our favorite magnet experiments. What happens when we break a magnet in half? Radio Shack sells cheap ceramic magnets in several shapes. Get a ring shaped magnet and break it with pliers or a tap with a hammer. Try to put it back

  14. Fact #618: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per Household and Other Demographic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    per Household and Other Demographic Statistics Fact 618: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per Household and Other Demographic Statistics Since 1969, the number of vehicles per ...

  15. EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 August 1997 Release Next Update: EIA has discontinued this series....

  16. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2a. Home Office Equipment by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.6 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 21.4 6.2 15.2 1.0 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 14.3 4.0 10.4 3.7 Number of

  17. FTCP Members

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Technical Capability Program Members (FTCP) Panel including FTCP Chair, Agents, Alternate Agents and other Representatives

  18. Fact #618: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per Household and Other Demographic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statistics | Department of Energy 8: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per Household and Other Demographic Statistics Fact #618: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per Household and Other Demographic Statistics Since 1969, the number of vehicles per household has increased by 66% and the number of vehicles per licensed driver has increased by 47%. The number of workers per household has changed the least of the statistics shown here. There has been a decline in the number of persons per household from 1969 to

  19. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Appliances Tables (Million U.S. Households; 60 pages, 240 kb) Contents Pages HC5-1a. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC5-2a. Appliances by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC5-3a. Appliances by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC5-4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC5-5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC5-6a. Appliances by Type of Rented

  20. Elastomeric member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1985-01-01

    An energy storage device (10) is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member (16) disposed within a tubular housing (14), which elastomeric member (16) is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member (16) is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section (74), and transition end sections (76, 78), attached to rigid end piece assemblies (22, 24) of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections (76, 78) are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member (16), a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing (14). Each of the transition sections (76, 78) are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve (26, 28) having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve (26, 28) also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween. During manufacture, the sleeves (26, 28) are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section (76, 78) to provide the correct profile and helix angle.

  1. Elastomeric member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, L.O.

    1985-07-30

    An energy storage device is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member disposed within a tubular housing, which elastomeric member is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section, and transition end sections, attached to rigid end piece assemblies of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member, a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing. Each of the transition sections are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond there between. During manufacture, the sleeves are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section to provide the correct profile and helix angle. 12 figs.

  2. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.0 1.5 1.5 Total .............................................................. 107.0 7.1 12.3 7.7 6.3 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 6.2 11.4 6.7 5.9 1.7 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 3.4 7.9 4.1 3.8 4.4 Number of Desktop PCs 1

  3. housingunit_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ... RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ...

  4. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ... RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ...

  5. ac_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ... RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ...

  6. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ... RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ...

  7. Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

    1991-01-01

    Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

  8. Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

    1991-12-31

    Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

  9. Fact #727: May 14, 2012 Nearly Twenty Percent of Households Own Three or

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Vehicles | Department of Energy 7: May 14, 2012 Nearly Twenty Percent of Households Own Three or More Vehicles Fact #727: May 14, 2012 Nearly Twenty Percent of Households Own Three or More Vehicles Household vehicle ownership has changed over the last six decades. In 1960, over twenty percent of households did not own a vehicle, but by 2010, that number fell to less than 10%. The number of households with three or more vehicles grew from 2% in 1960 to nearly 20% in 2010. Before 1990,

  10. Household and environmental characteristics related to household energy-consumption change: A human ecological approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guerin, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study focused on the family household as an organism and on its interaction with the three environments of the human ecosystem (natural, behavioral, and constructed) as these influence energy consumption and energy-consumption change. A secondary statistical analysis of data from the US Department of Energy Residential Energy Consumption Surveys (RECS) was completed. The 1980 and 1983 RECS were used as the data base. Longitudinal data, including household, environmental, and energy-consumption measures, were available for over 800 households. The households were selected from a national sample of owner-occupied housing units surveyed in both years. Results showed a significant( p = <.05) relationship between the dependent-variable energy-consumption change and the predictor variables heating degree days, addition of insulation, addition of a wood-burning stove, year the housing unit was built, and weighted number of appliances. A significant (p = <.05) relationship was found between the criterion variable energy-consumption change and the discriminating variables of age of the head of the household, cooling degree days, heating degree days, year the housing unit was built, and number of stories in the housing unit.

  11. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    or commercial trucks (See Table 1). Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 5 The 1991 RTECS count includes vehicles that were owned or used...

  12. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 December 1993 Release Next Update: August 1997. Based on the 1991...

  13. Washington Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Elec Member Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Washington Elec Member Corp Place: Georgia Phone Number: 478-552-2577; 1-800-552-2577 Website: washingtonemc.com...

  14. Brunswick Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Brunswick Electric Member Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Brunswick Electric Member Corp Place: North Carolina Phone Number: 1-800-682-5309 Website: www.bemc.org Outage...

  15. Next Generation Household Refrigerator | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Next Generation Household Refrigerator Next Generation Household Refrigerator Embraco's high efficiency, oil-free linear compressor.
    Credit: Whirlpool Embraco's high ...

  16. Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Use Cover Page Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry >Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Contact Us * Feedback * PrivacySecurity *...

  17. Strategies for Collecting Household Energy Data | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Collecting Household Energy Data Strategies for Collecting Household Energy Data Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call: Strategies for ...

  18. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0a. Air Conditioning by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 20.5 13.6 6.8 2.2 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.3 Q Q 27.5 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1

  19. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1a. Air Conditioning by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.3 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 37.2 19.3 6.4 11.5 1.5 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.4 Q Q Q 28.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1

  20. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2a. Air Conditioning by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.4 1.2 1.7 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 10.7 3.4 7.2 7.1 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 1.1 0.2 0.9 15.5 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 9.6 3.2

  1. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.6 1.5 1.4 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 4.9 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 21.8 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1

  2. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.5 0.8 1.4 1.3 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 36.8 13.6 18.9 13.6 4.3 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 1.2 0.2 0.4 0.3 21.4 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 ........................................ 80.8 35.6 13.4

  3. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9a. Air Conditioning by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 14.5 11.3 3.2 3.3 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.3 0.3 Q 28.3 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1

  4. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    16.8 17.4 18.6 18.9 1.7 2.2 0.6 1.5 Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 15 Vehicle Miles Traveled per Vehicle (Thousand) . . . . . . . . ....

  5. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ... 29.1 5.3 22.7 3.8 1 Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  6. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ... Income Relative to Poverty Line Below 100 Percent ...... 15.0 13.2 1.8 Q ...

  7. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Contact: Stephanie J. Battles, Survey Manager (stephanie.battles@eia.doe.gov) World Wide Web: http:www.eia.doe.govemeuconsumption Table HC2-1a. Household Characteristics by ...

  8. Readiness Review Training- Member

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slides used for November 10, 2010 Readiness Review Member Training at the Idaho National Laboratory. Course provides tools and tips to be an effective readiness review team member.

  9. Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends...

  10. Table 4

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9. Mean Annual Electricity Consumption for Lighting, by Family Income by Number of Household Members, 1993 (Kilowatthours) Number of Household Members Family Income All Households...

  11. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 13.6 16.0 14.7 10.4 10.5 17.6 4.7 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 Q 0.3 0.5 0.3 0.4 0.5 27.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2

  12. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.5 1.5 1.4 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 59.5 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 5.2 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 1.2 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 23.3 Households Using

  13. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.8 0.5 1.4 1.2 1.6 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 23.4 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 6.1 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 0.9 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 23.0 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning

  14. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0a. Home Office Equipment by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 22.4 15.7 6.7 1.3 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0

  15. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1a. Home Office Equipment by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.3 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 34.6 18.4 6.0 10.1 1.2 Personal Computers 1

  16. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9a. Home Office Equipment by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.1 1.4 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 17.9 12.8 5.0 1.3 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 10.9

  17. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ... 29.1 5.3 22.7 3.8 1 Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State income

  18. Fact #748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Household Expenditures on Transportation, 1984-2010 Fact 748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures on Transportation, 1984-2010 The overall share of annual household ...

  19. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.7 1.2 1.2 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 4.9 6.0 7.4 6.2 2.4 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.1 0.8 Q 0.1 23.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 4.7 5.2 7.4 6.1 2.6 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central

  20. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.4 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 14.9 16.7 17.0 12.2 13.0 22.4 4.4 Personal Computers 2

  1. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2a. Appliances by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.7 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 22.1 6.6 15.5 1.1 1

  2. NNMCAB Member Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the September 24, 2014 Board meeting Patti Jones LANL, Provided the Members with a Status Update to the TA-21 Demolition and Storm Water Season Rain Events.

  3. Members | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. map showing states with Consortium members highlighted in green. Join the Consortium Consortium Participant List (PDF) Consortium Participant List (Excel Spreadsheet) ...

  4. Members | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network members come from all sectors of the energy efficiency industry to leverage one another's experiences and expertise in an effort to accelerate ...

  5. Collapsable seal member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sherrell, Dennis L.

    1990-01-01

    A hollow, collapsable seal member normally disposed in a natural expanded state offering fail-safe pressure sealing against a seating surface and adapted to be evacuated by a vacuum force for collapsing the seal member to disengage the same from said seating surface.

  6. Collapsable seal member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sherrell, D.L.

    1983-12-08

    A hollow, collapsable seal member normally disposed in a natural expanded state offering fail-safe pressure sealing against a seating surface and adapted to be evacuated by a vacuum force for collapsing the seal member to disengage the same from said seating surface.

  7. Mitchell Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mitchell Electric Member Corp Place: Georgia Phone Number: Camilla, GA: 229-336-5221; Albany, GA: 229-436-0070, Sylvester, GA: 229-776-3386 Website: mitchellemc.com Facebook:...

  8. Excelsior Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Member Corp Place: Georgia Phone Number: 912-685-2115 Website: www.excelsioremc.com Outage Map: outage.excelsioremc.com:8181 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for...

  9. Jackson Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jackson Electric Member Corp Place: Georgia Phone Number: 1-800-462-3691 Website: www.jacksonemc.com Twitter: @JacksonEMC Facebook: https:www.facebook.comJacksonEMC Outage...

  10. Haywood Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Member Corp Place: North Carolina Phone Number: 828-452-2281 or 828-966-4215 or toll free at 1-800-951-6088 Website: www.haywoodemc.com Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  11. Table 4

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Mean Annual Electricity Consumption for Lighting, by Number of Household Members by Number of Rooms, 1993 (Kilowatthours) Number of Rooms Number of Household Members All...

  12. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0a. Appliances by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.5 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 23.8 16.6 7.2 NE 1

  13. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1a. Appliances by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.1 1.4 1.5 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 36.2 19.4 6.4 10.3 1.5 1

  14. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.5 1.7 1.6 1.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 69.1 9.4 16.7 6.6 4.3 1

  15. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.4 2.1 3.1 1.3 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ...........................................

  16. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6a. Appliances by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.9 2.5 Total ............................................... 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 33.4 10.1 7.3 14.9 1.1

  17. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8a. Appliances by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.5 0.9 1.4 1.2 1.3 Total .............................................................. 107.0 49.9 18.0 21.2 17.9 4.1 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 47.5 17.5 19.9 16.8 4.2 1

  18. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9a. Appliances by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.3 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 19.6 14.5 5.2 1.1 1

  19. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0a. Space Heating by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q 19.8 No

  20. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1a. Space Heating by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.9 1.2 1.4 1.3 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 38.8 20.2 6.8 11.8 NE Do Not Heat Home

  1. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2a. Space Heating by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.6 1.0 1.6 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 22.6 6.7 15.9 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 0.7 Q 0.7 10.6 No Heating Equipment

  2. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5a. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.4 1.9 3.0 1.3 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Heat Home ..................................... 72.4 63.0 2.0 1.7 5.7 6.7 Do Not Heat Home

  3. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6a. Space Heating by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.9 2.5 Total ............................................... 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Heat Home ..................................... 33.7 10.4 7.4 14.8 1.1 6.9 Do Not Heat Home

  4. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8a. Space Heating by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.6 0.9 1.3 1.3 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 49.9 18.0 21.2 17.9 4.3 Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 49.1 18.0 21.2 17.8 4.3 Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 0.7 0.1 0.1 0.1 25.8 No Heating

  5. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9a. Space Heating by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.7 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 20.1 14.7 5.4 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q 19.9 No

  6. New York Household Travel Patterns: A Comparison Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Patricia S; Reuscher, Tim

    2007-05-01

    In 1969, the U. S. Department of Transportation began collecting detailed data on personal travel to address various transportation planning issues. These issues range from assessing transportation investment programs to developing new technologies to alleviate congestion. This 1969 survey was the birth of the Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. Longer-distance travel was collected in 1977 and 1995. In 2001, the survey was renamed to the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) and collected both daily and longer-distance trips in one survey. In addition to the number of sample households that the national NPTS/NHTS survey allotted to New York State (NYS), the state procured an additional sample of households in both the 1995 and 2001 surveys. In the 1995 survey, NYS procured an addition sample of more than 9,000 households, increasing the final NY NPTS sample size to a total of 11,004 households. Again in 2001, NYS procured 12,000 additional sample households, increasing the final New York NHTS sample size to a total of 13,423 households with usable data. These additional sample households allowed NYS to address transportation planning issues pertinent to geographic areas significantly smaller than for what the national NPTS and NHTS data are intended. Specifically, these larger sample sizes enable detailed analysis of twelve individual Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs). Furthermore, they allowed NYS to address trends in travel behavior over time. In this report, travel data for the entire NYS were compared to those of the rest of the country with respect to personal travel behavior and key travel determinants. The influence of New York City (NYC) data on the comparisons of the state of New York to the rest of the country was also examined. Moreover, the analysis examined the relationship between population density and travel patterns, and the similarities and differences among New

  7. Hydraulic Institute Member Benefits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As the developer of the universally acclaimed ANSI/HI Pump Standards, a key reference for pump knowledge and end-user specifications, the Hydraulic  nstitute (HI) provides its members with timely...

  8. South River Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River Elec Member Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: South River Elec Member Corp Place: North Carolina Phone Number: (910) 892-8071 Website: www.sremc.com Twitter: https:...

  9. Tri-State Electric Member Corp (Tennessee) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tri-State Electric Member Corp (Tennessee) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tri-State Electric Member Corp Place: Tennessee Phone Number: 706-492-3251 Website: www.tsemc.net...

  10. Carteret-Craven El Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carteret-Craven El Member Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Carteret-Craven El Member Corp Place: North Carolina Phone Number: 252.247.3107 or 1.800.682.2217 Website:...

  11. Snapping Shoals El Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Snapping Shoals El Member Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Snapping Shoals El Member Corp Place: Georgia Phone Number: 770-786-3484 Website: www.ssemc.com Twitter:...

  12. Niobrara Valley El Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Member Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Niobrara Valley El Member Corp Place: Nebraska Phone Number: 402.336.2803 Website: nvemc.org Outage Hotline: (402) 336-2803 or (800)...

  13. Panhandle Rural El Member Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rural El Member Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name: Panhandle Rural El Member Assn Place: Nebraska Phone Number: 308-762-1311 Website: www.prema.coop Facebook: https:...

  14. Little Ocmulgee El Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocmulgee El Member Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Little Ocmulgee El Member Corp Place: Georgia Phone Number: 1-800-342-1290; 912-568-7171; 1-800-342-1290 Website:...

  15. Baldwin County El Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    El Member Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Baldwin County El Member Corp Place: Alabama Phone Number: (251) 989-6247 or (800) 837-3374 Website: www.baldwinemc.com Outage...

  16. Joe Wheeler Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Joe Wheeler Elec Member Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Joe Wheeler Elec Member Corp Place: Alabama Phone Number: (256) 552-2300 Website: www.jwemc.org Twitter: @jwemc...

  17. Household energy consumption and expenditures, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-02

    This report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990, is based upon data from the 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Focusing on energy end-use consumption and expenditures of households, the 1990 RECS is the eighth in a series conducted since 1978 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Over 5,000 households were surveyed, providing information on their housing units, housing characteristics, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information provided represents the characteristics and energy consumption of 94 million households nationwide.

  18. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.1 Total .................................................. 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.8 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven

  19. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2a. Appliances by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.5 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 14.3 17.2 17.8 12.9 13.7 25.9 4.2 1

  20. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2a. Space Heating by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.5 1.5 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.3 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 15.4 18.2 18.6 13.6 13.9 26.4 4.3 Do Not Heat Home ........................

  1. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4a. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.5 1.5 1.4 1.7 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.4 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 73.4 9.4 16.4 6.8 4.5 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 0.3 Q 0.6 Q 19.0 No

  2. A Mixed Nordic Experience: Implementing Competitive Retail Electricity Markets for Household Customers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Ole Jess; Johnsen, Tor Arnt; Lewis, Philip

    2006-11-15

    Although the Nordic countries were among the first to develop competition in the electricity industry, it took a long time to make retail competition work. In Norway and Sweden a considerable number of households are actively using the market but very few households are active in Finland and Denmark. One problem has been institutional barriers involving metering, limited unbundling of distribution and supply, and limited access to reliable information on contracts and prices. (author)

  3. Tipmont Rural Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Tipmont Rural Elec Member Corp Abbreviation: Tipmont REMC Address: 403 S Main St Place: Linden, Indiana Zip: 47955 Phone Number: 800-726-3953 Website:...

  4. Fact #565: April 6, 2009 Household Gasoline Expenditures by Income |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 5: April 6, 2009 Household Gasoline Expenditures by Income Fact #565: April 6, 2009 Household Gasoline Expenditures by Income In the annual Consumer Expenditure Survey, household incomes are grouped into five equal parts called quintiles (each quintile is 20%). Households in the second and third quintiles consistently have a higher share of spending on gasoline each year than households in the other quintiles. Household Gasoline Expenditures by Income Quintile Bar graph

  5. Member Benefits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    resources, and proven solutions shared by members Opportunities to be featured in media, case studies, and lessons learned materials Voluntary member initiatives that address...

  6. ORSSAB Members | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Belinda Price Chair Read Bio Alfreda Cook Vice Chair Read Bio David Hemelright Secretary Read Bio Leon Baker Member Read Bio Richard Burroughs Member Read Bio ...

  7. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Klaas Jan; Homan, Greg; Brown, Rich; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2009-04-15

    The term ?household carbon footprint? refers to the total annual carbon emissions associated with household consumption of energy, goods, and services. In this project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a carbon footprint modeling framework that characterizes the key underlying technologies and processes that contribute to household carbon footprints in California and the United States. The approach breaks down the carbon footprint by 35 different household fuel end uses and 32 different supply chain fuel end uses. This level of end use detail allows energy and policy analysts to better understand the underlying technologies and processes contributing to the carbon footprint of California households. The modeling framework was applied to estimate the annual home energy and supply chain carbon footprints of a prototypical California household. A preliminary assessment of parameter uncertainty associated with key model input data was also conducted. To illustrate the policy-relevance of this modeling framework, a case study was conducted that analyzed the achievable carbon footprint reductions associated with the adoption of energy efficient household and supply chain technologies.

  8. Kingston Creek Hydro Project Powers 100 Households | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kingston Creek Hydro Project Powers 100 Households Kingston Creek Hydro Project Powers 100 Households August 21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Nevada-based contracting firm Nevada ...

  9. Energy Information Administration/Household Vehicles Energy Consumptio...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    , Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 ix Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 presents statistics about energy-related...

  10. Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households Better Buildings Residential Network Multifamily and Low-Income Housing Peer ...

  11. Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Experimental Evidence Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Household Response To Dynamic...

  12. Advisory Board Members

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Call for Proposals Submit Proposals Research Subject Areas Types of Proposals Funding for Projects Evaluation and Selection Acceptance and Rejection Deadlines Events Partnerships NSEC » CSES » Advisory Boards Advisory Board Members High quality, cutting-edge science in the areas of astrophysics, space physics, solid planetary geoscience, and climate science. External Richard Aster New Mexico Tech George Fuller UC San Diego Brian McPherson University of Utah Mike Liemohn University of Michigan

  13. CASL Industry Council Members:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CASL Industry Council Members: We are looking forward to hosting you at the upcoming CASL Industry Council Meeting on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 through Wednesday, April 13, 2016 at the following location: ALOFT Greenville Downtown Converge Conference Room 5 North Laurens Street Greenville, SC 29601 864-297-6100 Meeting Contact: Lorie Fox (865) 548-5178 Lodging: ALOFT Greenville Downtown: http://www.aloftgreenvilledowntown.com/ Hotel Information * Check-in time: 4 PM * Checkout time: 12 PM * Fast

  14. Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US PAC CA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household  California households use 62 million Btu of energy per home, 31% less than the U.S. average. The lower than average site

  15. Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US PAC CA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household  California households use 62 million Btu of energy per home, 31% less than the U.S. average. The lower than average site

  16. Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-05

    This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

  17. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a comparison between the 1991 and previous years RTECS designs; (2) the sample design; (3) the data-collection procedures; (4) the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN); (5)...

  18. Cryogenic support member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Niemann, Ralph C.; Gonczy, John D.; Nicol, Thomas H.

    1987-01-01

    A cryogenic support member is comprised of a non-metallic rod having a depression in at least one end and a metallic end connection assembled to the rod. The metallic end connection comprises a metallic plug which conforms to the shape and is disposed in the depression and a metallic sleeve is disposed over the rod and plug. The plug and the sleeve are shrink-fitted to the depression in the rod to form a connection good in compression, tension and bending.

  19. TEC Working Group Member Organizations Representatives | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Member Organizations Representatives TEC Working Group Member Organizations Representatives PDF icon TEC MEMBER ORGANIZATION REPRESENTATIVES TOPIC GROUP PARTICIPATION February 2006...

  20. Melt containment member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

    2014-09-09

    A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

  1. Request Number:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3023307 Name: Madeleine Brown Organization: nJa Address: --- -------- -------- -- Country: Phone Number: United States Fax Number: n/a E-mail: --- -------- --------_._------ --- Reasonably Describe Records Description: Please send me a copy of the emails and records relating to the decision to allow the underage son of Bill Gates to tour Hanford in June 2010. Please also send the emails and records that justify the Department of Energy to prevent other minors from visiting B Reactor. Optional

  2. Request Number:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1074438 Name: Gayle Cooper Organization: nla Address: _ Country: United States Phone Number: Fax Number: nla E-mail: . ~===--------- Reasonably Describe Records Description: Information pertaining to the Department of Energy's cost estimate for reinstating pension benefit service years to the Enterprise Company (ENCO) employees who are active plan participants in the Hanford Site Pension Plan. This cost estimate was an outcome of the DOE's Worker Town Hall Meetings held on September 17-18, 2009.

  3. A Multi Agent-Based Framework for Simulating Household PHEV Distribution and Electric Distribution Network Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Xiaohui; Liu, Cheng; Kim, Hoe Kyoung; Kao, Shih-Chieh; Tuttle, Mark A; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2011-01-01

    The variation of household attributes such as income, travel distance, age, household member, and education for different residential areas may generate different market penetration rates for plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV). Residential areas with higher PHEV ownership could increase peak electric demand locally and require utilities to upgrade the electric distribution infrastructure even though the capacity of the regional power grid is under-utilized. Estimating the future PHEV ownership distribution at the residential household level can help us understand the impact of PHEV fleet on power line congestion, transformer overload and other unforeseen problems at the local residential distribution network level. It can also help utilities manage the timing of recharging demand to maximize load factors and utilization of existing distribution resources. This paper presents a multi agent-based simulation framework for 1) modeling spatial distribution of PHEV ownership at local residential household level, 2) discovering PHEV hot zones where PHEV ownership may quickly increase in the near future, and 3) estimating the impacts of the increasing PHEV ownership on the local electric distribution network with different charging strategies. In this paper, we use Knox County, TN as a case study to show the simulation results of the agent-based model (ABM) framework. However, the framework can be easily applied to other local areas in the US.

  4. Environmental Management Advisory Board Members

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EMAB membership reflects a diversity of views, demographics, expertise, and professional and academic experience. The following members comprise the current Board:

  5. Determinants of Household Use of Selected Energy Star Appliances - Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration Determinants of Household Use of Selected Energy Star Appliances Release date: May 25, 2016 Introduction According to the 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), household appliances1accounted for 35% of U.S. household energy consumption, up from 24% in 1993. Thus, improvements in the energy performance of residential appliances as well as increases in the use of more efficient appliances can be effective in reducing household energy consumption and

  6. (Document Number)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A TA-53 TOUR FORM/RADIOLOGICAL LOG (Send completed form to MS H831) _____________ _____________________________ _________________________________ Tour Date Purpose of Tour or Tour Title Start Time and Approximate Duration ___________________________ ______________ _______________________ _________________ Tour Point of Contact/Requestor Z# (if applicable) Organization/Phone Number Signature Locations Visited: (Check all that apply, and list any others not shown. Prior approval must be obtained

  7. Blue Ridge Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Ridge Elec Member Corp Place: North Carolina Phone Number: 1-800-448-2383 Website: www.blueridgeemc.com Twitter: @blueridgeemc Facebook: https:www.facebook.comBlueRidgeEMC...

  8. North Georgia Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: North Georgia Elec Member Corp Place: Georgia Phone Number: Dalton: (706) 259-9441; Fort Oglethorpe: (706) 866-2231; Calhoun: (706) 629-3160; Trion:...

  9. French Broad Elec Member Corp (Tennessee) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    French Broad Elec Member Corp Place: Tennessee Phone Number: (828)649-2051 or (828)688-4815 or (800)222-6190 or (828)682-6121 Website: www.frenchbroademc.com Twitter:...

  10. French Broad Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    French Broad Elec Member Corp Place: North Carolina Phone Number: (828)649-2051 or (828)688-4815 or (800)222-6190 or (828)682-6121 Website: www.frenchbroademc.com Twitter:...

  11. Middle Georgia El Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    El Member Corp Place: Georgia Phone Number: 1-800-342-0144 Website: www.mgemc.com Facebook: https:www.facebook.comMiddleGeorgiaEMC Outage Hotline: 229-268-2671; 800-342-0144...

  12. Okefenoke Rural El Member Corp (Florida) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Florida) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Okefenoke Rural El Member Corp Place: Florida Phone Number: 1-800-432-4770 Website: www.oremc.com Outage Hotline: 1.800.262.5131 Outage...

  13. Okefenoke Rural El Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Okefenoke Rural El Member Corp Place: Georgia Phone Number: 1-800-262-5131 Website: www.oremc.com Outage Hotline: 1-800-262-5131 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for...

  14. Central Georgia El Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Georgia El Member Corp Place: Georgia Phone Number: 770-775-7857 Website: www.cgemc.com Twitter: @CentralGAEMC Outage Hotline: 770-775-7857 References: EIA Form EIA-861...

  15. Household Energy Consumption Segmentation Using Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwac, J; Flora, J; Rajagopal, R

    2014-01-01

    The increasing US deployment of residential advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) has made hourly energy consumption data widely available. Using CA smart meter data, we investigate a household electricity segmentation methodology that uses an encoding system with a pre-processed load shape dictionary. Structured approaches using features derived from the encoded data drive five sample program and policy relevant energy lifestyle segmentation strategies. We also ensure that the methodologies developed scale to large data sets.

  16. Household energy consumption and expenditures, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-10

    Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1987, Part 1: National Data is the second publication in a series from the 1987 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). It is prepared by the Energy End Use Division (EEUD) of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU), Energy Information Administration (EIA). The EIA collects and publishes comprehensive data on energy consumption in occupied housing units in the residential sector through the RECS. 15 figs., 50 tabs.

  17. Environmental Management Advisory Board Members | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EMAB Board Member Read Bio David W. Swindle, Jr. EMAB Board Member Read Bio Robert J. Thompson EMAB Board Member Read Bio Lenn Vincent EMAB Board Member Read Bio

  18. Members

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on numerous other boards, policy and government panels. ... from solid oxide fuel cells, clean and efficient ... a major designer of coal, nuclear and other power plants. ...

  19. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. ... Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Water Heating Characteristics" ...

  20. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing ... (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Water Heating",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 ...

  1. Strategies for Collecting Household Energy Data | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Collecting Household Energy Data Strategies for Collecting Household Energy Data Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call: Strategies for Collecting Household Energy Data, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, July 19, 2012. Call Slides and Discussion Summary (700.06 KB) More Documents & Publications Homeowner and Contractor Surveys Mastermind: Jim Mikel, Spirit Foundation Generating Energy Efficiency Project Leads and Allocating Leads to Contractors

  2. Household energy consumption and expenditures 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-22

    This report is the third in the series of reports presenting data from the 1987 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The 1987 RECS, seventh in a series of national surveys of households and their energy suppliers, provides baseline information on household energy use in the United States. Data from the seven RECS and its companion survey, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), are made available to the public in published reports such as this one, and on public use data files. This report presents data for the four Census regions and nine Census divisions on the consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil and kerosene (as a single category), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Data are also presented on consumption of wood at the Census region level. The emphasis in this report is on graphic depiction of the data. Data from previous RECS surveys are provided in the graphics, which indicate the regional trends in consumption, expenditures, and uses of energy. These graphs present data for the United States and each Census division. 12 figs., 71 tabs.

  3. Appliance Commitment for Household Load Scheduling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Pengwei; Lu, Ning

    2011-06-30

    This paper presents a novel appliance commitment algorithm that schedules thermostatically-controlled household loads based on price and consumption forecasts considering users comfort settings to meet an optimization objective such as minimum payment or maximum comfort. The formulation of an appliance commitment problem was described in the paper using an electrical water heater load as an example. The thermal dynamics of heating and coasting of the water heater load was modeled by physical models; random hot water consumption was modeled with statistical methods. The models were used to predict the appliance operation over the scheduling time horizon. User comfort was transformed to a set of linear constraints. Then, a novel linear, sequential, optimization process was used to solve the appliance commitment problem. The simulation results demonstrate that the algorithm is fast, robust, and flexible. The algorithm can be used in home/building energy-management systems to help household owners or building managers to automatically create optimal load operation schedules based on different cost and comfort settings and compare cost/benefits among schedules.

  4. Household energy consumption and expenditures, 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-02

    This report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990, is based upon data from the 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Focusing on energy end-use consumption and expenditures of households, the 1990 RECS is the eighth in a series conducted since 1978 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Over 5,000 households were surveyed, providing information on their housing units, housing characteristics, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information provided represents the characteristics and energy consumption of 94 million households nationwide.

  5. Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-12-01

    Provides state and local policymakers with information on successful approaches to the design and implementation of residential efficiency programs for households ineligible for low-income programs.

  6. Barriers to household investment in residential energy conservation: preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, W.L.

    1982-12-01

    A general assessment of the range of barriers which impede household investments in weatherization and other energy efficiency improvements for their homes is provided. The relationship of similar factors to households' interest in receiving a free energy audits examined. Rates of return that underly household investments in major conservation improvements are assessed. A special analysis of household knowledge of economically attractive investments is provided that compares high payback improvements specified by the energy audit with the list of needed or desirable conservation improvements identified by respondents. (LEW)

  7. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ... to 79,999","80,000 or More" "Water Heating Characteristics" ...

  8. Theme 1 Members | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Members Theme 1 Members Volker Urban Principal Investigator Read more about Volker Urban Dean Myles Dean Myles Principal Investigator Read more about Dean Myles Himadri Pakrasi...

  9. Pataula Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pataula Electric Member Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pataula Electric Member Corp Place: Georgia Website: www.cobbemc.com Twitter: @cobbemc Facebook: https:...

  10. Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 43 Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 1994...

  11. Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 1994 (Continued) 1993 Household and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor:...

  12. Table 5.17. U.S. Number of Households by Vehicle Fuel Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    More ... 8.2 Q 1.7 1.9 1.7 2.6 6.1 2.0 Q Q Q 16.7 Below Poverty Line 100 Percent ... 9.0 2.5 3.6 1.3 1.0 0.6 Q...

  13. Executive Committee Member Roster | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Executive Committee Member Roster Executive Committee Member Roster List of NNMCAB members that serve on the Executive Committee ExCom Roster - June 2016 (277.33 KB) More Documents & Publications Environmental Management and Remediation Committee Roster Waste Management Committee Member Roster NNMCAB Membership Roster

  14. Members | Center for Gas Separations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Members Novel MOFs Membranes Character-ization Compu-tation Alumni Admin-istration Novel MOFs Principal Investigators Jeffrey R. Long Omar M. Yaghi Hong-Cai (Joe) Zhou Researchers Gokhan Barin Postdoctoral Researcher University of California, Berkeley barin@berkeley.edu Development of high capacity porous organic polymers for toxic gas removal from air Ying-Pin Chen PhD Student Texas A&M University ying-pin.chen@chem.tamu.edu Investigation of CO2/CH4 adsorption behavior in MOFs and

  15. Orienting members in a preselected rotary alignment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Ray E.

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus for orienting members and for maintaining their rotary alignment during orienting members. The apparatus comprises first and second cylindrical elements, a rotation prevention element, a collar and a retainer. Each element has an outside wall, and first and second ends, each end having an outside edge. The first element has portions defining a first plurality of notches located at the outside edge of its first end. An external threaded portion is on the outside wall of the first element and next to the first plurality of notches. The second element has portions defining a second plurality of notches located at the outside edge of its first end. The first plurality has a different number than the second plurality. The first ends of the first and second tubes have substantially the same outside diameter and are abutted during connection so that a cavity is formed whenever first and second tube notches substantially overlap. A rotation prevention element is placed in the cavity to prevent rotation of the first and second elements. A collar with an internal threaded portion is slidably disposed about the second element. The internal threaded portion engages the external threaded portion of the first element to connect the elements. A lip connected to the collar prevents separation of the collar from the second element.

  16. Perceptions of risk among households in two Australian coastal communities

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elrick-Barr, Carmen E.; Smith, Timothy F.; Thomsen, Dana C.; Preston, Benjamin L.

    2015-04-20

    There is limited knowledge of risk perceptions in coastal communities despite their vulnerability to a range of risks including the impacts of climate change. A survey of 400 households in two Australian coastal communities, combined with semi-structured interviews, provides insight into household perceptions of the relative importance of climatic and non-climatic risks and the subsequent risk priorities that may inform household adaptive action. In contrast to previous research, the results demonstrated that geographic location and household characteristics might not affect perceptions of vulnerability to environmental hazards. However, past experience was a significant influence, raising the priority of environmental concerns. Overall,more » the results highlight the priority concerns of coastal households (from finance, to health and environment) and suggest to increase the profile of climate issues in coastal communities climate change strategies need to better demonstrate links between climate vulnerability and other household concerns. Moreover, promoting generic capacities in isolation from understanding the context in which households construe climate risks is unlikely to yield the changes required to decrease the vulnerability of coastal communities.« less

  17. Perceptions of risk among households in two Australian coastal communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elrick-Barr, Carmen E.; Smith, Timothy F.; Thomsen, Dana C.; Preston, Benjamin L.

    2015-04-20

    There is limited knowledge of risk perceptions in coastal communities despite their vulnerability to a range of risks including the impacts of climate change. A survey of 400 households in two Australian coastal communities, combined with semi-structured interviews, provides insight into household perceptions of the relative importance of climatic and non-climatic risks and the subsequent risk priorities that may inform household adaptive action. In contrast to previous research, the results demonstrated that geographic location and household characteristics might not affect perceptions of vulnerability to environmental hazards. However, past experience was a significant influence, raising the priority of environmental concerns. Overall, the results highlight the priority concerns of coastal households (from finance, to health and environment) and suggest to increase the profile of climate issues in coastal communities climate change strategies need to better demonstrate links between climate vulnerability and other household concerns. Moreover, promoting generic capacities in isolation from understanding the context in which households construe climate risks is unlikely to yield the changes required to decrease the vulnerability of coastal communities.

  18. Reconstructing householder vectors from Tall-Skinny QR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ballard, Grey Malone; Demmel, James; Grigori, Laura; Jacquelin, Mathias; Knight, Nicholas; Nguyen, Hong Diep

    2015-08-05

    The Tall-Skinny QR (TSQR) algorithm is more communication efficient than the standard Householder algorithm for QR decomposition of matrices with many more rows than columns. However, TSQR produces a different representation of the orthogonal factor and therefore requires more software development to support the new representation. Further, implicitly applying the orthogonal factor to the trailing matrix in the context of factoring a square matrix is more complicated and costly than with the Householder representation. We show how to perform TSQR and then reconstruct the Householder vector representation with the same asymptotic communication efficiency and little extra computational cost. We demonstratemore » the high performance and numerical stability of this algorithm both theoretically and empirically. The new Householder reconstruction algorithm allows us to design more efficient parallel QR algorithms, with significantly lower latency cost compared to Householder QR and lower bandwidth and latency costs compared with Communication-Avoiding QR (CAQR) algorithm. Experiments on supercomputers demonstrate the benefits of the communication cost improvements: in particular, our experiments show substantial improvements over tuned library implementations for tall-and-skinny matrices. Furthermore, we also provide algorithmic improvements to the Householder QR and CAQR algorithms, and we investigate several alternatives to the Householder reconstruction algorithm that sacrifice guarantees on numerical stability in some cases in order to obtain higher performance.« less

  19. Reconstructing householder vectors from Tall-Skinny QR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballard, Grey Malone; Demmel, James; Grigori, Laura; Jacquelin, Mathias; Knight, Nicholas; Nguyen, Hong Diep

    2015-08-05

    The Tall-Skinny QR (TSQR) algorithm is more communication efficient than the standard Householder algorithm for QR decomposition of matrices with many more rows than columns. However, TSQR produces a different representation of the orthogonal factor and therefore requires more software development to support the new representation. Further, implicitly applying the orthogonal factor to the trailing matrix in the context of factoring a square matrix is more complicated and costly than with the Householder representation. We show how to perform TSQR and then reconstruct the Householder vector representation with the same asymptotic communication efficiency and little extra computational cost. We demonstrate the high performance and numerical stability of this algorithm both theoretically and empirically. The new Householder reconstruction algorithm allows us to design more efficient parallel QR algorithms, with significantly lower latency cost compared to Householder QR and lower bandwidth and latency costs compared with Communication-Avoiding QR (CAQR) algorithm. Experiments on supercomputers demonstrate the benefits of the communication cost improvements: in particular, our experiments show substantial improvements over tuned library implementations for tall-and-skinny matrices. Furthermore, we also provide algorithmic improvements to the Householder QR and CAQR algorithms, and we investigate several alternatives to the Householder reconstruction algorithm that sacrifice guarantees on numerical stability in some cases in order to obtain higher performance.

  20. "Table HC7.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ... for 2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ...

  1. "Table HC7.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Household...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ... for 2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ...

  2. "Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ... for 2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ...

  3. Fact #748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation, 1984-2010 | Department of Energy 8: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures on Transportation, 1984-2010 Fact #748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures on Transportation, 1984-2010 The overall share of annual household expenditures for transportation was lower in 2010 than it was in 1984, reaching its lowest point in 2009 at 15.5%. In the early to mid-1980s when oil prices were high, gasoline and motor oil made up a larger share of transportation

  4. Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",85.5450237,89.00343643,88.75545852,89.42917548,87.25590956,92.08...

  5. Transferring 2001 National Household Travel Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Patricia S; Reuscher, Tim; Schmoyer, Richard L; Chin, Shih-Miao

    2007-05-01

    Policy makers rely on transportation statistics, including data on personal travel behavior, to formulate strategic transportation policies, and to improve the safety and efficiency of the U.S. transportation system. Data on personal travel trends are needed to examine the reliability, efficiency, capacity, and flexibility of the Nation's transportation system to meet current demands and to accommodate future demand. These data are also needed to assess the feasibility and efficiency of alternative congestion-mitigating technologies (e.g., high-speed rail, magnetically levitated trains, and intelligent vehicle and highway systems); to evaluate the merits of alternative transportation investment programs; and to assess the energy-use and air-quality impacts of various policies. To address these data needs, the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) initiated an effort in 1969 to collect detailed data on personal travel. The 1969 survey was the first Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990, 1995, and 2001. Data on daily travel were collected in 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. In 2001, the survey was renamed the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) and it collected both daily and long-distance trips. The 2001 survey was sponsored by three USDOT agencies: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The primary objective of the survey was to collect trip-based data on the nature and characteristics of personal travel so that the relationships between the characteristics of personal travel and the demographics of the traveler can be established. Commercial and institutional travel were not part of the survey. Due to the survey's design, data in the NHTS survey series were not recommended for estimating travel statistics for categories smaller than the combination of Census division (e.g., New England, Middle

  6. Conducting Your Annual VPP Self-Evaluation by the Numbers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VPP Annual Self-Evaluation: By the Numbers Presented to: 25 th National VPPPA Conference August 26, 2009 San Antonio, Texas Presented by: Jack Griffith HNF-42179 CHPRC0907-38 VPP Annual Self-evaluation: By the Numbers Who is Jack Griffith: - Hanford Atomic Metal Trades Council Union Safety / Site VPP representative - 32-year member of United Brotherhood of Carpenters - Member and officer of Local 2403 Carpenters and Millwrights - Life member of Harley Owners Group - Certified Motorcycle Safety

  7. Ventilation Behavior and Household Characteristics in NewCalifornia Houses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip N.; Sherman, Max H.

    2006-02-01

    A survey was conducted to determine occupant use of windows and mechanical ventilation devices; barriers that inhibit their use; satisfaction with indoor air quality (IAQ); and the relationship between these factors. A questionnaire was mailed to a stratified random sample of 4,972 single-family detached homes built in 2003, and 1,448 responses were received. A convenience sample of 230 houses known to have mechanical ventilation systems resulted in another 67 completed interviews. Some results are: (1) Many houses are under-ventilated: depending on season, only 10-50% of houses meet the standard recommendation of 0.35 air changes per hour. (2) Local exhaust fans are under-utilized. For instance, about 30% of households rarely or never use their bathroom fan. (3) More than 95% of households report that indoor air quality is ''very'' or ''somewhat'' acceptable, although about 1/3 of households also report dustiness, dry air, or stagnant or humid air. (4) Except households where people cook several hours per week, there is no evidence that households with significant indoor pollutant sources get more ventilation. (5) Except households containing asthmatics, there is no evidence that health issues motivate ventilation behavior. (6) Security and energy saving are the two main reasons people close windows or keep them closed.

  8. TEC Working Group Members | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Members TEC Working Group Members TEC members represent many different national, regional, tribal, state and local governmental, labor, industry and professional groups. To maximize the opportunity for broad-based input and information exchange, no single state, local or tribal governmental, or other entity is itself a member. Instead, membership is composed of organizations representing those perspectives. DOE programs participate in TEC by providing regular updates on key activities and

  9. URTAC Committee Members | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    URTAC Committee Members URTAC Committee Members 2012-2014 Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee Members Dr. Nancy J. Brown* Senior Scientist and Department Head Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Mr. Wayne K. Camp Senior Geological Advisor Anadarko Petroleum Corporation Ms. Jessica J. Cavens Geologist EnCana Oil & Gas (USA) Mr. William S. Daugherty Managing Partner Blackridge Resources Mr. James P. Dwyer VP Region Engineering Baker Hughes Mr. J. Chris Hall President

  10. Modeling patterns of hot water use in households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, J.D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, J.E.

    1996-11-01

    This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual household. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies. 21 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Modeling patterns of hot water use in households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, James D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, James E.; Dunham, Camilla; Shown, Leslie J.; McCure, Quandra T.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual households. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies.

  12. Walton Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Member Corp Place: Georgia Website: www.waltonemc.com Twitter: @waltonemc Facebook: https:www.facebook.comwaltonemc Outage Hotline: 770-267-2505 Outage Map:...

  13. Interagency Energy Management Task Force Members

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interagency Energy Management Task Force is led by the Federal Energy Management Program director. Members include energy and sustainability managers from federal agencies.

  14. SSRLUO 2007 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Committee Members Joy Andrews (Ex-Officio) California State University East Bay, Chemistry, 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward, CA 94542 Professor in the Department of Chemistry...

  15. LEDSGP/about/members | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - logo.jpg Governmental Members Alternative Energy Promotion Centre, Ministry of science, Technology and Environment Auckland New Zealand City Government Australian Agency...

  16. Nothing But Networking for Residential Network Members

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call: Nothing But Networking for Residential Network Members, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, March 12, 2015.

  17. A Glance at China’s Household Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin

    2009-10-01

    Known for its scale, China is the most populous country with the world’s third largest economy. In the context of rising living standards, a relatively lower share of household consumption in its GDP, a strong domestic market and globalization, China is witnessing an unavoidable increase in household consumption, related energy consumption and carbon emissions. Chinese policy decision makers and researchers are well aware of these challenges and keen to promote green lifestyles. China has developed a series of energy policies and programs, and launched a wide-range social marketing activities to promote energy conservation.

  18. Shared Solar Projects Powering Households Throughout America | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Shared Solar Projects Powering Households Throughout America Shared Solar Projects Powering Households Throughout America January 31, 2014 - 2:30pm Addthis Shared solar projects allow consumers to take advantage of solar energy’s myriad benefits, even though the system is not located on the consumer’s own rooftop. | Photo courtesy of the Vote Solar Initiative Shared solar projects allow consumers to take advantage of solar energy's myriad benefits, even though the system

  19. Household heating bills expected to be lower this winter

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Household heating bills expected to be lower this winter U.S. consumers are expected to pay less this winter on their home heating bills because of lower oil and natural gas prices and projected milder temperatures than last winter. In its new forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said households that rely on heating oil which are mainly located in the Northeast will pay the lowest heating expenditures in 9 years down 25% from last winter as consumers are expected to save about

  20. A Method for Modeling Household Occupant Behavior to Simulate Residential Energy Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Brandon J; Starke, Michael R; Abdelaziz, Omar; Jackson, Roderick K; Tolbert, Leon M

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical method for modeling the behavior of household occupants to estimate residential energy consumption. Using data gathered by the U.S. Census Bureau in the American Time Use Survey (ATUS), actions carried out by survey respondents are categorized into ten distinct activities. These activities are defined to correspond to the major energy consuming loads commonly found within the residential sector. Next, time varying minute resolution Markov chain based statistical models of different occupant types are developed. Using these behavioral models, individual occupants are simulated to show how an occupant interacts with the major residential energy consuming loads throughout the day. From these simulations, the minimum number of occupants, and consequently the minimum number of multiple occupant households, needing to be simulated to produce a statistically accurate representation of aggregate residential behavior can be determined. Finally, future work will involve the use of these occupant models along side residential load models to produce a high-resolution energy consumption profile and estimate the potential for demand response from residential loads.

  1. Identification of Export Control Classification Number - ITER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Export Control Classification Number - ITER (April 2012) As the "Shipper of Record" please provide the appropriate Export Control Classification Number (ECCN) for the products (equipment, components and/or materials) and if applicable the nonproprietary associated installation/maintenance documentation that will be shipped from the United States to the ITER International Organization in Cadarache, France or to ITER Members worldwide on behalf of the Company. In rare instances an

  2. Data: Better Buildings Residential Network Members

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Better Buildings Residential Network members come from all sectors of the energy efficiency industry to leverage one another's experiences and expertise in an effort to accelerate the pace of energy upgrades in existing homes. Members include state and local governments, nonprofit organizations, utilities, financial institutions, and private-sector companies involved in energy efficiency programs in their locality.

  3. Member Institutions | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Member Institutions Member Institutions The 14 participating institutions and 21 principal investigators that comprise the Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center (PARC) are listed below. Washington University in St. Louis -- PARC's Host and Administrative Home - Bob Blankenship, PARC Director - Dewey Holten, PARC Associate Director - Michael Gross - Christine Kirmaier - Himadri Pakrasi Los Alamos National Laboratory - Gabriel Montaño North Carolina State University - Jonathan Lindsey

  4. Number | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property:NumOfPlants Property:NumProdWells Property:NumRepWells Property:Number of Color Cameras Property:Number of Devices Deployed Property:Number of Plants included in...

  5. Heating oil and propane households bills to be lower this winter...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heating oil and propane households bills to be lower this winter despite recent cold spell Despite the recent cold weather, households that use heating oil or propane as their main ...

  6. Table HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ... RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ...

  7. NSR Key Number Retrieval

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NSR Key Number Retrieval Pease enter key in the box Submit

  8. Elastomeric member for energy storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O.; Chute, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An energy storage device (10) is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member (16), disposed within a tubular housing (14), which elastomeric member (16) is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member (16) is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section, transition end sections, and is attached to rigid end piece assemblies (22, 24) of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections (76, 78) are such that upon stretching of the member, a substantially uniform diameter assembly results to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing (14). During manufacture, woven wire mesh sleeves (26, 28) are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section (76, 78) to provide the correct profile and helix angle. Each sleeve (26, 28) contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween.

  9. Upson Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Upson Elec Member Corp Place: Georgia Website: www.upsonemc.comUpson%20EMC%2 Facebook: https:www.facebook.comupson.emc Outage Hotline: 706-647-5475 References: EIA...

  10. Apparatus for fabricating composite ceramic members

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roy, P.; Simpson, J.L.; Aitken, E.A.

    1975-10-28

    Methods and apparatus for fabrication of composite ceramic members having particular application for measuring oxygen activities in liquid sodium are described. The method involves the simultaneous deposition of ThO$sub 2$: 15 percent Y$sub 2$O$sub 3$ on a sintered stabilized zirconia member by decomposition of gaseous ThCl$sub 4$ and YCl$sub 3$ and by reacting with oxygen gas. Means are provided for establishing an electrical potential gradient across the zirconia member whereby oxygen ions, from a source on one side of the member portion to be coated, are migrated to the opposite side where a reaction and said decomposition and deposition are effected.

  11. CMI Team Members | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMI Team Members CMI is a public/private partnership that brings together the best and brightest research minds from universities, national laboratories and the private sector to find innovative technology solutions that will help avoid a supply shortage that would threaten our clean energy industry as well as our security interests. CMI Team Members have research subcontracts from CMI or are providing cost sharing funds. Requirements include specific research project deliverables within the

  12. LLNL Distinguished Members of Technical Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    honors / dmts awards LLNL Distinguished Members of Technical Staff The Distinguised Members of Technical Staff (DMTS) classification, established in 2011, was created to serve as a career ladder for LLNL scientists and engineers within the Science & Engineering classification structure. It appropriately recognizes outstanding science and technology excellence with distinction and compensation while allowing the honored recipients to remain focused on delivering science and engineering

  13. Fact #729: May 28, 2012 Secondary Household Vehicles Travel Fewer Miles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 9: May 28, 2012 Secondary Household Vehicles Travel Fewer Miles Fact #729: May 28, 2012 Secondary Household Vehicles Travel Fewer Miles When a household has more than one vehicle, the secondary vehicles travel fewer miles than the primary vehicle. In a two-vehicle household, the second vehicle travels less than half of the miles that the primary vehicle travels in a day. In a six-vehicle household, the sixth vehicle travels fewer than five miles a day. Daily Vehicle

  14. Cost comparison between private and public collection of residual household waste: Multiple case studies in the Flemish region of Belgium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, R.; Buysse, J.; Gellynck, X.

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The goal is to compare collection costs for residual household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have clustered all municipalities in order to find mutual comparable pairs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each pair consists of one private and one public operating waste collection program. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All cases show that private service has lower costs than public service. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Municipalities were contacted to identify the deeper causes for the waste management program. - Abstract: The rising pressure in terms of cost efficiency on public services pushes governments to transfer part of those services to the private sector. A trend towards more privatizing can be noticed in the collection of municipal household waste. This paper reports the findings of a research project aiming to compare the cost between the service of private and public collection of residual household waste. Multiple case studies of municipalities about the Flemish region of Belgium were conducted. Data concerning the year 2009 were gathered through in-depth interviews in 2010. In total 12 municipalities were investigated, divided into three mutual comparable pairs with a weekly and three mutual comparable pairs with a fortnightly residual waste collection. The results give a rough indication that in all cases the cost of private service is lower than public service in the collection of household waste. Albeit that there is an interest in establishing whether there are differences in the costs and service levels between public and private waste collection services, there are clear difficulties in establishing comparisons that can be made without having to rely on a large number of assumptions and corrections. However, given the cost difference, it remains the responsibility of the municipalities to decide upon the service they offer their citizens, regardless the cost efficiency: public or private.

  15. Elastomeric member and method of manufacture therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1985-01-01

    An energy storage device (10) is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member (16) disposed within a tubular housing (14), which elastomeric member (16) is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member (16) is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section (74), and transition end sections (76, 78), attached to rigid end piece assemblies (22, 24) of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections (76, 78) are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member (16), a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing (14). Each of the transition sections (76, 78) are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve (26, 28) having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve (26, 28) also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween. During manufacture, the sleeves (26, 28) are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section (76, 78) to provide the correct profile and helix angle.

  16. Elastomeric member and method of manufacture therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, L.O.

    1985-12-10

    An energy storage device is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member disposed within a tubular housing, which elastomeric member is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section, and transition end sections, attached to rigid end piece assemblies of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member, a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing. Each of the transition sections are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween. During manufacture, the sleeves are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section to provide the correct profile and helix angle. 12 figs.

  17. Service Members Aim High-- for Energy Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Service members are helping reduce our dependency on oil, and saving taxpayers' money, with their energy-saving efforts. Operation Change Out has cut $26.3 million in total energy costs and helped prevent more than 396 lbs. of carbon dioxide.

  18. URTAC Committee Members, 2007-2008 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee Members, 2007-2008 URTAC Committee Members, 2007-2008 URTAC Committee Members, 2007-2008 (23.49 KB) More Documents & Publications Recommendations: 2007 Annual Plan URTAC Meeting - June 2007 Recommendations: 2008

  19. Previous Members | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Previous ASCAC Members Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) ASCAC Home Meetings Members ASCAC Members Bio Previous ASCAC Members Charges/Reports ASCAC Charter 2015 - signed .pdf file (134KB) ASCR Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees ASCR Home Members Previous ASCAC Members Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Dr. F. Ronald Bailey Computer Sciences Corp. 591 Branciforte Ridge Santa Cruz, CA 95065 Dr. Horst D. Simon Director, Computational Research Division

  20. Members | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Members Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) FESAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (266KB) FES Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees FES Home Members Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Committee Members .pdf file (196KB) are drawn from universities, national laboratories, and industrial companies. Members serve three-year terms and may be reappointed to serve multiple terms. Because members are appointed as experts in specific fields, it

  1. New York Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Commercial ... Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas Commercial Consumers New York Number of Natural Gas ...

  2. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Commercial ... Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas Commercial Consumers New Mexico Number of Natural ...

  3. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial ... Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas Commercial Consumers North Dakota Number of Natural ...

  4. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Steering Group Members Approve...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Steering Group Members Approve Transformation to the International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Steering Group Members Approve ...

  5. Ultra-Deepwater Advisory Committee Members | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Ultra-Deepwater Advisory Committee Members 2013-2014 Ultra-Deepwater Advisory Committee Members Dr. George A. Cooper* Professor University of California, Berkeley Dr. Quenton R. ...

  6. Text-Alternative Version: MSSLC Member Case Studies - LED Street...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    MSSLC Member Case Studies - LED Street Lighting Programs Webinar Text-Alternative Version: MSSLC Member Case Studies - LED Street Lighting Programs Webinar Below is the ...

  7. Energy Secretary Moniz, Senator Alexander, other Members of Congress...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Moniz, Senator Alexander, other Members of Congress to Make Major Investment Announcement Energy Secretary Moniz, Senator Alexander, other Members of Congress to Make Major ...

  8. Nothing But Networking for Residential Network Members | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nothing But Networking for Residential Network Members Nothing But Networking for Residential Network Members Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call: Nothing But ...

  9. Residential Network Members Unite to Form Green Bank Network...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The NY Green Bank logo. Residential Network members Connecticut Green Bank and NY Green Bank, a division of Residential Network member New York State Energy Research and ...

  10. Quantum random number generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pooser, Raphael C.

    2016-05-10

    A quantum random number generator (QRNG) and a photon generator for a QRNG are provided. The photon generator may be operated in a spontaneous mode below a lasing threshold to emit photons. Photons emitted from the photon generator may have at least one random characteristic, which may be monitored by the QRNG to generate a random number. In one embodiment, the photon generator may include a photon emitter and an amplifier coupled to the photon emitter. The amplifier may enable the photon generator to be used in the QRNG without introducing significant bias in the random number and may enable multiplexing of multiple random numbers. The amplifier may also desensitize the photon generator to fluctuations in power supplied thereto while operating in the spontaneous mode. In one embodiment, the photon emitter and amplifier may be a tapered diode amplifier.

  11. Export support of renewable energy industries. Task number 1, deliverable number 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-14

    The United States Export Council for Renewable Energy (US/ECRE), a consortium of six industry associations, promotes the interests of the renewable energy and energy efficiency member companies which provide goods and services in biomass, geothermal, hydropower, passive solar, photovoltaics, solar thermal, wind, wood energy, and energy efficiency technologies. US/ECRE`s mission is to catalyze export markets for renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies worldwide. Under this grant, US/ECRE has conducted a number of in-house activities, as well as to manage activities by member trade associations, affiliate organizations and non-member contractors and consultants. The purpose of this document is to report on task coordination and effectiveness.

  12. Export support of renewable energy industries, grant number 1, deliverable number 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-14

    The United States Export Council for Renewable Energy (US/ECRE), a consortium of six industry associations, promotes the interests of the renewable energy and energy efficiency member companies which provide goods and services in biomass, geothermal, hydropower, passive solar, photovoltaics, solar thermal, wind, wood energy, and energy efficiency technologies. US/ECRE`s mission is to catalyze export markets for renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies worldwide. Under this grant, US/ECRE has conducted a number of in-house activities, as well as to manage activities by member trade associations, affiliate organizations and non-member contractors and consultants. The purpose of this document is to report on grant coordination and effectiveness.

  13. Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households Better Buildings Residential Network Multifamily and Low-Income Housing Peer Exchange Call Series: Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households, March 13, 2014. Call Slides and Discussion Summary (919.64 KB) More Documents & Publications EcoHouse Program Overview Strengthening Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing Programs Targeted Marketing and Program

  14. Effect of Income on Appliances in U.S. Households, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01

    Entails how people live, the factors that cause the most differences in home lifestyle, including energy use in geographic location, socioeconomics and household income.

  15. Fact #614: March 15, 2010 Average Age of Household Vehicles | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 4: March 15, 2010 Average Age of Household Vehicles Fact #614: March 15, 2010 Average Age of Household Vehicles The average age of household vehicles has increased from 6.6 years in 1977 to 9.2 years in 2009. Pickup trucks have the oldest average age in every year listed. Sport utility vehicles (SUVs), first reported in the 1995 survey, have the youngest average age. Average Vehicle Age by Vehicle Type Graph showing the average vehicle age by type (car, van, pickup, SUV, all household

  16. Forum on Enhancing the Delivery of Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Households: Discussion Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-09-20

    Summarizes discussions and recommendations from a forum for practitioners and policymakers aiming to strengthen residential energy efficiency program design and delivery for middle income households.

  17. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 2001 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 9.4 9.2 19.6 41 19 40.2 16 607 0.29 598 231 Census Region and

  18. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 0 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 57.7 44.8 106.3 109 46 84.2 32 609 0.26 472 181 Census Region

  19. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 3 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 58.7 46.0 111.9 115 47 89.9 34 696 0.29 546 206 Census Region

  20. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires Natural Gas, 1997 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 61.9 51.3 106.1 103 50 85.3 32 698 0.34

  1. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 2001 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 66.9 53.8 137.2 90 35 72.4 27 873 0.34 702 265 Census Region

  2. Report number codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.N.

    1985-05-01

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  3. Quantum random number generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Zhang, Zhen; Qi, Bing

    2016-06-28

    Here, quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at amore » high speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.« less

  4. Waste Management Committee Member Roster | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Member Roster Waste Management Committee Member Roster List of the NNMCAB members that serve on the Waste Management Committee WM Roster - June 2016 (278.02 KB) More Documents & Publications Environmental Management and Remediation Committee Roster Executive Committee Member Roster NNMCAB Membership Roster

  5. CESA-2010-Members-Report.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2010-Members-Report.pdf CESA-2010-Members-Report.pdf CESA-2010-Members-Report.pdf CESA-2010-Members-Report.pdf (2.66 MB) More Documents & Publications Connecticut Fuel Cell Programs - From Demonstration to Deployment CESA-fuelcell-advancing-state-policies2010.pdf Clean Energy State Program Guide: Mainstreaming Solar Electricity Strategies for States to Build Local Markets

  6. ALARA notes, Number 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Beckman, M.C.

    1993-10-01

    This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the `tyranny` of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment.

  7. Members | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Members Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) ASCAC Home Meetings Members ASCAC Members Bio Previous ASCAC Members Charges/Reports ASCAC Charter 2015 - signed .pdf file (134KB) ASCR Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees ASCR Home Members Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Professor Daniel A. Reed, Chair Office of the Vice President for Research and Economic Development University of Iowa 2660 UCC Iowa City, IA 52242 dan-reed@uiowa.edu 319-335-2119 (phone)

  8. Document Details Document Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Document Details Document Number Date of Document Document Title/Description [Links below to each document] D195066340 Not listed. N/A REVISIONS IN STRATIGRAPHIC NOMENCLATURE OF COLUMBIA RIVER BASALT GROUP D196000240 Not listed. N/A EPA DENIAL OF LINER LEACHATE COLLECTION SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS D196005916 Not listed. N/A LATE CENOZOIC STRATIGRAPHY AND TECTONIC EVOLUTION WITHIN SUBSIDING BASIN SOUTH CENTRAL WASHINGTON D196025993 RHO-BWI-ST-14 N/A SUPRABASALT SEDIMENTS OF COLD CREEK SYNCLINE AREA

  9. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1996-01-01

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal to noise ratio.

  10. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1996-10-22

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer is disclosed for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. 12 figs.

  11. A material flow analysis on current electrical and electronic waste disposal from Hong Kong households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, Winifred Ka-Yan; Chung, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Chan

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Most household TWARC waste is sold directly to private e-waste collectors in HK. ► The current e-waste recycling network is popular with HK households. ► About 80% of household generated TWARC is exported overseas each year. ► Over 7000 tonnes/yr of household generated TWARC reach landfills. ► It is necessary to upgrade safety and awareness in HK’s e-waste recycling industry. - Abstract: A material flow study on five types of household electrical and electronic equipment, namely television, washing machine, air conditioner, refrigerator and personal computer (TWARC) was conducted to assist the Government of Hong Kong to establish an e-waste take-back system. This study is the first systematic attempt on identifying key TWARC waste disposal outlets and trade practices of key parties involved in Hong Kong. Results from two questionnaire surveys, on local households and private e-waste traders, were used to establish the material flow of household TWARC waste. The study revealed that the majority of obsolete TWARC were sold by households to private e-waste collectors and that the current e-waste collection network is efficient and popular with local households. However, about 65,000 tonnes/yr or 80% of household generated TWARC waste are being exported overseas by private e-waste traders, with some believed to be imported into developing countries where crude recycling methods are practiced. Should Hong Kong establish a formal recycling network with tight regulatory control on imports and exports, the potential risks of current e-waste recycling practices on e-waste recycling workers, local residents and the environment can be greatly reduced.

  12. Method for electrically isolating an electrically conductive member from another such member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsang, K.L.; Chen, Y.

    1984-02-09

    The invention relates to methods for electrically isolating a first electrically conductive member from another such member by means of an electrically insulating medium. In accordance with the invention, the insulating medium is provided in the form of MgO which contains a dopant selected from lithium, copper, cobalt, sodium, silver, gold and hydrogen. The dopant is present in the MgO in an amount effective to suppress dielectric breakdown of the MgO, even at elevated temperatures and in the presence of electrical fields.

  13. Carroll Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Georgia Phone Number: 770-832-3552 Website: www.cemc.com Twitter: @CarrollEMC Facebook: https:www.facebook.comCarrollEMC Outage Hotline: 770-832-6979 References: EIA...

  14. APPARATUS FOR NON-DESTRUCTIVE INSPECTION OF CANTILEVERED MEMBERS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, E.R.; Mahoney, C.H.; Lay, C.R.

    1961-10-24

    An apparatus for non-destructive inspection of cantilevered members, such as compressor blades, is described. The member under inspection is vibrated with a regulated source of air under pressure. The amplitude of vibration of the member is maintained at its natural frequency. The frequency of vibration of the member is measured. An indication of an excessive decay or erratic shifting in the measured frequency above an allowable hysteretic decay is provided as an indication of a fault in the member. The member is vibrated for a selected test period. (AEC)

  15. Modular redundant number systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-31

    With the increased use of public key cryptography, faster modular multiplication has become an important cryptographic issue. Almost all public key cryptography, including most elliptic curve systems, use modular multiplication. Modular multiplication, particularly for the large public key modulii, is very slow. Increasing the speed of modular multiplication is almost synonymous with increasing the speed of public key cryptography. There are two parts to modular multiplication: multiplication and modular reduction. Though there are fast methods for multiplying and fast methods for doing modular reduction, they do not mix well. Most fast techniques require integers to be in a special form. These special forms are not related and converting from one form to another is more costly than using the standard techniques. To this date it has been better to use the fast modular reduction technique coupled with standard multiplication. Standard modular reduction is much more costly than standard multiplication. Fast modular reduction (Montgomery`s method) reduces the reduction cost to approximately that of a standard multiply. Of the fast multiplication techniques, the redundant number system technique (RNS) is one of the most popular. It is simple, converting a large convolution (multiply) into many smaller independent ones. Not only do redundant number systems increase speed, but the independent parts allow for parallelization. RNS form implies working modulo another constant. Depending on the relationship between these two constants; reduction OR division may be possible, but not both. This paper describes a new technique using ideas from both Montgomery`s method and RNS. It avoids the formula problem and allows fast reduction and multiplication. Since RNS form is used throughout, it also allows the entire process to be parallelized.

  16. EA-98-M Members of WSPP, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    M Members of WSPP, Inc. EA-98-M Members of WSPP, Inc. Order authorizing WSPP to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-98-M WSPP Final.pdf More Documents & Publications ...

  17. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Triples in Size to 16 Members...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Triples in Size to 16 Members Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Triples in Size to 16 Members September 16, 2007 - 2:33pm Addthis Nations Sign On...

  18. Past Members | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Past Members since 2000 High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings 2016 HEPAP Membership Past Members since 2000 ChargesReports Charter .pdf file (44KB) HEP ...

  19. Members | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Members Home > Research > Members Search by Type Staff PI If you see this field, leave it BLANK. OR Name or Keyword(s) Search If you see this field, leave it BLANK.

  20. Vermont Member Helps House Hunters Come Home to Energy Savings...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Vermont Member Helps House Hunters Come Home to Energy Savings Photo of the outside of a two-story house, with a tree nearby. Better Buildings Residential Network member ...

  1. Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    You are not required to respond to this form unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. You will find the OMB approval number and expiration date at the top left-hand ...

  2. Energy-efficient housing alternatives: a predictive model of factors affecting household perceptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreckengost, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The major purpose of this investigation was to assess the impact of household socio-economic factors, dwelling characteristics, energy conservation behavior, and energy attitudes on the perceptions of energy-efficient housing alternatives. Perceptions of passive solar, active solar, earth sheltered, and retrofitted housing were examined. Data used were from the Southern Regional Research Project, S-141, Housing for Low and Moderate Income Families. Responses from 1804 households living in seven southern states were analyzed. A conceptual model was proposed to test the hypothesized relationships which were examined by path analysis. Perceptions of energy efficient housing alternatives were found to be a function of selected household and dwelling characteristics, energy attitude, household economic factors, and household conservation behavior. Age and education of the respondent, family size, housing-income ratio, utility income ratio, energy attitude, and size of the dwelling unit were found to have direct and indirect effects on perceptions of energy-efficient housing alternatives. Energy conservation behavior made a significant direct impact with behavioral energy conservation changes having the most profound influence. Conservation behavior was influenced by selected household and dwelling characteristics, energy attitude, and household economic factors.

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office: Information for Members of Media | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy News » Vehicle Technologies Office: Information for Members of Media Vehicle Technologies Office: Information for Members of Media The Vehicle Technologies Office provides photos, videos, and contact information for members of the media to cover Vehicle Technologies Office-related news. Photos Members of the media may use the following photos. For low-resolution images, click on an image below. Photo of an engine. Photo of a hybrid electric bus. Photo of a man fueling a natural

  4. Interagency Energy Management Task Force Members | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interagency Energy Management Task Force Members Interagency Energy Management Task Force Members The Interagency Energy Management Task Force is led by the Federal Energy Management Program director. Members include energy and sustainability managers from federal agencies. Task Force Executive Director Dr. Timothy Unruh U.S. Department of Energy 202-586-5772 Task Force Members Organization Primary Contact Alternate Contact General Services Administration Mark Ewing Karren Curran National

  5. EA-98-M Members of WSPP, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    98-M Members of WSPP, Inc. EA-98-M Members of WSPP, Inc. Order authorizing WSPP to export electric energy to Canada. EA-98-M WSPP Final.pdf (869.2 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-98-M Members of WSPP, Inc. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-98-M WSPP Inc. EA-098-D Western Systems Power Pool

  6. Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparn, B.; Jin, X.; Earle, L.

    2013-10-01

    With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses. The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

  7. Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparn, B.; Jin, X.; Earle, L.

    2013-10-01

    With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses.The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

  8. Fact #616: March 29, 2010 Household Vehicle-Miles of Travel by Trip Purpose

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 6: March 29, 2010 Household Vehicle-Miles of Travel by Trip Purpose Fact #616: March 29, 2010 Household Vehicle-Miles of Travel by Trip Purpose In 2009, getting to and from work accounted for about 27% of household vehicle-miles of travel (VMT). Work-related business was 8.4% of VMT in 2001, but declined to 6.7% in 2009, possibly due to advancements in computing technology making it possible for more business to be handled electronically. VMT for shopping was almost

  9. Estimating household fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and LPG prices by census region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S.

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this research is to estimate individual fuel prices within the residential sector. The data from four US Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration, residential energy consumption surveys were used to estimate the models. For a number of important fuel types - fuel oil, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas - the estimation presents a problem because these fuels are not used by all households. Estimates obtained by using only data in which observed fuel prices are present would be biased. A correction for this self-selection bias is needed for estimating prices of these fuels. A literature search identified no past studies on application of the selectivity model for estimating prices of residential fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas. This report describes selectivity models that utilize the Dubin/McFadden correction method for estimating prices of residential fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas in the Northeast, Midwest, South, and West census regions. Statistically significant explanatory variables are identified and discussed in each of the models. This new application of the selectivity model should be of interest to energy policy makers, researchers, and academicians.

  10. New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...