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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Household Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,13.5,8.5,4.3,2,1.8,5.9,13.1 "2 Persons",34.8,6,8.8,7.3,4.4,8.4,3.5,8.4 "3 Persons",18.4,3.1,4.7,3.4,2.5,4.6,2,5.8 "4 Persons",15.9,2.2,3.5,3.3,2.7,4.3,2.2,5.1

2

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,25.8,28,19.6,12.7,20.2,16,37.3 "2 or More",3.7,0.3,0.5,0.9,0.4,1.7,"Q",0.5 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,0.3,"Q","N","Q",0.5,0.8

3

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Housing Unit Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,4.9,5.4,3.5,2.4,4.3,3.2,8.1 "New England",5.5,1.3,1.3,1,0.6,1.2,0.7,2.3 "Middle Atlantic",15.1,3.7,4.1,2.5,1.8,3.1,2.5,5.8 "Midwest",25.6,6.5,6.6,4.7,3,4.8,3.5,9.4

4

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Space Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.5,0.3,0.2,"Q",0.2,0.3,0.6 "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,26.2,28.5,20.4,13,21.8,16.3,37.9 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,25.9,28.1,20.3,12.9,21.8,16,37.3

5

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC7.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" HC7.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,26.1,28.5,20.2,12.9,21.8,16.3,37.8 "1.",103.3,25.1,27.1,19.2,12.3,19.6,15.8,36.3 "2 or More",6.2,0.9,1.4,1,0.6,2.2,0.5,1.5

6

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Electronics Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,17.1,10.8,4.2,1.8,1.6,10.3,20.6 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,9.6,18,16.4,11.3,20.3,6.4,17.9 "Number of Desktop PCs" "1.",50.3,8.3,14.2,11.4,7.2,9.2,5.3,14.2

7

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.9,0.9,"Q","Q","Q",1.3,2.3 "500 to 999",23.8,10.5,7.3,3.3,1.4,1.2,6.6,12.9 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,5.8,7,3.8,2.2,2,3.9,8.9

8

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,20.8,23.6,17,11.3,19.1,13,30.7 "1.",28.6,9.4,9.1,4.5,2.4,3.2,5.7,12.6 "2.",29.5,6.8,8,5.8,3.7,5.2,4.2,10.2

9

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,5.3,4.7,2.8,1.9,3.1,3.6,7.5 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,21.5,24.1,17.8,11.2,18.8,13,31.1 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,21,23.5,17.4,11,18.6,12.6,30.3 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.5,0.6,0.4,"Q","Q",0.5,0.8

10

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2"...

11

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than...

12

"Table HC7.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Space Heating Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.5,0.3,0.2,"Q",0.2,0.3,0.6 "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,26.2,28.5,20.4,13,21.8,16.3,37.9 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,25.9,28.1,20.3,12.9,21.8,16,37.3

13

"Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,2.9,2.5,1.3,0.5,1,2.4,4.6 "2 Times A Day",24.6,6.5,7,4.3,3.2,3.6,4.8,10.3 "Once a Day",42.3,8.8,9.8,8.7,5.1,10,5,12.9

14

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Title Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Zimring, Mark, Merrian Borgeson, Ian M. Hoffman, Charles A. Goldman, Elizabeth Stuart, Annika Todd, and Megan A. Billingsley Pagination 102 Date Published 12/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract The question posed in this report is: How can programs motivate these middle income single family households to seek out more comprehensive energy upgrades, and empower them to do so? Research methods included interviews with more than 35 program administrators, policy makers, researchers, and other experts; case studies of programs, based on interviews with staff and a review of program materials and data; and analysis of relevant data sources and existing research on demographics, the financial status of Americans, and the characteristics of middle income American households. While there is no 'silver bullet' to help these households overcome the range of barriers they face, this report describes outreach strategies, innovative program designs, and financing tools that show promise in increasing the attractiveness and accessibility of energy efficiency for this group. These strategies and tools should be seen as models that are currently being honed to build our knowledge and capacity to deliver energy improvements to middle income households. However, the strategies described in this report are probably not sufficient, in the absence of robust policy frameworks, to deliver these improvements at scale. Instead, these strategies must be paired with enabling and complementary policies to reach their full potential.

15

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Household Tables Household Tables (Million U.S. Households; 24 pages, 122 kb) Contents Pages HC2-1a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-4a. Household Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-7a. Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2

16

Table HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 20.3 3.3 4.2 4.9 7.8 2.6 6.8 6.4 New England .............................. 5.4 0.8 1.1 1.3 2.3 0.6 1.6 9.9 Middle Atlantic ............................ 14.8 2.6 3.2 3.5 5.6 2.0 5.2 7.7 Midwest ......................................... 24.5 3.7 5.2 6.8 8.9 2.8 7.4 5.8 East North Central ......................

17

"Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"...

18

Income inequality and carbon dioxide emissions: The case of Chinese urban households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper draws on Chinese survey data to investigate variations in carbon dioxide emissions across households with different income levels. Rich households generate more emissions per capita than poor households via both their direct energy consumption and their higher expenditure on goods and services that use energy as an intermediate input. An econometric analysis confirms a positive relationship between emissions and income and establishes a slightly increasing marginal propensity to emit (MPE) over the relevant income range. The redistribution of income from rich to poor households is therefore shown to reduce aggregate household emissions, suggesting that the twin pursuits of reducing inequality and emissions can be achieved in tandem.

Jane Golley; Xin Meng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

usage_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Usage Indicators Tables Usage Indicators Tables (Million U.S. Households; 60 pages, 247 kb) Contents Pages HC6-1a. Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-2a. Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-4a. Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-5a. Usage Indicators by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-6a. Usage Indicators by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-7a. Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5

20

housingunit_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Tables Housing Unit Tables (Million U.S. Households; 49 pages, 210 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-4a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-6a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-7a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home Office Equipment Tables Home Office Equipment Tables (Million U.S. Households; 12 pages, 123 kb) Contents Pages HC7-1a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-4a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-7a. Home Office Equipment by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1

22

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neighborhood Program GETS – Green Energy Training ServicesGJGEI – Green Jobs, Green Energy Initiative CEWO – Cleanincome households. The Green Energy Training Services (GETS)

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Energy Department Provides $140.3 Million to Low-Income Families for Home  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

140.3 Million to Low-Income Families 140.3 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization Energy Department Provides $140.3 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization April 3, 2006 - 9:55am Addthis Funding is first installment of $243 million in total weatherization grants for FY 2006 WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced $140.3 million in weatherization program grants to 31 states and the Navajo Nation to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families; weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by $358 annually. Total Fiscal Year 2006 funding is $243 million and will provide weatherization to approximately 96,560 homes. "Weatherizing your home is a valuable way to save energy and money,"

24

DOE Provides $96.4 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

96.4 Million to Low-Income Families for Home 96.4 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization DOE Provides $96.4 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization July 6, 2006 - 2:50pm Addthis Funding is Second Installment of $243 Million in Total Weatherization Grants for FY 2006 WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced $96.4 million in weatherization program grants to 19 states to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families. Weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by $358 annually. Total Fiscal Year 2006 funding is $243 million and will provide weatherization to approximately 96,560 homes. "Weatherizing your home is a valuable way to save energy and money," Secretary Bodman said. "The Department of Energy's weatherization program

25

Department of Energy Provides Nearly $112 Million to Low-Income Families  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

112 Million to Low-Income 112 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization Department of Energy Provides Nearly $112 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization March 29, 2007 - 12:17pm Addthis Funding is First Installment of $204.5 Million in Total Weatherization Grants for FY 2007 WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $111.6 million in weatherization grants to 30 states and the Navajo Nation to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families. Weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by $358 annually. Total Fiscal Year 2007 funding is $204.5 million and will provide weatherization to approximately 70,000 homes. "Weatherization is a valuable way to help save money and energy," DOE Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Alexander

26

Department of Energy Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Families for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

88 Million to Low-Income 88 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization Department of Energy Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization June 29, 2007 - 2:36pm Addthis Funding is Second Installment of $200 Million in Total Weatherization Grants for FY 2007 WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $88 million in weatherization grants to 20 states to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families. Weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by $358 annually, and this year, DOE expects funding to weatherize approximately 70,000 homes nationwide. For every dollar spent, weatherization returns $1.53 in energy savings over the life of the measures. DOE's weatherization program performs energy

27

Department of Energy Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Families for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization Department of Energy Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization June 29, 2007 - 2:36pm Addthis Funding is Second Installment of $200 Million in Total Weatherization Grants for FY 2007 WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $88 million in weatherization grants to 20 states to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families. Weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by $358 annually, and this year, DOE expects funding to weatherize approximately 70,000 homes nationwide. For every dollar spent, weatherization returns $1.53 in energy savings over the life of the measures. DOE's weatherization program performs energy

28

A theoretical and simulation-based examination of household vehicle choice through an adoption perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

=2 Senior h =3 Table 17: Japan household income distributionto 2005 Japan Census (millions of households)). CHAPTER 5.same shifts of household dynamics as Japan (i.e. lower birth

Liu, Jenny Hsing-I

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

The Impact of the Earned Income Tax Credit on Economic Well-Being: A Comparison Across Household Types  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using survey data from Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) recipients in Madison County, New ... of the EITC across household types. For tax years 2002 through 2004, we find that ... of EITC amounts, poverty rates, u...

Nicole B. Simpson; Jill Tiefenthaler; Jameson Hyde

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Effects on minority and low-income households of the EPA proposal to reduce leaded gasoline use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To reduce the potentially harmful environmental effects of lead in the environment, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a reduction in the amount of lead used in leaded gasoline. This report examines the potential impacts of such action on minority and low-income households in the US. The benefits of the EPA's proposal would presumably accrue primarily to households that contain small children and that are located in the central cities of metropolitan areas. This is because small children (under age seven) are particularly susceptible to the effects of lead and also because the automobile traffic density in central cities is higher than in any other area. Potential costs are examined in terms of households that own vehicles requiring leaded gasoline. Costs could accrue either because of higher gasoline prices due to reduced lead content or because of higher vehicle repair costs for engines that must use leaded gasoline to prevent excessive wear. Because of their location and number, minority and low-income households with small children would benefit more than the average US household. No costs would be incurred by the relatively large segment of minority and low-income households that own no vehicles. However, the Hispanic and other minority (except black) and low-income households that do own vehicles have a greater than average share of vehicles that require leaded gasoline; costs to these households because of the EPA's proposed action would be comparatively high.

Rose, K.; LaBelle, S.; Winter, R.; Klein, Y.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Air Conditioning Tables Air Conditioning Tables (Million U.S. Households; 24 pages, 138 kb) Contents Pages HC4-1a. Air Conditioning by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-7a. Air Conditioning by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2

32

Physical activity of adults in households with and without children  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

whites, fewer Hispanics, and higher household incomes thanWhites, fewer Hispanics, and higher household incomes thanWhites, fewer Hispanics, and higher household incomes than

Candelaria, Jeanette Irene

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Do households smooth expenditure over anticipated income changes? Evidence from bonus payments to public employees in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides new evidence of consumers’ reaction to an anticipated sizable change in income. Until FY2002, Japanese public employees received predictable large bonus payments three times a fiscal year (in June, December, and March), but the March bonus was abolished in FY2003. We compare the seasonal patterns of public employees’ expenditure before and after the reform of the bonus payment schedule. Contrary to the prediction of the life cycle/permanent income hypothesis (LC/PIH), we find evidence that monthly patterns of household expenditure were significantly affected by the anticipated large change in income pattern. However, at closer inspection, this excess sensitivity of expenditure is observed only for expenditure subcategories of some durability, i.e., durables and semi-durables. Thus, while the LC/PIH does not appear to hold for expenditure (which we observe here), it may still hold for consumption.

Masahiro Hori; Satoshi Shimizutani

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Patterns of residential energy demand by type of household: white, black, Hispanic, and low- and nonlow-income  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compares patterns of residential energy use by white, black, Hispanic, low-income, and nonlow-income households. The observed downward trend in residential energy demand over the period of this study can be attributed primarily to changes in space-heating energy demand. Demand for space-heating energy has experienced a greater decline than energy demand for other end uses for two reasons: (1) it is the largest end use of residential energy, causing public attention to focus on it and on strategies for conserving it; and (2) space-heating expenditures are large relative to other residential energy expenditures. The price elasticity of demand is thus greater, due to the income effect. The relative demand for space-heating energy, when controlled for the effect of climate, declined significantly over the 1978-1982 period for all fuels studied. Income classes do not differ significantly. In contrast, black households were found to use more energy for space heating than white households were found to use, although those observed differences are statistically significant only for houses heated with natural gas. As expected, the average expenditure for space-heating energy increased significantly for dwellings heated by natural gas and fuel oil. No statistically significant increases were found in electricity expenditures for space heating. Electric space heat is, in general, confined to milder regions of the country, where space heating is relatively less essential. As a consequence, we would expect the electricity demand for space heating to be more price-elastic than the demand for other fuels.

Klein, Y.; Anderson, J.; Kaganove, J.; Throgmorton, J.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Race, median household income, and primary Grade IV glioma treatment patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...behaviors among a population of Hispanic origin. Daisy Gonzalez 1...population subgroups, including Hispanics. Objective: This study assessed...population-based sample of Hispanic women in PR. Methods: This...complex sampling design of households in the San Juan Metropolitan...

Jill S. Barnholtz-Sloan; Vonetta L. Williams; Marc Chamberlain; and Andrew E. Sloan

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Energy Department Provides $140.3 Million to Low-Income Families...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

grants to 31 states and the Navajo Nation to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families; weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by...

37

Department of Energy Provides Nearly $112 Million to Low-Income...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

grants to 30 states and the Navajo Nation to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families. Weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by...

38

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, 3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 9.7 -- -- -- 6.5 11.3 5.7 2 Persons ...................................... 35.1 4.3 -- -- -- 2.0 7.8 5.8 3 Persons ...................................... 17.0 -- 3.3 -- -- 2.2 5.2 7.3 4 Persons ...................................... 15.6 -- 2.2 -- -- -- 4.3 8.1 5 Persons ...................................... 7.1

39

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Space Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,22.8,26.5,20.5,13.8,9.1,5.6,11.8,16.1 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,0.6,0.7,0.5,0.2,0.2,0.1,0.1,0.5

40

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,18.3,22.3,17.9,11.9,8.1,5.1,10.4,12.8 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,1.5,1.3,0.9,0.5,0.2,0.1,0.3,1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Appliances" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,22.2,25.8,19.4,13,8.1,4.9,8.8,15.9 "1.",100.8,22,25.6,19.2,12.8,8,4.7,8.5,15.8

42

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Household Demographics" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,11.3,9.4,5,2.8,1.2,0.5,1,5 "2 Persons",35.8,5.7,8.3,7,5.3,3.1,2,4.3,3.9 "3 Persons",18.1,2.9,3.9,3.5,2.3,1.9,1.1,2.4,2.9

43

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More...

44

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, 3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.5 1.4 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.5 0.9 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 12.3 17.4 21.5 31.7 9.6 23.4 3.9 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 0.4 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.9 20.8 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 .......................... 80.8 11.9 16.7 21.0 31.2 9.1 22.6 3.9 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 3 .............. 57.5 6.2 10.7 15.2 25.3 4.5 12.4 5.3 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 4.9 9.1 12.1 20.1 3.6 10.4 6.1 With a Heat Pump

45

Collecting program planning and evaluation data from low-income, minority households: A case study baseline survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Wisconsin Demand Side Demonstrations (WDSD) collaborative effort, Wisconsin Electric Power Company (WEPCo) is implementing a direct-install lighting program in two minority low-income communities in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. One of the communities has a very high proportion of Hispanic residents, many of whom speak only Spanish, while the other is a predominantly African-American neighborhood. This demonstration is designed to test the use of community based organizations (CBOs) to contact, market and recruit program participants. As a matter of policy WDSD requires that all programs be evaluated and that whenever feasible, baseline studies be conducted. This paper describes the methods used to conduct the baseline studies in these neighborhoods. The methods are important for evaluators because they demonstrate a very effective way of surveying a hard to reach population. They may also be useful for marketers and program staff who may find the approach useful for working with similar populations. The methods presented in this paper resulted in a 94% completion rate for a baseline survey that averaged twenty-two minutes. The survey probed household activities, appliance mix, appliance use, and community social activities. The paper demonstrates what can be achieved in minority communities when resources located in the neighborhoods are mobilized to obtain market, program or evaluation information.

Hall, N. [RCG/Hagler, Bailly, Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Wintersberger, J. [Wisconsin Electric Power Co., Milwaukee, WI (United States); Reed, J.; Maggiore, A.; Pinkowski, C. [Wisconsin Demand Side Demonstration, Inc., Madison, WI (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, 3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.4 1.9 1.2 1.0 0.6 1.9 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 47.6 3.0 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 13.2 19.8 25.5 37.7 10.7 38.8 3.2 Personal Computers 2 ................... 60.0 3.7 8.7 16.0 31.6 3.7 17.4 4.6 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 2.8 7.1 12.8 22.4 2.8 13.6 5.1 2 or more .................................... 9.1 0.6 0.7 1.7 6.2 0.6 2.2 13.0 Number of Laptop PCs

47

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2...

48

The impacts of solar water heating in low-income households on the distribution utility’s active, reactive and apparent power demands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Brazilian low-income households, water-heating requirements are typically met by electrical showerheads. On average, 73.1% of all residential units in the country are equipped with these resistance-heating devices, with nominal powers ranging from 3 to 8 kW. This situation imposes a considerable burden on the electricity utility companies, since electrical showerheads typically represent the highest load but the lowest utilization (load factor) in a residential consumer unit. Furthermore, typical utilization times coincide with, and contribute to, the electrical power demand peaks in Brazil, rendering these low-cost, high-power electrical devices a high-cost consumer for the electrical system to cater for. For low-income residential consumers, electricity tariffs are subsidized, and utilities must therefore make a considerable investment in infrastructure for a limited return. In this paper we analyze the impacts of solar water heating in low-income households on the distribution utility active, reactive and apparent power demands. We have monitored a statistically representative group of low-income residences equipped with a compact domestic solar water heater in Florianopolis – Brazil for 1 year. We show that in comparison with identical residential units using electrical showerheads, with the adoption of solar water heating the reductions in the active, reactive and apparent power demands on the distribution utility were 49%, 29% and 49% respectively.

Helena F. Naspolini; Ricardo Rüther

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

" Million U.S. Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million U.S. Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.8,4,4.3,3.5,2.8,1.9,1.5,2.8,2.9 "New England",5.5,1.1,1,1,0.8,0.5,0.4,0.8,0.8

50

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Space Heating by Household Income, 3a. Space Heating by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 18.4 22.7 26.8 38.1 14.6 33.4 3.3 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 0.3 Q 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 23.4 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 Q Q Q 0.2 Q Q 35.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.3 22.8 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 18.4 22.7

51

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Appliances by Household Income, 3a. Appliances by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.5 1.4 1.1 1.0 0.8 1.6 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 18.0 22.0 26.1 35.6 14.4 32.6 3.2 1 ................................................ 95.2 17.3 21.1 24.8 32.0 13.8 31.1 3.4 2 or More .................................. 6.5 0.8 0.9 1.3 3.6 0.6 1.5 13.1 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 18.0 22.0 26.1 35.6 14.4 32.6 3.2

52

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Household Characteristics",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,11.5,6.2,2.1,3.2 "2 Persons",34.8,12.5,6.5,2.1,3.9 "3 Persons",18.4,7,4,1.1,1.8 "4 Persons",15.9,5.6,2.9,1.2,1.5 "5 Persons",7.9,2.9,1.5,0.3,1.1 "6 or More Persons",4.1,1.2,0.5,"Q",0.6 "2005 Annual Household Income Category"

53

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Household Characteristics",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,5.5,3.8,1.7 "2 Persons",34.8,6.5,4.8,1.7 "3 Persons",18.4,3.4,2.4,1.1 "4 Persons",15.9,3,2.4,0.7 "5 Persons",7.9,1.4,1.2,0.2 "6 or More Persons",4.1,0.7,0.6,0.1 "2005 Annual Household Income Category" "Less than $9,999",9.9,1.9,1.4,0.5 "$10,000 to $14,999",8.5,1.8,1.4,0.4

54

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Household Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,7.3,5,2.3 "2 Persons",34.8,8.4,5.7,2.7 "3 Persons",18.4,4.1,3,1.1 "4 Persons",15.9,3.2,2.2,1 "5 Persons",7.9,1.8,1.4,0.4 "6 or More Persons",4.1,0.7,0.4,0.3 "2005 Annual Household Income Category" "Less than $9,999",9.9,2.3,1.8,0.5 "$10,000 to $14,999",8.5,2,1.4,0.6

55

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Number of Household Members",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "2009 Annual Household Income" "Less than $20,000",23.7,11.3,5.7,2.9,2,1.9 "$20,000 to $39,999",27.5,9.4,8.3,3.9,3,2.9 "$40,000 to $59,000",21.2,5,7,3.5,3,2.6 "$60,000 to $79,999",14.2,2.8,5.3,2.3,2.2,1.6 "$80,000 to $99,999",9.3,1.2,3.1,1.9,1.7,1.3 "$100,000 to $119,999",5.7,0.5,2,1.1,1.4,0.7

56

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Household Demographics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census...

57

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Household Demographics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

58

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Household Demographics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

59

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

60

Serving low income households in a competitive environment: It's a tough job, but someone's got to do it  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the brave new world of a more competitive electricity market, low income customers are destined to be the forgotten market segment. Given the endemic challenges of minimal incomes, high turnover, payment problems, security risks, etc., this is the last place where ambitious power marketers (or the new competitively oriented utilities) are going to look for profits. Consequently, whereas private sector research devoted to potentially profitable segments of the residential market has picked up speed (especially regarding those higher socio-economic status early adopter types who participate in pilot programs), little or no market research has been focused on the low income population. The only trouble with this scenario is that the problem of needing to serve low income customers is not going to disappear after deregulation. If anything, it will likely intensify. In recognition of these circumstances, the purpose of this paper is to focus attention on the issue of providing energy efficiency services to low income customers in a restructured electricity market. The vehicle for doing so is to present some highlight results of an extensive sequence of research focused on the low income area, conducted for the Detroit Edison Evaluation Collaborative. This research includes an evaluation of a rather innovative in-home education and energy efficiency program operated by Detroit Edison, together with what the authors believe to be an unprecedented investigation and market assessment of the low income customer population of that major Midwestern utility. The paper then concludes with some more general observations regarding the need for and feasibility of providing energy efficiency services to this customer segment.

Kushler, M.G.; Malinowski, J.P.; Hall, N.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.5,0.4,0.2,0.2,"Q","Q",0.1,0.3 1,24.2,8,6.4,4.2,2.5,1.1,0.7,1.2,4.8 2,37.5,8.7,10.3,6.7,4.6,2.7,1.4,3.1,5.9 3,26.6,4.2,6.3,5.4,3.6,2.6,1.6,2.9,3.5

62

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Computers and Other Electronics" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,12.4,9,3.6,1.5,0.4,0.1,0.3,8.4 1,46.9,8.2,13,10.6,6.7,3.7,1.8,2.8,5.8 2,24.3,2.2,4.1,4.6,3.7,2.9,2.2,4.6,1.8 3,9.5,0.6,1,1.6,1.5,1.6,1,2.3,0.5

63

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.7,0.5,0.3,0.4,0.3,0.2,0.5,0.5 1,108.1,22.9,26.7,20.4,13.4,8.7,5.3,10.6,16.3 "2 or More",2.7,0.1,0.3,0.4,0.4,0.3,0.2,0.9,0.1 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters3"

64

Trip rate comparison of workplace and household surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Available vs. Trip Rate) 14 El Paso Household Survey (Household Income vs. Trip Rate) . 15 El Paso Workplace Survey (Household Income vs. Trip Rate) . 52 52 53 53 54 54 16 BPA Household Survey (Household Size vs. Trip Rate) . . 17 BPA Workplace... Survey (Household Size vs. Trip Rate) . . 56 56 18 BPA Household Survey (No. of Employees vs. Trip Rate) . . 19 BPA Workplace Survey (No. of Employees vs. Trip Rate) . . 20 BPA Household Survey (Vehicles Available vs. Trip Rate) . . 21 BPA Workplace...

Endres, Stephen Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

65

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Number of Household Members" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,6,7.4,11.5,6.3 "2 Persons",35.8,6.3,8.5,13.4,7.6 "3 Persons",18.1,3.3,3.9,6.8,4.1 "4 Persons",15.7,3.1,3.5,5.8,3.3 "5 Persons",7.7,1.3,1.7,2.8,2 "6 or More Persons",5,0.8,0.9,1.8,1.5 "2009 Annual Household Income" "Less than $20,000",23.7,4,5.5,10,4.3 "$20,000 to $39,999",27.5,4.3,6.5,10.7,6

66

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings...

67

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Household Expenditures Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Household Expenditures Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division (see

68

Table 5.17. U.S. Number of Households by Vehicle Fuel Expenditures...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

5.17. U.S. Number of Households by Vehicle Fuel Expenditures, 1994 (Continued) (Million Households) 1993 Household and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor: All...

69

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Household Characteristics",,"City","Town","Surburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,14.7,5.1,5.1,5.1 "2 Persons",34.8,12.8,6.1,7.5,8.5 "3 Persons",18.4,7.6,3,3.8,3.9 "4 Persons",15.9,6.8,2.6,3.3,3.1 "5 Persons",7.9,3.3,1.5,2.1,1 "6 or More Persons",4.1,1.9,0.7,0.8,0.7 "2005 Annual Household Income Category" "Less than $9,999",9.9,5.2,1.6,1.2,1.9 "$10,000 to $14,999",8.5,4.5,1.6,0.8,1.6

70

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 Weatherization Population Facts - Roughly 25% of Federally eligible households move in and out of poverty "classification" each year. - The average income of Federally eligible households in FY 2005 was $16,264, based on RECS and Bureau of the Census' Current Population Survey (CPS) data. - States target the neediest, especially the elderly, persons with disabilities, and families with children. - Since the inception of the Weatherization Assistance Program in 1976, over 6.3 million households have received weatherization services with DOE and leveraged funding. - In FY 2009, the energy burden on Federally eligible households was about four times the burden on Federally ineligible households (14% versus 4%). Source(s): ORNL, Weatherization Works: Final Report on the National Weatherization Evaluation, Sept. 1994, p. 1 for migrating poor; ORNL, 1996 for targeting; HHS,

71

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Trends in Household Vehicle Stock The 1991 RTECS counted more than 150 million vehicles in use by U.S. households. This chapter examines recent trends in the vehicle stock, as measured by the RTECS and other reputable vehicle surveys. It also provides some details on the type and model year of the household vehicle stock, and identifies regional differences in vehicle stock. Because vehicles are continuously being bought and sold, this chapter also reports findings relating to turnover of the vehicle stock in 1991. Finally, it examines the average vehicle stock in 1991 (which takes into account the acquisition and disposal of household vehicles over the course of the year) and identifies variations in the average number of household vehicles based on differences in household characteristics. Number of Household Vehicles Over the past 8 years, the stock of household vehicles has

72

Housing Diversity and Consolidation in Low-Income Colonias: Patterns of House Form and Household Arrangements in Colonias of the US-Mexico Border  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This research identifies the housing diversity and the process of housing consolidation in colonias of the US-Mexico border by looking at the patterns of house form and household arrangements in colonias of South Texas. Ten colonias located to the east...

Reimers-Arias, Carlos Alberto

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

73

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Program Definitions DOE Weatherization: Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program DOE Weatherization Eligible Households: Households with incomes at or below 125% of the Federal poverty level, which varies by family size; however, a State may instead elect to use the LIHEAP income standard if its State LIHEAP income standard is at least 125% of the Federal poverty level. Data listed in this chapter include previously weatherized units. DOE Weatherization Eligible Households are a subset of Federally Eligible Households. DOE Weatherization Recipient Households: Households that have received weatherization under DOE Weatherization funding. Federally Eligible Households: Households with incomes below the Federal maximum standard of 150% to 200% of the poverty

74

Efficient Use of Commercial Lists in U.S. Household Sampling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......educational attainment, Hispanic ethnicity, household income, and home tenure...on the two persons in the household as well as the Hispanic ethnicity status of the head of household (assuming that the Hispanic ethnicity status of persons......

Richard Valliant; Frost Hubbard; Sunghee Lee; Chiungwen Chang

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Household vehicles energy consumption 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted during 1991 and early 1992. The 1991 RTECS represents 94.6 million households, of which 84.6 million own or have access to 151.2 million household motor vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

Not Available

1993-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

76

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Household Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,30,"N","N","N","N" "2 Persons",34.8,"N",34.8,"N","N","N" "3 Persons",18.4,"N","N",18.4,"N","N" "4 Persons",15.9,"N","N","N",15.9,"N"

77

file://C:\Documents%20and%20Settings\VM3\My%20Documents\hc6-3a_  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, 3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ | | | | | | | 2001 Household Income | | Eli- | | | | | gible | | |___________________________________| | for | | | | | | | | Fed- |

78

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Vehicle Fuel Efficiency and Consumption Fuel consumption is estimated from RTECS data on the vehicle stock (Chapter 2) and miles traveled (Chapter 3), in combination with vehicle fuel efficiency ratings, adjusted to account for individual driving circumstances. The first two sections of this chapter present estimates of household vehicle fuel efficiency and household fuel consumption calculated from these fuel efficiency estimates. These sections also discuss variations in fuel efficiency and consumption based on differences in household and vehicle characteristics. The third section presents EIA estimates of the potential savings from replacing the oldest (and least fuel-efficient) household vehicles with new (and more fuel-efficient) vehicles. The final section of this chapter focuses on households receiving (or eligible to receive) supplemental income under

79

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" "Household Demographics",,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Number of Household Members"

80

"Table HC15.3 Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Household Characteristics",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,1.8,1.9,2,3.2 "2 Persons",34.8,2.2,2.3,2.4,3.2 "3 Persons",18.4,1.1,1.3,1.2,1.8 "4 Persons",15.9,1,0.9,1,2.3 "5 Persons",7.9,0.6,0.6,0.9,0.9 "6 or More Persons",4.1,0.4,"Q",0.5,0.7 "2005 Annual Household Income Category" "Less than $9,999",9.9,0.8,0.7,0.9,1 "$10,000 to $14,999",8.5,0.8,0.4,0.6,0.7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Household Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Household Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.7 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 6.7 4.7 2.0 6.2 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 8.0 5.4 2.6 5.0 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 3.8 2.7 1.1 7.9 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 3.5 2.5 1.0 8.1 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 1.7

82

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Household Characteristics by West Census Region, 2a. Household Characteristics by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.8 1.1 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 5.6 1.8 3.8 5.4 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 7.3 1.9 5.5 4.9 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 3.5 0.9 2.6 7.6 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 3.5 1.1 2.4 6.4 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 2.0 0.6 1.4 9.7 6 or More Persons

83

Household vehicles energy consumption 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use some 6,000 vehicles provided information to describe vehicle stock, vehicle-miles traveled, energy end-use consumption, and energy expenditures for personal vehicles. The survey results represent the characteristics of the 84.9 million households that used or had access to vehicles in 1994 nationwide. (An additional 12 million households neither owned or had access to vehicles during the survey year.) To be included in then RTECS survey, vehicles must be either owned or used by household members on a regular basis for personal transportation, or owned by a company rather than a household, but kept at home, regularly available for the use of household members. Most vehicles included in the RTECS are classified as {open_quotes}light-duty vehicles{close_quotes} (weighing less than 8,500 pounds). However, the RTECS also includes a very small number of {open_quotes}other{close_quotes} vehicles, such as motor homes and larger trucks that are available for personal use.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The impact of the low income housing tax credit program on local schools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The low-income housing tax credit (LIHTC) program has developed over two million rental homes for low-income households since 1986. The perception of deterioration in school quality has been a main reason for community opposition to LIHTC projects in middle- and upper-income areas. In this paper, we examine the impact of LIHTC projects on the nearby school performance using data on all LIHTC projects and elementary schools in Texas from the 2003–04 through 2008–09 academic years. We employ the longitudinal structure of the data to control for school fixed effects and estimate the relationship between the opening of nearby LIHTC on campus-level standardized test scores and performance ratings. We address the potential selection biases by controlling for preexisting trends in school performance prior to the study period. We find no robust evidence that the opening of LIHTC units negatively impacts the performance of nearby elementary schools.

Wenhua Di; James C. Murdoch

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Income Inequality in Hennepin County University of Minnesota  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Totals hide variation by race/ethnicity Hennepin County 2010 median household income by race,000 $70,000 White (not Hispanic) Black Asian Native American Hispanic/Latino Other race Race even" occurs at the median Household income percentiles: 1989 and 2010 $13,502 $24,182 $35,266 $47

Weiblen, George D

86

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Household Demographics" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,14.4,2.1,3.4,9.6,1.9 "2 Persons",35.8,24.2,1.9,2.5,5,2.1 "3 Persons",18.1,12.1,1.2,1.3,2.2,1.2 "4 Persons",15.7,11.5,1,1,1.5,0.8 "5 Persons",7.7,5.8,0.3,0.5,0.6,0.5

87

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" 6 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Household Demographics",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,11,9.7,3.3,5.4,1.9 "2 Persons",35.8,12.4,11.2,4.4,5.9,1.8 "3 Persons",18.1,6,5.7,2.2,3.1,1.1 "4 Persons",15.7,5.3,4.9,2,2.6,0.9 "5 Persons",7.7,2.6,2.4,1.1,1.2,0.4 "6 or More Persons",5,1.5,1.5,1,0.8,0.2

88

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Household Demographics of Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Household Demographics of Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Household Demographics",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,6,1.5,0.7,0.8,4.5,2.1,1.6,0.8 "2 Persons",35.8,6.3,1.8,0.8,1,4.5,2,1.5,0.9

89

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Household Demographics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Household Demographics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Household Demographics",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,7.4,5.1,1.4,1,0.6,2.1,2.3,0.6,1.1,0.6

90

Smoothing consumption across households and time : essays in development economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis studies two strategies that households may use to keep their consumption smooth in the face of fluctuations in income and expenses: credit (borrowing and savings) and insurance (state contingent transfers between ...

Kinnan, Cynthia Georgia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Low-Income Housing Tax Credits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) programme is the primary subsidy mechanism used to support the development of rental housing for low-income households in the United States. The programme adds about 1300 projects and 91 000 units per year. These projects are privately owned. The owners of the projects receive tax credits each year for 10 years in exchange for a commitment to maintain the units at affordable rents for occupancy by low-income households for a period of at least 15 years. The programme is proving to be popular with developers, but it is vulnerable to fluctuations in credit markets.

K. McClure

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US PAC CA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household  California households use 62 million Btu of energy per home, 31% less than the U.S. average. The lower than average site consumption results in households spending 30% less for energy than the U.S. average.  Average site electricity consumption in California homes is among the lowest in the nation, as the mild climate in much of the state leads to less reliance on

93

Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US PAC CA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household  California households use 62 million Btu of energy per home, 31% less than the U.S. average. The lower than average site consumption results in households spending 30% less for energy than the U.S. average.  Average site electricity consumption in California homes is among the lowest in the nation, as the mild climate in much of the state leads to less reliance on

94

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Homes Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.4 2.0 2.9 1.3 Total Owner-Occupied Units ....... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 15.8 12.5 0.8 0.9 1.6 10.3 2 Persons ...................................... 25.9 23.4 0.5 0.5 1.5 10.1 3 Persons ...................................... 11.6 9.6 0.5 Q 1.3 12.1 4 Persons ...................................... 11.8 10.9 Q Q 0.7 15.7 5 Persons ...................................... 5.1 4.5 Q Q 0.4 24.2 6 or More Persons

95

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Household Characteristics by South Census Region, 1a. Household Characteristics by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.1 1.5 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 9.9 5.0 1.8 3.1 6.3 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 13.0 6.7 2.5 3.8 4.2 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 6.6 3.7 1.2 1.7 8.8 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 6.0 3.3 0.8 1.9 10.7 5 Persons ....................................................

96

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.5 0.8 1.4 1.3 1.4 Total .............................................................. 107.0 49.9 18.0 21.2 17.9 4.1 Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 14.6 5.3 4.8 3.6 6.4 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 15.7 5.7 6.9 6.8 5.4 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 7.6 2.8 3.5 3.1 7.2 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 6.8 2.3 4.1 2.4 8.1 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 3.1 1.3 1.3 1.4 12.3 6 or More Persons

97

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.8 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 2.5 8.1 6.5 4.8 6.2 9.9 2 Persons ...................................... 35.1 3.1 9.4 8.2 6.5 7.9 8.7 3 Persons ...................................... 17.0 1.3 4.3 4.0 3.3 4.1 10.7 4 Persons ...................................... 15.6 1.4 3.9 3.4 3.4 3.5 10.5 5 Persons ......................................

98

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.9 2.5 Total Rented Units ........................ 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 12.3 2.5 2.6 7.0 0.3 10.0 2 Persons ...................................... 9.2 2.5 2.5 4.1 Q 11.8 3 Persons ...................................... 5.4 2.0 1.1 2.0 0.4 13.9 4 Persons ...................................... 3.8 1.6 0.7 1.4 Q 17.7 5 Persons ...................................... 2.0 0.9 0.4 0.6 Q 24.1 6 or More Persons ........................

99

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.0 1.2 1.2 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 2.5 4.5 5.1 4.0 3.7 8.3 7.5 2 Persons ...................................... 35.1 4.8 6.2 6.6 4.5 5.3 7.8 5.8 3 Persons ...................................... 17.0 2.5 3.3 2.9 2.3 1.9 4.1 8.4 4 Persons ...................................... 15.6 3.4 2.8 2.3 1.9 1.8 3.4 9.6 5 Persons ...................................... 7.1 1.6 1.2 1.3 0.6 0.7 1.6 14.3 6 or More Persons

100

Household energy consumption and its demand elasticity in Thailand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study concentrates on the analysis of energy consumption, expenditure on oil and LPG use in cars and aims to examine the elasticity effect of various types of oil consumption. By using the Deaton's analysis framework, the cross-sectional data of Thai households economic survey 2009 were used. By defining energy goods in the scope of automobile fuel, the results reflect the low importance of high-quality automobile fuel on all income level households. Thai households tend to vary the quality rather than the quantity of thermal energy. All income groups have a tendency to switch to lower quality fuel. Middle and high-middle households (Q3 and Q4) are the income groups with the greatest tendency to switch to lower-quality fuel when a surge in the price of oil price occurs. The poorest households (Q1) are normally insensitive to a change of energy expenditure in terms of quality and quantity. This finding illustrates the LPG price subsidy policy favours middle and high-middle income households. The price elasticity of energy quantity demand is negative in all income levels. High to middle income families are the most sensitive to changes in the price of energy.

Montchai Pinitjitsamut

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Detailed Tables The following tables present detailed characteristics of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the tables. Table Organization The "Detailed Tables" section consists of three types of tables: (1) Tables of totals such as number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) or gallons consumed; (2) Tables of per household statistics such as VMT per household; and (3) Tables of per vehicle statistics such as vehicle fuel consumption per vehicle. The tables have been grouped together by specific topics such as model year data, or family income data to facilitate finding related information. The Quick-Reference Guide to the detailed tables indicates major topics of each table. Row and Column Factors These tables present estimates

102

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Space Heating",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,30.3,35,17.6,15.2,12 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,0.6,0.6,0.3,0.4,0.4 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.3,0.3,0.2,0.1,0.3 "Main Heating Fuel and Equipment2" "Natural Gas",55.6,14.1,17.9,9.4,7.9,6.3

103

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Appliances",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,28.8,31.7,16.3,14,11.5 "1.",100.8,28.5,31.2,16,13.9,11.2 "2 or More",1.5,0.3,0.5,0.2,0.2,0.3 "Do Not Use a Stove",11.3,2.5,4.1,1.8,1.7,1.2 "Most-Used Stove Fuel" "Electric",61.9,18.3,19.7,9.7,8.2,6.1

104

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Air Conditioning",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,24.6,30.2,15.1,13.5,10.6 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,1.7,1.5,0.7,0.6,0.5 "Do Not Have Air Conditioning Equipment",14.7,5,4.1,2.3,1.7,1.7 "Type of Air Conditioning Equipment "

105

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Household Demographics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Household Demographics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Household Demographics",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

106

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Household Demographics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 1 Household Demographics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Household Demographics",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

107

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,,,,,"5 or More Members" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.8,6,6.3,3.3,3.1,2.1 "New England",5.5,1.5,1.8,1,0.7,0.5 "Middle Atlantic",15.3,4.5,4.5,2.3,2.4,1.6 "Midwest",25.9,7.4,8.5,3.9,3.5,2.6 "East North Central",17.9,5.1,5.6,2.7,2.5,1.9

108

Economic theory and women's household status: The case of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economic development disadvantages wives. Conventional microeconomic theory predicts this. As household incomes rise, wives have incentives to specialize in intangible household production. This may raise total household production according to the theory of comparative advantage, but disproportionately favors husbands in distribution of the gains according to the marginal productivity theory of distribution. Wives may become better off in absolute terms but more dependent financially on their husbands and lose power within the household. Historically, Japanese gender roles became highly specialized and wives’ legal status declined, although other Meiji-era features protected wives. Policies to improve women's status should address the precise economic problem involved.

Barbara J. Redman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Home Office Equipment by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Home Office Equipment by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.1 1.4 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 17.9 12.8 5.0 1.3 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 10.9 7.7 3.3 3.1 Number of Desktop PCs 1 ................................................................ 45.1 8.7 6.2 2.5 3.7 2 or more ................................................... 9.1 1.4 0.9 0.5 12.9 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ................................................................

110

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Home Office Equipment by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Home Office Equipment by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 22.4 15.7 6.7 1.3 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 14.1 9.9 4.2 3.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1 ................................................................ 45.1 10.4 7.2 3.2 3.7 2 or more ................................................... 9.1 2.3 1.6 0.7 10.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ................................................................

111

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

NONE

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

112

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2001 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.0 1.5 1.5 Total .............................................................. 107.0 7.1 12.3 7.7 6.3 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 2.2 2.4 1.8 1.7 7.3 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 2.2 4.0 2.4 2.0 6.9 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 1.1 2.0 1.2 1.2 9.5 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 0.8 1.9 1.3 0.9 11.2 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 0.4 1.1 0.4 0.5 19.8 6 or More Persons ....................................... 4.0 0.4 0.9 0.4 0.1 16.4 2001 Household Income Category

113

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Household Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,11.4,1.6,1,1.9,6.6,0.3 "2 Persons",34.8,8,1.9,0.8,1.5,3.5,0.3 "3 Persons",18.4,5.6,1.5,0.7,1.2,1.9,0.2 "4 Persons",15.9,4.3,1.3,0.6,0.7,1.6,"Q"

114

Minority and poor households: patterns of travel and transportation fuel use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the travel behavior and transportation fuel use of minority and poor households in the US, using information from numerous national-level sources. The resulting data base reveals distinctive patterns of household vehicle availability and use, travel, and fuel use and enables us to relate observed differences between population groups to differences in their demographic characteristics and in the attributes of their household vehicles. When income and residence location are controlled, black (and to a lesser extent, Hispanic and poor) households have fewer vehicles regularly available than do comparable white or nonpoor households; moreover, these vehicles are older and larger and thus have significantly lower fuel economy. The net result is that average black, Hispanic, and poor households travel fewer miles per year but use more fuel than do average white and nonpoor households. Certain other findings - notably, that of significant racial differences in vehicle availability and use by low-income households - challenge the conventional wisdom that such racial variations arise solely because of differences in income and residence location. Results of the study suggest important differences - primarily in the yearly fluctuation of income - between black and white low-income households even when residence location is controlled. These variables are not captured by cross-sectional data sets (either the national surveys used in our analysis or the local data sets that are widely used for urban transportation planning).

Millar, M.; Morrison, R.; Vyas, A.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Acculturation, education, and income as determinants of cigarette smoking in New Mexico Hispanics.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...determinants of smoking by Hispanics remain inadequately...characterized. We have assessed household income, education...cigarette smoking in 1072 Hispanic adults residing in a...determinants of smoking by Hispanics remain inadequately...characterized. We have assessed household income, education...

J M Samet; C A Howard; D B Coultas; and B J Skipper

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Air Conditioning by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Air Conditioning by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 20.5 13.6 6.8 2.2 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.3 Q Q 27.5 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 20.2 13.4 6.7 2.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 14.3 9.5 4.8 3.8 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 13.6 9.0 4.6 3.9 With a Heat Pump .....................................

117

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.5 0.8 1.4 1.3 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 36.8 13.6 18.9 13.6 4.3 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 1.2 0.2 0.4 0.3 21.4 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 ........................................ 80.8 35.6 13.4 18.6 13.3 4.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 3 ............................ 57.5 23.6 8.6 15.8 9.4 5.1 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 19.3 7.4 13.1 6.4 6.3 With a Heat Pump ..................................... 11.3 4.4

118

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.5 1.5 1.4 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 59.5 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 5.2 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 1.2 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 23.3 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 58.2 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 5.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 44.7 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 7.0 Without a Heat Pump .................. 35.6 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 7.7 With a Heat Pump .......................

119

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.8 0.5 1.4 1.2 1.6 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 23.4 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 6.1 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 0.9 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 23.0 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 22.5 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 6.2 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 12.7 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 8.5 Without a Heat Pump .................. 10.6 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 9.3 With a Heat Pump ....................... 2.2 8.6 0.8 1.0

120

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Air Conditioning by South Census Region, 1a. Air Conditioning by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.3 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 37.2 19.3 6.4 11.5 1.5 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.4 Q Q Q 28.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 36.9 19.0 6.4 11.5 1.6 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 30.4 16.1 5.0 9.2 2.8 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 22.1 10.4 3.4 8.3 5.6 With a Heat Pump

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Air Conditioning by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Air Conditioning by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 14.5 11.3 3.2 3.3 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.3 0.3 Q 28.3 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 14.2 11.1 3.2 3.4 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 5.7 4.9 0.8 8.9 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 5.2 4.5 0.7 9.2 With a Heat Pump .....................................

122

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, 2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 13.6 16.0 14.7 10.4 10.5 17.6 4.7 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 Q 0.3 0.5 0.3 0.4 0.5 27.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 .......................... 80.8 13.4 15.8 14.2 10.1 10.2 17.1 4.7 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 3 .............. 57.5 12.6 13.7 11.0 7.1 6.6 6.4 5.9 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 10.1 10.4 8.0 6.1 5.9 5.7 7.0 With a Heat Pump ....................... 11.3 2.5 3.3

123

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.6 1.5 1.4 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 4.9 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 21.8 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 80.8 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 4.9 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 57.5 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 6.7 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 7.7 With a Heat Pump ....................... 11.3 8.6 0.8 1.0 0.8 19.7 Room Air-Conditioning

124

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Key Assumptions Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2000 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2000 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and transportation sectors as inputs to the disaggregation algorithm that results in the direct fuel expenditure analysis. Household end-use and personal transportation service consumption are obtained by HEM from the NEMS Residential and Transportation Demand Modules. Household disposable income is adjusted with forecasts of total disposable income from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module.

125

The impact of retirement on household consumption in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using monthly data from the Japanese Family Income and Expenditure Survey, we examine the impact of retirement on household consumption. We find little evidence of an immediate change in consumption at retirement, on average, in Japan. However, we find a decrease in consumption at retirement for low income households that is concentrated in food and work-related consumption. The availability of substantial retirement bonuses to a large share of Japanese retirees may help smooth consumption at retirement. We find that those households that are more likely to receive such bonuses experience a short-run consumption increase at retirement. However, among households that are less likely to receive a retirement bonus, we find that consumption decreases at retirement.

Melvin Stephens Jr.; Takashi Unayama

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Household Demographics" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,4.8,1.5,3.9,3.9,5,5,3.9,3.3 "2 Persons",35.8,4.5,1.6,4.1,4.3,6.2,5.2,5.2,4.6 "3 Persons",18.1,2,0.9,2.3,2.1,2.8,2.9,2.7,2.4 "4 Persons",15.7,1.8,0.6,1.8,1.6,2.2,2.1,2.6,3.1

127

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Household Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,14.8,2.4,2.6,7.9,2.4 "2 Persons",34.8,24.8,2.1,2,4.2,1.7 "3 Persons",18.4,12.3,1.2,1.6,2.2,1.2 "4 Persons",15.9,11.1,1.2,0.9,1.6,1 "5 Persons",7.9,6.2,0.5,0.4,0.4,0.4 "6 or More Persons",4.1,2.9,0.2,0.3,0.4,0.3

128

Households and Pension  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter deals with two economic issues. First, we examine Japan’s household structure. In the previous chapter ( Chapter 10 ...), we recognized the importance of the ...

Mitsuhiko Iyoda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

HOUSEHOLD SOLAR POWER SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Photovoltaic power has become one of the most popular research area in new energy field. In this report, the case of household solar power… (more)

Jiang, He

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

An Analysis of the Price Elasticity of Demand for Household Appliances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dollars for selected years. AHAM Fact Book, TSDs. Operatingselected years. 1999 dollars. AHAM fact book. Income. Meanof units sold, in millions. AHAM Factbook and Appliance

Dale, Larry

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Transportation logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 August 1997 Release Next Update: EIA has discontinued this series. Based on the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) - survey series has been discontinued Only light-duty vehicles and recreational vehicles are included in this report. EIA has excluded motorcycles, mopeds, large trucks, and buses. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use

132

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

133

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Space...

134

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry"...

135

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Appliances by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Appliances by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.3 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 19.6 14.5 5.2 1.1 1 .............................................................. 95.2 18.2 13.3 4.9 1.1 2 or More ................................................. 6.5 1.4 1.1 0.3 11.7 Most Used Oven ...................................... 101.7 19.6 14.5 5.2 1.1 Electric .....................................................

136

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Space Heating by South Census Region, 1a. Space Heating by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.9 1.2 1.4 1.3 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 38.8 20.2 6.8 11.8 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q Q 20.1 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q Q Q Q 39.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 Q Q Q Q 39.0 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0

137

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Space Heating by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Space Heating by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.7 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 20.1 14.7 5.4 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q 19.9 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q Q Q 39.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 Q Q Q 38.7 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 20.1 14.7 5.4 NE Natural Gas .................................................

138

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Space Heating by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Space Heating by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q 19.8 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q Q Q 39.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 Q Q Q 38.4 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Natural Gas

139

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Space Heating by West Census Region, 2a. Space Heating by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.6 1.0 1.6 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 22.6 6.7 15.9 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 0.7 Q 0.7 10.6 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 0.4 Q 0.4 18.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 0.2 Q 0.2 27.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 22.6 6.7 15.9 NE Natural Gas .................................................

140

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Appliances by West Census Region, 2a. Appliances by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.7 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 22.1 6.6 15.5 1.1 1 .............................................................. 95.2 20.9 6.4 14.5 1.1 2 or More ................................................. 6.5 1.2 0.2 1.0 14.6 Most Used Oven ...................................... 101.7 22.1 6.6 15.5 1.1 Electric .....................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

homes, pickup trucks, and jeeps or similar vehicles. See Vehicle. Average Household Energy Expenditures: A ratio estimate defined as the total household energy expenditures for...

142

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, 2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.4 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 14.9 16.7 17.0 12.2 13.0 22.4 4.4 Personal Computers 2 ................... 60.0 11.0 11.6 10.3 7.2 7.8 12.0 5.3 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 8.0 9.0 7.7 5.3 6.1 9.1 5.8 2 or more .................................... 9.1 1.8 1.6 2.0 1.1 1.0 1.6 11.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

143

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Home Office Equipment by South Census Region, 1a. Home Office Equipment by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.3 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 34.6 18.4 6.0 10.1 1.2 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 20.7 11.7 3.2 5.8 4.0 Number of Desktop PCs 1 ................................................................ 45.1 15.5 8.6 2.6 4.3 4.9 2 or more ................................................... 9.1 3.1 2.0 0.4 0.7 9.6 Number of Laptop PCs

144

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.9 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 8.4 26.2 21.1 19.0 21.5 7.8 Personal Computers 2 ................... 60.0 5.7 16.7 13.1 12.1 12.6 7.4 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 4.2 12.8 9.6 8.8 9.6 7.8 2 or more .................................... 9.1 0.8 2.4 2.3 2.0 1.7 12.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

145

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Natural Gas",69.2,18,21.6,11.5,9.8,8.2 "Propane/LPG",48.9,8.3,17.6,8.4,8.3,6.3 "Wood",13.1,2.3,4.8,2.3,2,1.7 "Fuel Oil",7.7,2.2,2.4,1.1,1.1,0.9 "Kerosene",1.7,0.4,0.5,0.3,0.2,0.3

146

" Million Housing Units, Preliminary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, By Number of Household Members, 2009" Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, By Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Preliminary" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Computers and Other Electronics",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,12.9,7.6,3,1.8,2.1 1,46.9,14.5,15.5,6.7,5.7,4.5 2,24.3,3.1,9.3,4.6,4.2,3.1 3,9.5,0.5,2.6,2.5,2.3,1.7 4,3.6,0.2,0.6,0.9,1.2,0.7 "5 or More",2,0.1,0.3,0.4,0.5,0.7 "Most-Used Computer" "Computer Type" "Desktop",48.3,10.5,16.2,7.9,7.4,6.3

147

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Water Heating",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.9,0.8,0.4,0.4,0.3 1,108.1,30.2,33.9,17.3,14.9,11.9 "2 or More",2.7,0.2,1.1,0.4,0.4,0.5 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,30.6,34.8,17.5,15.2,12.3 1,3.1,0.7,1,0.5,0.5,0.4 "2 or More",0.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

148

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Televisions",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,1,0.3,"Q","Q",0.1 1,24.2,12.9,6.7,2.2,1.3,1.1 2,37.5,11.6,13.6,5.4,4,2.8 3,26.6,4,9.1,5.7,4.5,3.3 4,14.2,1.2,3.9,2.9,3.3,2.8 "5 or More",9.7,0.6,2.1,1.7,2.6,2.7 "Most-Used Television" "Display Size" "Less than 21 Inches",12.5,4.9,3.9,1.4,1.1,1.2

149

The Household “Pie”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The discussion of theoretical, conceptual, and methodological concerns in the last three chapters has set the stage for an examination of the total effort that households devote to domestic and market activiti...

Sarah Fenstermaker Berk

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

151

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census...

152

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC.1.11 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census...

153

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East...

154

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census...

155

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" " ",,,"East North Central Census...

156

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

157

Correlated income shocks and excess smoothness of consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the literature, econometricians typically assume that household income is the sum of a random walk permanent component and a transitory component, with uncorrelated permanent and transitory shocks. Using data on realized individual incomes and individual expectations of future incomes from the Survey of Italian Households? Income and Wealth, I find that permanent and transitory shocks are negatively correlated. Relaxing the assumption of no correlation between the shocks, I explore the effects of correlated income shocks on the estimated consumption insurance against permanent and transitory shocks, and consumption smoothness using a life-cycle model with self-insurance calibrated to U.S. data. Negatively correlated income shocks result in smoother consumption, and upward-biased estimates of the insurance against transitory (and permanent when borrowing constraints are not tight) income shocks. While the life-cycle model with negatively correlated shocks fits well the sensitivity of consumption to current income shocks observed in U.S. data, it falls short of explaining the sensitivity of consumption to income shocks cumulated over a longer horizon.

Dmytro Hryshko

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Space Heating Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.3,0.3,"Q",0.2,0.2 "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,29.7,34.5,18.2,15.6,11.8 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,29.5,34.4,18.1,15.5,11.6 "Have But Do Not Use Equipment",0.8,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

159

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,5.4,5.3,2.7,2.5,2 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,24.6,29.6,15.7,13.4,10 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,24,29.1,15.5,13.2,9.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.6,0.5,"Q",0.2,0.4 "Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2" "Central System",65.9,15.3,22.6,10.7,9.9,7.3

160

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" 2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer",35.5,16.3,9.4,4,2.7,3.2 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,13.8,25.4,14.4,13.2,8.8 "Most-Used Personal Computer" "Type of PC" "Desk-top Model",58.6,10,20,11.2,10.1,7.3 "Laptop Model",16.9,3.7,5.4,3.2,3.1,1.5 "Hours Turned on Per Week"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,1.4,1.9,1.4,1,2.4 "2 Times A Day",24.6,4.3,7.6,4.3,4.8,3.7 "Once a Day",42.3,9.9,14.4,7.4,6.7,4 "A Few Times Each Week",27.2,8.9,9.1,4.6,3.1,1.5 "About Once a Week",3.9,2.2,1,0.5,"Q","Q"

162

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Electronics Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,16.3,9.4,4,2.7,3.2 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,13.8,25.4,14.4,13.2,8.8 "Number of Desktop PCs" "1.",50.3,11.9,17.4,8.5,7.3,5.2 "2.",16.2,1.5,5.8,3.8,3.3,1.9 "3 or More",9,0.4,2.2,2.1,2.7,1.7 "Number of Laptop PCs"

163

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC6.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" HC6.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,29.5,34.4,18.2,15.7,11.8 "1.",103.3,28.4,32,17.3,14.7,11 "2 or More",6.2,1.1,2.5,1,0.9,0.8 "Do Not Use an Oven",1.5,0.6,0.4,"Q","Q","Q" "Most-Used Oven Fuel" "Electric",67.9,18.2,22.5,11.2,9.5,6.5

164

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,5.4,5.3,2.7,2.5,2 "Have Coolling Equipment",93.3,24.6,29.6,15.7,13.4,10 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,24,29.1,15.5,13.2,9.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.6,0.5,"Q",0.2,0.4 "Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2 " "Central System",65.9,15.3,22.6,10.7,9.9,7.3

165

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Space Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.3,0.3,"Q",0.2,0.2 "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,29.7,34.5,18.2,15.6,11.8 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,29.5,34.4,18.1,15.5,11.6 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use It",0.8,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

166

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,28.8,33.4,17.4,15.3,11.4 "2 or More",3.7,0.6,1.1,0.8,0.5,0.6 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,0.3,"Q","Q","Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater" "One Housing Unit",99.7,25.3,31.8,16.6,14.6,11.3 "Two or More Housing Units",10.3,4.2,2.7,1.6,1.2,0.6

167

Monitoring effective use of household water treatment and safe storage technologies in Ethiopia and Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Household water treatment and storage (HWTS) technologies dissemination is beginning to scale-up to reach the almost 900 million people without access to an improved water supply (WHO/UNICEF/JMP, 2008). Without well-informed ...

Stevenson, Matthew M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Equitable economic energy efficiency : creating good jobs in low-income efficiency programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy efficiency is an important consideration in energy policy-making. So, a federal program aimed at funding "energy efficiency retrofits" for low-income households could be an important step in increasing the overall ...

Sarin, Amit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

most non-Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) energythe federal Weatherization Assistance Program may have thefrom the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) due to the

Zimring, Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NASCSP). 2009. Weatherization Assistance Program Fundingof Energy’s Weatherization Assistance Program with State-2009. National Weatherization Assistance Program Training

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the residential energy efficiency market is a potentialinstitutions (CDFIs) to market energy improvements. Solve aapproach to energy efficiency market development is

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the residential energy efficiency market is a potentialinstitutions (CDFIs) to market energy improvements. Solve acan open significant markets for energy improvements among

Zimring, Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rentalhousing/Energy_Efficiency_Project/COB_rebates_8.2.11.PDS/rentalhousing/Energy_Efficiency_Project/SmartRegs_Final_s residential energy efficiency loan program November 2010-

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy assessments, title searches, and lien recordings. Theassessments, title searches, and lien recordings. Once INHP

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clean Energy Works Oregon Bill Payment History as a ProxyEnergy and Clean Energy Works Oregon (CEWO), also use utility bill repayment history

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Renewable Energy (DOE EERE), Weatherization andand Roya Stanley (DOE EERE) for their support of thisfor Humanity International DOE EERE – Department of Energy

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vermont Energy Investment Corporation NYSERDA – New Yorkfor a case study on New York’s energy efficiency programNew York, the New York State Energy Research and Development

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency Programs“. March 17, 2011. Available here:Efficiency Programs. ” March 17, 2011. Available here:

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system CFL – Compact Fluorescent Light Bulb IAQ – Indoor Airdiscount compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) or providediscount compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) or provide

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Hispanic or Latino",99,18.3,5,2.2,2.8,13.2,6,4.5,2.8 "Race of Householder6" "White",89.6,16.9,4.6,2,2.5,12.3,5.5,4.3,2.5 "Hispanic",12.8,2,0.2,0.2,0.1,1.7,1.1,0.4,0.3...

183

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Hispanic or Latino",99,29.1,32.8,15.4,12.9,8.9 "Race of Householder6" "White",89.6,24.7,29.5,13.9,12,9.5 "Hispanic",12.8,2,2.7,2.3,2.5,3.4 "Non-Hispanic",76.8,22.7...

184

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Hispanic or Latino",99,18.3,24.6,36.9,19.3 "Race of Householder6" "White",89.6,16.9,21.3,31.5,20 "Hispanic",12.8,2,1.1,4.8,5 "Non-Hispanic",76.8,14.9,20.2,26.7...

185

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Hispanic or Latino",99,35.7,32.3,9.9,15.7,5.4 "Race of Householder7" "White",89.6,32.5,26.6,11.1,14.5,4.9 "Hispanic",12.8,2.5,2.6,3.9,3.2,0.8...

186

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hispanic or Latino",99,19.8,22.9,18.5,12.7,8.5,5.3,11.3,12.9 "Race of Householder6" "White",89.6,16.8,21.4,17.1,11.7,7.6,4.9,10,11.5 "Hispanic",12.8,3.5,4,2.4,1.3,0.6,0.4,0.6,3....

187

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Hispanic or Latino",99,64.9,5.7,7.1,15.7,5.6 "Race of Householder6" "White",89.6,59.6,4.9,6,12.9,6.2 "Hispanic",12.8,6.2,0.8,1.6,3.1,1.1 "Non-Hispanic",76.8,53.3...

188

The federal energy policy: An example of its potential impact on energy consumption and expenditures in minority and poor households  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of the relative impacts of the National Energy Strategy on majority and minority households and on nonpoor and poor households. (Minority households are defined as those headed by black or Hispanic persons; poor households are defined as those having combined household income less than or equal to 125% of the Office of Management and Budget`s poverty-income threshold.) Energy consumption and expenditures, and projected energy expenditures as a share of income, for the period 1987 to 2009 are reported. Projected consumptions of electricity and nonelectric energy over this period are also reported for each group. An analysis of how these projected values are affected under different housing growth scenarios is performed. The analysis in this report presents a preliminary set of projections generated under a set of simplifying assumptions. Future analysis will rigorously assess the sensitivity of the projected values to various changes in a number of these assumptions.

Poyer, D.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Household portfolios in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I provide a detailed description and in-depth analysis of household portfolios in Japan. (1) It is shown that the share of equities in financial wealth and the stock market participation of Japanese households decreased throughout the 1990s. (2) Using survey data, age-related variations in the share of stocks in financial wealth are analyzed. The equity share and stock market participation increase with age among young households, peaking when people reach their 50s, and then stabilizing. However, the share of equities conditional on ownership exhibits no significant age-related pattern, implying that age-related patterns are primarily explained by the decision to hold stocks. A similar mechanism operates to that found in previous studies of Western countries. (3) Owner-occupied housing has a significantly positive effect on stock market participation and on the share of stocks in financial wealth.

Tokuo Iwaisako

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry >Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Contact Us * Feedback *...

191

Million Cu. Feet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2010 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table 29. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Alaska, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year................................................... 231 239 261 261 269 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells .............................................. 193,654 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 From Oil Wells ................................................ 3,012,097 3,313,666 3,265,401

192

"Keeping Up" or "Keeping Afloat"? : how American households accumulate wealth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

having a Black or Hispanic household head, and experiencingBlack households, Hispanic households, poor households, etc.that Black- and Hispanic- headed households appear to be at

Lundy, Jeffrey Dalton

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings...

194

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aggregate Aggregate Ratio: See Mean and Ratio Estimate. AMPD: Average miles driven per day. See Appendix B, "Estimation Methodologies." Annual Vehicle Miles Traveled: See Vehicle Miles Traveled. Automobile: Includes standard passenger car, 2-seater car and station wagons; excludes passenger vans, cargo vans, motor homes, pickup trucks, and jeeps or similar vehicles. See Vehicle. Average Household Energy Expenditures: A ratio estimate defined as the total household energy expenditures for all RTECS households divided by the total number of households. See Ratio Estimate, and Combined Household Energy Expenditures. Average Number of Vehicles per Household: The average number of vehicles used by a household for personal transportation during 1991. For this report, the average number of vehicles per household is computed as the ratio of the total number of vehicles to the

195

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Appliances by Climate Zone, a. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.1 Total .................................................. 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.8 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven .............................................. 101.7 9.1 27.9 23.1 19.4 22.2 7.8 1 ................................................... 95.2 8.7 26.0 21.6 17.7 21.2 7.9 2 or More ..................................... 6.5 0.4 1.9 1.5 1.7 1.0 14.7 Most Used Oven ........................... 101.7 9.1 27.9 23.1 19.4 22.2

196

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.5 1.7 1.6 1.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 69.1 9.4 16.7 6.6 4.3 1 ................................................ 95.2 63.7 8.9 16.2 6.3 4.3 2 or More .................................. 6.5 5.4 0.4 0.4 0.2 15.9 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 69.1 9.4 16.7 6.6 4.3 Electric ...................................... 63.0 43.3 5.2 10.9 3.6

197

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Space Heating by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Space Heating by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.6 0.9 1.3 1.3 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 49.9 18.0 21.2 17.9 4.3 Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 49.1 18.0 21.2 17.8 4.3 Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 0.7 0.1 0.1 0.1 25.8 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 0.4 0.1 Q 0.1 33.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 0.3 Q Q Q 30.2 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 49.1 18.0 21.2 17.8 4.3 Natural Gas

198

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.4 1.9 3.0 1.3 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Heat Home ..................................... 72.4 63.0 2.0 1.7 5.7 6.7 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 0.4 0.2 Q Q Q 46.2 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.3 0.2 Q Q Q 39.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ Q Q Q Q Q NF Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 72.4 63.0 2.0 1.7 5.7 6.7 Natural Gas

199

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Space Heating by Year of Construction, 2a. Space Heating by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.5 1.5 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.3 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 15.4 18.2 18.6 13.6 13.9 26.4 4.3 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 Q Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q 23.2 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 Q Q Q 0.2 Q Q 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q Q Q Q Q 37.8 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 15.4 18.2 18.6 13.6 13.9 26.4 4.3 Natural Gas ...................................

200

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.4 2.1 3.1 1.3 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 68.3 59.1 2.0 1.7 5.4 7.0 1 ................................................ 62.9 54.1 2.0 1.6 5.2 7.1 2 or More .................................. 5.4 5.0 Q Q 0.2 22.1 Most Used Oven ........................ 68.3 59.1 2.0 1.7 5.4 7.0 Electric ......................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.5 1.5 1.4 1.7 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.4 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 73.4 9.4 16.4 6.8 4.5 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 0.3 Q 0.6 Q 19.0 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 0.2 Q 0.3 Q 24.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q 0.3 Q 28.1 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 73.4 9.4 16.4 6.8 4.5 Natural Gas ...................................

202

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Appliances by Year of Construction, 2a. Appliances by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.5 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 14.3 17.2 17.8 12.9 13.7 25.9 4.2 1 ................................................ 95.2 13.1 16.3 16.6 12.1 12.7 24.3 4.4 2 or More .................................. 6.5 1.2 0.9 1.1 0.7 1.0 1.6 14.8 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 14.3 17.2 17.8 12.9 13.7 25.9 4.2 Electric ......................................

203

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Space Heating by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Space Heating by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.9 2.5 Total ............................................... 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Heat Home ..................................... 33.7 10.4 7.4 14.8 1.1 6.9 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 0.6 Q Q 0.5 Q 21.4 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.2 Q Q Q Q 84.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q 0.3 Q 36.4 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 33.7 10.4 7.4 14.8 1.1 6.9 Natural Gas ...................................

204

DETERMINANTS OF INCOME INEQUALITY IN BOTSWANA: A REGRESSION-BASED DECOMPOSITION APPROACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

level in Botswana. Using the Household Income and Expenditure Survey of 2002/03 an income generating Expenditure Surveys (HIES) undertaken in 1985/86, 1993/94, 2002/03 and the Botswana Core Welfare Indicator capital intensive and employs a very small proportion of the labour force, yet this sector accounts

205

Abstract B63: Barriers to colorectal cancer screening among low income and underinsured Hispanics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...barriers to CRCS in low income Hispanics, this cross-sectional study...associated with CRCS among Hispanics residing on the Texas-Mexico...older, self-identified as Hispanic or Latino, and no history...primary language spoken, household income, highest education...

Lara S. Savas; Maria E. Fernandez; and Janet Williams

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be damaged when corrosive chemicals are put down the drain. Burning hazardous wastes simply distributes themHousehold Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products containing toxic chemicals. These wastes CANNOT be disposed of in regular garbage. Any

de Lijser, Peter

207

9 - Chinese healthcare system reforms and household saving patterns: some stylised facts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter aims to evaluate the relationship between one of the recent healthcare reforms in the People’s Republic of China and household decisions both in terms of out-of-pocket expenditure and saving. Evidence on the results achieved by reforms of the health insurance sector in terms of reducing out-of-pocket medical expenditure is still uncertain and contradictory, and very little is known about the effect of these measures on the consumption and saving behaviour of the Chinese population. To shed light on this issue we use data collected by Chinese Household Income Project surveys (CHIPs), through a series of questionnaire-based interviews conducted in urban areas in 1995 and 2002. Our descriptive analysis suggests that there is a positive relationship between public health insurance coverage and household saving. This empirical evidence suggests that public insurance coverage is ineffective as a source of protection against income losses and might induce households to save more.

Vincenzo Atella; Agar Brugiavini; Hao Chen; Noemi Pace

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

millionImaging research infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Centre for Imaging Technology Commercialization, led by Aaron Fenster $34 million Hybrid imaging infrastructureimaging #12;IMAGING Investment $100 millionImaging research infrastructure Formation

Denham, Graham

209

The Determinants of Homeonwership in Presence of Shocks Experienced by Mexican Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that households? experience and government income support programs influence homeownership in Mexico. A secondary objective is to determine how socio-demographic variables influence homeownership in Mexico. Based on the Random Utility Model, logit models... of Direct Rural Support of Mexico (PROGRESA) and the Program of Direct Rural Support of Mexico (PROCAMPO), appear to be increasing iii homeownership. These social welfare programs provide cash transfers to households. For whatever reason, PROGRESA...

Lopez Cabrera, Jesus Antonio 1977-

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

210

A Life-Cycle General Equilibrium Simulation Model with Continuous Income Distribution An Application to an Aging Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chapters 3 through 6 incorporated plural representative households with unequal incomes in each cohort, and addressed the problem of intragenerational redistribution. However, the changes in the variance of li...

Akira Okamoto Ph.D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. 3. Vehicle Miles Traveled This chapter presents information on household vehicle usage, as measured by the number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT). VMT is one of the two most important components used in estimating household vehicle fuel consumption. (The other, fuel efficiency, is discussed in Chapter 4). In addition, this chapter examines differences in driving behavior based on the characteristics of the household and the type of vehicle driven. Trends in household driving patterns are also examined using additional information from the Department of Transportation's Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). Household VMT is a measure of the demand for personal transportation. Demand for transportation may be viewed from either an economic or a social perspective. From the economic point-of-view, the use of a household vehicle represents the consumption of one

212

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Year of Construction Unit, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Year of Construction Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Household Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,4.6,2.5,3.7,3.2,5.4,5.5,3.7,1.6 "2 Persons",34.8,4.3,1.9,4.4,4.1,5.9,5.3,5.5,3.4 "3 Persons",18.4,2.5,1.3,1.7,1.9,2.9,3.5,2.8,1.6 "4 Persons",15.9,1.9,0.8,1.5,1.6,3,2.5,3.1,1.4

213

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Household Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,2.6,7.9,7.3,6.5,5.8 "2 Persons",34.8,4.3,7.7,8.2,7.1,7.5 "3 Persons",18.4,1.8,4.2,4.8,3.9,3.7 "4 Persons",15.9,1.2,3.7,4,3.9,2.9 "5 Persons",7.9,0.7,1.8,2,1.4,2 "6 or More Persons",4.1,0.3,0.8,1,1.1,0.8

214

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

vehicle aging have an additional but unknown effect on the MPG of individual vehicles. Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 27 Of the...

215

Simulation of household in-home and transportation energy use : an integrated behavioral model for estimating energy consumption at the neighborhood scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Household in-home activities and out-of-home transportation are two major sources of urban energy consumption. In light of China's rapid urbanization and income growth, changing lifestyles and consumer patterns - evident ...

Yu, Feifei, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Asset Pricing with Countercyclical Household Consumption Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Asset Pricing with Countercyclical Household Consumption Risk George M. Constantinides that shocks to household consumption growth are negatively skewed, persistent, and countercyclical and play that drives the conditional cross-sectional moments of household consumption growth. The estimated model

Sadeh, Norman M.

217

A comparative evaluation of household preferences for solar photovoltaic standalone and mini-grid system: An empirical study in a costal village of Indian Sundarban  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar PhotoVoltaic (SPV) based systems have been widely accepted technology for rural electrification in developing countries. The standalone SPV home lighting system has increasingly been popular among rural households, while SPV mini-grid supply system is being promoted for rural electrification schemes. This study uses data from household survey to explore the impact of household characteristics on the preference for electrical energy from SPV systems. Econometric evidence shows heterogeneity in behavioural pattern for these two SPV systems. The flexibility in use and cost of systems might explain this difference. Household characteristics such as monthly household income, household size, occupational status of household head, number of room and type of house significantly influence household’s decision for SPV standalone home lighting systems. For SPV mini-grid supply household’s income and monthly expenditure on kerosene are significant predictors. The result reported in this paper might be a valuable input for policy makers to frame right policy mix with regard to provide subsidy on rural electrification programmes.

Amit K. Bhandari; Chinmoy Jana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Household Light Makes Global Heat: High Black Carbon Emissions From Kerosene Wick Lamps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(3) Lighting is another component of this household energy challenge, with millions of households still relying on simple liquid-fueled lamps, but little is known of the associated environmental and health impacts. ... For laboratory tests, CO2 and CO concentrations were measured in real-time with a Li-COR 6252 (Li-COR Biosciences, Lincoln, NE) and Horiba AIA-220 (Horiba, Kyoto, Japan) nondispersive infrared (NDIR) analyzer, respectively. ...

Nicholas L. Lam; Yanju Chen; Cheryl Weyant; Chandra Venkataraman; Pankaj Sadavarte; Michael A. Johnson; Kirk R. Smith; Benjamin T. Brem; Joseph Arineitwe; Justin E. Ellis; Tami C. Bond

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

219

Federal options for low-income electricity policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Protection of low-income consumers remains an important public policy concern in a restructuring electricity industry. Policies are needed to ensure that low-income households have enough affordable electricity to protect their health and safety, and that they are not victimized by unscrupulous suppliers. In this paper, the author presents three broad federal roles in setting low-income electricity policy, and discuss three more specific policy areas: universal service, electricity assistance, and health and safety. He discusses the key policy issues that arise when considering these potential federal initiatives and draw upon reviews of proposed low-income policies from restructuring proposals in eight states--California, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin.

Baxter, L.W. [Pew Charitable Trusts, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Pew Charitable Trusts, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Resource handbook for low-income residential retrofits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the handbook is to provide technical assistance to state grantees participating in the Partnerships in Low-Income Residential Retrofit (PILIRR) Program. PILIRR is a demonstration program aimed at identifying innovative, successful approaches to developing public and private support for weatherization of low-income households. The program reflects the basic concept that responsibility for financial support for conservation activities such as low-income residential retrofitting is likely to gradually shift from the DOE to the states and the private sector. In preparing the handbook, PNL staff surveyed over 50 programs that provide assistance to low-income residents. The survey provided information on factors that contribute to successful programs. PNL also studied the winning PILIRR proposals (from the states of Florida, Iowa, Kentucky, Oklahoma and Washington) and identified the approaches proposed and the type of information that would be most helpful in implementing these approaches.

Callaway, J.W.; Brenchley, D.L.; Davis, L.J.; Ivey, D.L.; Smith, S.A.; Westergard, E.J.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

About the modified Gaussian family of income distributions with applications to individual incomes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a recent paper in this journal [Q. Guo, L. Gao, Distribution of individual incomes in China between 1992 and 2009, Physica A 391 (2012) 5139–5145], a new family of distributions for modeling individual incomes in China was proposed. This family is the so-called Modified Gaussian (MG) distribution, which depends on two parameters. The MG distribution shows a satisfactory fit for the individual income data between 1992 and 2009. However, for the practical use of this model with individual incomes, it is necessary to know its probabilistic and statistical properties, especially the corresponding inequality measures. In this paper, probabilistic functions and inequality measures of the MG distribution are obtained in closed form, including the normalizing constant, probability functions, moments, first-degree stochastic dominance conditions, relationships with other families of distributions and standard tools for inequality measurement (Lorenz and generalized Lorenz curves and Gini, Donaldson–Weymark–Kakwani and Pietra indices). Several methods for parameter estimation are also discussed. In order to illustrate all the previous formulations, we have fitted individual incomes of Spain for three years using the European community household panel survey, concluding a static pattern of inequality, since the Gini index and other inequality measures remain constant over the study period.

José María Sarabia; Faustino Prieto; Carmen Trueba; Vanesa Jordá

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Obama Administration Delivers More than $101 Million for Weatherization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Obama Administration Delivers More than $101 Million for Obama Administration Delivers More than $101 Million for Weatherization Programs in Guam and Pennsylvania Obama Administration Delivers More than $101 Million for Weatherization Programs in Guam and Pennsylvania August 25, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $101 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expand weatherization assistance programs in Guam and Pennsylvania. The funding, along with additional funds to be disbursed after the grantees meet certain Recovery Act milestones, will help them weatherize approximately 29,200 homes, lowering energy costs for low-income families that need it, reducing pollution, and creating green jobs across the country.

223

Obama Administration Delivers More than $288 Million for Weatherization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Delivers More than $288 Million for Delivers More than $288 Million for Weatherization Programs in Seven States Obama Administration Delivers More than $288 Million for Weatherization Programs in Seven States July 6, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $288 million in Recovery Act funding to expand weatherization assistance programs in Arkansas, Iowa, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, and New Hampshire. These funds, along with additional funds to be disbursed after the states meet certain Recovery Act milestones, will help these states achieve their goal of weatherizing more than 91,000 homes, lowering energy costs for low-income families that need it, reducing greenhouse gas

224

Obama Administration Delivers More than $60 Million for Weatherization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Obama Administration Delivers More than $60 Million for Obama Administration Delivers More than $60 Million for Weatherization Programs in Six States and Territories Obama Administration Delivers More than $60 Million for Weatherization Programs in Six States and Territories September 14, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $60 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expand weatherization assistance programs in American Samoa, Northern Arapaho Tribe, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, Tennessee, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The funding, along with additional funds to be disbursed after the grantees meet certain Recovery Act milestones, will help to weatherize nearly 17,000 homes, lowering energy costs for low-income

225

Obama Administration Delivers More than $288 Million for Weatherization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

288 Million for 288 Million for Weatherization Programs in Seven States Obama Administration Delivers More than $288 Million for Weatherization Programs in Seven States July 6, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $288 million in Recovery Act funding to expand weatherization assistance programs in Arkansas, Iowa, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, and New Hampshire. These funds, along with additional funds to be disbursed after the states meet certain Recovery Act milestones, will help these states achieve their goal of weatherizing more than 91,000 homes, lowering energy costs for low-income families that need it, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and creating green jobs across the country.

226

Obama Administration Delivers More than $63 Million for Weatherization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Delivers More than $63 Million for Delivers More than $63 Million for Weatherization Programs in Indiana and New Mexico Obama Administration Delivers More than $63 Million for Weatherization Programs in Indiana and New Mexico July 21, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $63 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expand weatherization assistance programs in Indiana and New Mexico. The funding, along with additional funds to be disbursed after the states meet certain Recovery Act milestones, will help these states achieve their goal of weatherizing more than 22,400 homes, lowering energy costs for low-income families that need it, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and creating

227

Obama Administration Delivers More than $304 Million for Weatherization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

304 Million for 304 Million for Weatherization Programs in Georgia, Illinois and New York Obama Administration Delivers More than $304 Million for Weatherization Programs in Georgia, Illinois and New York June 26, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $304 million in Recovery Act funding to expand weatherization assistance programs in Georgia, Illinois and New York. These funds, along with additional funds to be disbursed after the states meet certain Recovery Act milestones, will help these states achieve their goal of weatherizing more than 85,000 homes, lowering energy costs for low-income families that need it, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and creating green jobs across the country.

228

Obama Administration Delivers More than $101 Million for Weatherization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Delivers More than $101 Million for Delivers More than $101 Million for Weatherization Programs in Guam and Pennsylvania Obama Administration Delivers More than $101 Million for Weatherization Programs in Guam and Pennsylvania August 25, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $101 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expand weatherization assistance programs in Guam and Pennsylvania. The funding, along with additional funds to be disbursed after the grantees meet certain Recovery Act milestones, will help them weatherize approximately 29,200 homes, lowering energy costs for low-income families that need it, reducing pollution, and creating green jobs across the country.

229

Obama Administration Delivers More Than $66 Million for Weatherization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Than $66 Million for Than $66 Million for Weatherization Programs in Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut and Hawaii Obama Administration Delivers More Than $66 Million for Weatherization Programs in Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut and Hawaii August 13, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $66 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expand weatherization assistance programs in Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut and Hawaii. The funding, along with additional funds to be disbursed after the states meet certain Recovery Act milestones, will help these states weatherize approximately 26,300 homes, lowering energy costs for low-income families that need it, reducing pollution, and creating green jobs across

230

Obama Administration Delivers More than $63 Million for Weatherization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Delivers More than $63 Million for Delivers More than $63 Million for Weatherization Programs in Indiana and New Mexico Obama Administration Delivers More than $63 Million for Weatherization Programs in Indiana and New Mexico July 21, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $63 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expand weatherization assistance programs in Indiana and New Mexico. The funding, along with additional funds to be disbursed after the states meet certain Recovery Act milestones, will help these states achieve their goal of weatherizing more than 22,400 homes, lowering energy costs for low-income families that need it, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and creating

231

Obama Administration Delivers More than $60 Million for Weatherization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Obama Administration Delivers More than $60 Million for Obama Administration Delivers More than $60 Million for Weatherization Programs in Six States and Territories Obama Administration Delivers More than $60 Million for Weatherization Programs in Six States and Territories September 14, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $60 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expand weatherization assistance programs in American Samoa, Northern Arapaho Tribe, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, Tennessee, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The funding, along with additional funds to be disbursed after the grantees meet certain Recovery Act milestones, will help to weatherize nearly 17,000 homes, lowering energy costs for low-income

232

Obama Administration Delivers More than $448 Million for Weatherization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

48 Million for 48 Million for Weatherization Programs in Thirteen States Obama Administration Delivers More than $448 Million for Weatherization Programs in Thirteen States July 10, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $448 million in Recovery Act funding to expand weatherization assistance programs in Alabama, Idaho, Maine, Missouri, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. These funds, along with additional funds to be disbursed after the states meet certain Recovery Act milestones, will help to weatherize more than 125,000 homes, cutting energy costs for low-income families that need it, reducing

233

Obama Administration Delivers More than $453 Million for Weatherization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

53 Million for 53 Million for Weatherization Programs in 15 States Obama Administration Delivers More than $453 Million for Weatherization Programs in 15 States June 18, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis COLUMBUS, OHIO - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $453 million in Recovery Act funding to expand weatherization assistance programs in 15 additional states. These funds, along with additional funds to be disbursed after the states meet certain Recovery Act milestones, will help these states achieve their goal of weatherizing more than 165,000 homes, lowering energy costs for low-income families that need it, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and creating green jobs across the country. Secretary Chu made today's announcement while helping to weatherize a local

234

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Energy Burden Definitions Energy burden is an important statistic for policy makers who are considering the need for energy assistance. Energy burden can be defined broadly as the burden placed on household incomes by the cost of energy, or more simply, the ratio of energy expenditures to household income. However, there are different ways to compute energy burden, and different interpretations and uses of the energy burden statistics. DOE Weatherization primarily uses mean individual burden and mean group burden since these statistics provide data on how an "average" individual household fares against an "average" group of households (that is, how burdens are distributed for the population). DOE Weatherization (and HHS) also uses the median individual burden which shows

235

Reform of Australian urban transport: A CGE-microsimulation analysis of the effects on income distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Australian urban transport industries experienced substantial reform during the 1990s leading to significant structural change. Urban transport is typically an important expenditure item for households and structural change in these services may affect households differently depending on their position in the distribution of income and expenditure. We estimate the effects on household income groups of this structural change by applying a computable general equilibrium model incorporating microsimulation behaviour with top-down and bottom-up links. We compare estimates based on a pure microsimulation approach, a top-down approach and a hybrid top-down/bottom-up approach. We estimate small reductions in real income and small reductions in inequality; this pattern is largely replicated across regions. Our results are insensitive to the inclusion of bottom-up links; in contrast, applying a pure microsimulation approach gives accurate results at the aggregate level but underestimates the variation in effects across deciles and regions.

George Verikios; Xiao-guang Zhang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy Use:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends November 2005 Release (Next Update: Discontinued) Based on the 2001 National Household Travel Survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Transportation and augmented by EIA Only light-duty vehicles and recreational vehicles are included in this report. EIA has excluded motorcycles, mopeds, large trucks, and buses in an effort to maintain consistency with its past residential transportation series, which was discontinued after 1994. This report, Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends, provides details on the nation's energy use for household passenger travel. A primary purpose of this report is to release the latest consumer-based data

237

Energy Department Awards $92.5 Million to 19 States to Weatherize Homes of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

92.5 Million to 19 States to Weatherize 92.5 Million to 19 States to Weatherize Homes of Low-Income Families Energy Department Awards $92.5 Million to 19 States to Weatherize Homes of Low-Income Families July 18, 2005 - 2:22pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced that $92.5 million has been awarded to 19 states to improve the energy efficiency of low-income family homes. The Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program makes improvements such as plugging air leaks, improving insulation and tuning air conditioning and heating systems, which reduces energy waste and lowers energy bills. Through DOE's weatherization program, approximately 92,300 homes will be upgraded this year. "The Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program helps

238

Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends...

239

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.7,0.8,0.4,0.3,"Q" "500 to 999",23.8,10.2,6.4,3.4,2.3,1.5 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,5.5,6.3,3,3.3,2.6 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,3.8,4.7,2.9,2.2,1.9 "2,000 to 2,499",12.2,2.6,4,2.5,2,1.3 "2,500 to 2,999",10.3,1.9,4.1,1.7,1.3,1.3

240

Private Sector Saw Solyndra as a Sound Investment, Put $961 Million Behind  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Saw Solyndra as a Sound Investment, Put $961 Million Behind Saw Solyndra as a Sound Investment, Put $961 Million Behind the Promising Company Solyndra's great promise and innovative technologies were widely recognized and highly valued by a wide range of very sophisticated private investors. In its S-1 Form filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission in December 2009, Solyndra detailed more than $961 million of private capital that investors had put on the line after conducting their own independent assessments of the company. The list is below: Affiliates of Artis Capital Management, L.P.: $44 million Affiliates of Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. (Fixed Income) LLC: $2.07 million Argonaut Ventures I, L.L.C.: $270.658 million CMEA Ventures VI, L.P.: $17.666 million CMEA Ventures VII, L.P.: $10 million

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Household solid waste characteristics and management in Chittagong, Bangladesh  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid waste management (SWM) is a multidimensional challenge faced by urban authorities, especially in developing countries like Bangladesh. We investigated per capita waste generation by residents, its composition, and the households' attitudes towards waste management at Rahman Nagar Residential Area, Chittagong, Bangladesh. The study involved a structured questionnaire and encompassed 75 households from five different socioeconomic groups (SEGs): low (LSEG), lower middle (LMSEG), middle (MSEG), upper middle (UMSEG) and high (HSEG). Wastes, collected from all of the groups of households, were segregated and weighed. Waste generation was 1.3 kg/household/day and 0.25 kg/person/day. Household solid waste (HSW) was comprised of nine categories of wastes with vegetable/food waste being the largest component (62%). Vegetable/food waste generation increased from the HSEG (47%) to the LSEG (88%). By weight, 66% of the waste was compostable in nature. The generation of HSW was positively correlated with family size (r{sub xy} = 0.236, p < 0.05), education level (r{sub xy} = 0.244, p < 0.05) and monthly income (r{sub xy} = 0.671, p < 0.01) of the households. Municipal authorities are usually the responsible agencies for solid waste collection and disposal, but the magnitude of the problem is well beyond the ability of any municipal government to tackle. Hence dwellers were found to take the service from the local waste management initiative. Of the respondents, an impressive 44% were willing to pay US$0.3 to US$0.4 per month to waste collectors and it is recommended that service charge be based on the volume of waste generated by households. Almost a quarter (22.7%) of the respondents preferred 12-1 pm as the time period for their waste to be collected. This study adequately shows that household solid waste can be converted from burden to resource through segregation at the source, since people are aware of their role in this direction provided a mechanism to assist them in this pursuit exists and the burden is distributed according to the amount of waste generated.

Sujauddin, Mohammad [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: mohammad.sujauddin@gmail.com; Huda, S.M.S. [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh); Hoque, A.T.M. Rafiqul [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh); Laboratory of Ecology and Systematics (Plant Ecophysiology Section), Faculty of Science, Biology Division, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Communications on energy Household energy conservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study assesses the influence of attitudinal and socio-economic factors on household energy conservation actions. A household interview survey in Regina, Saskatchewan found that respondents perceive an energy problem, although no association with energy conservation actions was determined. Two attitudinal and five socio-economic variables influence household energy conservation. Energy and monetary savings are available to households through energy conservation. Public awareness of household energy conservation through the media can reinforce existing energy conservation actions and encourage new actions.

Fred A. Curtis; P. Simpson-Housley; S. Drever

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Low Income Efficiency  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to serve as a starting point. Mission: The Northwest Public Power Regional Low-income Energy Efficiency Work Group aims to share information and develop best practices in order...

244

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million in non-Federal cost sharing) over four years. The overall goal of the research is to develop carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and separation technologies that can achieve at least 90 percent CO 2 removal at no more than a 35 percent increase in the cost of electricity. The projects, managed by FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), include: (1) Linde, LLC, which will use a post-combustion capture technology incorporating BASF's novel amine-based process at a 1-megawatt electric (MWe) equivalent slipstream pilot plant at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) (DOE contribution: $15 million); (2) Neumann Systems Group, Inc., which will design, construct, and test a patented NeuStreamTM absorber at the Colorado

245

Farm Income Taxation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the filing status of the taxpayer. Finally, the tax liability is determined by reducing the tax imposed by various credits. Reporting Farm Income Methods of accounting. Almost all farmers and ranchers operate on the cash method of accounting. This means... basis taxpayers must take income into account when it is actually received as well as when it is constructively received. The constructive receipt doctrine can be a concern for farmers and ranchers, especially with respect to government price...

McEowen, Roger A.

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

246

Standby electricity consumption and saving potentials of Turkish households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The share of the residential sector currently accounts for about 25% of the national electricity consumption in Turkey. Due to increase in household income levels and decrease in the costs of appliances; significant increases in appliance ownerships and residential electricity consumption levels have been observed in recent years. Most domestic appliances continue consuming electricity when they are not performing their primary functions, i.e. at standby mode, which can constitute up 15% of the total household electricity consumption in some countries. Although the demand in Turkish residential electricity consumption is increasing, there are limited studies on the components of the residential electricity consumption and no studies specifically examining the extent and effects of standby electricity consumption using a surveying/measurement methodology. Thus, determining the share of standby electricity consumption in total home electricity use and the ways of reducing it are important issues in residential energy conservation strategies. In this study, surveys and standby power measurements are conducted at 260 households in Ankara, Turkey, to determine the amount, share, and saving potentials of the standby electricity consumption of Turkish homes. The survey is designed to gather information on the appliance properties, lights, electricity consumption behavior, economic and demographics of the occupants, and electricity bills. A total of 1746 appliances with standby power are measured in the surveyed homes. Using the survey and standby power measurements data, the standby, active, and lighting end-use electricity consumptions of the surveyed homes are determined. The average Turkish household standby power and standby electricity consumption are estimated as 22 W and 95 kW h/yr, respectively. It was also found that the standby electricity consumption constitutes 4% of the total electricity consumption in Turkish homes. Two scenarios are then applied to the surveyed homes to determine the potentials in reducing standby electricity consumption of the households.

Mustafa Cagri Sahin; Merih Aydinalp Koksal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

RECS Data Show Decreased Energy Consumption per Household  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained relatively stable for many years as increased energy efficiency has offset the increase in the number and average size of housing units, according to the newly released data from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The average household consumed 90 million British thermal units (Btu) in 2009 based on RECS. This continues the downward trend in average residential energy consumption of the last 30 years. Despite increases in the number and the average size of homes plus increased use of electronics, improvements in efficiency for space heating, air conditioning, and major appliances have all led to decreased consumption per household. Newer homes also tend to feature better insulation and other characteristics, such as double-pane windows, that improve the building envelope.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

EERE Celebrates Completion of 1 Million Weatherized American Homes |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EERE Celebrates Completion of 1 Million Weatherized American Homes EERE Celebrates Completion of 1 Million Weatherized American Homes EERE Celebrates Completion of 1 Million Weatherized American Homes September 27, 2012 - 10:07am Addthis 1 of 6 David Poindexter with Veterans Green Jobs, puts moisture barrier and insulation into the crawl space of this Lakewood, Colorado, home. This home is part of the Energy Department's Weatherization Assistance Program that supports energy efficiency upgrades to low-income homes in Denver. In addition, the Department's Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program supports development of National Residential Retrofit Guidelines that will improve worker training and workforce development for weatherization and home improvement workers and enable these industries to increase the value of their services to homeowners. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder,

249

Celebrating the Completion of 1 Million Weatherized American Homes |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Celebrating the Completion of 1 Million Weatherized American Homes Celebrating the Completion of 1 Million Weatherized American Homes Celebrating the Completion of 1 Million Weatherized American Homes Addthis 1 of 6 David Poindexter with Veterans Green Jobs, puts moisture barrier and insulation into the crawl space of this Lakewood, Colorado, home. This home is part of the Energy Department's Weatherization Assistance Program that supports energy efficiency upgrades to low-income homes in Denver. In addition, the Department's Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program supports development of National Residential Retrofit Guidelines that will improve worker training and workforce development for weatherization and home improvement workers and enable these industries to increase the value of their services to homeowners. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder,

250

Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Households with Children Households...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 6.1 0.8 2.7 2.6 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 23.2 Race of Householder White ... 54.8 14.4 27.6 12.8 83.7 3.2 6.7 7.2...

251

Arizona - Natural Gas 2012 Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S3. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arizona, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6 6 5 5 5 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 523 711 183 168 117 From Oil Wells * * 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

252

The impact of the Persian Gulf crisis on household energy consumption and expenditure patterns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Iraqi invasion of the Kingdom of Kuwait on August 2, 1990, and the subsequent war between Iraq and an international alliance led by the United States triggered first immediate and then fluctuating world petroleum prices. Increases in petroleum prices and in U.S. petroleum imports resulted in increases in the petroleum prices paid by U.S. residential, commercial, and industrial consumers. The result was an immediate price shock that reverberated throughout the U.S. economy. The differential impact of these price increases and fluctuations on poor and minority households raised immediate, significant, and potentially long-term research, policy, and management issues for a variety of federal, state, and local government agencies, including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Among these issues are (1) the measurement of variations in the impact of petroleum price changes on poor, nonpoor, minority, and majority households; (2) how to use the existing policy resources and policy innovation to mitigate regressive impacts of petroleum price increases on lower-income households; and (3) how to pursue such policy mitigation through government agencies severely circumscribed by tax and expenditure limitations. Few models attempt to assess household energy consumption and energy expenditure under various alternative price scenarios and with respect to the inclusion of differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. This paper provides a preliminary analysis of the nature and extent of potential impacts of petroleum price changes attributable to the Persian Gulf War and its aftermath on majority, black, and Hispanic households and on overlapping poor and nonpoor households. At the time this was written, the Persian Gulf War had concluded with Iraq`s total surrender to all of the resolutions and demands of the United Nations and United States.

Henderson, L. [Univ. of Baltimore, MD (United States); Poyer, D.; Teotia, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Helicobacter pylori Prevalence and Circulating Micronutrient Levels in a Low-Income United States Population  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...39.4) 60 (24.6) Household income ($), n...8 (58.4) Total energy intake, kcal/day...supplements, and total energy intake. bFor absolute...supplements, and total energy intake. bFor absolute...of gastric cancer in Japan: a nested case-control...

Meira Epplein; Lisa B. Signorello; Wei Zheng; Qiuyin Cai; Margaret K. Hargreaves; Angelika Michel; Michael Pawlita; Jay H. Fowke; Pelayo Correa; and William J. Blot

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

or More...... 23.1 15.2 197 12.3 10.7 13.0 1.3 12.8 13.0| 6.7 | Race of Householder | White... 135.3 89.5 1,429 89.2 73.9 89.2 9.1 87.5 89.1| 2.0...

255

The World Distribution of Household Wealth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Japan is not a remote prospect. In summary, it is clear that householdJapan Korea, South New Zealand Norway Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Year Unit share of top 2002 household

DAVIES, JAMES B; Shorrocks, Anthony; Sandstrom, Susanna; WOLFF, EDWARD N

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

DOE to Fund up to $454 Million for Retrofit Ramp-Ups in Energy Efficiency |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Fund up to $454 Million for Retrofit Ramp-Ups in Energy to Fund up to $454 Million for Retrofit Ramp-Ups in Energy Efficiency DOE to Fund up to $454 Million for Retrofit Ramp-Ups in Energy Efficiency September 14, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced a new $450 million program designed to catalyze a nationwide energy upgrade that experts estimate could save $100 million annually in utility bills for households and businesses. The Recovery Act's "Retrofit Ramp-Up" program will pioneer innovative models for rolling out energy efficiency to hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses in a variety of communities. Much like past roll-outs for cable TV or the Internet, DOE intends to create models that, when undertaken nationally, will save consumers billions of dollars on their utility bills and make the huge

257

A comparative multivariate analysis of household energy requirements in Australia, Brazil, Denmark, India and Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we appraise sustainable household consumption from a global perspective. Using per capita energy requirements as an indicator of environmental pressure, we focus on the importance of income growth in a cross-country analysis. Our analysis is supported by a detailed within-country analysis encompassing five countries, in which we assess the importance of various socioeconomic-demographic characteristics of household energy requirements. We bring together family expenditure survey data, input–output tables, and energy statistics in a multivariate analysis. Instead of a uniform Kuznet's curve, we find that the effect of increasing income varies considerably across countries, even when controlling for socioeconomic and demographic variations. The latter variables show similar influences, but differing importance across countries.

Manfred Lenzen; Mette Wier; Claude Cohen; Hitoshi Hayami; Shonali Pachauri; Roberto Schaeffer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. 1. Introduction The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is mandated by Congress to collect, analyze, and disseminate impartial, comprehensive data about energy--how much is produced, who uses it, and the purposes for which it is used. To comply with this mandate, EIA collects energy data from a variety of sources covering a range of topics 1 . Background The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted

259

The causes of Japan's ‘lost decade’: The role of household consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, I analyze the causes of the prolonged slowdown of the Japanese economy in the 1990s and find that the stagnation of investment, especially private fixed investment, was the primary culprit. I then investigate the causes of the stagnation of household consumption during the 1990s and find that the stagnation of household disposable income, the decline in household wealth, and increased uncertainty about the future are among the contributing factors. Finally, I consider whether demand side factors or supply side factors were more important as causes of the prolonged slowdown of the Japanese economy in the 1990s and conclude that the former (especially misguided government policies) were probably more important.

Charles Yuji Horioka

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Extending Efficiency Services to Underserved Households: NYSERDAs Assisted Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

N April 4, 2012 Extending Efficiency Services to Underserved Households: NYSERDA's Assisted Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Program Since 2001, New York residents have completed over 39,000 energy upgrades through NYSERDA's Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (HPwES) initiative. Approximately one third of these projects have been completed through the Assisted HPwES track, which offers large incentives to middle income

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Consumer survey data as a basis for the derivation of retail price and income elasticities of demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and recording their response to the price changes. Prices were presented via use of price cards upon which were printed the various price levels. All price levels were presented during the course of one interview. A sample of 300 households in Dallas, Texas... 128 144 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 10 DISTRIBUTION OF SAtlPLF ViOUSEHOLDS BY INCOME AND SIZE CONSUl"iER DEMiAND STUDY, DALLAS, 1968 COMPARISQi'l OF INCOl~iE LEVELS, DEViAND SAMPLE HOUSEHOLDS AND TOTAL DALLAS COUI'lTY HOUSEHOLDS, 1968 Cotisu...

Wilson, Winston Lewis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

An economic assessment of the impact of two crude oil price scenarios on households  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of two possible future crude oil price scenarios -- high and low price cases -- is assessed for three population groups: majority (non-Hispanic and nonblack), black, and Hispanic. The two price scenarios were taken from the energy security'' report published by the US Department of Energy in 1987. Effects of the two crude oil price scenarios for the 1986--95 period are measured for energy demand and composition and for share of income spent on energy by the three population groups at both the national and census-region levels. The effects on blacks are marginally more adverse than on majority householders, while effects on Hispanics are about the same as those on the majority. Little change is seen in percentage of income spent on energy over the forecast period. Both Hispanic and black households would spend a larger share of their incomes on energy than would majority households. The relatively adverse effects in the higher price scenario shift from the South and West Census regions to the Northeast and Midwest. 24 refs., 7 figs., 22 tabs.

Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S.; Hemphill, R.C.; Hill, L.G.; Marinelli, J.L.; Rose, K.J.; Santini, D.J.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions) ","Single-Family...

264

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

265

Lab contractor awards LANL Foundation $3 million  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Contractor awards LANL Foundation 3 million Lab contractor awards LANL Foundation 3 million To provide educational enrichment and educational outreach funding for a wide variety...

266

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Title Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-55088 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Whitehead, Camilla Dunham, Victor H. Franco, Alexander B. Lekov, and James D. Lutz Document Number LBNL-55088 Pagination 22 Date Published May 31 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Residential household space heating energy use comprises close to half of all residential energy consumption. Currently, average space heating use by household is 43.9 Mbtu for a year. An average, however, does not reflect regional variation in heating practices, energy costs, or fuel type. Indeed, a national average does not capture regional or consumer group cost impacts from changing efficiency levels of heating equipment. The US Department of Energy sets energy standards for residential appliances in, what is called, a rulemaking process. The residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking process investigates the costs and benefits of possible updates to the current minimum efficiency regulations. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) selected the sample used in the residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking from publically available data representing United States residences. The sample represents 107 million households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler rulemaking. This paper describes the choice of criteria to select the sample of houses used in the rulemaking process. The process of data extraction is detailed in the appendices and is easily duplicated.The life-cycle cost is calculated in two ways with a household marginal energy price and a national average energy price. The LCC results show that using an national average energy price produces higher LCC savings but does not reflect regional differences in energy price.

267

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Residential Energy Burdens, by Weatherization Eligibility and Year (1) 1987 Mean Mean Mean Mean Mdn Mean Mean Mdn Mean Group Indvdl Group Indvdl Indvdl Group Indvdl Indvdl Group Total U.S. Households 4.0% 6.8% 3.2% 6.1% 3.5% 2.4% 7.2% 4.4% 3.2% Federally Eligible 13.0% 14.4% 10.1% 12.1% 7.9% 7.7% 13.8% 9.6% 10.0% Federally Ineligible 4.0% 3.5% N.A. 3.0% 2.6% 2.0% 3.6% 3.1% 2.6% Below 125% Poverty Line 13.0% N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. Note(s): Source(s): 1990 FY 2000 (2) FY 2009 (3) 1) Energy burden can be defined broadly as the burden placed on household incomes by the cost of energy, or the ratio of energy expenditures to income for a household. DOE Weatherization primarily uses mean individual burden and mean group burden since these statistics provide data on how an "average" individual household fares against an "average" group of households (that is, how burdens are

268

DOE Awards $235 Million to Southern Company to Build Clean Coal Plant |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

235 Million to Southern Company to Build Clean Coal 235 Million to Southern Company to Build Clean Coal Plant DOE Awards $235 Million to Southern Company to Build Clean Coal Plant February 22, 2006 - 12:13pm Addthis WASHINGTON , DC - The U.S. Department of Energy awarded $235 million to Southern Company, in partnership with the Orlando Utilities Commission and Kellogg, Brown and Root, to develop one of the cleanest coal-fired power plants in the world. Representatives of the Energy Department and Southern Company signed a cooperative agreement that launches the design, construction, and demonstration of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation system at the Orlando Utilities Commission's Stanton Energy Center. The system will produce 285 megawatts of electricity for the Orlando area - which will power approximately 285,000 households - and is

269

Secretary Chu Announces Closing of $117 Million Loan Guarantee for Kahuku  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

17 Million Loan Guarantee for 17 Million Loan Guarantee for Kahuku Wind Power Project Secretary Chu Announces Closing of $117 Million Loan Guarantee for Kahuku Wind Power Project July 27, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington D.C. --- Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy has finalized a $117 million loan guarantee for Kahuku Wind Power, LLC, the owner and operator of the Kahuku Wind Power project. The project includes the development of an innovative 30 megawatt (MW) wind power plant that will supply electricity to approximately 7,700 households per year. According to company estimates, the project, located in Kahuku, Hawaii, will create over 200 jobs on the island of Oahu. "This project is another example of America's leadership in the global clean energy economy," said Secretary Chu. "Through the Recovery Act, we

270

Earth: 15 Million Years Ago  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Einstein's general relativity theory the metric component gxx in the direction of motion (x-direction) of the sun deviates from unity due to a tensor potential caused by the black hole existing around the center of the galaxy. Because the solar system is orbiting around the galactic center at 200 km/s, the theory shows that the Newtonian gravitational potential due to the sun is not quite radial. At the present time, the ecliptic plane is almost perpendicular to the galactic plane, consistent with this modification of the Newtonian gravitational force. The ecliptic plane is assumed to maintain this orientation in the galactic space as it orbits around the galactic center, but the rotational angular momentum of the earth around its own axis can be assumed to be conserved. The earth is between the sun and the galactic center at the summer solstice all the time. As a consequence, the rotational axis of the earth would be parallel to the axis of the orbital rotation of the earth 15 million years ago, if the solar system has been orbiting around the galactic center at 200 km/s. The present theory concludes that the earth did not have seasons 15 million years ago. Therefore, the water on the earth was accumulated near the poles as ice and the sea level was very low. Geological evidence exists that confirms this effect. The resulting global ice-melting started 15 million years ago and is ending now.

Masataka Mizushima

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

271

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2001 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.7 1.2 1.2 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 4.9 6.0 7.4 6.2 2.4 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.1 0.8 Q 0.1 23.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 4.7 5.2 7.4 6.1 2.6 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 1.3 3.9 6.2 5.7 6.7 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 1.2 3.2 5.5 3.8 8.1 With a Heat Pump ..................................... 11.3 Q 0.8 0.6 1.9 14.7 Room Air-Conditioning ................................ 23.3 3.4 1.2 1.2 0.3 13.6 1 Unit

272

Electricity Prices for Households - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Households for Selected Countries1 Households for Selected Countries1 (U.S. Dollars per Kilowatthour) Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Argentina NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.023 NA NA Australia 0.091 0.092 0.094 0.098 NA NA NA NA NA Austria 0.144 0.154 0.152 0.163 0.158 0.158 0.178 0.201 NA Barbados NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Belgium NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Bolivia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Brazil NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.145 0.171 NA Canada 0.067 0.069 0.070 0.071 0.076 0.078 NA NA NA Chile NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.140 0.195 NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) 0.075 0.071 0.074 0.076 0.079 0.079 0.080 0.086 NA Colombia NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.111 0.135 NA

273

Changing Trends: A Brief History of the US Household Consumption of Energy, Water, Food, Beverages and Tobacco  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at 215 million Btu. The rate of consumption generally increased until the oil price shocks of the midChanging Trends: A Brief History of the US Household Consumption of Energy, Water, Food, Beverages understand energy conservation policies, we take a brief look at the history in the US of consumption

274

Household demand and willingness to pay for hybrid vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper quantitatively evaluates consumers' willingness to pay for hybrid vehicles by estimating the demand of hybrid vehicles in the U.S. market. Using micro-level data on consumer purchases of hybrid and non-hybrid vehicles from National Household Travel Survey 2009, this paper formulates a mixed logit model of consumers' vehicle choices. Parameter estimates are then used to evaluate consumers' willingness to pay for hybrids. Results suggest that households' willingness to pay for hybrids ranges from $963 to $1718 for different income groups, which is significantly lower than the average price premium (over $5000) of hybrid vehicles, even when taking the fuel costs savings of hybrid vehicles into consideration. The differences reveal that although the market has shown increasing interest in hybrid vehicles, consumers' valuation of the hybrid feature is still not high enough to compensate for the price premium when they make new purchases. Policy simulations are conducted to examine the effects of raising federal tax incentives on the purchase of hybrid vehicles.

Yizao Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Left to Our Own Devices – Financing Efficiency for Small Business and Low-Income Families (2009 Environmental Defense Fund Report)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

There is a widely known gap between cost-effective behavior, consumption patterns and actual marketplace conditions. This •engineering gap/efficiency gap is particularly the case for low-income households and small businesses, which tend to depend on older, inefficient equipment. This study identifies the limitations of current and potential of relatively new mechanisms for efficiency investment micro-financing.

276

Development of the household sample for furnace and boilerlife-cycle cost analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential household space heating energy use comprises close to half of all residential energy consumption. Currently, average space heating use by household is 43.9 Mbtu for a year. An average, however, does not reflect regional variation in heating practices, energy costs, or fuel type. Indeed, a national average does not capture regional or consumer group cost impacts from changing efficiency levels of heating equipment. The US Department of Energy sets energy standards for residential appliances in, what is called, a rulemaking process. The residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking process investigates the costs and benefits of possible updates to the current minimum efficiency regulations. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) selected the sample used in the residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking from publically available data representing United States residences. The sample represents 107 million households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler rulemaking. This paper describes the choice of criteria to select the sample of houses used in the rulemaking process. The process of data extraction is detailed in the appendices and is easily duplicated. The life-cycle cost is calculated in two ways with a household marginal energy price and a national average energy price. The LCC results show that using an national average energy price produces higher LCC savings but does not reflect regional differences in energy price.

Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Franco, Victor; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, Jim

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Experimental Evidence Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Household Response To Dynamic...

278

California Natural Gas International Deliveries (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Deliveries (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas International Deliveries (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

279

California Natural Gas International Receipts (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Receipts (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas International Receipts (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's...

280

More efficient household electricity use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy efficiency of electric appliances has increased markedly in OECD countries, according to data provided by utilities, appliance associations, appliance manufacturers, and independent analyses of each country we reviewed (US, Sweden, Norway, Holland, Japan, Germany, UK). These improvements have, in part, offset increases in electricity demand due to increasing saturation of appliances. However, we see evidence that the efficiency of new devices has hit a temporary plateau: Appliances sold in 1988, while far more efficient than similar ones sold in the early 1970s, may not be significantly more efficient than those sold in 1987. The reason for this plateau, according to manufacturers we interviewed, is that the simple energy-saving features have been incorporated; more sophisticated efficiency improvements are economically justified by five to ten year paybacks, but unattractive to consumers in most countries who appear to demand paybacks of less than three years. Manufacturers see features other than efficiency --- such as number of storage compartments and automatic ice-makers --- as more likely to boost sales, market share, or profits. If this efficiency plateau'' proves lasting, then electricity use for appliance could begin to grow again as larger and more fancy models appear in households. 38 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Schipper, L.; Hawk, D.V.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

LOW INCOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM OVERVIEW Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

314 LOW INCOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM OVERVIEW Background BPA's low income program began in 1980, serving the states of Oregon, Montana, Idaho, and Washington. Over time the...

282

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency Potential Study.  Technical Report Energy Efficiency  Potential Study.  Technical Report Energy Efficiency   Renewable Energy Technologies   Transportation   Assessment of Household Carbon Footprint Reduction Potentials is the final report 

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Household gasoline demand in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continuing rapid growth in U.S. gasoline consumption threatens to exacerbate environmental and congestion problems. We use flexible semiparametric and nonparametric methods to guide analysis of household gasoline consumption, ...

Schmalensee, Richard

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Nevada: Kingston Creek Hydro Project Powers 100 Households  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hydropower project produces enough electricity to annually power nearly 100 typical American households.

285

Low-Income Weatherization: The Human Dimension  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation focuses on how the human dimension saves energy within low-income weatherization programs.

286

1 million gallons of grout.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Historic Milestone Achieved as 1 Million Gallons of Grout Historic Milestone Achieved as 1 Million Gallons of Grout Is Poured into SRS Waste Tanks 18 and 19 AIKEN, S.C. (May 9, 2012) - Operational closure of the next two radioactive waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has achieved a historic milestone with the placement of over 1 million gallons of grout inside the massive underground tanks. Filling Tanks 18 and 19 began on April 2, 2012. As of today, over 1 million gallons of

287

Energy Department Announces $66 Million for Transformational...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

(REMOTE), provides 34 million to find advanced biocatalyst technologies that can convert natural gas to liquid fuel for transportation. Deputy Director Martin made the project...

288

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

289

Heating a Plasma to 100 Million Kelvin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In this work techniques for heating the fusion reactor ITER to thermonuclear temperatures, over 100 million kelvin, is investigated. The temperature is numerically computed… (more)

Fröberg, Gunnar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Tax year 2012 Earned Income Tax Credits, Education Credits, & Unemployment Income  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tax year 2012 ­ Earned Income Tax Credits, Education Credits, & Unemployment Income This article tax year. Expanded Earned Income Tax Credit benefits Many low-income families depend on the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), and the good news for this year is that the amount of the credit has been

Stephens, Graeme L.

291

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1: January 8, 1: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on AddThis.com... Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips In a day, the average household traveled 32.7 miles in 2001 (the latest

292

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2: October 3, 2: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on AddThis.com... Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership Household vehicle ownership has changed significantly over the last 40

293

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Non-Hispanic Descent",96.3,17.3,24.7,35.8,18.4 "Race of Householder2, 3" "White",79.1,14.7,21,27.4,16 "Hispanic",5,0.8,"Q",2.1,2.1 "Non-Hispanic",74.1,13.9,20.9,25.4,...

294

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Non-Hispanic Descent",96.3,18.4,5.9,12.5 "Race of Householder2, 3" "White",79.1,16,5.9,10.1 "Hispanic",5,2.1,0.7,1.4 "Non-Hispanic",74.1,13.9,5.2,8.7...

295

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Non-Hispanic Descent",96.3,70.6,58.5,3.7,1.6,2,4.8 "Race of Householder2, 3" "White",79.1,61.1,50.5,3.1,1.2,1.7,4.7 "Hispanic",5,2.6,1.9,"Q","Q","Q",0.4...

296

A gap in formal long-term care use related to characteristics of caregivers and households, under the public universal system in Japan: 2001–2010  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We investigated whether the universal provision of long-term care (LTC) under Japan's public system has equalized its use across households with different socio-economic characteristics, with a special focus on the gender and marital status of primary caregivers, and income. We used repeated cross-sectional data from national household surveys (2001, 2004, 2007, 2010) and conducted multiple logistic regression analyses to obtain odds ratios of caregiver and household characteristics for service use, adjusting for recipients’ characteristics. The results showed that the patterns of service use have been consistently determined by caregivers’ gender and marital status over the period despite demographic changes among caregivers. The gap in service use first narrowed, then widened again across income levels after the global economic recession. The results indicate that the traditional gender-bound norms and capacity constraints on households’ informal care provision remained influential on decisions over service use, even after the universal provision of formal care. To improve equality of service utilization, the universal LTC system needs to meet diversifying needs of caregivers/recipients and their households, by overcoming barriers related to gender norms and economic disparity.

Mutsumi Tokunaga; Hideki Hashimoto; Nanako Tamiya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD [PFP#201331587]  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million U.S. Households; 12 pages, 47 kb) Million U.S. Households; 12 pages, 47 kb) Contents Pages HC7-1a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-4a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-7a. Home Office Equipment by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1

298

1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million U.S. Households; 45 pages, 128 kb) Million U.S. Households; 45 pages, 128 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-4a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-6a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-7a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4

299

Using census aggregates to proxy for household characteristics: an application to vehicle ownership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instead, Asian and Hispanic households were undersampled byhousehold Age of the householder/Average age of residents Hispanichousehold Age of the householder/Average age of residents Hispanic

Adjemian, Michael; Williams, Jeffrey

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

302

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

303

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

304

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

305

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

306

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

307

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

308

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

309

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

310

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

311

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

312

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

313

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

314

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

315

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

316

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

317

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

318

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

319

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

320

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

322

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

323

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

324

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

325

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

326

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

327

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

328

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

329

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

330

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

331

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

332

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

333

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

334

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

335

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

336

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

337

Survey of Household Energy Use (SHEU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Household Energy Use (SHEU) 2003 Detailed Statistical Report #12;To obtain additional copies of this or other free publications on energy efficiency, please contact: Energy Publications Office of Energy Efficiency Natural Resources Canada c/o St. Joseph Communications Order Processing Unit

338

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3: January 22, 3: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on AddThis.com... Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership

339

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5: February 5, 5: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on AddThis.com... Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles The graphs below show the average vehicle miles of travel (VMT) - daily

340

Opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from households in Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efforts to mitigate climate threats should not exclude the household as the household is a major driver of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through its consumption...2) emissions from kerosene combustion for lighting

O. Adeoti; S. O. Osho

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Household Wealth in a Cross-Country Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides a comparative analysis of household wealth in the United States, the United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Spain, and Italy. ... wealth, looking at the instruments in which households invest...

Laura Bartiloro; Massimo Coletta…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY NATIONAL AWARENESS OF ENERGY STAR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY NATIONAL AWARENESS OF ENERGY STAR ® FOR 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements .................................................................................. ii Executive Summary ............................................................................ ES-1 Introduction ............................................................................................... 1 Methodology Overview ............................................................................. 2 Key Findings ............................................................................................. 5 Recognition .................................................................................................................. 5 Understanding ........................................................................................................... 12

343

LOW INCOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM OVERVIEW Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LOW INCOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM OVERVIEW Background BPA's low income program began in in the mid-80s, serving the states of Oregon, Montana, Idaho, and Washington. Over time...

344

A Million Meter Milestone | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Million Meter Milestone A Million Meter Milestone A Million Meter Milestone March 4, 2011 - 2:36pm Addthis To see what installing the 1 millionth meter looked like, check out this video. Don Macdonald Program Manager, Smart Grid Investment Grant Program What does this mean for me? Smart meters allow consumers to take personal control and ownership of her energy usage in a way not possible before. As program manager for the Department of Energy's Recovery Act funded Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) program, I've had the pleasure of seeing SGIG reach several important milestones recently. Among the most notable has been the recent achievement of three million smart meters installed by SGIG recipients as of December 31, 2010. On February 23, 2011, along with my colleague Chris Irwin, I was in Houston, Texas where SGIG

345

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 10.2 0.6 0.3 1.1 1.1 Table HC2.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units...

346

Just Suppose: Housing Subsidies for Low Income Renters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bonds Low-income housing tax credit Homeowner Multifamilybonds Low-income housing tax credit Fiscal year Fiscal yearthe Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program to provide

Quigley, John M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

storage of several million tonnes of carbon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of several million tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO of several million tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The three recipients of the award are: the In Salah CO 2 Storage Project in Algeria; the Sleipner CO 2 Project in the North Sea; and the Weyburn-Midale CO 2 Project in Canada. In addition to providing scientific research opportunities, the projects are also being recognized as exemplary global models for their willingness to share their experiences in

348

Home Prices and Household Callan Windsor, Jarkko Jskel and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Discussion Paper Home Prices and Household Spending Callan Windsor, Jarkko Jääskelä. ISSN 1320-7729 (Print) ISSN 1448-5109 (Online) #12;Home Prices and Household Spending Callan Windsor Abstract This paper explores the positive relationship between home prices and household spending

349

Handling Frame Problems When Address-Based Sampling Is Used for In-Person Household Surveys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......use as the sampling frame for household surveys. This subset includes...However, around 90 percent of households with PO box addresses also have...recent growth, new construction, Hispanic households, non-English-speaking households......

Graham Kalton; Jennifer Kali; Richard Sigman

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Incomes of Migratory Agricultural Workers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.64 Colorado 5.35 Minnesota Wisconsin Washington Ohio California Arizona Idaho Illinois North Dakota Other states1 Includes some work in Mexico. !ndicative of family income than are data on in- jividual workers. Average earnings of the fam- dies..., BY STATES, MIGRATORY FARMWORKERS, SOUTH TEXAS, 1956 State and Average Average type of work days earnings worked per worker per per day North Dakota Sugar beets Potatoes Ohio Sugar beets Potatoes Tomatoes Other crops Oklahoma Cotton Oregon...

Sargent, Frederic O.; Metzler, William H.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing household solid Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Groundwater Contamination from Household Wastewater... 12;Glossary Household Wastewater Treatment These terms may help you make more accurate assessments......

352

S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million U.S. Households; 13 pages, 52 kb) Million U.S. Households; 13 pages, 52 kb) Contents Pages HC2-1a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC2-2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC2-3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC2-4a. Household Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC2-5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC2-6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC2-7a. Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC2-8a. Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1

353

Towards sustainable consumption: do green households have smaller ecological footprints?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The need for households in rich countries to develop more sustainable consumption patterns is high on the political agenda. An increased awareness of environmental issues among the general public is often presented as an important prerequisite for this change. This article describes how the study team compared the ecological footprints of ''green'' and ''ordinary'' households. These footprint calculations are based on a number of consumption categories that have severe environmental consequences, such as energy and material use in the home, and transport. The comparison is based on a survey of 404 households in the city of Stavanger, where 66 respondents were members of the Environmental Home Guard in Norway. The analysis suggests that, even if the green households have a smaller ecological footprint per household member, this is not caused by their participation in the Home Guard. It merely reflects the fact that green households are larger than ordinary households.

Erling Holden

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Household transitions to energy efficient lighting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract New energy efficient lighting technologies can significantly reduce household electricity consumption, but adoption has been slow. A unique dataset of German households is used in this paper to examine the factors associated with the replacement of old incandescent lamps (ILs) with new energy efficient compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and light emitting diodes (LEDs). The ‘rebound’ effect of increased lamp luminosity in the transition to energy efficient bulbs is analyzed jointly with the replacement decision to account for household self-selection in bulb-type choice. Results indicate that the EU ban on \\{ILs\\} accelerated the pace of transition to \\{CFLs\\} and LEDs, while storage of bulbs significantly dampened the speed of the transition. Higher lighting needs and bulb attributes like energy efficiency, environmental friendliness, and durability spur IL replacement with \\{CFLs\\} or LEDs. Electricity gains from new energy efficient lighting are mitigated by 23% and 47% increases in luminosity for CFL and LED replacements, respectively. Model results suggest that taking the replacement bulb from storage and higher levels of education dampen the magnitude of these luminosity rebounds in IL to CFL transitions.

Bradford Mills; Joachim Schleich

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

356

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

357

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

358

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

359

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

360

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

362

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

363

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

364

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

365

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

366

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

367

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

368

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

369

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

370

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

371

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

372

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

373

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

374

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

375

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

376

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

377

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

378

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

379

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

380

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Million U.S. Housing Units Total............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Attached Attached 2 to 4 Units Table HC2.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Type of Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Home Electronics Usage Indicators Detached Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Attached 2 to 4 Units Table HC2.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Type of Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Home Electronics Usage Indicators Detached Status of PC When Not in Use Left On..............................................................

382

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

383

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

384

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

385

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

386

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

387

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

388

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

389

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

390

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

391

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

392

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

393

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

394

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000

395

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 California - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 120,579 From Oil Wells 122,345 121,949 151,369 120,880 70,900

396

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 40,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,452,148 1,413,759 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 From Oil Wells 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703 53,720

397

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 261 261 269 277 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 From Oil Wells 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918

398

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation did not help low income Hispanic women in Texas meet the dietary guidelines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective Low-income Hispanic women are at greater risk for dietary deficiencies and obesity. We assessed the association between Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation and dietary intake among 661 Hispanic women aged 26–44 years living in Texas. Methods Cross-sectional data was collected using standard methods. Analysis of variance and logistic regression examined the influence of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program on diet after adjusting for household characteristics, body mass index, and food security status. Results Most women did not meet recommended dietary guidelines. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participants consumed higher amounts of total sugars, sweets–desserts, and sugar-sweetened beverages than Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program nonparticipants. High sodium intakes and low dairy consumption were observed in both groups. Only 27% of low-income eligible women received Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits. Discussion Low-income Hispanic women participating in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program reported less healthful dietary patterns than nonparticipants. This may contribute to the increased obesity prevalence and related comorbidities observed in this population. Conclusion Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program should play an important role in enhancing the overall dietary quality of low-income households. Policy initiatives such as limiting the purchase of sugar-sweetened beverages and education to enable women to reduce consumption of high sodium processed foods deserve consideration as means to improve the dietary quality of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participants. Effective measures are needed to increase Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation rates among Hispanics.

Angela Hilmers; Tzu-An Chen; Jayna M. Dave; Deborah Thompson; Karen Weber Cullen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" ,,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX"

400

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Air Conditioning",,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Air Conditioning Equipment"

402

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Computers and Other Electronics",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX"

403

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Space Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Space Heating Equipment"

404

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Televisions in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 1 Televisions in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Televisions",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

405

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Appliances in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Appliances in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Appliances",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)"

406

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" "Appliances",,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both"

407

Ethylene capacity tops 77 million mty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

World ethylene production capacity is 77.8 million metric tons/year (mty). This total represents an increase of more than 6 million mty, or almost 9%, over last year`s survey. The biggest reason for the large change is more information about plants in the CIS. Also responsible for the increase in capacity is the start-up of several large ethylene plants during the past year. The paper discusses construction of ethylene plants, feedstocks, prices, new capacity, price outlook, and problems in Europe`s ethylene market.

Rhodes, A.K.; Knott, D.

1995-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

408

Current trends in income statements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and tho Caterpi11ar Tractor Company. Tbe first mentioned, included complete statements for tho parent company for the years 19'-1946? snd. tbe second included compIete consolidated statements for the years 3932 1946'? This study has caused the writer... various subjects to be treated in this paper are those that bav'e received considerable attention in recent pubs. cations. , The results of a tabulation of the income and surplus statements in the annual repcz ts oi' two hundred companies are given...

Cass, Edwin Childers

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

409

Requested Amount: $7 million annually PROGRAM DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Requested Amount: $7 million annually PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Goals are to increase the level of fire protection to the citizens of Texas and to decrease the level of losses (in lives and property) from wildfires, thereby enhancing the quality of life for Texans. The Texas Wildfire Protection Plan (TWPP

410

Colorado Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Colorado Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

411

Colorado Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun...

412

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

413

DOE Awards $3 Million Contract to Oak Ridge Associated Universities...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Million Contract to Oak Ridge Associated Universities for Expert Review of Yucca Mountain Work DOE Awards 3 Million Contract to Oak Ridge Associated Universities for Expert...

414

President Obama Announces Over $467 Million in Recovery Act Funding...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Over 467 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Geothermal and Solar Energy Projects President Obama Announces Over 467 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Geothermal and Solar...

415

President Obama Announces Over $467 Million in Recovery Act Funding...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Announces Over 467 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Geothermal and Solar Energy Projects President Obama Announces Over 467 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Geothermal and...

416

DOE Announces Nearly $170 Million in Available Funding to Advance...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

70 Million in Available Funding to Advance Solar Energy Technologies DOE Announces Nearly 170 Million in Available Funding to Advance Solar Energy Technologies April 8, 2011 -...

417

Energy Department Announces $4 Million for University Consortium...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

4 Million for University Consortium to Advance America's Water Power Industry Energy Department Announces 4 Million for University Consortium to Advance America's Water Power...

418

DOE Announces Over $30 Million to Help Universities Train the...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

30 Million to Help Universities Train the Next Generation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Experts DOE Announces Over 30 Million to Help Universities Train the Next Generation of...

419

Secretary Chu Announces $256 Million Investment to Improve the...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

56 Million Investment to Improve the Energy Efficiency of the American Economy Secretary Chu Announces 256 Million Investment to Improve the Energy Efficiency of the American...

420

Energy Department Announces $5 Million for Residential Building...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Announces 5 Million for Residential Building Energy Efficiency Research and University-Industry Partnerships Energy Department Announces 5 Million for Residential Building Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Secretary Chu Announces Nearly $50 Million of Recovery Act Funding...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nearly 50 Million of Recovery Act Funding to Accelerate Deployment of Geothermal Heat Pumps Secretary Chu Announces Nearly 50 Million of Recovery Act Funding to...

422

Secretary Chu Announces Nearly $50 Million of Recovery Act Funding...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

50 Million of Recovery Act Funding to Accelerate Deployment of Geothermal Heat Pumps Secretary Chu Announces Nearly 50 Million of Recovery Act Funding to Accelerate Deployment of...

423

Energy Secretary Chu Announces $148 million in Recovery Act Funding...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

48 million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in New York Energy Secretary Chu Announces 148 million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in New York...

424

Energy Department Invests Over $7 Million to Deploy Tribal Clean...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Department Invests Over 7 Million to Deploy Tribal Clean Energy Projects Energy Department Invests Over 7 Million to Deploy Tribal Clean Energy Projects November 14, 2013...

425

Energy Secretary Chu Announces $384 Million in Recovery Act Funding...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

384 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in New Mexico Energy Secretary Chu Announces 384 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in New...

426

Energy Department Announces $11 Million to Advance Renewable...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1 Million to Advance Renewable Carbon Fiber Production from Biomass Energy Department Announces 11 Million to Advance Renewable Carbon Fiber Production from Biomass July 30, 2014...

427

Combined Heat and Power System Achieves Millions in Cost Savings...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Achieves Millions in Cost Savings at Large University - Case Study, 2013 Combined Heat and Power System Achieves Millions in Cost Savings at Large University - Case Study, 2013...

428

Department of Energy Awards $9 Million in Grants for Science...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Awards 9 Million in Grants for Science and Technical Research to Historically Black Colleges and Universities in South Carolina and Georgia Department of Energy Awards 9 Million...

429

Energy Department Announces $53 Million to Drive Innovation,...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Department Announces 53 Million to Drive Innovation, Cut Cost of Solar Power Energy Department Announces 53 Million to Drive Innovation, Cut Cost of Solar Power October...

430

Energy Department Announces $3 Million to Support Clean Energy...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Department Announces 3 Million to Support Clean Energy Businesses and Entrepreneurs Energy Department Announces 3 Million to Support Clean Energy Businesses and...

431

Energy Department Announces $10 Million to Speed Enhanced Geothermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Department Announces 10 Million to Speed Enhanced Geothermal Systems into the Market Energy Department Announces 10 Million to Speed Enhanced Geothermal Systems into the...

432

Department of Energy Awards $15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development Department of Energy Awards 15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development August 1,...

433

Department of Energy Announces $17 Million to Bolster University...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 Million to Bolster University-Led Nuclear Energy Research and Development Department of Energy Announces 17 Million to Bolster University-Led Nuclear Energy Research and...

434

Department Of Energy Offers $60 Million to Spur Industry Engagement...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Of Energy Offers 60 Million to Spur Industry Engagement in Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Department Of Energy Offers 60 Million to Spur Industry Engagement in Global Nuclear...

435

Department of Energy Announces $39 Million to Strengthen University...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

39 Million to Strengthen University-Led Nuclear Energy Research and Development Department of Energy Announces 39 Million to Strengthen University-Led Nuclear Energy Research and...

436

Energy Department Announces $2 Million to Develop Supply Chain...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Announces 2 Million to Develop Supply Chain, Manufacturing Competitiveness Analysis for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Energy Department Announces 2 Million to Develop...

437

Department of Energy Awards Nearly $7 Million to Advance Fuel...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Million to Advance Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Storage Systems Research Department of Energy Awards Nearly 7 Million to Advance Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Storage Systems Research August...

438

Energy Secretary Bodman Announces $119 Million in Funding and...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

119 Million in Funding and Roadmap to Advance Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles Energy Secretary Bodman Announces 119 Million in Funding and Roadmap to Advance Hydrogen Fuel Cell...

439

Energy Department Invests Over $7 Million to Commercialize Cost...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Department Invests Over 7 Million to Commercialize Cost-Effective Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Energy Department Invests Over 7 Million to Commercialize...

440

Obama Administration Announces $12 Million i6 Green Investment...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Obama Administration Announces 12 Million i6 Green Investment to Promote Clean Energy Innovation and Job Creation Obama Administration Announces 12 Million i6 Green Investment to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Energy Department to Award $6 Million to State Partnerships to...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

to Award 6 Million to State Partnerships to Increase Energy Efficiency Energy Department to Award 6 Million to State Partnerships to Increase Energy Efficiency September 19, 2006...

442

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests 60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy...

443

Energy Department Invests $67 Million to Advanced Nuclear Technology...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Energy Department Invests 67 Million to Advanced Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests 67 Million to Advanced Nuclear Technology August 20, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis News...

444

Energy Department Awards $5 Million to Spur Local Clean Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 Million to Spur Local Clean Energy Development, Energy Savings Energy Department Awards 5 Million to Spur Local Clean Energy Development, Energy Savings October 14, 2014 -...

445

Energy Department Announces Up to $14 Million for Applying Landscape...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Up to 14 Million for Applying Landscape Design to Cellulosic Bioenergy Energy Department Announces Up to 14 Million for Applying Landscape Design to Cellulosic Bioenergy October...

446

The earned income tax credit and fertility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Government programs designed to provide income safety nets often restrict eligibility to families with children, creating an unintended fertility incentive. This paper considers whether dramatically changing ince...

Reagan Baughman; Stacy Dickert-Conlin

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

INCOME TAX MANAGEMENT FOR FARMERS IN 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................. 2 Child Tax Credit#12;INCOME TAX MANAGEMENT FOR FARMERS IN 2008 Table of Contents RECENT LAW CHANGES AFFECTING ...................................................................................................... 3 Kiddie Tax

448

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F (2001) -- Household Natural Gas Usage Form F (2001) -- Household Natural Gas Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Natural Gas Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

449

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E (2001) - Household Electricity Usage Form E (2001) - Household Electricity Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Electricity Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

450

Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Personal) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Personal) Personal) Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Personal) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate Statewide annual limit of 5 million in total credits Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 State New Mexico Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount 5 per wet ton Provider New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department [http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/10%20Regular/final/HB0171.pdf House Bill 171] of 2010 created a tax credit for agricultural biomass from a dairy or feedlot transported to a facility that uses agricultural biomass to generate electricity or make biocrude or other liquid or gaseous fuel for commercial use. For the purposes of this tax credit, agricultural biomass means wet manure. The Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department may

451

Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Corporate) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Corporate) Corporate) Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Corporate) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate Statewide annual limit of 5 million in total credits Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 State New Mexico Program Type Corporate Tax Credit Rebate Amount 5 per wet ton Provider New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department [http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/10%20Regular/final/HB0171.pdf House Bill 171] of 2010 created a tax credit for agricultural biomass from a dairy or feedlot transported to a facility that uses agricultural biomass to generate electricity or make biocrude or other liquid or gaseous fuel for commercial use. For the purposes of this tax credit, agricultural biomass means wet manure. The Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department may

452

High risk of depression among low-income women raises awareness about treatment options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

women were Hispanic, with larger household sizes and lowerthe 3.3-person households of non- Hispanic white clients (Pas household size, age and participation Hispanic and

Block Joy, Amy; Hudes, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Barriers to household investment in residential energy conservation: preliminary assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general assessment of the range of barriers which impede household investments in weatherization and other energy efficiency improvements for their homes is provided. The relationship of similar factors to households' interest in receiving a free energy audits examined. Rates of return that underly household investments in major conservation improvements are assessed. A special analysis of household knowledge of economically attractive investments is provided that compares high payback improvements specified by the energy audit with the list of needed or desirable conservation improvements identified by respondents. (LEW)

Hoffman, W.L.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Confronting earthquake risk in Japan—are private households underinsured?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite the fact that Japan is an earthquake-prone country and Japanese ... risk averse, less than half of Japanese households are insured against earthquake risk. Based on...

Franz Waldenberger

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Salmon consumption at the household level in Japan.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the salmon demand of Japanese households. The specific goals are to illuminate the substitutional relationship between… (more)

Kikuchi, Akihiro

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Consumer perspectives on household hazardous waste management in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We give an overview of the management systems of household hazardous waste (HHW) in Japan and discuss the management systems and their...

Misuzu Asari; Shin-ichi Sakai

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Short and Long-Term Perspectives: The Impact on Low-Income Consumers of Forecasted Energy Price Increases in 2008 and A Cap & Trade Carbon Policy in 2030  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently released its short-term forecast for residential energy prices for the winter of 2007-2008. The forecast indicates increases in costs for low-income consumers in the year ahead, particularly for those using fuel oil to heat their homes. In the following analysis, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has integrated the EIA price projections with the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 2001 in order to project the impact of these price increases on the nation's low-income households by primary heating fuel type, nationally and by Census Region. The report provides an update of bill estimates provided in a previous study, "The Impact Of Forecasted Energy Price Increases On Low-Income Consumers" (Eisenberg, 2005). The statistics are intended for use by policymakers in the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program and elsewhere who are trying to gauge the nature and severity of the problems that will be faced by eligible low-income households during the 2008 fiscal year. In addition to providing expenditure forecasts for the year immediately ahead, this analysis uses a similar methodology to give policy makers some insight into one of the major policy debates that will impact low-income energy expenditures well into the middle decades of this century and beyond. There is now considerable discussion of employing a cap-and-trade mechanism to first limit and then reduce U.S. emissions of carbon into the atmosphere in order to combat the long-range threat of human-induced climate change. The Energy Information Administration has provided an analysis of projected energy prices in the years 2020 and 2030 for one such cap-and-trade carbon reduction proposal that, when integrated with the RECS 2001 database, provides estimates of how low-income households will be impacted over the long term by such a carbon reduction policy.

Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,61.1,5.6,6.3,15.2,5.8 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,2.6,0.2,0.7,0.9,0.4 "Do Not Have Air Conditioning Equipment",14.7,8.1,0.9,2.1,3,0.7 "Type of Air Conditioning Equipment "

459

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Natural Gas",69.2,13.8,2.9,1.7,1.1,10.9,5.7,2.3,2.8

460

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 1 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Computers and Other Electronics",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Computers and Other Electronics",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,4.7,1,0.5,0.5,3.7,1.7,1.4,0.5 1,46.9,8.7,2.3,1,1.3,6.4,3.2,2,1.2 2,24.3,4.3,1.2,0.5,0.7,3.1,1.4,0.9,0.8

462

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Space Heating",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

463

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Space Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,20.8,25.8,41.1,22.4 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,"Q","Q",0.7,1.6 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"N","Q",0.3,0.8 "Main Heating Fuel and Equipment2" "Natural Gas",55.6,10.8,17.9,13.3,13.6 "Central Warm-Air Furnace",44.3,6.1,15.9,11.3,11

464

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.3,0.4,0.7,0.5 1,108.1,19.3,25,40.2,23.6 "2 or More",2.7,0.2,0.5,1.2,0.7 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,19.4,25.6,41.2,24.2 1,3.1,1.4,0.3,0.8,0.6 "2 or More",0.1,"Q","N","Q","Q" "Main Water Heater" "Main Water Heater Type" "Storage Tank",110.6,19.4,25.5,41.3,24.3

465

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Televisions in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Televisions in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Televisions",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.4,0.1,0.1,"Q",0.2,"Q","Q","Q" 1,24.2,4.6,1.2,0.6,0.6,3.5,2,1,0.4

466

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Air Conditioning in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Air Conditioning in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Air Conditioning",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

467

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Computers and Other Electronics",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,6.7,4.7,1.1,1.1,0.6,2,2,0.6,1,0.5

468

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Water Heating",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

469

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Space Heating",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do "

470

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8

471

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC4.9 Televisions in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" HC4.9 Televisions in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Televisions",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.3,0.2,"Q","Q","Q","Q",0.1,"Q","Q","Q"

472

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,,,,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Water Heating",,,,"IL","MI","WI","IN, OH",,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.4,0.3,"Q","Q","Q","Q",0.1,"Q","Q","Q"

473

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Air Conditioning in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Air Conditioning in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Air Conditioning",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,22.4,15,4.3,3.1,1.8,5.9,7.4,2.3,3.4,1.7

474

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" 6 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Space Heating",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,38.7,35.4,12.5,17.6,6 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,"Q","N",1.3,0.7,0.3 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q",0.3,0.8,"Q" "Main Heating Fuel and Equipment3"

475

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Space Heating",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

476

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters"

477

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" " ",,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Space Heating",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,25.8,17.8,4.7,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8

478

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Fuels Used and End Uses" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Natural Gas",69.2,45.6,4.7,6.1,11,1.8 "Propane/LPG",48.9,39.6,2.4,1.7,2,3.2 "Wood",13.1,11.4,0.3,0.2,0.5,0.7 "Fuel Oil",7.7,5.1,0.4,0.7,1.3,0.1

479

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" ,,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Urban and Rural2" "Urban",88.1,18,4.4,2.2,2.2,13.6,6.6,3.9,3.1 "Rural",25.5,2.8,1.1,0.3,0.8,1.7,0.6,1,"Q"

480

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household income million" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Computers and Other Electronics" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4

482

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

11 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 11 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Water Heating",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

483

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,16.5,22.4,40.5,14.6 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,1.4,1.2,0.9,1.4 "Do Not Have Air Conditioning Equipment",14.7,2.8,2.3,0.7,8.9 "Type of Air Conditioning Equipment " "Used (more than one may apply)" "Use Central Air Conditioning Equipment",69.7,7.2,17.1,34.6,10.8

484

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

485

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Air Conditioning in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Air Conditioning in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Air Conditioning",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,16.5,3.9,1.9,2,12.6,5.3,4.4,2.9 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But"

486

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Appliances in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Appliances in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Appliances",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

487

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" ,,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Urban and Rural2" "Urban",88.1,19.9,14.6,4.1,2.9,1.8,5.8,5.3,1.6,2.4,1.4

488

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC.1.11 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" HC.1.11 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

489

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Televisions in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Televisions in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Televisions",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

490

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Home Appliances in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Home Appliances in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Home Appliances",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,19.2,5.2,2.3,2.8,14.1,6.8,4.6,2.7

491

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Urban and Rural2" "Urban",88.1,18,19.9,28.6,21.5 "Rural",25.5,2.8,6,13.4,3.3 "Metropolitan and Micropolitan" "Statistical Area" "In metropolitan statistical area",94,18.6,19.4,33.4,22.7 "In micropolitan statistical area",12.4,1.5,4.7,4.7,1.5 "Not in metropolitan or micropolitan"

492

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Appliances in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 1 Appliances in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Appliances",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7 "Cooking Appliances"

493

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 1 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" ,,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

494

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" 6 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Appliances",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,35.8,32.4,11.6,17.3,5.2 "1.",100.8,35.1,31.9,11.5,17.1,5.1 "2 or More",1.5,0.7,0.5,0.1,0.2,"Q" "Do Not Use a Stove",11.3,3,3,2.5,1.8,1.1 "Most-Used Stove Fuel"

495

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,"5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Appliances",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,62.3,6.4,8.7,18.3,6.5 "1.",100.8,61,6.4,8.6,18.3,6.5 "2 or More",1.5,1.3,0.1,"Q","Q","Q" "Do Not Use a Stove",11.3,9.5,0.3,0.3,0.8,0.4

496

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Appliances" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,13.2,4.9,12.3,11.2,16.5,15.6,14.9,13.7 "1.",100.8,13,4.8,12.2,10.9,16.3,15.4,14.7,13.5 "2 or More",1.5,0.2,0.1,0.2,0.2,0.2,0.2,0.1,0.2

497

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.8,0.1,0.2,0.6,0.1 1,108.1,67.5,6.5,8.8,18.5,6.8 "2 or More",2.7,2.5,0.1,"Q","Q","Q" "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,69.5,6.5,8.9,18.6,6.8 1,3.1,2.2,0.2,0.2,0.5,"Q"

498

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Fuels Used for Any Use"

499

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Space Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,70.5,6.5,8.7,17.7,6.7 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,0.8,0.2,0.2,1,0.1 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,"Q",0.1,0.4,"Q"

500

Measuring Income and Projecting Energy Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: Energy is a key requirement for a healthy, productive life and a major driver of the emissions leading to an increasingly warm planet. The implications of a doubling and redoubling of per capita incomes over the remainder of this century for energy use are a critical input into understanding the magnitude of the carbon management problem. A substantial controversy about how the Special Report on Emssions Scenarios (SRES) measured income and the potential implications of how income was measured for long term levels of energy use is revisited again in the McKibbin, Pearce and Stegman article appearing elsewhere in this issue. The recent release of a new set of purchasing power estimates of national income, and the preparations for creating new scenarios to support the IPCC’s fifth assessment highlight the importance of the issues which have arisen surrounding income and energy use. Comparing the 1993 and 2005 ICP results on Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) based measures of income reveals that not only do the 2005 ICP estimates share the same issue of common growth rates for real income as measured by PPP and US $, but the lack of coherence in the estimates of PPP incomes, especially for developing countries raises yet another obstacle to resolving the best way to measure income. Further, the common use of an income term to mediate energy demand (as in the Kaya identity) obscures an underlying reality about per capita energy demands, leading to unreasonable estimates of the impact of changing income measures and of the recent high GDP growth rates in India and China. Significant new research is required to create both a reasonable set of GDP growth rates and long term levels of energy use.

Pitcher, Hugh M.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z