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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States

Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual...

2

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. This project utilized GridViewTM, an electric grid dispatch software package, to estimate hourly emission factors for all of the eGRID subregions in the continental United States. These factors took into account electricity imports and exports

3

OpenEI - hourly emission factors  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4640 en Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode488...

4

hourly emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

60 60 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278660 Varnish cache server hourly emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago)

5

Predicting hourly building energy usage  

SciTech Connect

This article presents the results of an evaluation to identify the most accurate method for making hourly energy use predictions. The prediction of energy usage by HVAC systems is important for the purposes of HVAC diagnostics, system control, parameter and system identification, optimization and energy management. Many new techniques are now being applied to the analysis problems involved with predicting the future behavior of HVAC systems and deducing properties of these systems. Similar problems arise in most observational disciplines, including physics, biology and economics.

Kreider, J.F. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering); Haberl, J.S. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Definition: Kilowatt-hour | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilowatt-hour Kilowatt-hour Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Kilowatt-hour A unit of measure for energy, typically applied to electricity usage; equal to the amount of energy used at a rate of 1,000 watts over the course of one hour. One kWh is equivalent to 3,412 Btu, or 3,600 kJ.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The kilowatt hour, or kilowatt-hour, (symbol kW·h, kW h or kWh) is a unit of energy equal to 1000 watt hours or 3.6 megajoules. For constant power, energy in watt hours is the product of power in watts and time in hours. The kilowatt hour is most commonly known as a billing unit for energy delivered to consumers by electric utilities. Also Known As kWh Related Terms British thermal unit, Electricity, Energy, Kilowatt, energy, electricity generation

7

Quantification of Variability and Uncertainty in Hourly NOx Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Quantification of Variability and Uncertainty in Hourly NOx Emissions from Coal-Fired Power to quantify variability and uncertainty for NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants. Data for hourly NOx Uncertainty, Variability, Emission Factors, Coal-Fired Power Plants, NOx emissions, Regression Models

Frey, H. Christopher

8

Development of an Hourly Optimization Tool for Renewable Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect

An hourly optimization tool is developed to select and size renewable energy (RE) systems to meet the energy needs for various federal facilities. The optimization is based on life cost analysis of various RE technologies including wind and PV systems. The developed hourly optimization tool is used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of RE technologies using complex energy and demand charges such time-of-use (TOU) rates. The paper compares results obtained using hourly analysis instead of annual based calculations to optimize the sizing of RE systems for residential, commercial, and industrial facilities in three representative US climates.

Lee, C.; Walker, A.; Krarti, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Renewable Energies program (6 credit hour) Option A: 11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Energies program (6 credit hour) Option A: 11 Option B: The program is organized by t Spanish Institute and the Asso program on renewable energy will provide students with advanced knowledge. opportunities: option A- two renewable energies; option B include on-site visits to renewable energy generation

Simaan, Nabil

10

Impact of Wind Energy on Hourly Load Following Requirements: An Hourly and Seasonal Analysis; Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of wind energy on the power system grid can be decomposed into several time scales that include regulation, load following, and unit commitment. Techniques for evaluating the impacts on these time scales are still evolving, and as wind energy becomes a larger part of the electricity supply, valuable experience will be gained that will help refine these methods. Studies that estimated the impact of wind in the load following time scale found differing results and costs, ranging from near zero to approximately $2.50/megawatt-hour (MWh). Part of the reason for these differences is the different interpretation of the impacts that would be allocated to this ancillary service. Because of the low correlation between changes in load and wind, long-term analyses of the load following impact of wind may find low impacts. During the daily load cycle, there is a tremendous variability in load following requirements in systems without wind. When significant levels of wind generation are added to the resource mix, relatively small changes in wind output can complicate the task of balancing the system during periods of large load swings. This paper analyzes the load following impacts of wind by segregating these critical time periods of the day and separating the analysis by season. The analysis compares wind generation at geographically dispersed sites to wind generation based primarily at a single site, and for a large penetration of wind (more than 20% wind capacity to peak load).

Krich, A.; Milligan, M.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

China Energy and Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030 (2 nd Edition) David Fridley, Nina Zheng, Nan Zhou, Jing Ke, Ali Hasanbeigi, Bill Morrow, and Lynn Price China Energy Group, Energy...

12

Team Surpasses 1 Million Hours Safety Milestone | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Team Surpasses 1 Million Hours Safety Milestone Team Surpasses 1 Million Hours Safety Milestone Team Surpasses 1 Million Hours Safety Milestone October 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Separations Process Research Unit Demolition Project Safety Committee meets regularly with employees and supervisors to discuss safety issues and reinforce safe work habits. The Separations Process Research Unit Demolition Project Safety Committee meets regularly with employees and supervisors to discuss safety issues and reinforce safe work habits. NISKAYUNA, N.Y. - Vigilance and dedication to safety led the EM program's disposition project team at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) to achieve a milestone of one million hours - over two-and-a-half-years - without injury or illness resulting in time away from work.

13

Team Surpasses 1 Million Hours Safety Milestone | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Team Surpasses 1 Million Hours Safety Milestone Team Surpasses 1 Million Hours Safety Milestone Team Surpasses 1 Million Hours Safety Milestone October 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Separations Process Research Unit Demolition Project Safety Committee meets regularly with employees and supervisors to discuss safety issues and reinforce safe work habits. The Separations Process Research Unit Demolition Project Safety Committee meets regularly with employees and supervisors to discuss safety issues and reinforce safe work habits. NISKAYUNA, N.Y. - Vigilance and dedication to safety led the EM program's disposition project team at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) to achieve a milestone of one million hours - over two-and-a-half-years - without injury or illness resulting in time away from work.

14

INCITE Program Doles Out Hours on Supercomputers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INCITE Program Doles Out Hours on Supercomputers INCITE Program Doles Out Hours on Supercomputers INCITE Program Doles Out Hours on Supercomputers November 5, 2012 - 1:30pm Addthis Mira, the 10-petaflop IBM Blue Gene/Q system at Argonne National Laboratory, is capable of carrying out 10 quadrillion calculations per second. Each year researchers apply to the INCITE program to get to use this machine's incredible computing power. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Lab. Mira, the 10-petaflop IBM Blue Gene/Q system at Argonne National Laboratory, is capable of carrying out 10 quadrillion calculations per second. Each year researchers apply to the INCITE program to get to use this machine's incredible computing power. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Lab. Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science

15

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy-related carbon emissions in manufacturing analysis and issues related to the energy use, energy efficiency, and carbon emission indicators.

Information Center

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time March 27, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis John Lippert The city of Greenbelt, Maryland, where I live, is living up to its "green" name by participating in Earth Hour. This global event asks everyone to "go dark" for an hour to make a powerful statement of concern about climate change. The city will be turning off all non-essential lights in municipal buildings. Residents are requested to turn off their lights (and other energy-consuming appliances). The Greenbelt Advisory Committee on Environmental Sustainability, which advises the mayor and city council and which I chair, will be sponsoring a flashlight walk around Old Greenbelt during Earth Hour. My wife and I will

17

Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time March 27, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis John Lippert The city of Greenbelt, Maryland, where I live, is living up to its "green" name by participating in Earth Hour. This global event asks everyone to "go dark" for an hour to make a powerful statement of concern about climate change. The city will be turning off all non-essential lights in municipal buildings. Residents are requested to turn off their lights (and other energy-consuming appliances). The Greenbelt Advisory Committee on Environmental Sustainability, which advises the mayor and city council and which I chair, will be sponsoring a flashlight walk around Old Greenbelt during Earth Hour. My wife and I will

18

Analysis of Sub-Hourly Ramping Impacts of Wind Energy and Balancing Area Size (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

WindPower 2008 conference sponsored by AWEA held in Houston, TX on June 1-4 2008. This poster illustrates the data collected for an analysis of sub-hourly ramping impacts of wind energy and balancing area size.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor, March 2002 to November 2004, showing the model overprediction Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor More Documents & Publications Comments on Department of Energy's Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station and Proposed Mirant Compliance Plan Answer of Potomac Electric Power Company and PJM lnterconnection, L.L.C. to the October 6, 2005 motion filed by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Special Environmental Analysis For Actions Taken under U.S. Department of Energy Emergency Orders Regarding Operation of the Potomac River Generating

20

High energy photon emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of this work was to initiate the use of BaF2 arrays for detection of high energy photon emission from nuclear reactions. A beam from the Texas A&M University K-500 Superconducting Cyclotron, and a variety of detectors for hard photons, neutrons, charged particles, and fission fragments were used to study the reaction 160 + 238 U at a projectile energy of 50 MeV/u. Inverse slope values of the photon spectra were extracted for inclusive data and data of higher multiplicities at angles of 90' and 135'. Two 19-element barium fluoride (BaF2) arrays, an array of liquid scintillation fast neutron detectors and plastic scintillation charged-particle veto detectors, together with a silicon-cesium iodide (Si-CsI) telescope and a silicon fission fragment detector allowed the possibility of impact parameter selection through neutron and charged particle multiplicities. The associated multiplicity distributions of photon and fast neutron triggers were compared at 30' and 90' angles. The hardware and electronics layout of the experimental set up are described. Fundamental properties of the various detectors are explained and typical spectra are shown as examples for each detector system. The data acquisition and data compression is described in Chap. III, and followed by the calibration methods used for the BaF2 and Nal(TI) detectors. A description of a dynamic pedestal (zero level) correction mechanism, is followed by a description of several cosmic ray background reduction methods, including the highly effective centrality condition. A summary is given to compare the various methods. After a description of the other types of detectors used in the experiment, an example is given how the final photon spectra were produced. In Chap. IV the measured results are presented and compared to those in the literature. The last chapter provides the conclusions of this work.

Jabs, Harry

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

On a QUEST to Save Oakland 8.4 Gigawatt Hours | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On a QUEST to Save Oakland 8.4 Gigawatt Hours On a QUEST to Save Oakland 8.4 Gigawatt Hours On a QUEST to Save Oakland 8.4 Gigawatt Hours August 13, 2010 - 3:38pm Addthis Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers Derrick Rebello wants to make the downtown corridor of Oakland, California, one of the greenest in the nation. Through the new Downtown Oakland Targeted Measure Saturation Project, he and his company, Quantum Energy Services and Technologies (QUEST), are targeting the city's 120-block business district to make as many buildings as possible highly energy efficient. "The goal is to really leave no stone unturned," said Rebello, president of QUEST. "We are trying to achieve 80 percent participation. And of those participating buildings, we are focusing on getting a 20 percent reduction

22

Energy savings can be communicated in terms of kilowatt hours (energy), carbon (climate change) or pounds (cost).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AIM Energy savings can be communicated in terms of kilowatt hours (energy), carbon (climate change for saving energy and impact subsequent perceptions and behaviour. A particular focus here is behaviour beyond immediate energy consumption behaviour, i.e., more general environmental behaviours. SOCIAL VALUES

McAuley, Derek

23

Energy Use and Carbon Emissions:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 1980-2001 World Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 1980-2001 April 2004 Energy Information Administration Contacts Staff from the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU), Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (EMCID) prepared this report. General questions concerning the content of the report may be referred to Mark Rodekohr (Mark.Rodekohr@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-1130), Director of EMCID; or Lowell Feld (Lowell.Feld@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-9502), Leader of the Contingency Information Team. Specific questions about the report should be referred to Nathan Wilson (Nathan.Wilson@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-9883). 1 Table of Contents CONTACTS .......................................................................................................................

24

Identifying Challenging Operating Hours for Solar Intergration in the NV Energy System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract-- In this paper, the ability of the Nevada (NV) Energy generation fleet to meet its system balancing requirements under different solar energy penetration scenarios is studied. System balancing requirements include capacity, ramp rate, and ramp duration requirements for load following and regulation. If, during some operating hours, system capability is insufficient to meet these requirements, there is certain probability that the balancing authoritys control and reliability performance can be compromised. These operating hours are considered as challenging hours. Five different solar energy integration scenarios have been studied. Simulations have shown that the NV Energy system will be potentially able to accommodate up to 942 MW of solar photovoltaic (PV) generation. However, the existing generation scheduling procedure should be adjusted to make it happen. Fast-responsive peaker units need to be used more frequently to meet the increasing ramping requirements. Thus, the NV Energy system operational cost can increase. Index TermsSolar Generation, Renewables Integration, Balancing Process, Load Following, Regulation.

Etingov, Pavel V.; Lu, Shuai; Guo, Xinxin; Ma, Jian; Makarov, Yuri V.; Chadliev, Vladimir; Salgo, Richard

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

25

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Detailed Energy-Related Carbon Emissions All Industry Groups 1994 emissions Selected Industries Petroleum refining Chemicals Iron & Steel Paper Food Stone, clay and glass Methodological Details Estimation methods Glossary Return to: Energy and GHG Analysis Efficiency Page Energy Use in Manufacturing Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing Manufacturing, which accounts for about 80 percent of industrial energy consumption, also accounts for about 80 percent of industrial energy-related carbon emissions. (Agriculture, mining, forestry, and fisheries account for the remaining 20 percent.) In 1994, three industries, petroleum, chemicals, and primary metals, emitted almost 60 percent of the energy-related carbon in manufacturing. The next three largest emitters (paper, food, and the stone, glass, and clay products industry) produced an additional 22 percent of the energy-related manufacturing emissions (Figure 1).

26

China Energy and Emissions Path to 2030  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China Energy and Emissions Path to 2030 Title China Energy and Emissions Path to 2030 Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4866E Year of Publication 2013 Authors...

27

High Energy Emission from Magnetars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recently discovered soft gamma-ray emission from the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1841-045 has a luminosity L_g ~ 10^{36} ergs/s. This luminosity exceeds the spindown power by three orders of magnitude and must be fed by an alternative source of energy such as an ultrastrong magnetic field. A gradual release of energy in the stellar magnetosphere is expected if it is twisted and a strong electric current is induced on the closed field lines. We examine two mechanisms of gamma-ray emission associated with the gradual dissipation of this current. (1) A thin surface layer of the star is heated by the downward beam of current-carrying charges, which excite Langmuir turbulence in the layer. As a result, it can reach a temperature kT ~ 100 keV and emit bremsstrahlung photons up to this characteristic energy. (2) The magnetosphere is also a source of soft gamma rays at a distance of ~100 km from the star, where the electron cyclotron energy is in the keV range. A large electric field develops in this region in response to the outward drag force felt by the current-carrying electrons from the flux of keV photons leaving the star. A seed positron injected in this region undergoes a runaway acceleration and upscatters keV photons above the threshold for pair creation. The created pairs emit a synchrotron spectrum consistent with the observed 20-100 keV emission. This spectrum is predicted to extend to higher energies and reach a peak at ~1 MeV.

C. Thompson; A. M. Beloborodov

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

28

High Energy Emission from Magnetars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recently discovered soft gamma-ray emission from the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1841-045 has a luminosity L_g ~ 10^{36} ergs/s. This luminosity exceeds the spindown power by three orders of magnitude and must be fed by an alternative source of energy such as an ultrastrong magnetic field. A gradual release of energy in the stellar magnetosphere is expected if it is twisted and a strong electric current is induced on the closed field lines. We examine two mechanisms of gamma-ray emission associated with the gradual dissipation of this current. (1) A thin surface layer of the star is heated by the downward beam of current-carrying charges, which excite Langmuir turbulence in the layer. As a result, it can reach a temperature kT ~ 100 keV and emit bremsstrahlung photons up to this characteristic energy. (2) The magnetosphere is also a source of soft gamma rays at a distance of ~100 km from the star, where the electron cyclotron energy is in the keV range. A large electric field develops in this region in resp...

Thompson, C

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Energy Use per Worker-Hour: Evaluating the Contribution of Labor to Manufacturing Energy Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to primary energy supply for industry is representative ofenergy supply, which includes all primary energy except that supplied to industry,energy supply for the country. Countries with industries

Zhang, Teresa; Dornfeld, David

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

NV Energy Large-Scale Photovoltaic Integration Study: Intra-Hour Dispatch and AGC Simulation  

SciTech Connect

The uncertainty and variability with photovoltaic (PV) generation make it very challenging to balance power system generation and load, especially under high penetration cases. Higher reserve requirements and more cycling of conventional generators are generally anticipated for large-scale PV integration. However, whether the existing generation fleet is flexible enough to handle the variations and how well the system can maintain its control performance are difficult to predict. The goal of this project is to develop a software program that can perform intra-hour dispatch and automatic generation control (AGC) simulation, by which the balancing operations of a system can be simulated to answer the questions posed above. The simulator, named Electric System Intra-Hour Operation Simulator (ESIOS), uses the NV Energy southern system as a study case, and models the systems generator configurations, AGC functions, and operator actions to balance system generation and load. Actual dispatch of AGC generators and control performance under various PV penetration levels can be predicted by running ESIOS. With data about the load, generation, and generator characteristics, ESIOS can perform similar simulations and assess variable generation integration impacts for other systems as well. This report describes the design of the simulator and presents the study results showing the PV impacts on NV Energy real-time operations.

Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Meng, Da; Guo, Xinxin; Jin, Chunlian; Samaan, Nader A.

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

31

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Energy-related CO2 emissions 2005 . 2020 : 2035 : Energy-related CO; 2 emissions ; 6.00 ; 5.43 . 5.76

32

Do energy taxes decrease carbon dioxide emissions?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This paper investigates the environmental effectiveness of the Swedish energy taxes. That is, whether these have decreased the CO2 emissions and how they have (more)

Sundqvist, Patrik

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Emissions from Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions from Energy Use Emissions from Energy Use Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Emissions from Energy Use Figure 81. Carbon diioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2007 and 2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 82. Sulfur dioxide emissions from electricity generation, 1995-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 83. Nitrogen oxide emissions from electricity generation, 1995-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Rate of Increase in Carbon Dioxide Emissions Slows in the Projections Even with rising energy prices, growth in energy use leads to increasing

34

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Emissions from Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions from Energy Use Emissions from Energy Use Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Emissions from Energy Use Figure 97. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2006 and 2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 98. Carbon dioxide emissions, 1990-2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Rising Energy Consumption Increases Carbon Dioxide Emissions Without capture and sequestration, CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are proportional to the carbon content of the fuel. Coal has the highest carbon content and natural gas the lowest, with petroleum in between. In the AEO2008 reference case, the shares of these fuels change

35

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Eneregy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Eneregy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 7: Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In the coming decades, actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions could affect patterns of energy use around the world and alter the level and composition of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by energy source. Figure 65. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 66. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Carbon dioxide is one of the most prevalent greenhouse gases in the

36

Analysis of Sub-Hourly Ramping Impacts of Wind Energy and Balancing Area Size: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze sub-hourly ramping requirements and the benefit of combining Balancing Authority operations with significant wind penetrations.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

IGES GHG Emissions Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES GHG Emissions Data IGES GHG Emissions Data Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IGES GHG Emissions Data Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/report_kyoto.html References: IGES GHG Emissions Data[1] Summary "IGES GHG Emissions Data is aimed at providing comprehensive, organised information on the GHG emissions from Annex I countries to the UNFCCC in an easy-to-understand way. All information is extracted from the publicly available sources on the UNFCCC web-site and this data will be updated regularly. " References ↑ "IGES GHG Emissions Data" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=IGES_GHG_Emissions_Data&oldid=383109"

38

Urban Transportation Emission Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Transport Canada Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Prog/2/UTEC-CETU/Menu.aspx?lang=eng Cost: Free References: http://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Prog/2/UTEC-CETU/Menu.aspx?lang=eng The Urban Transportation Emissions Calculator (UTEC) is a user-friendly tool for estimating annual emissions from personal, commercial, and public transit vehicles. It estimates greenhouse gas (GHG) and criteria air contaminant (CAC) emissions from the operation of vehicles. It also estimates upstream GHG emissions from the production, refining and

39

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions For additional terms, refer to: the Glossary of Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 for additional greenhouse gas related terms, the Glossary of Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 for additional manufacturing terms, and Appendix F of Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 for descriptions of the major industry groups. British Thermal Unit: The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 pound of water by 1 degree Fahrenheit. One quadrillion Btu is 1015 Btu, or 1.055 exajoules. Btu: See British Thermal Unit. Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless, non-poisonous gas that is a normal part of Earth's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is a product of fossil-fuel combustion as well as other processes. It is considered a greenhouse gas as it traps heat radiated into the atmosphere and thereby contributes to the potential for global warming.

40

Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours March 11, 2013 - 12:03pm Addthis Safety inspections are a key element in a nuclear cleanup environment with large pieces of cleanup equipment. Inspections are essential to continuing safety success and reaching new milestones.| Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge Safety inspections are a key element in a nuclear cleanup environment with large pieces of cleanup equipment. Inspections are essential to continuing safety success and reaching new milestones.| Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge David Sheeley Editor/Writer for Environmental Management's Office of External Affairs Workers at URS | CH2M Oak Ridge (UCOR), the prime contractor for EM's Oak Ridge cleanup, are approaching a milestone of 4 million safe work hours

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Energy Efficiency in CO2 Emissions Trading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update explores methods to account for carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reductions specifically associated with the implementation of energy efficiency programs into greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions trading or offset markets. It focuses on how to understand, account for, quantify, verify, and optimize how electricity savings may both reduce CO2 emissions and potentially be granted credits for CO2 savings that may be traded in cap-and-trade regimes.

2008-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

42

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trends in Global Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Lynn Price,Trends in Global Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Lynn Price,Trends in Global Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Lynn Price,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Methane Emissions - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Equivalent; Estimated 2003 ... for about 8.7 percent of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions when weighted by methanes global warming potential factor.

44

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Carbon Forum - North America October 1, 2012 Washington, D.C. by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Whats driving ...

45

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China Title Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission...

46

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China Title Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of...

47

Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model Abstract This full life-cycle model evaluates the energy and emission impacts of advanced vehicle technologies...

48

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry Title Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction...

49

Total energy cycle emissions and energy use of electric vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to provide estimates of changes in life cycle energy use and emissions that would occur with the introduction of EVs. The topics covered include a synopsis of the methodology used in the project, stages in the EV and conventional vehicle energy cycles, characterization of EVs by type and driving cycle, load analysis and capacity of the electric utility, analysis of the materials used for vehicle and battery, description of the total energy cycle analysis model, energy cycle primary energy resource consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, energy cycle emissions, and conclusions.

Singh, M.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

Energy Use and Carbon Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity use worldwide increased significantly faster than overall energy use, ... consumption of hydroelectric energy, largely from the Aswan High Dam on the

51

Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours February 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Mike Tidwell performs a leak check and inspection on propane tanks Mike Tidwell performs a leak check and inspection on propane tanks Inspections ensure hoisting and rigging equipment performs correctly so employees can safely complete their tasks Inspections ensure hoisting and rigging equipment performs correctly so employees can safely complete their tasks Mike Tidwell performs a leak check and inspection on propane tanks Inspections ensure hoisting and rigging equipment performs correctly so employees can safely complete their tasks OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Workers at URS | CH2M Oak Ridge (UCOR), the prime contractor for EM's Oak Ridge cleanup, are approaching a milestone of 4

52

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Transportation, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html Country: United States UN Region: Northern America CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Screenshot References: http://www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html "This Emissions Estimator provides the amount of reduced emissions in terms of pounds of CO2, SO2, and NOX based on input from the User regarding the CHP technology being used. In turn the User will be provided with

53

GEIA-ACCENT Emission Data Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEIA-ACCENT Emission Data Portal GEIA-ACCENT Emission Data Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) Agency/Company /Organization: National Aeronautics and Space Administration Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.geiacenter.org/ References: Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA)[1] "The GEIA /ACCENT data portal provides gridded emission data; emission data are usually separated into three main categories : anthropogenic emissions, biomass burning emissions, and natural emissions: anthropogenic emissions include emissions from fossil fuel and biofuel consumption, industry and agricultural sources. biomass burning emissions include emissions from forest fires, savannah fires, and sometimes large croplands fires.

54

Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Profile to someone by E-mail Emissions Profile to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Basics Federal Requirements Guidance & Reporting

55

Potential Efficiency Gains, and Energy and Carbon Emission Savings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 3. Potential Efficiency Gains, and Energy and Carbon Emission Savings, of Replacing Existing 1997 Appliances

56

Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power...

57

Environment energy-related emissions. For example, the clearing of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Environment Note. Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion. Carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions from the combustion of biomass to

58

Emission Factors (EMFAC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emission Factors (EMFAC) Emission Factors (EMFAC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: EMFAC Agency/Company /Organization: California Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Online calculator User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.arb.ca.gov/msei/onroad/latest_version.htm Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America References: http://www.arb.ca.gov/msei/onroad/latest_version.htm The EMission FACtors (EMFAC) model is used to calculate emission rates from all motor vehicles, such as passenger cars to heavy-duty trucks, operating on highways, freeways and local roads in California. EMFAC2007 is the most recent version of this model.

59

A Potential Path to Emissions-Free Fossil Energy | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Potential Path to Emissions-Free Fossil Energy A Potential Path to Emissions-Free Fossil Energy August 20, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis The National Energy Technology Laboratory's...

60

High-energy emission from pulsar binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unpulsed, high-energy emission from pulsar binaries can be attributed to the interaction of a pulsar wind with that of a companion star. At the shock between the outflows, particles carried away from the pulsar magnetosphere are accelerated and radiate both in synchrotron and inverse Compton processes. This emission constitutes a significant fraction of the pulsar spin-down luminosity. It is not clear however, how the highly magnetized pulsar wind could convert its mainly electromagnetic energy into the particles with such high efficiency. Here we investigate a scenario in which a pulsar striped wind converts into a strong electromagnetic wave before reaching the shock. This mode can be thought of as a shock precursor that is able to accelerate particles to ultrarelativistic energies at the expense of the electromagnetic energy it carries. Radiation of the particles leads to damping of the wave. The efficiency of this process depends on the physical conditions imposed by the external medium. Two regimes can b...

Mochol, Iwona

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

hourly | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

hourly hourly Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

62

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After over two decades of staggering economic growth and soaring energy demand, China has started taking serious actions to reduce its economic energy and carbon intensity by setting short and medium-term intensity reduction targets, renewable generation targets and various supporting policies and programs. In better understanding how further policies and actions can be taken to shape China's future energy and emissions trajectory, it is important to first identify where the largest opportunities for efficiency gains and emission reduction lie from sectoral and end-use perspectives. Besides contextualizing China's progress towards reaching the highest possible efficiency levels through the adoption of the most advanced technologies from a bottom-up perspective, the actual economic costs and benefits of adopting efficiency measures are also assessed in this study. This study presents two modeling methodologies that evaluate both the technical and economic potential of raising China's efficiency levels to the technical maximum across sectors and the subsequent carbon and energy emission implications through 2030. The technical savings potential by efficiency measure and remaining gap for improvements are identified by comparing a reference scenario in which China continues the current pace of with a Max Tech scenario in which the highest technically feasible efficiencies and advanced technologies are adopted irrespective of costs. In addition, from an economic perspective, a cost analysis of selected measures in the key industries of cement and iron and steel help quantify the actual costs and benefits of achieving the highest efficiency levels through the development of cost of conserved energy curves for the sectors. The results of this study show that total annual energy savings potential of over one billion tonne of coal equivalent exists beyond the expected reference pathway under Max Tech pathway in 2030. CO2 emissions will also peak earlier under Max Tech, though the 2020s is a likely turning point for both emission trajectories. Both emission pathways must meet all announced and planned policies, targets and non-fossil generation targets, or an even wider efficiency gap will exist. The savings potential under Max Tech varies by sector, but the industrial sector appears to hold the largest energy savings and emission reduction potential. The primary source of savings is from electricity rather than fuel, and electricity savings are magnified by power sector decarbonization through increasing renewable generation and coal generation efficiency improvement. In order to achieve the maximum energy savings and emission reduction potential, efficiency improvements and technology switching must be undertaken across demand sectors as well as in the growing power sector. From an economic perspective, the cost of conserved energy analysis indicates that nearly all measures for the iron and steel and cement industry are cost-effective. All 23 efficiency measures analyzed for the cement industry are cost-effective, with combined CO2 emission reduction potential of 448 Mt CO2. All of the electricity savings measures in the iron and steel industry are cost-effective, but the cost-effective savings potential for fuel savings measures is slightly lower than total technical savings potential. The total potential savings from these measures confirm the magnitude of savings in the scenario models, and illustrate the remaining efficiency gap in the cement and iron and steel industries.

Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Ke, Jing; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Morrow, Bill; Price, Lynn

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

63

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details EPRI's continued efforts to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though intuitively recognized to reduce emissions, energy efficiency is not universally accepted as an eligible category for emissions credit in most trading or offset markets today. Chief among barriers to eligibility is the lack of precision in emissions reduction estimates based on average emissions factors. This study refines and expands marginal CO2 intensities of energy eff...

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

64

Solar Reserve Methodology for Renewable Energy Integration Studies Based on Sub-Hourly Variability Analysis: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increasing penetrations of wind a solar energy are raising concerns among electric system operators because of the variability and uncertainty associated with power sources. Previous work focused on the quantification of reserves for systems with wind power. This paper presents a new methodology that allows the determination of necessary reserves for high penetrations of photovoltaic (PV) power and compares it to the wind-based methodology. The solar reserve methodology is applied to Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study. A summary of the results is included.

Ibanez, E.; Brinkman, G.; Hummon, M.; Lew, D.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030 (2nd Edition)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030 (2nd Edition) Title China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030 (2nd Edition) Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors...

66

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009. World Energy Outlook 2009. Paris: OECD Publishing.Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050 Nan Zhou, David37 Figure 39 Carbon Emissions Outlook for Two Scenarios by

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Income Growth, Energy Consumption and Carbon Emissions in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper examines the long-run relationship between per capita income growth, energy consumption, and pollutant emissions in China during the period 19532004. We find that energy consumption, pollutant emissions and income are cointegrated in ... Keywords: Energy consumption, Pollutant emissions, Causality, Multivariate cointegration, China

Zhi Zhao; Jiahai Yuan

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Transit Emissions and Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

69

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Selected Paper Industries, 1994. Paper and paperboard mills emit over 80 percent of the energy-related carbon in ...

70

Trends in Building-Related Energy and Carbon Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

An analysis of trends in energy consumption and energy-related carbon emissions in U.S. buildings, 1970-1998.

71

Actual Commercial Buildings Energy Use and Emissions and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

An analysis of trends in energy consumption and energy-related carbon emissions in U.S. buildings, 1970-1998.

72

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012a. Analysis & Projections - Models & Documentation. Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions MetricsGovernment purposes. Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details EPRI's continued efforts to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though intuitively recognized to reduce emissions, energy efficiency is not universally accepted as an eligible category for emissions credit in most trading or offset markets today. Chief among the barriers to eligibility is the lack of precision in emissions reduction estimates based on average emissions factors. This study refines and expands the marginal CO2 intensities of en...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

74

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an effort to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though intuitively recognized to reduce emissions, energy efficiency is not universally accepted as an eligible category for emissions credit in most trading or offset markets today. Chief among the barriers to eligibility is the lack of precision in emissions reduction estimates based on average emissions factors. This study establishes a proof-of-concept for quantifying marginal CO2 intensi...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

75

The Energy and CO2 Emissions Impact of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy and CO2 Emissions Impact of Renewable Energy Development in China Xiliang Zhang, Tianyu Qi, and Valerie J. Karplus Report No. 242 April 2013 China Energy & Climate Project TSINGHUA - MIT://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 The Energy and CO2 Emissions Impact of Renewable Energy Development

76

Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Agency/Company /Organization: Local Governments for Sustainability Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Health, GHG inventory, Implementation, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.environmenttools.co.uk/directory/tool/name/harmonized-emissions-an Cost: Free Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Screenshot References: ICLEI-HEAT[1] Related Tools Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) ICCT Roadmap Model ... further results Find Another Tool

77

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The era of publicly mandated GHG emissions restrictions inthe United States has begun with recent legislation in California andseven northeastern states. Commercial and industrial buildings canimprove the carbon-efficiency of end-use energy consumption by installingtechnologies such as on-site cogeneration of electricity and useful heatin combined heat and power systems, thermally-activated cooling, solarelectric and thermal equipment, and energy storage -- collectively termeddistributed energy resources (DER). This research examines a collectionof buildings in California, the Northeast, and the southern United Statesto demonstrate the effects of regional characteristics such as the carbonintensity of central electricity grid, the climate-driven demand forspace heating and cooling, and the availability of solar insolation. Theresults illustrate that the magnitude of a realistic carbon tax ($100/tC)is too small to incent significant carbon-reducing effects oneconomically optimal DER adoption. In large part, this is because costreduction and carbon reduction objectives are roughly aligned, even inthe absence of a carbon tax.

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:16am Addthis After assessing the potential for agency size changes, a Federal agency should evaluate its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile using renewable energy in buildings. When using renewable energy in buildings, the approach for evaluating GHG emissions involves evaluating the renewable energy resource potential and determining what type of renewable energy technology to use in a building. To help determine renewable energy resource potential at a site, see FEMP's information on Renewable Energy Resource Maps and Screening Tools. Also see Renewable Energy Project Planning and Implementation.

79

After-hours power status of office equipment and energy use of miscellaneous plug-load equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research was conducted in support of two branches of the EPA ENERGY STAR program, whose overall goal is to reduce, through voluntary market-based means, the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the U.S. The primary objective was to collect data for the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program on the after-hours power state of computers, monitors, printers, copiers, scanners, fax machines, and multi-function devices. We also collected data for the ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings branch on the types and amounts of miscellaneous plug-load equipment, a significant and growing end use that is not usually accounted for by building energy managers. For most types of miscellaneous equipment, we also estimated typical unit energy consumption in order to estimate total energy consumption of the miscellaneous devices within our sample. This data set is the first of its kind that we know of, and is an important first step in characterizing miscellaneous plug loads in commercial buildings. The main purpose of this study is to supplement and update previous data we collected on the extent to which electronic office equipment is turned off or automatically enters a low power state when not in active use. In addition, it provides data on numbers and types of office equipment, and helps identify trends in office equipment usage patterns. These data improve our estimates of typical unit energy consumption and savings for each equipment type, and enables the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program to focus future effort on products with the highest energy savings potential. This study expands our previous sample of office buildings in California and Washington DC to include education and health care facilities, and buildings in other states. We report data from sixteen commercial buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania: four education buildings, two medical buildings, two large offices (> 500 employees each), three medium offices (50-500 employees each), and five small business offices (< 50 employees each). Two buildings are in the San Francisco Bay are a of California, nine (including the five small businesses) are in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and five are in Atlanta, Georgia.

Roberson, Judy A.; Webber, Carrie A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.; Pinckard, Marageret J.; Busch, John F.

2004-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

80

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EMISS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Three types of emission factors are currently included: carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxide. Emissions factors are specified separately for six different end-use...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2012 October 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 2013 U.S. Energy...

82

Table 1.5 Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Emissions ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption per Capita: Energy Expenditures 1: Energy ... 2009. 94,559,407 [R] 308 : 1,061,220 [R] ... 2 Carbon dioxide emissions from energy consumption. See Table 11.1.

83

Total energy cycle energy use and emissions of electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect

A total energy cycle analysis (TECA) of electric vehicles (EV) was recently completed. The EV energy cycle includes production and transport of fuels used in power plants to generate electricity, electricity generation, EV operation, and vehicle and battery manufacture. This paper summarizes the key assumptions and results of the EVTECA. The total energy requirements of EVS me estimated to be 24-35% lower than those of the conventional, gasoline-fueled vehicles they replace, while the reductions in total oil use are even greater: 55-85%. Greenhouse gases (GHG) are 24-37% lower with EVs. EVs reduce total emissions of several criteria air pollutants (VOC, CO, and NO{sub x}) but increase total emissions of others (SO{sub x}, TSP, and lead) over the total energy cycle. Regional emissions are generally reduced with EVs, except possibly SO{sub x}. The limitations of the EVTECA are discussed, and its results are compared with those of other evaluations of EVs. In general, many of the results (particularly the oil use, GHG, VOC, CO, SO{sub x}, and lead results) of the analysis are consistent with those of other evaluations.

Singh, M. K.

1999-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

84

Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels - Diesel Emissions Project (APBF-DEC): 2,000-Hour Performance of a NOx Adsorber Catalyst and Diesel Particle Filter System for a Medium-Duty, Pick-Up Diesel Engine Platform; Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presents the results of a 2,000-hour test of an emissions control system consisting of a nitrogen oxides adsorber catalyst in combination with a diesel particle filter, advanced fuels, and advanced engine controls in an SUV/pick-up truck vehicle platform.

Not Available

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Energy solutions for CO2 emission peak and subsequent decline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy solutions for CO2 emission peak and subsequent decline Edited by Leif Sønderberg Petersen and Hans Larsen Risø-R-1712(EN) September 2009 Proceedings Risø International Energy Conference 2009 #12;Editors: Leif Sønderberg Petersen and Hans Larsen Title: Energy solutions for CO2 emission peak

86

General Equilibrium Emissions Model (GEEM) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

General Equilibrium Emissions Model (GEEM) General Equilibrium Emissions Model (GEEM) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: General Equilibrium Emissions Model (GEEM) Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics: Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Technology characterizations Country: Kenya, Thailand UN Region: Eastern Africa, Caribbean Coordinates: 13.7240216°, 100.5798602°

87

Figure 18. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in three ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 18. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in three cases, 2005-2040 (million metric tons) Extended Policies No Sunset

88

Increased Energy Efficiency and Reduced HF Emissions with New ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Increased Energy Efficiency and Reduced HF Emissions with New Heat Exchanger. Author(s), Anders Kenneth Sorhuus, Geir Wedde, Ketil A.

89

Table 1.5 Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Emissions ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Expenditures include taxes where data are available. 5 In chained (2005) dollars. See "Chained Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Carbon dioxide emissions from energy consumption.

90

The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interface: Spreadsheet Website: greet.es.anl.govmain Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation...

91

Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China Title Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns:...

92

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

India's Iron and Steel Industry Title Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Iron and Steel Industry Publication Type Report...

93

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron and Steel Industry in China Title Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China Publication Type...

94

High energy emission from galactic jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this chapter we review some aspects of X-ray binaries, particularly those presenting steady jets, i.e. microquasars. Because of their proximity and similarities with active galactic nuclei (AGN), galactic jet sources are unique laboratories to test astrophysical theories of a universal scope. Due to recent observational progress made with the new generation of gamma-ray imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes and in view of the upcoming km3-size neutrino detectors, we focus especially on the possible high-energy gamma radiation and neutrino emission. In connection with this, we also comment about astrophysical jets present in young stellar objects, and we briefly discuss similarities and differences with extragalactic AGN and gamma-ray bursters.

H. R. Christiansen

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Agency/Company /Organization: Northwest Power and Conservation Council Sector: Energy Focus Area: Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Industry, Transportation, Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Publications Website: www.nwcouncil.org/energy/grac/20090130_Supply%20Curves_NWPCC_FINAL.pdf Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Screenshot References: Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves[1] Background "The ECL supply curve model includes data on potential emission reductions for approximately 60 separate technology options. It allows the examination of multiple scenarios involving the inclusion or exclusion of technology

96

Distributed Energy Resources Emissions Survey and Technology Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report characterizes emissions of gaseous and particulate pollutants from distributed energy resources (DER) technologies. Emissions profiles are provided for currently available equipment as well as for equipment expected to be commercially available by the year 2030. These profiles can be used to compare and evaluate DER technologies and can be used to develop emissions inventories for air quality modeling.

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

97

CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Sector: Energy, Water Focus Area: Agriculture, Greenhouse Gas Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/report_ers.html Cost: Free CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series Screenshot References: CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series[1] "IGES ERs Calculation Sheet aims at providing a simplified spreadsheet for demonstrating emission reductions based on the approved methodologies corresponding to eligible project activities. The sheet will provide you

98

CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Publications Website: www.iea.org/co2highlights/co2highlights.pdf CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Screenshot References: CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion[1] Overview "This annual publication contains: estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2008 selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information" Excel Spreadsheet References ↑ "CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion"

99

OpenEI - sulfur dioxide emissions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4600 en Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode488...

100

OpenEI - electricity emission factors  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4650 en Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode488...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool Agency/Company /Organization: National Energy Technology Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.netl.doe.gov/energy-analyses/refshelf/results.asp?ptype=Models/Too References: NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool [1] NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool This interactive tool enables the user to look at both total and power sector CO2 emissions from the use of coal, oil, or natural gas, over the period 1990 to 2030. One can use the tool to compare five of the larger CO2 emitters to each other or to overall world emissions. The data are from the

102

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Carbon Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CARBON EMISSIONS CARBON EMISSIONS A part of the integrating module, the carbon emissions submodule (CEM) computes the carbon emissions due to the combustion of energy. The coefficients for carbon emissions are derived from Energy Information Administration, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1996, published in October 1997. The calculations account for the fact that some fossil fuels are used for nonfuel purposes, such as feedstocks, and thus the carbon in the fuel is sequestered in the end product. CEM also allows for several carbon policy evaluation options to be imposed within NEMS. Although none of the policy options are assumed in the Annual Energy Outlook 1998, the options can be used in special analyses to simulate potential market-based approaches to meet national carbon emission

103

The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET Fleet) Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: greet.es.anl.gov/main Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model, GREET References: GREET Fleet Main Page[1] Logo: The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET Fleet)

104

Emissions Technology Gives Company Clean Win as Energy Innovator |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Technology Gives Company Clean Win as Energy Innovator Emissions Technology Gives Company Clean Win as Energy Innovator Emissions Technology Gives Company Clean Win as Energy Innovator March 7, 2012 - 2:38pm Addthis Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How does this innovation work? A plasma reformer attached to the engine extracts hydrogen from the fuel. The device injects the hydrogen into the combustion process making the fuel burn more completely. A catalyst attached to the tailpipe cleans up 85 percent of remaining emissions. In just a few months, startup company Umpqua Energy will open its first manufacturing facility with 50 new employees producing an emission control system that can potentially reduce the emissions from vehicles by 90 percent. In a significant technological jump, the startup's system is scalable to

105

Supporting RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Supporting RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UNDP Bratislava Regional Center Partner Interministerial committees headed by the national focal point on climate change Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://europeandcis.undp.org/e Program Start 2010 Program End 2012 Country Kazakhstan, Moldova, Republic of Kosovo, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

106

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs Massachusetts's 1997 electric utility restructuring legislation authorized the Massachusetts Department of Telecommunications and Energy (DTE)* to require certain electricity providers to disclose details on their fuel mix and emissions to end-use customers. In February 1998, the DTE issued final rules requiring competitive suppliers and distribution companies providing standard offer generation service or default generation service to provide this information to customers quarterly and upon request. * In 2007, the Massachusetts Department of Telecommunications and Energy

107

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Preliminary Report: Integrated NOx Emissions Savings from EE/RE Programs Statewide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL), at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits this sixth annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (Preliminary Report) to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. In this preliminary report the NOx emissions savings from the energy-efficiency programs from multiple Texas State Agencies working under Senate Bill 5 and Senate Bill 7 in a uniform format to allow the TECQ to consider the combined savings for Texas State Implementation Plan (SIP) planning purposes. This required that the analysis should include the cumulative savings estimates from all projects projected through 2020 for both the annual and Ozone Season Day (OSD) NOx reductions. The NOx emissions reduction from all these programs were calculated using estimated emissions factors for 2007 from the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) eGRID database, which had been specially prepared for this purpose. In 2007 the cumulative total annual electricity savings from all programs is 12,591,561 MWh/yr (8,326 tons-NOx/year). The total cumulative OSD electricity savings from all programs is 37,421 MWh/day, which would be a 1,559 MW average hourly load reduction during the OSD period (25.05 tons-NOx/day). By 2013 the total cumulative annual electricity savings from will be 28,802,074 MWh/year (18,723 tons-NOx/year). The total cumulative OSD electricity savings from all programs will be 88,560 MWh/day, which would be 3,690 MW average hourly load reduction during the OSD period (58.47 tons-NOx/day).

Degelman, L.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; McKelvey, K.; Montgomery, C.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Liu, Z.; Gilman, D.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J. S.

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

108

Fuel Sulfur Effects on a Medium-Duty Diesel Pick-Up with a NOx Adsorber, Diesel Particle Filter Emissions Control System: 2000-Hour Aging Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discusses the emission results of a nitrogen oxide adsorber catalyst and a diesel particle filter in a medium-duty, diesel pick-up truck.

Thornton, M.; Webb, C. C.; Weber, P. A.; Orban, J.; Slone, E.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Vehicle Emission Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics November 22, 2013 - 2:07pm Addthis Vehicle emissions are the gases emitted by the tailpipes of vehicles powered by internal combustion engines, which include gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and propane vehicles. Vehicle emissions are composed of varying amounts of: water vapor carbon dioxide (CO2) nitrogen oxygen pollutants such as: carbon monoxide (CO) nitrogen oxides (NOx) unburned hydrocarbons (UHCs) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) particulate matter (PM) A number of factors determine the composition of emissions, including the vehicle's fuel, the engine's technology, the vehicle's exhaust aftertreatment system, and how the vehicle operates. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation during fueling or even when vehicles are

110

Production, Energy, and Carbon Emissions: A Data Profile of the Iron and Steel Industry  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy-related carbon emissions in manufacturing analysis and issues related to the energy use, energy efficiency, and carbon emission indicators.

Information Center

2000-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

111

Energy use and carbon emissions: Non-OECD countries  

SciTech Connect

This report surveys world energy use and carbon emissions patterns, with particular emphasis on the non-OECD countries. The non OECD is important not only because it currently makes up 84% of world population, but because its energy consumption, carbon emissions, population, and grow domestic product have all been growing faster than OECD`s. This presentation has seven major sections: (1) overview of key trends in non-OECD energy use and carbon emissions since 1970; (2) Comparison and contrasting energy use and carbon emissions for five major non OEDC regions (former Soviet Union and eastern Europe, Pacific Rim including China, Latin America, other Asia; Africa; 3-7) presentation of aggregate and sectoral energy use and carbon emissions data for countries within each of the 5 regions.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2009 Methane Emissions for U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Production, by Fuel Type (1) Fuel Type Petroleum 0.5 Natural Gas 26.8 Coal 0.3 Wood 0.4 Electricity (2) 50.5 Total 78.5 Note(s): Source(s): MMT CO2 Equivalent 1) Sources of emissions include oil and gas production, processing, and distribution; coal mining; and utility and site combustion. Carbon Dioxide equivalent units are calculated by converting methane emissions to carbon dioxide emissions (methane's global warming potential is 23 times that of carbon dioxide). 2) Refers to emissions of electricity generators attributable to the buildings sector. EIA, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U.S. 2009, Mar. 2011, Table 18, p. 37 for energy production emissions; EPA, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas

113

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type October 7, 2013 - 10:51am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Starting with the programs contributing the greatest proportion of building greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the agency should next determine which building types operated by those programs use the most energy (Figure 1). Energy intensity is evaluated instead of emissions in this approach because programs may not have access to emissions data by building type. Figure 1 - An image of an organizational-type chart. A rectangle labeled 'Program 1' has lines pointing to three other rectangles below it labeled 'Building Type 1,' 'Building Type 2,' and 'Building Type 3.' Next to the building types it says, 'Step 2. Estimate emissions by building type.

114

Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy Topics: Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: www.esmap.org/esmap/EFFECT Cost: Free Equivalent URI: www.esmap.org/esmap/EFFECT Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) Screenshot

115

IPCC Emission Factor Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IPCC Emission Factor Database IPCC Emission Factor Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IPCC Emission Factor Database Agency/Company /Organization: World Meteorological Organization, United Nations Environment Programme Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jp/EFDB/main.php References: IPCC-EFDB[1] About "EFDB is meant to be a recognised library, where users can find emission factors and other parameters with background documentation or technical references that can be used for estimating greenhouse gas emissions and removals. The responsibility of using this information appropriately will always remain with the users themselves." References ↑ "IPCC-EFDB" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=IPCC_Emission_Factor_Database&oldid=367213"

116

Emission Factors For Formaldehyde - Home | Energy Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found to be higher than values reported in comparable housing by Hodgson et al.,3.

117

UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Programme Programme Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Name UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), European Union Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Topics Low emission development planning Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.undp.org/climatestr References UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme[1] UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Screenshot "This collaborative programme aims to strengthen technical and institutional capacities at the country level, while at the same time facilitating inclusion and coordination of the public and private sector in national initiatives addressing climate change. It does so by utilizing the

118

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Energy Reliability, Distribution System Integrationand Energy Reliability, Distribution System Integration

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or the use of regenerative burner Energy monitoring andor regenerative burners can reduce energy consumption

Fridley, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

CLEAN-Low Emission Development Planning Webinar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CLEAN-Low Emission Development Planning Webinar CLEAN-Low Emission Development Planning Webinar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CLEAN-Low Emission Development Planning Webinar Agency/Company /Organization: Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN), National Renewable Energy Laboratory Resource Type: Webinar, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website: en.openei.org/wiki/CLEAN References: CLEAN Webinar[1] Webinar Video LEDP.JPG Presentations Jane Ebinger, Sr. Energy Specialist, World Bank; Energy Sector Management Assistance Program (ESMAP) Juan Mata, Mexico's Secretariat of Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT) Sadie Cox, International Analyst, US National Renewable Energy Laboratory(NREL) Announcement Dear Colleagues, The Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) will be offering a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

CO2 emissions, Nuclear energy, Renewable energy and Economic growth in Taiwan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??When the government decided to energy policy, we must first understand the energy and economic growth with a causal link between carbon dioxide emissions, this (more)

Lin, Yi-Ching

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Maryland Public Service Commission Maryland's 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires all electric companies and electricity suppliers to provide customers with details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of electric generation. Emissions data must be expressed in terms of pounds per megawatt-hour (MWh). This information must be provided to customers every six months and annually to the Maryland Public Service Commission (PSC). Past reports are available in Case No. 8738 through the [http://webapp.psc.state.md.us/Intranet/Casenum/caseform_new.cfm? PSC's

123

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Michigan Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Michigan Public Service Commission Michigan's Customer Choice and Electric Reliability Act of 2000 (P.A. 141) requires electric suppliers to disclose to customers details related to the fuel mix and emissions, in pounds per megawatt-hour (MWh) of electric generation. Electric suppliers must provide this information to customers twice annually in a standardized, uniform format. The Michigan Public Service Commission (MPSC) staff must calculate the regional electricity generation and environmental characteristics and make it available to be used by the state's generation providers. The web site above describes the

124

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-4472E China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050 Nan Zhou, David Fridley, Michael McNeil, Nina Zheng, Jing Ke, and Mark Levine China Energy Group Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory April 2011 This work was supported by the China

125

Emissions and Energy Efficiency Assessment of Baseload Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Many technologies exist that are capable of storing electrical energy, including pumped hydro storage). A wind energy system using a pure storage system such as pumped hydro would require a greater peak powerEmissions and Energy Efficiency Assessment of Baseload Wind Energy Systems P A U L D E N H O L M

Sheridan, Jennifer

126

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003. Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource TechnologyATIONAL L ABORATORY Distributed Energy Resources for CarbonFirestone 5128 Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s end-use energy loads, energy tariff structures and fuelEnergy costs are calculated using a detailed representation of utility tariffTariffs, Berkeley Lab Report LBNL-55680. http://tariffs.lbl.gov EIA [Energy

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

17 Figure 13. 2030 Residential Primary Energy Savings by26 Figure 22. 2030 Commercial Primary Energy Savings by End-2030 .

Fridley, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China's 2008 Total CO 2 Emissions from Energy Consumption:10. China's 2008 Total CO 2 Emissions from Energy: Sectoral16 Table 11. China's 2008 CO 2 Emissions from Energy:

Fridley, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Energy and Air Emission Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer D. Jacobson D.J. Consulting LLC McLean, Virginia C. High Resource Systems Group Inc. White River Junction, Vermont Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-42616 February 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-42616 February 2008 Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer D. Jacobson D.J. Consulting LLC McLean, Virginia

131

Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development Topics: Analysis Tools Website: greet.es.anl.gov/ This full life-cycle model evaluates the energy and emission impacts of advanced vehicle technologies and new transportation fuels. The model allows users to evaluate various vehicle and fuel combinations. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Shift - Change to low-carbon modes Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies Learn more about the avoid, shift, improve framework for limiting air

132

Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million metric tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008...

133

Figure 5. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in four ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Reference High Oil/Gas Resouce CO2$15 CO2$15HR Released: May 2, 2013 Figure 5. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in four ...

134

Quantifying emissions reductions from New England offshore wind energy resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Access to straightforward yet robust tools to quantify the impact of renewable energy resources on air emissions from fossil fuel power plants is important to governments aiming to improve air quality and reduce greenhouse ...

Berlinski, Michael Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions down in 2011 - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Annual energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions fell 2.4% in 2011 compared to the level in 2010. Several factors combined to produce this drop, including slower ...

136

Short-Term Energy Carbon Dioxide Emissions Forecasts August 2009  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Supplement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook. Short-term projections for U.S. carbon dioxide emissions of the three fossil fuels: coal, natural gas, and petroleum.

Information Center

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

137

Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions declined in 2012 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions in 2012 were the lowest in the United States since 1994, at 5.3 billion metric tons of CO 2 (see figure above).

138

The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, Emissions Allowances,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-62574 The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, Emissions Allowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio Standards Edward A. Holt Ed Holt & Associates, Inc. Ryan H. Wiser of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program) of the U.S. Department

139

Source Energy and Emission Factors for Energy Use in Buildings (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

This document supports the other measurement procedures and all building energy-monitoring projects by providing methods to calculate the source energy and emissions from the energy measured at the building. Energy and emission factors typically account for the conversion inefficiencies at the power plant and the transmission and distribution losses from the power plant to the building. The energy and emission factors provided here also include the precombustion effects, which are the energy and emissions associated with extracting, processing, and delivering the primary fuels to the point of conversion in the electrical power plants or directly in the buildings.

Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050. Lawrence Berkeley2009. World Energy Outlook 2009. Paris: OECD Publishing.Future Energy and Emissions Outlook Nina Zheng, Nan Zhou and

Zheng, Nina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Energy development and CO{sub 2} emissions in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to provide a better understanding of future Chinese energy development and CO{sub 2} emissions from burning fossil fuels. This study examines the current Chinese energy system, estimates CO{sub 2} emissions from burning fossil fuels and projects future energy use and resulting CO{sub 2} emissions up to the year of 2050. Based on the results of the study, development strategies are proposed and policy implications are explored. This study first develops a Base scenario projection of the Chinese energy development based upon a sectoral analysis. The Base scenario represents a likely situation of future development, but many alternatives are possible. To explore this range of alternatives, a systematic uncertainty analysis is performed. The Base scenario also represents an extrapolation of current policies and social and economic trends. As such, it is not necessarily the economically optimal future course for Chinese energy development. To explore this issue, an optimization analysis is performed. For further understanding of developing Chinese energy system and reducing CO{sub 2} emissions, a Chinese energy system model with 84 supply and demand technologies has been constructed in MARKAL, a computer LP optimization program for energy systems. Using this model, various technological options and economic aspects of energy development and CO{sub 2} emissions reduction in China during the 1985-2020 period are examined.

Xiaolin Xi [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry . 88 Energy Conservation SupplyEnergy Conservation Supply Curves for Chinas Cement IndustryEnergy Conservation Supply Curves for Chinas Iron and Steel Industry

Fridley, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency Webcast Presentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

his is a PDF of PowerPoint slides presented during the 17 February 2009 webcast, Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency. The webcast was based on work conducted for the report, Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency (product number 1016085). The webcast and the slides include the following information: Modeling approaches and assumptions Summary of results for two approaches How model output can be applied by utilities Planned refinements to the model in 2009 and beyond, includin...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

144

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the role played by renewable energies in China's sustainablePlan for Renewable Energy in China. NDRC, 2008, Nationalunits. Chinas announced targets for renewable generation

Fridley, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Annual Emission Fees (Michigan) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Emission Fees (Michigan) Annual Emission Fees (Michigan) Annual Emission Fees (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Michigan Program Type Fees Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Renewable Operating Permit (ROP) is required by Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The ROP program clarifies the requirements that apply to a facility that emits air contaminants. Any facility in Michigan

146

Planetary Emissions Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Planetary Emissions Management Planetary Emissions Management Jump to: navigation, search Name Planetary Emissions Management Place Cambridge, Massachusetts Sector Carbon Product US-based, company offering measurements of carbon budgets using laser technology. Coordinates 43.003745°, -89.017499° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.003745,"lon":-89.017499,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

147

Zero Emissions Leasing LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emissions Leasing LLC Emissions Leasing LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Zero Emissions Leasing LLC Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96822 Sector Solar Product Honolulu-based developer of solar power generation projects on a large-scale (more than 100 kilowatts) Coordinates 21.30477°, -157.857614° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.30477,"lon":-157.857614,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

148

Seismic Emissions Surveys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emissions Surveys Emissions Surveys Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Seismic Emissions Surveys Abstract With recent improvements in acquiring, processing and interpreting data, seismic ground noise provides a valuable tool for geothermal exploration. A time domain beam steering array processing technique is employed. This process eliminates the occurrence of false anomalies caused by local geologic amplification effects. Surveys of this type are used to located naturally fractured reservoirs. Results form Dixie Valley and Desert Peak, Nevada correlate well with the location of productive wells or known geology. Authors Katz and Lewis J. Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, 1984 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

149

Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.epa.gov/otaq/models/moves/index.htm Cost: Free Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/motor-vehicle-emission-simulator-move Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation References: http://www.epa.gov/otaq/models/moves/index.htm Intended to replace MOBILE6, NONROAD, and NMIM. Estimates energy consumption emissions from highway vehicles from 1999-2050 and accounts for

150

Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Minnesota) (Minnesota) Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Climate Policies This statute sets goals for the reduction of statewide greenhouse gas emissions by at least 15 percent by 2015, 30 percent by 2025, and 80

151

Philippines-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Philippines-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Philippines-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Philippines South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

152

MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: MOBILE6 Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.epa.gov/oms/m6.htm Cost: Free References: http://www.epa.gov/oms/m6.htm MOBILE6 is an emission factor model for predicting gram per mile emissions of Hydrocarbons (HC), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon Dioxide (CO2), Particulate Matter (PM), and toxics from cars, trucks, and motorcycles under various conditions. MOBILE6 is an emission factor model for predicting gram per mile emissions of Hydrocarbons (HC), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon

153

Thailand-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thailand-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Thailand-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Thailand South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

154

Bangladesh-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Bangladesh-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Bangladesh-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Bangladesh Southern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

155

Nepal-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Nepal-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Nepal Southern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

156

Vietnam-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Vietnam-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Vietnam South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

157

Malaysia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Malaysia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Malaysia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Malaysia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Malaysia South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

158

Laos-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laos-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Laos-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Laos-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Laos South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

159

Portfolio Manager Technical Reference: Greenhouse Gas Emissions | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Greenhouse Gas Emissions Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

160

Trading Emissions PLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trading Emissions PLC Trading Emissions PLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Trading Emissions PLC Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC2N 4AW Product Trading Emissions PLC is an investment fund established to acquire tradable environmental instruments. It invests in projects developed under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and Joint Implementation (JI) of the Kyoto Protocol. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West September 24, 2013 - 10:08am Addthis A new report released today by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) examines the potential impacts of increasing wind and solar power generation on the operators of coal and gas plants in the West. To accommodate higher amounts of wind and solar power on the electric grid, utilities must ramp down and ramp up or stop and start conventional generators more frequently to provide reliable power for their customers - a practice called cycling.

162

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The wet corn milling industry emits almost a sixth of the energy-related carbon in the food industry. ...

163

A GIS Analysis on Possible Photovoltaic Cell Use for Energy Reduction During Peak Hours in Huntington, West Virginia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Solar panels are one of the fastest growing renewable energy technologies. This study aims to identify to what extent roof-mounted solar panels can reduce the (more)

Tadlock, James Eric

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Comparison of Life Cycle Emissions and Energy Consumption for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of Life Cycle Emissions and Energy Consumption for Environmentally Adapted Metalworking to significantly influence the environmental burdens of all fluids, energy consumption was relatively constant and consumed without long-distance transportation. MWF Production Each MWF is composed of lubricant oil

Clarens, Andres

165

Indonesia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Indonesia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Indonesia South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and

166

Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, Melanesia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia References LEAD Program[1]

167

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generate electricity in a gas turbine. The energy content ofcogeneration units are gas turbine based, using eithera simple cycle system (gas turbine with waste heat recovery

Fridley, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Table 11.5c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Data are for emissions from energy consumption for electricity generation and useful thermal output.

169

Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Description of the procedures for estimating carbon dioxide emissions in the Short-Term Energy Outlook

Information Center

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

170

Maldives-Supporting the Zero Emissions Strategy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maldives-Supporting the Zero Emissions Strategy Maldives-Supporting the Zero Emissions Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name Maldives-Supporting the Zero Emissions Strategy Agency/Company /Organization German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Partner Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Maldives Southern Asia References GTZ Schwerpunkte[1] GIZ[2] Contents 1 Overview 1.1 Costa Rica 1.2 Maldives 2 Outcomes, Lessons Learned and Good Practices 3 References Overview Costa Rica Maldives The Maldives are less the 2.5 m above sea level. Hence, the danger from climate change is crucial. At the same time the Maldives' economy,

171

Supporting the Zero Emissions Strategy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Zero Emissions Strategy the Zero Emissions Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name Maldives - Supporting the Zero Emissions Strategy Agency/Company /Organization German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Partner Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Costa Rica, Maldives Central America, Southern Asia References GTZ Schwerpunkte[1] GIZ[2] Contents 1 Overview 1.1 Costa Rica 1.2 Maldives 2 Outcomes, Lessons Learned and Good Practices 3 References Overview Costa Rica Maldives The Maldives are less the 2.5 m above sea level. Hence, the danger from climate change is crucial. At the same time the Maldives' economy,

172

Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Climate Policies Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

173

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, by Industry, 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions > Total Table Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions > Total Table Total Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Manufacturing Industries, 1994 Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) Carbon Intensity SIC Code Industry Group Total Net Electricity Natural Gas Petro- leum Coal Other (MMTC/ Quadrillion Btu) Total 371.7 131.1 93.5 87.3 56.8 3.1 17.16 20 Food and Kindred Products 24.4 9.8 9.1 W W 0.1 20.44 21 Tobacco Products W 0.1 W W W W W 22 Textile Mill Products 8.7 5.5 1.7 0.6 1.0 * 28.21 23 Apparel and Other Textile Products W 1.3 0.4 W W W W 24 Lumber and Wood Products 4.9 3.4 0.7 W W 0.2 9.98 25 Furniture and Fixtures 1.6 1.1 0.3 * 0.1 0.1 23.19 26 Paper and Allied Products 31.6 11.0 8.3 4.3 7.8 0.3 11.88

174

Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Cropland Production in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Cropland Production in the Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Cropland Production in the United States, 1990-2004 These data represent energy use and fossil-fuel CO2 emissions associated with cropland production in the U.S. Energy use and emissions occurring on the farm are referred to as on-site energy and on-site emissions. Energy use and emissions associated with cropland production that occur off the farm (e.g., use of electricity, energy and emissions associated with fertilizer and pesticide production) are referred to as off-site energy and off-site emissions. The combination of on-site and off-site energy and carbon is referred to as total energy and total carbon, respectively. Data provided here are for on-site and total energy and associated CO2 emissions. Units are Megagram C for CO2 estimates and Gigajoule for energy

175

Promoting Geothermal Energy: Air Emissions Comparison and Externality Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When compared to fossil fuel energy sources such as coal and natural gas, geothermal emerges as one of the least polluting forms of energy, producing virtually zero air emissions. Geothermal offers a baseload source of reliable power that compares favorably with fossil fuel power sources. But unless legislative changes are enacted, geothermal energy will continue to be produced at only a fraction of its potential.

Kagel, Alyssa; Gawell, Karl

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Energy Use and Carbon Emissions: Non-OECD Countries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Non-OECD Non-OECD Countries December 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts Energy Use and Carbon Emissions: Non-OECD Countries was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU). General questions concerning the content of the report may be referred to W. Calvin Kilgore (202-586-1617), Director of EMEU; Mark Rodekohr (202-586-1130), Director of Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division; or Derriel Cato (202-586-6574),

177

Energy Use and Carbon Emissions: Some International Comparisons  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Some Some International Comparisons April 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts Energy Use and Carbon Emissions: Some International Comparisons is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU). General questions concerning the content of the report may be referred to W. Calvin Kilgore (202-586- 1617), Director of EMEU; Arthur Andersen (202-586-1441), Director of Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division; or

178

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,to provide cooling. Solar technologies: Photovoltaics provide renewable electricity. Solar thermal collectors type in each location. City-specific weather,energy costs,and electric grid carbon-intensity values

179

Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West September 24, 2013 - 10:08am Addthis A new report released today by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) examines the potential impacts of increasing wind and solar power generation on the operators of coal and gas plants in the West. To accommodate higher amounts of wind and solar power on the electric grid, utilities must ramp down and ramp up or stop and start conventional generators more frequently to provide reliable power for their customers - a practice called cycling. Grid operators typically cycle power plants to accommodate fluctuations in

180

Energy and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system Title Energy and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Shehabi, Arman, Jennifer R. Stokes, and Arpad Horvath Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 7 Issue 2 Abstract Both centralized and decentralized wastewater systems have distinct engineering, financial and societal benefits. This paper presents a framework for analyzing the environmental effects of decentralized wastewater systems and an evaluation of the environmental impacts associated with two currently operating systems in California, one centralized and one decentralized. A comparison of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and criteria air pollutants from the systems shows that the scale economies of the centralized plant help lower the environmental burden to less than a fifth of that of the decentralized utility for the same volume treated. The energy and emission burdens of the decentralized plant are reduced when accounting for high-yield wastewater reuse if it supplants an energy-intensive water supply like a desalination one. The centralized facility also reduces greenhouse gases by flaring methane generated during the treatment process, while methane is directly emitted from the decentralized system. The results are compelling enough to indicate that the life-cycle environmental impacts of decentralized designs should be carefully evaluated as part of the design process.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

SciTech Connect

As a result of soaring energy demand from a staggering pace of economic expansion and the related growth of energy-intensive industry, China overtook the United States to become the world's largest contributor to CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007. At the same time, China has taken serious actions to reduce its energy and carbon intensity by setting both a short-term energy intensity reduction goal for 2006 to 2010 as well as a long-term carbon intensity reduction goal for 2020. This study presents a China Energy Outlook through 2050 that assesses the role of energy efficiency policies in transitioning China to a lower emission trajectory and meeting its intensity reduction goals. Over the past few years, LBNL has established and significantly enhanced its China End-Use Energy Model which is based on the diffusion of end-use technologies and other physical drivers of energy demand. This model presents an important new approach for helping understand China's complex and dynamic drivers of energy consumption and implications of energy efficiency policies through scenario analysis. A baseline ('Continued Improvement Scenario') and an alternative energy efficiency scenario ('Accelerated Improvement Scenario') have been developed to assess the impact of actions already taken by the Chinese government as well as planned and potential actions, and to evaluate the potential for China to control energy demand growth and mitigate emissions. In addition, this analysis also evaluated China's long-term domestic energy supply in order to gauge the potential challenge China may face in meeting long-term demand for energy. It is a common belief that China's CO{sub 2} emissions will continue to grow throughout this century and will dominate global emissions. The findings from this research suggest that this will not necessarily be the case because saturation in ownership of appliances, construction of residential and commercial floor area, roadways, railways, fertilizer use, and urbanization will peak around 2030 with slowing population growth. The baseline and alternative scenarios also demonstrate that China's 2020 goals can be met and underscore the significant role that policy-driven energy efficiency improvements will play in carbon mitigation along with a decarbonized power supply through greater renewable and non-fossil fuel generation.

Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Ke, Jing; Levine, Mark

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Date Published 052012 Conference Location New Orleans, USA Keywords cement, co2 emissions, concrete, emerging technologies, energy efficiency, Low Emissions & Efficient...

183

Table 11.2d Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2 Carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy consumption are excluded from total emissions in this table. ... non-combustion use of fossil fuels.

184

Table 11.2c Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

9 Wood and wood-derived fuels. 2 Carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy consumption are excluded from total emissions in this ... non-combustion use of fossil ...

185

Aspects on Bioenergy as a Technical Measure to Reduce Energy Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Greenhouse gas emission assessments of energy supply systems have traditionally included the CO2 emissions produced as the fuel is burned. A lot of models and (more)

Wihersaari, Margareta

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Aspects on bioenergy as a technical measure to reduce energy related greenhouse gas emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Greenhouse gas emission assessments of energy supply systems have traditionally included the CO2 emissions produced as the fuel is burned. A lot of models and (more)

Wihersaari, Margareta

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Calculating CO2 Emissions from Mobile Sources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Calculating CO2 Emissions from Mobile Sources Calculating CO2 Emissions from Mobile Sources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Calculating CO2 Emissions from Mobile Sources,GHG Protocol Agency/Company /Organization: Aether, Environmental Data Services, Aether, Environmental Data Services Sector: Energy Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development, Industry, Transportation Topics: GHG inventory, Potentials & Scenarios Resource Type: Guide/manual Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: cf.valleywater.org/Water/Where_Your_Water_Comes_From/Water%20Supply%20 Cost: Free References: http://cf.valleywater.org/Water/Where_Your_Water_Comes_From/Water%20Supply%20and%20Infrastructure%20Planning/Climate%20Change/Guidance_for_mobile_emissions_GHG_protocol.pdf Related Tools Tool and Calculator (Transit, Fuel)

188

Gateway:Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network) (Redirected from Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network) Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) Featured CLEAN Reports Review of Networks and Platforms for Low Emission and Climate Compatible Development Planning LEDS networks and platforms rev (12-01-11).pdf Concepts on the Implementation Framework for the Climate Technology Center and Network under the UNFCCC CTCN Implementation Framework CLEAN paper.pdf Featured LEDS Event Outcomes LEDS Program Workshop CLEAN Expert Workshop Featured Partner Web Portals Click here to view LEDS-related portals Clean Energy Solutions Center ClimateTechWiki ESMAP Low Carbon Development Knowledge Products and E-Learning

189

Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development (LEAD) Program Development (LEAD) Program (Redirected from Low Emission Asian Development (LEAD) Program) Jump to: navigation, search Name Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, Melanesia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia

190

Gateway:Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) (Redirected from CLEAN) Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) Featured CLEAN Reports Review of Networks and Platforms for Low Emission and Climate Compatible Development Planning LEDS networks and platforms rev (12-01-11).pdf Concepts on the Implementation Framework for the Climate Technology Center and Network under the UNFCCC CTCN Implementation Framework CLEAN paper.pdf Featured LEDS Event Outcomes LEDS Program Workshop CLEAN Expert Workshop Featured Partner Web Portals Click here to view LEDS-related portals Clean Energy Solutions Center ClimateTechWiki ESMAP Low Carbon Development Knowledge Products and E-Learning

191

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008 Total CO 2 Emissions from Energy Consumption: ReferenceChinas 2008 Total CO 2 Emissions from Energy Consumption byof estimating apparent energy consumption by fuel type and

Fridley, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions March 15, 2010 - 11:14am Addthis Castle Geyser at Yellowstone National Park | File photo Castle Geyser at Yellowstone National Park | File photo Joshua DeLung The 10 federal land organizations - including two national parks, six national forests and two national wildlife refuges - in the Greater Yellowstone Area comprise an entire ecosystem of their own. Straddling Wyoming's borders with Montana and Idaho, the region draws millions of visitors a year, attracted by the dramatic landscapes, geothermal activity and chances to spot wildlife like bison, elk and grizzly bear. Thanks to funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program, the Greater Yellowstone Coordinating Committee will

193

How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager The new ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager How Portfolio Manager helps you save The benchmarking starter kit Identify your property type Enter data into Portfolio Manager The data quality checker

194

Table 12.1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review September 2013 159 Table 12.1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Source

195

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of Chinasof Chinas total energy consumption mix. However, accuratelyof Chinas total energy consumption, while others estimate

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Improved accounting of emissions from utility energy storage system operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several proposed utility-scale energy storage systems in the U.S. will use the spare output capacity of existing electric power systems to create the equivalent of new load-following plants that can rapidly respond to fluctuations in electricity demand and increase the flexibility of baseload generators. New energy storage systems using additional generation from existing plants can directly compete with new traditional sources of load-following and peaking electricity, yet this application of energy storage is not required to meet many of the Clean Air Act standards required of new electricity generators (e.g., coal- or gas-fired power plants). This study evaluates the total emissions that will likely result from the operation of a new energy storage facility when coupled with an average existing U.S. coal-fired power plant and estimates that the emission rates of SO{sub 2} and NOx will be considerably higher than the rate of a new plant meeting Clean Air Act standards, even accounting for the efficiency benefits of energy storage. This study suggests that improved emissions 'accounting' might be necessary to provide accurate environmental comparisons between energy storage and more traditional sources of electricity generation. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Paul Denholm; Tracey Holloway [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Emissions and Energy: An Integral Approach Using an Online Energy Management and Optimization Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the expected legislation on the horizon in the U.S., the cost of CO2 emissions will have significant impact on industrial plant operations in the near future. Our purpose in this presentation is to show real industrial examples in which, with the existing equipment, continuous CO2 emissions reductions were achieved while, at the same time, optimizing the energy systems using an online model. We will show the importance of including the cost of CO2 emissions and how they should properly be taken into account when managing energy systems. Furthermore, we will illustrate how an optimization model is used for evaluating case studies to suggest the most cost effective energy system modifications while taking into account CO2 emissions costs. Several examples and results corresponding to the application of such systems to refineries will be discussed. In addition, the integration of CO2 emission costs and constraints into the online energy system models and their optimization is also explained.

Ruiz, D.; Ruiz, C.; Santollani, O.; Reitmeier, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Opportunities to change development pathways toward lower greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinas energy-related CO 2 emissions from 1996 to 1999: thefoot: In measuring carbon emissions, its easy to confuseChinas greenhouse gas emissions. Science, 294, 1835 1837.

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

NETL: News Release - Converting Emissions into Energy - Three Companies to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 14, 2000 September 14, 2000 Converting Emissions into Energy - Three Companies To Develop Technologies for Tapping Coal Mine Methane Methane, the chief constituent of natural gas, is a potent greenhouse gas, and millions of cubic feet of it escape daily from active coal mines. Now, three projects selected the U.S. Department of Energy propose new ways to capture the gas and convert it to useful energy -- reducing an environmental threat while adding to the nation's supplies of clean natural gas and electric power. The National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Energy Department's chief field site for its fossil energy research program, has selected: Appalachian-Pacific Coal Mine Methane Power Co., LLC, Arlington, VA, to work with West Virginia University Research Corp., Morgantown, WV, and Invitation Energy, Mannington, WV, to convert coal mine methane from mines in Marion County, WV, and surrounding areas into liquefied natural gas (LNG) to fuel heavy trucks.

200

The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, Emissions Allowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Certificates, Emissions Allowances, and Green PowerEnergy Certificates, Emissions Allowances, and Green PowerIn a green power product with 50% renewable energy, for

Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a summary of the impact of wind energy development on various air pollutants for a general audience. The core document addresses the key facts relating to the analysis of emission reductions from wind energy development. It is intended for use by a wide variety of parties with an interest in this issue, ranging from state environmental officials to renewable energy stakeholders. The appendices provide basic background information for the general reader, as well as detailed information for those seeking a more in-depth discussion of various topics.

Jacobson, D.; High, C.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

EIA - AEO2010 - Accounting for carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Accounting for carbon diioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion Accounting for carbon diioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Accounting for carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion CO2 emissions from the combustion of biomass [75] to produce energy are excluded from the energy-related CO2 emissions reported in AEO2010. According to current international convention [76], carbon released through biomass combustion is excluded from reported energy-related emissions. The release of carbon from biomass combustion is assumed to be balanced by the uptake of carbon when the feedstock is grown, resulting in zero net emissions over some period of time [77]. However, analysts have debated whether increased use of biomass energy may result in a decline in terrestrial carbon stocks, leading to a net positive release of carbon rather than the zero net release assumed by its exclusion from reported energy-related emissions.

203

MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Topics: Analysis Tools Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/29790 Cost: Free Related Tools IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP) Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model ... further results The part of the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM) that represents human systems; a recursive-dynamic multi-regional general equilibrium model

204

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductionconsumption and related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions.during Cumulative Carbon Dioxide Emission Reduction (MtCO

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Indonesia-GTZ Emissions Reductions in Urban Transport | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reductions in Urban Transport Reductions in Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Indonesia-GTZ Emissions Reductions in Urban Transport Name Indonesia-GTZ Emissions Reductions in Urban Transport Agency/Company /Organization GTZ Partner Ministry of Transportation Sector Energy Focus Area Transportation Topics Background analysis Website http://www.gtz.de/en/themen/um Program Start 2008 Program End 2012 Country Indonesia UN Region South-Eastern Asia References GTZ Transport & Climate Change Website[1] GTZ is working with Indonesia on this program with the following objective: "Indonesian cities increasingly plan and implement measures for a transport system that is energy efficient as well as environmentally and climate friendly." Background of the project is the absence of a national policy on

206

Photovoltaic energy impacts on US CO{sub 2} emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential role of photovoltaic (PV) technology in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions was evaluated in an energy-environmental economic systems model. The model examines the role of photovoltaic energy systems in a competitive market environment. PV technology is already competitive for certain niche markets. Further growth in those markets is expected as well as expansion into other markets. Decreasing cost penalties should provide greater incentive for expansion of niche markets. This analysis indicated that, while PV was not projected to be competitive as a general source of electricity supply to the grid by 2030, it did become an attractive technology for this purpose after 2010 under carbon constraint, even if the carbon constraint was limited to stability of emissions at the 1990 level.

Morris, S.C.; Lee, J.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Goldstein, G.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

State-Level Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000-2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Environment. Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights Short-Term Energy Outlook ...

208

Decomposition of Energy and CO2 Emission of China between 1980 and 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2005, Chinas energy consumption amounted to 2233 million tons coal equivalent (MtCE), and the CO2 emission was 5322.69 million tons, making China the worlds second largest consumer of energy products and source of CO2 emissions behind ... Keywords: China, Energy intensity, CO2 emissions, decarbon

Xiaoli Liu; Yongxiu He; Jun Dong

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

A graphical technique for explaining the relationship between energy security and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and greenhouse gas emissions Larry Hughes and Nikita Sheth Energy Research Group Department of Electrical the relationship between energy security and greenhouse gas emissions Larry Hughes and Nikita Sheth Abstract and the differences between energy security and greenhouse gas emissions. This paper presents a graphical technique

Hughes, Larry

210

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and compared emissions and energy usages. HEVs were found toforecasting emission and energy usages. Time frames play ansimilar emission and energy usage as current ICV operation.

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Translating Energy Efficiency into CO2 Emissions Reduction: A Modeling Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a methodology that EPRI has developed to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though energy efficiency is intuitively recognized to reduce carbon emissions, one barrier to its broader application is the lack of precision in attributing emissions reductions to specific program activities. Coarse estimates based on utilities' average emissions factors, while straightforward to calculate, do not provide enough specificity on emissions reductions...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

Transportation Energy Futures: Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet summarizes actions in the areas of light-duty vehicle, non-light-duty vehicle, fuel, and transportation demand that show promise for deep reductions in energy use. Energy efficient transportation strategies have the potential to simultaneously reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examined how the combination of multiple strategies could achieve deep reductions in GHG emissions and petroleum use on the order of 80%. Led by NREL, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, the project's primary goal was to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an emphasis on underexplored opportunities. TEF findings reveal three strategies with the potential to displace most transportation-related petroleum use and GHG emissions: 1) Stabilizing energy use in the transportation sector through efficiency and demand-side approaches. 2) Using additional advanced biofuels. 3) Expanding electric drivetrain technologies.

Not Available

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Transportation Energy Futures: Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet summarizes actions in the areas of light-duty vehicle, non-light-duty vehicle, fuel, and transportation demand that show promise for deep reductions in energy use. Energy efficient transportation strategies have the potential to simultaneously reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examined how the combination of multiple strategies could achieve deep reductions in GHG emissions and petroleum use on the order of 80%. Led by NREL, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, the project's primary goal was to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an emphasis on underexplored opportunities. TEF findings reveal three strategies with the potential to displace most transportation-related petroleum use and GHG emissions: 1) Stabilizing energy use in the transportation sector through efficiency and demand-side approaches. 2) Using additional advanced biofuels. 3) Expanding electric drivetrain technologies.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Vehicle emissions and energy consumption impacts of modal shifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing concern over air quality has prompted the development of strategies to reduce vehicle emissions in these areas. Concern has also been expressed regarding the current dependency of the U,S, on foreign oil. An option for addressing these concerns is to reduce vehicle-miles travelled (VMT), High- occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes have been cited as one alternative for achieving this goal. However, latent travel demand frequently negates some or all of the VMT savings brought about by HOV lanes, The net effects of modal shifts to HOV lanes and the subsequent latent travel demand were studied in the thesis, A methodology was developed for estimating vehicle emissions and energy consumption impacts of modal shifts from private vehicles in the freeway mainlanes to buses in an HOV lane when latent travel demand is considered. The methodology was evaluated and determined to yield reasonable results, Finally, the methodology was applied to a freeway corridor in Houston, Texas. The results of the application indicate that reductions in VMT do not necessarily cause reductions in vehicle emissions of interest even when considered, all three of the pollutants of latent travel demand is not consumption was decreased at considered. Energy consumption was decreased a virtually all levels of latent travel demand except where latent travel demand was equivalent to the mode shift.

Mallett, Vickie Lynn

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Evidence for Post-Quiescent, High-Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Burst 990104  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is well known that high-energy emission (MeV-GeV) has been observed in a number of gamma-ray bursts, and temporally-extended emission from lowerenergy gamma rays through radio wavelengths is well established. An important observed characteristic of some bursts at low energy is quiescence: an initial emission followed by a quiet period before a second (post-quiescent) emission. Evidence for significant high-energy, post-quiescent emission has been lacking. Here we present evidence for high-energy emission, coincident with lower energy emission, from the post-quiescent emission episode of the very bright and long burst, GRB 990104. We show light curves and spectra that confirm emission above 50 MeV, approximately 152 seconds after the BATSE trigger and initial emission episode. Between the initial emission episode and the main peak, seen at both low and high energy, there was a quiescent period of ?100 s during which the burst was relatively quiet. This burst was found as part of an ongoing search for high-energy emission in gamma-ray bursts using the EGRET fixed interval (32 s) accumulation spectra, which provide sensitivity to later, high-energy emission that is otherwise missed by the standard EGRET BATSE-triggered burst spectra. Subject headings: gamma rays: burstsgamma rays: observations 2

D. N. Wren; D. L. Bertsch; S. Ritz

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Gateway:Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) Featured CLEAN Reports Review of Networks and Platforms for Low Emission and Climate Compatible Development Planning LEDS networks and platforms rev (12-01-11).pdf Concepts on the Implementation Framework for the Climate Technology Center and Network under the UNFCCC CTCN Implementation Framework CLEAN paper.pdf Featured LEDS Event Outcomes LEDS Program Workshop CLEAN Expert Workshop Featured Partner Web Portals Click here to view LEDS-related portals Clean Energy Solutions Center ClimateTechWiki ESMAP Low Carbon Development Knowledge Products and E-Learning IEA Policies and Measures Database

217

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 2010 Commercial Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Lighting 211.9 211.9 20.4% Space Heating 87.4 10.2 6.7 0.3 17.3 5.6 50.5 160.7 15.5% Space Cooling 2.3 149.1 151.3 14.6% Ventilation 95.2 95.2 9.2% Refrigeration 69.1 69.1 6.7% Electronics 46.4 46.4 4.5% Water Heating 23.2 2.0 2.0 16.2 41.4 4.0% Computers 37.7 37.7 3.6% Cooking 9.5 4.1 13.6 1.3% Other (4) 15.8 0.9 9.0 3.8 13.7 122.0 151.5 14.6% Adjust to SEDS (5) 36.2 18.4 18.4 2.8 57.3 5.5% Total 174.4 31.5 6.7 9.0 4.1 51.3 5.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 805.0 1,036.3 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. Carbon emissions

218

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #686: August 1, 2011 Emissions and Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: August 1, 6: August 1, 2011 Emissions and Energy Use Model - GREET to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #686: August 1, 2011 Emissions and Energy Use Model - GREET on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #686: August 1, 2011 Emissions and Energy Use Model - GREET on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #686: August 1, 2011 Emissions and Energy Use Model - GREET on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #686: August 1, 2011 Emissions and Energy Use Model - GREET on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #686: August 1, 2011 Emissions and Energy Use Model - GREET on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #686: August 1, 2011 Emissions and Energy Use Model - GREET on AddThis.com...

219

hourly data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

data data Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each data file is a set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. Each container file contains up to 30 yearly files for one station, plus the Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) file for the selected station, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. Source U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released May 03rd, 2005 (9 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords DNI GHI hourly data NREL solar Sri Lanka SWERA TILT TMY UNEP Data application/zip icon Download TMY data (zip, 67.5 MiB)

220

Energy Storage/Conservation and Carbon Emissions Reduction Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded the Center for Transportation and the Environment (CTE) federal assistance for the management of a project to develop and test a prototype flywheel-?based energy recovery and storage system in partnership with Test Devices, Inc. (TDI). TDI specializes in the testing of jet engine and power generation turbines, which uses a great deal of electrical power for long periods of time. In fact, in 2007, the company consumed 3,498,500 kW-?hr of electricity in their operations, which is equivalent to the electricity of 328 households. For this project, CTE and TDI developed and tested a prototype flywheel-?based energy recovery and storage system. This technology is being developed at TDIs facilities to capture and reuse the energy necessary for the companys core process. The new technology and equipment is expected to save approximately 80% of the energy used in the TDI process, reducing total annual consumption of power by approximately 60%, saving approximately two million kilowatt-?hours annually. Additionally, the energy recycling system will allow TDI and other end users to lower their peak power demand and reduce associated utility demand charges. The use of flywheels in this application is novel and requires significant development work from TDI. Flywheels combine low maintenance costs with very high cycle life with little to no degradation over time, resulting in lifetimes measured in decades. All of these features make flywheels a very attractive option compared to other forms of energy storage, including batteries. Development and deployment of this energy recycling technology will reduce energy consumption during jet engine and stationary turbine development. By reengineering the current inefficient testing process, TDI will reduce risk and time to market of efficiency upgrades of gas turbines across the entire spectrum of applications. Once in place the results from this program will also help other US industries to utilize energy recycling technology to lower domestic energy use and see higher net energy efficiency. The prototype system and results will be used to seek additional resources to carry out full deployment of a system. Ultimately, this innovative technology is expected to be transferable to other testing applications involving energy-?based cycling within the company as well as throughout the industry.

Bigelow, Erik

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Handbook of solar energy data for south-facing surfaces in the United States. Volume II. Average hourly and total daily insolation data for 235 localities (Alaska - Montana)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Average hourly and daily total insolaion estimates are given for 235 US sites at a variety of array tilt angles. (MHR)

Smith, J.H.

1980-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Energy - environmental methods to reduce CO2emissions in Romanian iron and steel industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents some energy-environmental methods for reducing the CO2 emissions in Romanian iron and steel processes, both technological, as well as combustion processes, in case of integrated, technological and energetic approach, using ... Keywords: CO2 emissions, emissions reduction, energy-environmental methods, integrated system, mathematical model

Ion Melinte; Mihaela Balanescu

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Energy, emissions, and social consequences of telecommuting. Technical Report One  

SciTech Connect

By reducing transportation use, telecommuting can help reduce some of the social costs of travel (traffic congestion, time lost, emissions, dependence on imported fuels, accident deaths and property damage). These positive direct effects will be both offset and supplemented by indirect effects of telecommuting: improved traffic flow, latent demand (people will start driving more), and increased urban sprawl. The study indicates that the energy and emissions benefits of telecommuting are not likely to be entirely offset by latent travel demand or by the geographical expansion of cities; perhaps half the potential reduction in vehicle-miles traveled will be replaced by new traffic. From a fuel-use perspective, the indirect benefit of lower average emissions and fuel consumption rates appears sufficient to offset impacts from the third indirect effect, additional travel brought about by increased suburbanization. Substantial levels of telecommuting will also reduce the need for highway capacity expansion, saving capital, maintenance, and urban land. Telecommuting and its benefits will be concentrated in the largest, most congested, and most polluted urban areas (20--25% in the NYC and LA areas; 50% in the 10 largest cities; 90% in the 75 largest).Telecommuting may also have a synergistic beneficial effect on other transportation strategies, e.g., congestion pricing, parking fees, taxes discouraging travel during peak periods, etc. Other beneficial effects may include greater presence of adults at home and on residential communities. Effects of improved telecommunications technology on transportation, freight, economy, industrial operations are discussed, including implications of an ``information superhighway.``

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

NERSC Edison Hours Used Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edison Hours Used Edison Hours Used Edison Usage Chart Edison Usage Chart Date Hours Used (in millions) Percent of Maximum Possible (24 hoursday) 10142013 1.852 61.8 10132013...

225

Figure 111. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in three cases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 111. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in three cases with three levels of emissions fees, 2000-2040 (million metric tons)

226

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agency (IEA), 2004c. CO2 emissions from fuel combustion,of Carbon Dioxide Emissions on GNP Growth: Interpretation ofD. , 2000. Special Report on Emissions Scenarios: Report of

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

EIA Energy Efficiency-Energy Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions Links for the  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions Links Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions Links Energy Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions Links Posted Date: May 2007 Page Last Modified: September 2010 EIA Links Disclaimer: These pages contain hypertext links to information created and maintained by other public and private organizations. These links provide additional information that may be useful or interesting and are being provided consistent with the intended purpose of the EIA website. EIA does not control or guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of this outside information. EIA does not endorse the organizations sponsoring linked websites, the views they express, or the products and services they offer. Government Agencies / Associations Energy Information Administration - Annual Energy Outlook: Carbon Dioxide Emissions, CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are proportional to fuel consumption. Among fossil fuel types, coal has the highest carbon content, natural gas the lowest, and petroleum in between. In the AEO2006 reference case, the shares of these fuels change slightly from 2004 to 2030, with more coal and less petroleum and natural gas. The combined share of carbon-neutral renewable and nuclear energy is stable from 2004 to 2030 at 14 percent

228

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2035 Commercial Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Lighting 179.6 179.6 15.5% Space Heating 87.3 6.7 6.6 0.4 13.7 5.5 25.5 132.0 11.4% Ventilation 100.7 100.7 8.7% Space Cooling 1.7 84.1 85.8 7.4% Electronics 72.3 72.3 6.2% Refrigeration 55.6 55.6 4.8% Water Heating 28.8 2.5 2.5 13.3 44.7 3.9% Computers 33.6 33.6 2.9% Cooking 11.9 3.4 15.2 1.3% Other (4) 42.8 1.0 9.8 4.2 14.9 227.3 285.0 24.6% Adjust to SEDS (5) 21.3 13.1 13.1 120.5 154.9 13.4% Total 193.8 23.3 6.6 9.8 4.6 44.3 5.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): 915.8 1,159.3 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

229

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2025 Commercial Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Lighting 171.2 171.2 16.1% Space Heating 89.4 7.7 6.3 0.4 14.3 5.5 25.7 135.0 12.7% Ventilation 94.4 94.4 8.9% Space Cooling 1.8 81.5 83.3 7.8% Electronics 63.8 63.8 6.0% Refrigeration 53.7 53.7 5.1% Computers 31.2 31.2 2.9% Water Heating 27.5 2.3 2.3 14.0 43.7 4.1% Cooking 11.0 3.5 14.5 1.4% Other (4) 25.3 0.9 9.3 3.8 14.0 177.4 216.8 20.4% Adjust to SEDS (5) 30.9 13.4 13.4 109.4 153.7 14.5% Total 185.8 24.3 6.3 9.3 4.2 44.0 5.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): 825.9 1,061.3 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

230

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 2015 Commercial Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Lighting 160.0 160.0 16.6% Space Heating 89.9 9.0 6.2 0.3 15.5 5.5 26.4 137.3 14.2% Space Cooling 1.9 80.0 81.9 8.5% Ventilation 85.0 85.0 8.8% Refrigeration 55.8 55.8 5.8% Electronics 49.9 49.9 5.2% Water Heating 25.5 2.0 2.0 14.3 41.8 4.3% Computers 30.0 30.0 3.1% Cooking 10.2 3.6 13.8 1.4% Other (4) 17.6 0.9 8.6 3.5 12.9 128.6 159.2 16.5% Adjust to SEDS (5) 36.0 13.9 13.9 99.8 149.8 15.5% Total 181.2 25.8 6.2 8.6 3.8 44.4 5.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): 733.4 964.5 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

231

Gateway:Low Emission Development Strategies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Gateway:Low Emission Development Strategies (Redirected from Developing LED Scenarios) Jump to: navigation, search Leds-Graphics 03.PNG Low Emission Development...

232

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Eligibility Utility Program Information Maine Program Type Generation Disclosure Maine's 1997 restructuring...

233

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Eligibility Utility Program Information Nevada Program Type Generation Disclosure In 2001, Nevada enacted...

234

Asia Carbon Emission Management India Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Emission Management India Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Asia Carbon Emission Management India Pvt Ltd Place Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India Zip 600 034 Sector Carbon...

235

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry, encouraging widespread energy saving, emission reduction, increased steel scrap recycling rate,

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. cement industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement Industry, An Energy Perspective", U.S. Department ofDioxide Emissions for Energy Use in U.S. Cement Production (3. Primary Energy Consumption in U.S. Cement Production by

Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Process-Related Emissions in the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Process-Related Emissions in the Industrial Sector Process-Related Emissions in the Industrial Sector International Energy Outlook 2009 Process-Related Emissions in the Industrial Sector Carbon dioxide emissions in the industrial sector result from both energy use and production processes. Together, energy- and process-related emissions in the industrial sector account for about one-fourth of global carbon dioxide emissions.a Process-related emissions are a direct byproduct of production. Because releases of carbon dioxide are inherent in the production of iron and steel, cement, and aluminum, the potential for reducing process-related emissions is limited. As a result, carbon abatement will face significant technological challenges in the industrial sector. In addition, there are no economical substitutes for these materials or their production processes, and none is likely be available in the near term.

238

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the renewable energy projects installed throughout Texas after the year 2000. The collection of these projects was done in response to the Energy System Laboratorys requirement to fulfill its obligations for Senate Bill 5 (SB5). The renewable energy projects researched and presented herein include: solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, hydroelectric, geothermal, and landfill gas-fired power plants. However, information on wind energy farms has been omitted in this report due to the fact that a more complete ESL report on this subject has already been prepared, ESL-TR-06-08-01. In addition to locating these projects, SB5 required the calculation of reduced NOx emissions. To accomplish this, the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at Texas A&M University developed eCalc in 2004 -- a web-based Emissions Reduction Calculator. This program is able to calculate weather-normalized NOx emissions estimates for energy efficiency and renewable sources projects, such as solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, and wind. Annual energy savings from renewable projects resulted in the following: Solar photovoltaic projects resulted in energy savings of 424.18 MWh/yr and a reduction of 0.28 tons of NOx/year. Solar thermal projects resulted in energy savings of 332.88 MWh/yr and a reduction of 0.26 tons of NOx/year. The peak ozone season day (OSD) NOx reductions were calculated to be: Solar photovoltaic projects resulted in savings of 1.29 MWh/day. Solar thermal projects resulted in savings equivalent to 0.94 MWh/day. The emissions reduction values for hydroelectric and geothermal projects are not presented here since there is no methodology in place at this time to obtain these values.

Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.; Ramirez, E. J.; Champeau, K.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission for Solar Energy Harvesting Progress Report to the Global Climate and Energy Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission for Solar Energy Harvesting Progress Report to the Global Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is a newly proposed form of solar energy harvesting which have inherently lower efficiency limits but take advantage of energy throughout the entire solar

Nur, Amos

240

APPLICATION OF A HYBRID MODEL TO EXPLORE ENERGY EMISSIONS ABATEMENT POLICIES IN CHINA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPLICATION OF A HYBRID MODEL TO EXPLORE ENERGY EMISSIONS ABATEMENT POLICIES IN CHINA by Jianjun Tu: Application of a Hybrid Model to Explore Energy Emissions Abatement Policies in China Project No. 360 key policy issues in China's energy sector. The objectives of this research project are: 1) to develop

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro Observatory Miguel F of Milagro allow it to detect very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray burst emission with much higher sensitivity gamma-ray burst satellites at keV to MeV energies. Even in the absence of a positive detection, VHE

California at Santa Cruz, University of

242

Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts using Milagro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts using Milagro P. M. Saz Parkinson 95064 Abstract. Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been detected at GeV energies by EGRET and models predict for very high energy emission from a sample of 106 gamma-ray bursts (GRB) detected since the beginning

California at Santa Cruz, University of

243

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Title Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ke, Jing, Nina Zheng, David Fridley, Lynn K. Price, and Nan Zhou Date Published 06/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords cement industry, china energy, china energy group, emission reduction, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, industrial energy efficiency, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, policy studies Abstract This study analyzes current energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission trends in China's cement industryas the basis for modeling different levels of cement production and rates of efficiency improvement andcarbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output projections are developed based on analyses ofhistorical production and physical and macroeconomic drivers. For each of these three productionprojections, energy savings and CO2 emission reduction potentials are estimated in a best practicescenario and two continuous improvement scenarios relative to a frozen scenario. The results reveal thepotential for cumulative final energy savings of 27.1 to 37.5 exajoules and energy-related directemission reductions of 3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice scenarios. Thecontinuous improvement scenarios produce cumulative final energy savings of 6.0 to 18.9 exajoules andreduce CO2 emissions by 1.0 to 2.4 gigatonnes. This analysis highlights that increasing energy efficiencyis the most important policy measure for reducing the cement industry's energy and emissions intensity,given the current state of the industry and the unlikelihood of significant carbon capture and storagebefore 2030. In addition, policies to reduce total cement production offer the most direct way ofreducing total energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

244

Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N. Zhou (2007), Distributed Generation with Heat RecoveryCO 2 emissions, distributed generation, energy management,1]. Although thermal distributed generation (DG) units are

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Coal-fired open cycle magnetohydrodynamic power plant emissions and energy efficiences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study is a review of projected emissions and energy efficiencies of coal-fired open cycle MHD power plants. Ideally one

Gruhl, Jim

246

Table 11.5c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: - Data are for emissions from energy consumption for electricity generation and useful thermal output. - See Table 11.5b for electric power sector data.

247

Table 11.2b Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of ... other biomass. 3 Natural gas, excluding supplemental gaseous fuels.

248

Table 11.2a Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

table. See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section. R=Revised. P=Preliminary.

249

Table 11.1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section. 10 Wood and wood-derived fuels.

250

Table 11.2e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section. R=Revised. P=Preliminary. ... 6 Wood and wood-derived fuels.

251

Table 11.2a Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

6 Wood and wood-derived fuels. ... See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section. R=Revised. P=Preliminary.

252

Table 11.2b Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

8 Wood and wood-derived fuels. ... table. See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section.

253

Table 11.2c Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

9 Wood and wood-derived fuels. ... table. See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section.

254

Table 11.2e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wood 6: Waste 7: Total: ... See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section. R=Revised. P=Preliminary.

255

State-Level Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000-2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Overview. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions vary significantly across states (Figure 1), whether considered on an absolute or per capita basis.

256

Emission Power Solutions Plc EPS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Solutions Plc EPS Power Solutions Plc EPS Jump to: navigation, search Name Emission & Power Solutions Plc (EPS) Place Carlsbad, California Zip 92008 Sector Efficiency Product California-based energy efficiency company, specializing in fuel efficiency. Coordinates 31.60396°, -100.641609° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.60396,"lon":-100.641609,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

257

ENERGY AND EMISSION INDICATORS International inventory and assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dril with respect to the assessment and reporting work. In this report an extensive inventory of international monitoring activities in the field of energy and emissions is provided. Information has been gathered about the organisations involved, monitoring scopes and topics, available data and relevant publications, etc. Based on this information a list of often used variables and indicators has been composed, followed by a global assessment of the different sources of information. The present opportunities and needs with respect to monitoring have been investigated in order to determine new or improved monitoring activities. Finally a number of new indicator types are proposed on differences between the Netherlands and the EU, capability for further action, policy intensity, policy integration, early change, fundamental shifts and climate rebound effects. The report also gives

P. G. M. Boonekamp Acknowledgement

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Energy, Carbon-emission and Financial Savings from Thermostat Control  

SciTech Connect

Among the easiest approaches to energy, and cost, savings for most people is the adjustment of thermostats to save energy. Here we estimate savings of energy, carbon, and money in the United States of America (USA) that would result from adjusting thermostats in residential and commercial buildings by about half a degree Celsius downward during the heating season and upward during the cooling season. To obtain as small a unit as possible, and therefore the least likely to be noticeable by most people, we selected an adjustment of one degree Fahrenheit (0.56 degree Celsius) which is the gradation used almost exclusively on thermostats in the USA and is the smallest unit of temperature that has been used historically. Heating and/or cooling of interior building space for personal comfort is sometimes referred to as space conditioning, a term we will use for convenience throughout this work without consideration of humidity. Thermostat adjustment, as we use the term here, applies to thermostats that control the indoor temperature, and not to other thermostats such as those on water heaters. We track emissions of carbon only, rather than of carbon dioxide, because carbon atoms change atomic partners as they move through the carbon cycle, from atmosphere to biosphere or ocean and, on longer time scales, through the rock cycle. To convert a mass of carbon to an equivalent mass of carbon dioxide (thereby including the mass of the 2 oxygen atoms in each molecule) simply multiply by 3.67.

Blasing, T J [ORNL; Schroeder, Dana [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit Agency/Company /Organization: American Public Transportation Association Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development Topics: Analysis Tools Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: www.aptastandards.com/Portals/0/SUDS/SUDSPublished/APTA_Climate_Change This Recommended Practice provides guidance to transit agencies for quantifying their greenhouse gas emissions, including both emissions generated by transit and the potential reduction of emissions through efficiency and displacement How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Shift - Change to low-carbon modes

260

ENERGY STAR Using On-site Renewable Energy as the Next Step to Improving Energy Performance and Reducing Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY AS THE NEXT STEP ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY AS THE NEXT STEP TO IMPROVING ENERGY PERFORMANCE AND REDUCING EMISSIONS jcpenney has a corporate energy management strategy that includes using energy efficient technologies in its stores and encouraging energy conservation. As part of this strategy, the company also investigated generating electricity through on-site renewable energy. jcpenney is a partner in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings Program, and has been tracking building energy use since 2006 using EPA's free benchmarking tool, Portfolio Manager. Portfolio Manager provides a 1-100 energy performance score similar to a "miles-per-gallon" metric for vehicle fuel efficiency. Those buildings that achieve an ENERGY STAR score

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Special Topic: Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing 1 Special Topic: Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing 1 Report #: DOE/EIA-0573(2005) Released Date: November 2006 Next Release Date: Not applicable Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing Mark Schipper 1 , Energy Information Administration (EIA) Abstract Based on the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration (EIA), this paper presents historical energy-related carbon dioxide emission estimates for energy-intensive sub-sectors and 23 industries. Estimates are based on surveys of more than 15,000 manufacturing plants in 1991, 1994, 1998, and 2002. EIA is currently developing its collection of manufacturing data for 2006.

262

The Energy and Economic Impacts of Expanding International Emissions Trading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions trading systems are recognized as a cost-effective way to facilitate emissions abatement and are expected to play an important role in international cooperation for global climate mitigation. Starting from the ...

Qi, Tianyu

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

263

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Profile Emissions Profile Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile October 7, 2013 - 10:14am Addthis Evaluating a Federal agency's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile means getting a solid understanding of the organization's largest emission categories, largest emission sources, and its potential for improvement: Buildings Vehicles and mobile equipment Business travel Employee commuting. While the data required for annual GHG reporting are sufficient to establish an agency's overall emission inventory, these data are not typically enough information for effectively managing emissions. A detailed, bottom-up assessment can provide the foundation for much more robust Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans. Because detailed analyses of all assets can be time-intensive, strategic planning helps the

264

Energy Efficiency / Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Vol. II Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its third annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). The report is organized in three volumes. Volume 1 Summary Report, provides an executive summary with key areas summarized; Volume II Technical Report, provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III Technical Appendix, contains detailed data from simulations for each of the forty-one counties included in the analysis.

Degelman, L. O.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Verdict, M.; Liu, Z.; Muns, S.; Ahmad, M.; Turner, W. D.; Culp, C.; Haberl, J. S.; Bryant, J.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Gilman, D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP): Vol. II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (Laboratory), at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its fifth annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in three volumes. Volume I Summary Report provides an executive summary and overview; Volume II Technical Report provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III Technical Appendix contains detailed data from simulations for each of the counties included in the analysis.

Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles; Yazdani, Bahman; Gilman, Don; Fitzpatrick, Tom; Muns, Shirley; Verdict, Malcolm; Ahmed, M.; Liu, Zi; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Montgomery, Cynthia; McKelvey, Katherine; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Degelman, Larry

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP): Volume I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (Laboratory), at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its fifth annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in three volumes. Volume I Summary Report provides an executive summary and overview; Volume II Technical Report provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III Technical Appendix contains detailed data from simulations for each of the counties included in the analysis.

Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles; Yazdani, Bahman; Gilman, Don; Fitzpatrick, Tom; Muns, Shirley; Liu, Zi; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Degelman, Larry; Claridge, David

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Energy Efficiency / Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Vol. I Summary Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its third annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in three volumes. Volume 1 Summary Report, provides an executive summary with key areas summarized; Volume II Technical Report, provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III Technical Appendix, contains detailed data from simulations for each of the forty-one counties included in the analysis.

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Gilman, D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Muns, S.; Verdict, M.; Ahmad, M.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Bryant, J.; Degelman, L. O.; Turner, W. D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Please cite this article in press as: R.E. Edwards, et al., Predicting future hourly residential electrical consumption: A machine learning case study, Energy Buildings (2012), doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2012.03.010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-offs in the building design process, sizing components (e.g., HVAC) for a specific building, optimizing control systemsPlease cite this article in press as: R.E. Edwards, et al., Predicting future hourly residential.03.010 ARTICLE IN PRESSG Model ENB-3661; No.of Pages13 Energy and Buildings xxx (2012) xxx­xxx Contents lists

Parker, Lynne E.

269

International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. Washington,related to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsDenmark - Energy Efficiency Agreements. ... 4

Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

An Analysis of Measures to Reduce the Life-Cycle Energy Consumption and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of California's Personal Computers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002). Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emissions Factors for thefactors for California of 9.2 megajoules per kilowatt-hour (MJ/kWh) and 0.4 kilograms of carbon dioxide

Horvath, A; Masanet, Eric

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A Potential Path to Emissions-Free Fossil EnergyA Potential Path...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 A Potential Path to Emissions-Free Fossil Energy The National Energy Technology Laboratory's chemical looping reactor, above, is the only one of its kind in the Western...

272

Challenges and opportunities in accounting for non-energy use CO2 emissions: an editorial comment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M (2009) Non-energy use of fossil fuels and resulting carbonThe combustion of fossil fuels for energy purposes is by farGHG) emissions. However, fossil fuels also contribute to GHG

Masanet, Eric; Sathaye, Jayant

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hour-by-Hour Cost Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production Genevieve Saur (PI), Chris Ainscough (Presenter), Kevin Harrison, Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory January 17 th , 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 Acknowledgements * This work was made possible by support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). http://www.eere.energy.gov/topics/hydrogen_fuel_cells.html * NREL would like to thank our DOE Technology Development Managers for this project, Sara Dillich, Eric Miller, Erika Sutherland, and David Peterson. * NREL would also like to acknowledge the indirect

274

Energy consumption and CO2emissions of Beijing heating system: based on a system dynamics model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beijing is a typical North China city, and it uses about 15-18% of its total energy consumption for heating. The building construction industry is also a key source of CO2 emissions. This article, based on a system dynamics model, aims to simulate and ... Keywords: CO2 emissions, energy consumption, heating system, system dynamics

Hefeng Tong; Weishuang Qu

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

electricity emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emission factors emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

276

sulfur dioxide emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sulfur dioxide emissions sulfur dioxide emissions Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

277

Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Biomass Energy Combustion (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

CO2 emissions from the combustion of biomass [75] to produce energy are excluded from the energy-related CO2 emissions reported in AEO2010. According to current international convention, carbon released through biomass combustion is excluded from reported energy-related emissions. The release of carbon from biomass combustion is assumed to be balanced by the uptake of carbon when the feedstock is grown, resulting in zero net emissions over some period of time]. However, analysts have debated whether increased use of biomass energy may result in a decline in terrestrial carbon stocks, leading to a net positive release of carbon rather than the zero net release assumed by its exclusion from reported energy-related emissions.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

278

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Municipalities GDP, Energy Consumption and Other IndicatorsEnergy Consumption 31 Figure 33 Primary Energy Consumption in Different

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

UK Energy and Emissions Projections (2010 Update) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- 2025); energy generation by source (2006 - 2025); primary energy demand (2006 - 2025); final energy demand (2000 - 2025); and energy capacity (2010 - 2025). Also available:...

280

UK Energy and Emissions Projections (2010 Update) The UK Department...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- 2025); energy generation by source (2006 - 2025); primary energy demand (2006 - 2025); final energy demand (2000 - 2025); and energy capacity (2010 - 2025). Also available:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Consumption 11and a decomposition of energy consumption to understand theData Historical energy consumption and energy-related CO 2

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

China's energy and emissions outlook to 2050: Perspectives from...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Published 022013 Keywords appliance energy efficiency, Buildings Energy Efficiency, china, Clean Energy Policy, industrial energy efficiency URL https:isswprod.lbl.gov...

283

Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook  

SciTech Connect

The past decade has seen the development of various scenarios describing long-term patterns of future Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, with each new approach adding insights to our understanding of the changing dynamics of energy consumption and aggregate future energy trends. With the recent growing focus on China's energy use and emission mitigation potential, a range of Chinese outlook models have been developed across different institutions including in China's Energy Research Institute's 2050 China Energy and CO2 Emissions Report, McKinsey & Co's China's Green Revolution report, the UK Sussex Energy Group and Tyndall Centre's China's Energy Transition report, and the China-specific section of the IEA World Energy Outlook 2009. At the same time, the China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed a bottom-up, end-use energy model for China with scenario analysis of energy and emission pathways out to 2050. A robust and credible energy and emission model will play a key role in informing policymakers by assessing efficiency policy impacts and understanding the dynamics of future energy consumption and energy saving and emission reduction potential. This is especially true for developing countries such as China, where uncertainties are greater while the economy continues to undergo rapid growth and industrialization. A slightly different assumption or storyline could result in significant discrepancies among different model results. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the key models in terms of their scope, methodologies, key driver assumptions and the associated findings. A comparative analysis of LBNL's energy end-use model scenarios with the five above studies was thus conducted to examine similarities and divergences in methodologies, scenario storylines, macroeconomic drivers and assumptions as well as aggregate energy and emission scenario results. Besides directly tracing different energy and CO{sub 2} savings potential back to the underlying strategies and combination of efficiency and abatement policy instruments represented by each scenario, this analysis also had other important but often overlooked findings.

Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

EIA - AEO2013 Early Release Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Total U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions do not return to their 2005 level (5,997 million metric tons) by the end of the AEO2013 projection period.6 Growth in demand for transportation fuels is moderated by rising fuel prices and new, stricter federal CAFE standards for model years 2017 to 2025, which reduce transportation emissions from 2018 until they begin to rise near the end of the projection period. Transportation emissions in 2040 are 26 million metric tons below the 2011 level. Largely as a result of the inclusion of the new CAFE standards in AEO2013, transportation-related CO2 emissions in 2035 are 94 million metric tons below their level in the AEO2012 Reference case. State RPS requirements and abundant low-cost natural gas help shift the

285

Thailand-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thailand-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Thailand-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.snvworld.org/en/sec Country Thailand South-Eastern Asia References LEAF[1] "Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF), supported by USAID/RDMA, aims to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in GHG emissions from the forestry-land use sector while assisting them in benefitting from the emerging international REDD+

286

Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector Agency/Company /Organization: PEW Center Sector: Climate Focus Area: Transportation, People and Policy Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.pewclimate.org/DDCF-Briefs/Transportation Cost: Free References: Policies To Reduce Emissions From The Transportation Sector[1] Provide an overview of policy tools available to reduce GHG emissions from the transportation sector. Overview Provide an overview of policy tools available to reduce GHG emissions from the transportation sector. Outputs include: General Information

287

Gateway:Low Emission Development Strategies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Low Emission Development Strategies (Redirected from Low Emission Development Strategies) Jump to: navigation, search Leds-Graphics 03.PNG Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) Gateway This website supports the creation and implementation of country-driven, analytically rigorous low emission development strategies (LEDS). LEDS will enable countries to transition to low carbon economic development resulting in sustained growth in employment and investment, increased financial flows through carbon markets, reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and other social, economic, and environmental benefits. The resources here are designed to help you create your own LEDS. We've assembled several toolkits and resources and a sample process for developing a LEDS based on proven best practices. The process is depicted in the diagram to your left, which also lets you navigate through the site. Start with the overview of the LEDS process, or go directly to one of the five major process phases:

288

Cambodia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cambodia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Cambodia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Cambodia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.snvworld.org/en/sec Country Cambodia South-Eastern Asia References LEAF[1] "Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF), supported by USAID/RDMA, aims to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in GHG emissions from the forestry-land use sector while assisting them in benefitting from the emerging international REDD+

289

MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) Agency/Company /Organization: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development Topics: Analysis Tools Website: www.epa.gov/otaq/models/moves/index.htm This emission modeling system estimates emissions from mobile sources, including cars, trucks, and motorcycles. The modeling tool covers a broad range of pollutants and allows multiple scale analysis. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Shift - Change to low-carbon modes Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies Learn more about the avoid, shift, improve framework for limiting air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions.

290

Vietnam-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Vietnam-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.snvworld.org/en/sec Country Vietnam South-Eastern Asia References LEAF[1] "Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF), supported by USAID/RDMA, aims to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in GHG emissions from the forestry-land use sector while assisting them in benefitting from the emerging international REDD+ framework.

291

Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.snvworld.org/en/sec Country Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Thailand, Vietnam South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Melanesia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia References LEAF[1] "Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF), supported by USAID/RDMA, aims to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in GHG emissions from the forestry-land use sector

292

Further Sensitivity Analysis of Hypothetical Policies to Limit Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Further Sensitivity Analysis of Hypothetical Policies to Limit Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 July 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Further Sensitivity Analysis of Hypothetical Policies to Limit Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views

293

Estimates of the Global Indirect Energy-Use Emission Impacts of USA Biofuel Policy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the indirect energy-use emission implications of increases in the use of biofuels in the USA between 2001 and 2010 as mandates within a dynamic global computable general equilibrium model. The study incorporates explicit markets for biofuels, petroleum and other fossil fuels, and accounts for interactions among all sectors of an 18-region global economy. It considers bilateral trade, as well as the dynamics of capital allocation and investment. Simulation results show that the biofuel mandates in the USA generate an overall reduction in global energy use and emissions over the simulation period from 2001 to 2030. Consequently, the indirect energy-use emission change or emission leakage under the mandate is negative. That is, global emission reductions are larger than the direct emission savings from replacing petroleum with biofuels under the USA RFS2 over the last decade. Under our principal scenario this enhanced the direct emission reduction from biofuels by about 66%. The global change in lifecycle energy-use emissions for this scenario was estimated to be about 93 million tons of CO2e in 2010, 45 million tons of CO2e in 2020, and an increase of 5 million tons of CO2e in 2030, relative to the baseline scenario. Sensitivity results of six alternative scenarios provided additional insights into the pattern of the regional and global effects of biofuel mandates on energy-use emissions.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methane, and nitrous oxide) from on-site fuel combustion and purchased electricity and district heating and cooling. Portfolio Manager also enables tracking of avoided emissions...

295

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Shale Gas, Natural Gas, Coal,of Unconventional Shale-Gas Reservoirs. In Society oftight gas reservoirs, shale gas, tight oil, oil shale, and

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Minnesota Department of Commerice In September 2002, the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission (PUC) issued an order requiring the state's regulated electric utilities to disclose to customers details on the fuel mix and emissions of electric generation. Utilities must provide this information to customers in a standard format twice annually. Utilities may distribute this information to customers electronically. Disclosure information must also be filed with the PUC. In addition, in 2009, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency began to transition to an inventory data management system that consolidates

297

Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam Southern Asia, South-Eastern...

298

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Conventional Oil Productionand Oil Sands. Environ. Sci. Technol. 44 (22): 87668772.Laboratory. CAPP. 2011. Crude Oil Forecast, Markets &

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. 2010). Shale gas production by hydraulic fracturing (anticipated growth in shale gas production is expected toFugitive emissions from shale gas production are the subject

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions intensity of unconventional oil production remainof the forecasts of unconventional oil and gas productionassociated with unconventional production of oil and gas;

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fugitive Emissions at the Department of Energy: An Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 GHG inventory - Fugitive emissions reduction is highlighted in DOE's Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (SSPP) as a key strategy for achieving DOE GHG reduction goals *...

302

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Shale Gas, Natural Gas, Coal,Footprint of Natural Gas from Shale Formations. Climaticof Unconventional Shale-Gas Reservoirs. In Society of

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Colorado Air Pollutant Emission Notice (APEN) Form | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Form Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Colorado Air Pollutant Emission Notice (APEN) Form Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions...

304

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure (Rhode Island) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DSIRE1 Summary Rhode Island requires all entities that sell electricity in the state to disclose details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of their electric generation...

305

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure (Virginia) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-- "to the extent feasible" -- fuel mix and emissions data regarding electric generation. Legislation in 2007 and 2008 related to Electric Utility Regulation amended the...

306

Gateway:Low Emission Development Strategies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Gateway Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gateway:Low Emission Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Leds-Graphics 03.PNG Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) Gateway This website supports the creation and implementation of country-driven, analytically rigorous low emission development strategies (LEDS). LEDS will enable countries to transition to low carbon economic development resulting in sustained growth in employment and investment, increased financial flows through carbon markets, reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and other social, economic, and environmental benefits.

307

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... State Energy Data System ... and Paul Holtberg, Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team.

308

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the Annual Energy Outlook 2012. Introduction Toinformation from the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (AEO 2012) (

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Effects of Fuel Ethanol Use on Fuel-Cycle Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We estimated the effects on per-vehicle-mile fuel-cycle petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and energy use of using ethanol blended with gasoline in a mid-size passenger car, compared with the effects of using gasoline in the same car. Our analysis includes petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with chemicals manufacturing, farming of corn and biomass, ethanol production, and ethanol combustion for ethanol; and petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with petroleum recovery, petroleum refining, and gasoline combustion for gasoline. For corn-based ethanol, the key factors in determining energy and emissions impacts include energy and chemical usage intensity of corn farming, energy intensity of the ethanol plant, and the method used to estimate energy and emissions credits for co-products of corn ethanol. The key factors in determining the impacts of cellulosic ethanol are energy and chemical usage intensity of biomass farming, ethanol yield per dry ton of biomass, and electricity credits in cellulosic ethanol plants. The results of our fuel-cycle analysis for fuel ethanol are listed below. Note that, in the first half of this summary, the reductions cited are per-vehicle-mile traveled using the specified ethanol/gasoline blend instead of conventional (not reformulated) gasoline. The second half of the summary presents estimated changes per gallon of ethanol used in ethanol blends. GHG emissions are global warming potential (GWP)-weighted, carbon dioxide (CO2)-equivalent emissions of CO2, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O).

C. Saricks; D. Santini; M. Wang

1999-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

310

Opportunities to change development pathways toward lower greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect

There is a multiplicity of development pathways in which low energy sector emissions are not necessarily associated with low economic growth. However, changes in development pathways can rarely be imposed from the top. On this basis, examples of energy efficiency opportunities to change development pathways toward lower emissions are presented in this paper. We review opportunities at the sectoral and macro level. The potential for action on nonclimate policies that influence energy use and emissions are presented. Examples are drawn from policies already adopted and implemented in the energy sector. The paper discusses relationships between energy efficiency policies and their synergies and tradeoffs with sustainable development and greenhouse gas emissions. It points to ways that energy efficiency could be mainstreamed into devel?opment choices.

Alterra, Swart; Masanet, Eric; Lecocq, Franck; Najam, Adil; Schaeffer, Robert; Winkler, Harald; Sathaye, Jayant

2008-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

311

Announcing the 2012-2013 Energy Innovation Contest for undergraduates to stamp out carbon emissions on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Announcing the 2012-2013 Energy Innovation Contest for undergraduates to stamp out carbon emissions on New Brunswick Campus The Rutgers Energy Institute will offer three awards: The REI gratefully acknowledges sponsorship of the Energy Contest by Sapphire Energy Inc. Awards will go to students who develop

Garfunkel, Eric

312

Environmental Emissions from Energy Technology Systems: The Total Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect

This is a summary report that compares emissions during the entire project life cycle for a number of fossil-fueled and renewable electric power systems, including geothermal steam (probably modeled after The Geysers). The life cycle is broken into Fuel Extraction, Construction, and Operation. The only emission covered is carbon dioxide.

San Martin, Robert L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Environmental Emissions From Energy Technology Systems: The Total Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect

This is a summary report that compares emissions during the entire project life cycle for a number of fossil-fueled and renewable electric power systems, including geothermal steam (probably modeled after The Geysers). The life cycle is broken into Fuel Extraction, Construction, and Operation. The only emission covered is carbon dioxide. (DJE 2005)

San Martin, Robert L.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Gateway:Low Emission Development Strategies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Low Emission Development Strategies (Redirected from LEDS Pathways Analysis) Jump to: navigation, search Leds-Graphics 03.PNG Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) Gateway This website supports the creation and implementation of country-driven, analytically rigorous low emission development strategies (LEDS). LEDS will enable countries to transition to low carbon economic development resulting in sustained growth in employment and investment, increased financial flows through carbon markets, reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and other social, economic, and environmental benefits. The resources here are designed to help you create your own LEDS. We've assembled several toolkits and resources and a sample process for developing a LEDS based on proven best practices. The process is depicted in the diagram to your left, which also lets you navigate through the site. Start with the overview of the LEDS process, or go directly to one of the five major process phases:

315

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Emissions Disclosure and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider DC Public Service Commission Under regulations adopted by the D.C. Public Service Commission, all electricity suppliers and electricity companies operating in the District of Columbia must report to the Commission every six months the fuel mix of electricity sold and the emissions produced. The fuel mix report must be in a format similar to the information provided by the PJM Environmental Information Services (PJM EIS). Electricity suppliers and electricity companies must also provide a fuel mix report to customers twice annually, within the June and December billing cycles. Emissions information must be disclosed every six months on

316

Gateway:Low Emission Development Strategies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Low Emission Development Strategies (Redirected from LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Leds-Graphics 03.PNG Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) Gateway This website supports the creation and implementation of country-driven, analytically rigorous low emission development strategies (LEDS). LEDS will enable countries to transition to low carbon economic development resulting in sustained growth in employment and investment, increased financial flows through carbon markets, reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and other social, economic, and environmental benefits. The resources here are designed to help you create your own LEDS. We've assembled several toolkits and resources and a sample process for developing a LEDS based on proven best practices. The process is depicted in the diagram to your left, which also lets you navigate through the site. Start with the overview of the LEDS process, or go directly to one of the five major process phases:

317

Definition: Reduced Co2 Emissions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co2 Emissions Co2 Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Co2 Emissions Functions that provide this benefit can lead to avoided vehicle miles, decrease the amount of central generation needed to their serve load (through reduced electricity consumption, reduced electricity losses, more optimal generation dispatch), and or reduce peak generation. These impacts translate into a reduction in CO2 emissions produced by fossil-based electricity generators and vehicles.[1] Related Terms electricity generation, reduced electricity losses, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. line Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reduced_Co2_Emissions&oldid=502618

318

OpenEI - hourly data  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4980 en Solar: hourly solar (direct normal (DNI), global horizontal (GHI), and diffuse) data for selected stations in Sri Lanka from...

319

Transitioning to 12-hour shifts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1989, Yankee Rowe nuclear power station successfully implemented a 12-hour shift schedule for all shiftworkers (control room personnel, auxiliary operators, and radiation protection shift technicians) with many positive effects on morale, motivation, and performance. The transition from an 8-hour to a 12-hour shift schedule was initiated, organized, and promoted by the shiftworkers themselves after they had identified numerous inadequacies in the 8-hour shift schedule. Preliminary and final implementation required several steps: (a) a survey of needs, (b) research of potential schedules, (c) cost/benefit analysis, (d) resolution of any union contract conflicts, (e) management approval, and (f) trial shift schedule periods.

Suter, P.S.; Cervassi, S.M.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

60 Assumptions behind Fossil Energy Supplyuse. Assumptions behind Fossil Energy Supply Scenarios Inof both of these fossil energy forms, and extraction

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scenario) and an alternative energy efficiency scenario (or CIS) and an alternative energy efficiency scenario (or CIS) and an alternative energy efficiency scenario (

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure (Ohio) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy use disclosed in fuel mix data Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector StateTerritory Energy Category Renewable Energy Incentive Programs Distribution and...

323

NERSC Franklin Hours Used Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Franklin Hours Used Franklin Hours Used Franklin Hours Used 2011 Franklin Usage in Hours 2011 Franklin Usage in Hours 2010 2010 Franklin Usage in Hours 2009 2009 Franklin Usage in Hours 2007-2008 2008 Franklin Usage in Hours 2008 Franklin Usage in Hours Date Hours Used (in thousands) Percentage of Maximum Possible (24 hours/day) 04/28/2012 0.00 0.00 04/27/2012 272.62 29.40 04/26/2012 692.81 74.71 04/25/2012 841.60 90.75 04/24/2012 53.86 5.81 04/23/2012 432.01 46.59 04/22/2012 823.23 88.77 04/21/2012 473.95 51.11 04/20/2012 173.75 18.74 04/19/2012 449.22 48.44 04/18/2012 816.23 88.02 04/17/2012 754.35 81.34 04/16/2012 648.89 69.97 04/15/2012 812.25 87.59 04/14/2012 843.46 90.95 04/13/2012 737.46 79.52 04/12/2012 711.97 76.77 04/11/2012 734.65 79.22 04/10/2012 815.65 87.95 04/09/2012 897.25 96.75

324

Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The State of Iowa may provide financial assistance in the form of loans

325

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction Act (Maryland) Reduction Act (Maryland) Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act requires the Department of the Environment to publish and update an inventory of statewide greenhouse gas emissions for calendar year 2006 and requires the State to reduce statewide

326

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rail and road electrification. Total Electrcity Final EnergyDemand (TWh) Total Electrcity Final Energy Demand (TWh)

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

industry, Cost Analyst, Energy Efficiency Technologies, industrial energy efficiency, Steel Industry URL https:isswprod.lbl.govlibraryview-docsprivateoutputrpt82351.PDF...

328

Effect on air and water emissions of energy conservation in industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Environmental emissions for five large energy-consuming industries plus others are estimated for four US energy system scenarios for 1985 and 2000. Emissions are estimated by specifying fuel mixes to steam boilers and direct heat, combustion efficiencies, shifts in the relative shares of alternative industrial processes use of industrial cogenerators, and penetration of pollution-control technologies. Analyses show that emissions do not vary significantly among scenarios principally because of increased coal use and the reduced penetration rate of advanced pollution-control technologies in the low-energy-demand scenarios. Within scenarios, emissions from the chemical and iron and steel subsectors dominate all aggregate estimates. Hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide process emission coefficients for the chemical subsector must be improved.

Raskin, P D; Rosen, R A

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Reducing Forestry Emissions in Indonesia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emissions in Indonesia Emissions in Indonesia Jump to: navigation, search Name Reducing Forestry Emissions in Indonesia Agency/Company /Organization Center for International Forestry Research Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Guide/manual Website http://prod-http-80-800498448. Country Indonesia UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Reducing Forestry Emissions in Indonesia[1] Overview "In this paper, we look critically at the trade-offs between development pathways based on land-intensive enterprises and climate change mitigation. Without a coordinated approach to multiple objectives, efforts in one area could undermine efforts in the other. For example, potential major

330

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Virginia Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Virginia State Corporation Commission Virginia's 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity providers to disclose -- "to the extent feasible" -- fuel mix and emissions data regarding electric generation. Legislation in 2007 and 2008 related to Electric Utility Regulation amended the restructuring laws, but still require emissions and fuel mix disclosure. Information must be provided to customers and to the Virginia State Corporation Commission (SCC) at least once annually. If any portion of this information is unavailable, the electricity provider must file a report

331

World energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions : 1950-2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions of carbon dioxide form combustion of fossil fuels, which may contribute to long-term climate change, are projected through 2050 using reduced form models estimated with national-level panel data for the period ...

Schmalensee, Richard

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

World energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions : 1950-2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions of carbon dioxide from combustion of fossil fuels, which may contribute to long-term climate change, are projected through 2050 using reduced form models estimated with national-level panel data for the period ...

Schmalensee, Richard.; Stoker, Thomas M.; Judson, Ruth A.

333

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Public Utilities Commission of Ohio Ohio's 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions to customers. Electric utilities and competitive retail electric service providers of retail electric generation service must provide this information to their customers in a standard format several times per year. The Ohio Public Utilities Commission (PUCO) adopted rules in 2000 to implement this policy; the rules have been amended subsequently. There are separate rules for electric utilities providing a standard offer for retail

334

Gateway:Low Emission Development Strategies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Gateway Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gateway:Low Emission Development Strategies (Redirected from Gateway:International/LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Leds-Graphics 03.PNG Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) Gateway This website supports the creation and implementation of country-driven, analytically rigorous low emission development strategies (LEDS). LEDS will enable countries to transition to low carbon economic development resulting in sustained growth in employment and investment, increased financial flows through carbon markets, reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and other social, economic, and environmental benefits.

335

Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency requires any facility that emits 25 tons or more of NOx and/or 25 tons or more of VOC during the calendar year and is located in a county designated as nonattainment for the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone submit emission statements. Any facility that is located in a county described above is exempt from these requirements. If NOx

336

Assessment of Methods to Manipulate Thermal Emission and Evaluate the Quality of Thermal Radiation for Direct Energy Conversion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACT Control of spectral thermal emission from surfaces may be desirable in some energy related applications, such as nano-scale antenna energy conversion and thermophotovoltaic conversion. (more)

Wijewardane, Samantha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation to help researchers understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies

338

Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a given facility were divided by its throughput to develop emissions factors Distribution curves were and Storage (99%) Transportation, Storage, and Distribution of Gasoline (99.5%) MTBE or EtOH for Gasoline.5%) Steam or Electricity Export NA: North American nNA: non-North American NG: natural gas G.H2 Compression

Argonne National Laboratory

339

Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Cropland Production in the United States, 1990-2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in cropland production and management influence energy consumption and emissions of CO2 from fossil-fuel combustion. A method was developed to calculate on-site and off-site energy and CO2 emissions for cropping practices in the US at the county scale. Energy consumption and emissions occur on-site from the operation of farm machinery and occur off-site from the manufacture and transport of cropland production inputs, such as fertilizers, pesticides, and agricultural lime. Estimates of fossil-fuel consumption and associated CO2 emissions for cropping practices enable (a) the monitoring of energy and emissions with changes in land management, and (b) the calculation and balancing of regional and national carbon budgets. Results indicate on-site energy use and total energy use (i.e., the sum of on-site and off-site) on US croplands in 2004 ranged from 1.6-7.9 GJ ha-1 yr-1 and from 5.5-20.5 GJ ha-1 yr-1, respectively. On-site and total CO2 emissions in 2004 ranged from 23-176 kg C ha-1 yr-1 and from 91-365 kg C ha-1 yr-1, respectively. During the period of this analysis (1990-2004), national total energy consumption for crop production ranged from 1204-1297 PJ yr-1 (Petajoule = 1 1015 Joule) with associated total fossil CO2 emissions ranging from 22.0-23.2 Tg C yr-1 (Teragram = 1 1012 gram). The annual proportion of on-site CO2 to total CO2 emissions changed depending on the diversity of crops planted. Adoption of reduced tillage practices in the US from 1990 to 2004 resulted in a net emissions reduction of 2.4 Tg C.

West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Nelson, Richard G [ORNL; Hellwinckel, Chad M [ORNL; De La Torre Ugarte, Daniel G [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A new challenge for the energy efficiency evaluation community: energy savings and emissions reductions from urban transportation policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new challenge for the energy efficiency evaluation community: energy savings and emissions reductions from urban transportation policies Dr. Jean-Sébastien BROC, Pr. Bernard BOURGES, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, France Abstract The energy efficiency evaluation community has a large experience about

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Vol. II - Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its fourth annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Gilman, D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Muns, S.; Verdict, M.; Ahmed, M.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Degelman, L. O.; Turner, W. D.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Vol. III - Technical Appendix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its fourth annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Gilman, D.; Verdict, M.; Yazdani, B.; Ahmed, M.; Muns, S.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Liu, Z.; Turner, W. D.; Degelman, L. O.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

EIA - AEO2011 Early Release Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Early Release Overview 1 Early Release Overview Release Date: December 16, 2011 | Next Release Date: January 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2011) Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure DataAfter falling by 3 percent in 2008 and nearly 7 percent in 2009, largely driven by the economic downturn, total U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions do not return to 2005 levels (5,980 million metric tons) until 2027, and then rise by an additional 5 percent from 2027 to 2035, reaching 6,315 million metric tons in 2035 (Figure 13). Energy-related CO2 emissions grow by 0.2 percent per year from 2005 to 2035. Emissions per capita fall by an average of 0.8 percent per year from 2005 to 2035, as growth in demand for electricity and transportation fuels is moderated by higher energy prices, effi ciency standards, State RPS requirements, and Federal

344

U.S. energy-related CO 2 emissions in early 2012 lowest since 1992 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions resulting from energy use during the first quarter of 2012 were the lowest in two decades for any January-March period.

345

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy demand and emissions in 2030 in China: scenarios andand carbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

EIA - AEO2013 Early Release Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In AEO2013, the 2030 values have fallen to 5,523 million metric tons for total energy-related CO 2 emissions, with 1,874 million metric tons (34 percent) ...

347

Detecting High-Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with EGRET and GLAST.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research described in this dissertation explores the detection of high-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with EGRET and GLAST. Data from the EGRET experiment (more)

Wren, David Nathan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a ...

349

Table 11.5a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 11.5a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2010 (Sum of Tables 11.5b and ...

350

Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A1-46612 September 2009 Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution...

351

U.S. energy-related CO 2 emissions in early 2012 lowest since ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions resulting from energy use during the first quarter of 2012 were the lowest in two decades for any January-March period.

352

Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions down in 2011 - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Annual energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions fell 2.4% in 2011 compared to the level in 2010. Several factors combined to produce this drop, including slower ...

353

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Ryan Firestone and Chris Marnay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-62871 Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation Ryan Firestone and Chris by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Distribution System Integration Program of the U Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;1 Firestone 5128 Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon

354

Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop biogeochemical cycles and global greenhouse gas budgets. Energy cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) is a sugarcane changing land from grazed pasture to energy cane would affect greenhouse gas (CO2, CH4 and N2O) fluxes

DeLucia, Evan H.

355

TOPIC: Shale Gas Emissions w/David Allen, Energy Institute HOST: Jeff Tester and Todd Cowen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOPIC: Shale Gas Emissions w/David Allen, Energy Institute HOST: Jeff Tester and Todd Cowen DATE fracturing of shale formations (shale gas) is projected by the Energy Information Administration to become the nation's energy landscape. However, the environmental impacts associated with ``fracking'' for shale gas

Angenent, Lars T.

356

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production from non- fossil-fuel energy such as renewableenergy of the non- fossil-fuel energy at the level ofenergy of the non fossil fuel energy is accounted for at the

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-56144 Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use andAC02-05CH11231. ii Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use andConsumption iii iv Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use and

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approaches. For non-renewable fossil-fuel energy, derivativeapproaches. For non-renewable fossil-fuel energy, derivativefuture supply of non-renewable fossil-fuel energy supply,

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Calculating Chiller Emissions and Source Energy Use: Commercial Cooling Update: Issue 12, November 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refrigerant phaseouts are raising questions about the environmental impacts of different types of chillers. This Update introduces a hand-calculation method for estimating the emissions and source energy use (i.e., fossil fuel use) of gas and electric chillers. The update also reviews the two methods of chiller systems emissions production: refrigerant losses and fossil fuel combustion; discusses meeting NOx regulations; use of source energy; and examines existing calculation approaches as opposed to a s...

1995-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

Secretary of Energy Memorandum on DOE Greenhouse Gas Emission...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

As the agency charged with advancing the Nation's energy security, we are committed to developing energy efficient technologies that support the transformation to a low-carbon...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Zero-Emission Facilities Production Tax Credit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Zero-Emission Facilities Production Tax Credit Zero-Emission Facilities Production Tax Credit Zero-Emission Facilities Production Tax Credit < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Maximum Rebate Not specified Program Info Start Date 01/01/03 Expiration Date 12/31/2020 State Oklahoma Program Type Corporate Tax Credit Rebate Amount 0.0025/kWh - 0.0075/kWh for 10 years; amount varies depending on when the facility is placed in operation and when electricity is generated. Provider Oklahoma Department of Commerce '''''Note: No credits will be paid during 2011 for electricity produced from July 1, 2010 - June 30, 2011. But any credits that accrue during that time period will be paid during the 2012 tax year.''''' For tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2003, a state income tax

362

Capturing Fugitives to Reduce DOE's GHG Emissions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capturing Fugitives to Reduce DOE's GHG Emissions Capturing Fugitives to Reduce DOE's GHG Emissions Capturing Fugitives to Reduce DOE's GHG Emissions November 15, 2011 - 2:04pm Addthis An electrician foreman for the Western Area Power Administration checks a circuit breaker at the Ault Substation in eastern Colorado. The circuit breaker, containing 85 lbs of SF6, protects equipment in the substation against damage from excessive electrical currents | Courtesy of Western Area Power Administration. An electrician foreman for the Western Area Power Administration checks a circuit breaker at the Ault Substation in eastern Colorado. The circuit breaker, containing 85 lbs of SF6, protects equipment in the substation against damage from excessive electrical currents | Courtesy of Western Area Power Administration.

363

Transportation Energy Futures: Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions (Brochure), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions Significant Energy Consumption - and Opportunities for Reduction Transportation is essential to our economy and quality of life, and currently accounts for 71% of the nation's total petroleum use and 33% of our total carbon emissions. Energy-efficient transportation strategies could reduce both oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examines how combining multiple strategies could reduce both GHG emissions and petroleum use by 80%. The project's primary objective is to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an

364

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

SciTech Connect

Although China became the world's largest emitter of energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007, China does not publish annual estimates of CO{sub 2} emissions and most published estimates of China's emissions have been done by other international organizations. Undertaken at the request of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy, this study examines the feasibility of applying the EIA emissions inventory methodology to estimate China's emissions from published Chinese data. Besides serving as a proof of concept, this study also helps develop a consistent and transparent method for estimating China's CO{sub 2} emissions using an Excel model and identified China-specific data issues and areas for improvement. This study takes a core set of data from the energy balances published in the China Energy Statistical Yearbook 2009 and China Petrochemical Corporation Yearbook 2009 and applies the EIA's eight-step methodology to estimate China's 2008 CO{sub 2} emissions. First, China's primary and secondary fuel types and consumption by end use are determined with slight discrepancies identified between the two data sources and inconsistencies in product categorization with the EIA. Second, energy consumption data are adjusted to eliminate double counting in the four potential areas identified by EIA; consumption data from China's Special Administrative Regions are not included. Physical fuel units are then converted to energy equivalents using China's standard energy measure of coal equivalent (1 kilogram = 29.27 MJ) and IPCC carbon emissions coefficients are used to calculate each fuel's carbon content. Next, carbon sequestration is estimated following EIA conventions for other petroleum products and non-energy use of secondary fuels. Emissions from international bunker fuels are also subtracted under the 'reference' calculation of estimating apparent energy consumption by fuel type and the 'sectoral' calculation of summing emissions across end-use sectors. Adjustments for the China-specific conventions of reporting foreign bunkers and domestic bunkers fueling abroad are made following IPCC definitions of international bunkers and EIA reporting conventions, while the sequestration of carbon in carbon steel is included as an additional adjustment. Under the sectoral approach, fuel consumption of bunkers and other transformation losses as well as gasoline consumption are reallocated to conform to EIA sectoral reporting conventions. To the extent possible, this study relies on official energy data from primary sources. A limited number of secondary sources were consulted to provide insight into the nature of consumption of some products and to guide the analysis of carbon sequestered in steel. Beyond these, however, the study avoided trying to estimate figures where directly unavailable, such as natural gas flaring. As a result, the basic calculations should be repeatable for other years with the core set of data from National Bureau of Statistics and Sinopec (or a similarly authoritative source of oil product data). This study estimates China's total energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions in 2008 to be 6666 Mt CO{sub 2}, including 234.6 Mt of non-fuel CO{sub 2} emissions and 154 Mt of sequestered CO{sub 2}. Bunker fuel emissions in 2008 totaled 15.9 Mt CO{sub 2}, but this figure is underestimated because fuel use by Chinese ship and planes for international transportation and military bunkers are not included. Of emissions related to energy consumption, 82% is from coal consumption, 15% from petroleum and 3% from natural gas. From the sectoral approach, industry had the largest share of China's energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions with 72%, followed by residential at 11%, transport and telecommunications at 8%, and the other four (commerce, agriculture, construction and other public) sectors having a combined share of 9%. Thermal electricity and (purchased) heat (to a lesser degree) are major sources of fuel consumption behind sectoral emissions, responsible for 2533 Mt CO2 and 321 Mt CO{sub 2}, respec

Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Qin, Yining

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

366

Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: Market Issues and Potential Energy and Emissions Impacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: Market Issues and Potential Energy and Emissions Impacts January 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. Unless referenced otherwise, the information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester.

367

Sustainability and Energy Development: Influences of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Options on Water Use in Energy Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change mitigation strategies cannot be evaluated solely in terms of energy cost and greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potential. Maintaining GHGs at a 'safe' level will require fundamental change in the way we approach energy production, and a number of environmental, economic, and societal factors will come into play. Water is an essential component of energy production, and water resource constraints (e.g., insufficient supplies and competing ecological and anthropogenic needs) will limit our options for producing energy and for reducing GHG emissions. This study evaluates these potential constraints from a global perspective by revisiting the 'climate wedges' proposal of Pacala and Sokolow [1], and evaluating the potential water impacts of the 'wedges' associated with energy production. Results indicate that there is a range of water impacts, with some options reducing water demand while others increase water demand. Mitigation options that improve energy conversion and end-use efficiency have the greatest potential for reducing water resources impacts. These options provide 'win-win-win' scenarios for reducing GHG emissions, lowering energy costs and reducing water demand. Thet may merit higher priority than alternative options that emphasize deploying new low-carbon energy facilities or modifying existing facilities with energy intensive GHG mitigation technologies to reduce GHG emissions. While the latter can reduce GHG emissions, they will typically increase energy costs and water impacts.

D. Craig Cooper; Gerald Sehlke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Population, Economy and Energy Uses Influence on Sulfur Emissions in the United States Since 1900  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper seeks to identify how changes in population, economic activity, and energy use have influenced sulfur emissions during this century. A linear model is presented which characterizes sulfur emissions as the product of these driving forces. The change in sulfur emissions is formulated as a function of changes in these trends. During this century, population growth and increasing economic activity have put upward pressure on sulfur emissions. The declining energy intensity of the economy and the transition from coal to less sulfur intensive fuels have reduced sulfur emissions. The net effect of all drivers has been moderate growth in sulfur emissions from 1900 to present. Since 1973, increased energy efficiency and the shift from an industrial to a commercially oriented economy have lowered the energy intensity of the economy. The increased use of low sulfur coal and reduced sulfur emissions from metal smelters have lowered the sulfur intensity of energy. These factors have combined to cause sulfur emissions to decline by 25%.

Kissock, J. K.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Turkey-Supporting RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turkey-Supporting RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development Turkey-Supporting RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Turkey-Supporting RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UNDP Bratislava Regional Center Partner Interministerial committees headed by the national focal point on climate change Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://europeandcis.undp.org/e Program Start 2010 Program End 2012 Country Turkey Western Asia

370

Environmental emissions and socioeconomic considerations in the production, storage, and transportation of biomass energy feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis was conducted to identify major sources and approximate levels of emissions to land, air, and water, that may result, in the year 2010, from supplying biofuel conversion facilities with energy crops. Land, fuel, and chemicals are all used in the establishment, maintenance, harvest, handling and transport of energy crops. The operations involved create soil erosion and compaction, particulate releases, air emissions from fuel use and chemical applications, and runoff or leachate. The analysis considered five different energy facility locations (each in a different major crop growing region) and three classes of energy crops -- woody crops, perennial herbaceous grasses, and an annual herbaceous crop (sorghum). All projections had to be based on reasonable assumptions regarding probable species used, type of land used, equipment requirements, chemical input requirements, and transportation fuel types. Emissions were summarized by location and class of energy crop.

Perlack, R.D.; Ranney, J.W.; Wright, L.L.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and analysis based on peak oil models. Energy Policy 36 (and analysis based on peak oil models, Energy Policy, 2008Sharp Peak Figure 71 Coal Demand and Extraction Profiles Oil

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power generation capacity factors are held constant with the exception of natural gas,Power Generation . 55 Energy Extraction .. 58 Uncertainties 60 Assumptions behind Fossil Energy Supply Scenarios . 63 Coal .. 63 Oil .. 65 Natural Gas ..

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possibility of oil reserve depletion raises questionscoefficient as these reserves of oil require more energy tooil use with other forms of energy. The potential exploitation of the large and inexpensive coal reserves

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry Ali Hasanbeigi, Lynn Price China Energy Group Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Marlene Arens Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI) January 2013 This work was supported by the China Sustainable Energy Program of the Energy Foundation and Dow Chemical Company (through a charitable contribution) through the Department of Energy under contract No.DE- AC02-05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL-6106E ii Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States

375

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... is sequestered in chemical industry products, such as plastics and fertilizers, rather than emitted through combustion. [Energy ...

376

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. supply, and it is assumed that the energy use for extraction and processing of pipeline imports

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Devices - Energy Innovation Portal  

Low energy consumption; High screen brightness ; Robust ; Operate at lower voltages and less severe vacuums than current FEDs or LCDs;

378

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficiency, structural change in industry, and new supplyenergy efficiency, structural change in industry, and new supply

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Sulfur oxide adsorbents and emissions control - Energy Innovation ...  

Energy Innovation Portal Technologies. ... Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic; Solar Thermal; Startup America; Vehicles and Fuels;

380

Reduction of Energy Consumption and GHGs Emission in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2012 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Energy Technologies and Carbon Dioxide Management. Presentation Title...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Develop low emissions growth scenarios | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

low emissions growth scenarios low emissions growth scenarios Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

382

Event:Low Emission Capacity Building Workshop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Event Event Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Event:Low Emission Capacity Building Workshop Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Low Emission Capacity Building Workshop: on 2012/10/01 The workshop sets out to discuss technical and policy relevant issues related to GHG inventory systems, NAMAs, LEDS, MRV, and industrial mitigation actions. It will take place in Marrakech, Morocco from October, 1-4, 2012. The main objectives of the workshop are: Facilitate an exchange among participating Phase 2 countries on the context assessments and the ultimate scope-of-work of Programme projects Identify follow-up actions to assist countries with the implementation of their projects Identify technical assistance needs and training priorities. Event Details

383

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Emission Paths to 2030. Berkeley, CA: Lawrenceand steel industry for 2010-2030 is estimated to be 251 TWh,emission factors through 2030 were from the factors used in

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Saving Energy and Reducing Emissions from the Regeneration Air System of a Butane Dehydrogenation Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Petrochemicals operates a butane dehydrogenation unit producing MTBE for reformulated gasoline that was originally constructed when energy was cheap and prior to environmental regulation. The process exhausts 900,000 pounds per hour of air at 900 to 1100F containing CO and VOC. By installing a furnace/heat recovery steam generator, Texas Petrochemicals achieved significant reductions of VOC, CO, and NOx, along with energy savings.

John, T. P.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) Preliminary Report: Integrated NOx Emissions Savings from EE/RE Programs Statewide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (Laboratory), at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its eighth annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in three volumes: Volume I Summary Report provides an executive summary and overview; Volume II Technical Report provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III Technical Appendix contains detailed data from simulations for each of the counties included in the analysis.

Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Gilman, D.; Baltazar, J. C.; Lewis, C.; McKelvey, K.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Degelman, L.; Liu, Z.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Exploring the hidden impacts of HomeSys: energy and emissions of home sensing and automation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Home sensing and automation systems are rarely discussed with reference to their direct energy demand, much less other environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas (GhG) emissions arising from their manufacture and transport. It is imperative that designers ... Keywords: embodied carbon, home energy, home systems

Oliver Bates, Mike Hazas

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

388

EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) (Redirected from UNDP/EC-China-Climate Change Capacity Building Program) Jump to: navigation, search Name EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

389

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle to grave" and facilitate more consistent comparisons of energy technologies. Figure 1. Generalized life cycle stages for energy technologies Source: Sathaye et al. (2011) Life cycle GHG emissions from renewable electricity generation technologies are generally less than those from fossil fuel-based technologies, based on evidence assembled by this project. Further, the proportion of GHG emissions from each life cycle stage differs by technology. For fossil-fueled technologies, fuel combustion during operation of the facility emits the vast majority of GHGs. For nuclear and renewable energy technologies, the majority of GHG emissions occur upstream of operation. LCA of Energy Systems

390

Event:11th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading 1th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png 11th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading: on 2011/10/03 "The IEA-IETA-EPRI Emissions Trading Workshop has been held annually at the headquarters of the International Energy Agency since 2000. This international workshop focuses on developments in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions trading around the world at the international, national and sub-national level. The 2011 workshop will cover topics relevant to the development of global, national and sub-national carbon markets, including scaled-up and new market mechanisms, NAMAs and sectoral crediting policies, MRV and international GHG accounting and 2nd-best trading programmes. As in previous years, the workshop will assemble representatives from government,

391

Control technology for radioactive emissions to the atmosphere at US Department of Energy facilities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide information to the US Environmental Protection agency (EPA) on existing technology for the control of radionuclide emissions into the air from US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, and to provide EPA with information on possible additional control technologies that could be used to further reduce these emissions. Included in this report are generic discussions of emission control technologies for particulates, iodine, rare gases, and tritium. Also included are specific discussions of existing emission control technologies at 25 DOE facilities. Potential additional emission control technologies are discussed for 14 of these facilities. The facilities discussed were selected by EPA on the basis of preliminary radiation pathway analyses. 170 references, 131 figures, 104 tables.

Moore, E.B.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most of the increase in crude oil demand is driven by aaverage quality of crude oil for refining and increasinglyadjustment by comparing crude oil throughput to energy

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

roofs on commercial buildings in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, corresponding to cooling energy savings of 10 19%. With the assumption of an annual increase...

394

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unconventional/. DOE EERE. 2002. Industrial Technologiesof Energy (DOE) (DOE EERE 2011). The uncertainties in thetotal material extracted (DOE EERE 2007). Estimates of the

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy consumption reaches a plateau, there are many drivers in building sector such as rising number of housing units, per capita floor area, urbanization increase,

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

products such as electricity, coke, and petroleum products.efficiency levels for coke, oil refining and electricitythe energy input to producing coke dropped dramatically from

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. Iron and Steel sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the U.S. 26 Energy Conservation SupplyDioxide Emissions from Energy For U.S. Steel Production (2 Final Energy Use for U.S. Steel Production (

Worrell, Ernst; Martin, N.; Price, L.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG Emissions Reduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supporting policies offered by the government Energy/GHGpolicy package, and include a real threat of increased government regulation or energy/energy/GHG emissions tax policy or with strict regulations. A variety of government-

Price, Lynn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Teach Yourself in 24 Hours  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"ations .................................................. 302 Reclaiming Memory with the kill Command .................................. 303 Getting System Load in a retrieval system, or transmitted by any means, electronic, mechanical, photo- copying, recording 1 Hour 1 Preparing to Install Linux 3 2 Installing Linux 11 3 Configuring the X Window System 31

Eckmiller, Rolf

400

NERSC Carver Hours Used Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carver Hours Carver Hours Used Carver Hours Used Hopper Usage Chart Hopper Usage Chart Date Hours Used (in millions) Percent of Maximum Possible (24 hours/day) 01/05/2014 170.00 89.35 01/04/2014 174.38 91.65 01/03/2014 174.15 91.53 01/02/2014 179.72 94.45 01/01/2014 173.76 91.32 12/31/2013 172.25 90.53 12/30/2013 169.62 89.14 12/29/2013 164.72 86.57 12/28/2013 177.92 93.51 12/27/2013 171.61 90.19 12/26/2013 172.74 90.79 12/25/2013 172.13 90.46 12/24/2013 173.48 91.18 12/23/2013 174.92 91.93 12/22/2013 175.26 92.11 12/21/2013 173.58 91.23 12/20/2013 174.50 91.71 12/19/2013 170.02 89.36 12/18/2013 178.25 93.68 12/17/2013 176.17 92.59 12/16/2013 162.03 85.16 12/15/2013 157.09 82.56 12/14/2013 173.40 91.13 12/13/2013 185.02 97.24 12/12/2013 150.91 79.31 12/11/2013 31.67 16.64 12/10/2013 92.44 48.58

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

hourly solar radiation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

solar radiation solar radiation Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): A need for predicting hourly global radiation exists for many locations particularly in Bangladesh for which measured values are not available and daily values have to be estimated from sunshine data. The CPRG model has been used to predict values of hourly Gh for Dhaka (23.770N, 90.380E), Chittagong (22.270N, 91.820E) and Bogra (24.850N, 89.370E) for = ±7.50, ±22.50, ±37.50, ±52.50, ±67.50, ±82.50 and ±97.50 i.e., for ±1/2, ±3/2, ±5/2, ±7/2, ±9/2, ±11/2, ±13/2 hours before and after solar noon and the computed values for Source Renewable Energy Research Centre Date Released October 22nd, 2003 (11 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Bangladesh documentation hourly solar radiation SWERA

402

Opportunity Analysis for Recovering Energy from Industrial Waste Heat and Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

United States industry consumed 32.5 Quads (34,300 PJ) of energy during 2003, which was 33.1% of total U.S. energy consumption (EIA 2003 Annual Energy Review). The U.S. industrial complex yields valuable goods and products. Through its manufacturing processes as well as its abundant energy consumption, it supports a multi-trillion dollar contribution to the gross domestic product and provides millions of jobs in the U.S. each year. Industry also yields waste products directly through its manufacturing processes and indirectly through its energy consumption. These waste products come in two forms, chemical and thermal. Both forms of waste have residual energy values that are not routinely recovered. Recovering and reusing these waste products may represent a significant opportunity to improve the energy efficiency of the U.S. industrial complex. This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program (DOE-ITP). It analyzes the opportunity to recover chemical emissions and thermal emissions from U.S. industry. It also analyzes the barriers and pathways to more effectively capitalize on these opportunities. A primary part of this analysis was to characterize the quantity and energy value of the emissions. For example, in 2001, the industrial sector emitted 19% of the U.S. greenhouse gases (GHG) through its industrial processes and emitted 11% of GHG through electricity purchased from off-site utilities. Therefore, industry (not including agriculture) was directly and indirectly responsible for emitting 30% of the U.S. GHG. These emissions were mainly comprised of carbon dioxide (CO2), but also contained a wide-variety of CH4 (methane), CO (carbon monoxide), H2 (hydrogen), NMVOC (non-methane volatile organic compound), and other chemicals. As part of this study, we conducted a survey of publicly available literature to determine the amount of energy embedded in the emissions and to identify technology opportunities to capture and reuse this energy. As shown in Table E-1, non-CO2 GHG emissions from U.S. industry were identified as having 2180 peta joules (PJ) or 2 Quads (quadrillion Btu) of residual chemical fuel value. Since landfills are not traditionally considered industrial organizations, the industry component of these emissions had a value of 1480 PJ or 1.4 Quads. This represents approximately 4.3% of the total energy used in the United States Industry.

Viswanathan, Vish V.; Davies, Richard W.; Holbery, Jim D.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Energy Emission by Quantum Systems in an Expanding FRW Metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bound quantum mechanical systems not expanding with the comoving frame of an expanding, flat FRW metric are found to release energy at a rate linearly proportional to the local Hubble constant ($H_{o}$) and the systems' binding energy ($E_{b}$); {\\em i.e.}, $\\dot{E} = H_{o} E_{b}$. Three exemplary quantum systems are examined. For systems with early cosmological condensation times | notably hadrons | time-integrated energy release could have been significant and could account for an appreciable fraction of the dark matter inventory.

D. P. Sheehan; V. G. Kriss

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

404

Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U national estimates of energy intensities and greenhouse gas (GHG) production are of less relevance than the ANL Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

405

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

petroleum petroleum petroleum Source Category undergroundwhich petroleum-based fuels are the primary energy source,Sources ..25 3.3.3 AEO Forecast .27 3.3.4 Issues for Further Study 28 3.4 Petroleum

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development Plan for Renewable Energy in China. AvailableGW Renewable (-235 GW) CCS Renewables Figure 28 China Powerrenewable and non-fossil fuel generation prior to It is a common belief that China

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Energy and Air Emission Implications of a Decentralized Wastewater System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

represent results when methane biogas that would have beenflaring will convert methane biogas to carbon dioxide, aAgency reports that biogas is used to offset energy use at

Shehabi, Arman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Natural Gas Combined-Cycle Power Generation System.combined with separate accounting for the use of energy in fuel production, is referred to as full- fuel- cycle (

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intensity of the energy use compared to the evolution of GDP. Historically, this indicatorenergy intensity to continue to decrease in a similar manner over the next 30 years (36%) while the B2 scenario forecasts this indicator

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thus determines the natural gas import demand to 2050. Underand natural gas extraction falls short of demand, resultingNatural Gas Supply Curves 66 v Abstract As a result of soaring energy demand

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

A Potential Path to Emissions-Free Fossil Energy | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

may not be a household term just yet, it represents one promising path forward for using fossil fuels as part of a clean energy future. At most coal fired power plants, the coal...

412

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy. Biomass and solar power capacity were both modeledcapacity of wind, solar, and biomass power grows from 2.3 GWcapacity of wind, solar, and biomass power grows from 2.3 GW

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

REPORT DISTRIBUTION OF CARBON EMISSIONS IN THE UK: IMPLICATIONS FOR DOMESTIC ENERGY POLICY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The report looks at the distribution of carbon emissions and abatement opportunities of households in England, and the implications for energy and climate change policy impacts. The UK government has a target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80 % on 1990 levels by 2050. In addition there are statutory targets to ensure that no household is in fuel poverty by 2016. An understanding of how current and proposed policy approaches to meeting these targets are likely to impact differentially on domestic energy consumers is fundamental to ensuring policies are both fair and effective. This research project uses advanced modelling techniques to develop and analyse the datasets needed to support and further understanding of: the distribution of carbon emissions from energy consumed in the home and through personal travel by car, public transport and aviation across households in Great Britain;

Ian Preston; Vicki White; Joshua Thumim; Toby Bridgeman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Energetics of midvelocity emissions in peripheral heavy ion collisions at Fermi energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peripheral and semi-peripheral collisions have been studied in the system 93Nb+93Nb at 38 AMeV. The evaporative and midvelocity components of the light charged particle and intermediate mass fragment emissions have been carefully disentangled. In this way it was possible to obtain the average amount not only of charge and mass, but also of energy, pertaining to the midvelocity emission, as a function of an impact parameter estimator. This emission has a very important role in the overall balance of the reaction, as it accounts for a large fraction of the emitted mass and for more than half of the dissipated energy. As such, it may give precious clues on the microscopic mechanism of energy transport from the interaction zone toward the target and projectile remnants.

A. Mangiarotti; P. R. Maurenzig; A. Olmi; S. Piantelli; L. Bardelli; A. Bartoli; M. Bini; G. Casini; C. Coppi; A. Gobbi; G. Pasquali; G. Poggi; A. A. Stefanini; N. Taccetti; E. Vanzi

2004-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

415

Energy conservation: The main factor for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the former Soviet Union  

SciTech Connect

The energy intensity of the former Soviet Union is more than twice that of other market economics in similar stages of economic development. Low energy efficiency in the Soviet Union has contributed significantly to global carbon and other greenhouse gas emissions. The technological potential for energy conservation in the former Soviet Union is the largest in the world. The inefficiencies of the previously command-system economy, however, have provided little incentive for conserving energy. The present transition to a market-based economy should encourage the incorporation of energy-efficiency improvements in order for the former Soviet Union to successfully lower its energy intensity. There are several obstacles that limit implementing energy conservation: for example, energy prices and discount rates influence the volume of investment in energy efficiency. Nevertheless, cost-effective measures for energy conservative do exist even in the most energy-intensive sectors of the Soviet economy and should form the core of any energy conservation program. The overall cost-effective potential for carbon savings in the former Soviet Union is estimated to be 280 to 367 million tons of carbon per year by the year 2005, or 23 to 29 percent of 1988 energy-related emissions.

Bashmakov, I.A.; Chupyatov, V.P.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Buildings represent an increasingly important component of China's total energy consumption mix. However, accurately assessing the total volume of energy consumed in buildings is difficult owing to deficiencies in China's statistical collection system and a lack of national surveys. Official statistics suggest that buildings account for about 19% of China's total energy consumption, while others estimate the proportion at 23%, rising to 30% over the next few years. In addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy used in the in the mining, extraction, harvesting, processing, manufacturing and transport of building materials as well as the energy used in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. This embodied energy, along with a building's operational energy, constitutes the building's life-cycle energy and emissions footprint. This report first provides a review of international studies on commercial building life-cycle energy use from which data are derived to develop an assessment of Chinese commercial building life-cycle energy use, then examines in detail two cases for the development of office building operational energy consumption to 2020. Finally, the energy and emissions implications of the two cases are presented.

Fridley, David; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

The effect of household consumption patterns on energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: Comparison between Spain and Sweden.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study is to provide a better understanding of the effect of increasing income on energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (more)

Cintas Snchez, Olivia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Table 4. 2010 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector " 2010 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector " "percent of total" ,"Shares" "State","Commercial","Electric Power","Residential","Industrial","Transportation" "Alabama",0.01584875241,0.5778871607,0.02136328943,0.1334667239,0.2514340736 "Alaska",0.06448385239,0.0785744956,0.0462016929,0.4291084798,0.3816314793 "Arizona",0.02474932909,0.5668758159,0.02425067581,0.04966758421,0.334456595 "Arkansas",0.03882032779,0.4886410984,0.03509200153,0.1307772146,0.3066693577 "California",0.04308920353,0.1176161395,0.07822332929,0.1824277392,0.5786435885 "Colorado",0.04301641968,0.4131279202,0.08115394032,0.1545280216,0.3081736982

419

EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(LECBP) (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment

420

CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS R. Atkins,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS R. Atkins,1,2 W. Benbow,3 emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) during the prompt emission phase. Detection of >100 GeV counterparts on potential GRB models. Subject headinggs: gamma rays: bursts -- gamma rays: observations 1. INTRODUCTION

California at Santa Cruz, University of

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421

The Regional Incidence of a National Greenhouse Gas Emission Limit: Title VII of the American Clean Energy and Security Act  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Regional Incidence of a National Greenhouse Gas Emission Limit: Title VII of the American the macroeconomic costs of greenhouse gas emission reductions under Title VII of the American Clean Energy limits on domestic emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). This paper analyzes the macroeconomic costs

Wing, Ian Sue

422

Discovery of Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from 1FGL J2001.1 4351 by MAGIC  

SciTech Connect

We report the discovery of Very High Energy (VHE; >100 GeV) gamma-ray emission from the source 1FGL J2001.1+4351, (RA 20 01 13.5, dec 43 53 02.8, J2000), which is positionally consistent with the location of the flat spectrum radio source MG4 J200112+4352 (RA 20 01 12.9, dec 43 52 52.8, J2000). The VHE detection is based on a 1.5 hour-long observation performed on July 16th in stereoscopic mode with the two 17m diameter imaging Cherenkov telescopes on La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. The preliminary analysis of the MAGIC data using the standard cuts optimized for soft energy spectra sources yields a detection of 125 gamma-rays above 90 GeV, corresponding to a pre-trail statistical significance of 7.6 standard deviations. The observed flux is estimated to be {approx}20% of the Crab nebula flux above 100 GeV. Earlier MAGIC observations indicated a substantially lower flux; hence indicating that the source is variable on a few days timescale.

Berger, Karsten; /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife; Paneque, David; /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /SLAC; Giavitto, Gianluca; /Barcelona, IFAE

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

423

Models of the Prompt and High Energy Emission of GRB  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray bursts have been detected at photon energies up to tens of GeV. We review some recent developments in the X-ray to GeV photon phenomenology in the light of Swift and Fermi observations, and some of the theoretical models developed to explain them.

Meszaros, Peter; Toma, Kenji; Wu Xuefeng; He Haoning [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Dept. of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.hbefa.net/e/index.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/handbook-emission-factors-road-transp Language: "English,French,German" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

425

China's sustainable energy future: Scenarios of energy and carbon emissions (Summary)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11%, respectively, of final energy consumption in 2020 ().Energy Consumption ..2003). As Chinas energy consumption continues to increase,

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Definition: Clock Hour | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

unless specifically noted.1 References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline...

427

China's sustainable energy future: Scenarios of energy and carbon emissions (Summary)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy use. Chinas Sustainable Energy Future Summary next31 -ii- Chinas Sustainable Energy Future Executive Summarystudy, entitled Chinas Sustainable Energy Future: Scenarios

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions for U.S. Commercial Buildings, by Year (Million Metric Tons) (1) Commercial U.S. Site Growth Rate Growth Rate Com.% Com.% Fossil Electricity Total 2010-Year Total 2010-Year of Total U.S. of Total Global 1980 245 409 653 4,723 14% 3.5% 1981 226 427 653 4,601 14% 3.6% 1982 226 426 653 4,357 15% 3.6% 1983 226 434 659 4,332 15% 3.6% 1984 236 455 691 4,561 15% 3.6% 1985 217 477 695 4,559 15% 3.6% 1986 216 481 698 4,564 15% 3.5% 1987 220 503 723 4,714 15% 3.5% 1988 230 531 761 4,939 15% 3.6% 1989 226 543 769 4,983 15% 3.6% 1990 227 566 793 5,039 16% 3.7% 1991 228 567 794 4,996 16% 3.7% 1992 229 567 796 5,093 16% 3.7% 1993 226 593 819 5,185 16% 3.8% 1994 229 605 833 5,258 16% 3.8% 1995 231 620 851 5,314 16% 3.8% 1996 240 643 883 5,501 16% 3.9% 1997 240 686 926 5,575 17% 4.0% 1998 223 724 947 5,622 17% 4.1% 1999 226 735 960 5,682 17% 4.1% 2000 239 783 1,022 5,867 17% 4.3% 2001 230 797 1,027

429

Fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of tripled fuel economy vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents estimates of the full cycle energy and emissions impacts of light-duty vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) as currently being developed by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Seven engine and fuel combinations were analyzed: reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines; low sulfur diesel and dimethyl ether in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines; and hydrogen and methanol in fuel-cell vehicles. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translated directly into reductions in total energy demand, petroleum demand, and carbon dioxide emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency resulted in substantial reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter smaller than 10 microns, particularly under the High Market Share Scenario.

Mintz, M.M.; Wang, M.Q.; Vyas, A.D.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are at the locus of three trends driving China's increased energy use and emissions: urbanization, growing personal consumption, and surging heavy industrial production. Migration to cities and urban growth create demand for new building construction. Higher levels of per-capita income and consumption drive building operational energy use with demand for higher intensity lighting, thermal comfort, and plug-load power. Demand for new buildings, infrastructure, and electricity requires heavy industrial production. In order to quantify the implications of China's ongoing urbanization, rising personal consumption, and booming heavy industrial sector, this study presents a lifecycle assessment (LCA) of the energy use and carbon emissions related to residential and commercial buildings. The purpose of the LCA model is to quantify the impact of a given building and identify policy linkages to mitigate energy demand and emissions growth related to China's new building construction. As efficiency has become a higher priority with growing energy demand, policy and academic attention to buildings has focused primarily on operational energy use. Existing studies estimate that building operational energy consumption accounts for approximately 25% of total primary energy use in China. However, buildings also require energy for mining, extracting, processing, manufacturing, and transporting materials, as well as energy for construction, maintenance, and decommissioning. Building and supporting infrastructure construction is a major driver of industry consumption--in 2008 industry accounted for 72% of total Chinese energy use. The magnitude of new building construction is large in China--in 2007, for example, total built floor area reached 58 billion square meters. During the construction boom in 2007 and 2008, more than two billion m{sup 2} of building space were added annually; China's recent construction is estimated to account for half of global construction. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed an integrated LCA model to capture the energy and emissions implications of all aspects of new buildings from material mining through construction, operations, and decommissioning. Over the following four sections, this report describes related existing research, the LBNL building LCA model structure and results, policy linkages of this lifecycle assessment, and conclusions and recommendations for follow-on work. The LBNL model is a first-order approach to gathering local data and applying lifecycle assessment to buildings in the Beijing area--it represents one effort among a range of established, predominantly American and European, LCA models. This report identifies the benefits, limitations, and policy applications of lifecycle assessment modeling for quantifying the energy and emissions impacts of specific residential and commercial buildings.

Aden, Nathaniel; Qin, Yining; Fridley, David

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are at the locus of three trends driving China's increased energy use and emissions: urbanization, growing personal consumption, and surging heavy industrial production. Migration to cities and urban growth create demand for new building construction. Higher levels of per-capita income and consumption drive building operational energy use with demand for higher intensity lighting, thermal comfort, and plug-load power. Demand for new buildings, infrastructure, and electricity requires heavy industrial production. In order to quantify the implications of China's ongoing urbanization, rising personal consumption, and booming heavy industrial sector, this study presents a lifecycle assessment (LCA) of the energy use and carbon emissions related to residential and commercial buildings. The purpose of the LCA model is to quantify the impact of a given building and identify policy linkages to mitigate energy demand and emissions growth related to China's new building construction. As efficiency has become a higher priority with growing energy demand, policy and academic attention to buildings has focused primarily on operational energy use. Existing studies estimate that building operational energy consumption accounts for approximately 25% of total primary energy use in China. However, buildings also require energy for mining, extracting, processing, manufacturing, and transporting materials, as well as energy for construction, maintenance, and decommissioning. Building and supporting infrastructure construction is a major driver of industry consumption--in 2008 industry accounted for 72% of total Chinese energy use. The magnitude of new building construction is large in China--in 2007, for example, total built floor area reached 58 billion square meters. During the construction boom in 2007 and 2008, more than two billion m{sup 2} of building space were added annually; China's recent construction is estimated to account for half of global construction. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed an integrated LCA model to capture the energy and emissions implications of all aspects of new buildings from material mining through construction, operations, and decommissioning. Over the following four sections, this report describes related existing research, the LBNL building LCA model structure and results, policy linkages of this lifecycle assessment, and conclusions and recommendations for follow-on work. The LBNL model is a first-order approach to gathering local data and applying lifecycle assessment to buildings in the Beijing area--it represents one effort among a range of established, predominantly American and European, LCA models. This report identifies the benefits, limitations, and policy applications of lifecycle assessment modeling for quantifying the energy and emissions impacts of specific residential and commercial buildings.

Aden, Nathaniel; Qin, Yining; Fridley, David

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

State-Level Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000-2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Environment - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Environment - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable &

433

Estimation of Daily Degree-hours  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Degree-hours have many applications in fields such as agriculture, architecture, and power generation. Since daily mean temperatures are more readily available than hourly temperatures, the difference between mean daily degree-hours computed from ...

Nathaniel B. Guttman; Richard L. Lehman

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Capital requirements and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of potential PNGV fuels.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our study reveals that supplying gasoline-equivalent demand for the low-market-share scenario requires a capital investment of less than $40 billion for all fuels except H{sub 2}, which will require a total cumulative investment of $150 billion. By contrast, cumulative capital investments under the high-market-share scenario are $50 billion for LNG, $90 billion for ethanol, $100 billion for methanol, $160 billion for CNG and DME, and $560 billion for H{sub 2}. Although these substantial capital requirements are spread over many years, their magnitude could pose a challenge to the widespread introduction of 3X vehicles. Fossil fuel use by US light-duty vehicles declines significantly with introduction of 3X vehicles because of fuel-efficiency improvements for 3X vehicles and because of fuel substitution (which applies to the nonpetroleum-fueled alternatives). Petroleum use for light-duty vehicles in 2030 is reduced by as much as 45% relative to the reference scenario. GHG emissions follow a similar pattern. Total GHG emissions decline by 25-30% with most of the propulsion system/fuel alternatives. For those using renewable fuels (i.e., ethanol and H{sub 2} from solar energy), GHG emissions drop by 33% (H{sub 2}) and 45% (ethanol). Among urban air pollutants, urban NOX emissions decline slightly for 3X vehicles using CIDI and SIDI engines and drop substantially for fuel-cell vehicles. Urban CO emissions decline for CIDI and FCV alternatives, while VOC emissions drop significantly for all alternatives except RFG-, methanol-, and ethanol-fueled SIDI engines. With the exception of CIDI engines fueled by RFD, FT50, or B20 (which increase urban PM{sub 10} emissions by over 30%), all propulsion system/fuel alternatives reduce urban PM{sub 10} emissions. Reductions are approximately 15-20% for fuel cells and for methanol-, ethanol-, CNG-, or LPG-fueled SIDI engines. Table 3 qualitatively summarizes impacts of the 13 alternatives on capital requirements and on energy use and emissions relative to the reference scenario. The table clearly shows the trade-off between costs and benefits. For example, while H{sub 2} FCVs have the greatest incremental capital needs, they offer the largest energy and emissions benefits. On the basis of the cost and benefit changes shown, methanol and gasoline FCVs appear to have particularly promising benefits-to-costs ratios.

Johnson, L.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Wang, M.

1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

435

Final Scientific/Technical Report to the U.S. Department of Energy on NOVA's Einstein's Big Idea (Project title: E-mc2, A Two-Hour Television Program on NOVA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Summary A woman in the early 1700s who became one of Europes leading interpreters of mathematics and a poor bookbinder who became one of the giants of nineteenth-century science are just two of the pioneers whose stories NOVA explored in Einsteins Big Idea. This two-hour documentary premiered on PBS in October 2005 and is based on the best-selling book by David Bodanis, E=mc2: A Biography of the Worlds Most Famous Equation. The film and book chronicle the scientific challenges and discoveries leading up to Einsteins startling conclusion that mass and energy are one, related by the formula E = mc2.

Susanne Simpson

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

436

A methodology to evaluate energy savings and NOx emissions reductions from the adoption of the 2000 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) to new residences in non-attainment and affected counties in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, four areas of Texas have been designated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as non-attainment areas because they exceeded the national one-hour ground-level ozone standard of 0.12 parts-per-million (ppm). Ozone is formed in the atmosphere by the reaction of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) in the presence of heat and sunlight. In May 2002, The Texas State Legislature passed Senate Bill 5, the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), to reduce the emissions of NOx by several sources. As part of the 2001 building energy performance standards program which is one of the programs in the TERP, the Texas Legislature established the 2000 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) as the state energy code. Since September 1, 2001, the 2000 IECC has been required for newly constructed single and multifamily houses in Texas. Therefore, this study develops and applies portions of a methodology to calculate the energy savings and NOx emissions reductions from the adoption of the 2000 IECC to new single family houses in non-attainment and affected counties in Texas. To accomplish the objectives of the research, six major tasks were developed: 1) baseline data collection, 2) development of the 2000 IECC standard building simulation, 3) projection of the number of building permits in 2002, 4) comparison of energy simulations, 5) validation and, 6) NOx emissions reduction calculations. To begin, the 1999 standard residential building characteristics which are the baseline construction data were collected, and the 2000 IECC standard building characteristics were reviewed. Next, the annual and peak-day energy savings were calculated using the DOE-2 building energy simulation program. The building characteristics and the energy savings were then crosschecked using the data from previous studies, a site visit survey, and utility billing analysis. In this thesis, several case study houses are used to demonstrate the validation procedure. Finally, the calculated electricity savings (MWh/yr) were then converted into the NOx emissions reductions (tons/yr) using the EPA's eGRID database. The results of the peak-day electricity savings and NOx emissions reductions using this procedure are approximately twice the average day electricity savings and NOx emissions reductions.

Im, Piljae

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Energy and Emissions Savings through Insulation Upgrade Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presentation demonstrates the value of including insulation system assessment, repairs and upgrades on a facility's physical function and its importance in the overall energy and environmental management program. Financial and environmental benefits are quantified and physical improvements detailed. The presentation will highlight the key components and successful execution of an insulation assessment and upgrade project. This includes: The extent of the problem How the current state happened The stake / reward for plants Specific case studies will be used including Sunoco and Marathon Petroleum

Lettich, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 18502000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850) and primary organic carbon (OC) aerosols from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion between 1850 and 2000. We-related combustion, 1850­2000, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 21, GB2018, doi:10.1029/2006GB002840. 1. Importance

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

439

Transport Energy-Saving Emission Reduction Countermeasures under the Concept of Sustainable Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper combined the actual situation of China's transport development, analyzed the environmental impact of transport sector and the domestic and international reflected to the advanced experience of traffic pollution. At the same time, I also proposed ... Keywords: Sustainable, Development, transport, Energy-saving, emission, reduction, Environment, Propose

Chengzhi Liu

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

MILAGRO CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM SHORT-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MILAGRO CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM SHORT-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS A. A. Abdo,1 localizations of short, hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Swift and HETE satellites have led: bursts -- gamma rays: observations Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have long been classified by their durations

California at Santa Cruz, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Future restrictions on diesel fuel combustion in California: Energy and emissions implications of four scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The paper discusses alternatives to diesel displacement, describing several scenarios. It studies three basic cases: (1) cars and trucks; (2) urban buses; and (3) off-road vehicles. The discussion also includes changes in energy use and emissions expected from the production and combustion of alternative fuels.

Saricks, C.L.; Rote, D.M.; Stodolsky, F.; Eberhardt, J.J.

1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

442

Water efficiency in buildings: assessment of its impact on energy efficiency and reducing GHG emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays humanity uses about 50% of existing drinking-water, but in the next 15 years this percentage will reach 75%. Consequently, hydric stress risk will rise significantly across the entire planet. Accordingly, several countries will have to apply ... Keywords: GHG emissions, efficient water devices, energy efficiency, hydric efficiency

A. Silva-Afonso; F. Rodrigues; C. Pimentel-Rodrigues

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Hybrid modeling of industrial energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions with an application to Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid modeling of industrial energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions with an application explore the implications for Canada's industrial sector of an economy-wide, compulsory greenhouse gas of these strengths is linked to challenges when it comes to forecasting the impact of greenhouse gas policy. We

444

An assessment of future energy use and carbon emissions from US residences  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores residential energy futures and their associated carbon emissions using an engineering-economic end-use model. The authors present detailed input assumptions and output results for twenty-four cases, each representing a different combination of electricity supply mix, demand-side policy case, and carbon tax. They describe current and projected future energy use by end-use and fuel, and assess which end-uses are growing most rapidly in importance over time.

Koomey, J.G.; Johnson, F.X.; McMahon, J.E.; Orland, M.C.; Levine, M.D.; Chan, P.; Krause, F.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated. Carbon dioxide emissions are the main component of greenhouse gas emissions caused by human ...

446

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information The Home Energy Scoring Tool: A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

component of the program has been designed to support the existing energy analysis marketplace by providing web- based applications and market delivery strategy. Introduction Globally, energy usedChemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information

448

Operational energy consumption and GHG emissions in residential sector in urban China : an empirical study in Jinan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Driven by rapid urbanization and increasing household incomes, residential energy consumption in urban China has been growing steadily in the past decade, posing critical energy and greenhouse gas emission challenges. ...

Zhang, Jiyang, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Projected Cost, Energy Use, and Emissions of Hydrogen Technologies for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Each combination of technologies necessary to produce, deliver, and distribute hydrogen for transportation use has a corresponding levelized cost, energy requirement, and greenhouse gas emission profile depending upon the technologies' efficiencies and costs. Understanding the technical status, potential, and tradeoffs is necessary to properly allocate research and development (R&D) funding. In this paper, levelized delivered hydrogen costs, pathway energy use, and well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use and emissions are reported for multiple hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. Technologies analyzed include both central and distributed reforming of natural gas and electrolysis of water, and central hydrogen production from biomass and coal. Delivery options analyzed include trucks carrying liquid hydrogen and pipelines carrying gaseous hydrogen. Projected costs, energy use, and emissions for current technologies (technology that has been developed to at least the bench-scale, extrapolated to commercial-scale) are reported. Results compare favorably with those for gasoline, diesel, and E85 used in current internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, gasoline hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and flexible fuel vehicles. Sensitivities of pathway cost, pathway energy use, WTW energy use, and WTW emissions to important primary parameters were examined as an aid in understanding the benefits of various options. Sensitivity studies on production process energy efficiency, total production process capital investment, feed stock cost, production facility operating capacity, electricity grid mix, hydrogen vehicle market penetration, distance from the hydrogen production facility to city gate, and other parameters are reported. The Hydrogen Macro-System Model (MSM) was used for this analysis. The MSM estimates the cost, energy use, and emissions trade offs of various hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways under consideration. The MSM links the H2A Production Model, the Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM), and the Greenhouse Gas, Regulated Emission, and Energy for Transportation (GREET) Model. The MSM utilizes the capabilities of each component model and ensures the use of consistent parameters between the models to enable analysis of full hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. To better understand spatial aspects of hydrogen pathways, the MSM is linked to the Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool (HyDRA). The MSM is available to the public and enables users to analyze the pathways and complete sensitivity analyses.

Ruth, M. F.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M. J.; Timbario, T. A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

FutureGen: Pathway to Near-Zero Emissions and Sustainable Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation will highlight the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) FutureGen project ? a $1 billion government-industry partnership to design, build, and operate a near-zero emissions coal-fueled power plant. The lead organization for the FutureGen initiative is the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), a multi-purpose laboratory operated by the U.S. DOEs Office of Fossil Energy. NETL has a mission to conduct R&D from fundamental science to technology demonstration for resolving the environmental, supply, and reliability constraints of producing and using fossil energy resources. The commercial-scale FutureGen R&D facility is a pathway toward future fossil-energy power plants that will produce hydrogen and electricity while nearly eliminating emissions, including carbon dioxide. The 275-megawatt FutureGen plant will initiate operations around 2012 and employ advanced coal gasification technology integrated with combined cycle electricity generation, hydrogen production, and carbon capture and sequestration. Low carbon emissions would be achieved by integrating CO2 capture and sequestration operations with the power plant.

Zitney, S.E.; Sarkus, T.A

2007-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

451

Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Carbon Dioxide Emissions on GNP Growth: Interpretation ofMcNeil et al Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (Keywords Greenhouse gas emissions, emissions scenarios,

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Renewable Energy Certificates and Air Emissions Benefits: Developing an Appropriate Definition for a REC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES TRUST ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES TRUST Pioneering Markets to Improve the Environment Renewable Energy Certificates and Air Emissions Benefits Developing an Appropriate Definition for a REC Patrick Leahy and Alden Hathaway April 2004 The Renewable Energy Certificate Market The past few years have witnessed the emergence of the Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) market as a viable model for the U.S. renewable energy industry. Once considered an esoteric topic for even the most ardent renewable energy expert, RECs have grown in popularity and exposure thanks to efforts of the renewable energy industry as well as several large purchases by high profile corporations and governmental organizations. Although still in its infancy, the Renewable Energy

453

Greenhouse gas emissions from MSW incineration in China: Impacts of waste characteristics and energy recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is complex because both contributions and savings of GHGs exist in the process. To identify the critical factors influencing GHG emissions from MSWI in China, a GHG accounting model was established and applied to six Chinese cities located in different regions. The results showed that MSWI in most of the cities was the source of GHGs, with emissions of 25-207 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. Within all process stages, the emission of fossil CO{sub 2} from the combustion of MSW was the main contributor (111-254 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw), while the substitution of electricity reduced the GHG emissions by 150-247 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. By affecting the fossil carbon content and the lower heating value of the waste, the contents of plastic and food waste in the MSW were the critical factors influencing GHG emissions of MSWI. Decreasing food waste content in MSW by half will significantly reduce the GHG emissions from MSWI, and such a reduction will convert MSWI in Urumqi and Tianjin from GHG sources to GHG sinks. Comparison of the GHG emissions in the six Chinese cities with those in European countries revealed that higher energy recovery efficiency in Europe induced much greater reductions in GHG emissions. Recovering the excess heat after generation of electricity would be a good measure to convert MSWI in all the six cities evaluated herein into sinks of GHGs.

Yang Na [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen Miao; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing, E-mail: xhpjk@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

SciTech Connect

Although China became the world's largest emitter of energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007, China does not publish annual estimates of CO{sub 2} emissions and most published estimates of China's emissions have been done by other international organizations. Undertaken at the request of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy, this study examines the feasibility of applying the EIA emissions inventory methodology to estimate China's emissions from published Chinese data. Besides serving as a proof of concept, this study also helps develop a consistent and transparent method for estimating China's CO{sub 2} emissions using an Excel model and identified China-specific data issues and areas for improvement. This study takes a core set of data from the energy balances published in the China Energy Statistical Yearbook 2009 and China Petrochemical Corporation Yearbook 2009 and applies the EIA's eight-step methodology to estimate China's 2008 CO{sub 2} emissions. First, China's primary and secondary fuel types and consumption by end use are determined with slight discrepancies identified between the two data sources and inconsistencies in product categorization with the EIA. Second, energy consumption data are adjusted to eliminate double counting in the four potential areas identified by EIA; consumption data from China's Special Administrative Regions are not included. Physical fuel units are then converted to energy equivalents using China's standard energy measure of coal equivalent (1 kilogram = 29.27 MJ) and IPCC carbon emissions coefficients are used to calculate each fuel's carbon content. Next, carbon sequestration is estimated following EIA conventions for other petroleum products and non-energy use of secondary fuels. Emissions from international bunker fuels are also subtracted under the 'reference' calculation of estimating apparent energy consumption by fuel type and the 'sectoral' calculation of summing emissions across end-use sectors. Adjustments for the China-specific conventions of reporting foreign bunkers and domestic bunkers fueling abroad are made following IPCC definitions of international bunkers and EIA reporting conventions, while the sequestration of carbon in carbon steel is included as an additional adjustment. Under the sectoral approach, fuel consumption of bunkers and other transformation losses as well as gasoline consumption are reallocated to conform to EIA sectoral reporting conventions. To the extent possible, this study relies on official energy data from primary sources. A limited number of secondary sources were consulted to provide insight into the nature of consumption of some products and to guide the analysis of carbon sequestered in steel. Beyond these, however, the study avoided trying to estimate figures where directly unavailable, such as natural gas flaring. As a result, the basic calculations should be repeatable for other years with the core set of data from National Bureau of Statistics and Sinopec (or a similarly authoritative source of oil product data). This study estimates China's total energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions in 2008 to be 6666 Mt CO{sub 2}, including 234.6 Mt of non-fuel CO{sub 2} emissions and 154 Mt of sequestered CO{sub 2}. Bunker fuel emissions in 2008 totaled 15.9 Mt CO{sub 2}, but this figure is underestimated because fuel use by Chinese ship and planes for international transportation and military bunkers are not included. Of emissions related to energy consumption, 82% is from coal consumption, 15% from petroleum and 3% from natural gas. From the sectoral approach, industry had the largest share of China's energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions with 72%, followed by residential at 11%, transport and telecommunications at 8%, and the other four (commerce, agriculture, construction and other public) sectors having a combined share of 9%. Thermal electricity and (purchased) heat (to a lesser degree) are major sources of fuel consumption beh

Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Qin, Yining

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

455

U.S. Department of Energy Report, 2005 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Amendments to the Clean Air Act, which added radionuclides to the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), went into effect in 1990. Specifically, a subpart (H) of 40 CFR 61 established an annual limit on the impact to the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides from U.S. Department of Energy facilities, such as the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). As part of the new NESHAP regulations, LANL must submit an annual report to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency headquarters and the regional office in Dallas by June 30. This report includes results of monitoring at LANL and the dose calculations for the calendar year 2006.

Keith W. Jacobson, David P. Fuehne

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

"No High Energy Emission" GRB Class Is Attributable to Brightness Bias  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The inhomogeneous brightness distribution of BATSE detected gamma-ray bursts has been considered strong evidence for their cosmological origin. However, subclasses of gamma-ray bursts have been shown to have significantly more homogeneous brightness distributions. Pendleton et al. (1997) have found such a result for gamma-ray bursts with no detectable emission at energies >300 keV. Accordingly, it has been suggested that these no high energy (NHE) emission bursts represent an underluminous population of nearby sources. A distinct homogeneous NHE brightness distribution has also been considered as evidence for beaming of different spectral components of the prompt burst emission. We synthesize observed distributions of gamma-ray bursts based on a sample of typical bright BATSE bursts with intrinsic high energy emission and adopt a single cosmological distance scale for all sources. We find that the resulting synthetic NHE bursts do indeed have a more nearly homogeneous intensity distribution when an appropriate decrease in signal to noise and redshifted spectrum is incorporated. We argue that the definition of NHE bursts, and soft-spectrum bursts in general, naturally produces a steep distribution. The NHE class of gamma-ray bursts is therefore likely due to brightness bias.

J. T. Bonnell; J. P. Norris

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

457

High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

458

China's sustainable energy future: Scenarios of energy and carbon emissions (Summary)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainability Green Growth Energy Demand Elasticity of GDPSustainability Green Growth Energy Demand GDP CarbonFigure 15. In Green Growth, building energy use more than

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume III--Technical Appendix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (Laboratory), at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its seventh annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in three volumes: Volume I Summary Report provides an executive summary and overview; Volume II Technical Report provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III Technical Appendix contains detailed data from simulations for each of the counties included in the analysis.

Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles; Yazdani, Bahman; Gilman, Don; Muns, Shirley; Liu, Zi; Baltazar-Cervantes, Juan-Carlos; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Degelman, Larry; Claridge, David

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Incident-Energy Dependent Quenching of the Analyzing Power in Pre-Equilibrium Composite Particle Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proton-induced pre-equilibrium process in the energy range of 100 to 160 MeV, which leads to emission of composite ejectiles such as {sup 3}He and {alpha}-particles, is discussed. New cross section and analyzing power measurements for the (p,{sup 3}He) reaction on {sup 93}Nb at an incident energy of 160 MeV are presented, and these are found to be in agreement with the prediction of a statistical multistep theoretical formulation. The observed quenching of the analyzing power is also reproduced well by the theory. The results are consistent with earlier work at lower incident energies and other nuclear species.

Cowley, A. A. [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dimitrova, S. S. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zyl, J. J. van [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa)

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Hydrogen production and delivery analysis in US markets : cost, energy and greenhouse gas emissions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen production cost conclusions are: (1) Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) is the least-cost production option at current natural gas prices and for initial hydrogen vehicle penetration rates, at high production rates, SMR may not be the least-cost option; (2) Unlike coal and nuclear technologies, the cost of natural gas feedstock is the largest contributor to SMR production cost; (3) Coal- and nuclear-based hydrogen production have significant penalties at small production rates (and benefits at large rates); (4) Nuclear production of hydrogen is likely to have large economies of scale, but because fixed O&M costs are uncertain, the magnitude of these effects may be understated; and (5) Given H2A default assumptions for fuel prices, process efficiencies and labor costs, nuclear-based hydrogen is likely to be more expensive to produce than coal-based hydrogen. Carbon taxes and caps can narrow the gap. Hydrogen delivery cost conclusions are: (1) For smaller urban markets, compressed gas delivery appears most economic, although cost inputs for high-pressure gas trucks are uncertain; (2) For larger urban markets, pipeline delivery is least costly; (3) Distance from hydrogen production plant to city gate may change relative costs (all results shown assume 100 km); (4) Pipeline costs may be reduced with system 'rationalization', primarily reductions in service pipeline mileage; and (5) Liquefier and pipeline capital costs are a hurdle, particularly at small market sizes. Some energy and greenhouse gas Observations: (1) Energy use (per kg of H2) declines slightly with increasing production or delivery rate for most components (unless energy efficiency varies appreciably with scale, e.g., liquefaction); (2) Energy use is a strong function of production technology and delivery mode; (3) GHG emissions reflect the energy efficiency and carbon content of each component in a production-delivery pathway; (4) Coal and natural gas production pathways have high energy consumption and significant GHG emissions (in the absence of carbon caps, taxes or sequestration); (5) Nuclear pathway is most favorable from energy use and GHG emissions perspective; (6) GH2 Truck and Pipeline delivery have much lower energy use and GHG emissions than LH2 Truck delivery; and (7) For LH2 Truck delivery, the liquefier accounts for most of the energy and GHG emissions.

Mintz, M.; Gillette, J.; Elgowainy, A. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( ES)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in energy-intensive industries in key developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural Factors Affecting Energy Use and Carbon DioxideStructural Factors Affecting Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Energy transfer and 1.54 {mu}m emission in amorphous silicon nitride films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Er-doped amorphous silicon nitride films with various Si concentrations (Er:SiN{sub x}) were fabricated by reactive magnetron cosputtering followed by thermal annealing. The effects of Si concentrations and annealing temperatures were investigated in relation to Er emission and excitation processes. Efficient excitation of Er ions was demonstrated within a broad energy spectrum and attributed to disorder-induced localized transitions in amorphous Er:SiN{sub x}. A systematic optimization of the 1.54 {mu}m emission was performed and a fundamental trade-off was discovered between Er excitation and emission efficiency due to excess Si incorporation. These results provide an alternative approach for the engineering of sensitized Si-based light sources and lasers.

Yerci, S.; Li, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary's Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215-2421 (United States); Kucheyev, S. O.; Buuren, T. van [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Basu, S. N. [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Boston University, 15 Saint Mary's Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, 110 Cummington Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Dal Negro, L. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary's Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215-2421 (United States); Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Boston University, 15 Saint Mary's Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States)

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

464

Biological Air Emissions Control for an Energy Efficient Forest Products Industry of the Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. wood products industry is a leader in the production of innovative wood materials. New products are taking shape within a growth industry for fiberboard, plywood, particle board, and other natural material-based energy efficient building materials. However, at the same time, standards for clean air are becoming ever stricter. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) during production of wood products (including methanol, formaldehyde, acetylaldehyde, and mercaptans) must be tightly controlled. Conventional VOC and HAP emission control techniques such as regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) and regenerative catalytic oxidation (RCO) require significant amounts of energy and generate secondary pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and spent carbon. Biological treatment of air emissions offers a cost-effective and sustainable control technology for industrial facilities facing increasingly stringent air emission standards. A novel biological treatment system that integrates two types of biofilter systems, promises significant energy and cost savings. This novel system uses microorganisms to degrade air toxins without the use of natural gas as fuel or the creation of secondary pollutants. The replacement of conventional thermal oxidizers with biofilters will yield natural gas savings alone in the range of $82,500 to $231,000 per year per unit. Widespread use of biofilters across the entire forest products industry could yield fuel savings up to 5.6 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year and electricity savings of 2.1 trillion Btu per year. Biological treatment systems can also eliminate the production of NOx, SO2, and CO, and greatly reduce CO2 emissions, when compared to conventional thermal oxidizers. Use of biofilters for VOC and HAP emission control will provide not only the wood products industry but also the pulp and paper industry with a means to cost-effectively control air emissions. The goal of this project was to demonstrate a novel sequential treatment technology that integrates two types of biofilter systems biotrickling filtration and biofiltration for controlling forest product facility air emissions with a water-recycling feature for water conservation. This coupling design maximizes the conditions for microbial degradation of odor causing compounds at specific locations. Water entering the biotrickling filter is collected in a sump, treated, and recycled back to the biotrickling filter. The biofilter serves as a polishing step to remove more complex organic compounds (i.e., terpenes). The gaseous emissions from the hardboard mill presses at lumber plants such as that of the Stimson Lumber Company contain both volatile and condensable organic compounds (VOC and COC, respectively), as well as fine wood and other very small particulate material. In applying bio-oxidation technology to these emissions Texas A&M University-Kingsville (TAMUK) and BioReaction (BRI) evaluated the potential of this equipment to resolve two (2) control issues which are critical to the industry: First, the hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions (primarily methanol and formaldehyde) and Second, the fine particulate and COC from the press exhaust which contribute to visual emissions (opacity) from the stack. In a field test in 2006, the biological treatment technology met the HAP and COC control project objectives and demonstrated significantly lower energy use (than regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs) or regenerative catalytic oxidizers (RCOs), lower water use (than conventional scrubbers) all the while being less costly than either for maintenance. The project was successfully continued into 2007-2008 to assist the commercial partner in reducing unit size and footprint and cost, through added optimization of water recycle and improved biofilm activity, and demonstration of opacity removal capabilities.

Jones, K; Boswell, J.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

465

Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant types.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the United States began a program to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types--categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly--from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Urban Form Energy Use and Emissions in China: Preliminary Findings and Model Proof of Concept  

SciTech Connect

Urbanization is reshaping China's economy, society, and energy system. Between 1990 and 2008 China added more than 300 million new urban residents, bringing the total urbanization rate to 46%. The ongoing population shift is spurring energy demand for new construction, as well as additional residential use with the replacement of rural biomass by urban commercial energy services. This project developed a modeling tool to quantify the full energy consequences of a particular form of urban residential development in order to identify energy- and carbon-efficient modes of neighborhood-level development and help mitigate resource and environmental implications of swelling cities. LBNL developed an integrated modeling tool that combines process-based lifecycle assessment with agent-based building operational energy use, personal transport, and consumption modeling. The lifecycle assessment approach was used to quantify energy and carbon emissions embodied in building materials production, construction, maintenance, and demolition. To provide more comprehensive analysis, LBNL developed an agent-based model as described below. The model was applied to LuJing, a residential development in Jinan, Shandong Province, to provide a case study and model proof of concept. This study produced results data that are unique by virtue of their scale, scope and type. Whereas most existing literature focuses on building-, city-, or national-level analysis, this study covers multi-building neighborhood-scale development. Likewise, while most existing studies focus exclusively on building operational energy use, this study also includes embodied energy related to personal consumption and buildings. Within the boundaries of this analysis, food is the single largest category of the building energy footprint, accounting for 23% of the total. On a policy level, the LCA approach can be useful for quantifying the energy and environmental benefits of longer average building lifespans. In addition to prospective analysis for standards and certification, urban form modeling can also be useful in calculating or verifying ex post facto, bottom-up carbon emissions inventories. Emissions inventories provide a benchmark for evaluating future outcomes and scenarios as well as an empirical basis for valuing low-carbon technologies. By highlighting the embodied energy and emissions of building materials, the LCA approach can also be used to identify the most intensive aspects of industrial production and the supply chain. The agent based modeling aspect of the model can be useful for understanding how policy incentives can impact individual behavior and the aggregate effects thereof. The most useful elaboration of the urban form assessment model would be to further generalize it for comparative analysis. Scenario analysis could be used for benchmarking and identification of policy priorities. If the model is to be used for inventories, it is important to disaggregate the energy use data for more accurate emissions modeling. Depending on the policy integration of the model, it may be useful to incorporate occupancy data for per-capita results. On the question of density and efficiency, it may also be useful to integrate a more explicit spatial scaling mechanism for modeling neighborhood and city-level energy use and emissions, i.e. to account for scaling effects in public infrastructure and transportation.

Aden, Nathaniel; Qin, Yining; Fridley, David

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

Urban Form Energy Use and Emissions in China: Preliminary Findings and Model Proof of Concept  

SciTech Connect

Urbanization is reshaping China's economy, society, and energy system. Between 1990 and 2008 China added more than 300 million new urban residents, bringing the total urbanization rate to 46%. The ongoing population shift is spurring energy demand for new construction, as well as additional residential use with the replacement of rural biomass by urban commercial energy services. This project developed a modeling tool to quantify the full energy consequences of a particular form of urban residential development in order to identify energy- and carbon-efficient modes of neighborhood-level development and help mitigate resource and environmental implications of swelling cities. LBNL developed an integrated modeling tool that combines process-based lifecycle assessment with agent-based building operational energy use, personal transport, and consumption modeling. The lifecycle assessment approach was used to quantify energy and carbon emissions embodied in building materials production, construction, maintenance, and demolition. To provide more comprehensive analysis, LBNL developed an agent-based model as described below. The model was applied to LuJing, a residential development in Jinan, Shandong Province, to provide a case study and model proof of concept. This study produced results data that are unique by virtue of their scale, scope and type. Whereas most existing literature focuses on building-, city-, or national-level analysis, this study covers multi-building neighborhood-scale development. Likewise, while most existing studies focus exclusively on building operational energy use, this study also includes embodied energy related to personal consumption and buildings. Within the boundaries of this analysis, food is the single largest category of the building energy footprint, accounting for 23% of the total. On a policy level, the LCA approach can be useful for quantifying the energy and environmental benefits of longer average building lifespans. In addition to prospective analysis for standards and certification, urban form modeling can also be useful in calculating or verifying ex post facto, bottom-up carbon emissions inventories. Emissions inventories provide a benchmark for evaluating future outcomes and scenarios as well as an empirical basis for valuing low-carbon technologies. By highlighting the embodied energy and emissions of building materials, the LCA approach can also be used to identify the most intensive aspects of industrial production and the supply chain. The agent based modeling aspect of the model can be useful for understanding how policy incentives can impact individual behavior and the aggregate effects thereof. The most useful elaboration of the urban form assessment model would be to further generalize it for comparative analysis. Scenario analysis could be used for benchmarking and identification of policy priorities. If the model is to be used for inventories, it is important to disaggregate the energy use data for more accurate emissions modeling. Depending on the policy integration of the model, it may be useful to incorporate occupancy data for per-capita results. On the question of density and efficiency, it may also be useful to integrate a more explicit spatial scaling mechanism for modeling neighborhood and city-level energy use and emissions, i.e. to account for scaling effects in public infrastructure and transportation.

Aden, Nathaniel; Qin, Yining; Fridley, David

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of tripled fuel-economy vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents estimates of the fill fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of light-duty vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) as currently being developed by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Seven engine and fuel combinations were analyzed: reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines; low-sulfur diesel and dimethyl ether in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines; and hydrogen and methanol in fuel-cell vehicles. Results were obtained for three scenarios: a Reference Scenario without PNGVs, a High Market Share Scenario in which PNGVs account for 60% of new light-duty vehicle sales by 2030, and a Low Market Share Scenario in which PNGVs account for half as many sales by 2030. Under the higher of these two, the fuel-efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translated directly into a nearly 50% reduction in total energy demand, petroleum demand, and carbon dioxide emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency resulted in substantial reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), sulfur oxide, (SO{sub x}), and particulate matter smaller than 10 microns (PM{sub 10}) for most of the engine-fuel combinations examined. The key exceptions were diesel- and ethanol-fueled vehicles for which PM{sub 10} emissions increased.

Mintz, M. M.; Vyas, A. D.; Wang, M. Q.

1997-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

469

Handbook of solar energy data for south-facing surfaces in the United States. Volume III. Average hourly and total daily insolation data for 235 localities (North Carolina - Wyoming)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Average hourly and daily total insolation estimates are given for 235 US sites at a variety of array tilt angles. (MHR)

Smith, J.H.

1980-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coating comparison of air-conditioning energy usage for bothtemperature, heat flux, and air conditioning electricity useHourly time series of air conditioning and non-conditioning

Akbari, Hashem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Incomplete Environmental Regulation, Imperfect Competition, and Emissions Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

each hour, equilibrium emissions and electricity prices areCalifornia Greenhouse Gas Emission and Sinks: 1990 to 2004 (estimates that CO 2 emissions from instate generationin 2004

Fowlie, Meredith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Secretary of Energy Memorandum on DOE Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 31,2010 March 31,2010 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF FROM: STEVEN CHU SUBJECT: Implementation of Executive Order 135 14, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance Addressing the crisis of climate change is the challenge of our time, and a fundamental priority for the Department of Energy. As the agency charged with advancing the Nation's energy security, we are committed to developing energy efficient technologies that support the transformation to a low-carbon economy. We must also lead by example in reducing greenhouse gas emissions associated with our own operations and facilities. On October 5,2009, the President issued Executive Order (EO) 135 14, "Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance." This requires all

473

Table 5. Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 201  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 2010)" Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 2010)" "metric tons carbon dioxide per person" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Change" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"2000 to 2010" "State",2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percent","Absolute" "Alabama",31.54590416,29.56352198,30.5739632,30.56483509,30.96927578,31.14605742,31.33283758,31.52225314,29.78727412,25.44798199,28.06679306,-0.1102872527,-3.479111105 "Alaska",70.60324067,68.51009907,67.8551127,67.17588806,70.92646205,72.04509462,67.81012638,64.8863351,57.56413017,54.58358965,54.63289567,-0.2261984697,-15.97034499 "Arizona",16.64049197,16.65546102,16.08173855,15.97087112,16.77174168,16.18743942,16.15392734,16.06780183,15.87052371,14.3654833,14.36549251,-0.1367146759,-2.274999466

474

Table 1. State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010)" State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010)" "million metric tons carbon dioxide" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Change" ,,,,,,,,,,,," 2000 to 2010 " "State",2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percent","Absolute" "Alabama",140.4264977,131.9521389,136.7103146,137.2323195,139.6896437,141.493798,143.9716001,146.076107,139.2224128,119.7962734,132.7462762,-0.05469211069,-7.680221558 "Alaska",44.32104312,43.40375114,43.56121812,43.5078746,46.76217106,48.06229125,45.79367017,44.11576503,39.46205329,37.91867389,38.72718369,-0.1262122693,-5.593859429 "Arizona",85.96984024,88.33838336,87.66914741,89.29026566,96.58329461,96.7032775,100.0087541,102.1950438,103.1458188,94.63481918,95.91303514,0.1156591064,9.943194897

475

Table 3. 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector " 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector " "million metric tons of carbon dioxide" "State","Commercial","Electric Power","Residential","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Alabama",2.103862865,76.71236863,2.835897119,17.71721059,33.37693698,132.7462762 "Alaska",2.497277997,3.042968925,1.789261448,16.61816292,14.7795124,38.72718369 "Arizona",2.373783271,54.37078005,2.325955921,4.76376875,32.07874715,95.91303514 "Arkansas",2.566776983,32.30865878,2.320262268,8.646911643,20.27679552,66.11940519 "California",15.93482613,43.49564577,28.92778352,67.46363514,213.9882899,369.8101805 "Colorado",4.150125234,39.85763155,7.82954551,14.90850811,29.73188961,96.47770002

476

"Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million metric tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",5060,5129.666667,5184.666667,5239.666667,5287.333333,5335,5379,5437.666667,5481.666667,5529.333333,5599,5657.666667,5694.333333,5738.333333,5797,5874,5925.333333,5984 "AEO 1995",,5137,5173.666667,5188.333333,5261.666667,5309.333333,5360.666667,5393.666667,5441.333333,5489,5551.333333,5621,5679.666667,5727.333333,5775,5841,5888.666667,5943.666667 "AEO 1996",,,5181.817301,5223.645142,5294.776326,5354.687297,5416.802205,5463.67395,5525.288005,5588.52771,5660.226888,5734.87972,5812.398031,5879.320068,5924.814575,5981.291626,6029.640422,6086.804077,6142.120972

477

Table 2. 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel " 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel " "million metric tons of carbon dioxide" ,,,,,," Shares " "State","Coal","Petroleum","Natural Gas ","Total","Coal","Petroleum","Natural Gas" "Alabama",67.81545193,35.95576449,28.97505976,132.7462762,0.5108651925,0.2708608145,0.218273993 "Alaska",1.364880388,19.58916888,17.77313443,38.72718369,0.03524347131,0.5058247724,0.4589317562 "Arizona",43.2377726,34.82066125,17.85460129,95.91303514,0.4508018387,0.3630440972,0.1861540641 "Arkansas",27.72445786,23.82768621,14.56726112,66.11940519,0.4193089424,0.3603735717,0.2203174859 "California",5.157135123,241.2575077,123.3955377,369.8101805,0.01394535736,0.6523820067,0.3336726359

478

China's sustainable energy future: Scenarios of energy and carbon emissions (Summary)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in total energy use. Chinas Sustainable Energy Future31 -ii- Chinas Sustainable Energy Future Executive SummaryC HINA S E NERGY C HALLENGE China has ambitious goals for

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Acoustic Emission for High-Energy Piping: A State-of-Knowledge Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report pulls together information on the application of acoustic emission (AE) testing for monitoring high-energy piping in fossil power plants. The experience data reviewed include the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) initiatives under research project RP1893 (circa 19861995) that culminated in the 1995 monitoring guidelines for hot reheat piping and available post-guidelines field applications through to the present. EPRI has had more than two decades of application experience ...

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

480

Energy Demand and Emissions in Building in China: Scenarios and Policy Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent rapid growth of energy use in China exerts great pressure on the energy supply and environment. This study provides scenarios of future energy development in buildings, including urban residential, rural residential and service sectors (not including transport), taking into account the most up-to-date data and recent policy discussions that will affect future economic, population, and energy supply trends. To understand the role of policy options including technology options and countermeasures, two scenarios were defined, which represent the range of plausible futures for energy development in buildings. This is also part of an energy and emission scenario study for the IPAC (Integrated Policy Assessment Model for China) modeling team. The results from quantitative analysis show that energy demand in buildings in China could increase quickly, as high as 666 million in 2030. However, policies and technologies could contribute a lot to energy demand savings, which could be 28% energy savings compared with the baseline scenario. There is still space for further energy savings if more advanced technologies could be fully diffused.

Kejun, J.; Xiulian, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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