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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. This project utilized GridViewTM, an electric grid dispatch software package, to estimate hourly emission factors for all of the eGRID subregions in the continental United States. These factors took into account electricity imports and exports

2

hourly emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

60 60 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278660 Varnish cache server hourly emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago)

3

Definition: Kilowatt-hour | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilowatt-hour Kilowatt-hour Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Kilowatt-hour A unit of measure for energy, typically applied to electricity usage; equal to the amount of energy used at a rate of 1,000 watts over the course of one hour. One kWh is equivalent to 3,412 Btu, or 3,600 kJ.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The kilowatt hour, or kilowatt-hour, (symbol kW·h, kW h or kWh) is a unit of energy equal to 1000 watt hours or 3.6 megajoules. For constant power, energy in watt hours is the product of power in watts and time in hours. The kilowatt hour is most commonly known as a billing unit for energy delivered to consumers by electric utilities. Also Known As kWh Related Terms British thermal unit, Electricity, Energy, Kilowatt, energy, electricity generation

4

Impact of realistic hourly emissions profiles on air pollutants concentrations modelled with CHIMERE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of realistic hourly emissions profiles on air pollutants concentrations modelled Keywords: Atmospheric composition European air quality Anthropogenic emissions a b s t r a c t Regional inputs data like anthropogenic surface emissions of NOx, VOCs and particulate matter. These emissions

Menut, Laurent

5

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation RyanEnergy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation Ryanand/or site-attributable carbon emissions at commercial and

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Team Surpasses 1 Million Hours Safety Milestone | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Team Surpasses 1 Million Hours Safety Milestone Team Surpasses 1 Million Hours Safety Milestone Team Surpasses 1 Million Hours Safety Milestone October 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Separations Process Research Unit Demolition Project Safety Committee meets regularly with employees and supervisors to discuss safety issues and reinforce safe work habits. The Separations Process Research Unit Demolition Project Safety Committee meets regularly with employees and supervisors to discuss safety issues and reinforce safe work habits. NISKAYUNA, N.Y. - Vigilance and dedication to safety led the EM program's disposition project team at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) to achieve a milestone of one million hours - over two-and-a-half-years - without injury or illness resulting in time away from work.

7

Team Surpasses 1 Million Hours Safety Milestone | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Team Surpasses 1 Million Hours Safety Milestone Team Surpasses 1 Million Hours Safety Milestone Team Surpasses 1 Million Hours Safety Milestone October 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Separations Process Research Unit Demolition Project Safety Committee meets regularly with employees and supervisors to discuss safety issues and reinforce safe work habits. The Separations Process Research Unit Demolition Project Safety Committee meets regularly with employees and supervisors to discuss safety issues and reinforce safe work habits. NISKAYUNA, N.Y. - Vigilance and dedication to safety led the EM program's disposition project team at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) to achieve a milestone of one million hours - over two-and-a-half-years - without injury or illness resulting in time away from work.

8

American Energy Data Challenge Hackathons – “Apps For Energy”: Turning Energy Data into Working Apps in 24 Hours  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Department of Energy's "Apps for Energy" Hackathons give dozens of app designers 24 hours to come up with working prototypes of apps that solve challenges using energy data.

9

INCITE Program Doles Out Hours on Supercomputers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INCITE Program Doles Out Hours on Supercomputers INCITE Program Doles Out Hours on Supercomputers INCITE Program Doles Out Hours on Supercomputers November 5, 2012 - 1:30pm Addthis Mira, the 10-petaflop IBM Blue Gene/Q system at Argonne National Laboratory, is capable of carrying out 10 quadrillion calculations per second. Each year researchers apply to the INCITE program to get to use this machine's incredible computing power. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Lab. Mira, the 10-petaflop IBM Blue Gene/Q system at Argonne National Laboratory, is capable of carrying out 10 quadrillion calculations per second. Each year researchers apply to the INCITE program to get to use this machine's incredible computing power. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Lab. Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science

10

Energy Conservation3. Lab Spaces 8 hours ago  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, producing lava, smoke and steam. Debbye Turner Bell reports. With recent earthquakes near a well in Ohio," the club's regional district project this year. The goal of the project is "to improve the quality of life://topics.treehugger.com/article/0cywbNJgWneQp?q=Energy+Conserv... 1 of 2 1/6/2012 9:05 PM #12;Related Quotes " The measurements were

Espinosa, Horacio D.

11

Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time March 27, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis John Lippert The city of Greenbelt, Maryland, where I live, is living up to its "green" name by participating in Earth Hour. This global event asks everyone to "go dark" for an hour to make a powerful statement of concern about climate change. The city will be turning off all non-essential lights in municipal buildings. Residents are requested to turn off their lights (and other energy-consuming appliances). The Greenbelt Advisory Committee on Environmental Sustainability, which advises the mayor and city council and which I chair, will be sponsoring a flashlight walk around Old Greenbelt during Earth Hour. My wife and I will

12

Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time March 27, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis John Lippert The city of Greenbelt, Maryland, where I live, is living up to its "green" name by participating in Earth Hour. This global event asks everyone to "go dark" for an hour to make a powerful statement of concern about climate change. The city will be turning off all non-essential lights in municipal buildings. Residents are requested to turn off their lights (and other energy-consuming appliances). The Greenbelt Advisory Committee on Environmental Sustainability, which advises the mayor and city council and which I chair, will be sponsoring a flashlight walk around Old Greenbelt during Earth Hour. My wife and I will

13

Energy Use and Carbon Emissions:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 1980-2001 World Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 1980-2001 April 2004 Energy Information Administration Contacts Staff from the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU), Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (EMCID) prepared this report. General questions concerning the content of the report may be referred to Mark Rodekohr (Mark.Rodekohr@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-1130), Director of EMCID; or Lowell Feld (Lowell.Feld@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-9502), Leader of the Contingency Information Team. Specific questions about the report should be referred to Nathan Wilson (Nathan.Wilson@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-9883). 1 Table of Contents CONTACTS .......................................................................................................................

14

Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor, March 2002 to November 2004, showing the model overprediction Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor More Documents & Publications Comments on Department of Energy's Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station and Proposed Mirant Compliance Plan Answer of Potomac Electric Power Company and PJM lnterconnection, L.L.C. to the October 6, 2005 motion filed by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Special Environmental Analysis For Actions Taken under U.S. Department of Energy Emergency Orders Regarding Operation of the Potomac River Generating

15

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Detailed Energy-Related Carbon Emissions All Industry Groups 1994 emissions Selected Industries Petroleum refining Chemicals Iron & Steel Paper Food Stone, clay and glass Methodological Details Estimation methods Glossary Return to: Energy and GHG Analysis Efficiency Page Energy Use in Manufacturing Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing Manufacturing, which accounts for about 80 percent of industrial energy consumption, also accounts for about 80 percent of industrial energy-related carbon emissions. (Agriculture, mining, forestry, and fisheries account for the remaining 20 percent.) In 1994, three industries, petroleum, chemicals, and primary metals, emitted almost 60 percent of the energy-related carbon in manufacturing. The next three largest emitters (paper, food, and the stone, glass, and clay products industry) produced an additional 22 percent of the energy-related manufacturing emissions (Figure 1).

16

On a QUEST to Save Oakland 8.4 Gigawatt Hours | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On a QUEST to Save Oakland 8.4 Gigawatt Hours On a QUEST to Save Oakland 8.4 Gigawatt Hours On a QUEST to Save Oakland 8.4 Gigawatt Hours August 13, 2010 - 3:38pm Addthis Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers Derrick Rebello wants to make the downtown corridor of Oakland, California, one of the greenest in the nation. Through the new Downtown Oakland Targeted Measure Saturation Project, he and his company, Quantum Energy Services and Technologies (QUEST), are targeting the city's 120-block business district to make as many buildings as possible highly energy efficient. "The goal is to really leave no stone unturned," said Rebello, president of QUEST. "We are trying to achieve 80 percent participation. And of those participating buildings, we are focusing on getting a 20 percent reduction

17

High Energy Emission from Magnetars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recently discovered soft gamma-ray emission from the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1841-045 has a luminosity L_g ~ 10^{36} ergs/s. This luminosity exceeds the spindown power by three orders of magnitude and must be fed by an alternative source of energy such as an ultrastrong magnetic field. A gradual release of energy in the stellar magnetosphere is expected if it is twisted and a strong electric current is induced on the closed field lines. We examine two mechanisms of gamma-ray emission associated with the gradual dissipation of this current. (1) A thin surface layer of the star is heated by the downward beam of current-carrying charges, which excite Langmuir turbulence in the layer. As a result, it can reach a temperature kT ~ 100 keV and emit bremsstrahlung photons up to this characteristic energy. (2) The magnetosphere is also a source of soft gamma rays at a distance of ~100 km from the star, where the electron cyclotron energy is in the keV range. A large electric field develops in this region in response to the outward drag force felt by the current-carrying electrons from the flux of keV photons leaving the star. A seed positron injected in this region undergoes a runaway acceleration and upscatters keV photons above the threshold for pair creation. The created pairs emit a synchrotron spectrum consistent with the observed 20-100 keV emission. This spectrum is predicted to extend to higher energies and reach a peak at ~1 MeV.

C. Thompson; A. M. Beloborodov

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

18

The high energy emission from black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The origin of the high energy emission (X-rays and gamma-rays) from black holes is still a matter of debate. We present new evidence that hard X-ray emission in the low/hard state may not be dominated by thermal Comptonization. We present an alternative scenario for the origin of the high energy emission that is well suited to explain the high energy emission from GRO J1655-40.

M. D. Caballero-Garcia; J. M. Miller; E. Kuulkers

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

19

Identifying Challenging Operating Hours for Solar Intergration in the NV Energy System  

SciTech Connect

Abstract-- In this paper, the ability of the Nevada (NV) Energy generation fleet to meet its system balancing requirements under different solar energy penetration scenarios is studied. System balancing requirements include capacity, ramp rate, and ramp duration requirements for load following and regulation. If, during some operating hours, system capability is insufficient to meet these requirements, there is certain probability that the balancing authority’s control and reliability performance can be compromised. These operating hours are considered as “challenging” hours. Five different solar energy integration scenarios have been studied. Simulations have shown that the NV Energy system will be potentially able to accommodate up to 942 MW of solar photovoltaic (PV) generation. However, the existing generation scheduling procedure should be adjusted to make it happen. Fast-responsive peaker units need to be used more frequently to meet the increasing ramping requirements. Thus, the NV Energy system operational cost can increase. Index Terms—Solar Generation, Renewables Integration, Balancing Process, Load Following, Regulation.

Etingov, Pavel V.; Lu, Shuai; Guo, Xinxin; Ma, Jian; Makarov, Yuri V.; Chadliev, Vladimir; Salgo, Richard

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

20

Energy savings can be communicated in terms of kilowatt hours (energy), carbon (climate change) or pounds (cost).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AIM Energy savings can be communicated in terms of kilowatt hours (energy), carbon (climate change) or pounds (cost). We want to know if these different communication units prime different motivations more broadly. This implies that considering carbon may result in wider changes in sustainable behaviour

McAuley, Derek

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Emissions from Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions from Energy Use Emissions from Energy Use Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Emissions from Energy Use Figure 81. Carbon diioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2007 and 2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 82. Sulfur dioxide emissions from electricity generation, 1995-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 83. Nitrogen oxide emissions from electricity generation, 1995-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Rate of Increase in Carbon Dioxide Emissions Slows in the Projections Even with rising energy prices, growth in energy use leads to increasing

22

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

63 Figure 59. Carbon Intensity of Power Generation,economic energy and carbon intensity by setting short andproduction) and carbon intensity (CO 2 emissions per unit of

Fridley, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program -...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies Program The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program - Part 2 Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project Scoping and Feasibility...

24

Energy Balance and Emissions Associated with Biochar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy off- sets. 41­64% of these emission reductions are related to the retention of C in biochar offersanenergeticallyefficientstrategyforbioenergyproduction, and the land application of biochar reduces greenhouse emissions to a greater extent than when and contribute significantly to greenhouse gas emissions (1). Bioenergy produced from renewable biomass can

Lehmann, Johannes

25

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Emissions from Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions from Energy Use Emissions from Energy Use Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Emissions from Energy Use Figure 97. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2006 and 2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 98. Carbon dioxide emissions, 1990-2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Rising Energy Consumption Increases Carbon Dioxide Emissions Without capture and sequestration, CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are proportional to the carbon content of the fuel. Coal has the highest carbon content and natural gas the lowest, with petroleum in between. In the AEO2008 reference case, the shares of these fuels change

26

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Eneregy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Eneregy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 7: Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In the coming decades, actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions could affect patterns of energy use around the world and alter the level and composition of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by energy source. Figure 65. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 66. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Carbon dioxide is one of the most prevalent greenhouse gases in the

27

IGES GHG Emissions Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES GHG Emissions Data IGES GHG Emissions Data Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IGES GHG Emissions Data Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/report_kyoto.html References: IGES GHG Emissions Data[1] Summary "IGES GHG Emissions Data is aimed at providing comprehensive, organised information on the GHG emissions from Annex I countries to the UNFCCC in an easy-to-understand way. All information is extracted from the publicly available sources on the UNFCCC web-site and this data will be updated regularly. " References ↑ "IGES GHG Emissions Data" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=IGES_GHG_Emissions_Data&oldid=383109"

28

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions For additional terms, refer to: the Glossary of Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 for additional greenhouse gas related terms, the Glossary of Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 for additional manufacturing terms, and Appendix F of Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 for descriptions of the major industry groups. British Thermal Unit: The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 pound of water by 1 degree Fahrenheit. One quadrillion Btu is 1015 Btu, or 1.055 exajoules. Btu: See British Thermal Unit. Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless, non-poisonous gas that is a normal part of Earth's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is a product of fossil-fuel combustion as well as other processes. It is considered a greenhouse gas as it traps heat radiated into the atmosphere and thereby contributes to the potential for global warming.

29

Urban Transportation Emission Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Transport Canada Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Prog/2/UTEC-CETU/Menu.aspx?lang=eng Cost: Free References: http://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Prog/2/UTEC-CETU/Menu.aspx?lang=eng The Urban Transportation Emissions Calculator (UTEC) is a user-friendly tool for estimating annual emissions from personal, commercial, and public transit vehicles. It estimates greenhouse gas (GHG) and criteria air contaminant (CAC) emissions from the operation of vehicles. It also estimates upstream GHG emissions from the production, refining and

30

NV Energy Large-Scale Photovoltaic Integration Study: Intra-Hour Dispatch and AGC Simulation  

SciTech Connect

The uncertainty and variability with photovoltaic (PV) generation make it very challenging to balance power system generation and load, especially under high penetration cases. Higher reserve requirements and more cycling of conventional generators are generally anticipated for large-scale PV integration. However, whether the existing generation fleet is flexible enough to handle the variations and how well the system can maintain its control performance are difficult to predict. The goal of this project is to develop a software program that can perform intra-hour dispatch and automatic generation control (AGC) simulation, by which the balancing operations of a system can be simulated to answer the questions posed above. The simulator, named Electric System Intra-Hour Operation Simulator (ESIOS), uses the NV Energy southern system as a study case, and models the system’s generator configurations, AGC functions, and operator actions to balance system generation and load. Actual dispatch of AGC generators and control performance under various PV penetration levels can be predicted by running ESIOS. With data about the load, generation, and generator characteristics, ESIOS can perform similar simulations and assess variable generation integration impacts for other systems as well. This report describes the design of the simulator and presents the study results showing the PV impacts on NV Energy real-time operations.

Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Meng, Da; Guo, Xinxin; Jin, Chunlian; Samaan, Nader A.

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

31

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas 5% less efficient than diesel, assuming same trendNatural gas buses are assumed to follow the same improvement trendNatural Gas Oil Products Solid Fuels Unlike primary energy, CO 2 emissions trends

Fridley, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and GDP Per Capita, with China 2050 Scenarios Carbon EmissionsEnergy and GDP Per Capita, with China 2050 Scenarios .. 37 Figure 39 Carbon Emissions

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Influence of wind power on hourly electricity prices and GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions: Evidence that congestion matters from Ontario zonal data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract With the growing share of wind production, understanding its impacts on electricity price and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions becomes increasingly relevant, especially to design better wind-supporting policies. Internal grid congestion is usually not taken into account when assessing the price impact of fluctuating wind output. Using 2006–2011 hourly data from Ontario (Canada), we establish that the impact of wind output, both on price level and marginal GHG emissions, greatly differs depending on the congestion level. Indeed, from an average of 3.3% price reduction when wind production doubles, the reduction jumps to 5.5% during uncongested hours, but is only 0.8% when congestion prevails. Similarly, avoided GHG emissions due to wind are estimated to 331.93 kilograms per megawatt-hour (kg/MWh) using all data, while for uncongested and congested hours, estimates are respectively 283.49 and 393.68 kg/MWh. These empirical estimates, being based on 2006–2011 Ontario data, cannot be generalized to other contexts. The main contribution of this paper is to underscore the importance of congestion in assessing the price and GHG impacts of wind. We also contribute by developing an approach to create clusters of data according to the congestion status and location. Finally, we compare different approaches to estimate avoided GHG emissions.

Mourad Ben Amor; Etienne Billette de Villemeur; Marie Pellat; Pierre-Olivier Pineau

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Transportation, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html Country: United States UN Region: Northern America CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Screenshot References: http://www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html "This Emissions Estimator provides the amount of reduced emissions in terms of pounds of CO2, SO2, and NOX based on input from the User regarding the CHP technology being used. In turn the User will be provided with

35

EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast: Portfolio Manager Office Hours, Focus Topic: Sharing Forward and Transfer Ownership  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Portfolio Manager "Office Hours" is a live webinar that gives all users an opportunity to ask their questions directly to EPA in an open forum. In 2014, Office Hours will be held once a month. We...

36

EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast- Portfolio Manager Office Hours, Focus Topic: Weather Data and Metrics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Portfolio Manager "Office Hours" is a live webinar that gives all users an opportunity to ask their questions directly to EPA in an open forum. In 2014, Office Hours will be held once a month. We...

37

Energy Use per Worker-Hour: Evaluating the Contribution of Labor to Manufacturing Energy Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of life-cycle assessment (LCA) is energy consumption, as iteconomic input-output (EIO) LCA, the methodology presentedincluded in process-based LCA. Because both EIO-LCA and the

Zhang, Teresa; Dornfeld, David

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

GEIA-ACCENT Emission Data Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEIA-ACCENT Emission Data Portal GEIA-ACCENT Emission Data Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) Agency/Company /Organization: National Aeronautics and Space Administration Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.geiacenter.org/ References: Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA)[1] "The GEIA /ACCENT data portal provides gridded emission data; emission data are usually separated into three main categories : anthropogenic emissions, biomass burning emissions, and natural emissions: anthropogenic emissions include emissions from fossil fuel and biofuel consumption, industry and agricultural sources. biomass burning emissions include emissions from forest fires, savannah fires, and sometimes large croplands fires.

39

Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Profile to someone by E-mail Emissions Profile to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Basics Federal Requirements Guidance & Reporting

40

Energy saving policy and emission decreasing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,9648,2787,4016,6985,9Electricity consumption E (TWh)3 13,8510,858,1085,7814,32GDP (bill. LVL)2 56765GDP grows (% per year)1Energy saving policy and emission decreasing Latvian experienceLatvian experience Dr. A. Davis, M of fuelNr. Table1. Primary energy consumption in Latvia #12;Introduction Table 2. Formation of pollutants

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Vol. II - Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESL-TR-06-06-08 ENERGY EFFICIENCY/RENEWABLE ENERGY IMPACT IN THE TEXAS EMISSIONS REDUCTION PLAN (TERP) VOLUME II ? SUMMARY REPORT Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality September 2004 ? December 2005..., the following results were determined for energy-code compliant new residential single- and multi-family construction in non-attainment and affected counties built in 2004: ? The annual savings in 2005 amounted to 348,794 megawatt hours (MWh...

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Gilman, D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Muns, S.; Verdict, M.; Ahmed, M.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Degelman, L. O.; Turner, W. D.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Emission Factors (EMFAC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emission Factors (EMFAC) Emission Factors (EMFAC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: EMFAC Agency/Company /Organization: California Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Online calculator User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.arb.ca.gov/msei/onroad/latest_version.htm Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America References: http://www.arb.ca.gov/msei/onroad/latest_version.htm The EMission FACtors (EMFAC) model is used to calculate emission rates from all motor vehicles, such as passenger cars to heavy-duty trucks, operating on highways, freeways and local roads in California. EMFAC2007 is the most recent version of this model.

43

Amendment: Energy and Emissions Benefit Table (December 30, 2008...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Fossil Energy Advanced Technologies (2008 - 2009) Amendment: Lifecycle Emissions Data Worksheet (December 30, 2008) Attachment C Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL...

44

Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. cement industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 2. Energy Consumption, Carbon Emissions Coefficients,and Carbon Emissions from Energy Consumption, and CarbonEnergy – Related Carbon Emissions Fuel Energy Use Carbon (

Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

High Energy Astrophysics: Emission and Absorption 1/114 Emission and Absorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Energy Astrophysics: Emission and Absorption 1/114 Emission and Absorption 1 Motivation and the jet. #12;High Energy Astrophysics: Emission and Absorption 2/114 HST optical image of 3C273 Note: Emission and Absorption 3/114 Set of 3 images of the jet of 3C273. Left: HST Middle: Chandra X-ray Right

Bicknell, Geoff

46

Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours March 11, 2013 - 12:03pm Addthis Safety inspections are a key element in a nuclear cleanup environment with large pieces of cleanup equipment. Inspections are essential to continuing safety success and reaching new milestones.| Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge Safety inspections are a key element in a nuclear cleanup environment with large pieces of cleanup equipment. Inspections are essential to continuing safety success and reaching new milestones.| Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge David Sheeley Editor/Writer for Environmental Management's Office of External Affairs Workers at URS | CH2M Oak Ridge (UCOR), the prime contractor for EM's Oak Ridge cleanup, are approaching a milestone of 4 million safe work hours

47

EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast- Portfolio Manager® Office Hours, Focus Topic: Portfolio Manager 2015 Priorities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Portfolio Manager "Office Hours" is a live webinar that gives all users an opportunity to ask their questions directly to EPA in an open forum. We will plan to spend the first 20-30 minutes of each...

48

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

SciTech Connect

After over two decades of staggering economic growth and soaring energy demand, China has started taking serious actions to reduce its economic energy and carbon intensity by setting short and medium-term intensity reduction targets, renewable generation targets and various supporting policies and programs. In better understanding how further policies and actions can be taken to shape China's future energy and emissions trajectory, it is important to first identify where the largest opportunities for efficiency gains and emission reduction lie from sectoral and end-use perspectives. Besides contextualizing China's progress towards reaching the highest possible efficiency levels through the adoption of the most advanced technologies from a bottom-up perspective, the actual economic costs and benefits of adopting efficiency measures are also assessed in this study. This study presents two modeling methodologies that evaluate both the technical and economic potential of raising China's efficiency levels to the technical maximum across sectors and the subsequent carbon and energy emission implications through 2030. The technical savings potential by efficiency measure and remaining gap for improvements are identified by comparing a reference scenario in which China continues the current pace of with a Max Tech scenario in which the highest technically feasible efficiencies and advanced technologies are adopted irrespective of costs. In addition, from an economic perspective, a cost analysis of selected measures in the key industries of cement and iron and steel help quantify the actual costs and benefits of achieving the highest efficiency levels through the development of cost of conserved energy curves for the sectors. The results of this study show that total annual energy savings potential of over one billion tonne of coal equivalent exists beyond the expected reference pathway under Max Tech pathway in 2030. CO2 emissions will also peak earlier under Max Tech, though the 2020s is a likely turning point for both emission trajectories. Both emission pathways must meet all announced and planned policies, targets and non-fossil generation targets, or an even wider efficiency gap will exist. The savings potential under Max Tech varies by sector, but the industrial sector appears to hold the largest energy savings and emission reduction potential. The primary source of savings is from electricity rather than fuel, and electricity savings are magnified by power sector decarbonization through increasing renewable generation and coal generation efficiency improvement. In order to achieve the maximum energy savings and emission reduction potential, efficiency improvements and technology switching must be undertaken across demand sectors as well as in the growing power sector. From an economic perspective, the cost of conserved energy analysis indicates that nearly all measures for the iron and steel and cement industry are cost-effective. All 23 efficiency measures analyzed for the cement industry are cost-effective, with combined CO2 emission reduction potential of 448 Mt CO2. All of the electricity savings measures in the iron and steel industry are cost-effective, but the cost-effective savings potential for fuel savings measures is slightly lower than total technical savings potential. The total potential savings from these measures confirm the magnitude of savings in the scenario models, and illustrate the remaining efficiency gap in the cement and iron and steel industries.

Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Ke, Jing; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Morrow, Bill; Price, Lynn

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

49

Development of an Open Source Hourly Building Energy Modeling Software Tool.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Computer building energy simulations are an important tool in the design of low-energy buildings. Building energy modeling is used to predict annual energy consumption, determine… (more)

Hanam, Brittany

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours February 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Mike Tidwell performs a leak check and inspection on propane tanks Mike Tidwell performs a leak check and inspection on propane tanks Inspections ensure hoisting and rigging equipment performs correctly so employees can safely complete their tasks Inspections ensure hoisting and rigging equipment performs correctly so employees can safely complete their tasks Mike Tidwell performs a leak check and inspection on propane tanks Inspections ensure hoisting and rigging equipment performs correctly so employees can safely complete their tasks OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Workers at URS | CH2M Oak Ridge (UCOR), the prime contractor for EM's Oak Ridge cleanup, are approaching a milestone of 4

51

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy and emissions intensity of unconventional production are at best a lower bound, and current projections of future

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Future Energy and GHG Emissions Impact of Alternative Personal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Future Energy and GHG Emissions Impact of Alternative Personal Transportation Pathways in China://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;The Future Energy and GHG Emissions Impact of Alternative Personal uncertainty in future energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions projections for China is the evolution

53

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Transit Emissions and Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

54

GBTL Workshop GHG Emissions | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

GHG Emissions GBTL Workshop GHG Emissions EERE Presentation of Greenhouse Gas EmissionsResource Potential gbtlworkshopghgemissions.pdf More Documents & Publications GBTL...

55

Development of a Web-based Emissions Reduction Calculator for Green Power Purchases from Texas Wind Energy Providers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEVELOPMENT OF A WEB-BASED, EMISSIONS REDUCTION CALCULATOR FOR GREEN POWER PURCHASES FROM TEXAS WIND ENERGY PROVIDERS Zi Liu, Ph.D. Research Engineer Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. Professor/Assc. Director Juan... that have been developed to calculate the emissions reductions from electricity provided by wind energy providers in the Texas ERCOT region, including an analysis of actual hourly wind power generated from a wind turbine in Randall County, Texas...

Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Gilman, D.; Haberl, J.; Culp, C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

The era of publicly mandated GHG emissions restrictions inthe United States has begun with recent legislation in California andseven northeastern states. Commercial and industrial buildings canimprove the carbon-efficiency of end-use energy consumption by installingtechnologies such as on-site cogeneration of electricity and useful heatin combined heat and power systems, thermally-activated cooling, solarelectric and thermal equipment, and energy storage -- collectively termeddistributed energy resources (DER). This research examines a collectionof buildings in California, the Northeast, and the southern United Statesto demonstrate the effects of regional characteristics such as the carbonintensity of central electricity grid, the climate-driven demand forspace heating and cooling, and the availability of solar insolation. Theresults illustrate that the magnitude of a realistic carbon tax ($100/tC)is too small to incent significant carbon-reducing effects oneconomically optimal DER adoption. In large part, this is because costreduction and carbon reduction objectives are roughly aligned, even inthe absence of a carbon tax.

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Agency/Company /Organization: Local Governments for Sustainability Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Health, GHG inventory, Implementation, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.environmenttools.co.uk/directory/tool/name/harmonized-emissions-an Cost: Free Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Screenshot References: ICLEI-HEAT[1] Related Tools Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) ICCT Roadmap Model ... further results Find Another Tool

58

Ultraviolet emissions from Gd3 + ions excited by energy transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultraviolet emissions from Gd3 + ions excited by energy transfer from Ho3 + ions Ying Yu October 2010 Accepted 28 October 2010 Available online 4 November 2010 Keywords: Ultraviolet emission Upconversion Energy transfer a b s t r a c t Ultraviolet (UV) upconversion (UC) emissions of Gd3+ ion were

Cao, Wenwu

59

World Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1950 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-U" relation with a within- sample peak between carbon dioxide emissions (and energy use) per capita and perWorld Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1950 Ã? 2050 Richard Schmalensee, Thomas M. Stoker, andRuth A. Judson* Emissions of carbon dioxide from combustion of fossil fuels, which may

60

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:16am Addthis After assessing the potential for agency size changes, a Federal agency should evaluate its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile using renewable energy in buildings. When using renewable energy in buildings, the approach for evaluating GHG emissions involves evaluating the renewable energy resource potential and determining what type of renewable energy technology to use in a building. To help determine renewable energy resource potential at a site, see FEMP's information on Renewable Energy Resource Maps and Screening Tools. Also see Renewable Energy Project Planning and Implementation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Suitability of Non-Energy Greenhouse Gases for Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper assesses the suitability of different sources of non-energy greenhouse gases for emissions trading. Different forms of emissions trading are defined and criteria for determining whether a source is sui...

Erik Haites; Angelo Proestos

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

School Bus Emissions Study | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

School Bus Emissions Study School Bus Emissions Study 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: international Truck and Engine Corporation deer2003slodowske.pdf More Documents &...

63

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2011 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NOx control, diesel oxidation catalysts, gasoline particulate filters deer11johnson.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 Diesel Emission...

64

Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy Impact in The Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP): Volume I- Summary Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this sixth annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (Preliminary Report) to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. In this preliminary report, the NOx emissions savings from the energy...

Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Lewis, C.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J..; Degelman, L.; McKelvey, K.; Clardige, D.; Ellis, S.; Kim, H.; Zilbershtein. G.; Gilman, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Impacts on Emission Reductions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reductions are surplus as long as they are not otherwise relied on to meet air quality attainment requirements in air quality programs related to your SIP. Enforceability: Measures that reduce emissions from electricity generation may be: (1) Enforceable...-family construction oESL Multi-family construction oESL Commercial construction 2. Green Power Production: Wind and other renewables 3. PUC SB7: Energy efficiency programs implemented by electric utilities under the Public Utility Regulatory Act §39.905 4. SECO...

Haberl,J; Bahman,Y.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Energy and GHG Emissions in British Columbia 1990 -2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and GHG Emissions in British Columbia 1990 - 2010 Report Highlights John Nyboer and Maximilian Kniewasser Canadian Industrial Energy End-use Data and Analysis Centre (CIEEDAC) Simon Fraser for Climate Solutions 1 HIGHLIGHTS The Energy and GHG Emissions in British

Pedersen, Tom

67

Energy solutions for CO2 emission peak and subsequent decline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy solutions for CO2 emission peak and subsequent decline Edited by Leif Sønderberg Petersen and Hans Larsen Risø-R-1712(EN) September 2009 Proceedings Risø International Energy Conference 2009 #12;Editors: Leif Sønderberg Petersen and Hans Larsen Title: Energy solutions for CO2 emission peak

68

Using Fourier Series to Model Hourly Energy Use in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fourier series analysis is eminently suitable for modeling strongly periodic data. Weather independent energy use such as lighting and equipment load in commercial buildings is strongly periodic and is thus appropriate for Fourier series treatment...

Dhar, A.; Reddy, T. A.; Claridge, D. E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

General Equilibrium Emissions Model (GEEM) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

General Equilibrium Emissions Model (GEEM) General Equilibrium Emissions Model (GEEM) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: General Equilibrium Emissions Model (GEEM) Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics: Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Technology characterizations Country: Kenya, Thailand UN Region: Eastern Africa, Caribbean Coordinates: 13.7240216°, 100.5798602°

70

Saving Energy and Reducing Emissions with Fuel-Flexible Burners  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

using biomass-derived liquid fuels, such as glycerin or fatty acids, as a substitute for natural gas, thereby reducing energy consumption, lowering greenhouse gas emissions, and...

71

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

After assessing the potential for agency size changes, a Federal agency should evaluate its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile using renewable energy in buildings.

72

Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for...

73

Diesel Emission Control in Review | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). deer07johnson.pdf More Documents & Publications Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Diesel...

74

Energy Department Announces $10 Million to Advance Zero-Emission...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

vehicles and infrastructure will reduce petroleum use, carbon emissions, and air pollution at transportation hubs, such as ports. The Energy Department seeks...

75

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Energy Efficiency, Wind and Renewables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND RENEWABLES May 2008 Energy Systems Laboratory p. 2 Electricity Production from Wind Farms (2002-2007) ? Installed capacity of wind turbines was 3,026 MW (March 2007). ? Announced new project capacity is 3,125 MW by 2010. ? Lowest electricity period... Speed (MPH) T u rb in e P o w er (k W h /h ) Hourly electricity produced vs on- site wind data acceptable for hourly modeling. Issue: hourly on-site data not always available. Calculating NOx Reductions from Wind Farms Energy...

Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.

76

Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Agency/Company /Organization: Northwest Power and Conservation Council Sector: Energy Focus Area: Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Industry, Transportation, Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Publications Website: www.nwcouncil.org/energy/grac/20090130_Supply%20Curves_NWPCC_FINAL.pdf Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Screenshot References: Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves[1] Background "The ECL supply curve model includes data on potential emission reductions for approximately 60 separate technology options. It allows the examination of multiple scenarios involving the inclusion or exclusion of technology

77

hourly | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

hourly hourly Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

78

CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Publications Website: www.iea.org/co2highlights/co2highlights.pdf CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Screenshot References: CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion[1] Overview "This annual publication contains: estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2008 selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information" Excel Spreadsheet References ↑ "CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion"

79

CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Sector: Energy, Water Focus Area: Agriculture, Greenhouse Gas Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/report_ers.html Cost: Free CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series Screenshot References: CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series[1] "IGES ERs Calculation Sheet aims at providing a simplified spreadsheet for demonstrating emission reductions based on the approved methodologies corresponding to eligible project activities. The sheet will provide you

80

NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool Agency/Company /Organization: National Energy Technology Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.netl.doe.gov/energy-analyses/refshelf/results.asp?ptype=Models/Too References: NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool [1] NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool This interactive tool enables the user to look at both total and power sector CO2 emissions from the use of coal, oil, or natural gas, over the period 1990 to 2030. One can use the tool to compare five of the larger CO2 emitters to each other or to overall world emissions. The data are from the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Carbon Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CARBON EMISSIONS CARBON EMISSIONS A part of the integrating module, the carbon emissions submodule (CEM) computes the carbon emissions due to the combustion of energy. The coefficients for carbon emissions are derived from Energy Information Administration, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1996, published in October 1997. The calculations account for the fact that some fossil fuels are used for nonfuel purposes, such as feedstocks, and thus the carbon in the fuel is sequestered in the end product. CEM also allows for several carbon policy evaluation options to be imposed within NEMS. Although none of the policy options are assumed in the Annual Energy Outlook 1998, the options can be used in special analyses to simulate potential market-based approaches to meet national carbon emission

82

Texas Emissions Reductions Program (TERP) Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS PROGRAM (TERP) ENERGY EFFICIENCY/RENEWABLE ENERGY (EE/RE) UPDATE October 2012 Jeff Haberl, Bahman Yazdani, Charles Culp Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University p. 2 Energy Systems Laboratory... Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 Legislation to reduce energy/emissions 2001 to Present Senate Bill 5 (77th Legislature, 2001) Ch. 386. Texas Emissions Reduction Plan Sec. 386.205. Evaluation Of State Energy Efficiency Programs (with PUC) Ch...

Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET Fleet) Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: greet.es.anl.gov/main Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model, GREET References: GREET Fleet Main Page[1] Logo: The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET Fleet)

84

Emissions Technology Gives Company Clean Win as Energy Innovator |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Technology Gives Company Clean Win as Energy Innovator Emissions Technology Gives Company Clean Win as Energy Innovator Emissions Technology Gives Company Clean Win as Energy Innovator March 7, 2012 - 2:38pm Addthis Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How does this innovation work? A plasma reformer attached to the engine extracts hydrogen from the fuel. The device injects the hydrogen into the combustion process making the fuel burn more completely. A catalyst attached to the tailpipe cleans up 85 percent of remaining emissions. In just a few months, startup company Umpqua Energy will open its first manufacturing facility with 50 new employees producing an emission control system that can potentially reduce the emissions from vehicles by 90 percent. In a significant technological jump, the startup's system is scalable to

85

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs Massachusetts's 1997 electric utility restructuring legislation authorized the Massachusetts Department of Telecommunications and Energy (DTE)* to require certain electricity providers to disclose details on their fuel mix and emissions to end-use customers. In February 1998, the DTE issued final rules requiring competitive suppliers and distribution companies providing standard offer generation service or default generation service to provide this information to customers quarterly and upon request. * In 2007, the Massachusetts Department of Telecommunications and Energy

86

Supporting RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Supporting RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UNDP Bratislava Regional Center Partner Interministerial committees headed by the national focal point on climate change Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://europeandcis.undp.org/e Program Start 2010 Program End 2012 Country Kazakhstan, Moldova, Republic of Kosovo, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

87

Energy and GHG Emissions in British Columbia 1990 -2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supply and use, greenhouse gas emissions and energy efficiency in British Columbia Canadian Industrial Energy End-use Data and Analysis Centre (CIEEDAC) Simon Fraser University June 2012 Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Chemical Producers

Pedersen, Tom

88

Energy Demand and Emission from Transport Sector in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper aims to present a comprehensive overview of the current status and future trends of energy demand and emissions from transportation sector in China. ... a brief review of the national profile of energy

Yin Huang; Mengjun Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Solar Reserve Methodology for Renewable Energy Integration Studies Based on Sub-Hourly Variability Analysis: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Increasing penetrations of wind a solar energy are raising concerns among electric system operators because of the variability and uncertainty associated with power sources. Previous work focused on the quantification of reserves for systems with wind power. This paper presents a new methodology that allows the determination of necessary reserves for high penetrations of photovoltaic (PV) power and compares it to the wind-based methodology. The solar reserve methodology is applied to Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study. A summary of the results is included.

Ibanez, E.; Brinkman, G.; Hummon, M.; Lew, D.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Vehicle Emission Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics November 22, 2013 - 2:07pm Addthis Vehicle emissions are the gases emitted by the tailpipes of vehicles powered by internal combustion engines, which include gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and propane vehicles. Vehicle emissions are composed of varying amounts of: water vapor carbon dioxide (CO2) nitrogen oxygen pollutants such as: carbon monoxide (CO) nitrogen oxides (NOx) unburned hydrocarbons (UHCs) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) particulate matter (PM) A number of factors determine the composition of emissions, including the vehicle's fuel, the engine's technology, the vehicle's exhaust aftertreatment system, and how the vehicle operates. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation during fueling or even when vehicles are

91

Energy use and carbon emissions: Non-OECD countries  

SciTech Connect

This report surveys world energy use and carbon emissions patterns, with particular emphasis on the non-OECD countries. The non OECD is important not only because it currently makes up 84% of world population, but because its energy consumption, carbon emissions, population, and grow domestic product have all been growing faster than OECD`s. This presentation has seven major sections: (1) overview of key trends in non-OECD energy use and carbon emissions since 1970; (2) Comparison and contrasting energy use and carbon emissions for five major non OEDC regions (former Soviet Union and eastern Europe, Pacific Rim including China, Latin America, other Asia; Africa; 3-7) presentation of aggregate and sectoral energy use and carbon emissions data for countries within each of the 5 regions.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy Topics: Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: www.esmap.org/esmap/EFFECT Cost: Free Equivalent URI: www.esmap.org/esmap/EFFECT Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) Screenshot

93

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2009 Methane Emissions for U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Production, by Fuel Type (1) Fuel Type Petroleum 0.5 Natural Gas 26.8 Coal 0.3 Wood 0.4 Electricity (2) 50.5 Total 78.5 Note(s): Source(s): MMT CO2 Equivalent 1) Sources of emissions include oil and gas production, processing, and distribution; coal mining; and utility and site combustion. Carbon Dioxide equivalent units are calculated by converting methane emissions to carbon dioxide emissions (methane's global warming potential is 23 times that of carbon dioxide). 2) Refers to emissions of electricity generators attributable to the buildings sector. EIA, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U.S. 2009, Mar. 2011, Table 18, p. 37 for energy production emissions; EPA, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas

94

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type October 7, 2013 - 10:51am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Starting with the programs contributing the greatest proportion of building greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the agency should next determine which building types operated by those programs use the most energy (Figure 1). Energy intensity is evaluated instead of emissions in this approach because programs may not have access to emissions data by building type. Figure 1 - An image of an organizational-type chart. A rectangle labeled 'Program 1' has lines pointing to three other rectangles below it labeled 'Building Type 1,' 'Building Type 2,' and 'Building Type 3.' Next to the building types it says, 'Step 2. Estimate emissions by building type.

95

IPCC Emission Factor Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IPCC Emission Factor Database IPCC Emission Factor Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IPCC Emission Factor Database Agency/Company /Organization: World Meteorological Organization, United Nations Environment Programme Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jp/EFDB/main.php References: IPCC-EFDB[1] About "EFDB is meant to be a recognised library, where users can find emission factors and other parameters with background documentation or technical references that can be used for estimating greenhouse gas emissions and removals. The responsibility of using this information appropriately will always remain with the users themselves." References ↑ "IPCC-EFDB" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=IPCC_Emission_Factor_Database&oldid=367213"

96

CO2 emissions, Nuclear energy, Renewable energy and Economic growth in Taiwan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??When the government decided to energy policy, we must first understand the energy and economic growth with a causal link between carbon dioxide emissions, this… (more)

Lin, Yi-Ching

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Study Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study Reports on Phase 1 testing of new 2007 heavy-duty diesel engines (using a common lubricant) from four manufacturers (Caterpillar,...

98

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

highlighting representative studies that illustrate the state-of-the-art deer12johnson.pdf More Documents & Publications Diesel Emission Control Review Review of Emerging...

99

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and thermal equipment, and energy storage - collectivelysolar thermal collectors, and energy storage devices can be

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photovoltaics, solar thermal collectors, and energy storagesolar electric and thermal equipment, and energy storage -

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Energy Reliability, Distribution System Integrationand Energy Reliability, Distribution System Integration

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Programme Programme Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Name UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), European Union Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Topics Low emission development planning Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.undp.org/climatestr References UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme[1] UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Screenshot "This collaborative programme aims to strengthen technical and institutional capacities at the country level, while at the same time facilitating inclusion and coordination of the public and private sector in national initiatives addressing climate change. It does so by utilizing the

103

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Maryland Public Service Commission Maryland's 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires all electric companies and electricity suppliers to provide customers with details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of electric generation. Emissions data must be expressed in terms of pounds per megawatt-hour (MWh). This information must be provided to customers every six months and annually to the Maryland Public Service Commission (PSC). Past reports are available in Case No. 8738 through the [http://webapp.psc.state.md.us/Intranet/Casenum/caseform_new.cfm? PSC's

104

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Michigan Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Michigan Public Service Commission Michigan's Customer Choice and Electric Reliability Act of 2000 (P.A. 141) requires electric suppliers to disclose to customers details related to the fuel mix and emissions, in pounds per megawatt-hour (MWh) of electric generation. Electric suppliers must provide this information to customers twice annually in a standardized, uniform format. The Michigan Public Service Commission (MPSC) staff must calculate the regional electricity generation and environmental characteristics and make it available to be used by the state's generation providers. The web site above describes the

105

CLEAN-Low Emission Development Planning Webinar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CLEAN-Low Emission Development Planning Webinar CLEAN-Low Emission Development Planning Webinar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CLEAN-Low Emission Development Planning Webinar Agency/Company /Organization: Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN), National Renewable Energy Laboratory Resource Type: Webinar, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website: en.openei.org/wiki/CLEAN References: CLEAN Webinar[1] Webinar Video LEDP.JPG Presentations Jane Ebinger, Sr. Energy Specialist, World Bank; Energy Sector Management Assistance Program (ESMAP) Juan Mata, Mexico's Secretariat of Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT) Sadie Cox, International Analyst, US National Renewable Energy Laboratory(NREL) Announcement Dear Colleagues, The Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) will be offering a

106

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected20 Figure 16. Office Buildings Energy Intensity by End-Projected Technology and Energy Intensity Trends in Cement

Fridley, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9. Residential Primary Energy Consumption by Fuel, Reference15 Figure 10. Residential Primary Energy Consumption by End-20 Figure 17. Commercial Primary Energy Consumption by

Fridley, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO 2 Emissions WeiAnalysis of Building Energy Costs and CO 2 Emissions Weiwhich minimizes building energy cost or CO 2 emissions, or a

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Energy and Air Emission Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer D. Jacobson D.J. Consulting LLC McLean, Virginia C. High Resource Systems Group Inc. White River Junction, Vermont Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-42616 February 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-42616 February 2008 Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer D. Jacobson D.J. Consulting LLC McLean, Virginia

110

Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels - Diesel Emissions Project (APBF-DEC): 2,000-Hour Performance of a NOx Adsorber Catalyst and Diesel Particle Filter System for a Medium-Duty, Pick-Up Diesel Engine Platform; Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Presents the results of a 2,000-hour test of an emissions control system consisting of a nitrogen oxides adsorber catalyst in combination with a diesel particle filter, advanced fuels, and advanced engine controls in an SUV/pick-up truck vehicle platform.

Not Available

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development Topics: Analysis Tools Website: greet.es.anl.gov/ This full life-cycle model evaluates the energy and emission impacts of advanced vehicle technologies and new transportation fuels. The model allows users to evaluate various vehicle and fuel combinations. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Shift - Change to low-carbon modes Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies Learn more about the avoid, shift, improve framework for limiting air

112

Quantifying emissions reductions from New England offshore wind energy resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Access to straightforward yet robust tools to quantify the impact of renewable energy resources on air emissions from fossil fuel power plants is important to governments aiming to improve air quality and reduce greenhouse ...

Berlinski, Michael Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Figure 3. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions" " (million metric tons)" ,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014,2015,2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021,2022,2023,2024,2025,2026,2027,2028,...

114

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar electric and thermal equipment, and energy storage - collectively termed distributed energy resources (energy resources (DER) such as on-site fossil-fuel based combined heat and power (CHP), thermally- activated cooling, photovoltaics, solar

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

world best practice energy intensity (weighted by current productionworld’s best practice energy intensity in all major industrial productionenergy intensity for ammonia production lags behind the world

Fridley, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photovoltaics, solar thermal collectors, and energy storagecooling, solar electric and thermal equipment, and energysolar thermal collectors coupled to absorption chillers are an economic approach to energy

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Planetary Emissions Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Planetary Emissions Management Planetary Emissions Management Jump to: navigation, search Name Planetary Emissions Management Place Cambridge, Massachusetts Sector Carbon Product US-based, company offering measurements of carbon budgets using laser technology. Coordinates 43.003745°, -89.017499° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.003745,"lon":-89.017499,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

118

Zero Emissions Leasing LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emissions Leasing LLC Emissions Leasing LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Zero Emissions Leasing LLC Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96822 Sector Solar Product Honolulu-based developer of solar power generation projects on a large-scale (more than 100 kilowatts) Coordinates 21.30477°, -157.857614° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.30477,"lon":-157.857614,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

119

Seismic Emissions Surveys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emissions Surveys Emissions Surveys Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Seismic Emissions Surveys Abstract With recent improvements in acquiring, processing and interpreting data, seismic ground noise provides a valuable tool for geothermal exploration. A time domain beam steering array processing technique is employed. This process eliminates the occurrence of false anomalies caused by local geologic amplification effects. Surveys of this type are used to located naturally fractured reservoirs. Results form Dixie Valley and Desert Peak, Nevada correlate well with the location of productive wells or known geology. Authors Katz and Lewis J. Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, 1984 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

120

Annual Emission Fees (Michigan) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Emission Fees (Michigan) Annual Emission Fees (Michigan) Annual Emission Fees (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Michigan Program Type Fees Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Renewable Operating Permit (ROP) is required by Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The ROP program clarifies the requirements that apply to a facility that emits air contaminants. Any facility in Michigan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

GHG emissions and energy performance of offshore wind power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents specific life cycle GHG emissions from wind power generation from six different 5 MW offshore wind turbine conceptual designs. In addition, the energy performance, expressed by the energy indicators Energy Payback Ratio (EPR) Energy Payback Time (EPT), is calculated for each of the concepts. There are currently few LCA studies in existence which analyse offshore wind turbines with rated power as great as 5 MW. The results, therefore, give valuable additional environmental information concerning large offshore wind power. The resulting GHG emissions vary between 18 and 31.4 g CO2-equivalents per kWh while the energy performance, assessed as EPR and EPT, varies between 7.5 and 12.9, and 1.6 and 2.7 years, respectively. The relatively large ranges in GHG emissions and energy performance are chiefly the result of the differing steel masses required for the analysed platforms. One major conclusion from this study is that specific platform/foundation steel masses are important for the overall GHG emissions relating to offshore wind power. Other parameters of importance when comparing the environmental performance of offshore wind concepts are the lifetime of the turbines, wind conditions, distance to shore, and installation and decommissioning activities. Even though the GHG emissions from wind power vary to a relatively large degree, wind power can fully compete with other low GHG emission electricity technologies, such as nuclear, photovoltaic and hydro power.

Hanne Lerche Raadal; Bjørn Ivar Vold; Anders Myhr; Tor Anders Nygaard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Minnesota) (Minnesota) Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Climate Policies This statute sets goals for the reduction of statewide greenhouse gas emissions by at least 15 percent by 2015, 30 percent by 2025, and 80

123

Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.epa.gov/otaq/models/moves/index.htm Cost: Free Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/motor-vehicle-emission-simulator-move Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation References: http://www.epa.gov/otaq/models/moves/index.htm Intended to replace MOBILE6, NONROAD, and NMIM. Estimates energy consumption emissions from highway vehicles from 1999-2050 and accounts for

124

MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: MOBILE6 Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.epa.gov/oms/m6.htm Cost: Free References: http://www.epa.gov/oms/m6.htm MOBILE6 is an emission factor model for predicting gram per mile emissions of Hydrocarbons (HC), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon Dioxide (CO2), Particulate Matter (PM), and toxics from cars, trucks, and motorcycles under various conditions. MOBILE6 is an emission factor model for predicting gram per mile emissions of Hydrocarbons (HC), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon

125

Thailand-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thailand-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Thailand-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Thailand South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

126

Bangladesh-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Bangladesh-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Bangladesh-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Bangladesh Southern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

127

Nepal-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Nepal-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Nepal Southern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

128

Vietnam-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Vietnam-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Vietnam South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

129

Malaysia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Malaysia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Malaysia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Malaysia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Malaysia South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

130

Philippines-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Philippines-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Philippines-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Philippines South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

131

Laos-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laos-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Laos-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Laos-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Laos South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

132

Portfolio Manager Technical Reference: Greenhouse Gas Emissions | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Greenhouse Gas Emissions Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

133

Energy use and sulphur dioxide emissions in Asia  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a review of energy use in 22 selected countries of Asia and estimates the anthropogenic emission of sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) for the selected countries, both at national and disaggregated sub-country-regional levels. The paper also makes a comparative assessment of the Asian countries in terms of SO{sub 2} emission intensity (i.e. emission per GDP), emission per capita and emission density (i.e. emission per unit area). Total SO{sub 2} emission in the region was estimated to be about 38 million tons in 1990 Five countries, China, India, South Korea, Japan and Thailand, accounted for over 91% of the regional SO{sub 2} emission. Coal use had the dominant share (81%) of the total emission from the region. Among the economic sectors, industry contributed the largest share (49%) to the total emissions of the selected countries as a whole, followed by the power sector (30%). These findings suggest the need for mitigation strategies focussed on the industry and power sectors of the major emitting countries in Asia. 20 refs., 10 tabs.

Shrestha, R.M.; Bhattacharya, S.C.; Malla, S. [Asian Inst. of Technology, Bangkok (Thailand)] [Asian Inst. of Technology, Bangkok (Thailand)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Trading Emissions PLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trading Emissions PLC Trading Emissions PLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Trading Emissions PLC Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC2N 4AW Product Trading Emissions PLC is an investment fund established to acquire tradable environmental instruments. It invests in projects developed under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and Joint Implementation (JI) of the Kyoto Protocol. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

135

A Canonical High Energy Afterglow Emission Light Curve?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present self consistent calculations of Synchrotron self Compton (SSC) radiation that takes place within the afterglow blast wave and External inverse Compton (EIC) radiation that takes place when flare photons (produced by an internal process) pass through the blast wave. We show that if our current interpretations of the Swift XRT data are correct, there should be a canonical high energy afterglow emission light curve. We expect that GRBs with a long term X-ray flattening or X-ray flares should show similar high energy features. The EIC emission, however, is long lasting and weak and might be outshined by the SSC emission of the forward shock. The high energy emission could be well detected by the soon to be launched GLAST satellite. Its detection could shed new light on the conditions within the emitting regions of GRBs.

Yi-Zhong Fan; Tsvi Piran

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West September 24, 2013 - 10:08am Addthis A new report released today by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) examines the potential impacts of increasing wind and solar power generation on the operators of coal and gas plants in the West. To accommodate higher amounts of wind and solar power on the electric grid, utilities must ramp down and ramp up or stop and start conventional generators more frequently to provide reliable power for their customers - a practice called cycling.

137

Establishing Standard Source Energy and Emission Factors for Energy Use in Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This procedure provides source energy factors and emission factors to calculate the source (primary) energy and emissions from a building's annual site energy consumption. This report provides the energy and emission factors to calculate the source energy and emissions for electricity and fuels delivered to a facility and combustion of fuels at a facility. The factors for electricity are broken down by fuel type and presented for the continental United States, three grid interconnections, and each state. The electricity fuel and emission factors are adjusted for the electricity and the useful thermal output generated by combined heat and power (CHP) plants larger than one megawatt. The energy and emissions from extracting, processing, and transporting the fuels, also known as the precombustion effects, are included.

Deru, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

High-energy afterglow emission from gamma-ray bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......in question. High-energy emission provides a new window into afterglow...Proc. Vol. 745, High Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy. Am. Inst. Phys., New York, p. 23. Proga D...Astrophysics. Wiley, New York. Sari R. , 1998, ApJ......

Yi-Zhong Fan; Tsvi Piran; Ramesh Narayan; Da-Ming Wei

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

139

Indonesia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Indonesia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Indonesia South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and

140

Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, Melanesia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia References LEAD Program[1]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Maldives-Supporting the Zero Emissions Strategy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maldives-Supporting the Zero Emissions Strategy Maldives-Supporting the Zero Emissions Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name Maldives-Supporting the Zero Emissions Strategy Agency/Company /Organization German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Partner Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Maldives Southern Asia References GTZ Schwerpunkte[1] GIZ[2] Contents 1 Overview 1.1 Costa Rica 1.2 Maldives 2 Outcomes, Lessons Learned and Good Practices 3 References Overview Costa Rica Maldives The Maldives are less the 2.5 m above sea level. Hence, the danger from climate change is crucial. At the same time the Maldives' economy,

142

Supporting the Zero Emissions Strategy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Zero Emissions Strategy the Zero Emissions Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name Maldives - Supporting the Zero Emissions Strategy Agency/Company /Organization German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Partner Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Costa Rica, Maldives Central America, Southern Asia References GTZ Schwerpunkte[1] GIZ[2] Contents 1 Overview 1.1 Costa Rica 1.2 Maldives 2 Outcomes, Lessons Learned and Good Practices 3 References Overview Costa Rica Maldives The Maldives are less the 2.5 m above sea level. Hence, the danger from climate change is crucial. At the same time the Maldives' economy,

143

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG Emissions Reduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Energy Efficiency and GHG Emissions Reduction infor Energy Efficiency or GHG Emissions Reduction inrelated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have been a popular

Price, Lynn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, by Industry, 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions > Total Table Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions > Total Table Total Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Manufacturing Industries, 1994 Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) Carbon Intensity SIC Code Industry Group Total Net Electricity Natural Gas Petro- leum Coal Other (MMTC/ Quadrillion Btu) Total 371.7 131.1 93.5 87.3 56.8 3.1 17.16 20 Food and Kindred Products 24.4 9.8 9.1 W W 0.1 20.44 21 Tobacco Products W 0.1 W W W W W 22 Textile Mill Products 8.7 5.5 1.7 0.6 1.0 * 28.21 23 Apparel and Other Textile Products W 1.3 0.4 W W W W 24 Lumber and Wood Products 4.9 3.4 0.7 W W 0.2 9.98 25 Furniture and Fixtures 1.6 1.1 0.3 * 0.1 0.1 23.19 26 Paper and Allied Products 31.6 11.0 8.3 4.3 7.8 0.3 11.88

145

Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Climate Policies Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

146

Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Cropland Production in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Cropland Production in the Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Cropland Production in the United States, 1990-2004 These data represent energy use and fossil-fuel CO2 emissions associated with cropland production in the U.S. Energy use and emissions occurring on the farm are referred to as on-site energy and on-site emissions. Energy use and emissions associated with cropland production that occur off the farm (e.g., use of electricity, energy and emissions associated with fertilizer and pesticide production) are referred to as off-site energy and off-site emissions. The combination of on-site and off-site energy and carbon is referred to as total energy and total carbon, respectively. Data provided here are for on-site and total energy and associated CO2 emissions. Units are Megagram C for CO2 estimates and Gigajoule for energy

147

Energy Use and Carbon Emissions: Non-OECD Countries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Non-OECD Non-OECD Countries December 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts Energy Use and Carbon Emissions: Non-OECD Countries was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU). General questions concerning the content of the report may be referred to W. Calvin Kilgore (202-586-1617), Director of EMEU; Mark Rodekohr (202-586-1130), Director of Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division; or Derriel Cato (202-586-6574),

148

Energy Use and Carbon Emissions: Some International Comparisons  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Some Some International Comparisons April 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts Energy Use and Carbon Emissions: Some International Comparisons is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU). General questions concerning the content of the report may be referred to W. Calvin Kilgore (202-586- 1617), Director of EMEU; Arthur Andersen (202-586-1441), Director of Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division; or

149

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in solid fuels (coal), coke and electricity as a result ofHeat Natural Gas Oil Products Coke Solid Fuels Efficiencydemand for metallurgical coke. The energy intensity of the

Fridley, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy, as the basic element supporting economic growth, is essential for the survival and development of modern society. During the past few decades, the global economy has witnessed substantial growth. In th...

Yiming Wei; Gang Wu; Hua Liao; Haibo Wang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West September 24, 2013 - 10:08am Addthis A new report released today by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) examines the potential impacts of increasing wind and solar power generation on the operators of coal and gas plants in the West. To accommodate higher amounts of wind and solar power on the electric grid, utilities must ramp down and ramp up or stop and start conventional generators more frequently to provide reliable power for their customers - a practice called cycling. Grid operators typically cycle power plants to accommodate fluctuations in

152

Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) Volume I - Summary Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ninth annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in three volumes. Volume I - Summary Report - provides...

Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Zilbershtein, G.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Clardige, D.; Parker, P.; Ellis, S.; Kim, H.; Gilman, D.; Degelman, L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Energy and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system Title Energy and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Shehabi, Arman, Jennifer R. Stokes, and Arpad Horvath Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 7 Issue 2 Abstract Both centralized and decentralized wastewater systems have distinct engineering, financial and societal benefits. This paper presents a framework for analyzing the environmental effects of decentralized wastewater systems and an evaluation of the environmental impacts associated with two currently operating systems in California, one centralized and one decentralized. A comparison of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and criteria air pollutants from the systems shows that the scale economies of the centralized plant help lower the environmental burden to less than a fifth of that of the decentralized utility for the same volume treated. The energy and emission burdens of the decentralized plant are reduced when accounting for high-yield wastewater reuse if it supplants an energy-intensive water supply like a desalination one. The centralized facility also reduces greenhouse gases by flaring methane generated during the treatment process, while methane is directly emitted from the decentralized system. The results are compelling enough to indicate that the life-cycle environmental impacts of decentralized designs should be carefully evaluated as part of the design process.

154

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP): Volume I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by adding the following additional energy efficiency initiatives: ? Requires 5,880 MW of generating capacity from renewable energy technologies by 2015; ? Includes 500 MW from non-wind renewables; ? Requires the PUCT to establish a target of 10... emissions reduction credits from energy efficiency and renewable energy programs; ? Requires the Texas Environmental Research Consortium (TERC) to contract with the Laboratory to develop and annually calculate creditable emissions reduction from wind...

Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles; Yazdani, Bahman; Gilman, Don; Fitzpatrick, Tom; Muns, Shirley; Liu, Zi; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Degelman, Larry; Claridge, David

155

Gateway:Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network) (Redirected from Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network) Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) Featured CLEAN Reports Review of Networks and Platforms for Low Emission and Climate Compatible Development Planning LEDS networks and platforms rev (12-01-11).pdf Concepts on the Implementation Framework for the Climate Technology Center and Network under the UNFCCC CTCN Implementation Framework CLEAN paper.pdf Featured LEDS Event Outcomes LEDS Program Workshop CLEAN Expert Workshop Featured Partner Web Portals Click here to view LEDS-related portals Clean Energy Solutions Center ClimateTechWiki ESMAP Low Carbon Development Knowledge Products and E-Learning

156

Calculating CO2 Emissions from Mobile Sources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Calculating CO2 Emissions from Mobile Sources Calculating CO2 Emissions from Mobile Sources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Calculating CO2 Emissions from Mobile Sources,GHG Protocol Agency/Company /Organization: Aether, Environmental Data Services, Aether, Environmental Data Services Sector: Energy Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development, Industry, Transportation Topics: GHG inventory, Potentials & Scenarios Resource Type: Guide/manual Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: cf.valleywater.org/Water/Where_Your_Water_Comes_From/Water%20Supply%20 Cost: Free References: http://cf.valleywater.org/Water/Where_Your_Water_Comes_From/Water%20Supply%20and%20Infrastructure%20Planning/Climate%20Change/Guidance_for_mobile_emissions_GHG_protocol.pdf Related Tools Tool and Calculator (Transit, Fuel)

157

Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development (LEAD) Program Development (LEAD) Program (Redirected from Low Emission Asian Development (LEAD) Program) Jump to: navigation, search Name Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, Melanesia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia

158

Gateway:Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) (Redirected from CLEAN) Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) Featured CLEAN Reports Review of Networks and Platforms for Low Emission and Climate Compatible Development Planning LEDS networks and platforms rev (12-01-11).pdf Concepts on the Implementation Framework for the Climate Technology Center and Network under the UNFCCC CTCN Implementation Framework CLEAN paper.pdf Featured LEDS Event Outcomes LEDS Program Workshop CLEAN Expert Workshop Featured Partner Web Portals Click here to view LEDS-related portals Clean Energy Solutions Center ClimateTechWiki ESMAP Low Carbon Development Knowledge Products and E-Learning

159

Intra-hour forecasting with a total sky imager at the UC San Diego solar energy testbed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solener.2011.02.014, Solar Energy. Lave, M. , Kleissl, J. ,smoothing. Submitted to Solar Energy. Linke, F. , 1922.24th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Hamburg,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

way of reducing total energy consumption and CO2 emissions.deducted from the total energy consumption to avoid double-However, total energy consumption and CO2 emissions will

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

China's energy and emissions outlook to 2050: Perspectives from bottom-up energy end-use model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications for Chinese energy demand and imports in 2020.for China to reduce energy demand and emissions. Thisand physical drivers of energy demand and thereby help

Zhou, Nan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions March 15, 2010 - 11:14am Addthis Castle Geyser at Yellowstone National Park | File photo Castle Geyser at Yellowstone National Park | File photo Joshua DeLung The 10 federal land organizations - including two national parks, six national forests and two national wildlife refuges - in the Greater Yellowstone Area comprise an entire ecosystem of their own. Straddling Wyoming's borders with Montana and Idaho, the region draws millions of visitors a year, attracted by the dramatic landscapes, geothermal activity and chances to spot wildlife like bison, elk and grizzly bear. Thanks to funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program, the Greater Yellowstone Coordinating Committee will

163

How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager The new ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager How Portfolio Manager helps you save The benchmarking starter kit Identify your property type Enter data into Portfolio Manager The data quality checker

164

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China’sof China’s total energy consumption mix. However, accuratelyof China’s total energy consumption, while others estimate

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Constraints on Very High Energy Emission from GRB 130427A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prompt emission from the very fluent and nearby (z=0.34) gamma-ray burst GRB 130427A was detected by several orbiting telescopes and by ground-based, wide-field-of-view optical transient monitors. Apart from the intensity and proximity of this GRB, it is exceptional due to the extremely long-lived high-energy (100 MeV to 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission, which was detected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope for ~70 ks after the initial burst. The persistent, hard-spectrum, high-energy emission suggests that the highest-energy gamma rays may have been produced via synchrotron self-Compton processes though there is also evidence that the high-energy emission may instead be an extension of the synchrotron spectrum. VERITAS, a ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array, began follow-up observations of GRB 130427A ~71 ks (~20 hr) after the onset of the burst. The GRB was not detected with VERITAS; however, the high elevation of the observations, coupled with the low redsh...

Aliu, E; Barnacka, A; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berger, K; Biteau, J; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cardenzana, J V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Ciupik, L; Connaughton, V; Cui, W; Dickinson, H J; Eisch, J D; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Federici, S; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Griffiths, S T; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Håkansson, N; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kar, P; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Meagher, K; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nieto, D; de Bhróithe, A O'Faoláin; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Park, N; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Prokoph, H; Pueschel, E; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Rajotte, J; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weiner, O M; Weinstein, A; Welsing, R; Wilhelm, A; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B; McEnery, J E; Perkins, J S; Veres, P; Zhu, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Parton energy loss due to synchrotron-like gluon emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a quasiclassical theory of the synchrotron-like gluon radiation. Our calculations show that the parton energy loss due to the synchrotron gluon emission may be important in the jet quenching phenomenon if the plasma instabilities generate a sufficiently strong chromomagnetic field. Our gluon spectrum disagrees with that obtained by Shuryak and Zahed within the Schwinger's proper time method.

B. G. Zakharov

2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

167

Energy-Dependent Timing of Thermal Emission in Solar Flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report solar flare plasma to be multi-thermal in nature based on the theoretical model and study of the energy-dependent timing of thermal emission in ten M-class flares. We ... observed by the Si detector of ...

Rajmal Jain; Arun Kumar Awasthi; Arvind Singh Rajpurohit…

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

NETL: News Release - Converting Emissions into Energy - Three Companies to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 14, 2000 September 14, 2000 Converting Emissions into Energy - Three Companies To Develop Technologies for Tapping Coal Mine Methane Methane, the chief constituent of natural gas, is a potent greenhouse gas, and millions of cubic feet of it escape daily from active coal mines. Now, three projects selected the U.S. Department of Energy propose new ways to capture the gas and convert it to useful energy -- reducing an environmental threat while adding to the nation's supplies of clean natural gas and electric power. The National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Energy Department's chief field site for its fossil energy research program, has selected: Appalachian-Pacific Coal Mine Methane Power Co., LLC, Arlington, VA, to work with West Virginia University Research Corp., Morgantown, WV, and Invitation Energy, Mannington, WV, to convert coal mine methane from mines in Marion County, WV, and surrounding areas into liquefied natural gas (LNG) to fuel heavy trucks.

169

Linking the emissions trading schemes of Europe and China - Combining climate and energy policy instruments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Both Europe and China have announced targets for greenhouse gas emissions reduction and renewable energy development. To achieve their emissions targets, Europe has introduced emissions trading scheme (ETS) since...

Yang Liu; Taoyuan Wei

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Anisotropy of Ion Emission from a Low Energy Plasma Focus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have investigated the ion flux ion energy and anisotropy of carbon ion emission at different angular positions from a low energy Plasma Focus (PF) device operating in methane at 20 kV with 1.8 kJ stored energy. A detector array is used to measure simultaneously the ion beams at five different angles with respect to the PF axis (0° 10° 15° 20° and 90°) at a distance of 77 cm from the ion source. Ion beam energy correlations for operation in methane indicate that the dominant charge states on the detector are H+ C+4 and C+5. The correlation of ion beam intensity with filling gas pressure indicates that the beam emission maximizes at the optimum pressure for focus formation at peak current. Estimated ion fluxes are maximum for the energy range of 50 – 100 keV 100 – 200 keV and 300 – 400 keV respectively. Measurements of the angular distribution of ions reveal a strong anisotropy. It is observed that the flux of hydrogen ions is maximum near the axis of the PF whereas the flux of carbon ions is maximum at off axis (around 15°). An ion emission dip is observed in case of the carbon ions at the PF axis.

H. Bhuyan; M. Favre; H. Chuaqui; E. Valderrama; I. Mitchell; E. Wyndham

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Optimization Model for Energy Planning with CO2 Emission Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper considers the problem of reducing CO2 emissions from a power grid consisting of a variety of power-generating plants:? coal, natural gas, nuclear, hydroelectric, and alternative energy. ... Approximately 28.5% of OPG electricity is produced through the combustion of fossil fuels, 27% through hydroelectricity, and 44% through nuclear energy, and the remaining 0.5% comes from renewable or other energy sources, such as wind turbines. ... A sensitivity analysis was also performed to evaluate the impact of natural gas prices, coal prices, and retrofit costs on the optimal configuration of the OPG fleet of electricity-generating stations. ...

Haslenda Hashim; Peter Douglas; Ali Elkamel; Eric Croiset

2005-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

172

Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a summary of the impact of wind energy development on various air pollutants for a general audience. The core document addresses the key facts relating to the analysis of emission reductions from wind energy development. It is intended for use by a wide variety of parties with an interest in this issue, ranging from state environmental officials to renewable energy stakeholders. The appendices provide basic background information for the general reader, as well as detailed information for those seeking a more in-depth discussion of various topics.

Jacobson, D.; High, C.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

EIA - AEO2010 - Accounting for carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Accounting for carbon diioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion Accounting for carbon diioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Accounting for carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion CO2 emissions from the combustion of biomass [75] to produce energy are excluded from the energy-related CO2 emissions reported in AEO2010. According to current international convention [76], carbon released through biomass combustion is excluded from reported energy-related emissions. The release of carbon from biomass combustion is assumed to be balanced by the uptake of carbon when the feedstock is grown, resulting in zero net emissions over some period of time [77]. However, analysts have debated whether increased use of biomass energy may result in a decline in terrestrial carbon stocks, leading to a net positive release of carbon rather than the zero net release assumed by its exclusion from reported energy-related emissions.

174

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Degration, T&D losses INTEGRATED NOx SAVINGS Energy Systems Laboratory p. 4 CUMULATIVE NOx EMISSIONS SAVINGS (2013) ? ESL Code Compliance (10.75 tons/day) ? Federal Buildings (0.81 tons/day) ? Furnace Pilot Lights (0.32 tons/day) ? PUCs SB7,SB5...1 Energy Systems Laboratory p. 1 Energy Systems Laboratory Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University System Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) September 2001 ? December...

Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.

175

MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Topics: Analysis Tools Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/29790 Cost: Free Related Tools IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP) Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model ... further results The part of the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM) that represents human systems; a recursive-dynamic multi-regional general equilibrium model

176

Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Analysis with the GREET Model...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Analysis with the GREET Model Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Analysis with the GREET Model 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies...

177

Indonesia-GTZ Emissions Reductions in Urban Transport | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reductions in Urban Transport Reductions in Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Indonesia-GTZ Emissions Reductions in Urban Transport Name Indonesia-GTZ Emissions Reductions in Urban Transport Agency/Company /Organization GTZ Partner Ministry of Transportation Sector Energy Focus Area Transportation Topics Background analysis Website http://www.gtz.de/en/themen/um Program Start 2008 Program End 2012 Country Indonesia UN Region South-Eastern Asia References GTZ Transport & Climate Change Website[1] GTZ is working with Indonesia on this program with the following objective: "Indonesian cities increasingly plan and implement measures for a transport system that is energy efficient as well as environmentally and climate friendly." Background of the project is the absence of a national policy on

178

Timelines for mitigating methane emissions from energy technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy technologies emitting differing proportions of methane and carbon dioxide vary in their relative climate impacts over time, due to the different atmospheric lifetimes of the two gases. Standard technology comparisons using the global warming potential (GWP) emissions equivalency metric do not reveal these dynamic impacts, and may not provide the information needed to assess technologies and emissions mitigation opportunities in the context of broader climate policy goals. Here we formulate a portfolio optimization model that incorporates changes in technology impacts as a radiative forcing (RF) stabilization target is approached. An optimal portfolio, maximizing allowed energy consumption while meeting the RF target, is obtained by year-wise minimization of the marginal RF impact in an intended stabilization year. The optimal portfolio calls for using certain higher methane-emitting technologies prior to an optimal switching year, followed by methane-light technologies as the stabilization year approac...

Roy, Mandira; Trancik, Jessika E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

ARPA-E Announces $60 Million for Disruptive Technologies to Cut Emissions, Boost Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Two New Programs Aim to Detect and Measure Methane Emissions and Develop Energy Efficient Heating and Cooling Systems

180

High Engine Efficiency at 2010 Emissions | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Engine Efficiency at 2010 Emissions High Engine Efficiency at 2010 Emissions 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005deernelson.pdf...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Effect of Biodiesel Blends on NOx Emissions | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biodiesel Blends on NOx Emissions Effect of Biodiesel Blends on NOx Emissions Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007)....

182

Impact of Transportation on Cost, Energy and Particulate Emissions for Recycled Concrete Aggregate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??IMPACT OF TRANSPORTATION ON COST, ENERGY AND PARTICULATE EMISSIONS FOR RECYCLED CONCRETE AGGREGATE Transportation distances can have a huge impact on cost, energy, and particulate… (more)

Hameed, Mohamed

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

2012 The report ranks the energy use, energy losses, and energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of 15 sectors. These sectors collectively account for 94% of all energy use...

184

Absorption and Emission of Energy at Electron Cyclotron Resonance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments are described in which the absorption and emission of energy at and near electron cyclotron resonance may be studied with simplified equipment. The magnetic field is measured by electron spin resonance thus bringing out aspects of spin as well as orbital angular momentum; the magnetic field may also be measured by the radius of the electron orbit rendered visible by low-pressure hydrogen. It is observed that in a gas-focused electron beam tube the frequencies of maximum electron cyclotron resonance absorption and emission (as determined by the zero crossing of the derivative of the line shape) are generally different from the frequency of electron spin resonance and the frequency shifts are functions of electron beam current. The line shapes are asymmetric and are also functions of beam current. These effects are tentatively identified with plasma effects in the gas-focused beam.

S. C. Bloch; H. R. Brooker; G. J. KeKelis

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Gateway:Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) Featured CLEAN Reports Review of Networks and Platforms for Low Emission and Climate Compatible Development Planning LEDS networks and platforms rev (12-01-11).pdf Concepts on the Implementation Framework for the Climate Technology Center and Network under the UNFCCC CTCN Implementation Framework CLEAN paper.pdf Featured LEDS Event Outcomes LEDS Program Workshop CLEAN Expert Workshop Featured Partner Web Portals Click here to view LEDS-related portals Clean Energy Solutions Center ClimateTechWiki ESMAP Low Carbon Development Knowledge Products and E-Learning IEA Policies and Measures Database

186

Energy Storage/Conservation and Carbon Emissions Reduction Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded the Center for Transportation and the Environment (CTE) federal assistance for the management of a project to develop and test a prototype flywheel-­?based energy recovery and storage system in partnership with Test Devices, Inc. (TDI). TDI specializes in the testing of jet engine and power generation turbines, which uses a great deal of electrical power for long periods of time. In fact, in 2007, the company consumed 3,498,500 kW-­?hr of electricity in their operations, which is equivalent to the electricity of 328 households. For this project, CTE and TDI developed and tested a prototype flywheel-­?based energy recovery and storage system. This technology is being developed at TDI’s facilities to capture and reuse the energy necessary for the company’s core process. The new technology and equipment is expected to save approximately 80% of the energy used in the TDI process, reducing total annual consumption of power by approximately 60%, saving approximately two million kilowatt-­?hours annually. Additionally, the energy recycling system will allow TDI and other end users to lower their peak power demand and reduce associated utility demand charges. The use of flywheels in this application is novel and requires significant development work from TDI. Flywheels combine low maintenance costs with very high cycle life with little to no degradation over time, resulting in lifetimes measured in decades. All of these features make flywheels a very attractive option compared to other forms of energy storage, including batteries. Development and deployment of this energy recycling technology will reduce energy consumption during jet engine and stationary turbine development. By reengineering the current inefficient testing process, TDI will reduce risk and time to market of efficiency upgrades of gas turbines across the entire spectrum of applications. Once in place the results from this program will also help other US industries to utilize energy recycling technology to lower domestic energy use and see higher net energy efficiency. The prototype system and results will be used to seek additional resources to carry out full deployment of a system. Ultimately, this innovative technology is expected to be transferable to other testing applications involving energy-­?based cycling within the company as well as throughout the industry.

Bigelow, Erik

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

187

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 2010 Commercial Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Lighting 211.9 211.9 20.4% Space Heating 87.4 10.2 6.7 0.3 17.3 5.6 50.5 160.7 15.5% Space Cooling 2.3 149.1 151.3 14.6% Ventilation 95.2 95.2 9.2% Refrigeration 69.1 69.1 6.7% Electronics 46.4 46.4 4.5% Water Heating 23.2 2.0 2.0 16.2 41.4 4.0% Computers 37.7 37.7 3.6% Cooking 9.5 4.1 13.6 1.3% Other (4) 15.8 0.9 9.0 3.8 13.7 122.0 151.5 14.6% Adjust to SEDS (5) 36.2 18.4 18.4 2.8 57.3 5.5% Total 174.4 31.5 6.7 9.0 4.1 51.3 5.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 805.0 1,036.3 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. Carbon emissions

188

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #686: August 1, 2011 Emissions and Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: August 1, 6: August 1, 2011 Emissions and Energy Use Model - GREET to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #686: August 1, 2011 Emissions and Energy Use Model - GREET on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #686: August 1, 2011 Emissions and Energy Use Model - GREET on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #686: August 1, 2011 Emissions and Energy Use Model - GREET on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #686: August 1, 2011 Emissions and Energy Use Model - GREET on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #686: August 1, 2011 Emissions and Energy Use Model - GREET on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #686: August 1, 2011 Emissions and Energy Use Model - GREET on AddThis.com...

189

Department of Energy Announces 22 New Projects to Enable Emissions Reductions and Improve Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) today announced $60 million in funding for 22 innovative new projects aimed at detecting and measuring methane emissions and developing localized thermal management systems that reduce the energy needed to heat and cool buildings. The projects are funded through ARPA-E’s two newest programs: Methane Observation Networks with Innovative Technology to Obtain Reductions (MONITOR) and Delivering Efficient Local Thermal Amenities (DELTA).

190

Emission Characteristics of the Projectile Fragments at Relativistic Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A projectile (84^Kr_36) having kinetic energy around 1 A GeV was used to expose NIKFI BR-2 emulsion target. A total of 700 inelastic events are used in the present studies on projectile fragments. The emission angle of the projectile fragments are strongly affected by charge of the other projectile fragments emitted at same time with different emission angle is observed. The angular distribution studies show symmetrical nature for lighter charge projectile fragments. The symmetrical nature decreased with the charge of projectile fragments. At ~4o of emission angle for double charge projectile fragments, the momentum transfer during interaction is similar for various target species of emulsion were observed. We also observed a small but significant amplitude peaks on both side of the big peak for almost all light charge projectile fragments having different delta angle values. It reflects that there are few percent of projectile fragments that are coming from the decay of heavy projectile fragments or any other process.

M. K. Singh; A. K. Soma; Ramji Pathak; V. Singh

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

2D representation of life cycle greenhouse gas emission and life cycle cost of energy conversion for various energy resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We suggest a 2D-plot representation combined with life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and life cycle cost for various energy conversion technologies. In general, life cycle ... use life cycle GHG emissions ...

Heetae Kim; Claudio Tenreiro; Tae Kyu Ahn

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Energy consumption, carbon dioxide emissions and economic growth: The case of Saudi Arabia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper investigates the dynamic causal relationships between energy consumption, energy price and economic activity in Saudi Arabia based on a demand side approach. We use a Johansen multivariate cointegration approach and incorporate CO2 emissions as a control variable. The results indicate that there exists at least a long-run relationship between energy consumption, energy price, carbon dioxide emissions, and economic growth. Furthermore, a long-run unidirectional causality stands from energy consumption to economic growth and CO2 emissions, bidirectional causality between carbon dioxide emissions and economic growth, and a long-run unidirectional causality runs from energy price to economic growth and CO2 emissions. In the short-run, there is unidirectional causality running from CO2 emissions to energy consumption and economic output and from energy price to CO2 emissions. Even though, the energy-led growth hypothesis is valid, the share of energy consumption in explaining economic growth is minimal. Energy price is the most important factor in explaining economic growth. Hence, policies aimed at reducing energy consumption and controlling for CO2 emissions may not reduce significantly Saudi?s economic growth. Investing in the use of renewable energy sources like solar and wind power is an urgent necessity to control for fossil fuel consumption and CO2 emissions.

Atef Saad Alshehry; Mounir Belloumi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

EIA Energy Efficiency-Energy Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions Links for the  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions Links Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions Links Energy Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions Links Posted Date: May 2007 Page Last Modified: September 2010 EIA Links Disclaimer: These pages contain hypertext links to information created and maintained by other public and private organizations. These links provide additional information that may be useful or interesting and are being provided consistent with the intended purpose of the EIA website. EIA does not control or guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of this outside information. EIA does not endorse the organizations sponsoring linked websites, the views they express, or the products and services they offer. Government Agencies / Associations Energy Information Administration - Annual Energy Outlook: Carbon Dioxide Emissions, CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are proportional to fuel consumption. Among fossil fuel types, coal has the highest carbon content, natural gas the lowest, and petroleum in between. In the AEO2006 reference case, the shares of these fuels change slightly from 2004 to 2030, with more coal and less petroleum and natural gas. The combined share of carbon-neutral renewable and nuclear energy is stable from 2004 to 2030 at 14 percent

194

Investigation of Energy, Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Costs in Single Point Incremental Forming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The LCA of sheet metal forming processes is lacking in studies of sustainability issues and quantification of energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. This paper summarizes an investigation of the...2 emissions

Kadra Branker; David W. Adams…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2035 Commercial Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Lighting 179.6 179.6 15.5% Space Heating 87.3 6.7 6.6 0.4 13.7 5.5 25.5 132.0 11.4% Ventilation 100.7 100.7 8.7% Space Cooling 1.7 84.1 85.8 7.4% Electronics 72.3 72.3 6.2% Refrigeration 55.6 55.6 4.8% Water Heating 28.8 2.5 2.5 13.3 44.7 3.9% Computers 33.6 33.6 2.9% Cooking 11.9 3.4 15.2 1.3% Other (4) 42.8 1.0 9.8 4.2 14.9 227.3 285.0 24.6% Adjust to SEDS (5) 21.3 13.1 13.1 120.5 154.9 13.4% Total 193.8 23.3 6.6 9.8 4.6 44.3 5.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): 915.8 1,159.3 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

196

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2025 Commercial Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Lighting 171.2 171.2 16.1% Space Heating 89.4 7.7 6.3 0.4 14.3 5.5 25.7 135.0 12.7% Ventilation 94.4 94.4 8.9% Space Cooling 1.8 81.5 83.3 7.8% Electronics 63.8 63.8 6.0% Refrigeration 53.7 53.7 5.1% Computers 31.2 31.2 2.9% Water Heating 27.5 2.3 2.3 14.0 43.7 4.1% Cooking 11.0 3.5 14.5 1.4% Other (4) 25.3 0.9 9.3 3.8 14.0 177.4 216.8 20.4% Adjust to SEDS (5) 30.9 13.4 13.4 109.4 153.7 14.5% Total 185.8 24.3 6.3 9.3 4.2 44.0 5.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): 825.9 1,061.3 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

197

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 2015 Commercial Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Lighting 160.0 160.0 16.6% Space Heating 89.9 9.0 6.2 0.3 15.5 5.5 26.4 137.3 14.2% Space Cooling 1.9 80.0 81.9 8.5% Ventilation 85.0 85.0 8.8% Refrigeration 55.8 55.8 5.8% Electronics 49.9 49.9 5.2% Water Heating 25.5 2.0 2.0 14.3 41.8 4.3% Computers 30.0 30.0 3.1% Cooking 10.2 3.6 13.8 1.4% Other (4) 17.6 0.9 8.6 3.5 12.9 128.6 159.2 16.5% Adjust to SEDS (5) 36.0 13.9 13.9 99.8 149.8 15.5% Total 181.2 25.8 6.2 8.6 3.8 44.4 5.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): 733.4 964.5 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

198

Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) emit approximately the same amount of water per mile as vehicles...

199

Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Fuel Cells Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) emit approximately the same amount of water per...

200

Real Time Tailpipe Emission Measurements | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Real Time Tailpipe Emission Measurements Real Time Tailpipe Emission Measurements 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Brookhaven National Laboratory 2002deerimre.pdf More...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Strategies for Integrated Emission Control | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Integrated Emission Control Strategies for Integrated Emission Control A new filter system technology significantly reduces harmful pollutants, uses less precious metals, and...

202

Module: Emission Factors for Deforestation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Website: www.leafasia.orgtoolstechnical-guidance-series-emission-factors-defo Cost: Free Language: English Module: Emission Factors for Deforestation Screenshot Logo: Module:...

203

Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Exhaust Emission Control 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Corning, Inc. deer2003johnson.pdf More Documents & Publications Review of Diesel Emission Control Technology Update...

204

A Novel Collaboration Paradigm for Reducing Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Data Centres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research and innovation projects to reduce the energy consumption The Computer...this topic. This research project designed energy-aware optimization policies...an unpredicted renewable energy surplus (typically solar or wind). This low emission......

D. Rincón; A. Agustí-Torra; J.F. Botero; F. Raspall; D. Remondo; X. Hesselbach; M.T. Beck; H. de Meer; F. Niedermeier; G. Giuliani

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

India's cement industry: Productivity, energy efficiency and carbon emissions  

SciTech Connect

Historical estimates of productivity growth in India's cement sector vary from indicating an improvement to a decline in the sector's productivity. The variance may be traced to the time period of study, source of data for analysis, and type of indices and econometric specifications used for reporting productivity growth. Analysis shows that in the twenty year period, 1973 to 1993, productivity in the aluminum sector increased by 0.8% per annum. An econometric analysis reveals that technical progress in India's cement sector has been biased towards the use of energy and capital, while it has been material and labor saving. The increase in productivity was mainly driven by a period of progress between 1983 and 1991 following partial decontrol of the cement sector in 1982. The authors examine the current changes in structure and energy efficiency in the sector. Their analysis shows that the Indian cement sector is moving towards world-best technology, which will result in fewer carbon emissions and more efficient energy use. However, substantial further energy savings and carbon reduction potentials still exist.

Schumacher, Katja; Sathaye, Jayant

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

An analysis of energy-related greenhouse gas emissions in the Chinese iron and steel industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With China's increasing pressures on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, Chinese iron and steel industry (ISI) is facing a great challenge. In this paper, we address the energy-related GHG emission trajectories, features, and driving forces in Chinese ISI for 2001–2010. First, energy related GHG inventory for ISI is made for both scope 1 (direct emissions) and scope 2 (including imported electricity emission). Then, the driving forces for such emission changes are explored by utilizing the method of logarithmic mean Divisa index (LMDI) decomposition analysis. Results indicate that Chinese ISI experienced a rapid growth of energy related GHG emission at average annual growth rate of 70 million tons CO2e. Production scale effect is the main driving factor for energy related GHG emission increase in Chinese ISI, while energy intensity effect and emission factor change effect offset the total increase and energy structure has marginal effect. Construction, manufacture of general purpose and special purpose machinery and manufacture of transport equipment sectors are main sectors for embodied emissions, amounting for more than 75% of the total embodied emissions from Chinese ISI. Such research findings propose that a detailed consideration can help make appropriate polices for mitigating ISI's energy-related GHG emission.

Yihui Tian; Qinghua Zhu; Yong Geng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Common Help Room Hours  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Common Help Room Hours for Spring 2015. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. 10:30 am. 11:30 am. MA 16200 - MATH 205 - Nathanael Cox ...

208

Common Help Room Hours  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Common Help Room Hours for Spring 2015. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. 10:30 am. 11:30 am. MA 16010 - MATH 205 - Alessandra ...

209

Contacts / Hours - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Station Real Time Met Data from Around the Site Current HMS Observations Daily HMS Extremes in Met Data Met and Climate Data Summary Products Contacts Hours Current NWS...

210

Emissions  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the extra emissions that are generated from manufacturing the material used to make CNG tanks); they can amount tc more than 2% of the emissions from 32 the fuel production and...

211

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Process-Related Emissions in the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Process-Related Emissions in the Industrial Sector Process-Related Emissions in the Industrial Sector International Energy Outlook 2009 Process-Related Emissions in the Industrial Sector Carbon dioxide emissions in the industrial sector result from both energy use and production processes. Together, energy- and process-related emissions in the industrial sector account for about one-fourth of global carbon dioxide emissions.a Process-related emissions are a direct byproduct of production. Because releases of carbon dioxide are inherent in the production of iron and steel, cement, and aluminum, the potential for reducing process-related emissions is limited. As a result, carbon abatement will face significant technological challenges in the industrial sector. In addition, there are no economical substitutes for these materials or their production processes, and none is likely be available in the near term.

212

Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts using Milagro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts using Milagro P. M. Saz Parkinson 95064 Abstract. Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been detected at GeV energies by EGRET and models predict for very high energy emission from a sample of 106 gamma-ray bursts (GRB) detected since the beginning

California at Santa Cruz, University of

213

Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro Observatory Miguel F of Milagro allow it to detect very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray burst emission with much higher sensitivity gamma-ray burst satellites at keV to MeV energies. Even in the absence of a positive detection, VHE

California at Santa Cruz, University of

214

Exploring the Hidden Impacts of HomeSys: Energy and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exploring the Hidden Impacts of HomeSys: Energy and Emissions of Home Sensing and Automation Abstract Home sensing and automation systems are rarely discussed with reference to their direct energy energy and estimates the embodied emissions arising from specific installations of home sensing. We

Hazas, Mike

215

Abstract--Energy consumption and the concomitant Green House Gases (GHG) emissions of network infrastructures are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract--Energy consumption and the concomitant Green House Gases (GHG) emissions of network on the overall power consumption and on the GHG emissions with just 25% of green energy sources. I. INTRODUCTION]. In the zero carbon approach, renewable (green) energy sources (e.g. sun, wind, tide) are employed and no GHGs

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

216

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Title Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ke, Jing, Nina Zheng, David Fridley, Lynn K. Price, and Nan Zhou Date Published 06/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords cement industry, china energy, china energy group, emission reduction, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, industrial energy efficiency, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, policy studies Abstract This study analyzes current energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission trends in China's cement industryas the basis for modeling different levels of cement production and rates of efficiency improvement andcarbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output projections are developed based on analyses ofhistorical production and physical and macroeconomic drivers. For each of these three productionprojections, energy savings and CO2 emission reduction potentials are estimated in a best practicescenario and two continuous improvement scenarios relative to a frozen scenario. The results reveal thepotential for cumulative final energy savings of 27.1 to 37.5 exajoules and energy-related directemission reductions of 3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice scenarios. Thecontinuous improvement scenarios produce cumulative final energy savings of 6.0 to 18.9 exajoules andreduce CO2 emissions by 1.0 to 2.4 gigatonnes. This analysis highlights that increasing energy efficiencyis the most important policy measure for reducing the cement industry's energy and emissions intensity,given the current state of the industry and the unlikelihood of significant carbon capture and storagebefore 2030. In addition, policies to reduce total cement production offer the most direct way ofreducing total energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

217

Saving Energy and Reducing Emissions from the Regeneration Air System of a Butane Dehydrogenation Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Petrochemicals operates a butane dehydrogenation unit producing MTBE for reformulated gasoline that was originally constructed when energy was cheap and prior to environmental regulation. The process exhausts 900,000 pounds per hour of air...

John, T. P.

218

Minimising emissions and energy wastage by improved industrial processes and integration of renewable energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article provides an introduction to this Special Issue of Journal of Cleaner Production (JCLP), which contains thirteen, carefully selected articles from the 12th Conference, “Process Integration, Modelling and Optimisation for Energy Saving and Pollution Reduction” – PRES'09. This issue builds upon the multi-year co-operation between the PRES conference planners and the JCLP. The articles cover important subjects of increased efficiency in energy generation and usage and in improvements in industrial process optimisation. The first group of five papers focuses upon recent advances in emissions reduction and the resulting energy penalties. The second group of four papers deals with improving the efficiency and reliability in the utilisation of renewable energy, where hydrogen and biodiesel are the key energy carriers. The final group of three papers focus on process integration challenges of sustainable energy systems and upon the challenges of industrial/societal integration of sustainable energy systems into regional sustainable development planning.

Ji?í Jaromír Klemeš; Petar Sabev Varbanov; Sauro Pierucci; Donald Huisingh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

ENERGY STAR Using On-site Renewable Energy as the Next Step to Improving Energy Performance and Reducing Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY AS THE NEXT STEP ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY AS THE NEXT STEP TO IMPROVING ENERGY PERFORMANCE AND REDUCING EMISSIONS jcpenney has a corporate energy management strategy that includes using energy efficient technologies in its stores and encouraging energy conservation. As part of this strategy, the company also investigated generating electricity through on-site renewable energy. jcpenney is a partner in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings Program, and has been tracking building energy use since 2006 using EPA's free benchmarking tool, Portfolio Manager. Portfolio Manager provides a 1-100 energy performance score similar to a "miles-per-gallon" metric for vehicle fuel efficiency. Those buildings that achieve an ENERGY STAR score

220

LIBRARY SERVICES LIBRARY HOURS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIBRARY SERVICES LIBRARY HOURS Up-to-date library hours are posted at http Wesleyan ID that is linked to the library circulation database is needed to charge out library materials to visit the Circulation Office in Olin Library 115 to set up their borrowing privileges. If you have

Royer, Dana

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Energy, Carbon-emission and Financial Savings from Thermostat Control  

SciTech Connect

Among the easiest approaches to energy, and cost, savings for most people is the adjustment of thermostats to save energy. Here we estimate savings of energy, carbon, and money in the United States of America (USA) that would result from adjusting thermostats in residential and commercial buildings by about half a degree Celsius downward during the heating season and upward during the cooling season. To obtain as small a unit as possible, and therefore the least likely to be noticeable by most people, we selected an adjustment of one degree Fahrenheit (0.56 degree Celsius) which is the gradation used almost exclusively on thermostats in the USA and is the smallest unit of temperature that has been used historically. Heating and/or cooling of interior building space for personal comfort is sometimes referred to as space conditioning, a term we will use for convenience throughout this work without consideration of humidity. Thermostat adjustment, as we use the term here, applies to thermostats that control the indoor temperature, and not to other thermostats such as those on water heaters. We track emissions of carbon only, rather than of carbon dioxide, because carbon atoms change atomic partners as they move through the carbon cycle, from atmosphere to biosphere or ocean and, on longer time scales, through the rock cycle. To convert a mass of carbon to an equivalent mass of carbon dioxide (thereby including the mass of the 2 oxygen atoms in each molecule) simply multiply by 3.67.

Blasing, T J [ORNL; Schroeder, Dana [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The report ranks the energy use, energy losses, and energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of 15 sectors. These sectors collectively account for 94% of all energy use in manufacturing. In addition, in-depth profiles of energy flows are available for U.S. manufacturing as a whole and for the five largest energy-consuming sectors.

223

Emission Power Solutions Plc EPS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Solutions Plc EPS Power Solutions Plc EPS Jump to: navigation, search Name Emission & Power Solutions Plc (EPS) Place Carlsbad, California Zip 92008 Sector Efficiency Product California-based energy efficiency company, specializing in fuel efficiency. Coordinates 31.60396°, -100.641609° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.60396,"lon":-100.641609,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - afterglow emission energy Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reserved. Printed Summary: . Printed OFF-AXIS AFTERGLOW EMISSION FROM JETTED GAMMA-RAY BURSTS Jonathan Granot, Alin Panaitescu, 2 Pawan... universal energy, orphan afterglows...

225

Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Analysis with the GREET Model  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

* Develop a comprehensive tool to examine full energy and emission effects of vehiclefuel systems * Conduct thorough WTW analyses with the developed tool * Total project funding...

226

Energy use and CO2 emissions reduction potential in passenger car fleet using zero emission vehicles and lightweight materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Introduction of \\{ZEVs\\} (zero emission vehicles) and lightweight materials in a conventional steel-intensive internal combustion engine vehicle fleet will affect energy consumption and automotive material requirements. We developed a bottom-up dynamic accounting model of the light-duty vehicle fleet, including vehicle production and disposal, with detailed coverage of powertrains and automotive materials. The model was used to study the potential for energy consumption and CO2 emissions reduction of \\{ZEVs\\} and lightweight materials in the Colombian passenger car fleet from 2010 to 2050. Results indicate that passenger car stock in Colombia is increased by 6.6 times between 2010 and 2050. In the base scenario energy consumption and CO2 emissions are increased by 5.5 and 4.9 times respectively. Lightweighting and battery electric vehicles offer the largest tank-to-wheel energy consumption and CO2 emissions reductions, 48 and 61% respectively, compared to 2050 baseline values. Slow stock turnover and fleet size increment prevent larger reductions. Switching to electric powertrains has larger impact than lightweighting on energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Iron and steel remain major materials in new cars. Aluminum consumption increases in all scenarios; while carbon fiber reinforced polymer consumption only increases due to fuel cell hybrid electric vehicle or lightweight vehicle use.

Juan C. González Palencia; Takaaki Furubayashi; Toshihiko Nakata

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit Agency/Company /Organization: American Public Transportation Association Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development Topics: Analysis Tools Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: www.aptastandards.com/Portals/0/SUDS/SUDSPublished/APTA_Climate_Change This Recommended Practice provides guidance to transit agencies for quantifying their greenhouse gas emissions, including both emissions generated by transit and the potential reduction of emissions through efficiency and displacement How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Shift - Change to low-carbon modes

228

Changes of energy-related GHG emissions in China: An empirical analysis from sectoral perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In order to better understand sectoral greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in China, this study utilized a logarithmic mean Divisia index (LMDI) decomposition analysis to study emission changes from a sectoral perspective. Based on the decomposition results, recently implemented policies and measures for emissions mitigation in China were evaluated. The results show that for the economic sectors, economic growth was the dominant factor in increasing emissions from 1996 to 2011, whereas the decline in energy intensity was primarily responsible for the emission decrease. As a result of the expansion of industrial development, economic structure change also contributed to growth in emissions. For the residential sector, increased emissions were primarily driven by an increase in per-capita energy use, which is partially confirmed by population migration. For all sectors, the shift in energy mix and variation in emission coefficient only contributed marginally to the emissions changes. The decomposition results imply that energy efficiency policy in China has been successful during the past decade, i.e., Top 1000 Priorities, Ten-Key Projects programs, the establishment of fuel consumption limits and vehicle emission standards, and encouragement of efficient appliances. Moreover, the results also indicate that readjusting economic structure and promoting clean and renewable energy is urgently required in order to further mitigate emissions in China.

Xianshuo Xu; Tao Zhao; Nan Liu; Jidong Kang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Special Topic: Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing 1 Special Topic: Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing 1 Report #: DOE/EIA-0573(2005) Released Date: November 2006 Next Release Date: Not applicable Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing Mark Schipper 1 , Energy Information Administration (EIA) Abstract Based on the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration (EIA), this paper presents historical energy-related carbon dioxide emission estimates for energy-intensive sub-sectors and 23 industries. Estimates are based on surveys of more than 15,000 manufacturing plants in 1991, 1994, 1998, and 2002. EIA is currently developing its collection of manufacturing data for 2006.

230

Emissions from a Suezmax Class Tanker | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Non-road and On-road Diesel Emissions Can We Accurately Measure In-Use Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines? The FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Health Impacts Program -...

231

DOE Emission Control R&D | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emission Control R&D DOE Emission Control R&D 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 --...

232

Energy, carbon dioxide emissions, carbon taxes and the Chinese economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given the global characteristics of climate change and China's potential importance as a source of CO2 emissions, advocates of controlling CO2 emissions call for substantial efforts in China. However, the Chinese...

ZhongXiang Zhang

233

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Profile Emissions Profile Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile October 7, 2013 - 10:14am Addthis Evaluating a Federal agency's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile means getting a solid understanding of the organization's largest emission categories, largest emission sources, and its potential for improvement: Buildings Vehicles and mobile equipment Business travel Employee commuting. While the data required for annual GHG reporting are sufficient to establish an agency's overall emission inventory, these data are not typically enough information for effectively managing emissions. A detailed, bottom-up assessment can provide the foundation for much more robust Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans. Because detailed analyses of all assets can be time-intensive, strategic planning helps the

234

Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Biomass Energy Combustion (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emissions from the combustion of biomass to produce energy are excluded from the energy-related CO2 emissions reported in Annual Energy Outlook 2010. According to current international convention, carbon released through biomass combustion is excluded from reported energy-related emissions. The release of carbon from biomass combustion is assumed to be balanced by the uptake of carbon when the feedstock is grown, resulting in zero net emissions over some period of time]. However, analysts have debated whether increased use of biomass energy may result in a decline in terrestrial carbon stocks, leading to a net positive release of carbon rather than the zero net release assumed by its exclusion from reported energy-related emissions.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The effect of African growth on future global energy, emissions, and regional development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economic growth will drive Africa’s demand for energy. However, despite the harmonization in GDP per capita and population, models foresee a broad range in baseline final energy and CO2 emissions (Fig. 1...), eve...

Katherine Calvin; Shonali Pachauri; Enrica De Cian; Ioanna Mouratiadou

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Biomass Storage Options Influence Net Energy and Emissions of Cellulosic Ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Incremental biomass losses during the harvest and storage of energy crops decrease the effective crop yield at ... expand the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREETTM...) m...

Isaac Emery; Jennifer B. Dunn; Jeongwoo Han; Michael Wang

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Opportunities to change development pathways toward lower greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Primary energy supply per unit of GDP (excluding biomass;is defined as energy use per unit of GDP and is an aggregateenergy sector. Much of the variations of CO 2 emissions per unit of GDP

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Investigating greenhouse gas emission pathways In selected OECD countries using a hybrid energy-economy approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This report outlines the development and analysis of CIMS OECD-EPM. CIMS OECD-EPM is a hybrid energy-economy model that forecasts energy consumption and GHG emissions in… (more)

Goldberg, Suzanne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Life Cycle Inventory Energy Consumption and Emissions for Biodiesel versus Petroleum Diesel Fueled Construction Vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Inventory Energy Consumption and Emissions for Biodiesel versus Petroleum Diesel Fueled Construction Vehicles ... In general, LCI emissions of HC and CO are lower if NSPS-compliant soyoil plants are used. ... The purpose of this study is to demonstrate a methodology for characterizing at high resolution the energy use and emissions of a plug-in parallel-hybrid diesel-electric school bus (PHSB) to support assessments of sensitivity to driving cycles and ... ...

Shih-Hao Pang; H. Christopher Frey; William J. Rasdorf

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

240

Independent components in acoustic emission energy signals from large diesel engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Independent components in acoustic emission energy signals from large diesel engines Niels Henrik-Sørensen et al. [5], to acoustic emission (AE) energy signals obtained from a large diesel engine acquired from the two stroke MAN B&W test bed engine in Copenhagen. The signals were sampled at 20 KHz

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Future CO2 Emissions and Climate Change from Existing Energy Infrastructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...comparability of per capita commitments in...persist: The per capita commitment in...only 23 t CO 2 per person means that...emissions per unit GDP in both China...emissions from non-energy sources. Global...satisfying growing demand for energy without...

Steven J. Davis; Ken Caldeira; H. Damon Matthews

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

242

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Consumption 11and a decomposition of energy consumption to understand theData Historical energy consumption and energy-related CO 2

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in energy-intensive industries in key developing countries  

SciTech Connect

The industrial sector is the most important end-use sector in developing countries in terms of energy use and was responsible for 50% of primary energy use and 53% of associated carbon dioxide emissions in 1995 (Price et al., 1999). The industrial sector is extremely diverse, encompassing the extraction of natural resources, conversion of these resources into raw materials, and manufacture of finished products. Five energy-intensive industrial subsectors account for the bulk of industrial energy use and related carbon dioxide emissions: iron and steel, chemicals, petroleum refining, pulp and paper, and cement. In this paper, we focus on the steel and cement sectors in Brazil, China, India, and Mexico.1 We review historical trends, noting that China became the world's largest producer of cement in 1985 and of steel in 1996. We discuss trends that influence energy consumption, such as the amount of additives in cement (illustrated through the clinker/cement ratio), the share of electric arc furnaces, and the level of adoption of continuous casting. To gauge the potential for improvement in production of steel and cement in these countries, we calculate a ''best practice'' intensity based on use of international best practice technology to produce the mix of products manufactured in each country in 1995. We show that Brazil has the lowest potential for improvement in both sectors. In contrast, there is significant potential for improvement in Mexico, India, and especially China, where adoption of best practice technologies could reduce energy use and carbon dioxide emissions from steel production by 50% and cement production by 37%. We conclude by comparing the identified potential for energy efficiency improvement and carbon dioxide emissions reduction in these key developing countries to that of the U.S. This comparison raises interesting questions related to efforts to improve energy efficiency in developing countries, such as: what is the appropriate role of industrialized countries in promoting the adoption of low carbon technologies, how do international steel and cement companies influence the situation, and how can such information be used in the context of Clean Development Mechanism in the Kyoto Protocol?

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook  

SciTech Connect

The past decade has seen the development of various scenarios describing long-term patterns of future Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, with each new approach adding insights to our understanding of the changing dynamics of energy consumption and aggregate future energy trends. With the recent growing focus on China's energy use and emission mitigation potential, a range of Chinese outlook models have been developed across different institutions including in China's Energy Research Institute's 2050 China Energy and CO2 Emissions Report, McKinsey & Co's China's Green Revolution report, the UK Sussex Energy Group and Tyndall Centre's China's Energy Transition report, and the China-specific section of the IEA World Energy Outlook 2009. At the same time, the China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed a bottom-up, end-use energy model for China with scenario analysis of energy and emission pathways out to 2050. A robust and credible energy and emission model will play a key role in informing policymakers by assessing efficiency policy impacts and understanding the dynamics of future energy consumption and energy saving and emission reduction potential. This is especially true for developing countries such as China, where uncertainties are greater while the economy continues to undergo rapid growth and industrialization. A slightly different assumption or storyline could result in significant discrepancies among different model results. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the key models in terms of their scope, methodologies, key driver assumptions and the associated findings. A comparative analysis of LBNL's energy end-use model scenarios with the five above studies was thus conducted to examine similarities and divergences in methodologies, scenario storylines, macroeconomic drivers and assumptions as well as aggregate energy and emission scenario results. Besides directly tracing different energy and CO{sub 2} savings potential back to the underlying strategies and combination of efficiency and abatement policy instruments represented by each scenario, this analysis also had other important but often overlooked findings.

Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Further Sensitivity Analysis of Hypothetical Policies to Limit Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Further Sensitivity Analysis of Hypothetical Policies to Limit Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 July 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Further Sensitivity Analysis of Hypothetical Policies to Limit Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views

246

electricity emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emission factors emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

247

sulfur dioxide emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sulfur dioxide emissions sulfur dioxide emissions Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

248

Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector Agency/Company /Organization: PEW Center Sector: Climate Focus Area: Transportation, People and Policy Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.pewclimate.org/DDCF-Briefs/Transportation Cost: Free References: Policies To Reduce Emissions From The Transportation Sector[1] Provide an overview of policy tools available to reduce GHG emissions from the transportation sector. Overview Provide an overview of policy tools available to reduce GHG emissions from the transportation sector. Outputs include: General Information

249

Gateway:Low Emission Development Strategies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Low Emission Development Strategies (Redirected from Low Emission Development Strategies) Jump to: navigation, search Leds-Graphics 03.PNG Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) Gateway This website supports the creation and implementation of country-driven, analytically rigorous low emission development strategies (LEDS). LEDS will enable countries to transition to low carbon economic development resulting in sustained growth in employment and investment, increased financial flows through carbon markets, reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and other social, economic, and environmental benefits. The resources here are designed to help you create your own LEDS. We've assembled several toolkits and resources and a sample process for developing a LEDS based on proven best practices. The process is depicted in the diagram to your left, which also lets you navigate through the site. Start with the overview of the LEDS process, or go directly to one of the five major process phases:

250

Cambodia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cambodia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Cambodia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Cambodia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.snvworld.org/en/sec Country Cambodia South-Eastern Asia References LEAF[1] "Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF), supported by USAID/RDMA, aims to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in GHG emissions from the forestry-land use sector while assisting them in benefitting from the emerging international REDD+

251

MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) Agency/Company /Organization: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development Topics: Analysis Tools Website: www.epa.gov/otaq/models/moves/index.htm This emission modeling system estimates emissions from mobile sources, including cars, trucks, and motorcycles. The modeling tool covers a broad range of pollutants and allows multiple scale analysis. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Shift - Change to low-carbon modes Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies Learn more about the avoid, shift, improve framework for limiting air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions.

252

Vietnam-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Vietnam-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.snvworld.org/en/sec Country Vietnam South-Eastern Asia References LEAF[1] "Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF), supported by USAID/RDMA, aims to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in GHG emissions from the forestry-land use sector while assisting them in benefitting from the emerging international REDD+ framework.

253

Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.snvworld.org/en/sec Country Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Thailand, Vietnam South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Melanesia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia References LEAF[1] "Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF), supported by USAID/RDMA, aims to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in GHG emissions from the forestry-land use sector

254

Thailand-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thailand-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Thailand-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.snvworld.org/en/sec Country Thailand South-Eastern Asia References LEAF[1] "Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF), supported by USAID/RDMA, aims to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in GHG emissions from the forestry-land use sector while assisting them in benefitting from the emerging international REDD+

255

EIA - AEO2013 Early Release Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Total U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions do not return to their 2005 level (5,997 million metric tons) by the end of the AEO2013 projection period.6 Growth in demand for transportation fuels is moderated by rising fuel prices and new, stricter federal CAFE standards for model years 2017 to 2025, which reduce transportation emissions from 2018 until they begin to rise near the end of the projection period. Transportation emissions in 2040 are 26 million metric tons below the 2011 level. Largely as a result of the inclusion of the new CAFE standards in AEO2013, transportation-related CO2 emissions in 2035 are 94 million metric tons below their level in the AEO2012 Reference case. State RPS requirements and abundant low-cost natural gas help shift the

256

Energy and complex industrial systems environmental emissions data reporting and acquisition  

SciTech Connect

The Joint International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), UNEP and WHO Project on Assessing and Managing Health and Environmental risks from Energy and Other Complex Technologies intends to complile emissions data for mportant energy systems and other complex technologies from a wide variety of countries. To facilitate data generation and compilation, this report: outlines data reporting protocols; identifies potential information sources; demonstrates how to estimate coefficients; presents some compiled US emission coefficients or criteria air pollutants for some energy process; and, compares national air emission standards for electricity generating plants in OECD member countries. 27 refs., 2 fis., 1 tabs.

Moskowitz, P.D.; Hamilton, L.D.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The road from Kyoto: The evolution of carbon dioxide emissions from energy use in IEA countries  

SciTech Connect

Building on earlier analysis of energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions in 13 member countries of the International Energy Agency (IEA), the authors quantify energy use and carbon emissions for nearly three dozen activities and economic branches from the early 1970s to the mid 1990s. They show how lifestyles, economic structure, and overall economic growth affect the structure and rate of CO{sub 2} emissions. Similarly they show how energy intensities, final fuel mixes, and utility fuel mixes shape emissions. Using Laspeyres indices, they calculate the relative importance of each of these factors in affecting sectoral and total emissions over time. They focus on consumer sectors, homes and personal travel, but extend the analysis to all sectors of the economies studied. The authors find that emissions reductions in all sectors after 1990 have been slower than in the previous fifteen years, a period that saw emissions reductions in spite of economic growth. Manufacturing and households led the reductions in most cases, but progress has slowed markedly. In almost all cases, emissions from the transportation sector showed the least reduction and indeed some increases. Findings do not give an optimistic view of the recently concluded accords at the Third Conference of Parties (COP-3) in Kyoto, Japan. The authors conclude that the current rate of energy saving and fuel switching must be greatly accelerated if the IEA countries studied here are to affect reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions to meet their Kyoto targets.

Schipper, L.; Unander, F.; Marie, C.; Gorham, R.; Justus, D.; Ting, M.; Khrushch, M.; Krackeler, T.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Minnesota Department of Commerice In September 2002, the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission (PUC) issued an order requiring the state's regulated electric utilities to disclose to customers details on the fuel mix and emissions of electric generation. Utilities must provide this information to customers in a standard format twice annually. Utilities may distribute this information to customers electronically. Disclosure information must also be filed with the PUC. In addition, in 2009, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency began to transition to an inventory data management system that consolidates

259

The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of a variety of vehicle, fuel, and technology choices. Overview Measures the petroleum displacement and greenhouse gas emissions of medium and heavy-duty vehicles and...

260

Guidelines for Low Emission Land use Planning | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Guidelines for Low Emission Land use Planning AgencyCompany Organization: USAID LEAF Sector: Climate, Land...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Malaysia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials...

262

Colorado Air Pollutant Emission Notice (APEN) Form | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Department of Public Health and Environment of the construction of a new source of pollution. Form Type ApplicationNotice Form Topic Air Pollutant Emission Notice &...

263

Gateway:Low Emission Development Strategies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Gateway Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gateway:Low Emission Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Leds-Graphics 03.PNG Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) Gateway This website supports the creation and implementation of country-driven, analytically rigorous low emission development strategies (LEDS). LEDS will enable countries to transition to low carbon economic development resulting in sustained growth in employment and investment, increased financial flows through carbon markets, reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and other social, economic, and environmental benefits.

264

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World Energy. http://www.bp.com/statisticalreview2004. EDMC 2002, “Handbook of Energy & Economics Statistics

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in organic and conventional farming systems in the Netherlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Organic agriculture is often considered to contribute to reducing energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, also on a per unit product basis. For energy, this is supported by a large number of studies, but the body of evidence for \\{GHGs\\} is smaller. Dutch agriculture is characterized by relatively intensive land use in both organic and conventional farming, which may affect their performance in terms of energy use and GHG emissions. This paper presents results of a model study on energy use and GHG emissions in Dutch organic and conventional farming systems. Energy use per unit milk in organic dairy is approximately 25% lower than in conventional dairy, while GHG emissions are 5-10% lower. Contrary to dairy farming, energy use and GHG emissions in organic crop production are higher than in conventional crop production. Energy use in organic arable farming is 10-30% and in organic vegetable farming 40-50% higher than in their respective conventional counterparts. GHG emissions in organic arable and vegetable farming are 0-15% and 35-40% higher, respectively. Our results correspond with other studies for dairy farming, but not for crop production. The most likely cause for higher energy use and GHG emissions in Dutch organic crop production is its high intensity level, which is expressed in crop rotations with a large share of high-value crops, relatively high fertiliser inputs and frequent field operations related to weeding.

Jules F.F.P. Bos; Janjo de Haan; Wijnand Sukkel; René L.M. Schils

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

John L Gaunt and Johannes Lehmann Energy balance and emissions associated with biochar sequestration and pyrolysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Table S1. Energy inputs (Mj ha-1 ) associated with bio-energy crop production Forage Corn CropS1 John L Gaunt and Johannes Lehmann Energy balance and emissions associated with biochar sequestration and pyrolysis bioenergy production Summary of tables Data are provided energy inputs (Mj ha-1

Lehmann, Johannes

267

Announcing the 2012-2013 Energy Innovation Contest for undergraduates to stamp out carbon emissions on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the best innovative plans to reduce student energy consumption and promote eco-friendly practices April 1, 2013. Read more... go to Energy Contest page at http://rei.rutgers.edu/ Check us out at www.facebook.com/RutgersEnergyAnnouncing the 2012-2013 Energy Innovation Contest for undergraduates to stamp out carbon emissions

Garfunkel, Eric

268

Carbon dioxide emissions intensity of Portuguese industry and energy sectors: A convergence analysis and econometric approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Given the relevance of energy and pollution issues for industrialised countries and the importance of industry and energy sectors to the achievement of their economic and environmental goals, it is important to know if there is a common pattern of emissions intensity, fuel intensity and energy intensity, between industries, to know if it justifies a more specific application of energy policies between sectors, which sectors have the greatest potential for reducing energy use and which are the long term effects of those specific variables on the mitigation of emissions. We found that although there is literature on decomposition of effects that affect emissions, the study of the convergence and of the relationships between these variables does not include ratios or effects that result from the decomposition analysis. Thus, the above questions are not answered, much less for the Portuguese reality. The purpose of this paper is to study: (i) the existence of convergence of some relevant ratios as Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emissions intensity, CO2 emissions by fossil fuel consumption, fossil fuel intensity, energy intensity and economic structure, between industry and energy sectors in Portugal, and (ii) the influence that the consumption of fossil fuels, the consumption of aggregate energy and GDP have on CO2 emissions, and the influence that the ratios in which CO2 emissions intensity decomposes can affect that variable, using an econometric approach, namely Panel corrected standard errors estimator. We concluded that there is sigma convergence for all ratios with exception of fossil fuel intensity. Gamma convergence verifies for all ratios, with exception of CO2 emissions by fossil fuel. From the econometric approach we concluded that the considered variables have a significant importance in explaining CO2 emissions and CO2 emissions intensity.

Victor Moutinho; Margarita Robaina-Alves; Jorge Mota

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Gateway:Low Emission Development Strategies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Low Emission Development Strategies (Redirected from LEDS Pathways Analysis) Jump to: navigation, search Leds-Graphics 03.PNG Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) Gateway This website supports the creation and implementation of country-driven, analytically rigorous low emission development strategies (LEDS). LEDS will enable countries to transition to low carbon economic development resulting in sustained growth in employment and investment, increased financial flows through carbon markets, reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and other social, economic, and environmental benefits. The resources here are designed to help you create your own LEDS. We've assembled several toolkits and resources and a sample process for developing a LEDS based on proven best practices. The process is depicted in the diagram to your left, which also lets you navigate through the site. Start with the overview of the LEDS process, or go directly to one of the five major process phases:

270

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Emissions Disclosure and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider DC Public Service Commission Under regulations adopted by the D.C. Public Service Commission, all electricity suppliers and electricity companies operating in the District of Columbia must report to the Commission every six months the fuel mix of electricity sold and the emissions produced. The fuel mix report must be in a format similar to the information provided by the PJM Environmental Information Services (PJM EIS). Electricity suppliers and electricity companies must also provide a fuel mix report to customers twice annually, within the June and December billing cycles. Emissions information must be disclosed every six months on

271

Gateway:Low Emission Development Strategies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Low Emission Development Strategies (Redirected from LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Leds-Graphics 03.PNG Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) Gateway This website supports the creation and implementation of country-driven, analytically rigorous low emission development strategies (LEDS). LEDS will enable countries to transition to low carbon economic development resulting in sustained growth in employment and investment, increased financial flows through carbon markets, reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and other social, economic, and environmental benefits. The resources here are designed to help you create your own LEDS. We've assembled several toolkits and resources and a sample process for developing a LEDS based on proven best practices. The process is depicted in the diagram to your left, which also lets you navigate through the site. Start with the overview of the LEDS process, or go directly to one of the five major process phases:

272

Definition: Reduced Co2 Emissions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co2 Emissions Co2 Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Co2 Emissions Functions that provide this benefit can lead to avoided vehicle miles, decrease the amount of central generation needed to their serve load (through reduced electricity consumption, reduced electricity losses, more optimal generation dispatch), and or reduce peak generation. These impacts translate into a reduction in CO2 emissions produced by fossil-based electricity generators and vehicles.[1] Related Terms electricity generation, reduced electricity losses, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. line Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reduced_Co2_Emissions&oldid=502618

273

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

data were performed for biomass energy consumption, for theinformation regarding biomass energy consumption only afterswitching from biomass energy use to a more modern form of

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approximately 30% of total energy consumption is residualrepresented 37% of total energy consumption globally inwe observed how the total energy consumption projected by A1

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A1 scenario forecasts GDP energy intensity to continue toby activity levels and the energy intensity of the specificDemand Activity x Energy Intensity Additional information on

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

31 Figure 33 Primary Energy Consumption in Differentiv Figure 47 Residential Primary Energy Consumption by End-48 Residential Primary Energy Consumption by Fuel, CIS and

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not provide data on primary energy consumption by sector. Inconsumption into primary energy consumption by multiplyingA.3.5 provides primary energy consumption values for the

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Final energy per GDP decreased considerably inper unit of GDP. Final energy per GDP decreased considerablysubstantial decline in final energy demand per unit of GDP.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 Figure 9 Retail Buildings Energy Intensity by End-12 Figure 10 Office Buildings Energy Intensity by End-Energy Intensity

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

function of the FFC energy intensity parameters. The FFCand c as the energy intensity of fuel production, defined asrepresenting the energy intensity and material losses at

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

hourly data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

data data Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each data file is a set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. Each container file contains up to 30 yearly files for one station, plus the Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) file for the selected station, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. Source U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released May 03rd, 2005 (9 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords DNI GHI hourly data NREL solar Sri Lanka SWERA TILT TMY UNEP Data application/zip icon Download TMY data (zip, 67.5 MiB)

282

Electricity-generation mix considering energy security and carbon emission mitigation: Case of Korea and Mongolia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract To compare electricity-generation fuel mixes in two countries with multiple energy policy goals and unique circumstances, we look at three scenarios reflecting the carbon emissions mitigation targets, differences in energy security levels, and electricity-generating costs of each nation. Korea and Mongolia show clear differences in electricity-generation structure related to import dependency, the potential of renewable energy, and threats to energy security. These variations lead to different decisions on the power-generation fuel mix plan. Use of fossil fuel resources in Korea results in carbon dioxide emissions and energy insecurity, while in Mongolia carbon emissions, also from fossil fuels, and energy insecurity are separate concerns as Mongolia domestically operates coal-fired power plants and imports electricity. Policies targeting two objectives, carbon emissions mitigation and energy security improvement, show complementarity in Korea as fossil fuels are replaced by renewables or nuclear power, but represent trade-offs in Mongolia as emissions mitigation and improved energy security cannot be achieved with one strategy. In conclusion, national plans to achieve two goals differ by country: In Korea, the appropriate portion of nuclear energy is the determining policy factor. In Mongolia, carbon capture and storage is the clear alternative for mitigating carbon emissions despite large renewables potential.

Hanee Ryu; Shonkhor Dorjragchaa; Yeonbae Kim; Kyunam Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

product (GDP) and energy is measured in Btu to allow for the summing of all energy forms (energyGDP or BtuGDP). On an economy-wide level, it is reflective of both energy...

284

Combining indicators of energy consumption and CO2 emissions: a cross-country comparison  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When countries are compared in terms of their carbon emission intensities, carbon emissions are normally considered as a function of either energy consumption, GDP, population or any other suitable variable. These can be termed as partial indicators as they consider emissions as a function of only one variable. Simultaneous consideration of more variables affecting carbon emissions is relatively complex. In this paper, several variables are simultaneously considered in comparing carbon emissions of countries using a new mathematical programming methodology, called the Data Envelopment Analysis. We have illustrated the use of the methodology with four variables representing CO2 emissions, energy consumption and economic activity. The illustrative analysis shows that Luxembourg, Norway, Sudan, Switzerland and Tanzania have been considered the most efficient countries, followed by India and Nigeria. Central European countries such as Poland, Romania, the Czech Republic, and South Africa are the least efficient.

R. Ramanathan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Energy intensities and CO2 emissions in Catalonia: a SAM analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we estimate sectoral energy intensities and CO2 emissions for the Catalonian economy. In order to evaluate energy intensities, we use the SAM (Social Accounting Matrix) multiplier analysis applied to a SAM of the economy. CO2 emissions are estimated by means of the Leontief input-output submodel of the SAM, together with a table of coefficients of emissions per unit of monetary expenditures. This new methodology allows us to dispense with energy input-output tables for the base period. Our results are of the same order of magnitude as others obtained by physical measurement methods. We also simulate how changes in demand and energy energy efficiency parameters may affect CO2 emissions for the economy.

Antonio Manresa; Ferran Sancho

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction Act (Maryland) Reduction Act (Maryland) Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act requires the Department of the Environment to publish and update an inventory of statewide greenhouse gas emissions for calendar year 2006 and requires the State to reduce statewide

287

Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The State of Iowa may provide financial assistance in the form of loans

288

Electric Urban Delivery Trucks: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Cost-Effectiveness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Considering current and projected U.S. regional electricity generation mixes, for the baseline case, the energy use and GHG emissions ratios of electric to diesel trucks range from 48 to 82% and 25 to 89%, respectively. ... The relationship between electric and ICE passenger car manufacturing energy use and GHG emissions is used to infer electric truck data from diesel truck manufacturing data. ... van Vliet, O.; Brouwer, A. S.; Kuramochi, T.; van den Broek, M.; Faaij, A.Energy use, cost and CO2 emissions of electric cars J. Power Sources 2011, 196 ( 4) 2298– 2310 ...

Dong-Yeon Lee; Valerie M. Thomas; Marilyn A. Brown

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

289

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Virginia Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Virginia State Corporation Commission Virginia's 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity providers to disclose -- "to the extent feasible" -- fuel mix and emissions data regarding electric generation. Legislation in 2007 and 2008 related to Electric Utility Regulation amended the restructuring laws, but still require emissions and fuel mix disclosure. Information must be provided to customers and to the Virginia State Corporation Commission (SCC) at least once annually. If any portion of this information is unavailable, the electricity provider must file a report

290

Reducing Forestry Emissions in Indonesia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emissions in Indonesia Emissions in Indonesia Jump to: navigation, search Name Reducing Forestry Emissions in Indonesia Agency/Company /Organization Center for International Forestry Research Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Guide/manual Website http://prod-http-80-800498448. Country Indonesia UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Reducing Forestry Emissions in Indonesia[1] Overview "In this paper, we look critically at the trade-offs between development pathways based on land-intensive enterprises and climate change mitigation. Without a coordinated approach to multiple objectives, efforts in one area could undermine efforts in the other. For example, potential major

291

Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

An Experimental Study of PM Emission Characteristics of Commercial Diesel Engine with Urea-SCR System Evaluation of NH3-SCR Catalyst Technology on a 250-kW Stationary Diesel Genset...

292

Vehicle emissions and energy consumption impacts of modal shifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing concern over air quality has prompted the development of strategies to reduce vehicle emissions in these areas. Concern has also been expressed regarding the current dependency of the U,S, on foreign oil. An option for addressing...

Mallett, Vickie Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

293

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Public Utilities Commission of Ohio Ohio's 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions to customers. Electric utilities and competitive retail electric service providers of retail electric generation service must provide this information to their customers in a standard format several times per year. The Ohio Public Utilities Commission (PUCO) adopted rules in 2000 to implement this policy; the rules have been amended subsequently. There are separate rules for electric utilities providing a standard offer for retail

294

Gateway:Low Emission Development Strategies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Gateway Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gateway:Low Emission Development Strategies (Redirected from Gateway:International/LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Leds-Graphics 03.PNG Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) Gateway This website supports the creation and implementation of country-driven, analytically rigorous low emission development strategies (LEDS). LEDS will enable countries to transition to low carbon economic development resulting in sustained growth in employment and investment, increased financial flows through carbon markets, reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and other social, economic, and environmental benefits.

295

Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency requires any facility that emits 25 tons or more of NOx and/or 25 tons or more of VOC during the calendar year and is located in a county designated as nonattainment for the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone submit emission statements. Any facility that is located in a county described above is exempt from these requirements. If NOx

296

Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation to help researchers understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies

297

NERSC Edison Hours Used Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hours Used Edison Hours Used 2014 Edison Usage Chart Edison Usage Chart 2013 Edison Usage Chart Edison Usage Chart 2014 Date Hours Used (in millions) Percent of Maximum Possible...

298

Life-cycle GHG emission Factors of Final Energy in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this manuscript, a model for the estimation of the life-cycle GHG emission factors of final energy and an empirical study of China is presented. A linear programming method is utilized to solve the problem that several forms of final energy are utilized in the life-cycle of one certain type of final energy. Nine types of final energy are considered, including raw coal, crude oil, raw natural gas, treated coal, diesel, gasoline, fuel oil, treated natural gas, and electricity. The results indicate that the life-cycle GHG emission factors of final energy in China slightly decreased in recent years.

Jiang Lixue; Ou Xunmin; Ma Linwei; Li Zheng; Ni Weidou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Energy management of HEV to optimize fuel consumption and pollutant emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AVEC'12 Energy management of HEV to optimize fuel consumption and pollutant emissions Pierre Michel, several energy management strategies are proposed to optimize jointly the fuel consumption and pollutant-line strategy are given. Keywords: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV), energy management, pollution, fuel consumption

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

300

Emissions Impacts of Wind and Energy Storage in a Market Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions Impacts of Wind and Energy Storage in a Market Environment ... Twomey, P.; Neuhoff, K.Wind power and market power in competitive markets Energy Policy 2010, 38, 3198– 3210 ... Borenstein, S.; Bushnell, J. B.; Knittel, C. R.Market Power in Electricity Markets: Beyond Concentration Measures Energy J. 1999, 20, 65– 89 ...

Ramteen Sioshansi

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

1. INTRODUCTION Energy consumption and noise emission are the most im-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. INTRODUCTION Energy consumption and noise emission are the most im- portant functional of clothes drying machines, the most important concerns are the energy efficient design of primary into the strategy for the reduction of energy consumption of the drying machine. The difference between various

Podgornik, Rudolf

302

Benchmarking Energy Efficiency, Power Costs and Carbon Emissions on Heterogeneous Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......interested in electricity costs and carbon emissions...proportional to energy use, but this turns...with the mix of energy sources such as...stations, nuclear and renewable, changing all the...kinds of metrics--energy efficiency, cost per simulation and......

Simon McIntosh-Smith; Terry Wilson; Amaurys Ávila Ibarra; Jonathan Crisp; Richard B. Sessions

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Transportation Energy Futures: Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions (Brochure), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions Significant Energy Consumption - and Opportunities for Reduction Transportation is essential to our economy and quality of life, and currently accounts for 71% of the nation's total petroleum use and 33% of our total carbon emissions. Energy-efficient transportation strategies could reduce both oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examines how combining multiple strategies could reduce both GHG emissions and petroleum use by 80%. The project's primary objective is to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an

304

EIA - AEO2011 Early Release Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Early Release Overview 1 Early Release Overview Release Date: December 16, 2011 | Next Release Date: January 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2011) Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure DataAfter falling by 3 percent in 2008 and nearly 7 percent in 2009, largely driven by the economic downturn, total U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions do not return to 2005 levels (5,980 million metric tons) until 2027, and then rise by an additional 5 percent from 2027 to 2035, reaching 6,315 million metric tons in 2035 (Figure 13). Energy-related CO2 emissions grow by 0.2 percent per year from 2005 to 2035. Emissions per capita fall by an average of 0.8 percent per year from 2005 to 2035, as growth in demand for electricity and transportation fuels is moderated by higher energy prices, effi ciency standards, State RPS requirements, and Federal

305

Water Loss Control Using Pressure Management: Life-cycle Energy and Air Emission Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pressure management is one cost-effective and efficient strategy for controlling water distribution losses. This paper evaluates the life-cycle energy use and emissions for pressure management zones in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Halifax, Nova Scotia. ...

Jennifer R. Stokes; Arpad Horvath; Reinhard Sturm

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

306

Impact of past and future residential housing development patterns on energy demand and related emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Strategies to meet the needs of Melbourne’s future residents, while restricting greenhouse gas emissions, have been proposed. These include increasing public transport patronage to 20% and mandating the energy ef...

R. J. Fuller; R. H. Crawford

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

overall, increasing total energy consumption. In this model,account for 47% of total energy consumption in 2050, downfor 47% of total industry energy consumption in 2050 in CIS,

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

38 International trends in Energy and GDP Per Capita, with4: International trends in energy and GDP per capita, with38 International trends in Energy and GDP Per Capita, with

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

FALL AND SPRING Per Hour # Hours # Semesters Total  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$4,060.00 FALL AND SPRING Per Hour # Hours # Semesters Total Tuition $765.00 15 2 $22,950.00 ISS, Engineering, Journalism & Mass Communications, Music and Social Welfare fees. These amounts do NOT include to complete at least 12 hours each fall and spring semester. Calculations are based on 15 hours (an average

310

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quality specification, unit refinery energy use will rise.few decades, where unit refinery fuel use increase by 34%the Japanese case, rising refinery energy use was primarily

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

values. Figure 7. Global Primary Energy by End-Use Sector,Scenario Figure 8. Global Primary Energy by End-Use Sector,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Canada Energy per capita (kgoe/person) USA Singapore NorwayCanada Energy per capita (kgoe/person) USA Singapore Norway

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Light emission from water irradiated with high energy electrons.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Luminescence has been observed from water Irradiated with an intense pulse of high energy electrons. The angular dependence, electron energy dependence, visible spectrum, lifetime and… (more)

Shaede, Eric Albert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emission reduction potentials in sugar production processes in Thailand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sugarcane is one of the most promising sources of green energy for a major sugar producing country like Thailand. Any efforts to improve energy efficiency in sugar industry would result for green energy production and more avoided GHG emissions. This paper assesses the potentials for energy saving and GHG emission reduction in sugar production in Thailand. It is found that there is a wide gap between the most efficient mills and the less efficient ones among the country’s 47 mills, with specific steam consumption ranging from 400 to 646 kg steam/ton cane. Thus significant potential exists for energy saving and GHG emission reduction in many mills, using some of the 17 commonly common technologies/measures identified. For the nine mills studied, which could have resulted in a combined saving savings of 23–32% of the total mill energy consumption, further savings of 5–14% could be achieved.

Sumate Sathitbun-anan; Bundit Fungtammasan; Mirko Barz; Boonrod Sajjakulnukit; Suthum Pathumsawad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Zero-Emission Facilities Production Tax Credit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Zero-Emission Facilities Production Tax Credit Zero-Emission Facilities Production Tax Credit Zero-Emission Facilities Production Tax Credit < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Maximum Rebate Not specified Program Info Start Date 01/01/03 Expiration Date 12/31/2020 State Oklahoma Program Type Corporate Tax Credit Rebate Amount 0.0025/kWh - 0.0075/kWh for 10 years; amount varies depending on when the facility is placed in operation and when electricity is generated. Provider Oklahoma Department of Commerce '''''Note: No credits will be paid during 2011 for electricity produced from July 1, 2010 - June 30, 2011. But any credits that accrue during that time period will be paid during the 2012 tax year.''''' For tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2003, a state income tax

316

Capturing Fugitives to Reduce DOE's GHG Emissions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capturing Fugitives to Reduce DOE's GHG Emissions Capturing Fugitives to Reduce DOE's GHG Emissions Capturing Fugitives to Reduce DOE's GHG Emissions November 15, 2011 - 2:04pm Addthis An electrician foreman for the Western Area Power Administration checks a circuit breaker at the Ault Substation in eastern Colorado. The circuit breaker, containing 85 lbs of SF6, protects equipment in the substation against damage from excessive electrical currents | Courtesy of Western Area Power Administration. An electrician foreman for the Western Area Power Administration checks a circuit breaker at the Ault Substation in eastern Colorado. The circuit breaker, containing 85 lbs of SF6, protects equipment in the substation against damage from excessive electrical currents | Courtesy of Western Area Power Administration.

317

Sustainability and Energy Development: Influences of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Options on Water Use in Energy Production  

SciTech Connect

Climate change mitigation strategies cannot be evaluated solely in terms of energy cost and greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potential. Maintaining GHGs at a 'safe' level will require fundamental change in the way we approach energy production, and a number of environmental, economic, and societal factors will come into play. Water is an essential component of energy production, and water resource constraints (e.g., insufficient supplies and competing ecological and anthropogenic needs) will limit our options for producing energy and for reducing GHG emissions. This study evaluates these potential constraints from a global perspective by revisiting the 'climate wedges' proposal of Pacala and Sokolow [1], and evaluating the potential water impacts of the 'wedges' associated with energy production. Results indicate that there is a range of water impacts, with some options reducing water demand while others increase water demand. Mitigation options that improve energy conversion and end-use efficiency have the greatest potential for reducing water resources impacts. These options provide 'win-win-win' scenarios for reducing GHG emissions, lowering energy costs and reducing water demand. Thet may merit higher priority than alternative options that emphasize deploying new low-carbon energy facilities or modifying existing facilities with energy intensive GHG mitigation technologies to reduce GHG emissions. While the latter can reduce GHG emissions, they will typically increase energy costs and water impacts.

D. Craig Cooper; Gerald Sehlke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: Market Issues and Potential Energy and Emissions Impacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: Market Issues and Potential Energy and Emissions Impacts January 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. Unless referenced otherwise, the information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester.

319

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

SciTech Connect

Although China became the world's largest emitter of energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007, China does not publish annual estimates of CO{sub 2} emissions and most published estimates of China's emissions have been done by other international organizations. Undertaken at the request of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy, this study examines the feasibility of applying the EIA emissions inventory methodology to estimate China's emissions from published Chinese data. Besides serving as a proof of concept, this study also helps develop a consistent and transparent method for estimating China's CO{sub 2} emissions using an Excel model and identified China-specific data issues and areas for improvement. This study takes a core set of data from the energy balances published in the China Energy Statistical Yearbook 2009 and China Petrochemical Corporation Yearbook 2009 and applies the EIA's eight-step methodology to estimate China's 2008 CO{sub 2} emissions. First, China's primary and secondary fuel types and consumption by end use are determined with slight discrepancies identified between the two data sources and inconsistencies in product categorization with the EIA. Second, energy consumption data are adjusted to eliminate double counting in the four potential areas identified by EIA; consumption data from China's Special Administrative Regions are not included. Physical fuel units are then converted to energy equivalents using China's standard energy measure of coal equivalent (1 kilogram = 29.27 MJ) and IPCC carbon emissions coefficients are used to calculate each fuel's carbon content. Next, carbon sequestration is estimated following EIA conventions for other petroleum products and non-energy use of secondary fuels. Emissions from international bunker fuels are also subtracted under the 'reference' calculation of estimating apparent energy consumption by fuel type and the 'sectoral' calculation of summing emissions across end-use sectors. Adjustments for the China-specific conventions of reporting foreign bunkers and domestic bunkers fueling abroad are made following IPCC definitions of international bunkers and EIA reporting conventions, while the sequestration of carbon in carbon steel is included as an additional adjustment. Under the sectoral approach, fuel consumption of bunkers and other transformation losses as well as gasoline consumption are reallocated to conform to EIA sectoral reporting conventions. To the extent possible, this study relies on official energy data from primary sources. A limited number of secondary sources were consulted to provide insight into the nature of consumption of some products and to guide the analysis of carbon sequestered in steel. Beyond these, however, the study avoided trying to estimate figures where directly unavailable, such as natural gas flaring. As a result, the basic calculations should be repeatable for other years with the core set of data from National Bureau of Statistics and Sinopec (or a similarly authoritative source of oil product data). This study estimates China's total energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions in 2008 to be 6666 Mt CO{sub 2}, including 234.6 Mt of non-fuel CO{sub 2} emissions and 154 Mt of sequestered CO{sub 2}. Bunker fuel emissions in 2008 totaled 15.9 Mt CO{sub 2}, but this figure is underestimated because fuel use by Chinese ship and planes for international transportation and military bunkers are not included. Of emissions related to energy consumption, 82% is from coal consumption, 15% from petroleum and 3% from natural gas. From the sectoral approach, industry had the largest share of China's energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions with 72%, followed by residential at 11%, transport and telecommunications at 8%, and the other four (commerce, agriculture, construction and other public) sectors having a combined share of 9%. Thermal electricity and (purchased) heat (to a lesser degree) are major sources of fuel consumption behind sectoral emissions, responsible for 2533 Mt CO2 and 321 Mt CO{sub 2}, respec

Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Qin, Yining

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Chapter 19 - Smart Energy Houses of the Future – Self-supporting in Energy and Zero Emission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The energy-efficient design of buildings leans heavily on traditional methods, as developed by our ancestors; they are fundamental, sustainable concepts that exploit natural means to provide the interior microclimates for our living and working areas. The principles used today for low-energy building design are highly constrained by the needs of the housing market, national building codes and other restrictions that our ancestors never faced; available sites often do not allow free orientation or use of natural shade, lightweight construction avoids thermal mass, and generally the economics of house building tends towards minimum performance standards. Construction technology over the centuries has progressed from the provision of basic shelter and security to sophisticated city buildings capable of providing an indoor environment that is nowadays taken for granted: warmth, light and abundant energy, all in opposition to the natural climate. New residential buildings are being built to constantly improving energy efficiency standards, although internationally these standards vary widely. With the construction and operation of buildings accounting for some 40% of total carbon emissions in most developed countries, it is clear these standards will be tightened in future years to minimize energy consumption. The zero-energy house can be realized technically, and today, highly insulated and virtually airtight residences built to Passive House standards are being demonstrated; the demand for space heating in these buildings can be less than that for the hot water. There are at least three areas where ongoing developments in technology promise improved energy utilization efficiency in housing, these being heat pumps, combined heat and power (CHP), and advanced materials.

Robert D. Wing

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Turkey-Supporting RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turkey-Supporting RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development Turkey-Supporting RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Turkey-Supporting RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UNDP Bratislava Regional Center Partner Interministerial committees headed by the national focal point on climate change Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://europeandcis.undp.org/e Program Start 2010 Program End 2012 Country Turkey Western Asia

323

Environmental emissions and socioeconomic considerations in the production, storage, and transportation of biomass energy feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

An analysis was conducted to identify major sources and approximate levels of emissions to land, air, and water, that may result, in the year 2010, from supplying biofuel conversion facilities with energy crops. Land, fuel, and chemicals are all used in the establishment, maintenance, harvest, handling and transport of energy crops. The operations involved create soil erosion and compaction, particulate releases, air emissions from fuel use and chemical applications, and runoff or leachate. The analysis considered five different energy facility locations (each in a different major crop growing region) and three classes of energy crops -- woody crops, perennial herbaceous grasses, and an annual herbaceous crop (sorghum). All projections had to be based on reasonable assumptions regarding probable species used, type of land used, equipment requirements, chemical input requirements, and transportation fuel types. Emissions were summarized by location and class of energy crop.

Perlack, R.D.; Ranney, J.W.; Wright, L.L.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and analysis based on peak oil models. ” Energy Policy 36 (and analysis based on peak oil models”, Energy Policy, 2008Sharp Peak Figure 71 Coal Demand and Extraction Profiles Oil

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry Ali Hasanbeigi, Lynn Price China Energy Group Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Marlene Arens Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI) January 2013 This work was supported by the China Sustainable Energy Program of the Energy Foundation and Dow Chemical Company (through a charitable contribution) through the Department of Energy under contract No.DE- AC02-05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL-6106E ii Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States

326

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hour-by-Hour Cost Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production Genevieve Saur (PI), Chris Ainscough (Presenter), Kevin Harrison, Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory January 17 th , 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 Acknowledgements * This work was made possible by support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). http://www.eere.energy.gov/topics/hydrogen_fuel_cells.html * NREL would like to thank our DOE Technology Development Managers for this project, Sara Dillich, Eric Miller, Erika Sutherland, and David Peterson. * NREL would also like to acknowledge the indirect

327

Develop low emissions growth scenarios | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

low emissions growth scenarios low emissions growth scenarios Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

328

Event:Low Emission Capacity Building Workshop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Event Event Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Event:Low Emission Capacity Building Workshop Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Low Emission Capacity Building Workshop: on 2012/10/01 The workshop sets out to discuss technical and policy relevant issues related to GHG inventory systems, NAMAs, LEDS, MRV, and industrial mitigation actions. It will take place in Marrakech, Morocco from October, 1-4, 2012. The main objectives of the workshop are: Facilitate an exchange among participating Phase 2 countries on the context assessments and the ultimate scope-of-work of Programme projects Identify follow-up actions to assist countries with the implementation of their projects Identify technical assistance needs and training priorities. Event Details

329

Population, Economy and Energy Use’s Influence on Sulfur Emissions in the United States Since 1900  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper seeks to identify how changes in population, economic activity, and energy use have influenced sulfur emissions during this century. A linear model is presented which characterizes sulfur emissions as the product of these driving forces...

Kissock, J. K.; Husar, R. B.

330

Internal energy transfer phenomenon and light-emission properties of ?-LiAlO2 phosphor doped with Mn2+  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?-LiAlO2:Mn2+...phosphor was synthesized using the cellulose-citric acid sol-gel method, and its light emission and energy transfer properties were investigated. Excitation and emission...2+...do...

Bai-Bin Wang; Chi-Fen Chang; Wein-Duo Yang

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in the steel sector in key developing countries  

SciTech Connect

Iron and steel production consumes enormous quantities of energy, especially in developing countries where outdated, inefficient technologies are still used to produce iron and steel. Carbon dioxide emissions from steel production, which range between 5 and 15% of total country emissions in key developing countries (Brazil, China, India, Mexico, and South Africa), will continue to grow as these countries develop and as demand for steel products such as materials, automobiles, and appliances increases. In this report, we describe the key steel processes, discuss typical energy-intensity values for these processes, review historical trends in iron and steel production by process in five key developing countries, describe the steel industry in each of the five key developing countries, present international comparisons of energy use and carbon dioxide emissions among these countries, and provide our assessment of the technical potential to reduce these emissions based on best-practice benchmarking. Using a best practice benchmark, we find that significant savings, in the range of 33% to 49% of total primary energy used to produce steel, are technically possible in these countries. Similarly, we find that the technical potential for reducing intensities of carbon dioxide emissions ranges between 26% and 49% of total carbon dioxide emissions from steel production in these countries.

Price, L.K.; Phylipsen, G.J.M.; Worrell, E.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) (Redirected from UNDP/EC-China-Climate Change Capacity Building Program) Jump to: navigation, search Name EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

333

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle to grave" and facilitate more consistent comparisons of energy technologies. Figure 1. Generalized life cycle stages for energy technologies Source: Sathaye et al. (2011) Life cycle GHG emissions from renewable electricity generation technologies are generally less than those from fossil fuel-based technologies, based on evidence assembled by this project. Further, the proportion of GHG emissions from each life cycle stage differs by technology. For fossil-fueled technologies, fuel combustion during operation of the facility emits the vast majority of GHGs. For nuclear and renewable energy technologies, the majority of GHG emissions occur upstream of operation. LCA of Energy Systems

334

Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

335

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adam R. 2008. “Converting Oil Shale to Liquid Fuels: Energyshale gas, tight oil, oil shale, and tar (bitumen) sands. Inunconventional (tar sands or shale oil) being more energy

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model AgencyCompany Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development Topics: Analysis Tools...

337

Energy and Air Emission Effects of Water Supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Breakdown of energy comsumption of a water utility: (a) life-cycle phase, (b) water supply phase, (c) life-cycle activity, and (d) material production category. ... The Water?Energy Sustainability Tool (WEST) can evaluate the construction, operation, and maintenance of water systems and compare the direct and indirect (supply chain) energy and environmental effects of alternative water sources in terms of material production (e.g., concrete, pipe, and chemicals), material delivery, construction and maintenance equipment use, energy production (electricity and fuel), and sludge disposal. ... The difference is due to fossil fuels, especially coal, which make up a larger portion of the U.S. electricity mix. ...

Jennifer R. Stokes; Arpad Horvath

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

338

Event:11th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading 1th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png 11th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading: on 2011/10/03 "The IEA-IETA-EPRI Emissions Trading Workshop has been held annually at the headquarters of the International Energy Agency since 2000. This international workshop focuses on developments in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions trading around the world at the international, national and sub-national level. The 2011 workshop will cover topics relevant to the development of global, national and sub-national carbon markets, including scaled-up and new market mechanisms, NAMAs and sectoral crediting policies, MRV and international GHG accounting and 2nd-best trading programmes. As in previous years, the workshop will assemble representatives from government,

339

Energy sources for X-ray cluster emission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Instead it would envelop them. Abell clusters 399 and 401 may be examples of the overheating case6. Conversely, if the heat input was too small then the clusterwould not be ... thin to optically thick material13. Consequently the spectrum is expec-ted to consist of a thermal bremsstrahlung low energy part fromthe optically thick region and a high energy inverse Compton part ...

P. D. MORLEY; R. W. TUCKER

1979-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Future energy loads for a large-scale adoption of electric vehicles in the city of Los Angeles: Impacts on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Using plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) has become an important component of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction strategy in the transportation sector. Assessing the net effect of \\{PEVs\\} on GHG emissions, however, is dependent on factors such as type and scale of electricity generation sources, adoption rate, and charging behavior. This study creates a comprehensive model that estimates the energy load and GHG emissions impacts for the years 2020 and 2030 for the city of Los Angeles. For 2020, model simulations show that the PEV charging loads will be modest with negligible effects on the overall system load profile. Contrary to previous study results, the average marginal carbon intensity is higher if PEV charging occurs during off-peak hours. These results suggest that current economic incentives to encourage off-peak charging result in greater GHG emissions. Model simulations for 2030 show that PEV charging loads increase significantly resulting in potential generation shortages. There are also significant grid operation challenges as the region?s energy grid is required to ramp up and down rapidly to meet PEV loads. For 2030, the average marginal carbon intensity for off-peak charging becomes lower than peak charging mainly due to the removal of coal from the power generation portfolio.

Jae D. Kim; Mansour Rahimi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Teamwork Plus Technology Equals Reduced Emissions, Reduced Energy Usage, and Improved Productivity for an Oil Production Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Teamwork plus Technology Equals Reduced Emissions, Reduced Energy Usage, and Improved Productivity for an Oil Production Facility Garth Booker P Eng Extraction Energy Engineer Suncor Energy Company Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada ABSTRACT...Teamwork plus Technology Equals Reduced Emissions, Reduced Energy Usage, and Improved Productivity for an Oil Production Facility Garth Booker P Eng Extraction Energy Engineer Suncor Energy Company Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada ABSTRACT...

Booker, G.; Robinson, J.

342

NERSC Hopper Hours Used Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hours Used Hopper Hours Used 2014 Hopper Usage Chart Hopper Usage Chart 2013 Hopper Usage Chart Hopper Usage Chart 2012 Hopper Usage Chart Hopper Usage Chart 2011 Hopper Usage...

343

Life-cycle energy and emission analysis of power generation from forest biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Forest harvest residues, which include limbs, branches, and tree tops, have the potential to generate energy. This paper uses a life-cycle assessment to determine the energy input-to-output ratios for each unit operation in the use of these residues for power generation. Two preparation options for obtaining the biomass were evaluated. For Option 1, the forest residues were chipped at the landing, while for Option 2 they were bundled and chipped at the power plant. Energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions were found for power plants sizes ranging from 10 to 300 MW. For power plants with capacities greater than 30 MW, the transportation of either bundles or woodchips to the power plant used the most energy, especially at larger power plant sizes. Option 1 used less energy than Option 2 for all power plant sizes, with the difference between the two becoming smaller for larger power plants. For the life-cycle GHG emissions, Option 1 ranges from 14.71 to 19.51 g-CO2eq/kW h depending on the power plant size. Option 2 ranges from 21.42 to 20.90 g-CO2eq/kW h. The results are not linear and are close to equal at larger power plant sizes. The GHG emissions increase with increasing moisture content. For a 300 MW power plant with chipping at the landing, the GHG emissions range from 11.17 to 22.24 g-CO2eq/kW h for moisture contents from 15% to 50%. The sensitivity analysis showed both energy use and GHG emissions are most sensitive to moisture content and then plant lifetime. For the equipment, both the energy use and GHG emissions are most sensitive to changes in the fuel consumption and load capacity of the chip van and the log-haul truck used to transport either bundles or wood chips to the power plant.

Amit Thakur; Christina E. Canter; Amit Kumar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

The effect of natural gas supply on US renewable energy and CO2 emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increased use of natural gas has been promoted as a means of decarbonizing the US power sector, because of superior generator efficiency and lower CO2 emissions per unit of electricity than coal. We model the effect of different gas supplies on the US power sector and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Across a range of climate policies, we find that abundant natural gas decreases use of both coal and renewable energy technologies in the future. Without a climate policy, overall electricity use also increases as the gas supply increases. With reduced deployment of lower-carbon renewable energies and increased electricity consumption, the effect of higher gas supplies on GHG emissions is small: cumulative emissions 2013–55 in our high gas supply scenario are 2% less than in our low gas supply scenario, when there are no new climate policies and a methane leakage rate of 1.5% is assumed. Assuming leakage rates of 0 or 3% does not substantially alter this finding. In our results, only climate policies bring about a significant reduction in future CO2 emissions within the US electricity sector. Our results suggest that without strong limits on GHG emissions or policies that explicitly encourage renewable electricity, abundant natural gas may actually slow the process of decarbonization, primarily by delaying deployment of renewable energy technologies.

Christine Shearer; John Bistline; Mason Inman; Steven J Davis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Comparative Study of Hybrid Powertrains on Fuel Saving, Emissions, and Component Energy Loss in HD Trucks  

SciTech Connect

We compared parallel and series hybrid powertrains on fuel economy, component energy loss, and emissions control in Class 8 trucks over both city and highway driving. A comprehensive set of component models describing battery energy, engine fuel efficiency, emissions control, and power demand interactions for heavy duty (HD) hybrids has been integrated with parallel and series hybrid Class 8 trucks in order to identify the technical barriers of these hybrid powertrain technologies. The results show that series hybrid is absolutely negative for fuel economy benefit of long-haul trucks due to an efficiency penalty associated with the dual-step conversions of energy (i.e. mechanical to electric to mechanical). The current parallel hybrid technology combined with 50% auxiliary load reduction could elevate 5-7% fuel economy of long-haul trucks, but a profound improvement of long-haul truck fuel economy requires additional innovative technologies for reducing aerodynamic drag and rolling resistance losses. The simulated emissions control indicates that hybrid trucks reduce more CO and HC emissions than conventional trucks. The simulated results further indicate that the catalyzed DPF played an important role in CO oxidations. Limited NH3 emissions could be slipped from the Urea SCR, but the average NH3 emissions are below 20 ppm. Meanwhile our estimations show 1.5-1.9% of equivalent fuel-cost penalty due to urea consumption in the simulated SCR cases.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission From Solar Flares: Summary of Fermi LAT Detections and Analysis of Two M-Class Flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the detections of 19 solar flares detected in high-energy gamma rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first four years of operation. Interestingly, all flares are associated with fairly fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and are not all powerful X-ray flares. We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of the first two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 flare, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive flare followed by slowly varying gamma-ray emission over 13 hours, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 flare, which was followed by gamma-ray emission lasting for 2 hours. We compare the Fermi-LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that a hadronic origin of the gamma rays is more likely than a leptonic origin and find that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens after the 2011 March 7 flare, favoring a scenario with continuous acceleration at the flare site. This work suggests that proton acceleratio...

,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Intergrated Nox Emissions Reductions from Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Programs across State Agencies in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Calculation of Integrated NOx Emissions Reductions from Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Programs across State Agencies in Texas Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Ph.D., P.E.,Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E., and Bahman Yazdani, P... on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) from the state-wide energy efficiency and renewable energy programs. These programs include: the impact of code-complaint construction, the Texas Public Utility Commission (PUC), the energy efficiency programs managed by the Texas...

Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Energy and Air Emission Implications of a Decentralized Wastewater System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

represent results when methane biogas that would have beenflaring will convert methane biogas to carbon dioxide, aAgency reports that biogas is used to offset energy use at

Shehabi, Arman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Secretary of Energy Memorandum on DOE Greenhouse Gas Emission...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Washington, D.C. 20585 March 31,2010 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF FROM: STEVEN CHU SUBJECT: Implementation of Executive Order 135 14, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and...

350

Reducing Energy-Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Canadian Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Canada is a large, northern country with a sparse population and an industrialized economy. Its economy has been highly energy-intensive, taking advantage of a substantial base of natural resources. Canada int...

Bunli Yang

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Reducing the CO2 emissions and the energy dependence of a large city area with zero-emission vehicles and nuclear energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper aims to study the feasibility of implementing a strategic plan for a gradual introduction of zero-emission vehicles in the city of Madrid during 2014–2024. The study estimate the amount of emissions saved if the electrical energy needed for the vehicles is generated with nuclear power plants. The use of zero-emission vehicles could play an important role in reducing our dependence on oil and, therefore, changing the economy structure of the country. Therefore, as a representing city, Madrid's nowadays situation is studied. The city's vehicle fleet is first considered and classified. An average both daily and annually fuel consumption is made, in order to know the city's gasoline investment. Moreover, the health effects of air pollution, which is largely due to the city's vehicles, are statistically considered in order to analyze the economic impact of treating these effects. Furthermore, noise pollution and it's both direct and indirect consequences are studied. After having analyzed Madrid's situation, a comparison between some international cities and the Spanish capital is made, regarding their vehicle fleet and their environmental and economical consequences. European environmental policy and future criteria are exposed. Regarding the technical feasibility, two types of zero-emission technologies are considered, the battery-electric car and de hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV). After having described the benefits and disadvantages of the use of zero-emission vehicles, a macroeconomic analysis is done in order to study the economic feasibility of the project. To do this, not only several economic variables, such as gross domestic product in the area, but also survey data, such as the average daily driving time are considered. Finally, a strategic plan for a gradual implementation of zero-emission vehicles in the city of Madrid is proposed, taking into account the quantity of emissions saved if the electrical energy needed is generated with nuclear power plants. In this plan, some policy actions are proposed for a gradual implementation. Policy actions such as special fees for those driving internal combustion engine vehicles, free parking for zero-emission vehicles or even a subsidized car replacement plan.

Gonzalo Jimenez; Jose Miguel Flores

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced Fuel/Vehicle Systems- A North American Study of Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A complete vehicle fuel-cycle analysis, commonly called a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis that examines the use and emissions associated with fuel production (or well-to-tank [WTT]) activities and energy use and emissions associated with vehicle operation (or tank-to-wheels [TTW]) activities.

353

Title of Dissertation: A Search for Short Duration Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of GRBs. #12;A Search for Short Duration Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts by David NoyesABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: A Search for Short Duration Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray by gamma rays with primary energies of approximately 100 GeV and higher. The wide field of view ( 2 sr

California at Santa Cruz, University of

354

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Buildings represent an increasingly important component of China's total energy consumption mix. However, accurately assessing the total volume of energy consumed in buildings is difficult owing to deficiencies in China's statistical collection system and a lack of national surveys. Official statistics suggest that buildings account for about 19% of China's total energy consumption, while others estimate the proportion at 23%, rising to 30% over the next few years. In addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy used in the in the mining, extraction, harvesting, processing, manufacturing and transport of building materials as well as the energy used in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. This embodied energy, along with a building's operational energy, constitutes the building's life-cycle energy and emissions footprint. This report first provides a review of international studies on commercial building life-cycle energy use from which data are derived to develop an assessment of Chinese commercial building life-cycle energy use, then examines in detail two cases for the development of office building operational energy consumption to 2020. Finally, the energy and emissions implications of the two cases are presented.

Fridley, David; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Particle and light fragment emission in peripheral heavy ion collisions at Fermi energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A systematic investigation of the average multiplicities of light charged particles and intermediate mass fragments emitted in peripheral and semiperipheral collisions is presented as a function of the beam energy, violence of the collision and mass of the system. The data have been collected with the "Fiasco" setup in the reactions 93Nb+93Nb at 17, 23, 30, 38AMeV and 116Sn+116Sn at 30, 38AMeV. The midvelocity emission has been separated from the emission of the projectile-like fragment. This last component appears to be compatible with an evaporation from an equilibrated source at normal density, as described by the statistical code Gemini at the appropriate excitation energy. On the contrary, the midvelocity emission presents remarkable differences for what concerns both the dependence of the multiplicities on the energy deposited in the midvelocity region and the isotopic composition of the emitted light charged particles.

S. Piantelli; P. R. Maurenzig; A. Olmi; L. Bardelli; A. Bartoli; M. Bini; G. Casini; C. Coppi; A. Mangiarotti; G. Pasquali; G. Poggi; A. A. Stefanini; N. Taccetti; E. Vanzi

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

356

EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(LECBP) (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment

357

Table 4. 2010 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector " 2010 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector " "percent of total" ,"Shares" "State","Commercial","Electric Power","Residential","Industrial","Transportation" "Alabama",0.01584875241,0.5778871607,0.02136328943,0.1334667239,0.2514340736 "Alaska",0.06448385239,0.0785744956,0.0462016929,0.4291084798,0.3816314793 "Arizona",0.02474932909,0.5668758159,0.02425067581,0.04966758421,0.334456595 "Arkansas",0.03882032779,0.4886410984,0.03509200153,0.1307772146,0.3066693577 "California",0.04308920353,0.1176161395,0.07822332929,0.1824277392,0.5786435885 "Colorado",0.04301641968,0.4131279202,0.08115394032,0.1545280216,0.3081736982

358

Balmer-line emission from low-energy H impact on Kr and Xe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Absolute cross sections for the emission of Balmer-? and Balmer-? radiation have been measured for H+Kr and H+Xe collisions. Measurements were made for H-atom energies from 2.5 to 0.04 keV. The polarizations of the emitted radiations were also determined and, for H-atom energies above 0.2 keV, the contributions to these emissions from decay of the long-lived 3s and 4s excited states of hydrogen were resolved. The results are discussed in comparison with similar data for H-atom impact on the other rare-gas atoms.

B. Van Zyl; H. Neumann; M. W. Gealy

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

A Suzaku Search for Nonthermal Emission at Hard X-Ray Energies in the Coma Cluster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The brightest cluster radio halo known resides in the Coma cluster of galaxies. The relativistic electrons producing this diffuse synchrotron emission should also produce inverse Compton emission that becomes competitive with thermal emission from the intracluster medium (ICM) at hard X-ray energies. Thus far, claimed detections of this emission in Coma are controversial. We present a Suzaku HXD-PIN observation of the Coma cluster in order to nail down its nonthermal hard X-ray content. The contribution of thermal emission to the HXD-PIN spectrum is constrained by simultaneously fitting thermal and nonthermal models to it and a spatially equivalent spectrum derived from an XMM-Newton mosaic of the Coma field. We fail to find statistically significant evidence for nonthermal emission in the spectra which are better described by only a single- or multitemperature model for the ICM. Including systematic uncertainties, we derive a 90% upper limit on the flux of nonthermal emission of 6.0 ? 10–12 erg s–1 cm–2 (20-80 keV, for ? = 2.0), which implies a lower limit on the cluster-averaged magnetic field of B>0.15 ?G. Our flux upper limit is 2.5 times lower than the detected nonthermal flux from RXTE and BeppoSAX. However, if the nonthermal hard X-ray emission in Coma is more spatially extended than the observed radio halo, the Suzaku HXD-PIN may miss some fraction of the emission. A detailed investigation indicates that ~50%-67% of the emission might go undetected, which could make our limit consistent with that of Rephaeli & Gruber and Fusco-Femiano et al. The thermal interpretation of the hard Coma spectrum is consistent with recent analyses of INTEGRAL and Swift data.

Daniel R. Wik; Craig L. Sarazin; Alexis Finoguenov; Kyoko Matsushita; Kazuhiro Nakazawa; Tracy E. Clarke

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Energy use, cost and CO2 emissions of electric cars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine efficiency, costs and greenhouse gas emissions of current and future electric cars (EV), including the impact from charging EV on electricity demand and infrastructure for generation and distribution. Uncoordinated charging would increase national peak load by 7% at 30% penetration rate of EV and household peak load by 54%, which may exceed the capacity of existing electricity distribution infrastructure. At 30% penetration of EV, off-peak charging would result in a 20% higher, more stable base load and no additional peak load at the national level and up to 7% higher peak load at the household level. Therefore, if off-peak charging is successfully introduced, electric driving need not require additional generation capacity, even in case of 100% switch to electric vehicles. GHG emissions from electric driving depend most on the fuel type (coal or natural gas) used in the generation of electricity for charging, and range between 0 g km?1 (using renewables) and 155 g km?1 (using electricity from an old coal-based plant). Based on the generation capacity projected for the Netherlands in 2015, electricity for EV charging would largely be generated using natural gas, emitting 35–77 g CO2 eq km?1. We find that total cost of ownership (TCO) of current EV are uncompetitive with regular cars and series hybrid cars by more than 800 € year?1. TCO of future wheel motor PHEV may become competitive when batteries cost 400 € kWh?1, even without tax incentives, as long as one battery pack can last for the lifespan of the vehicle. However, TCO of future battery powered cars is at least 25% higher than of series hybrid or regular cars. This cost gap remains unless cost of batteries drops to 150 € kWh?1 in the future. Variations in driving cost from charging patterns have negligible influence on TCO. GHG abatement costs using plug-in hybrid cars are currently 400–1400 € tonne?1 CO2 eq and may come down to ?100 to 300 € tonne?1. Abatement cost using battery powered cars are currently above 1900 € tonne?1 and are not projected to drop below 300–800 € tonne?1.

Oscar van Vliet; Anne Sjoerd Brouwer; Takeshi Kuramochi; Machteld van den Broek; André Faaij

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Models of the Prompt and High Energy Emission of GRB  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray bursts have been detected at photon energies up to tens of GeV. We review some recent developments in the X-ray to GeV photon phenomenology in the light of Swift and Fermi observations, and some of the theoretical models developed to explain them.

Meszaros, Peter; Toma, Kenji; Wu Xuefeng; He Haoning [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Dept. of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Energy, emissions and environmental impact analysis of wind turbine using life cycle assessment technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Wind turbine used for electricity generation is known as clean and renewable energy technology. The worldwide increasing trend of wind turbine installation present and future projection addressing the issue of energy required for manufacture and environmental impact due to energy consumption. The life cycle energy and environmental impact of wind turbine has been studied in many literature, but some studies are based on average data, the life cycle stages are incomplete of some study, most of the literature are horizontal axis type and the literature for Asian developing countries are rare. In addition, the life cycle study of vertical axis wind turbine is unusual. Since, the life cycle assessment (LCA) study varied from location to location due to industrial performance, countries energy mix and related issues, a life cycle embodied energy, emissions and environmental impacts analysis were undertaken for two grid connected rooftop wind turbines (vertical axis and horizontal axis) considering the industrial performance, applications and related issues in Thailand. The life cycle assessment was done using SimaPro 7.3.3 software from cradle to grave for base case and for alternative cases. The result showed that, wind turbine installation in Thailand at Chiangmai is reliable to deliver wind energy over the year compared to Phuket and Surat Thani Island. The vertical axis wind turbine is energy and emission intensive per kWh/year energy delivered compared to horizontal axis wind turbine for base case system. The embodied energy and environmental impact could be possible to reduce by more than 60% and 50% respectively using reuse of materials strategy. The embodied energy of vertical axis wind turbine could be possible to reduce by 36% with thermoplastic and 40% with fiberglass plastic turbine instead of aluminum turbine, while the environmental impact reduction more than 15% has been observed. The energy intensity, CO2 emission intensity and energy payback time found to be lower when compared with literature.

Md. Shazib Uddin; S. Kumar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS R. Atkins,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS R. Atkins,1,2 W. Benbow,3 emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) during the prompt emission phase. Detection of >100 GeV counterparts on potential GRB models. Subject headinggs: gamma rays: bursts -- gamma rays: observations 1. INTRODUCTION

California at Santa Cruz, University of

364

Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.hbefa.net/e/index.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/handbook-emission-factors-road-transp Language: "English,French,German" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

365

Cow power: the energy and emissions benefits of converting manure to biogas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This report consists of a top-level aggregate analysis of the total potential for converting livestock manure into a domestic renewable fuel source (biogas) that could be used to help states meet renewable portfolio standard requirements and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the US, livestock agriculture produces over one billion tons of manure annually on a renewable basis. Most of this manure is disposed of in lagoons or stored outdoors to decompose. Such disposal methods emit methane and nitrous oxide, two important GHGs with 21 and 310 times the global warming potential of carbon dioxide, respectively. In total, GHG emissions from the agricultural sector in the US amounted to 536 million metric tons (MMT) of carbon dioxide equivalent, or 7% of the total US emissions in 2005. Of this agricultural contribution, 51 to 118 MMT of carbon dioxide equivalent resulted from livestock manure emissions alone, with trends showing this contribution increasing from 1990 to 2005. Thus, limiting GHG emissions from manure represents a valuable starting point for mitigating agricultural contributions to global climate change. Anaerobic digestion, a process that converts manure to methane-rich biogas, can lower GHG emissions from manure significantly. Using biogas as a substitute for other fossil fuels, such as coal for electricity generation, replaces two GHG sources—manure and coal combustion—with a less carbon-intensive source, namely biogas combustion. The biogas energy potential was calculated using values for the amount of biogas energy that can be produced per animal unit (defined as 1000 pounds of animal) per day and the number of animal units in the US. The 95 million animal units in the country could produce nearly 1 quad of renewable energy per year, amounting to approximately 1% of the US total energy consumption. Converting the biogas into electricity using standard microturbines could produce 88 ± 20 billion kWh, or 2.4 ± 0.6% of annual electricity consumption in the US. Replacing coal and manure GHG emissions with the emissions from biogas would produce a net potential GHG emissions reduction of 99 ± 59 million metric tons or 3.9 ± 2.3% of the annual GHG emissions from electricity generation in the US.

Amanda D Cuéllar; Michael E Webber

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

On the transition from photoluminescence to thermal emission and its implication on solar energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photoluminescence (PL) is a fundamental light-matter interaction, which conventionally involves the absorption of energetic photon, thermalization and the emission of a red-shifted photon. Conversely, in optical-refrigeration the absorption of low energy photon is followed by endothermic-PL of energetic photon. Both aspects were mainly studied where thermal population is far weaker than photonic excitation, obscuring the generalization of PL and thermal emissions. Here we experimentally study endothermic-PL at high temperatures. In accordance with theory, we show how PL photon rate is conserved with temperature increase, while each photon is blue shifted. Further rise in temperature leads to an abrupt transition to thermal emission where the photon rate increases sharply. We also show how endothermic-PL generates orders of magnitude more energetic photons than thermal emission at similar temperatures. Relying on these observations, we propose and theoretically study thermally enhanced PL (TEPL) for highly eff...

Manor, Assaf; Rotschild, Carmel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions for U.S. Commercial Buildings, by Year (Million Metric Tons) (1) Commercial U.S. Site Growth Rate Growth Rate Com.% Com.% Fossil Electricity Total 2010-Year Total 2010-Year of Total U.S. of Total Global 1980 245 409 653 4,723 14% 3.5% 1981 226 427 653 4,601 14% 3.6% 1982 226 426 653 4,357 15% 3.6% 1983 226 434 659 4,332 15% 3.6% 1984 236 455 691 4,561 15% 3.6% 1985 217 477 695 4,559 15% 3.6% 1986 216 481 698 4,564 15% 3.5% 1987 220 503 723 4,714 15% 3.5% 1988 230 531 761 4,939 15% 3.6% 1989 226 543 769 4,983 15% 3.6% 1990 227 566 793 5,039 16% 3.7% 1991 228 567 794 4,996 16% 3.7% 1992 229 567 796 5,093 16% 3.7% 1993 226 593 819 5,185 16% 3.8% 1994 229 605 833 5,258 16% 3.8% 1995 231 620 851 5,314 16% 3.8% 1996 240 643 883 5,501 16% 3.9% 1997 240 686 926 5,575 17% 4.0% 1998 223 724 947 5,622 17% 4.1% 1999 226 735 960 5,682 17% 4.1% 2000 239 783 1,022 5,867 17% 4.3% 2001 230 797 1,027

368

Energy-efficient options: techno-economic potential for mitigating GHG emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the techno-economic potential of various energy-efficient options for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions for a period of 20 years, i.e. 1996-2015. For each option, the peak demand reduction, the energy savings and the costs of installing the options are estimated in various sectors, viz., industrial, residential, agricultural and commercial, in India. These options have been assessed from three perspectives: utility, customer, and society. The results show that, by the year 2015, peak demand will be reduced by 24 771 MW and the cumulative energy savings will be about 912 639 GWh. These savings can be achieved with an estimated cost of 117 billion rupees. Implementation of energy-efficient options helps to reduce pollution over the baseline. By 2015, CO2 emissions associated with power generation in thermal plants will be reduced by 809 million tonnes.

B. Sudhakara Reddy

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

A Hybrid Method for Provincial Scale Energy-related Carbon Emission Allocation in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Empirical studies were conducted to examine the hybrid method and three indices, per capita GDP, resource endowment index and the proportion of energy-intensive industries, were screened to preliminarily interpret the differences among China’s regional carbon emissions. ... (4, 26-32) The approach used in these studies is often based on industrial sectors (bottom-up methodology), life-cycle methods (in which the city is considered as land with a certain boundary as well as an energy and material demand center) or input-output models (top-down approach using public data). ... The switch from coal-dominance to cleaner, renewable energies (wind, solar, natural gas, nuclear power, geothermal, biomass energy) will undoubtedly reduce CO2 emissions in China. ...

Hongtao Bai; Yingxuan Zhang; Huizhi Wang; Yanying Huang; He Xu

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

State-Level Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000-2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Environment - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Environment - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable &

371

MILAGRO CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM SHORT-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MILAGRO CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM SHORT-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS A. A. Abdo,1 localizations of short, hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Swift and HETE satellites have led: bursts -- gamma rays: observations Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have long been classified by their durations

California at Santa Cruz, University of

372

Milagro Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Era  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Milagro Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Era P. M. Saz an unprecedented number of rapid and accurate Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) localizations, facilitating a flurry of follow as the flares. INTRODUCTION Some of the most important contributions to our understanding of gamma-ray bursts

California at Santa Cruz, University of

373

15 Energy for development: solar home systemsin Africa and global carbon emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar,and the Dutch utility Nuon (Karnmen, 1999; Anderson and Duke, 2001). Evencomplete saturationof15 Energy for development: solar home systemsin Africa and global carbon emissions RICHARD D. DUKEl;market transformation;photovoltaics; solar home systems; buydown ABST RACT A growingnumberofrural

Kammen, Daniel M.

374

The Economic, Energy, and GHG Emissions Impacts of Proposed 20172025 Vehicle Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Economic, Energy, and GHG Emissions Impacts of Proposed 2017­2025 Vehicle Fuel Economy of the Marine Biology Laboratory (MBL) at Woods Hole, and by short- and long-term visitors to the Program-2025 Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards in the United States Valerie J. Karplus* and Sergey Paltsev* Abstract

375

Assessment of GHG emissions of biomethane from energy cereal crops in Umbria, Italy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biomethane from energy crops is a renewable energy carrier and therefore it potentially contributes to climate change mitigation. However, significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions resulting from cultivation and processing must be considered. Among those, the production and use of nitrogen fertilizers, the resulting nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, the methane emissions from digestate storage and the energy consumption of the biogas plant are crucial factors. In the present paper an integrated life cycle assessment (LCA) of GHG emissions from biomethane production is carried out, taking into account own measurements and experience data from a modern biogas plant located in Umbria, Italy. The study is also focused on the electricity consumption of the biogas plant, assessing the specific absorption power of each machinery. The analysis is based on the methodology defined by the European Union Renewable Energy Directive 2009/28/EC (RED). The main result is that the biomethane chain exceeds the minimum value of GHG saving (35%) mainly due to the open storage of digestate. However by varying the system, using heat and electricity from a biogas CHP plant and covering digestate storage tank, a reduction of 68.9% could be obtained.

C. Buratti; M. Barbanera; F. Fantozzi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

FALL AND SPRING Per Hour # Hours # Semesters Total  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$4,060.00 FALL AND SPRING Per Hour # Hours # Semesters Total Tuition $828.00 15 2 $24,840.00 ISS Living Expenses Please see reverse side for Architecture, Arts, Business, Design & Planning, Engineering to change. Tuition will be guaranteed through spring 2018; however, expect approximately a 5% increase each

377

Operational energy consumption and GHG emissions in residential sector in urban China : an empirical study in Jinan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Driven by rapid urbanization and increasing household incomes, residential energy consumption in urban China has been growing steadily in the past decade, posing critical energy and greenhouse gas emission challenges. ...

Zhang, Jiyang, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Meeting State Carbon Emission Requirements through Industrial Energy Efficiency: The Southern California Gas Company’s Industrial End User Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This case study describes the Southern California Gas Company’s Industrial End User program, which helps large industrial customers increase energy efficiency and reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

379

FutureGen: Pathway to Near-Zero Emissions and Sustainable Energy  

SciTech Connect

This presentation will highlight the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) FutureGen project ? a $1 billion government-industry partnership to design, build, and operate a near-zero emissions coal-fueled power plant. The lead organization for the FutureGen initiative is the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), a multi-purpose laboratory operated by the U.S. DOE’s Office of Fossil Energy. NETL has a mission to conduct R&D from fundamental science to technology demonstration for resolving the environmental, supply, and reliability constraints of producing and using fossil energy resources. The commercial-scale FutureGen R&D facility is a pathway toward future fossil-energy power plants that will produce hydrogen and electricity while nearly eliminating emissions, including carbon dioxide. The 275-megawatt FutureGen plant will initiate operations around 2012 and employ advanced coal gasification technology integrated with combined cycle electricity generation, hydrogen production, and carbon capture and sequestration. Low carbon emissions would be achieved by integrating CO2 capture and sequestration operations with the power plant.

Zitney, S.E.; Sarkus, T.A

2007-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

380

Projected Cost, Energy Use, and Emissions of Hydrogen Technologies for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Each combination of technologies necessary to produce, deliver, and distribute hydrogen for transportation use has a corresponding levelized cost, energy requirement, and greenhouse gas emission profile depending upon the technologies' efficiencies and costs. Understanding the technical status, potential, and tradeoffs is necessary to properly allocate research and development (R&D) funding. In this paper, levelized delivered hydrogen costs, pathway energy use, and well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use and emissions are reported for multiple hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. Technologies analyzed include both central and distributed reforming of natural gas and electrolysis of water, and central hydrogen production from biomass and coal. Delivery options analyzed include trucks carrying liquid hydrogen and pipelines carrying gaseous hydrogen. Projected costs, energy use, and emissions for current technologies (technology that has been developed to at least the bench-scale, extrapolated to commercial-scale) are reported. Results compare favorably with those for gasoline, diesel, and E85 used in current internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, gasoline hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and flexible fuel vehicles. Sensitivities of pathway cost, pathway energy use, WTW energy use, and WTW emissions to important primary parameters were examined as an aid in understanding the benefits of various options. Sensitivity studies on production process energy efficiency, total production process capital investment, feed stock cost, production facility operating capacity, electricity grid mix, hydrogen vehicle market penetration, distance from the hydrogen production facility to city gate, and other parameters are reported. The Hydrogen Macro-System Model (MSM) was used for this analysis. The MSM estimates the cost, energy use, and emissions trade offs of various hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways under consideration. The MSM links the H2A Production Model, the Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM), and the Greenhouse Gas, Regulated Emission, and Energy for Transportation (GREET) Model. The MSM utilizes the capabilities of each component model and ensures the use of consistent parameters between the models to enable analysis of full hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. To better understand spatial aspects of hydrogen pathways, the MSM is linked to the Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool (HyDRA). The MSM is available to the public and enables users to analyze the pathways and complete sensitivity analyses.

Ruth, M. F.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M. J.; Timbario, T. A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Energy consumption and GHG emission scenarios of a university campus in Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study estimates energy consumption and related GHG emissions for the buildings and facilities of the main university campus at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The campus has a built area of 1.3 km2. Based on the strategic plan of growth, a scenario analysis for 2020 was also developed estimating baseline and mitigation scenarios that include energy efficiency technologies and solar water heating. To estimate energy consumption, a representative sample of buildings and facilities by category was selected in order to develop level I and when possible level II energy audits. The study was complemented with results of level III energy audits performed in previous studies for some buildings. The bottom-up results from energy audits were compared to the electricity bill for the whole campus. We found that lighting represents 28% of total energy use, followed by special research equipment 17%, refrigeration 14%, and water heating that includes the Olympic swimming pool 9%. If energy efficiency technologies are applied for retrofitting and considered for new buildings in lighting, refrigeration, air conditioning; and a hybrid system (solar–electric–LPG) is used for water heating, energy consumption could be 7.5% less than in 2011 and CO2 emissions 11.3% less than in 2011.

Azucena Escobedo; Sonia Briceño; Héctor Juárez; Daniel Castillo; Mireya Imaz; Claudia Sheinbaum

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Renewable Energy Certificates and Air Emissions Benefits: Developing an Appropriate Definition for a REC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES TRUST ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES TRUST Pioneering Markets to Improve the Environment Renewable Energy Certificates and Air Emissions Benefits Developing an Appropriate Definition for a REC Patrick Leahy and Alden Hathaway April 2004 The Renewable Energy Certificate Market The past few years have witnessed the emergence of the Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) market as a viable model for the U.S. renewable energy industry. Once considered an esoteric topic for even the most ardent renewable energy expert, RECs have grown in popularity and exposure thanks to efforts of the renewable energy industry as well as several large purchases by high profile corporations and governmental organizations. Although still in its infancy, the Renewable Energy

383

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in energy-intensive industries in key developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. Schaeffer, 1997, “Energy Intensity in the Iron and Steelwhich is the ratio of the actual energy intensity to thebest practice energy intensity, where the best practice

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Influencing factors on NOX emission level during grate conversion of three pelletized energy crops  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract NOX emission behavior of three different pelletized energy crops, a herbaceous one, Brassica carinata, a short rotation coppice, Populus sp., and a blend of them, was assessed during fixed grate conversion. Measurements of NOX emissions were done at combustion conditions that yielded both thermal efficiency and CO emissions according to the European norm (EN 303-5:2012), and results compared to limits established by the Austrian deviations. Based on the experimental data, NOX results fulfilled the Austrian restrictions except during combustion of brassica, which exhibited the highest Fuel-N content. The Fuel-NOX was identified as the main formation mechanism. An opposite relation was determined between the specific NOX emissions and the Fuel-N conversion ratio obtained between the N-rich and the N-lean fuels tested here. The influence of the air supply (amount and distribution) on the NOX formation was also noticeable. In general, a higher proportion of air increased the specific NOX emissions and the Fuel-N conversion ratio. Possibilities to control the NOX emissions level by air staging were rather limited, particularly, during combustion of brassica and the blend because of their peculiarities as ash-rich fuels with high slag formation risk. For attaining an appropriate conversion of these fuels, primary air requirements substantially increased. Due to limitations found during the energy crops conversion, efforts to minimize the level of NOX emissions identified here for the troublesome fuels tested should be mainly focused on attaining both a properly designed air supply system and the grate temperature control as well as on conditioning the Fuel-N content, for instance, by blending.

Maryori Díaz-Ramírez; Fernando Sebastián; Javier Royo; Adeline Rezeau

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Agriculture, Land Use, Energy and Carbon Emission Impacts of Global Biofuel Mandates to Mid-Century  

SciTech Connect

Three potential future scenarios of expanded global biofuel production are presented here utilizing the GCAM integrated assessment model. These scenarios span a range that encompasses on the low end a continuation of existing biofuel production policies to two scenarios that would require an expansion of current targets as well as an extension of biofuels targets to other regions of the world. Conventional oil use is reduced by 4-8% in the expanded biofuel scenarios, which results in a decrease of in CO2 emissions on the order of 1-2 GtCO2/year by mid-century from the global transportation sector. The regional distribution of crop production is relatively unaffected, but the biofuels targets do result in a marked increase in the production of conventional crops used for energy. Producer prices of sugar and corn reach levels about 12% and 7% above year 2005 levels, while the increased competition for land causes the price of food crops such as wheat, although not used for bioenergy in this study, to increase by 1 to 2%. The amount of land devoted to growing all food crops and dedicated bioenergy crops is increased by about 10% by 2050 in the High biofuel case, with concurrent decreases in other uses of land such as forest and pasture. In both of the expanded biofuels cases studied, there is an increase in net cumulative carbon emissions for the first couple of decades due to these induced land use changes. However, the difference in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels expansion decline by about 2035 as the reductions in energy system emissions exceed further increases in emissions from land use change. Even in the absence of a policy that would limit emissions from land use change, the differences in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels scenarios reach zero by 2050, and are decreasing further over time in both cases.

Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

NERSC Franklin Hours Used Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Franklin Hours Used Franklin Hours Used Franklin Hours Used 2011 Franklin Usage in Hours 2011 Franklin Usage in Hours 2010 2010 Franklin Usage in Hours 2009 2009 Franklin Usage in Hours 2007-2008 2008 Franklin Usage in Hours 2008 Franklin Usage in Hours Date Hours Used (in thousands) Percentage of Maximum Possible (24 hours/day) 04/28/2012 0.00 0.00 04/27/2012 272.62 29.40 04/26/2012 692.81 74.71 04/25/2012 841.60 90.75 04/24/2012 53.86 5.81 04/23/2012 432.01 46.59 04/22/2012 823.23 88.77 04/21/2012 473.95 51.11 04/20/2012 173.75 18.74 04/19/2012 449.22 48.44 04/18/2012 816.23 88.02 04/17/2012 754.35 81.34 04/16/2012 648.89 69.97 04/15/2012 812.25 87.59 04/14/2012 843.46 90.95 04/13/2012 737.46 79.52 04/12/2012 711.97 76.77 04/11/2012 734.65 79.22 04/10/2012 815.65 87.95 04/09/2012 897.25 96.75

387

Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak-Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

top graph) as a percent of the total average energy usage ofgraph) as a percentage of each hour’s average energy usagegraph: first, kWh savings; second, normalized savings as a percent of the total average energy usage

Todd, Annika

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Sustainability and Energy Development: Influences of Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Options on Water Use in Energy Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sustainability and Energy Development: Influences of Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Options on Water Use in Energy Production ... Water consumption for nuclear energy could be reduced, while also increasing the safety of nuclear plants, by deploying new high temperature gas reactors that potentially allow for internal operating temperatures in excess of 900 °C and combined cycle turbine designs. ... Whittaker, S.; White, D.; Law, D.; Chalatumyk, R. In IEA GHG Weyburn CO2Monitoring and Storage Project Summary Report 2000 - 2004, 7th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, Vancouver, Canada, Wilson, M.; Monea, M., Eds.; Petroleum Technology Research Centre: Vancouver, Canada, 2004. ...

D. Craig Cooper; Gerald Sehlke

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

389

Regulatory Reform to Promote Clean Energy: The Potential of Output-Based Emissions Standards  

SciTech Connect

Barriers to industrial energy-efficient technologies hinder their use. A number of EPA analyses and industrial experts have found that the utilization of input-based emissions standards (measured in parts-per-million or pounds/MMBtu) in the Clean Air Act creates a regulatory barrier to the installation and deployment of technologies that emit fewer criteria pollutants and use energy more efficiently. Changing emission management strategies to an output-based emissions standard (measured in tons of pollutant emitted) is a way to ameliorate some of these barriers. Combined heat and power (CHP) is one of the key technologies that would see increased industrial application if the emissions standards were modified. Many states have made this change since the EPA first approved it in 2000, although direction from the Federal government could speed implementation modifications. To analyze the national impact of accelerated state adoption of output-based standards on CHP technologies, this paper uses detailed National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and spreadsheet analysis illustrating two phased-in adoption scenarios for output-based emissions standards in the industrial sector. Benefit/cost metrics are calculated from a private and public perspective, and also a social perspective that considers the criteria and carbon air pollution emissions. These scenarios are compared to the reference case of AEO 2010 and are quite favorable, with a social benefit-cost ratio of 16.0 for a five-year phase-in scenario. In addition, the appropriateness of the Federal role, applicability, technology readiness, and administrative feasibility are discussed.

Cox, Matthew [Georgia Institute of Technology] [Georgia Institute of Technology; Brown, Dr. Marilyn Ann [Georgia Institute of Technology] [Georgia Institute of Technology; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Greenhouse gas emissions from MSW incineration in China: Impacts of waste characteristics and energy recovery  

SciTech Connect

Determination of the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is complex because both contributions and savings of GHGs exist in the process. To identify the critical factors influencing GHG emissions from MSWI in China, a GHG accounting model was established and applied to six Chinese cities located in different regions. The results showed that MSWI in most of the cities was the source of GHGs, with emissions of 25-207 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. Within all process stages, the emission of fossil CO{sub 2} from the combustion of MSW was the main contributor (111-254 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw), while the substitution of electricity reduced the GHG emissions by 150-247 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. By affecting the fossil carbon content and the lower heating value of the waste, the contents of plastic and food waste in the MSW were the critical factors influencing GHG emissions of MSWI. Decreasing food waste content in MSW by half will significantly reduce the GHG emissions from MSWI, and such a reduction will convert MSWI in Urumqi and Tianjin from GHG sources to GHG sinks. Comparison of the GHG emissions in the six Chinese cities with those in European countries revealed that higher energy recovery efficiency in Europe induced much greater reductions in GHG emissions. Recovering the excess heat after generation of electricity would be a good measure to convert MSWI in all the six cities evaluated herein into sinks of GHGs.

Yang Na [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen Miao; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing, E-mail: xhpjk@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

392

Pollutant Emissions and Energy Efficiency of Chinese Gasifier Cooking Stoves and Implications for Future Intervention Studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pollutant Emissions and Energy Efficiency of Chinese Gasifier Cooking Stoves and Implications for Future Intervention Studies ... Medium power stove operation emitted nearly twice as much PM2.5 as was emitted during high power stove operation, and the lighting phase of a cooking event contributed 45% and 34% of total PM2.5 emissions (combined lighting and cooking). ... A smaller pot was used with stoves A and B (500g) compared with stoves C and D (675g), but both sizes could hold at least 5 L of water. ...

Ellison M. Carter; Ming Shan; Xudong Yang; Jiarong Li; Jill Baumgartner

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

393

Probing the long range nature of pion emission source at SPS energies  

SciTech Connect

The NA49 experiment at CERN SPS has acquired a huge data set of Pb+Pb events over a broad range of energy and centrality during the last several years. This high statistics data set, coupled with a state-of-the-art analysis technique, allows for the first model-independent extraction and energy scan of 3D emission sources for pion pairs at SPS energies. These 3D pion emission sources provide new insights into the nature of a long-range source previously reported by PHENIX at RHIC. The new results indicate that the pion source function is essentially Gaussian from 20 AGeV to 80 AGeV but it displays significant non-Gaussian tails at 158 AGeV.

Chung, P. [Dept of Chemistry, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Danielewicz, P. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI. 48824-1321 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI. 48824-1321 (United States)

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hydrogen production and delivery analysis in US markets : cost, energy and greenhouse gas emissions.  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen production cost conclusions are: (1) Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) is the least-cost production option at current natural gas prices and for initial hydrogen vehicle penetration rates, at high production rates, SMR may not be the least-cost option; (2) Unlike coal and nuclear technologies, the cost of natural gas feedstock is the largest contributor to SMR production cost; (3) Coal- and nuclear-based hydrogen production have significant penalties at small production rates (and benefits at large rates); (4) Nuclear production of hydrogen is likely to have large economies of scale, but because fixed O&M costs are uncertain, the magnitude of these effects may be understated; and (5) Given H2A default assumptions for fuel prices, process efficiencies and labor costs, nuclear-based hydrogen is likely to be more expensive to produce than coal-based hydrogen. Carbon taxes and caps can narrow the gap. Hydrogen delivery cost conclusions are: (1) For smaller urban markets, compressed gas delivery appears most economic, although cost inputs for high-pressure gas trucks are uncertain; (2) For larger urban markets, pipeline delivery is least costly; (3) Distance from hydrogen production plant to city gate may change relative costs (all results shown assume 100 km); (4) Pipeline costs may be reduced with system 'rationalization', primarily reductions in service pipeline mileage; and (5) Liquefier and pipeline capital costs are a hurdle, particularly at small market sizes. Some energy and greenhouse gas Observations: (1) Energy use (per kg of H2) declines slightly with increasing production or delivery rate for most components (unless energy efficiency varies appreciably with scale, e.g., liquefaction); (2) Energy use is a strong function of production technology and delivery mode; (3) GHG emissions reflect the energy efficiency and carbon content of each component in a production-delivery pathway; (4) Coal and natural gas production pathways have high energy consumption and significant GHG emissions (in the absence of carbon caps, taxes or sequestration); (5) Nuclear pathway is most favorable from energy use and GHG emissions perspective; (6) GH2 Truck and Pipeline delivery have much lower energy use and GHG emissions than LH2 Truck delivery; and (7) For LH2 Truck delivery, the liquefier accounts for most of the energy and GHG emissions.

Mintz, M.; Gillette, J.; Elgowainy, A. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( ES)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interruption duration index (SAIDI) level of 9.1 hours perreach current U.S. average SAIDI levels (4.1 hours) (Eto et

Kahrl, Fredrich James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant types.  

SciTech Connect

Since the United States began a program to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types--categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly--from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the United States began a programme to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types—categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly—from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

Michael Wang; May Wu; Hong Huo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Future energy and emissions policy scenarios in Ireland for private car transport  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we use a technological model of Ireland's future car stock to simulate the impact of a range of policy measures on the baseline trend in energy demand in the period to 2030. The policies and measures modelled comprise meeting deployment targets for electric vehicles and compressed natural gas vehicles, an EU regulation for the improvement of vehicle efficiency, implementation of a national biofuel obligation, as well as several behavioural measures (encouraging modal shifting and reduced travel demand). The impact of the different measures simulated is measured in terms of their contribution to meeting Ireland's ambitious targets for energy savings, for renewable energy penetration and for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions. The results point to a possible improvement of 32% in car stock efficiency, the achievement of 7.8% renewable energy share of road and rail transport and a 22% reduction in non-ETS private car CO2 emissions relative to 2009 levels. A scenario analysis on meeting the EV penetration target shows a significant range of CO2 emissions reductions depending on the cars (and mileage) displaced and on the electricity generation portfolio.

Hannah E. Daly; Brian P. Ó Gallachóir

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Urbanisation, energy consumption, and carbon dioxide emissions in China: A panel data analysis of China’s provinces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Global warming resulting from rapid economic growth across the world has become a worldwide threat. The coordination of development of urbanisation, energy consumption, and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions therefore forms an important issue; it has attracted considerable attention from both governments and researchers in recent years. This study investigated the relationship between urbanisation, energy consumption, and CO2 emissions over the period 1995–2011, using a panel data model, based on the data for 30 Chinese provinces. The potential to reduce CO2 emissions was also analysed. The results indicated that per capita CO2 emissions in China were characterised by conspicuous regional imbalances during the period studied; in fact, per capita CO2 emissions decrease gradually from the eastern coastal region to the central region, and then to the western region. Urbanisation, energy consumption, and CO2 emissions were found to present a long run bi-directional positive relationship, the significance of which was discovered to vary between provinces as a result of the scale of their respective economies. In addition, a bi-directional causal relationship was found to exist between urbanisation, energy consumption, and CO2 emissions: specifically, a bi-directional positive causal relationship exists between CO2 emissions and urbanisation, as well as between energy consumption and CO2 emissions, and a one way positive causal relationship exists from urbanisation to energy consumption. Scenario simulations further demonstrated that whilst China’s per capita and total CO2 emissions will increase continuously between 2012 and 2020 under all of the three scenarios developed in this study, the potential to achieve reductions is also high. A better understanding of the relationship between urbanisation, energy consumption, and CO2 emissions will help China to realise the low-carbon economic development.

Shaojian Wang; Chuanglin Fang; Xingliang Guan; Bo Pang; Haitao Ma

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Comparison of Life Cycle Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Embodied Energy in Four Renewable Electricity Generation Technologies in New Zealand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparison of Life Cycle Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Embodied Energy in Four Renewable Electricity Generation Technologies in New Zealand ... Fugitive emissions from geothermal fields were noted, though not added to the result for geothermal power generation, but all other “CO2 emissions” pertaining to this study arose from construction, maintenance, and decommissioning of power stations, since renewable technologies (apart from geothermal) do not emit CO2 during normal operation. ... Hondo, H. Life cycle GHG emission analysis of power generation systems: Japanese case Energy 2005, 30 ( 11?12 SPEC. ...

Bridget M. Rule; Zeb J. Worth; Carol A. Boyle

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Investigating the impact of nuclear energy consumption on GDP growth and CO2 emission: A panel data analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study investigates the influence of nuclear energy consumption on GDP growth and CO2 emission in 30 major nuclear energy consuming countries. The panel mode was used taking the period 1990–2010. The results of the study indicated that nuclear energy consumption has a positive long run effect on GDP growth while it has no long run effect on CO2 emission. The Granger causality test results also revealed that nuclear energy consumption has a positive short run causal relationship with GDP growth while it has a negative short run causal relationship with CO2 emission. Based on the results of this study, nuclear energy consumption has an important role in increasing GDP growth in the investigated countries with no effect on CO2 emission. Consequently, unlike fossil fuels which also increase GDP growth, nuclear energy consumption causes less damage to the environment. From the results of the study, a number of recommendations were provided for the investigated countries.

Usama Al-mulali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Techno-economic assessment of the impact of phase change material thermal storage on the energy consumption and GHG emissions of the Canadian Housing Stock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Responsible for 17% of all energy consumption and 16% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Canada, the residential sector ... substantial opportunities for reducing both energy consumption and GHG emissions. Bein...

Sara Nikoofard; V. Ismet Ugursal; Ian Beausoleil-Morrison

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Secretary of Energy Memorandum on DOE Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 31,2010 March 31,2010 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF FROM: STEVEN CHU SUBJECT: Implementation of Executive Order 135 14, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance Addressing the crisis of climate change is the challenge of our time, and a fundamental priority for the Department of Energy. As the agency charged with advancing the Nation's energy security, we are committed to developing energy efficient technologies that support the transformation to a low-carbon economy. We must also lead by example in reducing greenhouse gas emissions associated with our own operations and facilities. On October 5,2009, the President issued Executive Order (EO) 135 14, "Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance." This requires all

404

Table 1. State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010)" State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010)" "million metric tons carbon dioxide" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Change" ,,,,,,,,,,,," 2000 to 2010 " "State",2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percent","Absolute" "Alabama",140.4264977,131.9521389,136.7103146,137.2323195,139.6896437,141.493798,143.9716001,146.076107,139.2224128,119.7962734,132.7462762,-0.05469211069,-7.680221558 "Alaska",44.32104312,43.40375114,43.56121812,43.5078746,46.76217106,48.06229125,45.79367017,44.11576503,39.46205329,37.91867389,38.72718369,-0.1262122693,-5.593859429 "Arizona",85.96984024,88.33838336,87.66914741,89.29026566,96.58329461,96.7032775,100.0087541,102.1950438,103.1458188,94.63481918,95.91303514,0.1156591064,9.943194897

405

Table 3. 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector " 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector " "million metric tons of carbon dioxide" "State","Commercial","Electric Power","Residential","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Alabama",2.103862865,76.71236863,2.835897119,17.71721059,33.37693698,132.7462762 "Alaska",2.497277997,3.042968925,1.789261448,16.61816292,14.7795124,38.72718369 "Arizona",2.373783271,54.37078005,2.325955921,4.76376875,32.07874715,95.91303514 "Arkansas",2.566776983,32.30865878,2.320262268,8.646911643,20.27679552,66.11940519 "California",15.93482613,43.49564577,28.92778352,67.46363514,213.9882899,369.8101805 "Colorado",4.150125234,39.85763155,7.82954551,14.90850811,29.73188961,96.47770002

406

"Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million metric tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",5060,5129.666667,5184.666667,5239.666667,5287.333333,5335,5379,5437.666667,5481.666667,5529.333333,5599,5657.666667,5694.333333,5738.333333,5797,5874,5925.333333,5984 "AEO 1995",,5137,5173.666667,5188.333333,5261.666667,5309.333333,5360.666667,5393.666667,5441.333333,5489,5551.333333,5621,5679.666667,5727.333333,5775,5841,5888.666667,5943.666667 "AEO 1996",,,5181.817301,5223.645142,5294.776326,5354.687297,5416.802205,5463.67395,5525.288005,5588.52771,5660.226888,5734.87972,5812.398031,5879.320068,5924.814575,5981.291626,6029.640422,6086.804077,6142.120972

407

Table 2. 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel " 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel " "million metric tons of carbon dioxide" ,,,,,," Shares " "State","Coal","Petroleum","Natural Gas ","Total","Coal","Petroleum","Natural Gas" "Alabama",67.81545193,35.95576449,28.97505976,132.7462762,0.5108651925,0.2708608145,0.218273993 "Alaska",1.364880388,19.58916888,17.77313443,38.72718369,0.03524347131,0.5058247724,0.4589317562 "Arizona",43.2377726,34.82066125,17.85460129,95.91303514,0.4508018387,0.3630440972,0.1861540641 "Arkansas",27.72445786,23.82768621,14.56726112,66.11940519,0.4193089424,0.3603735717,0.2203174859 "California",5.157135123,241.2575077,123.3955377,369.8101805,0.01394535736,0.6523820067,0.3336726359

408

Table 5. Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 201  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 2010)" Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 2010)" "metric tons carbon dioxide per person" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Change" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"2000 to 2010" "State",2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percent","Absolute" "Alabama",31.54590416,29.56352198,30.5739632,30.56483509,30.96927578,31.14605742,31.33283758,31.52225314,29.78727412,25.44798199,28.06679306,-0.1102872527,-3.479111105 "Alaska",70.60324067,68.51009907,67.8551127,67.17588806,70.92646205,72.04509462,67.81012638,64.8863351,57.56413017,54.58358965,54.63289567,-0.2261984697,-15.97034499 "Arizona",16.64049197,16.65546102,16.08173855,15.97087112,16.77174168,16.18743942,16.15392734,16.06780183,15.87052371,14.3654833,14.36549251,-0.1367146759,-2.274999466

409

Energy taxes and subsidies: their implications for CO2 emissions and abatement costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy markets are often distorted, with the result that price does not equal the marginal social cost of production. Subsidies encourage consumption of energy and impose welfare losses independent of those arising from global warming. Fossil fuels, especially oil, are already taxed in many countries. The superimposition of a carbon tax on existing taxes could greatly increase the welfare loss from taxation if such taxes do not reflect externalities or user costs. Moreover, existing taxes affect relative fuel prices and may raise emission levels. The removal of subsidies and the restructuring of taxes so that fuel prices are brought into line with marginal social costs could result in emission abatement and lower abatement costs.

Rosemary Clarke

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION OF GRB 130427A: EVIDENCE FOR INVERSE COMPTON RADIATION  

SciTech Connect

A nearby superluminous burst GRB 130427A was simultaneously detected by six ?-ray space telescopes (Swift, the Fermi GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM)/Large Area Telescope, Konus-Wind, SPI-ACS/INTEGRAL, AGILE, and RHESSI) and by three RAPTOR full-sky persistent monitors. The isotropic ?-ray energy release is ?10{sup 54} erg, rendering it the most powerful explosion among gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a redshift z ? 0.5. The emission above 100 MeV lasted about one day, and four photons are at energies greater than 40 GeV. We show that the count rate of 100 MeV-100 GeV emission may be mainly accounted for by the forward shock synchrotron radiation and the inverse Compton radiation likely dominates at GeV-TeV energies. In particular, an inverse Compton radiation origin is favored for the ?(95.3, 47.3, 41.4, 38.5, 32) GeV photons arriving at t ? (243, 256.3, 610.6, 3409.8, 34366.2) s after the trigger of Fermi-GBM. Interestingly, the external inverse Compton scattering of the prompt emission (the second episode, i.e., t ? 120-260 s) by the forward-shock-accelerated electrons is expected to produce a few ?-rays at energies above 10 GeV, while five were detected in the same time interval. A possible unified model for the prompt soft ?-ray, optical, and GeV emission of GRB 130427A, GRB 080319B, and GRB 090902B is outlined. Implications of the null detection of >1 TeV neutrinos from GRB 130427A by IceCube are discussed.

Fan, Yi-Zhong; Zhang, Fu-Wen; He, Hao-Ning; Zhou, Bei; Yang, Rui-Zhi; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Tam, P. H. T. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Liang, Yun-Feng, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: fwzhang@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn [Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Guangxi 530004 (China)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

411

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in energy-intensive industries in key developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Egypt, and Iran. The methodologies described here were developed through collaboration with international energy efficiency

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

EIA-930 Hourly and Daily Balancing ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

not change from day-to-day or hour-to-hour, as specified in the immediately preceding section. For each hour of the day, hourly integrated demand is to be posted within ten...

413

Defect characterization of silver-based low-emissivity multilayer coatings for energy-saving applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low-emissivity optical coatings which provide high-efficiency heat isolation are deposited onto architectural windows to be employed in offices and residential buildings for the purpose of saving energy. In the present work multilayer low-emissivity coatings with the structure glass/ SnO 2 (380?Å)/ Ni–Cr (10?Å)/ Ag (90?Å)/ Ni–Cr (30?Å)/ SnO 2 (380?Å) were deposited in an industrial sputtering system onto large glass substrates. The extremely low thickness of the layers which compose such structures as well as the large substrate area makes the morphology of the films and interfaces play an important role in providing efficient energy saving performance as well as high optical transmittance. Questions such as the cleaning process of the substrate previous to deposition partial pressure of the gasses in the sputtering system etc. will affect the overall behavior of the coatings. The resulting morphology and composition of the films and interfaces was studied by optical microscopy scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive x ray atomic force microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. Some structural defects that might affect the long-term stability of the coatings were found. Furthermore the effect of aggressive environments on the low-emissivity multilayercoatings was tested both from the structural and optical points of view.

R. J. Mart??n-Palma; L. Vázquez; J. M. Mart??nez-Duart

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Energy conservation and CO2 emission reduction in China's 11th Five-Year Plan: A performance evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) (2005–2010), the Chinese Government initiated a series of energy-saving and emission reduction policies in many key fields in response to environmental pollution and climate change. This paper quantitatively evaluates the performance of energy conservation and CO2 emission reduction in this period, the impact of these policies and potentials, by integrating the contributions of energy conversion efficiency and energy utilization efficiency improvement, industrial restructuring, fuel mix shift and renewable energy development in a unified framework, as a first attempt to introduce energy conversion efficiency improvement into a decomposition approach. Comprehensive and specific policies are summarized as a policy list to be investigated. The results show that energy intensity and conversion efficiency effects were mainly responsible for driving down energy consumption, by 637.4 Mtce and 85.4 Mtce respectively, and they reduced CO2 emissions by 1345.3 Mt and 243.8 Mt respectively due to a significant improvement in the 11th FYP period. Most of the contributions made by the conversion efficiency effect (94%) come from thermal power generation, and the emission coefficient effect reduced CO2 emissions by 17.4 Mt through developing renewable energy. Economic growth is still the biggest driver of energy consumption and increasing emissions, while industrial restructuring and fuel mix shift effects contributed relatively little. Developing renewable energy and promoting economic restructuring to limit the increase of energy-intensive sectors are still the main challenges and the next policy focus to achieve the targets for energy saving and carbon emission reduction in the 12th Five-Year Plan.

Jin-Hua Xu; Ying Fan; Song-Min Yu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Emissions and Energy: An Integral Approach Using an Online Energy Management and Optimization Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the expected legislation on the horizon in the U.S., the cost of CO2 emissions will have significant impact on industrial plant operations in the near future. Our purpose in this presentation is to show real industrial examples in which...

Ruiz, D.; Ruiz, C.; Santollani, O.; Reitmeier, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The energy and CO2 emissions impact of renewable energy development in China*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to provide a solid foundation for the public and private decisions needed to mitigate and adapt targets and subsidies make renewable electricity economically viable in the short term. Cumulative CO2 electricity leads to increases in other sectors, offsetting emissions reductions. The expansion of renewables

417

Cumulative energy, emissions, and water consumption for geothermal electric power production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A life cycle analysis has been conducted on geothermal electricity generation. The technologies covered in the study include flash binary enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and coproduced gas and electricity plants. The life cycle performance metrics quantified in the study include materials water and energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The life cycle stages taken into account were the plant and fuel cycle stages the latter of which includes fuel production and fuel use (operational). The plant cycle includes the construction of the plant wells and above ground piping and the production of the materials that comprise those systems. With the exception of geothermal flash plants GHG emissions from the plant cycle are generally small and the only such emissions from geothermal plants. Some operational GHGs arise from flash plants and though substantial when compared to other geothermal power plants these are nonetheless considerably smaller than those emitted from fossil fuel fired plants. For operational geothermal emissions an emission rate (g/kW h) distribution function vs. cumulative capacity was developed using California plant data. Substantial GHG emissions arise from coproduced facilities and two other “renewable” power plants but these are almost totally due to the production and use of natural gas and biofuels. Nonetheless those GHGs are still much less than those from fossil fuel fired plants. Though significant amounts of water are consumed for plant and well construction especially for well field stimulation of EGS plants they are small in comparison to estimated water consumed during plant operation. This also applies to air cooled plants which nominally should consume no water during operation. Considering that geothermal operational water use data are scarce our estimates show the lowest water consumption for flash and coproduced plants and the highest for EGS though the latter must be considered provisional due to the absence of field data. The EGS estimate was based on binary plant data.

J. L. Sullivan; C. Clark; J. Han; C. Harto; M. Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Energy Efficiency as a Low-Cost Resource for Achieving Carbon Emissions Reductions A RESOURCE OF THE NATIONAL ACTION PLAN FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper, Energy Efficiency as a Low-Cost Resource for Achieving Carbon Emissions Reductions, is provided to assist utility regulators, gas and electric utilities, and others in meeting the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency’s goal of achieving all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. This paper summarizes the scale and economic value of energy efficiency for reducing carbon emissions and discusses the barriers to achieving the potential for cost-effective energy efficiency. It also reviews current regional, state, and local approaches for including energy efficiency in climate policy, using these approaches to inform a set of recommendations for leveraging energy efficiency within state climate policy. The paper does not capture federal climate policy options or recommendations, discussion of tradable energy efficiency credits, or emissions impacts of specific energy efficiency measures or programs. The intended audience for the paper is any stakeholder interested in learning more about how to advance energy efficiency as a low-cost resource to reduce carbon emissions. All stakeholders, including state policy-makers, public utility commissions, city councils, and utilities, can use this paper to understand the key issues and terminology, as well as the approaches that are being used to reduce carbon emissions by advancing energy efficiency policies and programs. Energy Efficiency as a Low-Cost

unknown authors

419

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in the steel sector in key developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intensities and the carbon emission factor for each process.through fuel switching. Carbon emissions factors used infor reduction in carbon emissions was slightly larger than

Price, Lynn; Phylipsen, Dian; Worrell, Ernst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= 29.27 MJ) and IPCC carbon emissions coefficients are used5 Identify carbon emission coefficients and calculate total35 Appendix: Overview of the China Carbon Emissions

Fridley, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The influence of cluster emission and the symmetry energy on neutron-proton spectral double ratios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions of free neutrons and protons from the central collisions of 124Sn+124Sn and 112Sn+112Sn reactions are simulated using the Improved Quantum Molecular Dynamics model with two different density dependence of the symmetry energy in the nuclear equation of state. The constructed double ratios of the neutron to proton ratios of the two reaction systems are found to be sensitive to the symmetry terms in the EOS. The effect of cluster formation is examined and found to affect the double ratios mainly in the low energy region. In order to extract better information on symmetry energy with transport models, it is therefore important to have accurate data in the high energy region which also is affected minimally by sequential decays.

Y. X. Zhang; P. Danielewicz; M. Famiano; Z. Li; W. G. Lynch; M. B. Tsang

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

422

hourly solar radiation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

solar radiation solar radiation Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): A need for predicting hourly global radiation exists for many locations particularly in Bangladesh for which measured values are not available and daily values have to be estimated from sunshine data. The CPRG model has been used to predict values of hourly Gh for Dhaka (23.770N, 90.380E), Chittagong (22.270N, 91.820E) and Bogra (24.850N, 89.370E) for = ±7.50, ±22.50, ±37.50, ±52.50, ±67.50, ±82.50 and ±97.50 i.e., for ±1/2, ±3/2, ±5/2, ±7/2, ±9/2, ±11/2, ±13/2 hours before and after solar noon and the computed values for Source Renewable Energy Research Centre Date Released October 22nd, 2003 (11 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Bangladesh documentation hourly solar radiation SWERA

423

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsReduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World  

SciTech Connect

Voluntary agreements for energy efficiency improvement and reduction of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have been a popular policy instrument for the industrial sector in industrialized countries since the 1990s. A number of these national-level voluntary agreement programs are now being modified and strengthened, while additional countries--including some recently industrialized and developing countries--are adopting these type of agreements in an effort to increase the energy efficiency of their industrial sectors.Voluntary agreement programs can be roughly divided into three broad categories: (1) programs that are completely voluntary, (2) programs that use the threat of future regulations or energy/GHG emissions taxes as a motivation for participation, and (3) programs that are implemented in conjunction with an existing energy/GHG emissions tax policy or with strict regulations. A variety of government-provided incentives as well as penalties are associated with these programs. This paper reviews 23 energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programs in 18 countries, including countries in Europe, the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea, and Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) and discusses preliminary lessons learned regarding program design and effectiveness. The paper notes that such agreement programs, in which companies inventory and manage their energy use and GHG emissions to meet specific reduction targets, are an essential first step towards GHG emissions trading programs.

Price, Lynn

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Building commissioning: a golden opportunity for reducing energy costs and greenhouse gas emissions in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Commissioning is arguably the single most cost-effective strategy for reducing energy, costs, and greenhouse gas emissions in buildings today. Although commissioning has earned increased recognition in recent ...

Evan Mills

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions from enzyme and yeast manufacture for corn and cellulosic ethanol production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Enzymes and yeast are important ingredients in the production of ethanol, yet the energy consumption and emissions associated with their production ... are often excluded from life-cycle analyses of ethanol. We p...

Jennifer B. Dunn; Steffen Mueller; Michael Wang; Jeongwoo Han

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Mitigation policies for energy related greenhouse gas emissions in Cyprus: the potential role of natural gas imports  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the possibility of introducing mitigation policies for greenhouse gas emissions in isolated areas with limited availability of alternative energy sources. The Cypriot energy system has been considered as a reference case study and it is concluded that even for an isolated economy with very high rates of growth, enough options are available to reduce significantly greenhouse gas emissions and effectively contribute to sustainable environment. The conclusions of the study are based on analysis done with ENPEP, a hybrid model that employs a market-based simulation approach to project future energy supply/demand balances and the associated air emissions, as well as to evaluate alternative energy technologies. The study also shows that one of the best long-term strategies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Cyprus is the introduction of natural gas via a submerged gas pipeline to Syria.

S Mirasgedis; Y Sarafidis; E Georgopoulou; D.P Lalas; C Papastavros

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Tool for calculation of CO2 emissions from organisations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tool for calculation of CO2 emissions from organisations Tool for calculation of CO2 emissions from organisations Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Tool for calculation of CO2 emissions from organisations Agency/Company /Organization: United Kingdom Department of Environment Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Topics: Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory Resource Type: Online calculator, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/nationalindicators/ni185emissio Country: United Kingdom Northern Europe Coordinates: 55.378051°, -3.435973° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.378051,"lon":-3.435973,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

428

High-energy emission from the stellar wind collisions in gamma-2 Velorum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The binary system gamma-2 Velorum (WC8+O7.5) contains the nearest known Wolf-Rayet star to the Sun, at a distance of 258$_{-31}^{+41}$ pc. Its strong radio emission shows evidence for a partially absorbed nonthermal component, which has been interpreted as synchrotron emission from electrons accelerated in the colliding wind region. Inverse Compton cooling of these electrons in the intense UV radiation field from the O-type companion star could produce a significant hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission, whose flux depends on the ratio of the energy densities of magnetic to seed photon fields. The Vela region was observed with the INTEGRAL satellite in 2003, as part of the Core Programme. No signals from gamma-2 Vel are detected in the images obtained with the IBIS/ISGRI coded aperture instrument in the energy ranges 20-40 and 40-80 keV. From the derived 3$\\sigma$ upper limits, we show that the average magnetic field near the region of stellar wind collision should be relatively high, greater than about 1 G. The ...

Tatischeff, V; Lebrun, F

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

NETL: News Release - Fuel Cells to Advance Zero-Emissions Energy in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 17, 2003 September 17, 2003 Fuel Cells to Advance Zero-Emissions Energy in Tomorrow's Economy R&D on Key Components, Diagnostics, Modeling Gets $5.4 Million Boost with 10 New DOE Research Grants WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham today announced a new phase of fuel-cell research designed to hasten the wider availability of zero-emissions energy. The 10 Department of Energy (DOE) research grants, totaling $4.2 million, will be matched by another $1.2 million from university and private sector participants for research aimed at resolving obstacles to fuel-cell use. "The President's Hydrogen and Climate Initiatives envision fuel cells playing a prominent role in the economy and everyday life," Secretary Abraham said, "For that to occur, we have to reduce the costs of fuel cell acquisition and use. These projects address the most important priorities identified by industry and researchers, and were chosen for their technological impact and high potential for overall success."

430

Waste-to-energy plants face costly emissions-control upgrades  

SciTech Connect

One treatment method of municipal solid waste, incineration, has fallen in and out of public favor. In the 1970s, emerging consciousness of the threat to groundwater posed by leaking landfills made incineration an attractive option. Prompted by disrupted energy supplies and steeply rising prices, more than 100 municipalities began to generate electricity from the heat produced by burning trash. In the 1990s, the pendulum of public enthusiasm has swung away from incineration. Energy prices have declined dramatically, and safety and siting concerns complicate new projects. A recent Supreme Court decision ruled that municipal incinerator ash must be tested as hazardous waste and disposed accordingly if levels of such pollutants as cadmium and lead exceed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act limits. So-called flow control regulations, which allowed municipalities to apportion garbage disposal to ensure steady supplies to incinerators, also have been struck down. EPA is tackling the issue of air emissions from waste-to-energy and non-energy-producing municipal waste combustors. Emissions guidelines for MWCs and new-source performance standards for new units, proposed Sept. 20 under Sec. 129 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, are the culmination of a stalled and litigated initiative dating back to the CAA Amendments of 1977.

McIlvaine, R.W.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

The Search for High Energy Extended Emission by Fermi-LAT from Swift-Localized Gamma-Ray Bursts  

SciTech Connect

The brighter Fermi-LAT bursts have exhibited emission at energies >0.1 GeV that persists as late as {approx}2 ks after the prompt phase has nominally ended. This so-called 'extended emission' could arise from continued activity of the prompt burst mechanism or it could be the start of a high energy afterglow component. The high energy extended emission seen by the LAT has typically followed a t{sup -}{gamma} power-law temporal decay where {gamma} {approx} 1.2-1.7 and has shown no strong indication of spectral evolution. In contrast, the prompt burst emission generally displays strong spectral variability and more complex temporal changes in the LAT band. This differing behavior suggests that the extended emission likely corresponds to an early afterglow phase produced by an external shock. In this study, we look for evidence of high energy extended emission from 145 Swift-localized GRBs that have occurred since the launch of Fermi. A majority of these bursts were either outside of the LAT field-of-view or were otherwise not detected by the LAT during the prompt phase. However, because of the scanning operation of the Fermi satellite, the long-lived extended emission of these bursts may be detectable in the LAT data on the {approx}few ks time scale. We will look for emission from individual bursts and will perform a stacking analysis in order to set bounds on this emission for the sample as a whole. The detection of such emission would have implications for afterglow models and for the overall energy budget of GRBs.

Chiang, J.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC; Racusin, J.L.; /NASA, Goddard

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Net Energy Payback and CO{sub 2} Emissions from Three Midwestern Wind Farms: An Update  

SciTech Connect

This paper updates a life-cycle net energy analysis and carbon dioxide emissions analysis of three Midwestern utility-scale wind systems. Both the Energy Payback Ratio (EPR) and CO{sub 2} analysis results provide useful data for policy discussions regarding an efficient and low-carbon energy mix. The EPR is the amount of electrical energy produced for the lifetime of the power plant divided by the total amount of energy required to procure and transport the materials, build, operate, and decommission the power plants. The CO{sub 2} analysis for each power plant was calculated from the life-cycle energy input data.A previous study also analyzed coal and nuclear fission power plants. At the time of that study, two of the three wind systems had less than a full year of generation data to project the life-cycle energy production. This study updates the analysis of three wind systems with an additional four to eight years of operating data.The EPR for the utility-scale wind systems ranges from a low of 11 for a two-turbine system in Wisconsin to 28 for a 143-turbine system in southwestern Minnesota. The EPR is 11 for coal, 25 for fission with gas centrifuge enriched uranium and 7 for gaseous diffusion enriched uranium. The normalized CO{sub 2} emissions, in tonnes of CO{sub 2} per GW{sub e}h, ranges from 14 to 33 for the wind systems, 974 for coal, and 10 and 34 for nuclear fission using gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion enriched uranium, respectively.

White, Scott W. [University of Kansas, Kansas Geological Survey (United States)], E-mail: whites@kgs.ku.edu

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Costs and Emissions Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory K. Parks, P. Denholm, and T. Markel Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41410 May 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory K. Parks, P. Denholm, and T. Markel Prepared under Task No. WR61.2001 Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41410 May 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

434

Transverse Collective Flow and Emission Order of Mid-Rapidity Fragments in Fermi Energy Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSVERSE COLLECTIVE FLOW AND EMISSION ORDER OF MID-RAPIDITY FRAGMENTS IN FERMI ENERGY HEAVY ION COLLISIONS A Dissertation by ZACHARY WAYNE KOHLEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2010 Major Subject: Chemistry TRANSVERSE COLLECTIVE FLOW AND EMISSION ORDER OF MID-RAPIDITY FRAGMENTS IN FERMI ENERGY HEAVY ION COLLISIONS A Dissertation by ZACHARY WAYNE KOHLEY Submitted...

Kohley, Zachary Wayne

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

435

Energy efficiency for greenhouse gas emission reduction in China: The case of the cement industry  

SciTech Connect

A project at LBNL has combined two different approaches to investigate changes in efficiency in China`s cement industry, which currently accounts for over 6% of China`s total commercial energy use and over 1% of global carbon emissions. Cement output has doubled over the past five years, and will double again within 15 years. Addressing cement industry carbon emissions will be a key element of any program to control China`s carbon emissions. Macro-level analysis was used to investigate industry-wide trends, and detailed case studies of individual plants illuminated key issues in technology choice that fundamentally affect efficiency. In general, enterprises adopted technologies that increased output and improved quality, and had little regard for energy efficiency, though most new technologies and practices did improve efficiency. Changes in energy prices were a surprisingly weak factor in adoption of efficient technologies. Unexpectedly, many enterprises developed a strong preference for the least fuel-efficient technology, which allows power generation with kiln waste heat. This preference was motivated in a large part by the desire to achieve security in electricity supply, and by some reforms. This alternative has become increasingly popular, and threatens to reverse some progress made in reducing the carbon-intensiveness of China`s cement industry. Foreign technical assistance and more importantly, greater participation in China`s cement industry of foreign cement companies would speed the adoption of large scale very efficient precalciner plants. Paradoxically, improving energy efficiency in China`s cement industry is also a supply-side issue, improved reliability in China`s power network will make the more fuel-efficient alternative more attractive.

Sinton, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

An assessment of operations of oil-exporting countries in terms of energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions from 16 oil-exporting countries are studied using Data Envelopment Analysis using indicators representing economic growth, energy consumption and emissions. The analysis for 1996 shows that Norway, Gabon and Nigeria are efficient and that Russia is inefficient. Malmquist Productivity Index analysis shows that there is progress in achieving higher values of GDP and non-fossil fuel consumption and in achieving lower values of fossil fuel consumption and carbon emissions in the year 1996 when compared with 1992 for Norway, Russia, Mexico, Algeria, Libya, Gabon and Oman.

Ramakrishnan Ramanathan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Energy Efficient IT IT for Energy Efficiency Clean Energy Generation Emissions Accounting Policy Considerations At Microsoft, we see information technology (IT) as a key tool to help address the daunting en-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficient IT IT for Energy Efficiency Clean Energy Generation Emissions Accounting Policy in energy conservation and integration of more renewable and zero-carbon energy sources into our economy. Microsoft envisions a clean energy ecosystem where information technology: · Empowers people

Narasayya, Vivek

438

NERSC Carver Hours Used Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carver Hours Carver Hours Used Carver Hours Used Hopper Usage Chart Hopper Usage Chart Date Hours Used (in millions) Percent of Maximum Possible (24 hours/day) 01/05/2014 170.00 89.35 01/04/2014 174.38 91.65 01/03/2014 174.15 91.53 01/02/2014 179.72 94.45 01/01/2014 173.76 91.32 12/31/2013 172.25 90.53 12/30/2013 169.62 89.14 12/29/2013 164.72 86.57 12/28/2013 177.92 93.51 12/27/2013 171.61 90.19 12/26/2013 172.74 90.79 12/25/2013 172.13 90.46 12/24/2013 173.48 91.18 12/23/2013 174.92 91.93 12/22/2013 175.26 92.11 12/21/2013 173.58 91.23 12/20/2013 174.50 91.71 12/19/2013 170.02 89.36 12/18/2013 178.25 93.68 12/17/2013 176.17 92.59 12/16/2013 162.03 85.16 12/15/2013 157.09 82.56 12/14/2013 173.40 91.13 12/13/2013 185.02 97.24 12/12/2013 150.91 79.31 12/11/2013 31.67 16.64 12/10/2013 92.44 48.58

439

Contemporary low-emissions hydrogen-based energy market in Poland: Issues and opportunities, part I  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The study presents an analysis of the contemporary market for low-emissions hydrogen-based energy in the Ma?opolska (also known as Lesser Poland) area – one of the major administrative regions known as voivodeships. The study, prepared as a case study, concerns the concept of a fledgling enterprise making its first steps on the regional market of fuel cells designed for stationary applications (efficient high-temperature SOFC-type cells). Developing this type of concept is particularly significant for Ma?opolska, as it is consistent with one of the strategic development paths projected for the region, and it may also help solve a number of problems related to access to reliable and competitively priced electrical energy. The presented work may also provide a basis for the analysis of the low-emissions energy market and the potential for the adaptation of this technology in other regions of Poland and in countries which have not yet undergone such analyses.

Miros?aw Stygar; Tomasz Brylewski

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Phase-matched emission from an optically thin medium following one-photon pulse excitation: Energy considerations  

SciTech Connect

Scully and coworkers [M. O. Scully, E. S. Fry, C. H. R. Oii, and K. Wodkiewicz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 010501 (2006)] demonstrated that there is directional, phase-matched emission following the excitation of an ensemble of atoms by a single-photon pulse. While the phase-matched emission intensity is proportional to the the number of atoms, for optically thin samples the total energy emitted in the phase-matched direction is much less than that radiated in other directions. Moreover, even for optically thin samples, it is necessary to take into account effects related to cooperative decay if energy is to be conserved in the overall emission process. An analytic calculation is presented to show explicitly how cooperative decay reduces the incoherent emission and restores energy conservation in this low-density limit.

Berman, P. R.; Le Goueet, J.-L. [Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics and Physics Department, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States); Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS UPR3321, Universite Paris Sud, Batiment 505, Campus Universitaire, F-91405 Orsay (France)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hourly energy emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) Volume II - Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (Laboratory), at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of The Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its...

Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Zilbershtein, G.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Clardige, D.; Parker, P.; Ellis, S.; Kim, H.; Gilman, D.; Degelman, L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Energy deposition spectra of simultaneous electron emissions from low energy protons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

track is more complicated than the normal LET/RBE relationship. Recent measurements of atomic cross-section indicate that interactions of low energy protons with target atoms sometimes produce two or more electrons simultaneously. However, these cross...

DePriest, Kendall Russell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

443

Location and Hours | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Location and Hours Location The ORNL Research Library is located off the central corridor of Bldg. 4500N on the main ORNL campus. Hours The library is open 24 hours, seven days a...

444

Energy, cost, and CO 2 emission comparison between radiant wall panel systems and radiator systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main goal of this paper is to evaluate the possibility of application or replacement of radiators with low-temperature radiant panels. This paper shows the comparison results of operations of 4 space heating systems: the low-temperature radiant panel system without any additional thermal insulation of external walls (PH-WOI), the low-temperature radiant panel system with additional thermal insulation of external walls (PH-WI), the radiator system without any additional thermal insulation of external walls (the classical heating system) (RH-WOI), and the radiator system with additional thermal insulation of external walls (RH-WI). The operation of each system is simulated by software EnergyPlus. The investigation shows that the PH-WI gives the best results. The RH-WOI has the largest energy consumption, and the largest pollutant emission. However, the PH-WI requires the highest investment.

Milorad Boji?; Dragan Cvetkovi?; Marko Mileti?; Jovan Maleševi?; Harry Boyer

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

445

Energy, cost, and CO 2 emission comparison between radiant wall panel systems and radiator systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main goal of this paper is to evaluate the possibility of application or replacement of radiators with low-temperature radiant panels. This paper shows the comparison results of operations of 4 space heating systems: the low-temperature radiant panel system without any additional thermal insulation of external walls (PH-WOI), the low-temperature radiant panel system with additional thermal insulation of external walls (PH-WI), the radiator system without any additional thermal insulation of external walls (the classical heating system) (RH-WOI), and the radiator system with additional thermal insulation of external walls (RH-WI). The operation of each system is simulated by software EnergyPlus. The investigation shows that the PH-WI gives the best results. The RH-WOI has the largest energy consumption, and the largest pollutant emission. However, the PH-WI requires the highest investment.

Boji?, Milorad; Mileti?, Marko; Maleševi?, Jovan; Boyer, Harry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

A Methodology for Calculating Emissions Reductions from Renewable Energy Programs and Its Application to the Wind Farms in the Texas ERCOT Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

calculate creditable emissions reductions from wind and other renewable energy resources for the TCEQ. This paper provides a detailed description of the methodology developed to calculate the emissions reductions from electricity provided by a wind farm...

Culp, C.; Haberl, J. S.; Liu, Z.; Subbarao, K.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Yazdani, B.

447

DMSP-IEES: A Stochastic Programming Model Based on Dual-Interval and Multi-Stage Scenarios Modeling Approaches for Energy Systems Management and GHG Emissions Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy-related activities contribute a major portion of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions into the atmosphere. In this ... -environment systems management, in which issues of GHG-emission mitigation ca...

G. C. Li; G. H. Huang; Z. F. Liu

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Achieving greenhouse gas emission reductions in developing countries through energy efficient lighting projects in the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)  

SciTech Connect

Energy efficiency can help address the challenge of increasing access to modern energy services, reduce the need for capital-intensive supply investments as well as mitigating climate change. Efficient lighting is a promising sector for improving the adequacy and reliability of power systems and reducing emissions in developing countries. However, these measures are hardly represented in the CDM portfolio. The COP/MOP decision to include programs of activities in the CDM could open the door to the implementation of a large number of energy efficiency projects in developing countries. Since GHG reductions are essentially the emission equivalent of energy savings, the CDM can benefit from long established energy efficiency methodologies for quantifying energy savings and fulfilling CDM methodological requirements. The integration of the CDM into energy efficiency programs could help spur a necessary transformation in the lighting market.

Figueres, C.; Bosi, M.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Texas Emissions Reductions Program (TERP) Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Generated in Texas by Renewable Sources Solar Biomass Landfill gas Hydro RENEWABLES: WHAT ARE THEY? Wind energy is the largest portion. Landfill gas, hydro are next. Biomass, solar are smallest 0 5,000,000 10,000,000 15,000,000 20... Total Installed Capacity in Ercot Area by 2010 Total Installed Capacity in Texas by 2010 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 WIND PROJECTS IN TEXAS (2010) Substantial increases in measured electricity from wind energy. However, wind...

Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Potential for reducing paper mill energy use and carbon dioxide emissions through plant-wide energy audits: A case study in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The pulp and paper industry is one of the most energy-intensive industries worldwide. In 2007, it accounted for 5% of total global industrial energy consumption and 2% of direct industrial carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. An energy audit is a primary step toward improving energy efficiency at the facility level. This paper describes a plant-wide energy audit aimed at identifying energy conservation and CO2 mitigation opportunities at a paper mill in Guangdong province, China. We describe the energy audit methods, relevant Chinese standards, methods of calculating energy and carbon indicators, baseline energy consumption and CO2 emissions of the audited paper mill, and nine energy-efficiency improvement opportunities identified by the audit. For each of the nine options, we evaluate the energy conservation and associated CO2 mitigation potential. The total technical energy conservation potential for these nine opportunities is 967.8 terajoules (TJ), and the total CO2 mitigation potential is equal to 93,453 tonnes CO2 annually, representing 14.4% and 14.7%, respectively, of the mill’s total energy consumption and CO2 emissions during the audit period.

Lingbo Kong; Lynn Price; Ali Hasanbeigi; Huanbin Liu; Jigeng Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

CONSTRAINING THE HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH FERMI  

SciTech Connect

We examine 288 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) that fell within the field of view of Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT) during the first 2.5 years of observations, which showed no evidence for emission above 100 MeV. We report the photon flux upper limits in the 0.1-10 GeV range during the prompt emission phase as well as for fixed 30 s and 100 s integrations starting from the trigger time for each burst. We compare these limits with the fluxes that would be expected from extrapolations of spectral fits presented in the first GBM spectral catalog and infer that roughly half of the GBM-detected bursts either require spectral breaks between the GBM and LAT energy bands or have intrinsically steeper spectra above the peak of the {nu}F{sub {nu}} spectra (E{sub pk}). In order to distinguish between these two scenarios, we perform joint GBM and LAT spectral fits to the 30 brightest GBM-detected bursts and find that a majority of these bursts are indeed softer above E{sub pk} than would be inferred from fitting the GBM data alone. Approximately 20% of this spectroscopic subsample show statistically significant evidence for a cutoff in their high-energy spectra, which if assumed to be due to {gamma}{gamma} attenuation, places limits on the maximum Lorentz factor associated with the relativistic outflow producing this emission. All of these latter bursts have maximum Lorentz factor estimates that are well below the minimum Lorentz factors calculated for LAT-detected GRBs, revealing a wide distribution in the bulk Lorentz factor of GRB outflows and indicating that LAT-detected bursts may represent the high end of this distribution.

Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Charles, E. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Bonamente, E.; Cecchi, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica 'M. Merlin' dell'Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Caliandro, G. A., E-mail: jchiang@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: kocevski@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: moretti@particle.kth.se, E-mail: connauv@uah.edu, E-mail: valerie@nasa.gov, E-mail: michael.briggs@nasa.gov [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (IEEE-CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); Collaboration: Fermi Large Area Telescope Team; Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor Team; and others

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

ERS 14.2 Emissions Monitoring, 4/3/95 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ERS 14.2 Emissions Monitoring, 4395 ERS 14.2 Emissions Monitoring, 4395 The objective of this surveillance is to verify that the contractor is monitoring emissions of...

453

HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION INDUCED BY ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY PHOTONS AS A PROBE OF ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATORS EMBEDDED IN THE COSMIC WEB  

SciTech Connect

The photomeson production in ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) accelerators such as {gamma}-ray bursts and active galaxies may lead to ultra-high-energy (UHE) {gamma}-ray emission. We show that the generation of UHE pairs in magnetized structured regions where the sources are embedded is inevitable, and accompanying {approx}> 0.1 TeV synchrotron emission provides an important probe of UHECR acceleration. It would especially be relevant for powerful transient sources, and synchrotron pair echoes may be detected by future CTA via coordinated search for transients of duration {approx}0.1-1 yr for the structured regions of {approx}Mpc. Detections will be useful for knowing structured extragalactic magnetic fields as well as properties of the sources.

Murase, Kohta [Department of Physics, Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Discrete Dipole Approximation for Low-Energy Photoelectron Emission from NaCl Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

This work presents a model for the photoemission of electrons from sodium chloride nanoparticles 50-500 nm in size, illuminated by vacuum ultraviolet light with energy ranging from 9.4-10.9 eV. The discrete dipole approximation is used to calculate the electromagnetic field inside the particles, from which the two-dimensional angular distribution of emitted electrons is simulated. The emission is found to favor the particle?s geometrically illuminated side, and this asymmetry is compared to previous measurements performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. By modeling the nanoparticles as spheres, the Berkeley group is able to semi-quantitatively account for the observed asymmetry. Here however, the particles are modeled as cubes, which is closer to their actual shape, and the interaction of an emitted electron with the particle surface is also considered. The end result shows that the emission asymmetry for these low-energy electrons is more sensitive to the particle-surface interaction than to the specific particle shape, i.e., a sphere or cube.

Berg, Matthew J.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Sorensen, Chris; Chakrabarti, Amit; Ahmed, Musahid

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

455

Folding Proteins at 500 ns/hour with Work Queue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in part to the unbiased nature of these simulations: the low-energy regions of the free-energy landscape to achieve an aggregate sampling rate of over 500 ns/hour. As a comparison, a single process typically are oversampled while the (arguably more interesting) high-energy tran- sition regions are rarely observed

Thain, Douglas

456

Testimony of R. E. Smalley to the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources; Hearing on sustainable , low emission,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, for example, hundreds of gigawatts of electrical power to be transported from solar farms in New Mexico1 Testimony of R. E. Smalley to the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources; Hearing on sustainable , low emission, electricity generation, April 27, 2004 Energy is the single most important

457

Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation to help researchers understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies for recharging PHEVs, as well as the powertrain technology and fuel sources for PHEVs.

458

Life-Cycle Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emission Implicaitons of Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Simulated with the GREET Model  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Life-Cycle Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emission Implications of Life-Cycle Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emission Implications of Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Simulated with the GREET Model Michael Wang*, May Wu, Hong Huo and Jiahong Liu Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA. *Contact author: Tel: +1 (630) 252 2819 Fax: +1 (630) 252 3443 Email: mqwang@anl.gov In International Sugar Journal 2008, Vol. 110, No. 1317 ABSTRACT By using data available in the open literature, we expanded the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed by Argonne National Laboratory to include Brazilian-grown sugarcane ethanol. With the expanded GREET model, we examined the well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use and

459

The Value of End-Use Energy Efficiency in Mitigation of U.S. Carbon Emissions  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a scenario analysis exploring the value of advanced technologies in the U.S. buildings, industrial, and transportation sectors in stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. The analysis was conducted by staff members of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), working at the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) in support of the strategic planning process of the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The conceptual framework for the analysis is an integration of detailed buildings, industrial, and transportation modules into MiniCAM, a global integrated assessment model. The analysis is based on three technology scenarios, which differ in their assumed rates of deployment of new or presently available energy-saving technologies in the end-use sectors. These technology scenarios are explored with no carbon policy, and under two CO2 stabilization policies, in which an economic price on carbon is applied such that emissions follow prescribed trajectories leading to long-term stabilization of CO2 at roughly 450 and 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv). The costs of meeting the emissions targets prescribed by these policies are examined, and compared between technology scenarios. Relative to the reference technology scenario, advanced technologies in all three sectors reduce costs by 50% and 85% for the 450 and 550 ppmv policies, respectively. The 450 ppmv policy is more stringent and imposes higher costs than the 550 ppmv policy; as a result, the magnitude of the economic value of energy efficiency is four times greater for the 450 ppmv policy than the 550 ppmv policy. While they substantially reduce the costs of meeting emissions requirements, advanced end-use technologies do not lead to greenhouse gas stabilization without a carbon policy. This is due mostly to the effects of increasing service demands over time, the high consumption of fossil fuels in the electricity sector, and the use of unconventional feedstocks in the liquid fuel refining sector. Of the three end-use sectors, advanced transportation technologies have the greatest potential to reduce costs of meeting carbon policy requirements. Services in the buildings and industrial sectors can often be supplied by technologies that consume low-emissions fuels such as biomass or, in policy cases, electricity. Passenger transportation, in contrast, is especially unresponsive to climate policies, as the fuel costs are small compared to the time value of transportation and vehicle capital and operating costs. Delaying the transition from reference to advanced technologies by 15 years increases the costs of meeting 450 ppmv stabilization emissions requirements by 21%, but the costs are still 39% lower than the costs assuming reference technology. The report provides a detailed description of the end-use technology scenarios and provides a thorough analysis of the results. Assumptions are documented in the Appendix.

Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

460

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production...

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461

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Market Trend - Carbon Emissions and Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Economic Growth World Oil Prices Total Energy Consumption Residential and Commercial Sectors Industrial Sector Transportation Sector Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Three other organizations—Standard & Poor’s DRI (DRI), the WEFA Group (WEFA), and the Gas Research Institute (GRI)—also produce comprehensive energy projections with a time horizon similar to that of AEO2000. The most recent projections from those organizations (DRI, Spring/Summer 1999; WEFA, 1999; GRI, August 1998), as well as other forecasts that concentrate on petroleum, natural gas, and international oil markets, are compared here with the AEO2000 projections. Economic Growth Differences in long-run economic forecasts can be traced primarily to different views of the major supply-side determinants of growth in gross

462

EVIDENCE FOR A SECOND COMPONENT IN THE HIGH-ENERGY CORE EMISSION FROM CENTAURUS A?  

SciTech Connect

We report on an analysis of Fermi Large Area Telescope data from four years of observations of the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A (Cen A). The increased photon statistics results in a detection of high-energy (>100 MeV) gamma-rays up to 50 GeV from the core of Cen A, with a detection significance of about 44{sigma}. The average gamma-ray spectrum of the core reveals evidence for a possible deviation from a simple power law. A likelihood analysis with a broken power-law model shows that the photon index becomes harder above E{sub b} {approx_equal} 4 GeV, changing from {Gamma}{sub 1} = 2.74 {+-} 0.03 below to {Gamma}{sub 2} = 2.09 {+-} 0.20 above. This hardening could be caused by the contribution of an additional high-energy component beyond the common synchrotron self-Compton jet emission. No clear evidence for variability in the high-energy domain is seen. We compare our results with the spectrum reported by H.E.S.S. in the TeV energy range and discuss possible origins of the hardening observed.

Sahakyan, N. [ICRANet, Piazz della Repubblica 10, I-65122 Pescara (Italy); Yang, R. [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China); Aharonian, F. A. [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Rieger, F. M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, P.O. Box 103980, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

463

Chapter 563 - Potential Assessment of Renewable Energy Technologies in CO2 Emission Mitigation in Domestic Sector of India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter deals with an assessment of exiting potential, present status, and future trends of the development of various renewable energy technologies in India. The chapter also tries to correlate the overall development of the renewable energy sources in the context of carbon dioxide emission mitigation efforts. Some of the technologies, like solar water heaters, solar cookers, domestic PV lighting systems, and biogas plants for cooking and lighting have achieved a certain level of maturity to boost their scope of application in domestic sector. It reviews all of these developments. India has an extensive potential of renewable energy sources that can be developed as a significant source of energy at the local and regional level. Significant cost reduction as well as mitigation of other constraints will be needed for the renewable energy technologies to achieve their potential in supplying energy, and reduction in carbon dioxide emission in India.

H.P. Garg; Rakesh Kumar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Non-thermal high-energy emission from colliding winds of massive stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colliding winds of massive star binary systems are considered as potential sites of non-thermal high-energy photon production. This is motivated merely by the detection of synchrotron radio emission from the expected colliding wind location. Here we investigate the properties of high-energy photon production in colliding winds of long-period WR+OB-systems. We found that in the dominating leptonic radiation process anisotropy and Klein-Nishina effects may yield spectral and variability signatures in the gamma-ray domain at or above the sensitivity of current or upcoming gamma-ray telescopes. Analytical formulae for the steady-state particle spectra are derived assuming diffusive particle acceleration out of a pool of thermal wind particles, and taking into account adiabatic and all relevant radiative losses. For the first time we include their advection/convection in the wind collision zone, and distinguish two regions within this extended region: the acceleration region where spatial diffusion is superior to convective/advective motion, and the convection region defined by the convection time shorter than the diffusion time scale. The calculation of the Inverse Compton radiation uses the full Klein-Nishina cross section, and takes into account the anisotropic nature of the scattering process. This leads to orbital flux variations by up to several orders of magnitude which may, however, be blurred by the geometry of the system. The calculations are applied to the typical WR+OB-systems WR 140 and WR 147 to yield predictions of their expected spectral and temporal characteristica and to evaluate chances to detect high-energy emission with the current and upcoming gamma-ray experiments. (abridged)

A. Reimer; M. Pohl; O. Reimer

2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

465

DISCOVERY OF AN EXTRA HARD SPECTRAL COMPONENT IN THE HIGH-ENERGY AFTERGLOW EMISSION OF GRB 130427A  

SciTech Connect

The extended high-energy gamma-ray (>100 MeV) emission which occurs after prompt gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is usually characterized by a single power-law spectrum, which has been explained as the afterglow synchrotron radiation. The afterglow inverse Compton emission has long been predicted to be able to produce a high-energy component as well, but previous observations have not clearly revealed such a signature, probably due to the small number of >10 GeV photons even for the brightest GRBs known so far. In this Letter, we report on the Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of the >100 MeV emission from the very bright and nearby GRB 130427A. We characterize the time-resolved spectra of the GeV emission from the GRB onset to the afterglow phase. By performing time-resolved spectral fits of GRB 130427A, we found strong evidence of an extra hard spectral component that exists in the extended high-energy emission of this GRB. We argue that this hard component may arise from the afterglow inverse Compton emission.

Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Tang Qingwen; Liu Ruoyu; Wang Xiangyu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Hou Shujin, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: xywang@nju.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

The evolution of carbon dioxide emissions from energy use in industrialized countries: an end-use analysis  

SciTech Connect

There has been much attention drawn to plans for reductions or restraint in future C02 emissions, yet little analysis of the recent history of those emissions by end use or economic activity. Understanding the components of C02 emissions, particularly those related to combustion of fossil fuels, is important for judging the likely success of plans for dealing with future emissions. Knowing how fuel switching, changes in economic activity and its structure, or changes in energy-use efficiency affected emissions in the past, we can better judge both the realism of national proposals to restrain future emissions and the outcome as well. This study presents a first step in that analysis. The organization of this paper is as follows. We present a brief background and summarize previous work analyzing changes in energy use using the factorial method. We then describe our data sources and method. We then present a series of summary results, including a comparison of C02 emissions in 1991 by end use or sector. We show both aggregate change and change broken down by factor, highlighting briefly the main components of change. We then present detailed results, sector by sector. Next we highlight recent trends. Finally, we integrate our results, discussing -the most important factors driving change - evolution in economic structure, changes in energy intensities, and shifts in the fuel mix. We discuss briefly some of the likely causes of these changes - long- term technological changes, effects of rising incomes, the impact of overall changes in energy prices, as well as changes in the relative prices of energy forms.

Schipper, L.; Ting, M.; Khrushch, M.; Unander, F.; Monahan, P.; Golove, W.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of Travel Reduction and Efficient Driving on Transportation: Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Since the 1970s, numerous transportation strategies have been formulated to change the behavior of drivers or travelers by reducing trips, shifting travel to more efficient modes, or improving the efficiency of existing modes. This report summarizes findings documented in existing literature to identify strategies with the greatest potential impact. The estimated effects of implementing the most significant and aggressive individual driver behavior modification strategies range from less than 1% to a few percent reduction in transportation energy use and GHG emissions. Combined strategies result in reductions of 7% to 15% by 2030. Pricing, ridesharing, eco-driving, and speed limit reduction/enforcement strategies are widely judged to have the greatest estimated potential effect, but lack the widespread public acceptance needed to accomplish maximum results. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; DeFlorio, J.; McKenzie, E.; Tao, W.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Forster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems: III. Exact stochastic path integral evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A numerically exact path integral treatment of the absorption and emission spectra of open quantum systems is presented that requires only the straightforward solution of a stochastic differential equation. The approach converges rapidly enabling the calculation of spectra of large excitonic systems across the complete range of system parameters and for arbitrary bath spectral densities. With the numerically exact absorption and emission operators one can also immediately compute energy transfer rates using the multi-chromophoric Forster resonant energy transfer formalism. Benchmark calculations on the emission spectra of two level systems are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the stochastic approach. This is followed by calculations of the energy transfer rates between two weakly coupled dimer systems as a function of temperature and system-bath coupling strength. It is shown that the recently developed hybrid cumulant expansion is the only perturbative method capable of generating uniformly reliable e...

Moix, Jeremy; Cao, Jianshu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

SciTech Connect

Globally, the cement industry accounts for approximately 5 percent of current anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. World cement demand and production are increasing significantly, leading to an increase in this industry's absolute energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} emission-reduction technologies and their deployment in the market will be key for the cement industry's mid- and long-term climate change mitigation strategies. This report is an initial effort to compile available information on process description, energy savings, environmental and other benefits, costs, commercialization status, and references for emerging technologies to reduce the cement industry's energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions. Although studies from around the world identify a variety of sector-specific and cross-cutting energy-efficiency technologies for the cement industry that have already been commercialized, information is scarce and/or scattered regarding emerging or advanced energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies that are not yet commercialized. This report consolidates available information on nineteen emerging technologies for the cement industry, with the goal of providing engineers, researchers, investors, cement companies, policy makers, and other interested parties with easy access to a well-structured database of information on these technologies.

Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn; Lin, Elina

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

470

The impact of energy prices on the volatility of ethanol prices and the role of gasoline emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The contribution of Renewable Energy Resources is vital for a country?s economic growth by providing high efficiency in energy, as well as an effective tool for the confrontation of climate change. In particular, concerning the EU, an increase in the consumption of Renewable Energy Resources as a proportion of the total energy consumption by its member states was set as an objective until 2020. Ethanol has been widely used as a substitute to conventional energy like gasoline and oil. The present paper surveys the role of alternative energy prices and gas emissions in the formation of the ethanol prices. The results of the empirical survey confirmed th