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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Household Expenditures Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Household Expenditures Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division (see

2

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

NONE

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

3

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Key Assumptions Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2000 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2000 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and transportation sectors as inputs to the disaggregation algorithm that results in the direct fuel expenditure analysis. Household end-use and personal transportation service consumption are obtained by HEM from the NEMS Residential and Transportation Demand Modules. Household disposable income is adjusted with forecasts of total disposable income from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module.

4

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Completed Copy in PDF Format Completed Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Household Expenditures Module Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2001 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2001 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and

5

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

homes, pickup trucks, and jeeps or similar vehicles. See Vehicle. Average Household Energy Expenditures: A ratio estimate defined as the total household energy expenditures for...

8

The federal energy policy: An example of its potential impact on energy consumption and expenditures in minority and poor households  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of the relative impacts of the National Energy Strategy on majority and minority households and on nonpoor and poor households. (Minority households are defined as those headed by black or Hispanic persons; poor households are defined as those having combined household income less than or equal to 125% of the Office of Management and Budget`s poverty-income threshold.) Energy consumption and expenditures, and projected energy expenditures as a share of income, for the period 1987 to 2009 are reported. Projected consumptions of electricity and nonelectric energy over this period are also reported for each group. An analysis of how these projected values are affected under different housing growth scenarios is performed. The analysis in this report presents a preliminary set of projections generated under a set of simplifying assumptions. Future analysis will rigorously assess the sensitivity of the projected values to various changes in a number of these assumptions.

Poyer, D.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The impact of the Persian Gulf crisis on household energy consumption and expenditure patterns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Iraqi invasion of the Kingdom of Kuwait on August 2, 1990, and the subsequent war between Iraq and an international alliance led by the United States triggered first immediate and then fluctuating world petroleum prices. Increases in petroleum prices and in U.S. petroleum imports resulted in increases in the petroleum prices paid by U.S. residential, commercial, and industrial consumers. The result was an immediate price shock that reverberated throughout the U.S. economy. The differential impact of these price increases and fluctuations on poor and minority households raised immediate, significant, and potentially long-term research, policy, and management issues for a variety of federal, state, and local government agencies, including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Among these issues are (1) the measurement of variations in the impact of petroleum price changes on poor, nonpoor, minority, and majority households; (2) how to use the existing policy resources and policy innovation to mitigate regressive impacts of petroleum price increases on lower-income households; and (3) how to pursue such policy mitigation through government agencies severely circumscribed by tax and expenditure limitations. Few models attempt to assess household energy consumption and energy expenditure under various alternative price scenarios and with respect to the inclusion of differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. This paper provides a preliminary analysis of the nature and extent of potential impacts of petroleum price changes attributable to the Persian Gulf War and its aftermath on majority, black, and Hispanic households and on overlapping poor and nonpoor households. At the time this was written, the Persian Gulf War had concluded with Iraq`s total surrender to all of the resolutions and demands of the United Nations and United States.

Henderson, L. [Univ. of Baltimore, MD (United States); Poyer, D.; Teotia, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

11

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aggregate Aggregate Ratio: See Mean and Ratio Estimate. AMPD: Average miles driven per day. See Appendix B, "Estimation Methodologies." Annual Vehicle Miles Traveled: See Vehicle Miles Traveled. Automobile: Includes standard passenger car, 2-seater car and station wagons; excludes passenger vans, cargo vans, motor homes, pickup trucks, and jeeps or similar vehicles. See Vehicle. Average Household Energy Expenditures: A ratio estimate defined as the total household energy expenditures for all RTECS households divided by the total number of households. See Ratio Estimate, and Combined Household Energy Expenditures. Average Number of Vehicles per Household: The average number of vehicles used by a household for personal transportation during 1991. For this report, the average number of vehicles per household is computed as the ratio of the total number of vehicles to the

12

Fact #748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

but then declined until about 2004 when gasoline and motor oil expenditures began to rise again. The share of household expenditures on gasoline and oil was exactly the same...

13

A comparative analysis of energy demand and expenditures by minority and majority households within the context of a conditional demand system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis and evaluation of the impact that programs and policies have on energy consumption and expenditures are confounded by many intervening variables. A clear understanding of how these variables influence energy consumption patterns should be grounded in a rigorously developed framework. In this regard much is documented in the literature. However, an analysis of the comparative relationship between energy demand and variables which influence it among different socioeconomic groups has not been thoroughly explored with any theoretical rigor. It is proposed that differences in patterns of energy use between black, Hispanic, and majority households (where the household head is neither black nor Hispanic) are due to both structural and distribution differences. It is felt that the structural dissimilarities are primarily due to the dynamic nature in which energy consumption patterns evolve, with differences in changing housing patterns playing a significant role. For minorities, this implies a potential difference in the effect of policy and programs on economic welfare when compared to majority households.To test this hypothesis, separate conditional demand systems are estimated for majority, black, and Hispanic households. With the use of separate variance/covariance matrices, various parameter groups are tested for statistically significant differences.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

A comparative analysis of energy demand and expenditures by minority and majority households within the context of a conditional demand system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis and evaluation of the impact that programs and policies have on energy consumption and expenditures are confounded by many intervening variables. A clear understanding of how these variables influence energy consumption patterns should be grounded in a rigorously developed framework. In this regard much is documented in the literature. However, an analysis of the comparative relationship between energy demand and variables which influence it among different socioeconomic groups has not been thoroughly explored with any theoretical rigor. It is proposed that differences in patterns of energy use between black, Hispanic, and majority households (where the household head is neither black nor Hispanic) are due to both structural and distribution differences. It is felt that the structural dissimilarities are primarily due to the dynamic nature in which energy consumption patterns evolve, with differences in changing housing patterns playing a significant role. For minorities, this implies a potential difference in the effect of policy and programs on economic welfare when compared to majority households.To test this hypothesis, separate conditional demand systems are estimated for majority, black, and Hispanic households. With the use of separate variance/covariance matrices, various parameter groups are tested for statistically significant differences.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Table 5.17. U.S. Number of Households by Vehicle Fuel Expenditures...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

5.17. U.S. Number of Households by Vehicle Fuel Expenditures, 1994 (Continued) (Million Households) 1993 Household and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor: All...

16

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2005 Average Household Expenditures as Percent of Annual Income, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Average Annual Expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other categories are calculated from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE). RECS assumed total US households to be 111,090,617 in 2005, while the CE data is based on 117,356,000 "consumer units," which the Bureau of Labor Statistics defines to be financially independent persons or groups of people that use their incomes to make joint expenditure decisions, including all members of a

17

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 2005 Average Household Expenditures, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Other expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other categories are calculated from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE). RECS assumed total US households to be 111,090,617 in 2005, while the CE data is based on 117,356,000 "consumer units," which the Bureau of Labor Statistics defines to be financially independent persons or groups of people that use their incomes to make joint expenditure decisions, including all members of a

18

Household vehicles energy consumption 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use some 6,000 vehicles provided information to describe vehicle stock, vehicle-miles traveled, energy end-use consumption, and energy expenditures for personal vehicles. The survey results represent the characteristics of the 84.9 million households that used or had access to vehicles in 1994 nationwide. (An additional 12 million households neither owned or had access to vehicles during the survey year.) To be included in then RTECS survey, vehicles must be either owned or used by household members on a regular basis for personal transportation, or owned by a company rather than a household, but kept at home, regularly available for the use of household members. Most vehicles included in the RTECS are classified as {open_quotes}light-duty vehicles{close_quotes} (weighing less than 8,500 pounds). However, the RTECS also includes a very small number of {open_quotes}other{close_quotes} vehicles, such as motor homes and larger trucks that are available for personal use.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Household vehicles energy consumption 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted during 1991 and early 1992. The 1991 RTECS represents 94.6 million households, of which 84.6 million own or have access to 151.2 million household motor vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

Not Available

1993-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

20

BODY COMPOSITION -ENERGY EXPENDITURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BODY COMPOSITION - ENERGY EXPENDITURE Validation of dual, X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for body for BW, BMC and FC were significantly correlated with scale BW (r== 0.999), chemical calcium (r=0.992) and chemical fat (r= 0.971).Regression analy- sis showed that BW was accurately mea- sured, but FC

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The impact of rising energy prices on household energy consumption and expenditure patterns: The Persian Gulf crisis as a case example  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and the subsequent war between Iraq and an international alliance led by the United States triggered immediate increases in world oil prices. Increases in world petroleum prices and in US petroleum imports resulted in higher petroleum prices for US customers. In this report, the effects of the Persian Gulf War and its aftermath are used to demonstrate the potential impacts of petroleum price changes on majority, black, and Hispanic households, as well as on poor and nonpoor households. The analysis is done by using the Minority Energy Assessment Model developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The differential impacts of these price increases and fluctuations on poor and minority households raise significant issues for a variety of government agencies, including DOE. Although the Persian Gulf crisis is now over and world oil prices have returned to their prewar levels, the differential impacts of rising energy prices on poor and minority households as a result of any future crisis in the world oil market remains a significant long-term issue.

Henderson, L.J. (Baltimore Univ., MD (United States)); Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. 1. Introduction The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is mandated by Congress to collect, analyze, and disseminate impartial, comprehensive data about energy--how much is produced, who uses it, and the purposes for which it is used. To comply with this mandate, EIA collects energy data from a variety of sources covering a range of topics 1 . Background The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted

23

Fact #747: October 1, 2012 Behind Housing, Transportation is the Top Household Expenditure  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Except for housing, transportation was the largest single expenditure for the average American household in 2010. The average household spends more on transportation in a year than on food. Vehicle...

24

Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US PAC CA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household  California households use 62 million Btu of energy per home, 31% less than the U.S. average. The lower than average site consumption results in households spending 30% less for energy than the U.S. average.  Average site electricity consumption in California homes is among the lowest in the nation, as the mild climate in much of the state leads to less reliance on

25

Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US PAC CA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household  California households use 62 million Btu of energy per home, 31% less than the U.S. average. The lower than average site consumption results in households spending 30% less for energy than the U.S. average.  Average site electricity consumption in California homes is among the lowest in the nation, as the mild climate in much of the state leads to less reliance on

26

Energy Expenditures | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Expenditures Expenditures Dataset Summary Description The State Energy Data System (SEDS) is compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA); it is a comprehensive database of energy statistics by state (and includes totals for the entire US). SEDS includes estimates of energy production, consumption, prices, and expenditures broken down by energy source and sector. Annual estimates are available from 1960 - 2009 for production and consumption estimates and from 1970 - 2009 for price and expenditure estimates. Source EIA Date Released June 30th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Energy Consumption Energy Expenditures energy prices energy production SEDS State energy data States US Data text/csv icon Complete SEDS dataset as csv (may be too big for Excel) (csv, 40.6 MiB)

27

Residential Energy Expenditures for Water Heating (2005) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Expenditures for Water Heating (2005) Expenditures for Water Heating (2005) Dataset Summary Description Provides total and average household expenditures on energy for water heating in the United States in 2005. The data was collected as part of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). RECS is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the United States. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the data. Source EIA Date Released September 01st, 2008 (6 years ago) Date Updated January 01st, 2009 (6 years ago) Keywords Energy Expenditures Residential Water Heating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2005_Total.Expenditures.for_.Water_.Heating_EIA.Sep_.2008.xls (xls, 70.1 KiB)

28

Energy Expenditure Estimation DEMO Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of accelerometry. An average smart phone contains an inertial sensor and today we hardly leave our home without itEnergy Expenditure Estimation DEMO Application Bozidara Cvetkovi´c1,2 , Simon Kozina1,2 , Bostjan://www.mps.si Abstract. The paper presents two prototypes for the estimation of hu- man energy expenditure during normal

Lu?trek, Mitja

29

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 2005 Household Energy Expenditures, by Vintage ($2010) | Year | Prior to 1950 887 | 22% 1950 to 1969 771 | 22% 1970 to 1979 736 | 16% 1980 to 1989 741 | 16% 1990 to 1999 752 | 16% 2000 to 2005 777 | 9% | Average 780 | Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1.24 2,003 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008 for 2005 expenditures; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price inflators.

30

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 2005 Energy Expenditures per Household, by Housing Type and Square Footage ($2010) Per Household Single-Family 1.16 Detached 1.16 Attached 1.20 Multi-Family 1.66 2 to 4 units 1.90 5 or more units 1.53 Mobile Home 1.76 All Homes 1.12 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-1 part1; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for

31

EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Transportation logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 August 1997 Release Next Update: EIA has discontinued this series. Based on the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) - survey series has been discontinued Only light-duty vehicles and recreational vehicles are included in this report. EIA has excluded motorcycles, mopeds, large trucks, and buses. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use

32

Fact #748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures on Transportation, 1984-2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The overall share of annual household expenditures for transportation was lower in 2010 than it was in 1984, reaching its lowest point in 2009 at 15.5%. In the early to mid-1980s when oil prices...

33

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry >Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Contact Us * Feedback *...

34

Communications on energy Household energy conservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study assesses the influence of attitudinal and socio-economic factors on household energy conservation actions. A household interview survey in Regina, Saskatchewan found that respondents perceive an energy problem, although no association with energy conservation actions was determined. Two attitudinal and five socio-economic variables influence household energy conservation. Energy and monetary savings are available to households through energy conservation. Public awareness of household energy conservation through the media can reinforce existing energy conservation actions and encourage new actions.

Fred A. Curtis; P. Simpson-Housley; S. Drever

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

OpenEI - Energy Expenditures  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Energy Data State Energy Data System (SEDS) Complete Dataset through 2009 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/883 The State Energy Data System (SEDS) is compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA); it is a comprehensive database of energy statistics by state (and includes totals for the entire US). SEDS includes estimates of energy production, consumption, prices, and expenditures broken down by energy source and sector. Annual estimates are available from 1960 - 2009 for production and consumption estimates and from 1970 - 2009 for price and expenditure estimates.

License
Type of

36

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

vehicle aging have an additional but unknown effect on the MPG of individual vehicles. Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 27 Of the...

37

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2005 Households and Energy Expenditures, by Income Level ($2010) Energy Expenditures by Household Income Households (millions) Household Less than $10,000 9.9 9% $10,000 to $14,999 8.5 8% $15,000 to $19,999 8.4 8% $20,000 to $29,999 15.1 14% $30,000 to $39,999 13.6 12% $40,000 to $49,999 11.0 10% $50,000 to $74,999 19.8 18% $75,000 to $99,999 10.6 10% $100,000 or more 14.2 13% Total 111.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 7% 1) See Table 2.3.15 for more on energy burdens. 2) A household is defined as a family, an individual, or a group of up to nine unrelated individuals occupying the same housing unit. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-1 part 2; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price inflators. 2,431 847 3% 2,774 909 3% 1,995

38

State energy price and expenditure report 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates developed in the State Energy Price and Expenditure Data System (SEPEDS) are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970 through 1994. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures and the documentation for those estimates are taken from the State Energy Data Report 1994, Consumption Estimates (SEDR), published in October 1996. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, which are adjusted to remove process fuel; intermediate petroleum products; and other consumption that has no direct fuel costs, i.e., hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, solar, and photovoltaic energy sources. Documentation is included describing the development of price estimates, data sources, and calculation methods. 316 tabs.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

State energy price and expenditure report 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970, 1980, and 1985 through 1992. Data for all years, 1970 through 1992, are available on personal computer diskettes.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

State energy price and expenditure report 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970, 1975, 1980, and 1985 through 1991. Data for all years, 1970 through 1991, are available on personal computer diskettes. Documentation in Appendix A describes how the price estimates are developed, including sources of data, methods of estimation, and conversion factors applied. This report is an update of the State Energy Price and Expenditure Report 1990, published in September 1992.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Energy consumption and expenditure projections by population group on the basis on the annual energy outlook 2000 forecast.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The changes in the patterns of energy use and expenditures by population group are analyzed by using the 1993 and 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Surveys. Historically, these patterns have differed among non-Hispanic White households, non-Hispanic Black households, and Hispanic households. Patterns of energy use and expenditures are influenced by geographic and metropolitan location, the composition of housing stock, economic and demographic status, and the composition of energy use by end-use category. As a consequence, as energy-related factors change across groups, patterns of energy use and expenditures also change. Over time, with changes in the composition of these factors by population group and their variable influences on energy use, the impact on energy use and expenditures has varied across these population groups.

Poyer, D. A.; Decision and Information Sciences

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

State energy price and expenditure report, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the US. The estimates developed in the State Energy Price and Expenditure Data System (SEPEDS) are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970 through 1995. Data for all years are available on a CD-ROM and via Internet. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures and the documentation for those estimates are taken from the State Energy Data Report 1995, Consumption Estimates (SEDR), published in December 1997. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, which are adjusted to remove process fuel; intermediate petroleum products; and other consumption that has no direct fuel costs, i.e., hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, solar, and photovoltaic energy sources.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

State energy price and expenditure report 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates for the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the United States. The estimates are provided by energy source (e.g., petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity) and by major consuming or economic sector. This report is an update of the State Energy Price and Expenditure Report 1988 published in September 1990. Changes from the last report are summarized in a section of the documentation. Energy price and expenditure estimates are published for the years 1970, 1975, 1980, and 1985 through 1989. Documentation follows the tables and describes how the price estimates are developed, including sources of data, methods of estimation, and conversion factors applied. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures, and the documentation for those estimates, are from the State Energy Data Report, Consumption Estimates, 1960--1989 (SEDR), published in May 1991. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, adjusted to remove process fuel and intermediate product consumption. All expenditures are consumer expenditures, that is, they represent estimates of money directly spent by consumers to purchase energy, generally including taxes. 11 figs., 43 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Household energy consumption and its demand elasticity in Thailand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study concentrates on the analysis of energy consumption, expenditure on oil and LPG use in cars and aims to examine the elasticity effect of various types of oil consumption. By using the Deaton's analysis framework, the cross-sectional data of Thai households economic survey 2009 were used. By defining energy goods in the scope of automobile fuel, the results reflect the low importance of high-quality automobile fuel on all income level households. Thai households tend to vary the quality rather than the quantity of thermal energy. All income groups have a tendency to switch to lower quality fuel. Middle and high-middle households (Q3 and Q4) are the income groups with the greatest tendency to switch to lower-quality fuel when a surge in the price of oil price occurs. The poorest households (Q1) are normally insensitive to a change of energy expenditure in terms of quality and quantity. This finding illustrates the LPG price subsidy policy favours middle and high-middle income households. The price elasticity of energy quantity demand is negative in all income levels. High to middle income families are the most sensitive to changes in the price of energy.

Montchai Pinitjitsamut

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends...

48

State energy price and expenditure report 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 states and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the US. The five economic sectors used in SEPER correspond to those used in SEDR and are residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility. Documentation in appendices describe how the price estimates are developed, provide conversion factors for measures used in the energy analysis, and include a glossary. 65 tabs.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

EIA - Gasoline and Diesel Fuel report: Household Vehicles Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Transportation logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 December 1993 Release Next Update: August 1997. Based on the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) - survey series has been discontinued after EIA's 1994 survey. Only light-duty vehicles and recreational vehicles are included in this report. EIA has excluded motorcycles, mopeds, large trucks, and buses. This report, Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991, is based on data from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). Focusing on vehicle miles traveled (VMT) and energy enduse consumption and expenditures by households for personal transportation, the 1991 RTECS is

50

EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy Use:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends November 2005 Release (Next Update: Discontinued) Based on the 2001 National Household Travel Survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Transportation and augmented by EIA Only light-duty vehicles and recreational vehicles are included in this report. EIA has excluded motorcycles, mopeds, large trucks, and buses in an effort to maintain consistency with its past residential transportation series, which was discontinued after 1994. This report, Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends, provides details on the nation's energy use for household passenger travel. A primary purpose of this report is to release the latest consumer-based data

51

Do households smooth expenditure over anticipated income changes? Evidence from bonus payments to public employees in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides new evidence of consumers reaction to an anticipated sizable change in income. Until FY2002, Japanese public employees received predictable large bonus payments three times a fiscal year (in June, December, and March), but the March bonus was abolished in FY2003. We compare the seasonal patterns of public employees expenditure before and after the reform of the bonus payment schedule. Contrary to the prediction of the life cycle/permanent income hypothesis (LC/PIH), we find evidence that monthly patterns of household expenditure were significantly affected by the anticipated large change in income pattern. However, at closer inspection, this excess sensitivity of expenditure is observed only for expenditure subcategories of some durability, i.e., durables and semi-durables. Thus, while the LC/PIH does not appear to hold for expenditure (which we observe here), it may still hold for consumption.

Masahiro Hori; Satoshi Shimizutani

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Detailed Tables The following tables present detailed characteristics of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the tables. Table Organization The "Detailed Tables" section consists of three types of tables: (1) Tables of totals such as number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) or gallons consumed; (2) Tables of per household statistics such as VMT per household; and (3) Tables of per vehicle statistics such as vehicle fuel consumption per vehicle. The tables have been grouped together by specific topics such as model year data, or family income data to facilitate finding related information. The Quick-Reference Guide to the detailed tables indicates major topics of each table. Row and Column Factors These tables present estimates

53

Towards Human Energy Expenditure Estimation Using Smart Phone Inertial Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to reliably estimate energy expenditure (EE). Direct calorimetry [5] measures the heat produced by human bodyTowards Human Energy Expenditure Estimation Using Smart Phone Inertial Sensors Bozidara Cvetkovi´c1 human energy expenditure during sport and normal daily ac- tivities. The paper presents technical

Lu?trek, Mitja

54

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Trends in Household Vehicle Stock The 1991 RTECS counted more than 150 million vehicles in use by U.S. households. This chapter examines recent trends in the vehicle stock, as measured by the RTECS and other reputable vehicle surveys. It also provides some details on the type and model year of the household vehicle stock, and identifies regional differences in vehicle stock. Because vehicles are continuously being bought and sold, this chapter also reports findings relating to turnover of the vehicle stock in 1991. Finally, it examines the average vehicle stock in 1991 (which takes into account the acquisition and disposal of household vehicles over the course of the year) and identifies variations in the average number of household vehicles based on differences in household characteristics. Number of Household Vehicles Over the past 8 years, the stock of household vehicles has

55

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

56

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. 3. Vehicle Miles Traveled This chapter presents information on household vehicle usage, as measured by the number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT). VMT is one of the two most important components used in estimating household vehicle fuel consumption. (The other, fuel efficiency, is discussed in Chapter 4). In addition, this chapter examines differences in driving behavior based on the characteristics of the household and the type of vehicle driven. Trends in household driving patterns are also examined using additional information from the Department of Transportation's Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). Household VMT is a measure of the demand for personal transportation. Demand for transportation may be viewed from either an economic or a social perspective. From the economic point-of-view, the use of a household vehicle represents the consumption of one

57

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

9 9 Average Annual Energy Expenditures per Household, by Year ($2010) Year 1980 1,991 1981 1,981 1982 2,058 1983 2,082 1984 2,067 1985 2,012 1986 1,898 1987 1,846 1988 1,849 1989 1,848 1990 1,785 1991 1,784 1992 1,729 1993 1,797 1994 1,772 1995 1,727 1996 1,800 1997 1,761 1998 1,676 1999 1,659 2000 1,824 2001 1,900 2002 1,830 2003 1,978 2004 2,018 2005 2,175 2006 2,184 2007 2,230 2008 2,347 2009 2,173 2010 2,201 2011 2,185 2012 2,123 2013 2,056 2014 2,032 2015 2,030 2016 2,007 2017 1,992 2018 1,982 2019 1,973 2020 1,963 2021 1,961 2022 1,964 2023 1,962 2024 1,959 2025 1,957 2026 1,959 2027 1,960 2028 1,953 2029 1,938 2030 1,932 2031 1,937 2032 1,946 2033 1,956 2034 1,967 2035 1,978 Source(s): Average Expenditure EIA, State Energy Data 2009: Prices and Expenditures, Jun. 2011 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table A2, p. 3-

58

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Vehicle Fuel Efficiency and Consumption Fuel consumption is estimated from RTECS data on the vehicle stock (Chapter 2) and miles traveled (Chapter 3), in combination with vehicle fuel efficiency ratings, adjusted to account for individual driving circumstances. The first two sections of this chapter present estimates of household vehicle fuel efficiency and household fuel consumption calculated from these fuel efficiency estimates. These sections also discuss variations in fuel efficiency and consumption based on differences in household and vehicle characteristics. The third section presents EIA estimates of the potential savings from replacing the oldest (and least fuel-efficient) household vehicles with new (and more fuel-efficient) vehicles. The final section of this chapter focuses on households receiving (or eligible to receive) supplemental income under

59

National patterns of energy demand and expenditures by Hispanics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is based on ongoing research, at Argonne National Laboratory, being done for the Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) of the US Department of Energy. Under its legislative mandate MI is required to assess the impact of government policy, programs, and actions on US minorities. In line with this mission Argonne is currently involved in characterizing and analyzing the patterns of energy demand and expenditures of minorities. A major barrier associated with this task is the availability of sufficient data. With the possible exception of blacks, analysis of the patterns of energy demand for most minority population categories is all but impossible because of small sample sizes. The major source of residential energy consumption data, the Residential Energy Consumption Survey, only collects data on 5000 to 7000 households. For many minority population categories, this number of observations make any meaningful statistical analysis at least at the regional Census level practically impossible, with any further refinement of the analysis becoming even more difficult. In this paper our primary purpose is to describe the patterns of energy demand for Hispanics and nonhispanics but ancillary to that briefly present one possible solution to the data availability problem.

Poyer, D.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The Energy Expenditure of Rats Bearing Walker Carcinoma 256  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the law of conservation of energy holds true for the animal body...010 0.010 0.100 731 The Energy Expenditure of Rats Bearing...product which is difficult to mix. Samples to be burned were...nitro.. Mmir@iiet al. "Energy Expenditure of Tumorous Rats...

G. B. Mider; L. D. Fenninger; F. L. Haven; and J. J. Morton

1951-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

or More...... 23.1 15.2 197 12.3 10.7 13.0 1.3 12.8 13.0| 6.7 | Race of Householder | White... 135.3 89.5 1,429 89.2 73.9 89.2 9.1 87.5 89.1| 2.0...

62

Survey of Household Energy Use (SHEU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Household Energy Use (SHEU) 2003 Detailed Statistical Report #12;To obtain additional copies of this or other free publications on energy efficiency, please contact: Energy Publications Office of Energy Efficiency Natural Resources Canada c/o St. Joseph Communications Order Processing Unit

63

E-Print Network 3.0 - alterarions energy expenditure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

causes greater energy expenditure... but also weighted to match the mass of the walking boots. We estimated metabolic energy expenditure, joint... fixation with walking boots...

64

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity energy expenditure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

causes greater energy expenditure... but also weighted to match the mass of the walking boots. We estimated metabolic energy expenditure, joint... fixation with walking boots...

65

Space-Heating energy used by households in the residential sector.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 The following 28 tables present detailed data describing the consumption of and expenditures for energy used by households in the residential sector. The data are presented at the national level, Census region and division levels, for climate zones and for the most populous States, as well as for other selected characteristics of households. This section provides assistance in reading the tables by explaining some of the headings for the categories of data. It also explains the use of the row and column factors to compute the relative standard error of the estimates given in the tables. Organization of the Tables The tables cover consumption and expenditures for six topical areas: Major Energy Source

66

Table 7.9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Million U.S. Dollars." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

67

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

methodology used to estimate these statistics relied on data from the 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption...

68

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Expenditures > Executive Summary & Expenditures > Executive Summary 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 presents statistics about the amount of energy consumed in commercial buildings and the corresponding expenditures for that energy. These data are based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national energy survey of buildings in the commercial sector, conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Figure ES1. Energy Consumption is Commercial Buidings by Energy Source, 1992 Energy Consumption: In 1992, the 4.8 million commercial buildings in the United States consumed 5.5 quadrillion Btu of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat. Of those 5.5 quadrillion Btu, consumption of site electricity accounted for 2.6 quadrillion Btu, or 48.0 percent, and consumption of natural gas accounted for 2.2 quadrillion Btu, or 39.6 percent. Fuel oil consumption made up 0.3 quadrillion Btu, or 4.0 percent of the total, while consumption of district heat made up 0.4 quadrillion Btu, or 7.9 percent of energy consumption in that sector. When the energy losses that occur at the electricity generating plants are included, the overall energy consumed by commercial buildings increases to about 10.8 quadrillion Btu (Figure ES1).

69

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Publication  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Expenditures > Publication and Tables and Expenditures > Publication and Tables 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Publication and Tables Figure ES1. Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings by Energy Sources, 1992 Separater Bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader . If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Separater Bar Full Report - Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures, 1992 (file size 1.07 MB) pages: 214 Selected Sections Main Text - requires Adobe Acrobat Reader (file size 193,634 bytes) pages: 28, includes the following: Contacts Contents Executive Summary Introduction Background

70

Household transitions to energy efficient lighting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract New energy efficient lighting technologies can significantly reduce household electricity consumption, but adoption has been slow. A unique dataset of German households is used in this paper to examine the factors associated with the replacement of old incandescent lamps (ILs) with new energy efficient compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and light emitting diodes (LEDs). The rebound effect of increased lamp luminosity in the transition to energy efficient bulbs is analyzed jointly with the replacement decision to account for household self-selection in bulb-type choice. Results indicate that the EU ban on \\{ILs\\} accelerated the pace of transition to \\{CFLs\\} and LEDs, while storage of bulbs significantly dampened the speed of the transition. Higher lighting needs and bulb attributes like energy efficiency, environmental friendliness, and durability spur IL replacement with \\{CFLs\\} or LEDs. Electricity gains from new energy efficient lighting are mitigated by 23% and 47% increases in luminosity for CFL and LED replacements, respectively. Model results suggest that taking the replacement bulb from storage and higher levels of education dampen the magnitude of these luminosity rebounds in IL to CFL transitions.

Bradford Mills; Joachim Schleich

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neighborhood Program GETS Green Energy Training ServicesGJGEI Green Jobs, Green Energy Initiative CEWO Cleanincome households. The Green Energy Training Services (GETS)

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Residential energy consumption across different population groups : comparative analysis for latino and non-latino households in USA.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential energy cost is an important part of the household budget and could vary significantly across different population groups in many countries. In the United States, many studies have analyzed household fuel consumption by fuel type, including electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and by geographic areas. Past research has also demonstrated significant variation in residential energy use across various population groups, including white, black, and Latino. However, our research shows that residential energy demand by fuel type for Latinos, the fastest growing population group, has not been explained by economic and non-economic factors in any statistical model in public domain. The purpose of this paper was to discuss energy demand and expenditure patterns for Latino and non-Latino households in the United States as a case example of analyzing residential energy consumption across different population groups in a country. The linear expenditure system model developed by Stone and Geary is the basis of the statistical model developed to explain fuel consumption and expenditures for Latino households. For comparison, the models are also developed for non-Latino, black, and non-black households. These models estimate energy consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and LPG by various households at the national level. Significant variations in the patterns of these fuels consumption for Latinos and non-Latinos are highlighted. The model methodology and results of this research should be useful to energy policymakers in government and industry, researches, and academicians who are concerned with economic and energy issues related to various population groups in their country.

Poyer, D. A.; Henderson, L.; Teotia, A. P. S.; Energy Systems; Univ. of Baltimore

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Residential energy consumption across different population groups: Comparative analysis for Latino and non-Latino households in U.S.A.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential energy cost, an important part of the household budget, varies significantly across different population groups. In the United States, researchers have conducted many studies of household fuel consumption by fuel type -- electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) -- and by geographic areas. The results of past research have also demonstrated significant variation in residential energy use across various population groups, including white, black, and Latino. However, research shows that residential energy demand by fuel type for Latinos, the fastest-growing population group in the United States, has not been explained by economic and noneconomic factors in any available statistical model. This paper presents a discussion of energy demand and expenditure patterns for Latino and non-Latino households in the United States. The statistical model developed to explain fuel consumption and expenditures for Latino households is based on Stone and Geary`s linear expenditure system model. For comparison, the authors also developed models for energy consumption in non-Latino, black, and nonblack households. These models estimate consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and LPG by various households at the national level. The study revealed significant variations in the patterns of fuel consumption for Latinos and non-Latinos. The model methodology and results of this research should be useful to energy policymakers in government and industry, researchers, and academicians who are concerned with economic and energy issues related to various population groups.

Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Henderson, L. [Univ. of Baltimore, MD (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY NATIONAL AWARENESS OF ENERGY STAR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY NATIONAL AWARENESS OF ENERGY STAR ® FOR 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements .................................................................................. ii Executive Summary ............................................................................ ES-1 Introduction ............................................................................................... 1 Methodology Overview ............................................................................. 2 Key Findings ............................................................................................. 5 Recognition .................................................................................................................. 5 Understanding ........................................................................................................... 12

75

wf01 - Energy_Expenditures.xlsx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6-07 6-07 07-08 08-09 09-10 10-11 11-12 12-13 13-14 % Change Natural Gas Northeast Consumption (mcf**) 73.6 74.2 79.6 74.7 79.7 65.6 75.2 77.5 3.1 Price ($/mcf) 14.74 15.18 15.83 13.31 12.66 12.23 11.75 13.38 13.8 Expenditures ($) 1,085 1,127 1,260 994 1,010 802 883 1,036 17.3 Midwest Consumption (mcf) 74.5 78.2 80.8 78.6 80.1 65.4 77.5 77.9 0.5 Price ($/mcf) 11.06 11.40 11.47 9.44 9.23 8.96 8.23 9.15 11.2 Expenditures ($) 824 892 927 742 740 586 638 713 11.8 South Consumption (mcf) 45.3 44.8 47.0 53.4 49.5 41.1 46.6 47.5 1.9 Price ($/mcf) 13.57 14.19 14.08 11.52 11.03 11.47 10.69 11.78 10.3 Expenditures ($) 615 635 661 615 546 472 498 560 12.4 West Consumption (mcf) 46.4 48.1 46.2 47.7 47.2 47.6 46.9 46.5 -0.8 Price ($/mcf) 11.20 11.31 10.86 9.91 9.67 9.38 9.15 9.90 8.1 Expenditures ($) 520 544 502 473 457 447 429

76

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C C Quality of the Data Appendix C Quality of the Data Introduction This appendix discusses several issues relating to the quality of the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) data and to the interpretation of conclusions based on these data. The first section discusses under- coverage of the vehicle stock in the residential sector. The second section discusses the effects of using July 1991 as a time reference for the survey. The remainder of this appendix discusses the treatment of sampling and nonsampling errors in the RTECS, the quality of specific data items such as the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) and fuel prices, and poststratification procedures used in the 1991 RTECS. The quality of the data collection and the processing of the data affects the accuracy of estimates based on survey data. All the statistics published in this report such as total

77

Sex differences in energy expenditure in nonhuman primates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1986 Time and energy budgets. In...141^166. New York: Alan R. Liss...175^200. New York and London...colobus as a low-energy strategist...pp. 11^33. New York: Cambridge University...and C. Ross Energy expenditure in...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 FY 2007 Federal Buildings Energy Prices and Expenditures, by Fuel Type ($2010) Fuel Type Electricity (1) Natural Gas Fuel Oil Coal Purchased Steam LPG/Propane Other Average Total Note(s): Source(s): 17.05 6028.63 Prices and expenditures are for Goal-Subject buildings. 1) $0.0776/kWh. 2) Energy used in Goal-Subject buildings in FY 2007 accounted for 33.8% of the total Federal energy bill. DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP FY 2007, Jan. 2010, Table A-4, p. 93 for prices and expenditures, and Table A-9, p. 97 for total energy expenditures; EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators. 24.30 318.35 17.06 43.87 16.19 36.64 9.37 1138.21 15.25 419.30 3.62 62.87 Average Fuel Prices Total Expenditures ($/million BTU) ($ million) (2) 23.68

79

The comparative impact of the market penetration of energy-efficient measures: A sensitivity analysis of its impact on minority households  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sensitivity study was made of the potential market penetration of residential energy efficiency as energy service ratio (ESR) improvements occurred in minority households, by age of house. The study followed a Minority Energy Assessment Model analysis of the National Energy Strategy projections of household energy consumption and prices, with majority, black, and Hispanic subgroup divisions. Electricity and total energy consumption and expenditure patterns were evaluated when the households` ESR improvement followed a logistic negative growth (i.e., market penetration) path. Earlier occurrence of ESR improvements meant greater discounted savings over the 22-year period.

Bozinovich, L.V.; Poyer, D.A.; Anderson, J.L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Energy Information Administration/Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

, , Energy Information Administration/Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 ix Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 presents statistics about energy-related characteristics of highway vehicles available for personal use by members of U.S. households. The data were collected in the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, the final cycle in a series of nationwide energy consumption surveys conducted during the 1980's and 1990's by the Energy Information Administrations. Engines Became More Powerful . . . Percent Distribution of Total Residential Vehicle Fleet by Number of Cylinders, 1988 and 1994 Percent Distribution of Vehicle Fleet by Engine Size, 1988 and 1994 Percent Percent 4 cyl Less than 2.50 liters 6 cyl 2.50- 4.49 liters 8 cyl 4.50 liters or greater 20 20 40 40 Vehicle

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Barriers to household investment in residential energy conservation: preliminary assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general assessment of the range of barriers which impede household investments in weatherization and other energy efficiency improvements for their homes is provided. The relationship of similar factors to households' interest in receiving a free energy audits examined. Rates of return that underly household investments in major conservation improvements are assessed. A special analysis of household knowledge of economically attractive investments is provided that compares high payback improvements specified by the energy audit with the list of needed or desirable conservation improvements identified by respondents. (LEW)

Hoffman, W.L.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A comparative multivariate analysis of household energy requirements in Australia, Brazil, Denmark, India and Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we appraise sustainable household consumption from a global perspective. Using per capita energy requirements as an indicator of environmental pressure, we focus on the importance of income growth in a cross-country analysis. Our analysis is supported by a detailed within-country analysis encompassing five countries, in which we assess the importance of various socioeconomic-demographic characteristics of household energy requirements. We bring together family expenditure survey data, inputoutput tables, and energy statistics in a multivariate analysis. Instead of a uniform Kuznet's curve, we find that the effect of increasing income varies considerably across countries, even when controlling for socioeconomic and demographic variations. The latter variables show similar influences, but differing importance across countries.

Manfred Lenzen; Mette Wier; Claude Cohen; Hitoshi Hayami; Shonali Pachauri; Roberto Schaeffer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

9 9 2003 Energy Expenditures per Square Foot of Commercial Floorspace and per Building, by Building Type ($2010) ($2010) Food Service 4.88 27.2 Mercantile 2.23 38.1 Food Sales 4.68 26.0 Education 1.43 36.6 Health Care 2.76 68.0 Service 1.39 9.1 Public Order and Safety 2.07 32.0 Warehouse and Storage 0.80 13.5 Office 2.01 29.8 Religious Worship 0.76 7.8 Public Assembly 1.73 24.6 Vacant 0.34 4.8 Lodging 1.72 61.5 Other 2.99 65.5 Note(s): Source(s): Mall buildings are no longer included in most CBECs tables; therefore, some data is not directly comparable to past CBECs. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Oct. 2006, Table 4; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators. Per Square Foot Per Building

84

Patterns of residential energy demand by type of household: white, black, Hispanic, and low- and nonlow-income  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compares patterns of residential energy use by white, black, Hispanic, low-income, and nonlow-income households. The observed downward trend in residential energy demand over the period of this study can be attributed primarily to changes in space-heating energy demand. Demand for space-heating energy has experienced a greater decline than energy demand for other end uses for two reasons: (1) it is the largest end use of residential energy, causing public attention to focus on it and on strategies for conserving it; and (2) space-heating expenditures are large relative to other residential energy expenditures. The price elasticity of demand is thus greater, due to the income effect. The relative demand for space-heating energy, when controlled for the effect of climate, declined significantly over the 1978-1982 period for all fuels studied. Income classes do not differ significantly. In contrast, black households were found to use more energy for space heating than white households were found to use, although those observed differences are statistically significant only for houses heated with natural gas. As expected, the average expenditure for space-heating energy increased significantly for dwellings heated by natural gas and fuel oil. No statistically significant increases were found in electricity expenditures for space heating. Electric space heat is, in general, confined to milder regions of the country, where space heating is relatively less essential. As a consequence, we would expect the electricity demand for space heating to be more price-elastic than the demand for other fuels.

Klein, Y.; Anderson, J.; Kaganove, J.; Throgmorton, J.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households Focus Area: Appliances & Equipment Topics: Policy Impacts Website: active.cput.ac.za/energy/web/DUE/DOCS/422/Paper%20-%20Shuma-Iwisi%20M. Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/appliance-standby-power-and-energy-co Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance A modified engineering model is proposed to estimate standby power and energy losses in households. The modified model accounts for the randomness of standby power and energy losses due to unpredicted user appliance operational behavior.

86

Table 7.9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; 9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Million U.S. Dollars. NAICS Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coal and Breeze Other(e) Total United States 311 Food 10,111 5,328 130 431 3,391 150 442 29 210 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 2,130 932 2 12 673 Q 294 0 158 311221 Wet Corn Milling 1,002 352 1 5 296 1 239 0 107 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 367 105 7 18 87 1 118 29 2 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1,408 698 17 Q 579 18 7 0 18 3115 Dairy Products 1,186 695 20 40 412 8 1 0 10 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

87

Water Related Energy Use in Households and Cities - an Australian  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Related Energy Use in Households and Cities - an Australian Water Related Energy Use in Households and Cities - an Australian Perspective Speaker(s): Steven Kenway Date: May 12, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Anita Estner James McMahon This presentation covers the content of recent journal papers and reports focused on the water-energy nexus and the related theory of urban metabolism. This includes (i) a review of the water-energy nexus focused on cities (ii) quantifying water-related energy in cities (iii) modeling household water-related energy use including key factors, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, and (iv) relevance and implications of the urban metabolism theoretical framework. Steven's work focuses on understanding the indirect connections between urban water management, energy use and

88

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures March 2012 3.3.3 Commercial Buildings Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (2) Total 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 148.6 37.0 17.0 202.6 148.9 37.2 17.1 203.2 145.9 36.2 16.7 198.9 147.5 36.8 16.9 201.2 143.8 35.1 16.4 195.2 145.0 35.5 16.6 197.0 141.1 34.0 16.0 191.1 142.5 34.6 16.2 193.3 136.9 32.1 15.7 184.8 139.1 33.0 15.9 188.0 133.5 31.0 15.4 179.9 135.0 31.6 15.6 182.2 131.0 29.7 15.1 175.8 131.9 30.3 15.3 177.5 128.1 28.7 14.5 171.3 130.0 29.3 15.0 174.4 129.4 29.7 15.4 174.5 127.7 29.2 13.8 170.7 134.8 29.9 14.5 179.2 134.5 28.5 16.9 180.0 141.1

89

Primate energy expenditure and life history Herman Pontzera,b,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Primate energy expenditure and life history Herman Pontzera,b,1 , David A. Raichlenc , Adam D life histories reflect low total energy expenditure (TEE) (kilocalo- ries per day) relative to other), or allocation within the energy budget could change over evolutionary time to fuel changes in life history

Pontzer, Herman

90

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Title Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Zimring, Mark, Merrian Borgeson, Ian M. Hoffman, Charles A. Goldman, Elizabeth Stuart, Annika Todd, and Megan A. Billingsley Pagination 102 Date Published 12/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract The question posed in this report is: How can programs motivate these middle income single family households to seek out more comprehensive energy upgrades, and empower them to do so? Research methods included interviews with more than 35 program administrators, policy makers, researchers, and other experts; case studies of programs, based on interviews with staff and a review of program materials and data; and analysis of relevant data sources and existing research on demographics, the financial status of Americans, and the characteristics of middle income American households. While there is no 'silver bullet' to help these households overcome the range of barriers they face, this report describes outreach strategies, innovative program designs, and financing tools that show promise in increasing the attractiveness and accessibility of energy efficiency for this group. These strategies and tools should be seen as models that are currently being honed to build our knowledge and capacity to deliver energy improvements to middle income households. However, the strategies described in this report are probably not sufficient, in the absence of robust policy frameworks, to deliver these improvements at scale. Instead, these strategies must be paired with enabling and complementary policies to reach their full potential.

91

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 Average Annual Energy Expenditures per Square Foot of Commercial Floorspace, by Year ($2010) Year $/SF 1980 (1) 2.12 1981 2.22 (2) 1982 2.24 1983 2.21 1984 2.25 1985 2.20 1986 2.06 1987 2.00 1988 1.99 1989 2.01 1990 1.98 1991 1.92 1992 1.86 1993 1.96 1994 2.05 1995 2.12 1996 2.10 1997 2.08 1998 1.97 1999 1.88 2000 2.06 2001 2.20 2002 2.04 2003 2.13 2004 2.16 2005 2.30 2006 2.36 2007 2.35 2008 1.71 2009 2.43 2010 2.44 2011 2.44 2012 2.35 2013 2.28 2014 2.27 2015 2.29 2016 2.29 2017 2.28 2018 2.29 2019 2.29 2020 2.29 2021 2.31 2022 2.32 2023 2.32 2024 2.32 2025 2.32 2026 2.32 2027 2.33 2028 2.32 2029 2.31 2030 2.31 2031 2.32 2032 2.35 2033 2.37 2034 2.39 2035 2.42 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, State Energy Data Prices and Expenditures Database, June 2011 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Summary Reference Case Tables, Table A2, p. 3-5 and Table A5, p. 11-12 for consumption, Table A3, p. 6-8 for prices for 2008-2035; EIA, Annual Energy Review

92

Energy Consumption of Refrigerators in Ghana - Outcomes of Household  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Consumption of Refrigerators in Ghana - Outcomes of Household Energy Consumption of Refrigerators in Ghana - Outcomes of Household Surveys Speaker(s): Essel Ben Hagan Date: July 12, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Robert Van Buskirk Galen Barbose As part of activities to develop refrigerator efficiency standards regulations in Ghana, a national survey on the energy consumption of refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers has been conducted. The survey covered 1000 households in urban, peri-urban and rural communities in various parts of the country. The survey found that, on average, refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers in Ghana use almost three times what is allowed by minimum efficiency standards in the U.S., and a few refrigerators had energy use at levels almost ten times the U.S.

93

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Residential Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Electricity Total 1980 158.5 1981 164.0 1982 172.3 1983 176.1 1984 178.5 1985 176.8 1986 169.2 1987 167.1 1988 170.1 1989 172.8 1990 168.2 1991 169.9 1992 166.7 1993 175.6 1994 174.9 1995 172.7 1996 181.8 1997 180.0 1998 173.5 1999 174.0 2000 192.8 2001 203.3 2002 192.1 2003 208.8 2004 215.1 2005 236.7 2006 240.0 2007 246.1 2008 259.6 2009 241.6 2010 251.8 2011 251.3 2012 247.1 2013 240.3 2014 239.4 2015 241.7 2016 241.8 2017 243.0 2018 244.7 2019 246.4 2020 247.9 2021 250.4 2022 253.3 2023 255.6 2024 257.8 2025 260.3 2026 263.2 2027 266.0 2028 267.6 2029 268.1 2030 269.7 2031 272.9 2032 276.6 2033 280.4 2034 284.6 2035 288.6 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Residential petroleum products include distillate fuel oil, LPG, and kerosene. EIA, State Energy Data 2009: Prices and Expenditures, Jun. 2011, Table 2 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table

94

"Table A28. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region" Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region" " and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" " "," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"

95

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 2035 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 44.3 10.3 7.7 18.6 0.0 16.0 79.0 27.4% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 40.6 40.6 14.1% Water Heating 17.6 1.2 1.2 2.3 17.7 37.6 13.0% Lighting 15.5 15.5 5.4% Refrigeration (4) 17.0 17.0 5.9% Electronics (5) 14.2 14.2 4.9% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.9 10.4 11.3 3.9% Cooking 3.2 0.8 0.8 4.8 8.9 3.1% Computers 8.7 8.7 3.0% Other (7) 0.0 7.7 7.7 47.9 55.7 19.3% Total 66.0 11.5 17.5 29.6 0.0 193.0 288.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.8 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($14.1 billion) and freezers ($2.9 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($14.2 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($0.8 billion), natural gas

96

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2010 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 38.7 11.2 8.0 19.8 0.0 14.3 72.9 28.9% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 35.4 35.4 14.0% Water Heating (4) 14.3 2.1 2.0 4.0 14.2 32.6 12.9% Lighting 22.6 22.6 9.0% Refrigeration (5) 14.9 14.9 5.9% Electronics (6) 17.8 17.8 7.1% Cooking 2.4 0.8 0.8 6.0 9.2 3.7% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.6 10.7 11.3 4.5% Computers 5.6 5.6 2.2% Other (8) 0.0 4.4 4.4 6.7 11.1 4.4% Adjust to SEDS (9) 13.6 13.6 5.4% Total 56.1 13.3 15.2 29.0 0.0 166.8 251.8 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.5 0.5 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.5 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes residential recreational water heating ($1.4 billion). 5) Includes refrigerators ($15.3 billion) and freezers ($4.4 billion). 6) Includes color televisions ($11.0

97

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 2025 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 39.7 11.5 7.8 19.9 0.0 15.0 74.5 28.6% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 36.2 36.2 13.9% Water Heating 16.0 1.4 1.3 2.7 17.1 35.9 13.8% Lighting 15.2 15.2 5.8% Refrigeration (4) 15.5 15.5 6.0% Electronics (5) 12.0 12.0 4.6% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.8 9.8 10.5 4.1% Cooking 2.7 0.8 0.8 4.3 7.8 3.0% Computers 7.7 7.7 2.9% Other (7) 0.0 6.4 6.4 38.7 45.0 17.3% Total 59.1 12.9 16.3 29.8 0.0 171.3 260.3 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.7 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($12.7 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($12 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($0.8 billion), natural gas

98

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2015 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 35.0 13.0 8.1 21.6 0.0 14.0 70.6 29.2% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 33.8 33.8 14.0% Water Heating 13.5 1.9 1.5 3.4 15.8 32.7 13.5% Lighting 17.6 17.6 7.3% Refrigeration (4) 15.0 15.0 6.2% Electronics (5) 10.9 10.9 4.5% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.6 10.8 11.4 4.7% Cooking 2.2 0.9 0.9 3.8 6.8 2.8% Computers 6.3 6.3 2.6% Other (7) 0.0 5.2 5.2 31.3 36.5 15.1% Total 51.3 14.9 15.7 31.1 0.0 159.3 241.7 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.6 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($12.3 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($10.9 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($1.1 billion), natural gas

99

Surfacers change their dive tactics depending on the aim of the dive: evidence from simultaneous measurements of breaths and energy expenditure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to clarify how green turtles manage their energy expenditure during...estimate internal energy expenditure, such...consumption rate of fed green turtles is approximately...Georges. 2011 Energy expenditure of freely swimming adult green turtles (Chelonia...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 2035 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (3) 63.4 13.0 1.6 7.7 0.8 23.1 0.2 20.6 107.2 20.9% Water Heating 23.8 2.2 1.2 3.4 35.8 63.0 12.3% Space Cooling 0.4 55.7 56.1 10.9% Lighting 47.8 47.8 9.3% Electronics (4) 27.2 27.2 5.3% Refrigeration (5) 27.0 27.0 5.3% Computers 14.8 14.8 2.9% Cooking 5.8 0.8 0.8 5.4 12.1 2.3% Wet Clean (6) 0.9 10.4 11.3 2.2% Ventilation (7) 2.4 2.4 0.5% Other (8) 9.3 0.4 12.6 2.0 15.0 88.8 113.2 22.0% Adjust to SEDS (9) 4.6 5.3 5.3 21.7 31.6 6.2% Total 108.2 21.0 1.6 22.3 2.8 47.6 0.2 357.8 513.8 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.8 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($2.0 billion). 3) Includes furnace fans ($4.8 billion). 4) Includes color televisions ($14.2 billion). 5) Includes refrigerators ($24.1 billion) and freezers ($3.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2015 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 28.4 28.4 16.3% Space Heating 14.6 2.9 1.3 0.1 4.3 0.1 4.7 23.7 13.6% Ventilation 15.1 15.1 8.6% Space Cooling 0.3 14.2 14.5 8.3% Refrigeration 9.9 9.9 5.7% Electronics 8.8 8.8 5.1% Water Heating 4.1 0.7 0.7 2.5 7.3 4.2% Computers 5.3 5.3 3.0% Cooking 1.7 0.6 2.3 1.3% Other (4) 2.9 0.3 3.7 1.4 5.4 22.8 31.1 17.8% Adjust to SEDS (5) 5.8 4.5 4.5 17.7 28.1 16.1% Total 29.3 8.4 1.3 3.7 1.5 14.9 0.1 130.0 174.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.4 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

102

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2010 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 35.4 35.4 19.7% Space Heating 15.0 2.9 0.9 0.1 3.9 0.1 8.5 27.5 15.3% Space Cooling 0.4 25.0 25.3 14.1% Ventilation 15.9 15.9 8.9% Refrigeration 11.6 11.6 6.5% Water Heating 4.0 0.6 0.6 2.7 7.3 4.1% Electronics 7.8 7.8 4.3% Computers 6.3 6.3 3.5% Cooking 1.6 0.7 2.3 1.3% Other (4) 2.7 0.3 3.3 1.2 4.8 20.4 28.0 15.6% Adjust to SEDS (5) 6.2 5.2 5.2 0.6 12.0 6.7% Total 29.9 9.0 0.9 3.3 1.3 14.5 0.1 134.8 179.4 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.2 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

103

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2010 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (3) 53.7 14.2 0.9 8.0 0.6 23.7 0.1 23.2 100.8 23.4% Space Cooling 0.4 61.3 61.7 14.3% Lighting 59.3 59.3 13.8% Water Heating 18.3 2.6 2.0 4.6 17.8 40.7 9.4% Refrigeration (4) 26.9 26.9 6.2% Electronics (5) 26.1 26.1 6.1% Ventilation (6) 15.9 15.9 3.7% Cooking 4.0 0.8 0.8 8.8 13.6 3.2% Computers 12.1 12.1 2.8% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.6 11.0 11.6 2.7% Other (8) 2.7 0.3 7.7 1.2 9.2 27.3 39.2 9.1% Adjust to SEDS (9) 6.2 5.2 5.2 11.9 23.4 5.4% Total 86.0 22.3 0.9 18.5 1.8 43.5 0.1 301.6 431.2 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.6 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.2 billion). 3) Includes furnace fans ($4.5 billion). 4) Includes refrigerators ($24.1 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($11.0

104

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2015 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Total Percent Space Heating (3) 49.5 15.9 1.3 8.1 0.7 25.9 0.2 18.7 94.3 22.7% Space Cooling 0.3 48.0 48.3 11.6% Lighting 45.9 45.9 11.0% Water Heating 17.6 2.6 1.5 4.1 18.3 40.0 9.6% Refrigeration (4) 24.9 24.9 6.0% Electronics (5) 19.8 19.8 4.7% Ventilation (6) 15.1 15.1 3.6% Computers 11.6 11.6 2.8% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.6 10.8 11.4 2.7% Cooking 3.9 0.9 0.9 4.4 9.1 2.2% Other (8) 2.9 0.3 8.9 1.4 10.6 54.1 67.6 16.3% Adjust to SEDS (9) 5.8 4.5 4.5 17.7 28.1 6.7% Total 80.6 23.3 1.3 19.4 2.1 46.1 0.2 289.3 416.2 100% Note(s): Source(s): Petroleum Electricity 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.7 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.4 billion). 3) Includes furnace fans ($4.6 billion). 4) Includes refrigerators ($22.6 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($10.9

105

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 2025 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (3) 56.7 14.3 1.5 7.8 0.7 24.3 0.2 19.5 100.7 22.0% Space Cooling 0.3 50.5 50.9 11.1% Lighting 45.2 45.2 9.9% Water Heating 21.3 2.3 1.3 3.6 19.6 44.4 9.7% Refrigeration (4) 24.9 24.9 5.4% Electronics (5) 23.2 23.2 5.1% Computers 13.2 13.2 2.9% Wet Clean (6) 0.8 9.8 10.5 2.3% Cooking 4.8 0.8 0.8 4.9 10.5 2.3% Ventilation (7) 16.6 16.6 3.6% Other (8) 4.8 0.4 10.6 1.7 12.7 69.8 87.4 19.1% Adjust to SEDS (9) 5.9 4.9 4.9 19.2 30.0 6.6% Total 94.6 21.9 1.5 20.6 2.5 46.4 0.2 316.3 457.4 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.7 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.7 billion). 3) Includes furnace fans ($4.7 billion). 4) Includes refrigerators ($22.3 billion) and freezers ($2.6 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($12.0

106

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2025 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 30.1 30.1 15.2% Space Heating 17.1 2.8 1.5 0.1 4.4 0.2 4.5 26.1 13.3% Electronics 11.2 11.2 5.7% Space Cooling 0.3 14.3 14.6 7.4% Water Heating 5.2 0.8 0.8 2.5 8.5 4.3% Computers 5.5 5.5 2.8% Refrigeration 9.4 9.4 4.8% Ventilation 16.6 16.6 8.4% Cooking 2.1 0.6 2.7 1.4% Other (4) 4.8 0.3 4.3 1.7 6.3 31.2 42.3 21.5% Adjust to SEDS (5) 5.9 4.9 4.9 19.2 30.0 15.2% Total 35.5 8.9 1.5 4.3 1.9 16.5 0.2 145.0 197.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.7 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2011 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

107

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 2035 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 32.3 32.3 14.4% Space Heating 19.0 2.7 1.6 0.2 4.5 0.2 4.6 28.2 12.5% Water Heating 6.3 1.0 1.0 18.1 25.4 11.3% Space Cooling 0.4 15.1 15.5 6.9% Electronics 13.0 13.0 5.8% Refrigeration 10.0 10.0 4.4% Computers 6.0 6.0 2.7% Cooking 2.6 0.6 3.2 1.4% Ventilation 2.4 2.4 1.1% Other (4) 9.3 0.4 4.9 2.0 7.2 40.9 57.5 25.5% Adjust to SEDS (5) 4.6 5.3 5.3 21.7 31.6 14.0% Total 42.2 9.4 1.6 4.9 2.2 18.0 0.2 164.8 225.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.2 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($2.0 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

108

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATIONHOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST DATA & TRENDS ENERGY OVERVIEW E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W INTRODUCTION Author's...

109

Energy demand of German households and saving potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The implementation of the principles of sustainable development requires both using potentialities in saving resources and cutting down emissions (efficiency strategies) as well as more conscious patterns of behaviour of the actors involved (sufficiency strategies). Starting from the current situation of annual CO2 emissions of about 10 t and a sustainability goal of 1??2 t CO2 emissions per inhabitant and year, the question arises in how far households can contribute to achieve this goal. Therefore, in this paper, the environmental impacts of the energy demand of German households will be evaluated by means of describing its status quo and there from deriving saving potentials.

Anke Eber; Dominik Most; Otto Rentz; Thomas Lutzkendorf

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

This page left blank. E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATIONHOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST DATA & TRENDS ENERGY OVERVIEW E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W...

111

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Residential Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) LPG ($/gal) 1980 2.24 1981 2.51 1982 2.30 1983 2.14 1984 2.10 1985 1.96 1986 1.54 1987 1.42 1988 1.39 1989 1.48 1990 1.69 1991 1.56 1992 1.40 1993 1.33 1994 1.27 1995 1.22 1996 1.37 1997 1.34 1998 1.15 1999 1.16 2000 1.70 2001 1.59 2002 1.42 2003 1.67 2004 1.84 2005 2.36 2006 2.64 2007 2.81 2008 3.41 2009 2.52 2010 2.92 2011 3.62 2012 3.65 2013 3.43 2014 3.60 2015 3.74 2016 3.79 2017 3.86 2018 3.89 2019 3.92 2020 3.96 2021 3.99 2022 4.02 2023 4.07 2024 4.10 2025 4.15 2026 4.19 2027 4.23 2028 4.26 2029 4.30 2030 4.34 2031 4.35 2032 4.38 2033 4.43 2034 4.50 2035 4.55 Source(s): EIA, State Energy Data 2009: Prices and Expenditures, Jun. 2011, Table 2, p. 24-25 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table A3, p. 6-8 for 2010-2035 and Table G1, p. 215 for fuels' heat content; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for

112

RECS Data Show Decreased Energy Consumption per Household  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained relatively stable for many years as increased energy efficiency has offset the increase in the number and average size of housing units, according to the newly released data from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The average household consumed 90 million British thermal units (Btu) in 2009 based on RECS. This continues the downward trend in average residential energy consumption of the last 30 years. Despite increases in the number and the average size of homes plus increased use of electronics, improvements in efficiency for space heating, air conditioning, and major appliances have all led to decreased consumption per household. Newer homes also tend to feature better insulation and other characteristics, such as double-pane windows, that improve the building envelope.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Buildings Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Residential Buildings Commercial Buildings Total Building Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (2) Total Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (3) Total Expenditures 1980 89.1 40.5 28.9 158.5 70.9 20.5 17.2 108.6 267.2 1981 94.9 41.3 27.8 164.0 79.4 21.4 16.5 117.3 281.3 1982 99.9 47.9 24.5 172.3 83.4 25.1 13.7 122.2 294.5 1983 103.6 51.0 21.4 176.1 83.6 26.1 14.6 124.3 300.4 1984 103.3 51.6 23.6 178.5 87.6 25.9 14.7 128.2 306.7 1985 105.4 48.8 22.6 176.8 90.0 24.0 12.6 126.6 303.4 1986 106.9 44.2 18.1 169.2 90.5 20.7 9.1 120.2 289.4 1987 108.2 40.9 18.0 167.1 88.7 19.8 9.2 117.7 284.7 1988 110.3 41.8 18.0 170.1 89.9 20.4 8.2 118.5 288.7 1989 110.2 42.9 19.7 172.8 91.5 20.5 8.4 120.4 293.2 1990 110.9 39.0 18.2 168.2 92.9 19.4 9.2 121.5 289.7 1991 113.7 39.2 17.0 169.9 93.9 19.5 7.7 121.1 291.0

114

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

This page left blank. This page left blank. E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION/HOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST DATA & TRENDS ENERGY OVERVIEW E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W INTRODUCTION Author's Note Estimates of gallons of fuel consumed, type of fuel used, price paid for fuel, and fuel economy are based on data imputed by EIA, using vehicle characteristics and vehicle-miles traveled data collected during the interview process for the 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS). Rather than obtaining that information directly from fuel purchase diaries, EIA exploited its experience and expertise with modeling techniques for transportation studies, filling missing and uncollected data with information reported to other federal agencies, as described in Appendices

115

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION/HOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST DATA & TRENDS ENERGY OVERVIEW E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W INTRODUCTION Author's Note Estimates of gallons of fuel consumed, type of fuel used, price paid for fuel, and fuel economy are based on data imputed by EIA, using vehicle characteristics and vehicle-miles traveled data collected during the interview process for the 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS). Rather than obtaining that information directly from fuel purchase diaries, EIA exploited its experience and expertise with modeling techniques for transportation studies, filling missing and uncollected data with information reported to other federal agencies, as described in Appendices B and C of this report.

116

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

to on-road, in-use fuel economy, EIA has extended this inventory to include the energy used for travel, thereby continuing a data series that was discontinued by EIA in...

117

"Table A37. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 7. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" " "," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"

118

"Table A36. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

119

Lifestyle change and energy use in Japan: Household equipment and energy consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy use in the Japanese residential sector has more than doubled (on a per-household basis) during the post-war period. Important factors contributing to the increase include changes in the types of housing built, heating, cooling, water-heating equipment, and other appliances. In this paper, the developments of household equipment and living conditions in Japan are described, from their 1950s state to the present. Trends in energy consumption by fuel types and end uses are reviewed over the same period. The past trends are combined with expectations for future developments in household equipment and quality, as well as with international comparisons of household-energy use, to predict further increases in household-energy consumption. The results indicate the importance of a renewed emphasis on energy efficiency in the residential sector.

Hidetoshi Nakagami

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

EIA - Appendix B: Estimation Methodologies of Household Vehicles Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

If you have trouble viewing this page, contact the National Energy Informaiton Center at (202) 586-8800. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page If you have trouble viewing this page, contact the National Energy Informaiton Center at (202) 586-8800. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page EIA Home > Transportation Home Page > Appendix B Estimation MethodologiesIntroduction Appendix B Estimation Methodologies Introduction Statistics concerning vehicle miles traveled (VMT), vehicle fuel efficiency (given in terms of miles per gallon (MPG)), vehicle fuel consumption, and vehicle fuel expenditures are presented in this report. The methodology used to estimate these statistics relied on data from the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) fuel efficiency test results, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) retail pump price series, and the Lundberg Survey, Inc., price series for 1994.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 - Appendix C  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction This appendix discusses several issues relating to the quality of the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) data and to the interpretation of conclusions based on these data. The first section discusses undercoverage of the vehicle stock in the residential sector. The second section discusses the effects of using July 1994 as a time reference for the survey. The remainder of this appendix discusses the treatment of sampling and nonsampling errors in the RTECS, the quality of specific data items such as the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) and fuel prices, and poststratification procedures used in the 1994 RTECS. The quality of the data collection and the processing of the data affects the accuracy of estimates based on survey data. All the statistics

122

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B B : E S T I M AT I O N M E T H O D O L O G I E S APPENDIX B A P P E N D I X B ESTIMATION METHODOLOGIES INTRODUCTION The National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) is the nation's inventory of local and long distance travel, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation. Between April 2001 and May 2002, roughly 26 thousand households 41 were interviewed about their travel, based on the use of over 53 thousand vehicles. Using confidential data collected during those interviews, coupled with EIA's retail fuel prices, external data sources of test 42 fuel economy, and internal procedures for modifying test fuel economy to on-road, in-use fuel economy, EIA has extended this inventory to include the energy used for travel, thereby continuing a data series that was discontinued by EIA in 1994. This appendix presents the methods used for each eligible sampled

123

Greenhouse Gas Implications of Household Energy Technology in Kenya  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy and Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-3050, Risk, Resource, and Environmental Management Division, Resources for the Future, 1616 P Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20036, and Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7320 ... Household energy policy is further complicated because charcoal markets in many sub-Saharan African countries operate within a complex political economy that can be hard to characterize and still more difficult to regulate. ... While charcoal consumption carries a larger burden of GHG emissions than firewood use, it also has more potential to attract investment in GHG mitigation activities. ...

Rob Bailis; Majid Ezzati; Daniel M. Kammen

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F (2001) -- Household Natural Gas Usage Form F (2001) -- Household Natural Gas Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Natural Gas Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

125

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E (2001) - Household Electricity Usage Form E (2001) - Household Electricity Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Electricity Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

126

Resting and daily energy expenditures of free-living field voles are positively correlated but reflect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1050 Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway; Aberdeen Centre for Energy RegulationResting and daily energy expenditures of free-living field voles are positively correlated and Obesity, Division of Energy Balance and Obesity, Rowett Research Institute, Bucksburn, Aberdeen AB24 9SB

Lambin, Xavier

127

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division. Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2003 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2003 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS).

128

"Table A24. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 4. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groupsc and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:","0.6 ",0.6,1.3,1.3,0.7,1.2,1.2,1.5,1.1

129

Surfacers change their dive tactics depending on the aim of the dive: evidence from simultaneous measurements of breaths and energy expenditure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...simultaneously to reveal the energy expended during...turtles manage their energy expenditure during...taking physical measurements of the turtles...embedded. A logger unit was affixed to...underestimation of energy expenditure per unit body weight. Consequently...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

How Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? How Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? June 18, 2009 - 5:25pm Addthis Anyone who has decided to save energy at home knows that the entire household needs to be involved if you really want to see savings. Some people-be they roommates, spouses, children, or maybe even yourself-just seem to need some extra reminders to take simple energy-saving steps. How do you encourage everyone in your household to save energy? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a topic related to energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. Addthis Related Articles How Have You Helped Someone Else Save Energy?

131

How Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? How Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? June 18, 2009 - 5:25pm Addthis Anyone who has decided to save energy at home knows that the entire household needs to be involved if you really want to see savings. Some people-be they roommates, spouses, children, or maybe even yourself-just seem to need some extra reminders to take simple energy-saving steps. How do you encourage everyone in your household to save energy? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a topic related to energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. Addthis Related Articles How Have You Helped Someone Else Save Energy?

132

Income inequality and carbon dioxide emissions: The case of Chinese urban households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper draws on Chinese survey data to investigate variations in carbon dioxide emissions across households with different income levels. Rich households generate more emissions per capita than poor households via both their direct energy consumption and their higher expenditure on goods and services that use energy as an intermediate input. An econometric analysis confirms a positive relationship between emissions and income and establishes a slightly increasing marginal propensity to emit (MPE) over the relevant income range. The redistribution of income from rich to poor households is therefore shown to reduce aggregate household emissions, suggesting that the twin pursuits of reducing inequality and emissions can be achieved in tandem.

Jane Golley; Xin Meng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Energy consumption and expenditure projections by income quintile on the basis of the Annual Energy Outlook 1997 forecast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of the relative impacts of the base-case scenario used in the Annual Energy Outlook 1997, published by the US Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration, on income quintile groups. Projected energy consumption and expenditures, and projected energy expenditures as a share of income, for the period 1993 to 2015 are reported. Projected consumption of electricity, natural gas, distillate fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas over this period is also reported for each income group. 33 figs., 11 tabs.

Poyer, D.A.; Allison, T.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Energy Policy 30 (2002) 815826 Evaluating the health benefits of transitions in household energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the primary source of domestic energy, has put preventive measures to reduce exposure to indoor air pollutionEnergy Policy 30 (2002) 815­826 Evaluating the health benefits of transitions in household energy for the Future, 1616 P Street NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA b Epidemiology and Burden of Disease Unit, Global

Kammen, Daniel M.

135

Drivers of U.S. Household Energy Consumption, 1980-2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Drivers of U.S. Household Energy Consumption, 1980-2009 February 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy...

136

Modelling useful energy demand system as derived from basic needs in the household sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inter-fuel substitution in the household sector depends on whether their target energy use is similar or not. To account ... for the effect of end-use application on energy demand, the concept of useful energy is...

Zahra A. Barkhordar; Yadollah Saboohi

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

0 2005 Average Energy Expenditures per Household Member and per Square Foot, by Weatherization Eligibility (2010) Members Hhold Hhold Total U.S. Households 780 2.6 0.86 Federally...

138

Special Topics on Energy Use in Household Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home Page Welcome to the Energy Information Administration's Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Home Page. If you need assistance in viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800 Home Page Welcome to the Energy Information Administration's Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Home Page. If you need assistance in viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800 Home > Transportation Home Page > Special Topics Special Topics Change in Method for Estimating Fuel Economy for the 1988 and subsequent RTECS (Released 09/12/2000) Can Household Members Accurately Report How Many Miles Their Vehicles Are Driven? (Released 08/03/2000) Calculate your Regional Gasoline Costs of Driving using the “Transportation Calculator” updated for new model years! Choose your car or SUV and see the gasoline part of the cost of driving in various parts of the country using EIA's current weekly prices. This application uses DOE/EPA's Fuel Economy Guide to set the MPG, but you can change it to compare your estimate of your car's mpg to the average of everyone else who takes the test. (Released 04/11/2000; Updated Yearly for Fuel Economies and Weekly for Fuel Prices)

139

Minority energy assessment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to project household energy consumption, energy expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income for five population groups from 1991 to 2009. The approach uses the Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy's Office of Minority Economic Impact. The MEAM provides a framework that can be used to forecast regional energy consumption and energy expenditure for majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. The forecasts of key macroeconomic and energy variables used as exogenous variables in the MEAM were obtained from the Data Resources, Inc., Macromodel and Energy Model. Generally, the projections of household energy consumption, expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income vary across population groups and census regions.

Teotia, A.P.S.; Poyer, D.A.; Lampley, L.; Anderson, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Dietary Modulation of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis: Calories and Energy Expenditure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...required in order for the HF corn oil diet to stimulate...administration & dosage Eating Energy Intake Female Lung Neoplasms...element of "net utilizable energy." Induction of MTs by...in rats fed HF and LF corn oil diets, restricted...independent of the level of energy intake." Thus, we were...

Theresa Craven-Giles; Anthony R. Tagliaferro; Anne M. Ronan; Karen J. Baumgartner; and B. D. Roebuck

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Energy Expenditure of Rats Bearing Walker Carcinoma 256  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...promotion with TPA (12). Corn oil was the fat used in all...did not show 2035s DIETARY ENERGY AND TUMOR PROMOTION Table I...similar effects of dietary corn oil on skin tumorigenesis...observations. 2036s DIETARY ENERGY AND TUMOR PROMOTION 16 weeks...

G. B. Mider; L. D. Fenninger; F. L. Haven; and J. J. Morton

1951-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Competition Helps Kids Learn About Energy and Save Their Households Some  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Competition Helps Kids Learn About Energy and Save Their Households Competition Helps Kids Learn About Energy and Save Their Households Some Money Competition Helps Kids Learn About Energy and Save Their Households Some Money May 21, 2013 - 2:40pm Addthis Students can register now to save energy and win prizes with the Home Energy Challenge. Students can register now to save energy and win prizes with the Home Energy Challenge. Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Visit HomeEnergyChallenge.org to register for the competition. Third through eighth grade students and teachers will be excited to hear about a competition starting up for next school year that challenges students to learn about energy, develop techniques for saving energy, and

143

The system for observing fitness instruction time (SOFIT) as a measure of energy expenditure during classroom based physical activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this investigation was to develop an equation to estimate physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) during a 10-min physically active academic lesson using The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time ...

Honas, Jeffery J.; Washburn, Richard A.; Smith, Bryan K.; Greene, Leon; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Donnelly, Joseph E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Energy Service Company (ESCO) Industry Activity ($Million Nominal) (1) Low High 1990 143 342 Market Segment Share 1991 218 425 MUSH (2) 69% 1992 331 544 Federal 15% 1993 505 703 Commercial & Industrial 7% 1994 722 890 Residential 6% 1995 1,105 1,159 Public Housing 3% 1996 1,294 1,396 1997 1,394 1,506 1998 1,551 1,667 2008 Revenues by Project/Technology Type 1999 1,764 1,925 2000 1,876 2,186 Market Segment Share 2001 - - Energy Efficiency 75% 2002 - - Onsite Renewables 14% 2003 - - Engine/Turbine Generators 6% 2004 2,447 2,507 Consulting/Master Planning 3% 2005 2,949 3,004 Other 2% 2006 3,579 3,627 2007 - - 2008 4,087 4,171 Note(s): Source(s): Estimated Revenue ($Million Nominal) (1) 2008 Revenue Sources 1) Estimates based on surveys of major ESCOs and input from industry experts. 2) Includes municipal and state governments, universities

145

A model to assess the relative impact of policy in transportation energy expenditures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research reported in this paper uses the 1977 and 1983 Nationwide Personal Transportation Study surveys (NPTS's) to estimate the cross-section and time responses of minority and majority households in terms of variations in vehicles held by the household, VMT per household vehicle, 1983 dollar income of the household, education and age of the household head, transit availability to the household, workers and nonworkers per household, and urban vs rural location.

Santini, D.J.; Vyas, A.D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Minority energy assessment report. Fall 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to project household energy consumption, energy expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income for five population groups from 1991 to 2009. The approach uses the Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy`s Office of Minority Economic Impact. The MEAM provides a framework that can be used to forecast regional energy consumption and energy expenditure for majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. The forecasts of key macroeconomic and energy variables used as exogenous variables in the MEAM were obtained from the Data Resources, Inc., Macromodel and Energy Model. Generally, the projections of household energy consumption, expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income vary across population groups and census regions.

Teotia, A.P.S.; Poyer, D.A.; Lampley, L.; Anderson, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Commercial Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) Electricity Natural Gas Distillate Oil Residual Oil ($/gal) ($/gal) 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 9.39 104.50 2.79 3.78 9.35 104.74 2.81 3.81 9.47 101.25 2.73 3.69 9.40 103.22 2.76 3.75 9.54 99.28 2.67 3.60 9.51 100.49 2.70 3.64 9.52 94.53 2.66 3.52 9.55 97.45 2.64 3.55 9.46 90.92 2.61 3.46 9.48 92.13 2.63 3.49 9.49 87.65 2.54 3.41 9.47 89.48 2.58 3.42 9.58 85.91 2.41 3.28 9.54 86.36 2.49 3.34 9.57 87.02 2.07 2.97 9.52 84.58 2.26 3.14 10.09 86.14 2.34 3.55 9.76 87.22 2.37 3.57 10.27 97.87 1.49 2.03 10.14 90.95 1.66 2.86 10.04 114.33 1.51 2.47 10.56 121.16 2.01 3.34 9.59 121.45 1.24 2.07 10.13 124.31 1.39 2.32 9.44 94.94 0.93 1.23

148

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Residential Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Avg. 1980 36.40 8.35 16.77 17.64 1981 38.50 8.88 18.35 19.09 1982 40.15 10.08 17.28 19.98 1983 40.43 11.30 16.08 21.00 1984 38.80 11.02 15.61 20.20 1985 38.92 10.68 14.61 20.10 1986 38.24 9.98 11.88 19.38 1987 37.29 9.22 11.23 18.73 1988 36.22 8.80 10.83 18.02 1989 35.67 8.71 11.96 17.93 1990 35.19 8.63 13.27 18.64 1991 34.88 8.38 12.49 18.31 1992 34.79 8.28 11.23 17.76 1993 34.52 8.47 10.75 17.76 1994 34.04 8.63 10.63 17.87 1995 33.43 8.00 10.33 17.50 1996 32.63 8.21 11.70 17.28 1997 32.34 8.83 11.47 17.69 1998 31.33 8.55 9.96 17.73 1999 30.52 8.29 10.13 17.09 2000 30.13 9.54 14.18 18.06 2001 30.71 11.50 13.98 19.38 2002 29.73 9.24 12.26 17.89 2003 30.05 10.87 14.21 18.88 2004 29.98 11.97 15.54 19.76 2005 30.64 13.66 18.93 21.50 2006 32.67 14.30 21.06 23.34 2007 32.50

149

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Building Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Residential Buildings Commercial Buildings Building Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Avg. Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (2) Avg. Avg. (3) 1980 36.40 8.35 16.77 17.64 37.22 7.70 13.06 18.52 17.99 1981 38.50 8.88 18.35 19.09 39.06 8.29 14.78 20.56 19.68 1982 40.15 10.08 17.28 19.98 40.15 9.40 13.28 21.21 20.48 1983 40.43 11.30 16.08 21.00 39.51 10.43 12.53 21.55 21.23 1984 38.80 11.02 15.61 20.20 38.68 10.00 12.04 21.14 20.58 1985 38.92 10.68 14.61 20.10 38.29 9.60 11.68 21.41 20.63 1986 38.24 9.98 11.88 19.38 37.09 8.69 7.85 20.17 19.70 1987 37.29 9.22 11.23 18.73 34.93 7.93 8.16 19.14 18.90 1988 36.22 8.80 10.83 18.02 33.60 7.45 7.47 18.24 18.11 1989 35.67 8.71 11.96 17.93 33.06 7.34 8.13 18.29 18.07 1990 35.19 8.63 13.27 18.64 32.49 7.20 9.31 18.62 18.63 1991 34.88 8.38 12.49 18.31

150

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Commercial Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Average 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 (2) 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 27.39 10.47 27.48 21.15 27.10 10.45 27.73 21.01 27.56 10.32 27.04 21.10 27.52 10.45 27.28 21.18 27.86 10.05 26.41 21.06 27.74 10.12 26.73 21.07 28.00 9.75 25.85 20.90 27.96 9.93 26.16 21.01 27.78 9.21 25.46 20.46 27.90 9.45 25.69 20.67 27.76 8.95 24.95 20.23 27.72 9.09 25.24 20.32 27.96 8.64 24.34 20.11 27.81 8.77 24.80 20.14 27.91 8.46 23.15 19.90 28.07 8.59 24.07 20.11 28.61 8.72 23.94 20.36 28.05 8.70 22.00 19.99 29.73 9.10 20.28 20.99 29.57 8.61 24.24 21.03 30.95 12.12 23.75 23.21 30.09 9.79 15.83 21.13 29.70

151

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Building Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) (cents/therm) (cents/gal) ($/gal) 1980 12.42 83.51 1.53 2.24 12.70 77.01 1.43 2.05 1981 13.14 88.83 1.47 2.51 13.33 82.90 1.63 2.32 1982 13.70 100.83 1.54 2.30 13.70 93.95 1.40 2.11 1983 13.79 113.04 1.51 2.14 13.48 104.33 1.30 1.75 1984 13.24 110.16 1.46 2.10 13.20 100.01 1.37 1.68 1985 13.28 106.80 1.37 1.96 13.06 95.96 1.21 1.56 1986 13.05 99.76 1.25 1.54 12.66 86.86 0.71 1.01 1987 12.72 92.16 1.22 1.42 11.92 79.32 0.79 1.05 1988 12.36 87.96 1.15 1.39 11.46 74.52 0.62 0.95 1989 12.17 87.08 1.39 1.48 11.28 73.39 0.70 1.07 1990 12.01 86.28 1.40 1.69 11.08 72.04 0.78 1.26 1991 11.90 83.77 1.34 1.56 10.97 69.49 0.58 1.11 1992 11.87 82.80 1.24 1.40 10.93 68.64 0.58 1.01 1993 11.78 84.73 1.19 1.33 10.81 71.91 0.58 0.96 1994 11.62 86.30 1.25 1.27 10.57 74.09 0.60 0.90 1995 11.41 79.96 1.22 1.22 10.32 66.99 0.64 0.88 1996 11.13 82.07 1.36 1.37

152

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data and Trends - Table...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 32.8 17.2 307 13.4 16.1 14.2 2.0 21.3 14.1 Race of Householder White... 149.5 78.3 1,774 77.6...

153

A Look at Commercial Buldings in 1995: Characteristics, Energy Consumption, and Energy Expenditures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DOE/EIA-0625(95) DOE/EIA-0625(95) Distribution Category UC-950 A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995: Characteristics, Energy Consumption, and Energy Expenditures October 1998 En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion Of fice of En ergy Mar kets and End Use U.S. De part ment of En ergy Wash ing ton, DC 20585 This re port was pre pared by the En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion, the in de pend ent sta tis ti cal and ana lytic agency within the U.S. De part ment of En ergy. The in for ma tion con tained herein should be at trib uted to the En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion and should not be con strued as ad vo cat ing or re flect ing any pol icy po si tion of the De part ment of En ergy or any other or gani za tion. Contacts The En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion (EIA) pre pared this pub li ca tion un der the gen eral di rec tion of W. Cal vin

154

Abstract--Numerous studies have shown that households' consumption is an important part of the total energy consumed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

appropriate strategies of giving households' effective feedback on their energy consumption. This study, Energy efficiency. I. INTRODUCTION HE energy consumption of households in buildings attracts a lot in the housing sector. Energy consumption in buildings accounts for 39% of Sweden's total final energy

Beigl, Michael

155

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.3 Federal Buildings and Facilities Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Annual Energy Expenditures per Gross Square Foot of Federal Floorspace Stock, by Year ($2010) FY 1985 2.13 FY 2000 1.36 FY 2001 1.58 FY 2002 1.49 FY 2003 1.45 FY 2004 1.54 FY 2005 1.59 FY 2006 2.01 (1) FY 2007 2.01 Note(s): Source(s): Total Federal buildings and facilities energy expenditures in FY 2006 were $5.79 billion (in $2010). 1) Increase due to change in FEMP categorization of Federal buildings. DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP FY 2007, Jan. 2010, Table A-9, p. 97 and Table 1, p. 13; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Nov. 2008, Table A-9, p. 78 for energy costs, and Table 1, p. 12 for floorspace for 2006; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Sep. 2006, Table A-12, p. 158 for energy costs for 1985-2005; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report on FEMP, Dec. 2002, Table 8-A, p. 61 for 2000; DOE/FEMP, Annual

156

Factors predicting the capacity of Los Angeles city-region recreation programs to promote energy expenditure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An audit of recreation programs with moderate or higher levels of physical activity (PA) in Los Angeles area cities (N=82) was conducted using internet, telephone, and survey methods. Metabolic Equivalents (METs) were used to code programs? physical activity intensity. MET-hours per recreation program was associated with required age for enrollment, percent of residents >64 years of age, and fiscal capacity of cities. Capacity to promote energy expenditure may depend on targeted age groups, age of population, and municipal fiscal capacity. Cities with lower fiscal capacity might offer those higher MET-hour activities which require less specialized equipment and seek outside funding to offer higher MET programs.

Kim D. Reynolds; Nicholas Dahmann; Jennifer Wolch; Pascale Joassart-Marcelli; Genevieve Dunton; Diana Rudulph; Joshua Newell; Jennifer Thayer; Michael Jerrett

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Environmental and Resource Economics Household Energy Demand in Urban China: Accounting for regional prices and rapid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

growth, China's energy consumption is rising at one of the fastest rates in the world, almost 8% per year over the period 2000-2010. Residential energy consumption has grown even faster than the national total . Although household energy consumption per capita is still low compared to the developed countries

158

Reforming Household Energy Markets: Some Welfare Effects in the United Catherine Waddams Price  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reforming Household Energy Markets: Some Welfare Effects in the United Kingdom by Catherine Waddams remain vulnerable. The implications of these findings for the future of energy markets both in the UK This paper summarises some early effects of deregulating the UK energy sector, focusing on the effects

Feigon, Brooke

159

Using Circuit-Level Power Measurements in Household Energy Management Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Circuit-Level Power Measurements in Household Energy Management Systems Alan Marchiori and Qi to accurately measure en- ergy usage in the home. Measuring energy usage is not dif- ficult, however we must decide what to measure. Whole- home energy measurement is cheap and easy to setup be- cause only one

Han, Qi "Chee"

160

vol. 163, no. 3 the american naturalist march 2004 Optimal Body Size and Energy Expenditure during Winter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, South Africa; e-mail: m.scantlebury@zoology.up.ac.za. § E-mail: rachel@naturebureau.co.uk. k E-mail: xvol. 163, no. 3 the american naturalist march 2004 Optimal Body Size and Energy Expenditure during energy requirements for thermogenesis at a time when little energy is available. We formulated a model

Lambin, Xavier

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C C : Q U A L I T Y O F T H E D ATA APPENDIX C A P P E N D I X C QUALITY OF THE DATA INTRODUCTION This section discusses several issues relating to the quality of the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) data and to the interpretation of conclusions based on these data. In particular, the focus of our discussion is on the quality of specific data items, such as the fuel economy and fuel type, that were imputed to the NHTS via a cold-decking imputation procedure. This imputation procedure used vehicle-level information from the NHTSA Corporate Average Fuel Economy files for model year's 1978 through 2001. It is nearly impossible to quantify directly the quality of this imputation procedure because NHTS does not collect the necessary fuel economy information for comparison. At best, we have indirect evidence on the quality of our

162

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the residential energy efficiency market is a potentialinstitutions (CDFIs) to market energy improvements. Solve aapproach to energy efficiency market development is

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the residential energy efficiency market is a potentialinstitutions (CDFIs) to market energy improvements. Solve acan open significant markets for energy improvements among

Zimring, Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rentalhousing/Energy_Efficiency_Project/COB_rebates_8.2.11.PDS/rentalhousing/Energy_Efficiency_Project/SmartRegs_Final_s residential energy efficiency loan program November 2010-

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clean Energy Works Oregon Bill Payment History as a ProxyEnergy and Clean Energy Works Oregon (CEWO), also use utility bill repayment history

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? June 21, 2011 - 11:37am Addthis A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus’ DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus' DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. Ben Squires Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? The Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are working to harness the natural process that spoils fruits and vegetables as a way to make fuel and other petroleum substitutes from the parts of plants that we can't eat. The genetic bases of the behaviors and abilities of these two industrially relevant fungal strains will allow researchers to exploit

167

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? June 21, 2011 - 11:37am Addthis A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus’ DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus' DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. Ben Squires Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? The Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are working to harness the natural process that spoils fruits and vegetables as a way to make fuel and other petroleum substitutes from the parts of plants that we can't eat. The genetic bases of the behaviors and abilities of these two industrially relevant fungal strains will allow researchers to exploit

168

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NASCSP). 2009. Weatherization Assistance Program Fundingof Energys Weatherization Assistance Program with State-2009. National Weatherization Assistance Program Training

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - January 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 2005 January 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2005 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Consumer prices for heating fuels are relatively unchanged since the December Outlook, leaving projections for household heating fuel expenditures about the same as previously projected, despite continued warm weather in the middle of the heating season. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are expected to average 30 percent above last winter's levels, with residential fuel oil prices averaging $1.82 per gallon for the October-to-March period. Expenditures for propane-heated households are expected to increase about 20 percent this winter.

170

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - February 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 2005 February 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2005 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Despite some cold weather during the second half of January, expected average consumer prices for heating fuels this heating season are little changed since the January Outlook, leaving projections for household heating fuel expenditures about the same as previously reported. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are expected to average 32 percent above last winter's levels, with residential fuel oil prices averaging $1.82 per gallon for the October-to-March period. Expenditures for propane-heated households are expected to increase about

171

Poor agreement between continuous measurements of energy expenditure and routinely used prediction equations in intensive care unit patients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SummaryBackground & aims A wide variation in 24h energy expenditure has been demonstrated previously in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The accuracy of equations used to predict energy expenditure in critically ill patients is frequently compared with single or short-duration indirect calorimetry measurements, which may not represent the total energy expenditure (TEE) of these patients. To take into account this variability in energy expenditure, estimates have been compared with continuous indirect calorimetry measurements. Methods Continuous (24h/day for ?5 days) indirect calorimetry measurements were made in patients requiring mechanical ventilation for ?5 days. The Harris-Benedict, Schofield and Ireton-Jones equations and the American College of Chest Physicians recommendation of 25kcal/kg/day were used to estimate energy requirements. Results A total of 192 days of measurements, in 27 patients, were available for comparison with the different equations. Agreement between the equations and measured values was poor. The Harris-Benedict, Schofield and ACCP equations provided more estimates (66%, 66% and 65%, respectively) within 80% and 110% of TEE values. However, each of these equations would have resulted in clinically significant underfeeding (110% of TEE) in 18%, 19% and 13% of patients, respectively. Conclusions Limits of agreement between the different equations and TEE values were unacceptably wide. Prediction equations may result in significant under or overfeeding in the clinical setting.

Clare L. Reid

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vermont Energy Investment Corporation NYSERDA New Yorkfor a case study on New Yorks energy efficiency programNew York, the New York State Energy Research and Development

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Renewable Energy (DOE EERE), Weatherization andand Roya Stanley (DOE EERE) for their support of thisfor Humanity International DOE EERE Department of Energy

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Extending Efficiency Services to Underserved Households: NYSERDAs Assisted Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

N April 4, 2012 Extending Efficiency Services to Underserved Households: NYSERDA's Assisted Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Program Since 2001, New York residents have completed over 39,000 energy upgrades through NYSERDA's Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (HPwES) initiative. Approximately one third of these projects have been completed through the Assisted HPwES track, which offers large incentives to middle income

175

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy assessments, title searches, and lien recordings. Theassessments, title searches, and lien recordings. Once INHP

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency Programs. March 17, 2011. Available here:Efficiency Programs. March 17, 2011. Available here:

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The influence of energy audits on the energy efficiency investments of private owner-occupied households in the Netherlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy audits are promoted as an effective tool to drive investment in energy efficiency measures in the residential sector. Despite operating in many countries for several decades details of the impact of audits are mixed. The aim of research presented here is to explore the role of audits on investment in energy efficiency measures by private owner-occupied householders in the Netherlands. Results showed that the main influence of the energy audit was to confirm information held by householders. A significant portion of audit recommendations was ignored, the main reason being that householders considered their dwellings to be adequately energy efficient. A comparison of audit recipients to non-recipients showed that audit recipients did not adopt, plan to adopt or invest in more energy efficiency measures than non-recipients. In fact non-recipients adopted more and invested more in measures. It is concluded that energy based renovation is driven by householder perception of comfort and acceptable outlay on energy bills and not necessarily to expert technical tailored information on the potential to reduce CO2 emissions and environmental impact. Results support arguments for minimum energy efficiency standards and performance based incentives.

Lorraine Murphy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Household energy use: Applying behavioural economics to understand consumer decision-making and behaviour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Household energy conservation has emerged as a major challenge and opportunity for researchers, practitioners and policymakers. Consumers also seem to be gaining greater awareness of the value and need for sustainable energy practices, particularly amid growing public concerns over greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. Yet even with adequate knowledge of how to save energy and a professed desire to do so, many consumers still fail to take noticeable steps towards energy efficiency and conservation. There is often a sizeable discrepancy between peoples self-reported knowledge, values, attitudes and intentions, and their observable behaviourexamples include the well-known knowledge-action gap and value-action gap. But neither is household energy consumption driven primarily by financial incentives and the rational pursuit of material interests. In fact, people sometimes respond in unexpected and undesirable ways to rewards and sanctions intended to shift consumers costbenefit calculus in favour of sustainable behaviours. Why is this so? Why is household energy consumption and conservation difficult to predict from either core values or material interests? By drawing on critical insights from behavioural economics and psychology, we illuminate the key cognitive biases and motivational factors that may explain why energy-related behaviour so often fails to align with either the personal values or material interests of consumers. Understanding these psychological phenomena can make household and community responses to public policy interventions less surprising, and in parallel, can help us design more cost-effective and mass-scalable behavioural solutions to encourage renewable and sustainable energy use among consumers.

Elisha R. Frederiks; Karen Stenner; Elizabeth V. Hobman

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Reduced postprandial energy expenditure and increased exogenous fat oxidation in young woman after ingestion of test meals with a low protein content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Macronutrient composition of diets can influence energy balance in humans. We tested the hypothesis whether low protein content in single meals may induce lower values of energy expenditure (EE) and fat oxidation...

Klaus J Petzke; Susanne Klaus

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data and Trends  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report provides newly available national and regional data and analyzes the nation's energy use by light-duty vehicles. This release represents the analytical component of the report, with a data component having been released in early 2005.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Occupational physical activity, energy expenditure and 11-year progression of carotid atherosclerosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

expenditure measurements. Ergonomics. 1985;28(1):3659.time and physical workload. Ergonomics. Lynch JW, Kaplan GA,arm and leg exercise. Ergonomics. 1998;41(1):109 Shvartz E,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - adolescent energy expenditure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hedge said, "and has helped the United States become a nation of workaholics... 's expenditure on this approach. ne of the keys to stemming the obesity ... Source: Wang, Z....

183

Reading and Listening to Music Increase Resting Energy Expenditure during an Indirect Calorimetry Test  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Indirect calorimetry is often done early in the morning in a fasting state, with the subject unshowered and abstained from caffeine or other stimulants. Subjects often fall asleep, resulting in measurement of a sleeping metabolic rate rather than a resting metabolic rate. The objective of this study was to determine whether listening to self-selected relaxing music or reading an electronic device or magazine affects resting energy expenditure (REE) during measurement in healthy adults. A randomized trial comparing three different conditions (ie, resting, reading, and listening to music) wasperformed. Sixty-five subjects (36 female and 29 male) were used in final dataanalysis. Inclusion criteria included healthy subjects between the ages of 18 and 50years with a stable weight. Exclusion criteria included pregnant or lactating women or use of medications known to affect metabolism. Results showed that reading either amagazine or an electronic device significantly increased REE by 102.7 kcal/day when compared with resting (Pdevice and magazine. Listening to self-selected relaxing music increased REE by 27.6 kcal/day compared with rest (P=0.0072). Based on our results, we recommend subjects refrain from reading a magazine or electronic device during an indirect calorimetry test. Whether or not the smaller difference found while listening to music ispractically significant would be a decision for the indirect calorimetry test administrator.

Blaire Snell; Susan Fullmer; Dennis L. Eggett

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

HOUSEHOLD SOLAR POWER SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Photovoltaic power has become one of the most popular research area in new energy field. In this report, the case of household solar power (more)

Jiang, He

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Increased energy prices: energy savings and equity aspects. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical model has been developed which approximates the reduction in a household's total energy consumption in response to higher energy prices and different rebate schemes. This model is based on the assumption that energy consumption is a function of a household's real income, prices of different commodities and energy intensities. The amount of energy saved and the change in real expenditure of a household has been calculated for four tax rates; 50%, 100%, 224% and 400%, and five rebate schemes; one regressive, two progressive, one income distribution preserving and the flat per capita rebate. The results indicate that, for a given tax rate, the choice of rebate scheme does not significantly affect the amount of energy conserved by the households. However, the effect of different rebate schemes on a household's real expenditure could be dramatically different.

Herendeen, R.A.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Table ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States Year Primary Energy Electric Power Sector h,j Retail Electricity Total Energy g,h,i Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i,j Coking Coal Steam Coal Total Exports Imports Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f,g Prices in Dollars per Million Btu 1970 0.45 0.36 0.38 1.27 0.93 0.59 1.16 0.73 1.43 2.85 0.42 1.38 1.71 0.18 1.29 1.08 0.32 4.98 1.65 1975 1.65 0.90 1.03 2.37 3.47 1.18 2.60 2.05 2.96 4.65 1.93 2.94 3.35 0.24 1.50 2.19 0.97 8.61 3.33 1980 2.10 1.38 1.46 2.54 3.19 2.86 6.70 6.36 5.64 9.84 3.88 7.04 7.40 0.43 2.26 4.57 1.77 13.95 6.89 1985 2.03 1.67 1.69 2.76 2.99 4.61 7.22 5.91 6.63 9.01 4.30 R 7.62 R 7.64 0.71 2.47 4.93 1.91 19.05

187

Rural household energy consumption and its implications for eco-environments in NW China: A case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Rural household energy consumption plays an essential role in the daily life of farmers, especially in developing regions. In this paper, we present a study of household energy consumption in terms of energy sources and energy end uses, and analysis of technical and economic issues associated with the use of biomass and renewable energy and the replacement of fossil fuels. Results show that energy from biomass represents the largest share of total energy supply, and that 41.15% of total energy is consumed for home heating and cooking. The average cost of household energy is 1259 RMB ($US193.6) and this expense is no longer subsidized by the government. It takes less than one year to make a solar stove profitable and less than two years to pay back the household cost of biogas digesters. An 8m3 digester can produce as much energy as 500550kg of standard coal or 940kg of firewood, while a solar stove can generate 1.76נ103MJ heat each year. Moreover, it is estimated that in rural China the annual reduction of CO2 and SO2 emissions in 2020, due to the replacement of fossil fuel by biomass, will be 68.86נ106 and 54.37נ104 tons, respectively. Overall, the investigations and analyses have revealed that the structure of rural household energy consumption is undergoing a transformation from traditional low-efficiency biomass domination to integrated consumption of traditional and renewable energies. Renewable energy will significantly contribute to the sustainable development of rural households.

Hewen Niu; Yuanqing He; Umberto Desideri; Peidong Zhang; Hongyi Qin; Shijin Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projected Winter Fuel Expenditures by Fuel and Region Projected Winter Fuel Expenditures by Fuel and Region The average household winter heating fuel expenditures discussed in this STEO provide a broad guide to changes compared with last winter. However, fuel expenditures for individual households are highly dependent on local weather conditions, market size, the size and energy efficiency of individual homes and their heating equipment, and thermostat settings (see Winter Fuels Outlook table). Forecast temperatures are close to last winter nationally, with the Northeast about 3% colder and the West 3% warmer. Natural Gas About one-half of U.S. households use natural gas as their primary heating fuel. EIA expects households heating with natural gas to spend an average of $80 (13%) more this winter than last winter. The increase in natural gas

189

A look at commercial buildings in 1995: Characteristics, energy consumption, and energy expenditures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commercial sector consists of business establishments and other organizations that provide services. The sector includes service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as a wide range of facilities that would not be considered commercial in a traditional economic sense, such as public schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with different types of buildings is the clearest way to evaluate commercial sector energy use. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national-level sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted quadrennially (previously triennially) by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The target population for the 1995 CBECS consisted of all commercial buildings in the US with more than 1,000 square feet of floorspace. Decision makers, businesses, and other organizations that are concerned with the use of energy--building owners and managers, regulators, legislative bodies and executive agencies at all levels of government, utilities and other energy suppliers--are confronted with a buildings sector that is complex. Data on major characteristics (e.g., type of building, size, year constructed, location) collected from the buildings, along with the amount and types of energy the buildings consume, help answer fundamental questions about the use of energy in commercial buildings.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Energy efficiency in Norwegian households - identifying motivators and barriers with a focus group approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the theoretical background and results of a focus group study on determinants of energy related behaviour in Norwegian households. 70 Norwegians between 18 and 79 years of age participated in eight focus-groups in four Norwegian cities. The aim of the study was to identify behaviours that Norwegians consider relevant with respect to energy use, the main determinants of those behaviours, as well as barriers against and facilitators of energy efficiency. The most important behaviours from the participants' perspectives were heating, water heating, use of white ware and mobility. The main motivators named were minimising behavioural costs, value orientations, perceived consumer efficacy and social norms. The most important barriers were structural misfits, economic, effort, time consumption, low consumer efficacy and lack of relevant and trustworthy information. The most potent facilitators were economic incentives, gains in comfort, reduced effort, tailored practical information, individual feedback and legislative actions.

Christian A. Klöckner; Bertha M. Sopha; Ellen Matthies; Even Bjørnstad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Understanding household energy consumption patterns: When West Is Best in Metro Manila  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper addresses the topic of energy and development through a multi-disciplinary and systemic approach that combines environmental considerations with a social understanding of consumption. The focus is on electricity usage in the home and specifically lighting and cooling. Set in the urban mega-polis of Metro Manila, the Philippines, energy consumption is first placed in its biophysical perspective: the energy sources and electricity grid are presented, in relation to the Philippines as well as the region. The research findings then explore the social and cultural drivers behind household electricity consumption, revealing in several examples the strong influence of globalizationunderstood here as the flow of people, remittances, images and ideas. Policy recommendations are provided, based on the research results, with concluding remarks relevant to other similar contexts.

Marlyne D. Sahakian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Distributional aspects of an energy conserving tax and rebate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previous work on an energy-conserving well-head tax and rebate has treated consumers as a single, lumped entity. This work investigates energy savings, and, especially, distributional effects over a disaggregated household sector (16 expenditure levels 7 household sizes 4 degrees of urbanization). The approach includes the price effects on indirect as well as direct energy consumption. Reduction in energy demand is insensitive to the distribution of the rebate, i.e., it is dominated by interproduct substitution and technology change. Change in a household's real expenditure is, of course, affected by the rebate scheme. A rebate which maintains real expenditures (i.e., allows consumption of the pre-tax market basket) is designed for different households; this is compared with a flat per-capita rebate. This is done for energy taxes of 100, 224 and 400% (base year = 19721973), yielding energy savings of about 8, 16 and 20%, respectively.

Robert A. Herendeen; Farzaneh Fazel

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Do Households Smooth Small Consumption Shocks? Evidence from Anticipated and Unanticipated Variation in Home Energy Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Effects of Electricity Price Changes on Californiafacing typical electricity prices in Massachusetts or aand maximum electricity price), these high expenditure

Cullen, Julie Berry; Friedberg, Leora; Wolfram, Catherine

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) Dataset Summary Description The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The 2005 survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the U.S. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the Consumption & Expenditures data. The Consumption & Expenditures and Intensities data is divided into two parts: Part 1 provides energy consumption and expenditures by census region, population density, climate zone, type of housing unit, year of construction and ownership status; Part 2 provides the same data according to household size, income category, race and age. The next update to the RECS survey (2009 data) will be available in 2011.

195

Changing Trends: A Brief History of the US Household Consumption of Energy, Water, Food, Beverages and Tobacco  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at 215 million Btu. The rate of consumption generally increased until the oil price shocks of the midChanging Trends: A Brief History of the US Household Consumption of Energy, Water, Food, Beverages understand energy conservation policies, we take a brief look at the history in the US of consumption

196

Simulation of household in-home and transportation energy use : an integrated behavioral model for estimating energy consumption at the neighborhood scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Household in-home activities and out-of-home transportation are two major sources of urban energy consumption. In light of China's rapid urbanization and income growth, changing lifestyles and consumer patterns - evident ...

Yu, Feifei, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

A Comparison of Household Budget Allocation Patterns Between Hispanic Americans and Non-Hispanic White Americans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The budget allocation patterns of Hispanic versus non-Hispanic White households are examined. Annual household expenditure data from 1980 to 1992 are ... Index (1990). The sample includes 588 Hispanic and 8,444 n...

Jessie X. Fan; Virginia Solis Zuiker

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Financial Statistics: Expenditure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While public attention is usually focussed on one category of expenditure viz Rate Fund expenditure-both revenue and capital (see section 3.3)-it is ... financial statistics to realise that the term expenditure...

J. M. Gillespie

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Can ambient persuasive technology persuade unconsciously?: using subliminal feedback to influence energy consumption ratings of household appliances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we explore a fundamental characteristic of Ambient Persuasive Technology: Can it persuade the user without receiving the user's conscious attention? In a task consisting of 90 trials, participants had to indicate which of three household ... Keywords: ambient persuasive technology, energy conservation behavior, human-technology interaction, persuasion, social feedback, subliminal feedback

Jaap Ham; Cees Midden; Femke Beute

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

A comparative evaluation of household preferences for solar photovoltaic standalone and mini-grid system: An empirical study in a costal village of Indian Sundarban  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar PhotoVoltaic (SPV) based systems have been widely accepted technology for rural electrification in developing countries. The standalone SPV home lighting system has increasingly been popular among rural households, while SPV mini-grid supply system is being promoted for rural electrification schemes. This study uses data from household survey to explore the impact of household characteristics on the preference for electrical energy from SPV systems. Econometric evidence shows heterogeneity in behavioural pattern for these two SPV systems. The flexibility in use and cost of systems might explain this difference. Household characteristics such as monthly household income, household size, occupational status of household head, number of room and type of house significantly influence households decision for SPV standalone home lighting systems. For SPV mini-grid supply households income and monthly expenditure on kerosene are significant predictors. The result reported in this paper might be a valuable input for policy makers to frame right policy mix with regard to provide subsidy on rural electrification programmes.

Amit K. Bhandari; Chinmoy Jana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

SEDS CSV File Documentation: Price and Expenditure  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices and Expenditures Prices and Expenditures The State Energy Data System (SEDS) comma-separated value (CSV) files contain the price and expenditure estimates shown in the tables located on the SEDS website. There are three files that contain estimates for all states and years. Prices contains the price estimates for all states and Expenditures contains the expenditure estimates for all states. The third file, Adjusted Consumption for Expenditure Calculations contains adjusted consumption estimates used in calculating expenditures (see Appendix E below). Zip files are also available for the large data files. In addition, there is a CSV file for each state, named with the two-letter U.S. Postal Code listed in Appendix A, as well as a file for the United States.

202

Estimating exergy prices for energy carriers in heating systems: Country analyses of exergy substitution with capital expenditures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exergy represents the ability of an energy carrier to perform work and can be seen as a core indicator for measuring its quality. In this article we postulate that energy prices reflect the exergy content of the underlying energy carrier and that capital expenditures can substitute for exergy to some degree. We draw our line of argumentation from cost and technology data for heating systems of four European countries: Austria, Finland, The Netherlands, and Sweden. Firstly, this paper shows that the overall consumer costs for different heating options, widely installed in those countries, are in the same range. In this analysis we derived an overall standard deviation of about 8%. Secondly, additional analysis demonstrates that the share of capital costs on total heating cost increases with lower exergy input. Based on the data used in this analysis, we conclude that for the case of modern cost effective heating systems the substitution rate between exergy and capital is in the vicinity of 2/3. This means that by reducing the average specific exergy input of the applied energy carriers by one unit, the share of capital costs on the total costs increases by 2/3 of a unit.

A. Mller; L. Kranzl; P. Tuominen; E. Boelman; M. Molinari; A.G. Entrop

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Capital and revenue expenditures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T and Charaoteristios of Various Expenditures ~ ~ 7 III. Bases for Expenditure Classifioationi ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ r ~ ' ~ IV ~ Methods of kooountiag for Capital and Revenue Expenditure( ~ ~ I CkPITLL ERE RKVRRUm bXPLM)ITURkiS ISTRORUGTIOR kn ?ttonpt will be made... whish represent part of the nooessary cost of usine the asset during the current period, shouLd be oharged abainst the revenue of the period? heveaue expenditures are expensosg capital expenditures are noti fhe toras aooounting period' and "fiscal...

Owens, Jack Bailey

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

204

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form D (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

205

U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration (EIA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 - Households by Cost","Table A17. U.S. Number of Households by Vehicle Fuel Expenditures, 2001 7 - Households by Cost","Table A17. U.S. Number of Households by Vehicle Fuel Expenditures, 2001 (Million Households) " "Std Errors for A17","Relative Standard Errors for Table A17. U.S. Number of Households by Vehicle Fuel Expenditures, 2001 (Percent) " "N Cells for A17","Number of Sample Cases Contributing to Estimates in Table A17. U.S. Number of Households by Vehicle Fuel Expenditures, 2001"

206

Compilation of Expenditures for the Hawai`i Gateway Energy Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discussed in earlier reporting to the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) chose to simply develop fuel cell and storage activities, reported in a previous document to NETL, were conducted at Kahua for space that have been charged to the project, since we developed the contract with NETL. The space

207

Interaction between building design, management, household and individual factors in relation to energy use for space heating in apartment buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In Stockholm, 472 multi-family buildings with 7554 dwellings has been selected by stratified random sampling. Information about building characteristics and property management was gathered from each property owners. Energy use for space heating was collected from the utility company. Perceived thermal comfort, household and personal factors were assessed by a standardized self-administered questionnaire, answered by one adult person in each dwelling, and a proportion of each factor was calculated for each building. Statistical analysis was performed by multiple linear regression models with control for relevant factors all at the same time in the model. Energy use for heating was significantly related to the building age, type of building and ventilation, length of time since the last heating adjustment, ownership form, proportion of females, and proportion of occupants expressing thermal discomfort. How beneficial energy efficiency measures will be may depend on the relationship between energy use and factors related to the building and the property maintenance together with household and personal factors, as all these factors interact with each other. The results show that greater focus should be on real estate management and maintenance and also a need for research with a gender perspective on energy use for space heating.

Karin Engvall; Erik Lampa; Per Levin; Per Wickman; Egil fverholm

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.3 Federal Buildings and Facilities Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Direct Appropriations on Federal Buildings Energy Conservation Retrofits and Capital Equipment ($2010 Million) FY 1985 FY 1986 FY 1987 FY 1988 FY 1989 FY 1990 Source(s): DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP FY 2007, Jan. 2010, Table 11-B, p. 31; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Nov. 2007, Table 9-B, p. 26 for 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000-2006; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Sep. 2004, Table 4-B, p. 38 for 1986-1989, 1991-1994, 1996-1999; EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators. 349,350 102,135 FY 1996 238,232 FY 2002 147,895 83,340 FY 1995 438,943 FY 2001 162,488 FY 2007 321,686 108,705 FY 1994 318,739 FY 2000 150,900 FY 2006 301,222 98,708 FY 1993 170,826 FY 1999 261,784 FY 2005 201,156 342,653 FY 1992 209,973

209

Expenditures on Children by Families | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Expenditures on Children by Families Expenditures on Children by Families Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Expenditures on Children by Families Dataset Summary Description This dataset provides expenditures on Children by Families provides estimates of the cost of raising children from birth through age 17 for major budgetary components. Tags {children,families,expenditures,cost,budget,household,income,single-parent,husband-wife} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 2012 Publisher Food and Nutrition Service, Department of Agriculture Contact Name Contact Email Mark.Lino@cnpp.usda.gov

210

UNCOVERING BASIC WANTS USING THE ROTTERDAM AND AIDS MODELS: THE US HOUSEHOLD ENERGY CONSUMPTION CASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

refers to these latent goods as transformed goods or T-goods. Leading researchers have explored this technique of incorporating characteristics. In this study, we revisit this technique by trying to uncover the basic wants behind the demand for gas..., distillate fuel oil, and the liquefied petroleum gases (LPG) by US households. To give some examples, electricity may be used for many basic wants such as lighting, cooking, and cooling. Similarly, without being exhaustive, gas may be used for heating...

Diallo, Ibrahima

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration (EIA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A2 - Average per Households","Table A2. U.S. Per Household Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001" A2 - Average per Households","Table A2. U.S. Per Household Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001" "Std Errors for A2","Relative Standard Errors for Table A2. U.S. Per Household Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001 (Percent)" "N Cells for A2","Number of Sample Cases Contributing to Estimates in Table A2. U.S. Per Household Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001" " Page A-1 of A-N" "Table A2. U.S. Per Household Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001" "2001 Household Characteristics","Number of Households with Vehicles (million)","Average per Household with Vehicles"

212

Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013 1 and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas and propane will increase by 13% and 9%, respectively, this winter heating season (October 1 through March 31) compared with last winter. Projected U.S. household expenditures are 2% higher for electricity and 2% lower for heating oil this winter. Although EIA expects average expenditures for households that heat with natural gas will be significantly higher than last winter, spending for gas heat will still be lower than the previous 5-year average (see EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook slideshow).  Brent crude oil spot prices fell from a recent peak of $117 per barrel in early September to

213

Monthly energy review, August 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two brief articles are presented: measuring dependence on imported oil; and preliminary estimates of household energy consumption and expenditures in 1993. Then statistical tables are presented: energy overview, energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy. Appendices present thermal conversion factors, metric and other physical conversion factors, CO{sub 2} emission factors for coal, and listing of previous articles. A glossary is also included.

NONE

1995-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

214

Military Expenditure, Threats, and Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a country's external military threat; lgdp is the log ofMilitary Expenditure, Threats, and Growth * September 2003expenditure, external threats, corruption, and other

Aizenman, Joshua; Glick, Reuven

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Petroleum Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Coal Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Renewable Fuels Module . . . . . . . . . . .

216

NYSERDA's Green Jobs-Green New York Program: Extending Energy Efficiency Financing To Underserved Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Financing Home Energy Upgrades in New York Since 2001, New2009. Administered by the New York State Energy Research andA Diverse Energy Upgrade Platform in New York The new GJGNY

Zimring, Mark

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Energy use of US residential refrigerators and freezers: function derivation based on household and climate characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), U.S. Energyod for estimating field energy consumption of US residentialconsumption surveydetailed tables. Residential Energy Con- sumption Survey (RECS), U.S.

Greenblatt, Jeffery

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Do Households Smooth Small Consumption Shocks? Evidence from Anticipated and Unanticipated Variation in Home Energy Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Cold Weather and High Energy Costs on the Health of Low-and NBER April 2005 Home energy costs comprise a significant1. Introduction Home energy costs comprise a significant

Cullen, Julie Berry; Friedberg, Leora; Wolfram, Catherine

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption and Expenditures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures This chapter analyzes trends in fuel economy, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures, using data unique to the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, as well as selected data from other sources. Analysis topics include the following: Following the oil supply and price disruptions caused by the Arab oil embargo of 1973-1974, motor gasoline price increases, the introduction of corporate average fuel economy standards, and environmental quality initiatives helped to spur major changes in vehicle technology. But have the many advances in vehicle technology resulted in measurable gains in the fuel economy of the residential vehicle fleet?

220

Public Expenditure on Education  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of Commons on December 17, Mr. Geoffrey Lloyd, Minister of Education, said that expenditure by the Ministry and local education authorities, excluding ... by the Ministry and local education authorities, excluding capital ...

1959-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Drivers of U.S. Household Energy Consumption, 1980-2009  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In 2012, the residential sector accounted for 21% of total primary energy consumption and about 20% of carbon dioxide emissions in the United States (computed from EIA 2013). Because of the impacts of residential sector energy use on the environment and the economy, this study was undertaken to help provide a better understanding of the factors affecting energy consumption in this sector. The analysis is based on the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) residential energy consumption surveys (RECS) 1980-2009.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Study of energy tax and rebate schemes: energy conservation and the question of equity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Taxing all kinds of primary energy at the wellhead on a $/Btu basis is suggested. This aims at inducing energy conservation throughout the economic system. To reduce the financial pressure of the tax on consumers, especially the poor, tax revenues could be rebated to households. It has been attempted to design an equitable rebate scheme. A mathematical model was developed that approximates the reduction in a household's total energy consumption in response to higher energy prices and different rebate schemes. This model is based on the assumption that energy consumption is a function of a household's real income, prices of different commodities, and energy intensities. The amount of energy saved and the change in real expenditure of a household was calculated for four tax rates; 50%, 100%, 224% and 400%, and five rebate schemes; one regressive, two progressive, one income distribution preserving and the flat per-capita rebate. The results indicate that, for a given tax rate, the choice of rebate scheme does not significantly affect the amount of energy conserved by the households. However, the effectof different rebate schemes on a household's real expenditure could be dramatically different.

Fazel Sarjui, F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Hybrid application of biogas and solar resources to fulfill household energy needs: A potentially viable option in rural areas of developing countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The absence of clean cooking facilities and electricity means billions of rural people are deprived of much needed socioeconomic development. Livestock residues (dung) and solar radiation are two renewable energy resources that are abundantly available in rural areas of developing countries. Although it is not feasible for these two resources separately to meet both thermal (cooking) and electricity demands, hybrid applications have not been given due attention. To facilitate integrating these two resources in rural energy planning, and to promote their dissemination through hybrid applications, it is necessary to evaluate their economic merits, and assess their ability to deal with the demands. In this paper, we examine the techno-economic performance of hybrid applications of these two resources by applying a simulation technique using the HOMER tool, and by giving derived cost-saving equations. We also quantify the monetary savings from replacing traditional fuels, and perform a sensitivity analysis on a number of variables (e.g. dung cost, fuelwood cost) to see how they affect the performance of different energy supply alternatives. Furthermore, we examine the practical applicability of the biogas system in the households through a structured survey of 72 ongoing household biogas plants. This study finds that households that have between three and six cattle can potentially meet their cooking and electricity loads through a hybrid implementation of biogas and solar PV (Photovoltaic) system. By replacing conventional fuels households can achieve savings that are more than the total annualized costs incurred for installing new services.

Md. Mizanur Rahman; Mohammad Mahmodul Hasan; Jukka V. Paatero; Risto Lahdelma

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Household operational energy consumption in urban China : a multilevel analysis on Jinan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With decades of economic growth and socio-economic transformation, China's residential sector has seen rapid expansion in energy consumption, and is now the second largest energy consuming sector in the country. Faced with ...

Wang, Dong, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Retrofitting the domestic built environment: investigating household perspectives towards energy efficiency technologies and behaviour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Company Obligation EEPfH Energy Efficiency Partnership for Homes EPC Energy Performance Certificate EPSRC Engineering & Physical Science Research Council ERDF European Regional Development Fund FDR False discovery rate FIT Feed-in Tariff GHG Greenhouse has...

Pelenur, Marcos

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

226

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute household accidental Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluating the health benefits of transitions in household energy Summary: ; Household energy; Indoor air pollution; Intervention assessment; Kenya 1. Introduction Acute...

227

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EnergyEfficiencyPotentialStudy. TechnicalReportEnergyEfficiency PotentialStudy. TechnicalReportEnergyEfficiency RenewableEnergyTechnologies Transportation AssessmentofHouseholdCarbonFootprintReductionPotentialsisthefinalreport

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Retrofitting the domestic built environment: investigating household perspectives towards energy efficiency technologies and behaviour.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Retrofitting the UK domestic built environment presents an excellent opportunity to improve its energy performance. However, retrofitting homes is a complex challenge conflated by multiple (more)

Pelenur, Marcos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Automated Demand Response Approaches to Household Energy Management in a Smart Grid Environment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The advancement of renewable energy technologies and the deregulation of theelectricity market have seen the emergence of Demand response (DR) programs. Demand response is a (more)

Adika, Christopher Otieno

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Household actions can provide a behavioral wedge to rapidly reduce US carbon emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ineffective in reducing household energy consumption. Mass media...10 years. The changes in household behavior outlined above result...European Union countries and Japan, where the household sector is less energy intensive. Analyses similar...

Thomas Dietz; Gerald T. Gardner; Jonathan Gilligan; Paul C. Stern; Michael P. Vandenbergh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Understanding and Improving Household Energy Consumption and Carbon Emissions Policies - A System Dynamics Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? scale?. This covers any energy generation that is decentralized. Micro-generation technologies may take the form of solar photovoltaic (PV), micro-wind turbines, micro-hydro or even micro-combined heat and power (CHP). Micro-generation provides energy...

Oladokun, M.; Motawa, I.; Banfill, P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Material and Energy Dependence of Services and Its Implications for Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By decomposing the CO2 emissions embodied in material goods and services, this study quantitatively analyzes the implications of energy and materials consumption in services for the change in indirect CO2 emissions by household consumers in Japan. ... In contrast to p?kl, this indicator is independent of the total expenditure of households and thus allows the structure of supply chain CO2 emission by each segment to be compared from year to year. ...

Keisuke Nansai; Shigemi Kagawa; Sangwon Suh; Minoru Fujii; Rokuta Inaba; Seiji Hashimoto

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Retailers : a possible stepping stone for promoting energy efficiency in household appliances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The public support of energy efficiency generally targets manufacturers (support to R&D policies) and consumers (information campaign). This practice leaves out the retailers, who often have an essential role ...

Michel Colombier; Sophie Attali

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A cross-cultural analysis of household energy use behaviour in Japan and Norway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we compare and contrast the results of ethnographic investigations of energy use behaviour in Fukuoka, Japan and Oslo, Norway. These studies show significant differences in end use patterns for space heating, lighting and hot water use. We discuss how these patterns are related to cultural and economic factors. Our findings show that while energy intensive space heating and lighting habits have become an integral part of the presentation of the Norwegian home, Japanese space heat and light habits are more disciplined and less culturally significant. In Japan, the bathing routine is extremely important to the Japanese lifestyle and at the same time very energy intensive. Other energy intensive patterns are identified which do not have the same cultural significance, such as lax temperature setback in Norway and dish washing practices in Japan. The policy implications of these findings are discussed.

Harold Wilhite; Hidetoshi Nakagami; Takashi Masuda; Yukiko Yamaga; Hiroshi Haneda

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Control of household refrigerators. Part 2: Alternate control approaches for improving temperature performance and reducing energy use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Part 1 it was shown that conventional control of household refrigerators is achieved by regulating the distribution of air in the freezer compartment to all other parts of the plant. In Part 2 three alternative approaches to the conventional control of a top-mount refrigerator are presented: variable temperature bandwidths, uncoupled compressor and evaporator fan, and the combination of these two. These allowed the plant to achieve near-ideal control with respect to improved temperature performance in each compartment. Automatic airflow dampers were used with the dual controllers to independently regulate refrigerator compartment temperature. Plant performance was simulated using a model that computes the refrigerant and airflow systems behavior. Together, these alternate configurations and approaches define new control algorithms that reveal the plant's optimal control model for improving performance and energy usage relative to conventional controllers. Results based on model simulations are dependent upon the model's accuracy and validity. However, the model validation studies cited here, though limited in scope, do show agreement between simulation and experimental data for the ambient temperatures and thermal load conditions considered. This suggests that these model results are reasonable, and representative of actual plant behavior under these conditions and configurations for a top-mount style refrigerator plant.

Graviss, K.J.; Collins, R.L.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration (EIA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A2 - Average per Households","Table A2. U.S. Per Household Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001" A2 - Average per Households","Table A2. U.S. Per Household Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001" "Std Errors for A2","Relative Standard Errors for Table A2. U.S. Per Household Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001 (Percent)" "N Cells for A2","Number of Sample Cases Contributing to Estimates in Table A2. U.S. Per Household Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001" "A3 - Average per Vehicles","Table A3. U.S. Per Vehicle Average Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001" "Std Errors for A3","Relative Standard Errors for Table A3. U.S. Per Vehicle Average Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001

237

Operating and Capital Expenditures Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, you will learn how to plan, create, and use the Operating Expenditure (OPEX) model and the Capital Expenditure (CAPEX) model. These models are used ... to forecast, respectively, general operatin...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Economy slows Arco's capital expenditures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economy slows Arco's capital expenditures ... Arco Chemical's new president and chief executive officer, Alan R. Hirsig, told shareholders the company plans to stretch out its capital expenditure program and as a result, expects sharply lower capital spending in 1992. ...

MARC REISCH

1991-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

239

Corporate Expenditure on Environmental Protection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine the determinants of firms current environmental expenditure and firms capital investment in equipment for pollution control in ... The main determinants for the two types of expenditure are similar: ...

Stefanie A. Haller; Liam Murphy

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Household Tables Household Tables (Million U.S. Households; 24 pages, 122 kb) Contents Pages HC2-1a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-4a. Household Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-7a. Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Proceedings of the 1991 Socioeconomic Energy Research and Analysis Conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings analyze US energy policy as it pertains to minority groups. Example topics include: Economic impacts of the National Energy Strategy on minority and majority households, Utility measures to assist payment-troubled customers, Equity impacts of controlling energy usage through market-based versus regulatory approaches, Technical and planning support for the DOE-HUD initiative for energy efficiency in housing, an analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage, and methodical issues in evaluating integrated least cost planning programs.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Energy Burden Definitions Energy burden is an important statistic for policy makers who are considering the need for energy assistance. Energy burden can be defined broadly as the burden placed on household incomes by the cost of energy, or more simply, the ratio of energy expenditures to household income. However, there are different ways to compute energy burden, and different interpretations and uses of the energy burden statistics. DOE Weatherization primarily uses mean individual burden and mean group burden since these statistics provide data on how an "average" individual household fares against an "average" group of households (that is, how burdens are distributed for the population). DOE Weatherization (and HHS) also uses the median individual burden which shows

243

Measured energy savings and demand reduction from a reflective roof membrane on a large retail store in Austin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the abated annual energy and demand expenditures, simplea/c annual abated energy and demand expenditures and presentof future abated energy and demand expenditures is estimated

Konopacki, Steven J.; Akbari, Hashem

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Validity of predictive equations for resting energy expenditure according to the body mass index in a population of 1726 patients followed in a Nutrition Unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SummaryBackground & aims The resting energy expenditure (REE) predictive formulas are often used in clinical practice to adapt the nutritional intake of patients or to compare to REE measured by indirect calorimetry. We aimed to evaluate which predictive equations was the best alternative to REE measurements according to the BMI. Methods 28 REE prediction equations were studied in a population of 1726 patients without acute or chronic high-grade inflammatory diseases followed in a Nutrition Unit for malnutrition, eating disorders or obesity. REE was measured by indirect calorimetry for 30min after a fasting period of 12h. Some formulas requiring fat mass and free-fat mass, body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis. The percentage of accurate prediction (10%/REE measured) and Pearson r correlations were calculated. Results Original Harris & Benedict equation provided 73.0% of accurate predictions in normal BMI group but only 39.3% and 62.4% in patients with BMI40kgm?2, respectively. Conclusion Usual predictive equations of REE are not suitable for predicting REE in patients with extreme BMI, in particularly in patients with BMI <16kgm?2. Indirect Calorimetry may still be recommended for an accurate assessment of REE in this population until the development of an adapted predictive equation.

Pierre Jsus; Najate Achamrah; Sbastien Grigioni; Jocelyne Charles; Agns Rimbert; Vanessa Folope; Andr Petit; Pierre Dchelotte; Mose Coffier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Incubation temperature affects hatching success, embryonic expenditure of energy and hatchling phenotypes of a prolonged egg-retaining snake, Deinagkistrodon acutus (Viperidae)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We used eggs of Deinagkistrodon acutus to study the effects of incubation temperature on hatching success, embryonic expenditure of energy and hatchling phenotypes. One egg from each of the 15 fertile clutches was dissected for determination of egg composition, and a total of 164 eggs were incubated at five constant temperatures. Embryonic mortality increased dramatically at 30C, and none of eggs incubated at 32C hatched. Within the range from 24 to 30C, temperature affected incubation length and most hatchling traits examined. The mean incubation length at 24, 26, 28 and 30C was 36.4, 28.7, 21.8 and 15.7 days, respectively. Embryos developing at higher temperatures (28 and 30C) consumed more energy but produced less developed (and hence smaller) hatchlings, which characteristically had larger residual yolks but smaller carcasses. A principal component analysis resolved two components (with eigenvalues ?1) from ten size (initial egg mass)-free hatchling variables, accounting for 79.3% of variation in the original data. The first component (43.8% variance explained) had high positive loading for size-free values of dry mass, lipid mass, energy contents and ash mass of hatchlings, and the second component (35.5% variance explained) had high positive loading for size-free values of SVL, carcass dry mass and fatbody dry mass. Hatchlings from different incubation temperatures did not differ in scores on the first axis of the principal component analysis, whereas hatchlings from higher incubation temperatures (28 and 30C) had significantly lower scores on the second axis than did those from lower incubation temperatures (24 and 26C). As the second axis mainly represents traits relating to the developmental condition at hatching, the analysis therefore provided further evidence that eggs incubated at higher temperatures produced less developed hatchlings. Taken together, our data show that the optimal temperatures for embryonic development are relatively low in D. acutus largely due to its use of relatively cool habitats.

Zhi-Hua Lin; Xiang Ji; Lai-Gao Luo; Xiao-Mei Ma

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

all comparisons reported in the text are statistically significant, based on a standard test made at the 0.05 significance level. These tests were made using the actual RSE's...

247

Abstract One way for animals to decrease energy ex-penditures is to minimize the cost of movement. For ani-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract One way for animals to decrease energy ex- penditures is to minimize the cost of movement. For ani- mals dwelling on slopes, gravity can impart a large ener- getic cost to movement. For this reason (specifically hillslope angle) so as to minimize their energetic costs. Subterra- nean animals should also

Chadwick, Oliver A.

248

The impact of retirement on household consumption in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using monthly data from the Japanese Family Income and Expenditure Survey, we examine the impact of retirement on household consumption. We find little evidence of an immediate change in consumption at retirement, on average, in Japan. However, we find a decrease in consumption at retirement for low income households that is concentrated in food and work-related consumption. The availability of substantial retirement bonuses to a large share of Japanese retirees may help smooth consumption at retirement. We find that those households that are more likely to receive such bonuses experience a short-run consumption increase at retirement. However, among households that are less likely to receive a retirement bonus, we find that consumption decreases at retirement.

Melvin Stephens Jr.; Takashi Unayama

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Households and Pension  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter deals with two economic issues. First, we examine Japans household structure. In the previous chapter ( Chapter 10 ...), we recognized the importance of the ...

Mitsuhiko Iyoda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

9 - Chinese healthcare system reforms and household saving patterns: some stylised facts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter aims to evaluate the relationship between one of the recent healthcare reforms in the Peoples Republic of China and household decisions both in terms of out-of-pocket expenditure and saving. Evidence on the results achieved by reforms of the health insurance sector in terms of reducing out-of-pocket medical expenditure is still uncertain and contradictory, and very little is known about the effect of these measures on the consumption and saving behaviour of the Chinese population. To shed light on this issue we use data collected by Chinese Household Income Project surveys (CHIPs), through a series of questionnaire-based interviews conducted in urban areas in 1995 and 2002. Our descriptive analysis suggests that there is a positive relationship between public health insurance coverage and household saving. This empirical evidence suggests that public insurance coverage is ineffective as a source of protection against income losses and might induce households to save more.

Vincenzo Atella; Agar Brugiavini; Hao Chen; Noemi Pace

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

More on Capital Expenditure Anticipations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We turn now to analysis of investment realizations functions, beginning with the one-year ahead, or short run capital expenditure anticipations,based upon McGraw-Hill data over...a fortiori..., for all firms of a...

R. Eisner

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Towards sustainable consumption: do green households have smaller ecological footprints?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The need for households in rich countries to develop more sustainable consumption patterns is high on the political agenda. An increased awareness of environmental issues among the general public is often presented as an important prerequisite for this change. This article describes how the study team compared the ecological footprints of ''green'' and ''ordinary'' households. These footprint calculations are based on a number of consumption categories that have severe environmental consequences, such as energy and material use in the home, and transport. The comparison is based on a survey of 404 households in the city of Stavanger, where 66 respondents were members of the Environmental Home Guard in Norway. The analysis suggests that, even if the green households have a smaller ecological footprint per household member, this is not caused by their participation in the Home Guard. It merely reflects the fact that green households are larger than ordinary households.

Erling Holden

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The Household Pie  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The discussion of theoretical, conceptual, and methodological concerns in the last three chapters has set the stage for an examination of the total effort that households devote to domestic and market activiti...

Sarah Fenstermaker Berk

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The Role of Capital Expenditures in Signalling Firm Value  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Corporate Capital Expenditure Announcements," PurdueTHE ROLE OF CAPITAL EXPENDITURES IN SIGNALLING FIRM VALUEAngeles THE ROLE OF CAPITAL EXPENDITURES IN SIGNALLING FIRM

Titman, Brett

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

usage_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Usage Indicators Tables Usage Indicators Tables (Million U.S. Households; 60 pages, 247 kb) Contents Pages HC6-1a. Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-2a. Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-4a. Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-5a. Usage Indicators by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-6a. Usage Indicators by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-7a. Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5

256

housingunit_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Tables Housing Unit Tables (Million U.S. Households; 49 pages, 210 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-4a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-6a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-7a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4

257

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home Office Equipment Tables Home Office Equipment Tables (Million U.S. Households; 12 pages, 123 kb) Contents Pages HC7-1a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-4a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-7a. Home Office Equipment by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1

258

Energy Information Administration - Transportation Energy Consumption by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys energy used by vehicles EIA conducts numerous energy-related surveys and other information programs. In general, the surveys can be divided into two broad groups: supply surveys, directed to the suppliers and marketers of specific energy sources, that measure the quantities of specific fuels produced for and/or supplied to the market; and consumption surveys, which gather information on the types of energy used by consumer groups along with the consumer characteristics that are associated with energy use. In the transportation sector, EIA's core consumption survey was the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. RTECS belongs to the consumption group because it collects information directly from the consumer, the household. For roughly a decade, EIA fielded the RTECS--data were first collected in 1983. This survey, fielded for the last time in 1994, was a triennial survey of energy use and expenditures, vehicle miles-traveled (VMT), and vehicle characteristics for household vehicles. For the 1994 survey, a national sample of more than 3,000 households that own or use some 5,500 vehicles provided data.

259

Household portfolios in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I provide a detailed description and in-depth analysis of household portfolios in Japan. (1) It is shown that the share of equities in financial wealth and the stock market participation of Japanese households decreased throughout the 1990s. (2) Using survey data, age-related variations in the share of stocks in financial wealth are analyzed. The equity share and stock market participation increase with age among young households, peaking when people reach their 50s, and then stabilizing. However, the share of equities conditional on ownership exhibits no significant age-related pattern, implying that age-related patterns are primarily explained by the decision to hold stocks. A similar mechanism operates to that found in previous studies of Western countries. (3) Owner-occupied housing has a significantly positive effect on stock market participation and on the share of stocks in financial wealth.

Tokuo Iwaisako

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Purchasing a New Energy-Efficient Central Heating System | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Purchasing a New Energy-Efficient Central Heating System Purchasing a New Energy-Efficient Central Heating System Purchasing a New Energy-Efficient Central Heating System October 21, 2008 - 4:00am Addthis John Lippert Energy prices are skyrocketing. According to the Energy Information Administration's October 7, 2008 forecast, heating fuel expenditures for the average household using oil as its primary heating fuel are expected to increase by $449 over last winter. Households using natural gas to heat their homes can expect to pay $155 more this winter, on average, than last year, and those using propane can expect to pay $188 more. Households heating primarily with electricity can expect to pay an average of $89 more. That's a lot of money resulting solely from rising heating expenses. You may long for the "good old days," but when it comes to heating systems,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Purchasing a New Energy-Efficient Central Heating System | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Purchasing a New Energy-Efficient Central Heating System Purchasing a New Energy-Efficient Central Heating System Purchasing a New Energy-Efficient Central Heating System October 21, 2008 - 4:00am Addthis John Lippert Energy prices are skyrocketing. According to the Energy Information Administration's October 7, 2008 forecast, heating fuel expenditures for the average household using oil as its primary heating fuel are expected to increase by $449 over last winter. Households using natural gas to heat their homes can expect to pay $155 more this winter, on average, than last year, and those using propane can expect to pay $188 more. Households heating primarily with electricity can expect to pay an average of $89 more. That's a lot of money resulting solely from rising heating expenses. You may long for the "good old days," but when it comes to heating systems,

262

Forecasting Capital Expenditure with Plan Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The short-term forecasting of capital expenditure presents one of the most difficult problems ... reason is that year-to-year fluctuations in capital expenditure are extremely wide. Some simple methods which...

W. Gerstenberger

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Essays on pharmaceuticals and health care expenditures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

health care expenditures. This dissertation also explores the relations between FDA Therapeutic Drug Classification and total health care expenditures. It offers a better methodology by incorporating both the quality and the age of the drugs to capture...

Karaca, Zeynal

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

264

Capital Expenditure Policy Final V1.0 Approved 110613 -1 -Capital Expenditure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capital Expenditure Policy Final V1.0 Approved 110613 - 1 - Capital Expenditure Policy Version and Risk Committee Audit and Risk Committee: 11 June 2013 (Draft v.11) #12;Capital Expenditure Policy Final on intranet To be referenced during Capital Expenditure training As approved by Audit & Risk Committee 11

Chittka, Lars

265

"Keeping Up" or "Keeping Afloat"? : how American households accumulate wealth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

having a Black or Hispanic household head, and experiencingBlack households, Hispanic households, poor households, etc.that Black- and Hispanic- headed households appear to be at

Lundy, Jeffrey Dalton

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be damaged when corrosive chemicals are put down the drain. Burning hazardous wastes simply distributes themHousehold Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products containing toxic chemicals. These wastes CANNOT be disposed of in regular garbage. Any

de Lijser, Peter

267

Compilation and Application of Japanese Inventories for Energy Consumption and Air Pollutant Emissions Using Input?Output Tables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan ... Next, for each of the 400 sectors (the 399 sectors of the consolidated Input?Output Table plus the consumption expenditure of households sector, which is one of the final demand sectors), various statistics and source materials were used to estimate gross consumptions, expressed as a physical amount for each sector, of 6 coal-based fuels, 12 petroleum-based fuels, 3 natural gas-based fuels, and 5 other fuels. ... LPG. LPG for automobile and household use is more expensive than that used by industry, because of its higher tax rate and less efficient mode of supply. ...

Keisuke Nansai; Yuichi Moriguchi; Susumu Tohno

2003-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

268

Audit of controls over Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory subcontractor expenditures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In January 1989 the Department of Energy contracted with Universities Research Association, Inc. to design, construct, manage, operate, and maintain the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory. Through Fiscal Year 1992, costs for subcontractor goods and services accounted for about 75 percent of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory expenditures. The Office of Inspector General evaluated the adequacy of controls in place to ensure that subcontractor costs were reasonable, as required by the contract. The following conclusions were drawn from the audit. The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory did not consistently exercise prudent business judgment in making subcontractor expenditures. As a result, $60 million in expenditures already made and $128 million planned with commercial subcontractors were, in the authors opinion, unnecessary, excessive, or represented uncontrolled growth. The audit also found inadequate justifications, accountability, and cost controls over $143 million in expenditures made and $47 million planned with other Department of Energy laboratories. Improvements were needed in subcontract administration and internal controls, including appropriate audit coverage of the subcontracts. In addition, Department of Energy guidance concerning procurement actions between the laboratories needed to be established.

Not Available

1993-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

269

Non-CFC vacuum alternatives for the energy-efficient insulation of household refrigerators: Design and use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy efficiency, environmental issues, and market incentives all encourage government and industry to continue work on thin-profile vacuum insulations for domestic refrigerators and freezers (R/Fs). Vacuum insulations promise significant improvement in thermal savings over current insulations; the technical objective of one design is an R-value of better than 10 (hr-ft{sup 2}-F/Btu) in 0.1 in. thickness. If performance is improved by a factor of 10 over that of CFC-blown insulating foams, the new insulations (made without CFCs or other potentially troublesome fill gases) will change the design and improve the efficiency of refrigerators. Such changes will meet the conservation, regulatory, and market drivers now strong in developed countries and likely to increase in developing countries. Prototypes of various designs have been tested in the laboratory and in factories, and results to date confirm the good thermal performance of these thin-profile alternatives. The next step is to resolve issues of reliability and cost effectiveness. 34 refs., 4 figs.

Potter, T.F.; Benson, D.K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Green Pricing Program Marketing Expenditures: Finding the Right Balance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

449 449 September 2009 Green Pricing Program Marketing Expenditures: Finding the Right Balance Barry Friedman and Mackay Miller National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-46449 September 2009 Green Pricing Program Marketing Expenditures: Finding the Right Balance Barry Friedman and Mackay Miller Prepared under Task No. SAO9.3003 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

271

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Air Conditioning Tables Air Conditioning Tables (Million U.S. Households; 24 pages, 138 kb) Contents Pages HC4-1a. Air Conditioning by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-7a. Air Conditioning by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2

272

EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES Foundation FOUNDATION EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES are used primarily by Accounting Services for Foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES ­ Foundation 2-J page 1 FOUNDATION EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES are used primarily by Accounting Services for Foundation transactions. 3080 Foundation Service Fee: Allocation of administrative costs to Foundation beneficiary departmental accounts. 3120 LSU Magazine Costs - Foundation

Harms, Kyle E.

273

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

all comparisons reported in the text are statistically significant, based on a standard test made at the 0.05 significance level. No adjustments were made for simultaneous...

274

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Protection Agency (EPA) certification files (CERT files) containing laboratory test results of MPG. When the vehicle characteristic was missing from the questionnaire, but...

275

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Christy Hall 202-586-1068 chall@eia.doe.gov Public Use Data, Computer Nanno Smith 202-586-5841 nsmith@eia.doe.gov Systems Design Detailed Statistical Tables Vicky...

276

CBECS 1992 - Consumption & Expenditures, Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Figure on Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings by Energy Source, 1992 Divider Line The 49 tables present detailed energy consumption and expenditure data for buildings in the commercial sector. This section provides assistance in reading the tables by explaining some of the headings for the data categories. It will also explain the use of row and column factors to compute both the confidence levels of the estimates given in the tables and the statistical significance of differences between the data in two or more categories. The section concludes with a "Quick-Reference Guide" to the statistics in the different tables. Categories of Data in the Tables After Table 3.1, which is a summary table, the tables are grouped into the major fuel tables (Tables 3.2 through 3.13) and the specific fuel tables (Tables 3.14 through 3.29 for electricity, Tables 3.30 through 3.40 for natural gas, Tables 3.41 through 3.45 for fuel oil, and Tables 3.46 through 3.47 for district heat). Table 3.48 presents energy management and DSM data as reported by the building respondent. Table 3.49 presents data on participation in electric utility-sponsored DSM programs as reported by both the building respondent and the electricity supplier.

277

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, 3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 9.7 -- -- -- 6.5 11.3 5.7 2 Persons ...................................... 35.1 4.3 -- -- -- 2.0 7.8 5.8 3 Persons ...................................... 17.0 -- 3.3 -- -- 2.2 5.2 7.3 4 Persons ...................................... 15.6 -- 2.2 -- -- -- 4.3 8.1 5 Persons ...................................... 7.1

278

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Household Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Household Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.7 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 6.7 4.7 2.0 6.2 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 8.0 5.4 2.6 5.0 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 3.8 2.7 1.1 7.9 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 3.5 2.5 1.0 8.1 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 1.7

279

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Household Characteristics by West Census Region, 2a. Household Characteristics by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.8 1.1 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 5.6 1.8 3.8 5.4 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 7.3 1.9 5.5 4.9 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 3.5 0.9 2.6 7.6 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 3.5 1.1 2.4 6.4 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 2.0 0.6 1.4 9.7 6 or More Persons

280

Asset Pricing with Countercyclical Household Consumption Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Asset Pricing with Countercyclical Household Consumption Risk George M. Constantinides that shocks to household consumption growth are negatively skewed, persistent, and countercyclical and play that drives the conditional cross-sectional moments of household consumption growth. The estimated model

Sadeh, Norman M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

More efficient household electricity use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy efficiency of electric appliances has increased markedly in OECD countries, according to data provided by utilities, appliance associations, appliance manufacturers, and independent analyses of each country we reviewed (US, Sweden, Norway, Holland, Japan, Germany, UK). These improvements have, in part, offset increases in electricity demand due to increasing saturation of appliances. However, we see evidence that the efficiency of new devices has hit a temporary plateau: Appliances sold in 1988, while far more efficient than similar ones sold in the early 1970s, may not be significantly more efficient than those sold in 1987. The reason for this plateau, according to manufacturers we interviewed, is that the simple energy-saving features have been incorporated; more sophisticated efficiency improvements are economically justified by five to ten year paybacks, but unattractive to consumers in most countries who appear to demand paybacks of less than three years. Manufacturers see features other than efficiency --- such as number of storage compartments and automatic ice-makers --- as more likely to boost sales, market share, or profits. If this efficiency plateau'' proves lasting, then electricity use for appliance could begin to grow again as larger and more fancy models appear in households. 38 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Schipper, L.; Hawk, D.V.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

The acid precipitation provisions of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments and minorities' energy consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In November 1990 Congress passed a comprehensive set of amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1977 with potentially very high compliance costs. The provisions pertaining to control of acid precipitation have been specified with sufficient detail to examine their cost impacts. These provisions will require investment in emissions control technology, mainly by electric utilities. Production costs will increase due to the required investment, resulting in higher electricity prices. This paper examines the possible magnitude of these effects and whether there might be differential impacts on racial/ethnic minority groups. Differential impacts were considered a possibility because of the differences in the percentage of total income spent on energy by various population subgroups. In 1989, the Majority group (defined as non-Black, non-Hispanic) spent about three percent of household income on energy, while Blacks spent double that, six percent, and Hispanics spent about four percent. (The differences in income underlying these figures are greater, however, than the differences in energy expenditures). To address these issues, we compare projected electricity consumption and expenditures and total energy expenditures for Black, Hispanic, and Majority households. The distribution of benefits from reducing acid precipitation is not addressed since the possible effects on ambient air quality in specific geographical areas that are directly attributable to reducing utilities' sulfur dioxide emissions are highly uncertain.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The acid precipitation provisions of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments and minorities` energy consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In November 1990 Congress passed a comprehensive set of amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1977 with potentially very high compliance costs. The provisions pertaining to control of acid precipitation have been specified with sufficient detail to examine their cost impacts. These provisions will require investment in emissions control technology, mainly by electric utilities. Production costs will increase due to the required investment, resulting in higher electricity prices. This paper examines the possible magnitude of these effects and whether there might be differential impacts on racial/ethnic minority groups. Differential impacts were considered a possibility because of the differences in the percentage of total income spent on energy by various population subgroups. In 1989, the Majority group (defined as non-Black, non-Hispanic) spent about three percent of household income on energy, while Blacks spent double that, six percent, and Hispanics spent about four percent. (The differences in income underlying these figures are greater, however, than the differences in energy expenditures). To address these issues, we compare projected electricity consumption and expenditures and total energy expenditures for Black, Hispanic, and Majority households. The distribution of benefits from reducing acid precipitation is not addressed since the possible effects on ambient air quality in specific geographical areas that are directly attributable to reducing utilities` sulfur dioxide emissions are highly uncertain.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

THE DESIRE TO ACQUIRE: FORECASTING THE EVOLUTION OF HOUSEHOLD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy-using devices in the average U.S. household that used over 4,700 kWh of electricity, natural gas.46]. The cost of these devices was also statistically significant. Keywords: electricity use; energy efficiency the Canadian Industrial Energy End Use Data and Analysis (CIEEDAC) for their financial support made possible

285

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Residential Energy Burdens, by Weatherization Eligibility and Year (1) 1987 Mean Mean Mean Mean Mdn Mean Mean Mdn Mean Group Indvdl Group Indvdl Indvdl Group Indvdl Indvdl Group Total U.S. Households 4.0% 6.8% 3.2% 6.1% 3.5% 2.4% 7.2% 4.4% 3.2% Federally Eligible 13.0% 14.4% 10.1% 12.1% 7.9% 7.7% 13.8% 9.6% 10.0% Federally Ineligible 4.0% 3.5% N.A. 3.0% 2.6% 2.0% 3.6% 3.1% 2.6% Below 125% Poverty Line 13.0% N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. Note(s): Source(s): 1990 FY 2000 (2) FY 2009 (3) 1) Energy burden can be defined broadly as the burden placed on household incomes by the cost of energy, or the ratio of energy expenditures to income for a household. DOE Weatherization primarily uses mean individual burden and mean group burden since these statistics provide data on how an "average" individual household fares against an "average" group of households (that is, how burdens are

286

Chapter 9 - CAPEX and OPEX Expenditures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter is dedicated to expenditures related to all investments that are made in advance and the operational expenses that will occur from the start up of production onward.

Luiz Amado

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, 3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.5 1.4 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.5 0.9 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 12.3 17.4 21.5 31.7 9.6 23.4 3.9 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 0.4 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.9 20.8 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 .......................... 80.8 11.9 16.7 21.0 31.2 9.1 22.6 3.9 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 3 .............. 57.5 6.2 10.7 15.2 25.3 4.5 12.4 5.3 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 4.9 9.1 12.1 20.1 3.6 10.4 6.1 With a Heat Pump

288

An Exploratory Analysis of Transportation Household Expenditures in the Greater Sylhet Area in Bangladesh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Geography and GeoTrans Lab University ofDepartment of Geography and GeoTrans Lab University of

Dalal, Pamela; Sikder, Saiyid Hassan; Goulias, Konstadinos G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Household equipment of Canadians -- features of the 1993 stock and the 1994 and 1995 purchases: Analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the results of three surveys that collected information on household equipment: The 1994 and 1995 Household Equipment Surveys and the 1993 Survey of Household Energy Use. The goal of the report is to highlight the features of energy-consuming equipment bought by Canadian households in 1994 and 1995 in comparison to those owned by households in 1993. Results are presented by type of equipment: Refrigerators, stoves, dishwashers, freezers, automatic washers, automatic dryers, air conditioning systems, heating systems, and water heaters. Appendices include information on survey methodology and a copy of the survey questionnaire.

Not Available

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Ventilation Behavior and Household Characteristics in NewCalifornia Houses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey was conducted to determine occupant use of windows and mechanical ventilation devices; barriers that inhibit their use; satisfaction with indoor air quality (IAQ); and the relationship between these factors. A questionnaire was mailed to a stratified random sample of 4,972 single-family detached homes built in 2003, and 1,448 responses were received. A convenience sample of 230 houses known to have mechanical ventilation systems resulted in another 67 completed interviews. Some results are: (1) Many houses are under-ventilated: depending on season, only 10-50% of houses meet the standard recommendation of 0.35 air changes per hour. (2) Local exhaust fans are under-utilized. For instance, about 30% of households rarely or never use their bathroom fan. (3) More than 95% of households report that indoor air quality is ''very'' or ''somewhat'' acceptable, although about 1/3 of households also report dustiness, dry air, or stagnant or humid air. (4) Except households where people cook several hours per week, there is no evidence that households with significant indoor pollutant sources get more ventilation. (5) Except households containing asthmatics, there is no evidence that health issues motivate ventilation behavior. (6) Security and energy saving are the two main reasons people close windows or keep them closed.

Price, Phillip N.; Sherman, Max H.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Homes Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.4 2.0 2.9 1.3 Total Owner-Occupied Units ....... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 15.8 12.5 0.8 0.9 1.6 10.3 2 Persons ...................................... 25.9 23.4 0.5 0.5 1.5 10.1 3 Persons ...................................... 11.6 9.6 0.5 Q 1.3 12.1 4 Persons ...................................... 11.8 10.9 Q Q 0.7 15.7 5 Persons ...................................... 5.1 4.5 Q Q 0.4 24.2 6 or More Persons

292

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Household Characteristics by South Census Region, 1a. Household Characteristics by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.1 1.5 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 9.9 5.0 1.8 3.1 6.3 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 13.0 6.7 2.5 3.8 4.2 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 6.6 3.7 1.2 1.7 8.8 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 6.0 3.3 0.8 1.9 10.7 5 Persons ....................................................

293

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.5 0.8 1.4 1.3 1.4 Total .............................................................. 107.0 49.9 18.0 21.2 17.9 4.1 Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 14.6 5.3 4.8 3.6 6.4 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 15.7 5.7 6.9 6.8 5.4 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 7.6 2.8 3.5 3.1 7.2 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 6.8 2.3 4.1 2.4 8.1 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 3.1 1.3 1.3 1.4 12.3 6 or More Persons

294

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.8 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 2.5 8.1 6.5 4.8 6.2 9.9 2 Persons ...................................... 35.1 3.1 9.4 8.2 6.5 7.9 8.7 3 Persons ...................................... 17.0 1.3 4.3 4.0 3.3 4.1 10.7 4 Persons ...................................... 15.6 1.4 3.9 3.4 3.4 3.5 10.5 5 Persons ......................................

295

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.9 2.5 Total Rented Units ........................ 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 12.3 2.5 2.6 7.0 0.3 10.0 2 Persons ...................................... 9.2 2.5 2.5 4.1 Q 11.8 3 Persons ...................................... 5.4 2.0 1.1 2.0 0.4 13.9 4 Persons ...................................... 3.8 1.6 0.7 1.4 Q 17.7 5 Persons ...................................... 2.0 0.9 0.4 0.6 Q 24.1 6 or More Persons ........................

296

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, 3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.4 1.9 1.2 1.0 0.6 1.9 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 47.6 3.0 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 13.2 19.8 25.5 37.7 10.7 38.8 3.2 Personal Computers 2 ................... 60.0 3.7 8.7 16.0 31.6 3.7 17.4 4.6 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 2.8 7.1 12.8 22.4 2.8 13.6 5.1 2 or more .................................... 9.1 0.6 0.7 1.7 6.2 0.6 2.2 13.0 Number of Laptop PCs

297

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.0 1.2 1.2 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 2.5 4.5 5.1 4.0 3.7 8.3 7.5 2 Persons ...................................... 35.1 4.8 6.2 6.6 4.5 5.3 7.8 5.8 3 Persons ...................................... 17.0 2.5 3.3 2.9 2.3 1.9 4.1 8.4 4 Persons ...................................... 15.6 3.4 2.8 2.3 1.9 1.8 3.4 9.6 5 Persons ...................................... 7.1 1.6 1.2 1.3 0.6 0.7 1.6 14.3 6 or More Persons

298

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the nnual Energy Outlook Assumptions to the nnual Energy Outlook EIA Glossary Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 Report #: DOE/EIA-0554(2004) Release date: February 2004 Next release date:February 2005 The Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook. Table of Contents Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Household Expenditures Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module Appendix A Adobe Acrobat Logo

299

Annual Capital Expenditures Survey | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Annual Capital Expenditures Survey Annual Capital Expenditures Survey BusinessUSA Data/Tools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov » Communities » BusinessUSA » Data Annual Capital Expenditures Survey Dataset Summary Description Provides national estimates of investment in new and used buildings and other structures, machinery, and equipment by U.S. nonfarm businesses with and without employees. Data are published by industry for companies with employees for NAICS 3-digit and selected 4-digit industries. Data on the amount of business expenditures for new plant and equipment and measures of the stock of existing facilities are critical to evaluate productivity growth, the ability of U.S. business to compete with foreign business, changes in industrial capacity, and measures of overall economic performance. In addition, ACES data provide industry analysts with capital expenditure data for market analysis, economic forecasting, identifying business opportunities and developing new and strategic plans. The ACES is an integral part of the Federal Government's effort to improve and supplement ongoing statistical programs. Private companies and organizations,, educators and students, and economic researchers use the survey results for analyzing and conducting impact evaluations on past and current economic performance, short-term economic forecasts, productivity, long-term economic growth, tax policy, capacity utilization, business fixed capital stocks and capital formation, domestic and international competitiveness trade policy, market research, and financial analysis.

300

Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Households with Children Households...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 6.1 0.8 2.7 2.6 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 23.2 Race of Householder White ... 54.8 14.4 27.6 12.8 83.7 3.2 6.7 7.2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

An investigation of regulatory and voluntary environmental capital expenditures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the firm-specific economic consequences of regulatory and voluntary environmental capital expenditures. Using firm-level environmental data, I decompose total environmental capital expenditures into estimates of regulatory and voluntary components. I then examine the relations of regulatory and voluntary environmental capital outlays with future abnormal earnings, stock prices, and stock returns. As predicted, the empirical analysis reveals that regulatory environmental capital expenditures are negatively associated with future abnormal earnings. Moreover, market-based tests indicate that the regulatory component of environmental capital expenditures is negatively priced. Finally, the results suggest that voluntary environmental capital expenditures and regulatory environmental capital expenditures have different firm-specific economic consequences.

Derek Johnston

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Physical activity of adults in households with and without children  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

whites, fewer Hispanics, and higher household incomes thanWhites, fewer Hispanics, and higher household incomes thanWhites, fewer Hispanics, and higher household incomes than

Candelaria, Jeanette Irene

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Household environmental monitoring a strategy to help homeowners reduce their environmental impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A group of 20 households was established to study whether we can motivate environmentally sustainable behaviour by providing homeowners with a clear picture of their impact, tangible reasons for improvement, and tailored solutions to follow. Reports for each household compared heating fuel, electricity, water, vehicle fuel/waste generation within the group and recommended cost-effective measures to reduce consumption. On average, 26% of the recommended measures were implemented, resulting in an estimated greenhouse gas reduction of about 2 tonnes per household. Wide variations were found between households, demonstrating the potential to reduce environmental impact through lifestyle, conservation, and energy conscious retrofits.

Jane Thompson; Magda Goemans; Peter C. Goemans; Andrzej Wisniowski

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Capital expenditure decision making in small firms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A number of studies have been conducted to determine the extent to which large firms utilize sophisticated techniques in capital expenditure decision making. This research effort focuses on financial decision making procedures of small firms, exploring the techniques utilized to evaluate investment opportunities, methods employed to adjust for risk, purposes of expenditures and concern for profitability, and the source and cost of funds. In light of the recent debate on the capital shortage issue, small firms were also asked what type of tax reform they deemed most desirable to stimulate capital investments.

L.R. Runyon

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Evaluation of the soft measures' effects on ambient water quality improvement and household and industry economies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Various ecological footprint calculators, carbon footprint calculators and water footprint calculators have been developed in recent years. The basic concepts of ecological behaviour record notebooks and of carbon dioxide emission calculators have been developed since the late 20th century. The first carbon dioxide emission calculator was developed in 1991. Likewise, water pollutant discharge calculators have been developed to estimate the effects of soft measures introduced into households to reduce pollutant discharge since 2004. The soft measures which have been developed in Japan may consist of a wider framework, household sustainable consumption, which has been developed in Europe, and can be referred to cleaner consumption. In this research, summarisation of the short history of ecological behaviour record notebooks and ecological footprint calculators in Japan since the 1980s was conducted, and the soft measures in households to reduce pollutant discharge were evaluated for their effects on ambient water quality improvement as well as household and industry economies. Effects of the soft measures on related industry economies were investigated using an InputOutput Tableanalysis and the effects of the imported goods were evaluated with an import effect matrix, which was developed in this research. The effects of the soft measures on household expenditures were estimated to be a decrease by 2.5% or USD 285 person?1year?1 in 20032006. The results show that the soft measures positively affect the chemical fibre industry and significantly affect the detergent industry. Analysis of the import effect matrix proved that the six industries were tightly related through extensive amounts of imported goods. The soft measures in households may lead to household sustainable consumption and thus reduce disadvantageous human impacts on water environments. The effects of the measures introduced to improve the environment should be qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated to avoid redundant concerns and discord between the environment and the economy, which may be worried when the relationship is not well understood.

Yoshiaki Tsuzuki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Space Heating by Household Income, 3a. Space Heating by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 18.4 22.7 26.8 38.1 14.6 33.4 3.3 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 0.3 Q 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 23.4 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 Q Q Q 0.2 Q Q 35.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.3 22.8 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 18.4 22.7

307

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Appliances by Household Income, 3a. Appliances by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.5 1.4 1.1 1.0 0.8 1.6 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 18.0 22.0 26.1 35.6 14.4 32.6 3.2 1 ................................................ 95.2 17.3 21.1 24.8 32.0 13.8 31.1 3.4 2 or More .................................. 6.5 0.8 0.9 1.3 3.6 0.6 1.5 13.1 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 18.0 22.0 26.1 35.6 14.4 32.6 3.2

308

The World Distribution of Household Wealth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Japan is not a remote prospect. In summary, it is clear that householdJapan Korea, South New Zealand Norway Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Year Unit share of top 2002 household

DAVIES, JAMES B; Shorrocks, Anthony; Sandstrom, Susanna; WOLFF, EDWARD N

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The relationship between advertising and household loans.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Advertising expenditures are increasing on a yearly basis. An interesting question emerges from this: What are the macroeconomic effects of increasing advertising spending? Does (more)

Sahlin, Daniel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Government Expenditure on Scientific Research, 1961  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... year is mainly concerned with assisting industry to apply the results of research, records gross expenditure in the year ended March 31, 1961, of 14,467,278, compared with ... the Research Grants Committee considered 447 applications for grants, other than those for very expensive capital projects, with a total value of 3,156,000, compared with 422 valued ...

1962-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

311

Expenditure on Research and Development in Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... annual report for 1961-62*, the Advisory Council on Scientific Policy again reviews the expenditure on scientific and technical research and development, which in 1961-62 is estimated at ... -7 per cent of the gross national product, of which about 67 million was capital ...

1963-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

312

The potential impact on socio-economic groups of rising energy prices due to the Kuwaiti crisis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Iraqi invasion of the kingdom of Kuwait on August 2, 1990, triggered immediate increases in the world price of petroleum. With US imports of petroleum and residential, commercial, and industrial consumption of petroleum products on the rise, these price increases are already evident in the US. The differential impact of these increases on poor and minority households raises significant and potentially long-term research and policy issues for various government agencies, including the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this paper is to provide a preliminary analysis of the nature and extent of the potential impact of Iraqi-induced petroleum price changes on majority, black, and Hispanic households, as well as on poor and non-poor households. As this paper is written, the US is continuing the deployment of several hundred thousand troops, aircraft, naval vessels, and other equipment to the Persian Gulf. The objectives of this deployment are to deter Iraqi invasion of Saudi Arabia and to encourage Iraqi withdrawal from Kuwait. The outcome of these initiatives, particularly the response of the government of Iraq, could stimulate additional changes in world petroleum prices and subsequent impacts on the household energy consumption and expenditure patterns of US black, Hispanic, and poor households. 8 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

Henderson, L. (Baltimore Univ., MD (USA)); Poyer, D.; Teotia, A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Trip rate comparison of workplace and household surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Available vs. Trip Rate) 14 El Paso Household Survey (Household Income vs. Trip Rate) . 15 El Paso Workplace Survey (Household Income vs. Trip Rate) . 52 52 53 53 54 54 16 BPA Household Survey (Household Size vs. Trip Rate) . . 17 BPA Workplace... Survey (Household Size vs. Trip Rate) . . 56 56 18 BPA Household Survey (No. of Employees vs. Trip Rate) . . 19 BPA Workplace Survey (No. of Employees vs. Trip Rate) . . 20 BPA Household Survey (Vehicles Available vs. Trip Rate) . . 21 BPA Workplace...

Endres, Stephen Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

314

Estimating broad-brush rebound effects for household energy consumption in the EU 28 countries and Norway: some policy implications of Odyssee data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Currently there is a strong policy commitment in European Union (EU) and Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries to increase the energy efficiency of residential buildings, and it is widely assumed that this will naturally and automatically reduce domestic energy consumption. However, other factors such as fuel prices, wages, attitudes and lifestyles also influence energy consumption. This paper calculates broad-brush rebound effects based on changes in energy efficiency and energy consumption in each of the 28EU countries plus Norway, for the years 20002011. In doing so, it tests how well the assumption of energy efficiency leading to energy reduction stands up to scrutiny in these lands. It uses the EUs Odyssee database for efficiency and consumption figures and a commonly employed econometric definition of the rebound effect as an energy-efficiency elasticity. Most older EU lands show rebound effects in the expected range of 050%. However, the range for newer EU countries is 100550%, suggesting that energy efficiency increases are not a good predictor of energy consumption. A more in-depth look at one country, Germany, suggests these results underestimate the rebound effect significantly. This also identifies research needs for specific energy consumption determinants in each country, to find more precisely what is driving consumption levels.

Ray Galvin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration (EIA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A1 - Number of Vehicles","Table A1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicles-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001" A1 - Number of Vehicles","Table A1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicles-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001" "Std Errors for A1","Relative Standard Errors for Table A1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicles-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001 (Percent)" "N Cells for A1","Number of Sample Cases Contributing to Estimates in Table A1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicles-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001" " Page A-1 of A-N" "Table A1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicles-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001" "2001 Household and Vehicle Characteristics","Number of Vehicles",,"Vehicle-Miles Traveled",,"Motor Fuel Consumption",,,"Motor Fuel Expenditures"

316

Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparison o f energy consumption i n housing (1998) (Trends i n household energy consumption (Jyukankyo Research4) Average (N=2976) Energy consumption [GJ / household-year

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Private health care expenditure and quality in Beveridge systems: Cross-regional differences in the Italian NHS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Private health care expenditure ranges from 15% to 30% of total healthcare spending in OECD countries. The literature suggests that there should be an inverse correlation between quality of public services and private expenditures. The main objective of this study is to explore the association between quality of public healthcare and private expenditures in the Italian Regional Healthcare Systems (RHSs).The institutional framework offered by the Italian NHS allows to investigate on the differences among the regions while controlling for institutional factors.The study uses micro-data from the ISTAT Household Consumption Survey (HCS) and a rich set of regional quality indicators. The results indicate that there is a positive and significant correlation between quality and private spending per capita across regions. The study also points out the strong association between the distribution of private consumption and income. In order to account for the influence of income, the study segmented data in three socio-economic classes and computed cross-regional correlations of \\{RHSs\\} quality and household healthcare expenditure per capita, within each class. No correlation was found between the two variables.These findings are quite surprising and call into question the theory that better quality of public services crowds out private spending, or, at the very least, it undermines the simplistic notions that higher levels of private spending are a direct consequence of poor quality in the public sector. This suggests that policies should avoid to simplistically link private spending with judgements or assessments about the functioning or efficacy of the public system and its organizations.

Mario Del Vecchio; Lorenzo Fenech; Anna Prenestini

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Home Office Equipment by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Home Office Equipment by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.1 1.4 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 17.9 12.8 5.0 1.3 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 10.9 7.7 3.3 3.1 Number of Desktop PCs 1 ................................................................ 45.1 8.7 6.2 2.5 3.7 2 or more ................................................... 9.1 1.4 0.9 0.5 12.9 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ................................................................

319

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Home Office Equipment by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Home Office Equipment by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 22.4 15.7 6.7 1.3 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 14.1 9.9 4.2 3.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1 ................................................................ 45.1 10.4 7.2 3.2 3.7 2 or more ................................................... 9.1 2.3 1.6 0.7 10.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ................................................................

320

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Air Conditioning by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Air Conditioning by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 20.5 13.6 6.8 2.2 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.3 Q Q 27.5 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 20.2 13.4 6.7 2.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 14.3 9.5 4.8 3.8 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 13.6 9.0 4.6 3.9 With a Heat Pump .....................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.5 0.8 1.4 1.3 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 36.8 13.6 18.9 13.6 4.3 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 1.2 0.2 0.4 0.3 21.4 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 ........................................ 80.8 35.6 13.4 18.6 13.3 4.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 3 ............................ 57.5 23.6 8.6 15.8 9.4 5.1 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 19.3 7.4 13.1 6.4 6.3 With a Heat Pump ..................................... 11.3 4.4

322

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.5 1.5 1.4 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 59.5 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 5.2 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 1.2 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 23.3 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 58.2 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 5.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 44.7 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 7.0 Without a Heat Pump .................. 35.6 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 7.7 With a Heat Pump .......................

323

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.8 0.5 1.4 1.2 1.6 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 23.4 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 6.1 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 0.9 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 23.0 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 22.5 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 6.2 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 12.7 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 8.5 Without a Heat Pump .................. 10.6 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 9.3 With a Heat Pump ....................... 2.2 8.6 0.8 1.0

324

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2001 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.0 1.5 1.5 Total .............................................................. 107.0 7.1 12.3 7.7 6.3 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 2.2 2.4 1.8 1.7 7.3 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 2.2 4.0 2.4 2.0 6.9 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 1.1 2.0 1.2 1.2 9.5 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 0.8 1.9 1.3 0.9 11.2 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 0.4 1.1 0.4 0.5 19.8 6 or More Persons ....................................... 4.0 0.4 0.9 0.4 0.1 16.4 2001 Household Income Category

325

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Air Conditioning by South Census Region, 1a. Air Conditioning by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.3 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 37.2 19.3 6.4 11.5 1.5 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.4 Q Q Q 28.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 36.9 19.0 6.4 11.5 1.6 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 30.4 16.1 5.0 9.2 2.8 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 22.1 10.4 3.4 8.3 5.6 With a Heat Pump

326

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Air Conditioning by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Air Conditioning by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 14.5 11.3 3.2 3.3 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.3 0.3 Q 28.3 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 14.2 11.1 3.2 3.4 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 5.7 4.9 0.8 8.9 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 5.2 4.5 0.7 9.2 With a Heat Pump .....................................

327

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, 2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 13.6 16.0 14.7 10.4 10.5 17.6 4.7 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 Q 0.3 0.5 0.3 0.4 0.5 27.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 .......................... 80.8 13.4 15.8 14.2 10.1 10.2 17.1 4.7 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 3 .............. 57.5 12.6 13.7 11.0 7.1 6.6 6.4 5.9 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 10.1 10.4 8.0 6.1 5.9 5.7 7.0 With a Heat Pump ....................... 11.3 2.5 3.3

328

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.6 1.5 1.4 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 4.9 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 21.8 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 80.8 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 4.9 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 57.5 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 6.7 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 7.7 With a Heat Pump ....................... 11.3 8.6 0.8 1.0 0.8 19.7 Room Air-Conditioning

329

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Title Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-55088 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Whitehead, Camilla Dunham, Victor H. Franco, Alexander B. Lekov, and James D. Lutz Document Number LBNL-55088 Pagination 22 Date Published May 31 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Residential household space heating energy use comprises close to half of all residential energy consumption. Currently, average space heating use by household is 43.9 Mbtu for a year. An average, however, does not reflect regional variation in heating practices, energy costs, or fuel type. Indeed, a national average does not capture regional or consumer group cost impacts from changing efficiency levels of heating equipment. The US Department of Energy sets energy standards for residential appliances in, what is called, a rulemaking process. The residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking process investigates the costs and benefits of possible updates to the current minimum efficiency regulations. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) selected the sample used in the residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking from publically available data representing United States residences. The sample represents 107 million households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler rulemaking. This paper describes the choice of criteria to select the sample of houses used in the rulemaking process. The process of data extraction is detailed in the appendices and is easily duplicated.The life-cycle cost is calculated in two ways with a household marginal energy price and a national average energy price. The LCC results show that using an national average energy price produces higher LCC savings but does not reflect regional differences in energy price.

330

Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from household energy consumption i n Japan increased b y 20is that household energy consumption i n Japan has notfrom a l l households i n Japan, through 2050 (with energy-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Metering Campaign on All Cooking End-Uses in 100 Households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the findings of an experimental study performed in 100 French households on the end-use power demand and energy consumption of domestic appliances focusing on cooking appliances [1].

Olivier Sidler

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures 2.4 Residential Environmental Data 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market 2.6 Residential Home Improvements 2.7 Multi-Family Housing 2.8 Industrialized Housing 2.9 Low-Income Housing 3Commercial Sector 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 2 focuses on energy use in the U.S. residential buildings sector. Section 2.1 provides data on energy consumption by fuel type and end use, as well as energy consumption intensities for different housing categories. Section 2.2 presents characteristics of average households and changes in the U.S. housing stock over time. Sections 2.3 and 2.4 address energy-related expenditures and residential sector emissions, respectively. Section 2.5 contains statistics on housing construction, existing home sales, and mortgages. Section 2.6 presents data on home improvement spending and trends. Section 2.7 describes the industrialized housing industry, including the top manufacturers of various manufactured home products. Section 2.8 presents information on low-income housing and Federal weatherization programs. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

333

Chemical Characterization and Source Apportionment of Household Fine Particulate Matter in Rural, Peri-urban, and Urban West Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In addition to households own fuel, HAP in urban households is affected by the extent of biomass use in the neighborhood, and by traffic-related sources. ... The elemental concentrations of the samples were quantified by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) using a Shimadzu EDX-700HS spectrometer (Shimadzu Corp., Japan) at the Institute of Astronomy, Geophysics and Atmospheric Science, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. ...

Zheng Zhou; Kathie L. Dionisio; Thiago G. Verissimo; Americo S. Kerr; Brent Coull; Stephen Howie; Raphael E. Arku; Petros Koutrakis; John D. Spengler; Kimberly Fornace; Allison F. Hughes; Jose Vallarino; Samuel Agyei-Mensah; Majid Ezzati

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

334

Transportation and Energy Use Data Files  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Files Data Files Transportation and Energy Use Data Files Data from the last two Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys are available on-line. These data include fuel consumption and expenditures, vehicle-miles traveled, vehicle characteristics, and household characteristics from national samples of over 3,000 households. To protect respondent confidentiality, these data files do not contain any information which could be used to identify individual households. The lowest level of geographic detail provided is the Census Division (a grouping of 3 to 5 States.) 1994 RTECS Public Use Data 1991 RTECS Public Use Data 1994 RTECS Public Use Data The data from the 1994 RTECS is distributed in dBase and ASCII formats. The data in each set has been compressed using PKZIP. After downloading either the ASCII or dBase set, place the downloaded file in a separate directory and expand it using pkunzip. If you don't have pkunzip.exe, you can download that package here. PKUNZIP.EXE is in PKZ204g.exe. PKUNZIP.EXE is the only file you need, but the developers of the product have asked that the entire package be distributed and not the individual files. You can however find pkunzip.exe on several other Internet sites. If you download PKZ204g.exe to a separate directory, type PKZ204g and press ENTER.

335

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, 2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.4 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 14.9 16.7 17.0 12.2 13.0 22.4 4.4 Personal Computers 2 ................... 60.0 11.0 11.6 10.3 7.2 7.8 12.0 5.3 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 8.0 9.0 7.7 5.3 6.1 9.1 5.8 2 or more .................................... 9.1 1.8 1.6 2.0 1.1 1.0 1.6 11.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

336

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2001 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.7 1.2 1.2 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 4.9 6.0 7.4 6.2 2.4 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.1 0.8 Q 0.1 23.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 4.7 5.2 7.4 6.1 2.6 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 1.3 3.9 6.2 5.7 6.7 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 1.2 3.2 5.5 3.8 8.1 With a Heat Pump ..................................... 11.3 Q 0.8 0.6 1.9 14.7 Room Air-Conditioning ................................ 23.3 3.4 1.2 1.2 0.3 13.6 1 Unit

337

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Home Office Equipment by South Census Region, 1a. Home Office Equipment by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.3 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 34.6 18.4 6.0 10.1 1.2 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 20.7 11.7 3.2 5.8 4.0 Number of Desktop PCs 1 ................................................................ 45.1 15.5 8.6 2.6 4.3 4.9 2 or more ................................................... 9.1 3.1 2.0 0.4 0.7 9.6 Number of Laptop PCs

338

Electricity Prices for Households - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Households for Selected Countries1 Households for Selected Countries1 (U.S. Dollars per Kilowatthour) Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Argentina NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.023 NA NA Australia 0.091 0.092 0.094 0.098 NA NA NA NA NA Austria 0.144 0.154 0.152 0.163 0.158 0.158 0.178 0.201 NA Barbados NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Belgium NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Bolivia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Brazil NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.145 0.171 NA Canada 0.067 0.069 0.070 0.071 0.076 0.078 NA NA NA Chile NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.140 0.195 NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) 0.075 0.071 0.074 0.076 0.079 0.079 0.080 0.086 NA Colombia NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.111 0.135 NA

339

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.9 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 8.4 26.2 21.1 19.0 21.5 7.8 Personal Computers 2 ................... 60.0 5.7 16.7 13.1 12.1 12.6 7.4 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 4.2 12.8 9.6 8.8 9.6 7.8 2 or more .................................... 9.1 0.8 2.4 2.3 2.0 1.7 12.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

340

Development of the household sample for furnace and boilerlife-cycle cost analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential household space heating energy use comprises close to half of all residential energy consumption. Currently, average space heating use by household is 43.9 Mbtu for a year. An average, however, does not reflect regional variation in heating practices, energy costs, or fuel type. Indeed, a national average does not capture regional or consumer group cost impacts from changing efficiency levels of heating equipment. The US Department of Energy sets energy standards for residential appliances in, what is called, a rulemaking process. The residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking process investigates the costs and benefits of possible updates to the current minimum efficiency regulations. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) selected the sample used in the residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking from publically available data representing United States residences. The sample represents 107 million households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler rulemaking. This paper describes the choice of criteria to select the sample of houses used in the rulemaking process. The process of data extraction is detailed in the appendices and is easily duplicated. The life-cycle cost is calculated in two ways with a household marginal energy price and a national average energy price. The LCC results show that using an national average energy price produces higher LCC savings but does not reflect regional differences in energy price.

Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Franco, Victor; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, Jim

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

What People Do with Consumption Feedback: A Long-Term Living Lab Study of a Home Energy Management System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......to seven households over a period...edition of the Energy Efficiency Action Plan...Consumption. Energy Efficiency in Household Appliances...Council on energy efficiency and repealing...Standards-Households in the informations......

Tobias Schwartz; Gunnar Stevens; Timo Jakobi; Sebastian Denef; Leonardo Ramirez; Volker Wulf; Dave Randall

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

OUTDOOR RECREATION DEMAND AND EXPENDITURES: LOWER SNAKE RIVER RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i OUTDOOR RECREATION DEMAND AND EXPENDITURES: LOWER SNAKE RIVER RESERVOIRS John R. Mc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v SECTION ONE - OUTDOOR RECREATION DEMAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Recreation Demand Methods

O'Laughlin, Jay

343

Simulating Progressive Expenditure Taxation in an Aging Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter investigates the effects of tax reform from progressive labor income taxation toward progressive expenditure taxation, on capital accumulation, and intragenerational income redistribution. The ... th...

Akira Okamoto Ph.D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Appliances by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Appliances by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.3 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 19.6 14.5 5.2 1.1 1 .............................................................. 95.2 18.2 13.3 4.9 1.1 2 or More ................................................. 6.5 1.4 1.1 0.3 11.7 Most Used Oven ...................................... 101.7 19.6 14.5 5.2 1.1 Electric .....................................................

345

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Space Heating by South Census Region, 1a. Space Heating by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.9 1.2 1.4 1.3 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 38.8 20.2 6.8 11.8 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q Q 20.1 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q Q Q Q 39.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 Q Q Q Q 39.0 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0

346

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Space Heating by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Space Heating by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.7 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 20.1 14.7 5.4 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q 19.9 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q Q Q 39.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 Q Q Q 38.7 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 20.1 14.7 5.4 NE Natural Gas .................................................

347

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Space Heating by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Space Heating by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q 19.8 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q Q Q 39.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 Q Q Q 38.4 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Natural Gas

348

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Space Heating by West Census Region, 2a. Space Heating by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.6 1.0 1.6 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 22.6 6.7 15.9 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 0.7 Q 0.7 10.6 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 0.4 Q 0.4 18.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 0.2 Q 0.2 27.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 22.6 6.7 15.9 NE Natural Gas .................................................

349

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Appliances by West Census Region, 2a. Appliances by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.7 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 22.1 6.6 15.5 1.1 1 .............................................................. 95.2 20.9 6.4 14.5 1.1 2 or More ................................................. 6.5 1.2 0.2 1.0 14.6 Most Used Oven ...................................... 101.7 22.1 6.6 15.5 1.1 Electric .....................................................

350

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1997 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 1997 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables Table Titles (Released: February 2004) Entire Section Percents Tables: HC1 Housing Unit Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF NOTE: As of 10/31/01, numbers in the "Housing Units" TABLES section for stub item: "Number of Floors in Apartment Buildings" were REVISED. These numbers will differ from the numbers in the published report. Tables: HC2 Household Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF Tables: HC3 Space Heating, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF Tables: HC4 Air-Conditioning, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF Tables: HC5 Appliances, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF

351

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 3 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables Topical Sections Entire Section All Detailed Tables PDF Tables: HC1 Household Characteristics, Million U.S. Households Presents data relating to location, type, ownership, age, size, construction, and householder demographic and income characteristics. PDF Tables: HC2 Space Heating, Million U.S. Households Presents data describing the types of heating fuel and equipment used for main and secondary heating purposes. PDF Tables: HC3 Air-Conditioning, Million U.S. Households Presents data describing selected household characteristics including location, number of rooms and area cooled and air-conditioning usage. PDF

352

Standby electricity consumption and saving potentials of Turkish households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The share of the residential sector currently accounts for about 25% of the national electricity consumption in Turkey. Due to increase in household income levels and decrease in the costs of appliances; significant increases in appliance ownerships and residential electricity consumption levels have been observed in recent years. Most domestic appliances continue consuming electricity when they are not performing their primary functions, i.e. at standby mode, which can constitute up 15% of the total household electricity consumption in some countries. Although the demand in Turkish residential electricity consumption is increasing, there are limited studies on the components of the residential electricity consumption and no studies specifically examining the extent and effects of standby electricity consumption using a surveying/measurement methodology. Thus, determining the share of standby electricity consumption in total home electricity use and the ways of reducing it are important issues in residential energy conservation strategies. In this study, surveys and standby power measurements are conducted at 260 households in Ankara, Turkey, to determine the amount, share, and saving potentials of the standby electricity consumption of Turkish homes. The survey is designed to gather information on the appliance properties, lights, electricity consumption behavior, economic and demographics of the occupants, and electricity bills. A total of 1746 appliances with standby power are measured in the surveyed homes. Using the survey and standby power measurements data, the standby, active, and lighting end-use electricity consumptions of the surveyed homes are determined. The average Turkish household standby power and standby electricity consumption are estimated as 22W and 95kWh/yr, respectively. It was also found that the standby electricity consumption constitutes 4% of the total electricity consumption in Turkish homes. Two scenarios are then applied to the surveyed homes to determine the potentials in reducing standby electricity consumption of the households.

Mustafa Cagri Sahin; Merih Aydinalp Koksal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration (EIA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A3 - Average per Vehicles","Table A3. U.S. Per Vehicle Average Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001" A3 - Average per Vehicles","Table A3. U.S. Per Vehicle Average Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001" "Std Errors for A3","Relative Standard Errors for Table A3. U.S. Per Vehicle Average Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001 (Percent)" "N Cells for A3","Number of Sample Cases Contributing to Estimates in Table A3. U.S. Per Vehicle Average Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001" " Page A-1 of A-N" "Table A3. U.S. Per Vehicle Average Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 2001" "2001 Household and Vehicle Characteristics","Number of Vehicles (million)","Average per Vehicle",,,"Miles per Gallon"

354

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Efficiency Efficiency exec summary Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural agas is used in heavy-duty vehicles....Read full section mkt trends Market Trends Energy expenditures decline relative to gross domestic product and gross output...Read full section In the United States, average energy use per person declines from 2010 to 2040...Read full section Residential energy intensity continues to declines across a range of technology assumptions...Read full section Electricity use per household declines from 2011 to 2040 in the Reference case...Read full section Efficiency can offset increases in residential service demand...Read full section Planned expiration of tax credits affects renewable energy use in

355

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Efficiency Efficiency exec summary Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural agas is used in heavy-duty vehicles....Read full section mkt trends Market Trends Energy expenditures decline relative to gross domestic product and gross output...Read full section In the United States, average energy use per person declines from 2010 to 2040...Read full section Residential energy intensity continues to declines across a range of technology assumptions...Read full section Electricity use per household declines from 2011 to 2040 in the Reference case...Read full section Efficiency can offset increases in residential service demand...Read full section Planned expiration of tax credits affects renewable energy use in

356

How Much Do You Spend on Energy? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Click on a state Energy Expenditure 3724 per person in 2012 Transportation Residential Data: EIA State Energy Data System View All Maps Addthis...

357

Short and Long-Term Perspectives: The Impact on Low-Income Consumers of Forecasted Energy Price Increases in 2008 and A Cap & Trade Carbon Policy in 2030  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently released its short-term forecast for residential energy prices for the winter of 2007-2008. The forecast indicates increases in costs for low-income consumers in the year ahead, particularly for those using fuel oil to heat their homes. In the following analysis, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has integrated the EIA price projections with the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 2001 in order to project the impact of these price increases on the nation's low-income households by primary heating fuel type, nationally and by Census Region. The report provides an update of bill estimates provided in a previous study, "The Impact Of Forecasted Energy Price Increases On Low-Income Consumers" (Eisenberg, 2005). The statistics are intended for use by policymakers in the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program and elsewhere who are trying to gauge the nature and severity of the problems that will be faced by eligible low-income households during the 2008 fiscal year. In addition to providing expenditure forecasts for the year immediately ahead, this analysis uses a similar methodology to give policy makers some insight into one of the major policy debates that will impact low-income energy expenditures well into the middle decades of this century and beyond. There is now considerable discussion of employing a cap-and-trade mechanism to first limit and then reduce U.S. emissions of carbon into the atmosphere in order to combat the long-range threat of human-induced climate change. The Energy Information Administration has provided an analysis of projected energy prices in the years 2020 and 2030 for one such cap-and-trade carbon reduction proposal that, when integrated with the RECS 2001 database, provides estimates of how low-income households will be impacted over the long term by such a carbon reduction policy.

Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Energy-efficient control in injection molding.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As an energy-intensive process, in injection molding, energy cost is one of the major cost components. The energy expenditure during molding can be divided into (more)

Yao, Ke

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

User-needs study for the 1993 residential energy consumption survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1992, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) conducted a user-needs study for the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Every 3 years, the RECS collects information on energy consumption and expenditures for various classes of households and residential buildings. The RECS is the only source of such information within EIA, and one of only a few sources of such information anywhere. EIA sent letters to more than 750 persons, received responses from 56, and held 15 meetings with users. Written responses were also solicited by notices published in the April 14, 1992 Federal Register and in several energy-related publications. To ensure that the 1993 RECS meets current information needs, EIA made a specific effort to get input from policy makers and persons needing data for forecasting efforts. These particular needs relate mainly to development of the National Energy Modeling System and new energy legislation being considered at the time of the user needs survey.

Not Available

1993-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

360

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Experimental Evidence Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Household Response To Dynamic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Household Light Makes Global Heat: High Black Carbon Emissions From Kerosene Wick Lamps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(3) Lighting is another component of this household energy challenge, with millions of households still relying on simple liquid-fueled lamps, but little is known of the associated environmental and health impacts. ... For laboratory tests, CO2 and CO concentrations were measured in real-time with a Li-COR 6252 (Li-COR Biosciences, Lincoln, NE) and Horiba AIA-220 (Horiba, Kyoto, Japan) nondispersive infrared (NDIR) analyzer, respectively. ...

Nicholas L. Lam; Yanju Chen; Cheryl Weyant; Chandra Venkataraman; Pankaj Sadavarte; Michael A. Johnson; Kirk R. Smith; Benjamin T. Brem; Joseph Arineitwe; Justin E. Ellis; Tami C. Bond

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

362

CORPORATE DISCLOSURE OF ENVIRONMENTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURES: A TEST OF ALTERNATIVE THEORIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CORPORATE DISCLOSURE OF ENVIRONMENTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURES: A TEST OF ALTERNATIVE THEORIES Charles capital expenditure; environmental disclosure; environmental regulation; legitimacy theory; materiality DISCLOSURE OF ENVIRONMENTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURES: A TEST OF ALTERNATIVE THEORIES Introduction The United

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

363

Fourth Annual Report to the Northwest Governors on Expenditures of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S.ArmyCorpsofEngineers #12;Fourth Annual Report on Expenditures of the Bonneville Power Administration 1 For Fiscal Year 2003 in this report were supplied by the Bonneville Power Administration at the Council's request and were Report on Expenditures of the Bonneville Power Administration 3 Background In July 1999, the governors o

364

Capital Expenditures, Financial Constraints, and the Use of Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capital Expenditures, Financial Constraints, and the Use of Options Tim Adam RMI Working Paper No@nus.edu.sg 1 #12;Capital Expenditures, Financial Constraints, and the Use of Options Abstract This paper of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of NUS Risk Management Institute (RMI). #12;Capital

Chaudhuri, Sanjay

365

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Contacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Contacts Specific questions about the information in this report may be directed to: Introduction Paul D. Holtberg 202/586-1284 Macroeconomic Activity Module Ronald F. Earley Yvonne Taylor 202/586-1398 202/586-1398 International Energy Module G. Daniel Butler 202/586-9503 Household Expenditures Module/ Residential Demand Module John H. Cymbalsky 202/586-4815 Commercial Demand Module Erin E. Boedecker 202/586-4791 Industrial Demand Module T. Crawford Honeycutt 202/586-1420 Transportation Demand Module John D. Maples 202/586-1757 Electricity Market Module Laura Martin 202/586-1494 Oil and Gas Supply Module/Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Joseph Benneche 202/586-6132 Petroleum Market Module Bill Brown 202/586-8181

366

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for a period of 1 year. VMT was calculated using (1) a regression method developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Center for Transportation Analysis (2) two odometer...

367

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

a NHTS sample vehicle having the following attributes: Volkswagen, Sirocco, 1990, Automobile. Toggling of model years, by a single year increase followed by a single year...

368

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 - Appendix C  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Protection Agency (EPA) certification files (CERT files) containing laboratory test results of MPG. When the vehicle characteristic was missing from the questionnaire, but...

369

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

80, 85, 86, 88, and 600 and 10 CFR Part 474. GREET MODEL Of course, there are other conversion factors available, depending on the various fuel-specific factors. For the...

370

Environmental Communication Aimed at Household Energy Conservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol started in 2008. Japan is required to cut down on greenhouse...2) emissions in Japan have been showing a tendency to increase ... report of the Ministry of the En...

Chizuru Nishio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Economic growth and alternative deficit-reducing tax increases and expenditure cuts: A cross-sectional study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Classifying government expenditures into capital and current expenditures renders the latter as the best type for implementing a reduction in expenditures. Deficit-reducing cuts in capital expenditures are concom...

Mohsen Fardmanesh

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Appliances by Climate Zone, a. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.1 Total .................................................. 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.8 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven .............................................. 101.7 9.1 27.9 23.1 19.4 22.2 7.8 1 ................................................... 95.2 8.7 26.0 21.6 17.7 21.2 7.9 2 or More ..................................... 6.5 0.4 1.9 1.5 1.7 1.0 14.7 Most Used Oven ........................... 101.7 9.1 27.9 23.1 19.4 22.2

373

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.5 1.7 1.6 1.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 69.1 9.4 16.7 6.6 4.3 1 ................................................ 95.2 63.7 8.9 16.2 6.3 4.3 2 or More .................................. 6.5 5.4 0.4 0.4 0.2 15.9 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 69.1 9.4 16.7 6.6 4.3 Electric ...................................... 63.0 43.3 5.2 10.9 3.6

374

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Space Heating by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Space Heating by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.6 0.9 1.3 1.3 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 49.9 18.0 21.2 17.9 4.3 Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 49.1 18.0 21.2 17.8 4.3 Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 0.7 0.1 0.1 0.1 25.8 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 0.4 0.1 Q 0.1 33.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 0.3 Q Q Q 30.2 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 49.1 18.0 21.2 17.8 4.3 Natural Gas

375

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.4 1.9 3.0 1.3 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Heat Home ..................................... 72.4 63.0 2.0 1.7 5.7 6.7 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 0.4 0.2 Q Q Q 46.2 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.3 0.2 Q Q Q 39.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ Q Q Q Q Q NF Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 72.4 63.0 2.0 1.7 5.7 6.7 Natural Gas

376

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Space Heating by Year of Construction, 2a. Space Heating by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.5 1.5 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.3 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 15.4 18.2 18.6 13.6 13.9 26.4 4.3 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 Q Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q 23.2 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 Q Q Q 0.2 Q Q 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q Q Q Q Q 37.8 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 15.4 18.2 18.6 13.6 13.9 26.4 4.3 Natural Gas ...................................

377

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.4 2.1 3.1 1.3 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 68.3 59.1 2.0 1.7 5.4 7.0 1 ................................................ 62.9 54.1 2.0 1.6 5.2 7.1 2 or More .................................. 5.4 5.0 Q Q 0.2 22.1 Most Used Oven ........................ 68.3 59.1 2.0 1.7 5.4 7.0 Electric ......................................

378

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.5 1.5 1.4 1.7 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.4 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 73.4 9.4 16.4 6.8 4.5 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 0.3 Q 0.6 Q 19.0 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 0.2 Q 0.3 Q 24.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q 0.3 Q 28.1 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 73.4 9.4 16.4 6.8 4.5 Natural Gas ...................................

379

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Appliances by Year of Construction, 2a. Appliances by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.5 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 14.3 17.2 17.8 12.9 13.7 25.9 4.2 1 ................................................ 95.2 13.1 16.3 16.6 12.1 12.7 24.3 4.4 2 or More .................................. 6.5 1.2 0.9 1.1 0.7 1.0 1.6 14.8 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 14.3 17.2 17.8 12.9 13.7 25.9 4.2 Electric ......................................

380

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Space Heating by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Space Heating by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.9 2.5 Total ............................................... 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Heat Home ..................................... 33.7 10.4 7.4 14.8 1.1 6.9 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 0.6 Q Q 0.5 Q 21.4 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.2 Q Q Q Q 84.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q 0.3 Q 36.4 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 33.7 10.4 7.4 14.8 1.1 6.9 Natural Gas ...................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2012 | Release Date: October 11, 0, 2012 | Release Date: October 11, 2012 | Next Release: October 18, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 12/29/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: EIA's Winter Fuels Outlook Projects Higher Heating Expenditures. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects that household consumption of all heating fuels will increase this winter, as temperatures are expected to be close to normal. Last year's unusually warm winter resulted in relatively low consumption of the primary space heating energy sources, including natural gas, propane, heating oil, and electricity. EIA's Winter Fuels Outlook projects that overall consumption of natural gas for space heating this winter (October 2012 - March 2013) will increase

382

Household gasoline demand in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continuing rapid growth in U.S. gasoline consumption threatens to exacerbate environmental and congestion problems. We use flexible semiparametric and nonparametric methods to guide analysis of household gasoline consumption, ...

Schmalensee, Richard

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Nevada: Kingston Creek Hydro Project Powers 100 Households  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hydropower project produces enough electricity to annually power nearly 100 typical American households.

384

Return on investment and corporate capital expenditures: Empirical evidence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is well known (e.g., Gordon 1996, Chapter 8) that maximizing a firm's ROI is not equivalent to maximizing the value of the firm. This fact notwithstanding, it is often claimed that many managers use ROI in making capital expenditure decisions. The purpose of our paper is to empirically examine this claim. The primary findings presented in this paper offer substantial evidence demonstrating the positive association between ROI and capital expenditures. The positive association between ROI and capital expenditures occurs even where the interests of owners and managers are apparently in conflict.

Lawrence A. Gordon; Raghavan J. Iyengar

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Investment opportunities and market reaction to capital expenditure decisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we argue that share price reaction to a firm's capital expenditure decisions depends critically on the market's assessment of the quality of its investment opportunities. We postulate that announcements of increases (decreases) in capital expenditures positively (negatively) affect the stock prices of firms with valuable investment opportunities. Contrarily, we predict that announcements of increases (decreases) in capital spending negatively (positively) affect the share prices of firms without such opportunities. Our empirical results are generally consistent with these predictions. Overall, empirical evidence supports our conjecture that it is the quality of the firm's investment opportunities rather than its industry affiliation which determines the share price reaction to its capital expenditure decisions.

Kee H. Chung; Peter Wright; Charlie Charoenwong

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Basis for Contributions by New Members to Past Capital Expenditure - Draft Note by the UK Delegation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basis for Contributions by New Members to Past Capital Expenditure - Draft Note by the UK Delegation

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Special Contribution by New Member States to Capital Expenditure Previously Incurred by the Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Special Contribution by New Member States to Capital Expenditure Previously Incurred by the Organization

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Special Contribution by New Member States to Capital Expenditure Previously Incurred by the Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Special Contribution by New Member States to Capital Expenditure Previously Incurred by the Organization

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Note on R&D expenditures and fixed capital formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we deal with the fixed capital nature of the means of production and ... . We argue that these R&D current expenditures typically have the nature of fixed investments. ... then present an empirical ...

Mario De Marchi; Maurizio Rocchi

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. All Principal Buildings Activities Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities, 1995

391

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2001 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 2001 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables + EXPAND ALL Tables HC1: Housing Unit Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF (all tables) Climate Zone PDF Year of Construction PDF Household Income PDF Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit PDF Four Most Populated States PDF Urban/Rural Location PDF Northeast Census Region PDF Midwest Census Region PDF South Census Region PDF West Census Region PDF Tables HC2: Household Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF (all tables) Climate Zone PDF Year of Construction PDF Household Income PDF Type of Housing Unit PDF Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit PDF Type of Rented Housing Unit PDF

392

Table A39. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity and Steam  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity and Steam" 9. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity and Steam" " by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ," Electricity",," Steam" ,,,,,"RSE" ,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.3,2,1.6,1.2

393

Green Computing Wanted: Electricity Consumptions in the IT Industry and by Household Computers in Five Major Chinese Cities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exhausted energy consumption becomes a world-wide issue nowadays. Computing contributes a large portion of energy consumption. The concept of green computing has been popularized. Along with the rapid development of China, energy issue becomes more and ... Keywords: energy/electricity consumption, IT industry, household computers, energy efficiency, green computing

Luyang Wang; Tao Wang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Environmental attitudes and household consumption: an ambiguous relationship  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article analyses the relationship between environmental attitudes and energy use in the home and for transport by Norwegian households. Quantitative surveys were used to find statistical correlations, and qualitative analyses to reveal mechanisms that influence the ability to behave in an environmentally friendly way. Three theses about attitudes, mechanisms and household consumption are presented. Firstly, a desire to project an environmentally friendly image has little influence on energy use in the home and for transport. Secondly, a sense of powerlessness prevents people from translating positive environmental attitudes into low energy use in the home and for everyday transport. Thirdly, a desire to self-indulge prevents people from translating positive environmental attitudes into low energy use for long distance leisure travel. These results have important implications for environmental policy. Public information and awareness campaigns can give consumers information on how to behave in an environmentally responsible way, but tend only to influence categories of consumption with little environmental impact. Structural change can be used to mitigate the effect of the sense of powerlessness and encourage environmentally friendly behaviour, but the desire to self-indulge is much more difficult to deal with.

Erling Holden; Kristin Linnerud

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A cohort analysis of household vehicle expenditure in the U.S. and Japan: A possibility of generational marketing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper shows the usefulness of cohort analysis for generational marketing. Aggregate data classified by age and period are decomposed into age, period, and generational cohort effects. We compare two cohort-a...

Kosei Fukuda

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1: January 8, 1: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on AddThis.com... Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips In a day, the average household traveled 32.7 miles in 2001 (the latest

397

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2: October 3, 2: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on AddThis.com... Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership Household vehicle ownership has changed significantly over the last 40

398

Drivers of Future Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

trends - Household income migration urbanization * Policy: China Energy Outlook - Air pollution - Climate change 4 (1) Industrial energy intensity: The energy intensity of...

399

Summary of expenditures of rebates from the low-level radioactive waste surcharge escrow account for calendar year 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the seventh report submitted to Congress in accordance with section 5(d)(2)(E)(ii)(II) of Title I--Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (the Act). This section of the Act directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to summarize the annual expenditures of funds disbursed from the DOE surcharge escrow account and to assess compliance of these expenditures with the limitations specified in the Act. In addition to placing limitations on the use of these funds, the Act also requires the nonsited compact regions and nonmember States to provide DOE with an itemized report of their expenditures on December 31 of each year in which funds are expended. Within 6 months after receiving the individual reports, the Act requires the Secretary to furnish Congress with a summary of the reported expenditures and an assessment of compliance with the specified usage limitations. This report fulfills that requirement. DOE disbursed funds totaling $15,037,778.91 to the States and compact regions following the July 1, 1986, January 1, 1988, and January 1, 1990, milestones specified in the Act. Of this amount, $1,445,701.61 was expended during calendar year 1992 and $10,026,763.87 was expended during the prior 6 years. At the end of December 1992, $3,565,313.43 was unexpended. DOE has reviewed each of the reported expenditures and concluded that all reported expenditures comply with the spending limitations stated in section 5(d)(2)(E)(i) of the Act.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Enhanced naphthenic refrigeration oils for household refrigerator systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to industry concerns about the successful employment of hydrofluorocarbon-immiscible hydrocarbon oils in refrigeration systems, enhanced naphthenic refrigeration oils have been developed. These products have been designed to be more dispersible with hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants, such as R-134a, in order to facilitate lubricant return to the compressor and to ensure proper energy efficiency of the system. Bench tests and system performance evaluations indicate the feasibility of these oils for use in household refrigeration applications. Results of these evaluations are compared with those obtained with polyol esters and typical naphthenic mineral oils employed in chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) refrigeration applications.

Reyes-Gavilan, J.L.; Flak, G.T.; Tritcak, T.R. [Witco Corp., Oakland, NJ (United States); Barbour, C.B. [Americold, Cullman, AL (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Housing subsidies and tax expenditures: The case of mortgage credit certificates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In many developed countries, the most significant housing subsidy programs are funded by tax expenditures rather than direct appropriations. Beyond the subsidy to homeownership under the personal income tax, the U.S. tax code provides additional subsidies to specific groups of homeowners. For example, the Mortgage Revenue Bond program (MRB) permits lower levels of government to issue tax-exempt debt, using the proceeds to supply mortgages at below-market interest rates to deserving households. States are also permitted to issue and distribute Mortgage Credit Certificates (MCCs) which entitle recipient homeowners to claim a tax credit for some portion of the mortgage interest paid rather than the tax deduction claimed by other homeowners. This paper documents the wide variations in reliance upon \\{MCCs\\} and \\{MRBs\\} across U.S. states and the emergence of Mortgage Credit Certificates as the largest housing program administered by California, the largest U.S. state. The paper also provides an economic analysis of the MCC program using micro data on more than 12 thousand program recipients in California. We estimate the extent and distribution of MCC subsidies across income and demographic groups, measuring the dollar amount of federal subsidies and their effects upon the user cost of residential capital and the demand price of housing. We estimate Poisson models of the geographic incidence of MCC subsidies across neighborhoods of varying socio-demographic composition and deprivation. Finally, we note differences in the administrative and programmatic costs of \\{MCCs\\} and MRBs, suggesting that there are clear reasons to favor Mortgage Credit Certificates as a means of subsidizing deserving households.

Erica Greulich; John M. Quigley

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Using census aggregates to proxy for household characteristics: an application to vehicle ownership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instead, Asian and Hispanic households were undersampled byhousehold Age of the householder/Average age of residents Hispanichousehold Age of the householder/Average age of residents Hispanic

Adjemian, Michael; Williams, Jeffrey

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES Capital Outlays CAPITAL OUTLAYS are expenditures that result in acquisitions of, additions to, replacement of, or major repairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES ­ Capital Outlays 2-G page 1 CAPITAL OUTLAYS are expenditures that result and other purchase-related costs. #12;EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES ­ Capital Outlays 2-G page 2 7300 and future fiscal periods. These objects are not to include cost of service contracts. 7100 Capital Outlays

Harms, Kyle E.

404

Transferring 2001 National Household Travel Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Policy makers rely on transportation statistics, including data on personal travel behavior, to formulate strategic transportation policies, and to improve the safety and efficiency of the U.S. transportation system. Data on personal travel trends are needed to examine the reliability, efficiency, capacity, and flexibility of the Nation's transportation system to meet current demands and to accommodate future demand. These data are also needed to assess the feasibility and efficiency of alternative congestion-mitigating technologies (e.g., high-speed rail, magnetically levitated trains, and intelligent vehicle and highway systems); to evaluate the merits of alternative transportation investment programs; and to assess the energy-use and air-quality impacts of various policies. To address these data needs, the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) initiated an effort in 1969 to collect detailed data on personal travel. The 1969 survey was the first Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990, 1995, and 2001. Data on daily travel were collected in 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. In 2001, the survey was renamed the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) and it collected both daily and long-distance trips. The 2001 survey was sponsored by three USDOT agencies: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The primary objective of the survey was to collect trip-based data on the nature and characteristics of personal travel so that the relationships between the characteristics of personal travel and the demographics of the traveler can be established. Commercial and institutional travel were not part of the survey. Due to the survey's design, data in the NHTS survey series were not recommended for estimating travel statistics for categories smaller than the combination of Census division (e.g., New England, Middle Atlantic, and Pacific), MSA size, and the availability of rail. Extrapolating NHTS data within small geographic areas could risk developing and subsequently using unreliable estimates. For example, if a planning agency in City X of State Y estimates travel rates and other travel characteristics based on survey data collected from NHTS sample households that were located in City X of State Y, then the agency could risk developing and using unreliable estimates for their planning process. Typically, this limitation significantly increases as the size of an area decreases. That said, the NHTS contains a wealth of information that could allow statistical inferences about small geographic areas, with a pre-determined level of statistical certainty. The question then becomes whether a method can be developed that integrates the NHTS data and other data to estimate key travel characteristics for small geographic areas such as Census tract and transportation analysis zone, and whether this method can outperform other, competing methods.

Hu, Patricia S [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [ORNL; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3: January 22, 3: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on AddThis.com... Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership

406

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5: February 5, 5: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on AddThis.com... Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles The graphs below show the average vehicle miles of travel (VMT) - daily

407

Opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from households in Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efforts to mitigate climate threats should not exclude the household as the household is a major driver of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through its consumption...2) emissions from kerosene combustion for lighting

O. Adeoti; S. O. Osho

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Household Wealth in a Cross-Country Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides a comparative analysis of household wealth in the United States, the United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Spain, and Italy. ... wealth, looking at the instruments in which households invest...

Laura Bartiloro; Massimo Coletta

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Control of household refrigerators. Part 1: Modeling temperature control performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial household refrigerators use simple, cost-effective, temperature controllers to obtain acceptable control. A manually adjusted airflow damper regulates the freezer compartment temperature while a thermostat controls operation of the compressor and evaporator fan to regulate refrigerator compartment temperature. Dual compartment temperature control can be achieved with automatic airflow dampers that function independently of the compressor and evaporator fan thermostat, resulting in improved temperature control quality and energy consumption. Under dual control, freezer temperature is controlled by the thermostat while the damper controls refrigerator temperature by regulating airflow circulation. A simulation model is presented that analyzes a household refrigerator configured with a conventional thermostat and both manual and automatic dampers. The model provides a new paradigm for investigating refrigerator systems and temperature control performance relative to the extensive verification testing that is typically done by manufacturers. The effects of each type of control and damper configuration are compared with respect to energy usage, control quality, and ambient temperature shift criteria. The results indicate that the appropriate control configuration can have significant effects and can improve plant performance.

Graviss, K.J.; Collins, R.L.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Home Prices and Household Callan Windsor, Jarkko Jskel and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Discussion Paper Home Prices and Household Spending Callan Windsor, Jarkko Jääskelä. ISSN 1320-7729 (Print) ISSN 1448-5109 (Online) #12;Home Prices and Household Spending Callan Windsor Abstract This paper explores the positive relationship between home prices and household spending

411

Handling Frame Problems When Address-Based Sampling Is Used for In-Person Household Surveys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......use as the sampling frame for household surveys. This subset includes...However, around 90 percent of households with PO box addresses also have...recent growth, new construction, Hispanic households, non-English-speaking households......

Graham Kalton; Jennifer Kali; Richard Sigman

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Japan by 2020. 12 of 17 Because of their large share in household energyJapan in 2000 which was 4560 kWh/household (IEEJ, 2003). In developed countries, the energy

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing household solid Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Groundwater Contamination from Household Wastewater... 12;Glossary Household Wastewater Treatment These terms may help you make more accurate assessments......

414

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Consumption of Electric and Electronic Equipment by Norwegian Households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Consumption of Electric and Electronic Equipment by Norwegian Households ... Conventional wisdom holds that large appliances, in particular washers, dryers, refrigerators and freezers, dominate residential energy consumption apart from heat, hot water and light. ... (16) It excludes lighting, all professional equipment, space heating, hot water, garden or car equipment, fire alarms, and air conditioning. ...

Edgar G. Hertwich; Charlotte Roux

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

415

Stranded Vehicles: How Gasoline Taxes Change the Value of Households' Vehicle Assets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stranded Vehicles: How Gasoline Taxes Change the Value of Households' Vehicle Assets Meghan Busse pollution caused by the burning of fossil fuels. Argu- ments against energy taxes, and gasoline taxes more incidence of the tax. We study the effect of a gasoline tax using changes in vehicle values. We construct

Rothman, Daniel

416

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey 2003 - Detailed Tables  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The tables contain information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Towards energy-efficient workload placement in Data Centers Rania Elnaggar (student & presenter) , Raj Yavatkar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; first, the cost of power, cooling and facilities provisioning in capital expenditure (CapEx); and second, the operational energy cost of powering servers, cooling and facilities equipment in operational expenditure (Op is proportional to average power. In our research we focus on improving operational energy expenditure and hence

Walpole, Jonathan

418

Court Committee Structure Capital Expenditure Committee is a "peer" committee sitting between Estates Committee, Finance Committee and Senior Management Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Court Committee Structure Capital Expenditure Committee is a "peer" committee sitting between Audit Committee Estates Committee Estates Management Committee Capital Expenditure Committee Finance Committee Capital Expenditure Committee Investment Advisory Committee Student Finance Subcommittee Health

Glasgow, University of

419

An intervention analysis for the relationship between capital expenditure decisions and the market value of firms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article is meant to explore the relationship between corporate capital expenditure decisions and the market value of firms ... . The article shows that deep cuts in capital expenditures may, for sink-hole ty...

Yang-Tzong Tsay; Ken Hung

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Nonlinear relationship between health care expenditure and its determinants: a panel smooth transition regression model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper employs a panel of 16 OECD countries over the period 19752009 to reexamine the health care expenditure (HCE)-income relationship by considering a lagged ratio of public expenditures on health as th...

Po-Chin Wu; Shiao-Yen Liu; Sheng-Chieh Pan

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Special Inquiry on the Office of the Chief Financial Officer's Information Technology Expenditures, OAS-RA-L-12-01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Special Inquiry on the Office of the Special Inquiry on the Office of the Chief Financial Officer's Information Technology Expenditures OAS-RA-L-12-01 November 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 28, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE DEPUTY SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Special Report on "Inquiry on the Office of the Chief Financial Officer's Information Technology Expenditures" INTRODUCTION The Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO) is responsible for ensuring the effective management and financial integrity of Department of Energy programs, projects, and resources. To achieve its mission, the OCFO develops, implements, and monitors policies and systems related to areas such as budget administration, program analysis, and strategic planning. The

422

2012-13 Expenditures Req # Amount Category Vendor Detail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

803472 $800 Food Costco Food, drink, paper COGS 802508 $891 Expense Advance Business Machines Service2012-13 Expenditures Req # Amount Category Vendor Detail SGA OFFICES COGS 801857 $800 Food Publix Food, drink, paper COGS 803830 $2,750 Expense Astro Tour Rental - Tour Bus COGS 803835 $650 Food Grammy

423

Expenditure by Colleges of Advanced Technology in Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... at the colleges of advanced technology to be 660,000. He estimated net recurrent expenditure after allowing for income receivable from fees and sources other than Ministry grant was ... receivable from fees and sources other than Ministry grant was 7,532,107, besides capital ...

1962-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

424

CREEL CENSUS AND EXPENDITURE STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CREEL CENSUS AND EXPENDITURE STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER, MONTANA, 1951 Marine Biological STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER, MONTANA, 1951 Marine Biological Laboratory JUN16 1954 WOODS HOLE, MASS MAP CREEL CENSUS SUN RIVER MONTANA DRAWN i*^ ^ TRACED- _2£jLt:l SUBMITTED . 1 V N 01 1 VN ei

425

Annual Energy Review - financial indicators section  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Annual statistics on consumer energy prices and expenditures, fossil fuel production prices and value, and value of fossil fuel imports and exports back to 1949.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Program Definitions DOE Weatherization: Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program DOE Weatherization Eligible Households: Households with incomes at or below 125% of the Federal poverty level, which varies by family size; however, a State may instead elect to use the LIHEAP income standard if its State LIHEAP income standard is at least 125% of the Federal poverty level. Data listed in this chapter include previously weatherized units. DOE Weatherization Eligible Households are a subset of Federally Eligible Households. DOE Weatherization Recipient Households: Households that have received weatherization under DOE Weatherization funding. Federally Eligible Households: Households with incomes below the Federal maximum standard of 150% to 200% of the poverty

427

Global Potential of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Energy Use in Japan: Household Equipment and EnergyHousehold (Electrified), 1999-2000 Average standby power (W/home) Austria Belgium Canada Denmark Finland France Germany Iceland Ireland Italy Japan

McNeil, Michael A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Energy content of spider eggs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy content of spider eggs was determined on samples ... stages within the egg sac. Rates of energy expenditure of developing eggs and spiderlings within ... 19% of those of emerged spiderlings. The energy

John F. Anderson

429

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 Cost of a Generic Quad Used in the Residential Sector ($2010 Billion) (1) Residential 1980 10.45 1981 11.20 1982 11.58 1983 11.85 1984 11.65 1985 11.43 1986 10.90 1987 10.55 1988 10.18 1989 9.98 1990 10.12 1991 9.94 1992 9.78 1993 9.77 1994 9.78 1995 9.44 1996 9.44 1997 9.59 1998 9.23 1999 8.97 2000 9.57 2001 10.24 2002 9.33 2003 10.00 2004 10.32 2005 11.10 2006 11.60 2007 11.61 2008 12.29 2009 11.65 2010 9.98 2011 9.99 2012 9.87 2013 9.77 2014 9.76 2015 9.88 2016 9.85 2017 9.83 2018 9.86 2019 9.88 2020 9.91 2021 10.00 2022 10.09 2023 10.11 2024 10.12 2025 10.09 2026 10.10 2027 10.13 2028 10.11 2029 10.06 2030 10.06 2031 10.13 2032 10.23 2033 10.34 2034 10.45 2035 10.57 Note(s): 1) See Table 1.5.1 for generic quad definition. This table provides the consumer cost of a generic quad in the buildings sector. Use this table to estimate the average consumer cost savings resulting from the savings of a generic (primary) quad in the buildings sector. 2) Price of

430

The Energy Expenditure of Rats Bearing Walker Carcinoma 256  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Calorimetrische Untersuchungen. Ztschr. f. Biol., 21:250 "884, 557 "410,1885. 6. . Die Quelle der thierischen Warme. Ibid., 30: 78 " 142, 1894. 7. SHERMAN, C. D., JR. ; MORTON, J. J. ; and Mmaa, G. B. Potential Sources of...

G. B. Mider; L. D. Fenninger; F. L. Haven; J. J. Morton

1951-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

ViziCal: Accurate Energy Expenditure Prediction for Playing Exergames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@cse.unr.edu Jeff Angermann2 jeff@medicine.unr.edu George Bebis1 bebis@cse.unr.edu Eelke Folmer1 efolmer to promote physical activity, fitness, and gross motor skill development [26]. As exergames typi- cally

Bebis, George

432

Partition of Energy Expenditure between Host and Tumor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...tumor growth. Daily food intake, water intake, evaporated water, urine weight, and fresh and...elevations attributable to spontaneous motor activity (24). The environmental...semisynthetic diet (22, 24) and water ad libitum. The calorimetric...

S. D. Morrison

1971-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Energy expenditures and carbon-dioxide emissions at blast furnaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic analysis of the reduction of iron and the material balances of carbon shows that the CO2 levels in the blast-furnace gas may be maintained by lowering the carbon consumption in the direct reduction ...

G. V. Korshikov; V. N. Titov; V. G. Mikhailov

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

An economic assessment of the impact of two crude oil price scenarios on households  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of two possible future crude oil price scenarios -- high and low price cases -- is assessed for three population groups: majority (non-Hispanic and nonblack), black, and Hispanic. The two price scenarios were taken from the energy security'' report published by the US Department of Energy in 1987. Effects of the two crude oil price scenarios for the 1986--95 period are measured for energy demand and composition and for share of income spent on energy by the three population groups at both the national and census-region levels. The effects on blacks are marginally more adverse than on majority householders, while effects on Hispanics are about the same as those on the majority. Little change is seen in percentage of income spent on energy over the forecast period. Both Hispanic and black households would spend a larger share of their incomes on energy than would majority households. The relatively adverse effects in the higher price scenario shift from the South and West Census regions to the Northeast and Midwest. 24 refs., 7 figs., 22 tabs.

Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S.; Hemphill, R.C.; Hill, L.G.; Marinelli, J.L.; Rose, K.J.; Santini, D.J.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Energy Conservation Management Can Pay For Itself  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With proper management of energy conservation programs, any structure can be energy efficient. And this energy efficiency need not require great expenditures. A 'systems approach' to energy management identifies a series of activities which...

McCall, R.; Bickle, L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Economic theory and women's household status: The case of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economic development disadvantages wives. Conventional microeconomic theory predicts this. As household incomes rise, wives have incentives to specialize in intangible household production. This may raise total household production according to the theory of comparative advantage, but disproportionately favors husbands in distribution of the gains according to the marginal productivity theory of distribution. Wives may become better off in absolute terms but more dependent financially on their husbands and lose power within the household. Historically, Japanese gender roles became highly specialized and wives legal status declined, although other Meiji-era features protected wives. Policies to improve women's status should address the precise economic problem involved.

Barbara J. Redman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Confronting earthquake risk in Japanare private households underinsured?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite the fact that Japan is an earthquake-prone country and Japanese ... risk averse, less than half of Japanese households are insured against earthquake risk. Based on...

Franz Waldenberger

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Salmon consumption at the household level in Japan.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the salmon demand of Japanese households. The specific goals are to illuminate the substitutional relationship between (more)

Kikuchi, Akihiro

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Consumer perspectives on household hazardous waste management in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We give an overview of the management systems of household hazardous waste (HHW) in Japan and discuss the management systems and their...

Misuzu Asari; Shin-ichi Sakai

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Post-IPO capital expenditures and market feedback  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an empirical test of the market feedback hypothesis, a theory suggesting that information aggregated in the IPO process is used for the firms investment decision. We examine the relation between post-IPO unexpected capital expenditures and feedback generated during the IPO process for 1543 \\{IPOs\\} between 1987 and 1995. Feedback is measured by (i) the unexpected price adjustment made at the end of the waiting period and (ii) the unexpected initial return. Consistent with the hypothesis, we find that positive feedback is followed by positive abnormal capital expenditures. A long-term event study finds no significant difference in stock returns between positive and negative feedback IPOs. This suggests that firms should not ignore market feedback as there is no evidence for a feedback related bias in post-IPO stock prices.

Jos van Bommel; Theo Vermaelen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Experimental Evidence Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Experimental Evidence Focus Area: Crosscutting Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.hks.harvard.edu/hepg/Papers/2009/The%20Power%20of%20Experimentatio Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/household-response-dynamic-pricing-el Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation Regulations: "Mandates/Targets,Cost Recovery/Allocation,Enabling Legislation" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

442

Northern Virginia Residents Improve Their Homes' Energy With...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Boost The Northern Virginia Home Energy Makeover Contest logo. The Local Energy Alliance Program (LEAP) awarded energy efficiency funding to three households as part of the...

443

Space Heating Scenarios for Ontario: a Demonstration of the Statistics Canada Household Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT This paper describes the analytical and simulation capabilities of the currently implemented version of the household model developed by the Structural Analysis Division, Statistics Canada. The household model, as described in A Design Framework for Long Term Energy Economic Analysis of Dwelling Related Demand [1], is a simulation framework and related data base of the Canadian housing stocks, residential construction, and end-use energy consumption in the residential sector. The purpose of the model is to provide an analytical tool for evaluating a variety of residential energy conservation strategies including insulation retrofitting and the introduction of new building standards, the possibilities for fuel substitution afforded by equipment retrofitting, and the impact of new technologies for space conditioning with respect to impacts on residential energy requirements and construction materials over time. The simulation results for Ontario that are presented in the paper are for demonstration purposes only and do not constitute a forecast. The choice of Ontario was arbitrary; similar calculations can be performed for other provinces, for Canada as a whole, and for selected subprovincial regions. At the time of preparation of this paper, the population and household formation block at the national level, the housing stock block, and the space heating part of the space conditioning block are implemented. Therefore simulation results are limited to these areas.

R.H.H. Moll; K.H. Dickinson

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Inefficient subsidy in Nigerian oil sector; implications for revenue generation and household welfare in Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Subsidy exists when consumers are assisted by the government to pay less than the prevailing market price of a given commodity. In respect of fuel subsidy, it means that consumers would pay below the market price per litre of petroleum product. This paper is aim at analysing the effects of the increase in energy prices on the social welfare of Nigerian households and comparing the consequences with the condition in which in concurrence with increase in energy prices, the government undertakes transfer payments to Nigerian households in order to protect their social welfare status. An analytical reasoning model was adopted and within the framework of this model the effects of increase in energy price on social welfare is discussed. Decrease in energy subsidies and a shift towards market prices will result in a lower budget deficit for the government and powerfully harness one of the main causes of inflation. However, if the elimination of subsidies be accompanied by transfer payments to households, the result is increase in the government budget deficit which in its turn will enhance inflation thus very negatively affecting social welfare.

Benjamin Anabori Mmadu; David Chuks Akan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Intra-Household Inequality in Transitional Russia Ekaterina Kalugina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Intra-Household Inequality in Transitional Russia Ekaterina Kalugina Natalia Radtchenko Catherine and satisfaction. Using two different subjective questions of the Russian data RLMS (Russia Longitudinal Monitoring and social changes in Russia, we investigate the dynamics of household behavior. Keywords: subjective data

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

446

Controlling Households' Drilling Fever in France: an economic modeling approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to generate environmental benefits through reducing water use, has produced economic incentives for households; France; households; domestic boreholes; tube well; water pricing. Author-produced version Fourth World negative environmental impact of water price increase in the drinking water sector. Using primary data

Boyer, Edmond

447

Summary of expenditures of rebates from the DOE low-level radioactive waste surcharge escrow account for calendar year 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, Public Law 99-240, requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to manage an escrow account creatd by collection of 25% of the non-penalty surcharge fees paid by the generators in non-sited regions and nonmember states to sited states for disposal of low-level radioactive waste. For the milestone period ending June 30, 1986, a total of $921,807.84, representing surcharge fees collected and interest earned, was in escrow during 1986 for rebate to the nonmember states, non-sited compact regions, and sited states. As of December 31, 1986, $802,194.54 had been rebated from the Escrow Account with an additional $118,517.62 scheduled for rebate in early 1987. The remaining rebate to be disbursed under this milestone is $1,095.68 for the state of Delaware. At the request of the state of Delaware, this rebate amount is being held in the Escrow Account until the state provides specific instructions for its disbursement. Individual rebate expenditure reports were submitted to DOE by all the non-sited compact regions and nonmember states that received rebates in 1986. Only $14.00 of these rebates were expended in 1986. DOE reviewed all of these reports and concluded that the single expenditure complies with the expenditure limitations stated in the Act.

Not Available

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Summary of expenditures of rebates from the low-level radioactive waste surcharge escrow account for calendar year 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is submitted in response to Title 1 of the 1980 Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act, as amended, (the Act). The report summarizes expenditures made by compact regions and unaffiliated states during calendar year 1995 of surcharge rebates from the July 1, 1986, January 1, 1988, and January 1, 1990, milestones, and the January 1, 1993, deadline. Section 5(d)(2)(A) of the Act requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to administer a surcharge escrow account. This account consists of a portion of the surcharge fees paid by generators of low-level radioactive waste in nonsited compact regions (compact regions currently without disposal sites) and nonmember states (states without disposal sites that are not members of compact regions) to the three sited states (states with operating disposal facilities--Nevada, South Carolina, and Washington) for the use of facilities in sited states through the end of 1992. In administering the surcharge escrow account, the Act requires DOE to: (1) Invest the funds in interest-bearing United States Government securities with the highest available yield; (2) Determine eligibility for rebates of the funds by evaluating compact region and state progress toward developing new disposal sites against the milestone requirements set forth in the Act; (3) Disburse the collected rebates and accrued interest to eligible compact regions, states, or generators; (4) Assess compliance of rebate expenditures in accordance with the conditions and limitations prescribed in the Act; and (5) Submit a report annually to Congress summarizing rebate expenditures by state and compact region and assessing the compliance of each such state or compact region with the requirement for expenditure of the rebates as provided in section 5(d)(2)(E) of the Act.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption and Expenditures Tables Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel ............................................... 124 Table C2. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel................................................ 130 Table C3. Consumption for Sum of Major Fuels ...................................................... 135 Table C4. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels....................................................... 140 Table C5. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels................................................................................................... 145 Table C6. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels......................... 150 Table C7. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of

450

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Purchasing or installing a clean energy system outright requires a large initial expenditure. High initial costs are often prohibitive for a consumer interested in...

451

Assimilation and differences between the settlement patterns of individual immigrants and immigrant households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...delineate directions for future household-scale investigations of...Categorization: Individuals or Households? The concentration on the...individual bodies. Of course, household structure and geographic context...children compared with non-Hispanic white children hinge on such...

Mark Ellis; Richard Wright

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Efficient Use of Commercial Lists in U.S. Household Sampling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......educational attainment, Hispanic ethnicity, household income, and home tenure...on the two persons in the household as well as the Hispanic ethnicity status of the head of household (assuming that the Hispanic ethnicity status of persons......

Richard Valliant; Frost Hubbard; Sunghee Lee; Chiungwen Chang

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

A theoretical and simulation-based examination of household vehicle choice through an adoption perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

=2 Senior h =3 Table 17: Japan household income distributionto 2005 Japan Census (millions of households)). CHAPTER 5.same shifts of household dynamics as Japan (i.e. lower birth

Liu, Jenny Hsing-I

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Annual energy outlook 1997 with projections to 2015  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Annual Energy Outlook 1997 (AEO97) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2015 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). These projections are based on results of EIA`s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). This report begins with a summary of the reference case, followed by a discussion of the legislative assumptions and evolving legislative and regulatory issues. ``Issues in Focus`` discusses emerging energy issues and other topics of particular interest. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends. The analysis in AEO97 focuses primarily on a reference case and four other cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. Forecast tables for these cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendixes D and E present summaries of the reference case forecasts in units of oil equivalence and household energy expenditures. Twenty-three other cases explore the impacts of varying key assumptions in NEMS--generally, technology penetration, with the major results shown in Appendix F. Appendix G briefly describes NEMS and the major AEO97 assumptions, with a summary table. 114 figs., 22 tabs.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

978-3-901882-56-2 c 2013 IFIP Energy Considerations in EoS-over-WDM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption and capital expenditure. We then propose an exact integer linear program to minimize either cost configurations. Our results for a realistic network show that capital expenditure optimization would result the energy efficiency (or capital expenditure efficiency) of the metro optical network, based on the Ethernet

Kuipers, Fernando A.

456

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Japan by 2020. Because of their large share in household energyJapan in 2000 which was 4560 kWh/household (IEEJ, 2003). In developed countries, the energy

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Source Demand per Household Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat, Electricity Total Energy Source Demand Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat, Electricity Demography Japan

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

"Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"...

459

Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiency of Household Appliances in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of household refrigerators and freezers 2 . Therefore, thesales of the refrigerators and freezers are about 20.6for household refrigerators and freezers has been updated

Lin, Jiang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Modeling households decisions on reconstruction of houses damaged by earthquakesJapanese case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, households decisions on reconstruction of damaged houses were modeled, using questionnaire data in Japan. Characteristics of households decisions were investigated using parameter estimation resu...

H. Sakakibara; H. Murakami; S. Esaki; D. Mori; H. Nakata

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Market reaction to capital expenditures of powerful CEOs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is controversial whether governance structure affects the value of the firm. This paper examines the sensitivity of firm value to capital expenditure under various levels of CEO power. The paper uses two measures of CEO power and finds that the greater the power of the CEO the less the increase in market value for a given increase in capital spending. The results are robust to the inclusion of firm and governance characteristics and indicate that the market is weary of investment decisions made by powerful CEOs.

Anwar Boumosleh; Elias Raad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Analysis of household refrigerators for different testing standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study highlights the salient differences among various testing standards for household refrigerator-freezers and proposes a methodology for predicting the performance of a single evaporator-based vapor-compression refrigeration system (either refrigerator or freezer) from one test standard (where the test data are available-the reference case) to another (the alternative case). The standards studied during this investigation include the Australian-New Zealand Standard (ANZS), the International Standard (ISO), the American National Standard (ANSI), the Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS), and the Chinese National Standard (CNS). A simple analysis in conjunction with the BICYCLE model (Bansal and Rice 1993) is used to calculate the energy consumption of two refrigerator cabinets from the reference case to the alternative cases. The proposed analysis includes the effect of door openings (as required by the JIS) as well as defrost heaters. The analytical results are found to agree reasonably well with the experimental observations for translating energy consumption information from one standard to another.

Bansal, P.K. [Univ. of Auckland (New Zealand). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; McGill, I. [Fischer and Paykel Ltd., Auckland (New Zealand)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Household electricity consumption and CO2 emissions in the Netherlands: A model-based analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Twenty percent of the total energy consumption in the Netherlands comes from household electricity consumption. This comes from household electric appliances whose number has grown in recent years. The paper explores the effect of smart meter introduction, appliance efficiency and consumer behaviour on reducing electricity consumption in the Netherlands. It does so by combining two perspectives: a sociotechnical approach and a bottom up simulation approach. The range of scenarios explored through simulation in the paper provides an understanding of the interplay between efficiency, smart meter diffusion and consumer behaviour. The results show their effect on electricity consumption and suggest that further effort is required to control and reduce it. Insights from the paper suggest that future studies should disaggregate with respect to a number of factors.

George Papachristos

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Microsoft Word - Highlights Bullets.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2004 December 2004 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 2004 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Lower petroleum and natural gas prices in this Outlook marginally reduced our projections of winter heating fuel prices and winter household heating fuel expenditures. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are now expected to average 34 percent above last winter's levels, with residential fuel prices averaging $1.85 per gallon for the October-to-March period. Expenditures for propane-heated households are expected to increase about 22 percent this winter. Expected increases in expenditures for natural gas-heated households have also been lowered in this Outlook to 9 percent. The reduction

465

Smoothing consumption across households and time : essays in development economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis studies two strategies that households may use to keep their consumption smooth in the face of fluctuations in income and expenses: credit (borrowing and savings) and insurance (state contingent transfers between ...

Kinnan, Cynthia Georgia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

in gallons, of this household's storage tank(s)? Enter the capacity for the two largest tanks (if there is more than one) in the boxes below. If the capacity is not known, write...

467

Fact #614: March 15, 2010 Average Age of Household Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The average age of household vehicles has increased from 6.6 years in 1977 to 9.2 years in 2009. Pickup trucks have the oldest average age in every year listed. Sport utility vehicles (SUVs), first...

468

Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

or More","NA","NA",93.75,96.42857143,91.27516779,97.46835443 "Race of Householder1" " White",88.61111111,"NA",91.54929577,91.68704156,90.27093596,92.77845777 " Black...

469

Householder Symposium on Numerical Linear Algebra June 1721, 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for discussions. This year's symposium is held at Peebles Hotel Hydro in the small town of Peebles (populationHouseholder Symposium on Numerical Linear Algebra June 17­21, 2002 Peebles Hotel Hydro, Scotland

Higham, Nicholas J.

470

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiencymeasuresapplicabletohomeenergy, commercialsectorelectricityandnaturalgas,industrial

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Effect of local government expenditure on the ratio of output to capital: Evidence from panel data at Chinas provincial level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper divides the expenditure of local government into the productive and nonproductive expenditure for revealing the effect of local governments expenditure on output-capital efficiency through model and e...

Tao Jin; Jianhui Zhang

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Residential Energy-Efficient Technology Adoption, Energy Conservation, Knowledge, and Attitudes: An Analysis of European Countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 households in ten EU countries and Norway. Knowledge of energy consumption and energy-efficient technology1 Residential Energy-Efficient Technology Adoption, Energy Conservation, Knowledge, and Attitudes of measures of household energy use behavior are estimated using a unique dataset of approximately 5

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

473

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was for 15% of total primary energy consumption to come fromis on domestic primary energy consumption, for most of thisdoes not include primary energy consumption by households

Kahrl, Fredrich James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Energy Impacts of Effective Range Hood Use for all U.S. Residential Cooking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impact on source energy and cost based on state specifichouse average annual energy and cost savings, relative toof household source energy and cost of range hood use in

Logue, Jennifer M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Fact #638: August 30, 2010 Average Expenditure for a New Car Declines in Relation to Family Earnings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Although the average expenditure for a new car has increased from 1967 to 2009, family earnings have also been on the rise. For this period, new car expenditures went from $3,216 to $23,186, while...

476

Innovative System and Method for Monitoring Energy Efficiency in Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improving energy efficiency (EE) in buildings may significantly reduce...@lisee, for achieving energy efficiency in buildings (households, officies, campus, data centers, etc. ... devices, locally estimating indo...

Grazia Fattoruso; Saverio De Vito; Ciro Di Palma; Girolamo Di Francia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

666,1876.378052,1886.589233,1896.617065,1906.307617,1915.627686,1924.664062,1933.551636 " Energy Intensity" " (million Btu per household)" " Delivered Energy Consumption",95.737358...

478

Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

086,1876.765991,1887.016235,1897.062622,1906.736938,1916.007446,1924.966064,1933.756714 " Energy Intensity" " (million Btu per household)" " Delivered Energy Consumption",95.737365...

479

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings characteristics tables-number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy consumption and expenditures tables-energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy end-use tables-total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. Guide to the 1992 CBECS Detailed Tables Released: Nov 1999 Column Categories Row Categories The first set of detailed tables for the 1992 CBECS, Tables A1 through A70,

480

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOE)(2008b). IndustrialAssessmentCentersDatabase. ofEnergysIndustrialAssessmentCenter(IAC) database(

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "household energy expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Slide24 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

(related to national energy R&D expenditures relative to other member countries). * Contracting party has right to determine ETDEWEB access policies and any fees within its...

482

AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF CAPITAL PROJECTS GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS TO MAKE CAPITAL EXPENDITURES FOR SENIOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF CAPITAL PROJECTS GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS TO MAKE CAPITAL EXPENDITURES.--For the purpose of providing funds for capital expenditures as authorized in the 2014 Capital Projects General Capital Projects General Obligation Bond Act. SECTION 4. EXPENDITURES.--The proceeds from the sale of #12

Johnson, Eric E.

483

Effects of Energy Conservation in Residential and Commercial Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...percent per year. The cumulative direct energy saving...users. Present worth of cumulative (1977-2000) expenditures...145 340 350 425 *Cumulative expenditures represent...15). 1) Energy production and delivery re-quire...and distillate fuel oil) to a customer consume...

Eric Hirst; Bruce Hannon

1979-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

484

The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis -- A Reflexively Designed Survey of New-Car-Buying Multi-Vehicle California Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EV,then we expect 13.3 to 15.2% of all light-duty vehicle sales,EV marketpotential for smaller and shorter range velucles represented by our sampleis about 7%of annual, newhght duty vehicle sales.EV body styles" EVs ICEVs Total PAGE 66 THE HOUSEHOLD MA RKET FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES percent mandatein the year 2003will dependon sales

Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Lincoln Electric System (Residential)- Sustainable Energy Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Lincoln Electric System (LES) offers several rebates to residential customers who are interested in upgrading to energy efficient household equipment. The program includes rebates for insulation...

486

LEDSGP/benefits | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Topics include Housing, Urban Transport, Household Energy in Developing Countries, Health-Care Facilities, and Occupational Health. Health Indicators for Sustainable...

487

Energy Metabolism and Requirements in the Cancer Patient  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...view. Finally, resting energy metabolism per unit of body weight declines...syn thesis expressed per unit of resting energy metabolism. These observations...upon modern methods for measurement of whole-body energy expenditure in human subjects...

Vernon R. Young

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Allocating energy in a first-to-n match  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......expenditure. The modelling of energy replenishment during the match...deal with a limited supply of energy. R EFERENCES BLACKWELL,D...Games and Statistical Decisions.New York: Wiley. ALLOCATING ENERGY IN A FIRST-TOn MATCH 37 GAESSER......

Jack Brimberg; W. J. Hurley; D. U. Lior

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Placing barriers to industrial energy efficiency in a social context: a discussion of lifestyle categorisation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper compares how analyses of energy use and efficiency have developed in households and industrial small- and medium-sized enterprises ... earlier studies that use lifestyle categories in examining household

Jenny Palm

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

The effects of energy efficiency and environmental labels on appliance choice in SouthKorea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the effects of energy efficiency and environmental labels on households choice of appliances, using a discrete ... on appliance choice. This paper found that households showed a positive ...

Gicheol Jeong; Yeunjoong Kim

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Advances in Household Appliances- A Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overview of options and potential barriers and risks for reducing the energy consumption, peak demand, and emissions for seven key energy consuming residential products (refrigerator-freezers, dishwashers, clothes washers, clothes dryers, electric ovens, gas ovens and microwave ovens) is presented. The paper primarily concentrates on the potential energy savings from the use of advanced technologies in appliances for the U.S. market. The significance and usefulness of each technology was evaluated in order to prioritize the R&D needs to improve energy efficiency of appliances in view of energy savings, cost, and complexity. The paper provides a snapshot of the future R&D needs for each of the technologies along with the associated barriers. Although significant energy savings may be achieved, one of the major barriers in most cases is high first cost. One way of addressing this issue and promoting the introduction of new technologies is to level the playing field for all manufacturers by establishing Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEPS) which are not cost prohibitive and promoting energy efficient products through incentives to both manufacturers and consumers.

Bansal, Pradeep [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards and Labeling Programs for Clothes Washers, Water Dispensers, Vending Machines and CFLs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy labels for household clothes washers include the United States, Canada, Korea, the European Union, Australia and New Zealand, Japan,

Fridley, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

energy prices | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

prices prices Dataset Summary Description The State Energy Data System (SEDS) is compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA); it is a comprehensive database of energy statistics by state (and includes totals for the entire US). SEDS includes estimates of energy production, consumption, prices, and expenditures broken down by energy source and sector. Annual estimates are available from 1960 - 2009 for production and consumption estimates and from 1970 - 2009 for price and expenditure estimates. Source EIA Date Released June 30th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Energy Consumption Energy <