Sample records for hourly emission factors

  1. Quantification of Variability and Uncertainty in Hourly NOx Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    to quantify variability and uncertainty for NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants. Data for hourly NOx emissions, heat rate, gross load and capacity factor of 32 units from 9 different power plants were analyzed Uncertainty, Variability, Emission Factors, Coal-Fired Power Plants, NOx emissions, Regression Models

  2. Impact of realistic hourly emissions profiles on air pollutants concentrations modelled with CHIMERE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Impact of realistic hourly emissions profiles on air pollutants concentrations modelled Keywords: Atmospheric composition European air quality Anthropogenic emissions a b s t r a c t Regional inputs data like anthropogenic surface emissions of NOx, VOCs and particulate matter. These emissions

  3. A PM10 emission factor for free stall dairies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodrich, Lee Barry

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    was determined using the Coulter Counter Multisizer. The results of this process was a representative dairy PM PSD with 28% of TSP emissions being PM10. The reported PM10 24-hour emission factors were 4.7 kg/1000hd/day for the free-stall areas of the facility...

  4. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski Missoula Fire burning Greenhouse gases Emission factors a b s t r a c t While the vast majority of carbon emitted wildland fire greenhouse gas and aerosol (organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC)) emission inventories

  5. Effect of Environmental Factors on Sulfur Gas Emissions from Drywall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Randy

    2011-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Problem drywall installed in U.S. homes is suspected of being a source of odorous and potentially corrosive indoor pollutants. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC) investigation of problem drywall incorporates three parallel tracks: (1) evaluating the relationship between the drywall and reported health symptoms; (2) evaluating the relationship between the drywall and electrical and fire safety issues in affected homes; and (3) tracing the origin and the distribution of the drywall. To assess the potential impact on human health and to support testing for electrical and fire safety, the CPSC has initiated a series of laboratory tests that provide elemental characterization of drywall, characterization of chemical emissions, and in-home air sampling. The chemical emission testing was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The LBNL study consisted of two phases. In Phase 1 of this study, LBNL tested thirty drywall samples provided by CPSC and reported standard emission factors for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), aldehydes, reactive sulfur gases (RSGs) and volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs). The standard emission factors were determined using small (10.75 liter) dynamic test chambers housed in a constant temperature environmental chamber. The tests were all run at 25 C, 50% relative humidity (RH) and with an area-specific ventilation rate of {approx}1.5 cubic meters per square meter of emitting surface per hour [m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}/h]. The thirty samples that were tested in Phase 1 included seventeen that were manufactured in China in 2005, 2006 and 2009, and thirteen that were manufactured in North America in 2009. The measured emission factors for VOCs and aldehydes were generally low and did not differ significantly between the Chinese and North American drywall. Eight of the samples tested had elevated emissions of volatile sulfur-containing compounds with total RSG emission factors between 32 and 258 micrograms per square meter per hour [{micro}g/m{sup 2}/h]. The dominant sulfur containing compounds in the RSG emission stream were hydrogen sulfide with emission factors between 17-201 {micro}g/m{sup 2}/h, and sulfur dioxide with emission factors between 8-64 {micro}g/m{sup 2}/h. The four highest emitting samples also had a unique signature of VSC emissions including > 40 higher molecular weight sulfur-containing compounds although the emission rate for the VSCs was several orders of magnitude lower than that of the RSGs. All of the high emitting drywall samples were manufactured in China in 2005-2006. Results from Phase 1 provided baseline emission factors for drywall samples manufactured in China and in North America but the results exclude variations in environmental conditions that may exist in homes or other built structures, including various combinations of temperature, RH, ventilation rate and the influence of coatings such as texture and paints. The objective of Phase 2 was to quantify the effect of temperature and RH on the RSG emission factors for uncoated drywall, and to measure the effect of plaster and paint coatings on RSG emission factors from drywall. Additional experiments were also performed to assess the influence of ventilation rate on measured emission factors for drywall.

  6. Abdel-Aziz, A. and H.C. Frey, "Quantification of Hourly Variability in Hourly Activity and NOx Emissions for Baseload Coal-Fired Power Plants," Proceedings, Annual Meeting of the Air & Waste Management Association, Pittsburgh, PA, June 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    Emissions for Baseload Coal- Fired Power Plants," Proceedings, Annual Meeting of the Air & Waste Management emission factors from coal-fired power plants vary over time due to variation in coal composition fed or to evaluate the variability of NOx emission rates for coal-fired power plants of the 100 largest electric

  7. Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Coal

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has developed factors for estimating the amount of carbon dioxide emitted, accounting for differences among coals, to reflect the changing "mix" of coal in U.S. coal consumption.

  8. Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klepeis, Neil E.; Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Sextro, Richard G.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2002-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Because size is a major controlling factor for indoor airborne particle behavior, human particle exposure assessments will benefit from improved knowledge of size-specific particle emissions. We report a method of inferring size-specific mass emission factors for indoor sources that makes use of an indoor aerosol dynamics model, measured particle concentration time series data, and an optimization routine. This approach provides--in addition to estimates of the emissions size distribution and integrated emission factors--estimates of deposition rate, an enhanced understanding of particle dynamics, and information about model performance. We applied the method to size-specific environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) particle concentrations measured every minute with an 8-channel optical particle counter (PMS-LASAIR; 0.1-2+ micrometer diameters) and every 10 or 30 min with a 34-channel differential mobility particle sizer (TSI-DMPS; 0.01-1+ micrometer diameters) after a single cigarette or cigar was machine-smoked inside a low air-exchange-rate 20 m{sup 3} chamber. The aerosol dynamics model provided good fits to observed concentrations when using optimized values of mass emission rate and deposition rate for each particle size range as input. Small discrepancies observed in the first 1-2 hours after smoking are likely due to the effect of particle evaporation, a process neglected by the model. Size-specific ETS particle emission factors were fit with log-normal distributions, yielding an average mass median diameter of 0.2 micrometers and an average geometric standard deviation of 2.3 with no systematic differences between cigars and cigarettes. The equivalent total particle emission rate, obtained integrating each size distribution, was 0.2-0.7 mg/min for cigars and 0.7-0.9 mg/min for cigarettes.

  9. Development of an ammonia emission protocol and preliminary emission factor for a central Texas dairy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Adam Joseph

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    dairies. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), the Texas SAPRA, does not currently use an emission factor to permit or regulate emitted ammonia for the dairy industry. ________________________ This thesis follows the style..., and is subject to gas-phase reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl (-OH) radicals, reaction with gaseous nitric acid (to form particulate ammonium nitrate), and with aerosols to form ammonium salts (Singh et al., 2001). Ammonia that does not react...

  10. Spontaneous emission factor for semiconductor superluminescent diodes Yongsheng Zhao, Weihua Han, Junfeng Song, Xuemei Li, Yang Liu, Dingsan Gao,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Hui

    Spontaneous emission factor for semiconductor superluminescent diodes Yongsheng Zhao, Weihua Han emission factor is an important parameter for the characterization of semiconductor light emitting devices difference involved in each device. In this article, the spontaneous emission factor for superluminescent

  11. Establishing Standard Source Energy and Emission Factors for Energy Use in Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This procedure provides source energy factors and emission factors to calculate the source (primary) energy and emissions from a building's annual site energy consumption. This report provides the energy and emission factors to calculate the source energy and emissions for electricity and fuels delivered to a facility and combustion of fuels at a facility. The factors for electricity are broken down by fuel type and presented for the continental United States, three grid interconnections, and each state. The electricity fuel and emission factors are adjusted for the electricity and the useful thermal output generated by combined heat and power (CHP) plants larger than one megawatt. The energy and emissions from extracting, processing, and transporting the fuels, also known as the precombustion effects, are included.

  12. Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Individual Heavy-Duty Trucks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Individual Heavy-Duty Trucks of California, Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Berkeley, CA 94720-1710 Abstract Emission factors for black carbon (BC) and particle number (PN) were measured from 226 individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel

  13. Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels - Diesel Emissions Project (APBF-DEC): 2,000-Hour Performance of a NOx Adsorber Catalyst and Diesel Particle Filter System for a Medium-Duty, Pick-Up Diesel Engine Platform; Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presents the results of a 2,000-hour test of an emissions control system consisting of a nitrogen oxides adsorber catalyst in combination with a diesel particle filter, advanced fuels, and advanced engine controls in an SUV/pick-up truck vehicle platform.

  14. Emission factors for ammonia and particulate matter from broiler Houses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redwine, Jarah Suzanne

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of ammonia will probably result in the emission of other odorants (e. g. volatile fatty acids. volatile amines, indole, phenol, sulfur-containing compounds). Ammonia is produced from the microbial breakdown of uric acid in poultry manure. The decomposition... sulfate (Barthelmie and Pryor, 1998). Additionally, ammonia is an odorant and conditions conducive to the production of ammonia will probably result in the emission of other odorants (e. g. volatile fatty acids, volatile amines, indole, phenol, sulfur...

  15. GHG emission factors developed for the recycling and composting of municipal waste in South African municipalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, Elena, E-mail: Friedriche@ukzn.ac.za; Trois, Cristina

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • GHG emission factors for local recycling of municipal waste are presented. • GHG emission factors for two composting technologies for garden waste are included. • Local GHG emission factors were compared to international ones and discussed. • Uncertainties and limitations are presented and areas for new research highlighted. - Abstract: GHG (greenhouse gas) emission factors for waste management are increasingly used, but such factors are very scarce for developing countries. This paper shows how such factors have been developed for the recycling of glass, metals (Al and Fe), plastics and paper from municipal solid waste, as well as for the composting of garden refuse in South Africa. The emission factors developed for the different recyclables in the country show savings varying from ?290 kg CO{sub 2} e (glass) to ?19 111 kg CO{sub 2} e (metals – Al) per tonne of recyclable. They also show that there is variability, with energy intensive materials like metals having higher GHG savings in South Africa as compared to other countries. This underlines the interrelation of the waste management system of a country/region with other systems, in particular with energy generation, which in South Africa, is heavily reliant on coal. This study also shows that composting of garden waste is a net GHG emitter, releasing 172 and 186 kg CO{sub 2} e per tonne of wet garden waste for aerated dome composting and turned windrow composting, respectively. The paper concludes that these emission factors are facilitating GHG emissions modelling for waste management in South Africa and enabling local municipalities to identify best practice in this regard.

  16. Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPower Finance Jump to:Information of Emission

  17. Emission Factor for Antimony in Brake Abrasion Dusts as One of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    originating from automobiles. Abrasion dusts from commercially available brake pads (nonasbestos organic type factors originating from automobiles were approximately 32 µg Sb/braking/car for PM10 and 22 µg Sb of automobiles to the atmospheric Sb concen- tration. The emission factors of pollutants from automobiles have

  18. Source Apportionment of Stack Emissions from Research and Development Facilities Using Positive Matrix Factorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Larson, Timothy V.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions from research and development (R&D) facilities are difficult to characterize due to the wide variety of processes used, changing nature of research, and large number of chemicals. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) concentrations measured in the main exhaust stacks of four different R&D buildings to identify the number and composition of major contributing sources. PMF identified from 9-11 source-related factors contributing to the stack emissions depending on the building. The factors that were similar between buildings were major contributors to trichloroethylene (TCE), acetone, and ethanol emissions. Several other factors had similar profiles for two or more buildings but not for all four. One factor for each building was a combination of p/m-xylene, o-xylene and ethylbenzene. At least one factor for each building was identified that contained a broad mix of many species and constraints were used in PMF to modify the factors to resemble more closely the off-shift concentration profiles. PMF accepted the constraints with little decrease in model fit. Although the PMF model predicted the profiles of the off-shift samples, the percent of total emissions was under-predicted by the model versus the measured data.

  19. Emission factors for particles, elemental carbon, and trace gases from the Kuwait oil fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laursen, K.K.; Ferek, R.J.; Hobbs, P.V. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rasmussen, R.A. [Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology, Beaverton, OR (United States)

    1992-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission factors are presented for particles, elemental carbon (i.e., soot), total organic carbon in particles and vapor, and for various trace gases from the 1991 Kuwait oil fires. Particle emissions accounted for {approximately} 2% of the fuel burned. In general, soot emission factors were substantially lower than those used in recent {open_quotes}nuclear winter{close_quotes} calculations. Differences in the emissions and appearances of some of the individual fires are discussed. Carbon budget data for the composite plumes from the Kuwait fires are summarized; most of the burned carbon in the plumes was in the form of CO{sub 2}. Fluxes are presented for several combustion products. 26 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  20. Estimating carbon dioxide emission factors for the California electric power sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The California Climate Action Registry (''Registry'') was initially established in 2000 under Senate Bill 1771, and clarifying legislation (Senate Bill 527) was passed in September 2001. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has been asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (CEC) in establishing methods for calculating average and marginal electricity emissions factors, both historic and current, as well as statewide and for sub-regions. This study is exploratory in nature. It illustrates the use of three possible approaches and is not a rigorous estimation of actual emissions factors. While the Registry will ultimately cover emissions of all greenhouse gases (GHGs), presently it is focusing on carbon dioxide (CO2). Thus, this study only considers CO2, which is by far the largest GHG emitted in the power sector. Associating CO2 emissions with electricity consumption encounters three major complications. First, electricity can be generated from a number of different primary energy sources, many of which are large sources of CO2 emissions (e.g., coal combustion) while others result in virtually no CO{sub 2} emissions (e.g., hydro). Second, the mix of generation resources used to meet loads may vary at different times of day or in different seasons. Third, electrical energy is transported over long distances by complex transmission and distribution systems, so the generation sources related to electricity usage can be difficult to trace and may occur far from the jurisdiction in which that energy is consumed. In other words, the emissions resulting from electricity consumption vary considerably depending on when and where it is used since this affects the generation sources providing the power. There is no practical way to identify where or how all the electricity used by a certain customer was generated, but by reviewing public sources of data the total emission burden of a customer's electricity supplier can b e found and an average emissions factor (AEF) calculated. These are useful for assigning a net emission burden to a facility. In addition, marginal emissions factors (MEFs) for estimating the effect of changing levels of usage can be calculated. MEFs are needed because emission rates at the margin are likely to diverge from the average. The overall objective of this task is to develop methods for estimating AEFs and MEFs that can provide an estimate of the combined net CO2 emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to California electricity customers. The method covers the historic period from 1990 to the present, with 1990 and 1999 used as test years. The factors derived take into account the location and time of consumption, direct contracts for power which may have certain atypical characteristics (e.g., ''green'' electricity from renewable resources), resource mixes of electricity providers, import and export of electricity from utility owned and other sources, and electricity from cogeneration. It is assumed that the factors developed in this way will diverge considerably from simple statewide AEF estimates based on standardized inventory estimates that use conventions inconsistent with the goals of this work. A notable example concerns the treatment of imports, which despite providing a significant share of California's electricity supply picture, are excluded from inventory estimates of emissions, which are based on geographical boundaries of the state.

  1. TRB 08-1311 Link-Based Emission Factors for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    TRB 08-1311 Link-Based Emission Factors for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks Based on Real-World Data H and Zhai 1 ABSTRACT Heavy-duty diesel vehicles contribute a substantial fraction of nitrogen oxides unloaded trucks. Replacing diesel fuel with biodiesel fuel for heavy-duty trucks may reduce tailpipe

  2. Using Local and Regional Air Quality Modeling and Source Apportionment Tools to Evaluate Vehicles and Biogenic Emission Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kota, Sri H

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    and inventories of CO, NO_(x) and VOCs from on-road vehicles estimated by vehicle emission factor models and biogenic emissions of isoprene estimated by a popular biogenic emission model are evaluated using local and regional scale air quality modeling and source...

  3. Linear regression analysis of emissions factors when firing fossil fuels and biofuels in a commercial water-tube boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharon Falcone Miller; Bruce G. Miller [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Energy Institute

    2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper compares the emissions factors for a suite of liquid biofuels (three animal fats, waste restaurant grease, pressed soybean oil, and a biodiesel produced from soybean oil) and four fossil fuels (i.e., natural gas, No. 2 fuel oil, No. 6 fuel oil, and pulverized coal) in Penn State's commercial water-tube boiler to assess their viability as fuels for green heat applications. The data were broken into two subsets, i.e., fossil fuels and biofuels. The regression model for the liquid biofuels (as a subset) did not perform well for all of the gases. In addition, the coefficient in the models showed the EPA method underestimating CO and NOx emissions. No relation could be studied for SO{sub 2} for the liquid biofuels as they contain no sulfur; however, the model showed a good relationship between the two methods for SO{sub 2} in the fossil fuels. AP-42 emissions factors for the fossil fuels were also compared to the mass balance emissions factors and EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors. Overall, the AP-42 emissions factors for the fossil fuels did not compare well with the mass balance emissions factors or the EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors. Regression analysis of the AP-42, EPA, and mass balance emissions factors for the fossil fuels showed a significant relationship only for CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}. However, the regression models underestimate the SO{sub 2} emissions by 33%. These tests illustrate the importance in performing material balances around boilers to obtain the most accurate emissions levels, especially when dealing with biofuels. The EPA emissions factors were very good at predicting the mass balance emissions factors for the fossil fuels and to a lesser degree the biofuels. While the AP-42 emissions factors and EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors are easier to perform, especially in large, full-scale systems, this study illustrated the shortcomings of estimation techniques. 23 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Common Help Room Hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Common Help Room Hours for Spring 2015. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. 10:30 am. 11:30 am. MA 16200 - MATH 205 - Nathanael Cox ...

  5. Common Help Room Hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Common Help Room Hours for Spring 2015. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. 10:30 am. 11:30 am. MA 16010 - MATH 205 - Alessandra ...

  6. LIBRARY SERVICES LIBRARY HOURS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    LIBRARY SERVICES LIBRARY HOURS Up-to-date library hours are posted at http Wesleyan ID that is linked to the library circulation database is needed to charge out library materials to visit the Circulation Office in Olin Library 115 to set up their borrowing privileges. If you have

  7. Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

    2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

  8. L:\\SEO\\SEOGN\\WORK-STUDY\\SWS\\SWS11\\EarningsChart.xls Hourly Rate 10 Hours 15 Hours 20 Hours 25 Hours 30 Hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    L:\\SEO\\SEOGN\\WORK-STUDY\\SWS\\SWS11\\EarningsChart.xls Hourly Rate 10 Hours 15 Hours 20 Hours 25 Hours, 2011 through September 4, 2011, the entire Summer Program). Summer 2011 Earnings Chart #12;L:\\SEO,200 $9,000 $10,800 $25.00 $3,750 $5,625 $7,500 $9,375 $11,250 #12;L:\\SEO\\SEOGN\\WORK-STUDY\\SWS\\SWS11

  9. Quantitative analysis of factors affecting greenhouse gas emissions at institutions of higher education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    States, emissions from buildings comprise 40% of energy consumption and carbon emissions, not including to have 10 times more effect on emissions per square meter than space such as classroom and office, while to the institution's own greenhouse gas emission reductions, energy and water conservation, and other sustainability

  10. Intra-Hour Scheduling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation for and Application deadline: NovemberScienceintra-hour

  11. GHG emission factors developed for the collection, transport and landfilling of municipal waste in South African municipalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, Elena, E-mail: Friedriche@ukzn.ac.za [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, Civil Engineering Programme, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa); Trois, Cristina [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, Civil Engineering Programme, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? An average GHG emission factor for the collection and transport of municipal solid waste in South Africa is calculated. ? A range of GHG emission factors for different types of landfills (including dumps) in South Africa are calculated. ? These factors are compared internationally and their implications for South Africa and developing countries are discussed . ? Areas for new research are highlighted. - Abstract: Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors are used with increased frequency for the accounting and reporting of GHG from waste management. However, these factors have been calculated for developed countries of the Northern Hemisphere and are lacking for developing countries. This paper shows how such factors have been developed for the collection, transport and landfilling of municipal waste in South Africa. As such it presents a model on how international results and methodology can be adapted and used to calculate country-specific GHG emission factors from waste. For the collection and transport of municipal waste in South Africa, the average diesel consumption is around 5 dm{sup 3} (litres) per tonne of wet waste and the associated GHG emissions are about 15 kg CO{sub 2} equivalents (CO{sub 2} e). Depending on the type of landfill, the GHG emissions from the landfilling of waste have been calculated to range from ?145 to 1016 kg CO{sub 2} e per tonne of wet waste, when taking into account carbon storage, and from 441 to 2532 kg CO{sub 2} e per tonne of wet waste, when carbon storage is left out. The highest emission factor per unit of wet waste is for landfill sites without landfill gas collection and these are the dominant waste disposal facilities in South Africa. However, cash strapped municipalities in Africa and the developing world will not be able to significantly upgrade these sites and reduce their GHG burdens if there is no equivalent replacement of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) resulting from the Kyoto agreement. Other low cost avenues need to be investigated to suit local conditions, in particular landfill covers which enhance methane oxidation.

  12. Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tast, CynthiaL; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.; Fairley, David

    2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived Coefficient of Haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population?s exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of ~;;3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has recently been retired.

  13. Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission FactorsDerived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California:1967-2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived Coefficient of Haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population's exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of {approx}3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has recently been retired.

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonia emission factors Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FROM WASTE-TO-ENERGY FACILITIES WITH OPERATIONAL CONTROLS... program for the theory that combustion controls can be utilized to minimize NOx emissions. ... Source: Columbia...

  15. Application of positive matrix factorization to on-road measurements for source apportionment of diesel-and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    of diesel- and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City D. A. Thornhill, A. E. Williams, T. B be low. The second figure shows the background versus diesel factors. There may be a slight horizontal factors. In this case, even when the diesel factor's contributions are very high, the background factor

  16. Economic investigation of discount factors for agricultural greenhouse gas emission offsets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Man-Keun

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    approaches to discount factors, estimation and incorporation of discount factors procedures are developed. Discount factors would be imposed by credit purchasers due to noncompliance with regulatory program of the credits with GHG program including...

  17. Dust covering factor, silicate emission and star formation in luminous QSOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Maiolino; O. Shemmer; M. Imanishi; H. Netzer; E. Oliva; D. Lutz; E. Sturm

    2007-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Spitzer IRS low resolution, mid-IR spectra of a sample of 25 high luminosity QSOs at 2silicate emission feature in the average spectrum, but also in four individual objects. These are the Silicate emission in the most luminous objects obtained so far. When combined with the silicate emission observed in local, low luminosity type-I AGNs, we find that the silicate emission strength is correlated with luminosity. The silicate strength of all type-I AGNs also follows a positive correlation with the black hole mass and with the accretion rate. The Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features, expected from starburst activity, are not detected in the average spectrum of luminous, high-z QSOs. The upper limit inferred from the average spectrum points to a ratio between PAH luminosity and QSO optical luminosity significantly lower than observed in lower luminosity AGNs, implying that the correlation between star formation rate and AGN power saturates at high luminosities.

  18. Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ban-Weiss, George A.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Harley, Robert A.

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Average particle number concentrations and size distributions from {approx}61,000 light-duty (LD) vehicles and {approx}2500 medium-duty (MD) and heavy-duty (HD) trucks were measured during the summer of 2006 in a San Francisco Bay area traffic tunnel. One of the traffic bores contained only LD vehicles, and the other contained mixed traffic, allowing pollutants to be apportioned between LD vehicles and diesel trucks. Particle number emission factors (particle diameter D{sub p} > 3 nm) were found to be (3.9 {+-} 1.4) x 10{sup 14} and (3.3 {+-} 1.3) x 10{sup 15} kg{sup -1} fuel burned for LD vehicles and diesel trucks, respectively. Size distribution measurements showed that diesel trucks emitted at least an order of magnitude more particles for all measured sizes (10 < D{sub p} < 290 nm) per unit mass of fuel burned. The relative importance of LD vehicles as a source of particles increased as D{sub p} decreased. Comparing the results from this study to previous measurements at the same site showed that particle number emission factors have decreased for both LD vehicles and diesel trucks since 1997. Integrating size distributions with a volume weighting showed that diesel trucks emitted 28 {+-} 11 times more particles by volume than LD vehicles, consistent with the diesel/gasoline emission factor ratio for PM{sub 2.5} mass measured using gravimetric analysis of Teflon filters, reported in a companion paper.

  19. Pollutant Emission Factors from Residential Natural Gas Appliances: A Literature Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traynor, G.W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H. Bromly, Reduction of Nitrogen Dioxide Emissions from Gasthan 10 ! lm), and nitrogen dioxide ( N0 2) standards areare nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (N0 2); although,

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn England; Oliver Chang; Stephanie Wien

    2002-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides results from the second year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operation. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation tests results for a gas turbine, a process heater, and a commercial oil/gas fired boiler are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods. A series of pilot tests were conducted to identify the constraints to reduce the size of current research dilution sampler for future stack emission tests. Based on the test results, a bench prototype compact dilution sampler developed and characterized in GE EER in August 2002.

  1. Form factor in K+ --> pi+ pi0 gamma: interference versus direct emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luigi Cappiello; Giancarlo D'Ambrosio

    2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the effect of a form factor in the magnetic contribution to K+ --> pi+ pi0 gamma. We emphasize how this can show up experimentally: in particular we try to explore the difference between a possible interference contribution and a form factor in the magnetic part. The form factor used for K+ --> pi+ pi0 gamma is analogous to the one for KL --> pi+ pi- gamma, experimentally well established.

  2. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn C. England

    2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1997, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated new National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter, including for the first time particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers ({micro}m) referred to as PM2.5. PM2.5 in the atmosphere also contributes to reduced atmospheric visibility, which is the subject of existing rules for siting emission sources near Class 1 areas and new Regional Haze rules. There are few existing data regarding emissions and characteristics of fine aerosols from oil, gas and power generation industry combustion sources, and the information that is available is generally outdated and incomplete. Traditional stationary source air emission sampling methods tend to underestimate or overestimate the contribution of the source to ambient aerosols because they do not properly account for primary aerosol formation, which occurs after the gases leave the stack. Primary aerosol includes both filterable particles that are solid or liquid aerosols at stack temperature plus those that form as the stack gases cool through mixing and dilution processes in the plume downwind of the source. These deficiencies in the current methods can have significant impacts on regulatory decision-making. PM2.5 measurement issues were extensively reviewed by the American Petroleum Institute (API) (England et al., 1998), and it was concluded that dilution sampling techniques are more appropriate for obtaining a representative particulate matter sample from combustion systems for determining PM2.5 emission rate and chemical speciation. Dilution sampling is intended to collect aerosols including those that condense and/or react to form solid or liquid aerosols as the exhaust plume mixes and cools to near-ambient temperature immediately after the stack discharge. These techniques have been widely used in recent research studies. For example, Hildemann et al. (1994) and McDonald et al. (1998) used filtered ambient air to dilute the stack gas sample followed by 80-90 seconds residence time to allow aerosol formation and growth to stabilize prior to sample collection and analysis. More accurate and complete emissions data generated using the methods developed in this program will enable more accurate source-receptor and source apportionment analysis for PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) implementation and streamline the environmental assessment of oil, gas and power production facilities. The overall goals of this program were to: (1) Develop improved dilution sampling technology and test methods for PM2.5 mass emissions and speciation measurements, and compare results obtained with dilution and traditional stationary source sampling methods. (2) Develop emission factors and speciation profiles for emissions of fine particulate matter, especially organic aerosols, for use in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses. (3) Identify and characterize PM2.5 precursor compound emissions that can be used in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses.

  4. An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

  5. Land and Water Use, CO2 Emissions, and Worker Radiological Exposure Factors for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett W Carlsen; Brent W Dixon; Urairisa Pathanapirom; Eric Schneider; Bethany L. Smith; Timothy M. AUlt; Allen G. Croff; Steven L. Krahn

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies program is preparing to evaluate several proposed nuclear fuel cycle options to help guide and prioritize Fuel Cycle Technology research and development. Metrics are being developed to assess performance against nine evaluation criteria that will be used to assess relevant impacts resulting from all phases of the fuel cycle. This report focuses on four specific environmental metrics. • land use • water use • CO2 emissions • radiological Dose to workers Impacts associated with the processes in the front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, mining through enrichment and deconversion of DUF6 are summarized from FCRD-FCO-2012-000124, Revision 1. Impact estimates are developed within this report for the remaining phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. These phases include fuel fabrication, reactor construction and operations, fuel reprocessing, and storage, transport, and disposal of associated used fuel and radioactive wastes. Impact estimates for each of the phases of the nuclear fuel cycle are given as impact factors normalized per unit process throughput or output. These impact factors can then be re-scaled against the appropriate mass flows to provide estimates for a wide range of potential fuel cycles. A companion report, FCRD-FCO-2013-000213, applies the impact factors to estimate and provide a comparative evaluation of 40 fuel cycles under consideration relative to these four environmental metrics.

  6. Coupling field and laboratory measurements to estimate the emission factors of identified and unidentified trace gases for prescribed fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokelson, Robert J.; Burling, Ian R.; Gilman, Jessica; Warneke, Carsten; Stockwell, Chelsea E.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Akagi, Sheryl; Urbanski, Shawn; Veres, Patrick; Roberts, James M.; Kuster, W. C.; Reardon, James; Griffith, David WT; Johnson, Timothy J.; Hosseini, SeyedEhsan; Miller, J. Wayne; Cocker, David R.; Jung, H.; Weise, David

    2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetative fuels commonly consumed in prescribed fires were collected from five locations in the southeastern and southwestern U.S. and burned in a series of 77 fires at the U.S. Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions were measured by gravimetric filter sampling with subsequent analysis for elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and 38 elements. The trace gas emissions were measured with a large suite of state-of-the-art instrumentation including an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP FTIR) spectrometer, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS), negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS), and gas chromatography with MS detection (GC-MS). 204 trace gas species (mostly non-methane organic compounds (NMOC)) were identified and quantified with the above instruments. An additional 152 significant peaks in the unit mass resolution mass spectra were quantified, but either could not be identified or most of the signal at that molecular mass was unaccounted for by identifiable species. As phase II of this study, we conducted airborne and ground-based sampling of the emissions from real prescribed fires mostly in the same land management units where the fuels for the lab fires were collected. A broad variety, but smaller number of species (21 trace gas species and PM2.5) was measured on 14 fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These extensive field measurements of emission factors (EF) for temperate biomass burning are useful both for modeling and to examine the representativeness of our lab fire EF. The lab/field EF ratio for the pine understory fuels was not statistically different from one, on average. However, our lab EF for “smoldering compounds” emitted by burning the semi-arid SW fuels should likely be increased by about a factor of 2.7 to better represent field fires. Based on the lab/field comparison, we present a table with emission factors for 365 pyrogenic species (including unidentified species) for 4 broad fuel types: pine understory, semi-arid shrublands, evergreen canopy, and duff. To our knowledge this is the most complete measurement of biomass burning emissions to date and it should enable improved representation of smoke in atmospheric models. The results provide important insights into the nature of smoke. For example, ~35% (range from 16-71%) of the mass of gas-phase NMOC species was attributed to the species that we could not identify. These unidentified species are likely not represented in most models, but some provision should be made for the fact that they will react in the atmosphere. In addition, the total mass of gas-phase NMOC divided by the mass of co-emitted PM2.5 averaged ~2.6 for the main fire types with a range from ~1.8-8.8. About 36-63% of the NMOC were likely semivolatile or of intermediate volatility. Thus, the gas-phase NMOC represent a large reservoir of potential precursors for secondary formation of organic aerosol. For the one fire in organic soil (Alaskan duff) about 28% of the emitted carbon was present as gas-phase NMOC in contrast to the other fuels for which NMOC accounted for only ~1-3% of emitted carbon. 71% of the mass of NMOC emitted by the smoldering duff was un-identified. The duff results highlight the need to learn more about the emissions from smoldering organic soils. The ?NMOC/“NOx-as-NO” ratio was consistently about ten for the main fire types when accounting for all NMOC, indicating strongly NOx-limited O3 production conditions. Finally, the fuel consumption per unit area was measured on 6 of the 14 prescribed fires and averaged 7.08 ± 2.09 (1?) Mg ha-1.

  7. Start Date: Hours per Week

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Storming Robots Technology Learning Institution 3322 Rt. 22 West, Suite 402 Branchburg NJ 08876 Elizabeth Mabrey emabrey@stormingrobots.com 908-595-1010 Robotics Instructor / Assistant $15 to $30 Any Time from 2 to 12 hours per week one 1) Instructor/Assistant

  8. NERSC Carver Hours Used Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challengeMultiscale Subsurface BiogeochemicalOverviewSelectsCarver Hours

  9. SUB-DEGREE-PER-HOUR SILICON MEMS RATE SENSOR WITH 1 MILLION Q-FACTOR I.P. Prikhodko, S.A. Zotov, A.A. Trusov, and A.M. Shkel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, William C

    Mass Gyroscope (QMG) design, which suppresses substrate energy dissipation and maximizes Q-factors. We approach is to utilize a continuous structure, such as a disk or a ring, in a balanced wine-glass mode combination of low energy dissipation and isotropy of both the resonant frequency and damping. The QMG

  10. NERSC Edison Hours Used Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challengeMultiscale SubsurfaceExascale Era ComputingData ManagementHours

  11. Methane emissions from rice fields: The effects of climatic and agricultural factors. Final report, March 1, 1994--April 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, M.A.K. [Portland State Univ., OR (United States). Dept. of Physics] [Portland State Univ., OR (United States). Dept. of Physics; Rasmussen, R.A. [Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering] [Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work reported was performed for the purpose of refining estimates of methane emissions from rice fields. Research performed included methane flux measurements, evaluation of variables affecting emissions, compilation of a data base, and continental background measurements in China. The key findings are briefly described in this report. Total methane emissions, seasonal patterns, and spatial variability were measured for a 7-year periods. Temperature was found to be the most important variable studies affecting methane emissions. The data archives for the research are included in the report. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inventory for Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck Emissions. J. Air &T. A. Cackette (2001), Diesel engines: Environmental impact2003), http://www.arb.ca.gov/diesel/diesel.htm BAAQMD, Bay

  13. OASIS This Hour and Next Hour ATC data - September 24, 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CommitteesTeams Customer Training Interconnection Notices Rates Standards of Conduct Tariff TF Web Based Training Notice: OASIS This Hour and Next Hour ATC data (Updated) Posted...

  14. OASIS This Hour and Next Hour ATC Data - October 21, 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CommitteesTeams Customer Training Interconnection Notices Rates Standards of Conduct Tariff TF Web Based Training Notice: OASIS This Hour and Next Hour ATC data Posted Date: 10...

  15. Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiency of Household Appliances in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    onward. Table A-4: Carbon Emission Factors of ElectricityAdjustment factor Carbon Emission Factor (kg C/kWh)L ABORATORY Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn C. England; Stephanie Wien; Mingchih O. Chang

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides results from the first year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operations. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation test results for a refinery gas-fired process heater and plans for cogeneration gas turbine tests and pilot-scale tests are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods to compare PM2.5 mass and chemical speciation. Test plans are presented for a gas turbine facility that will be tested in the fourth quarter of 2002. A preliminary approach for pilot-scale tests is presented that will help define design constraints for a new dilution sampler design that is smaller, lighter, and less costly to use.

  17. Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ban-Weiss, George A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    matter from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles.D.H. , Chase, R.E. , 1999b. Gasoline vehicle particle sizeFactors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles

  18. FINANCE DEPARTMENT Office Hours Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    FINANCE DEPARTMENT Office Hours Fall 2014 NAME OFFICE HOURS COURSE # COURSE TITLE DAY TIME ROOM-1515 and by appointment FIN 323.8 FIN 323.9 FIN 323.11 FIN 326.1 Fundamentals of Finance Fundamentals of Finance Fundamentals of Finance Financial Institution Mgt TTH TTH TH TTH 0930-1045 1100-1215 1600-1840 1230-1345 GMCS

  19. Earned Value Management Essentials 14 hours, $895

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fork, Richard

    Earned Value Management Essentials 14 hours, $895 A growing demand for Earned Value Management (EVM in the tenets of work planned, work accomplished, and actual work cost. Earned Value terminology, formulae Management Analysis and Reporting 14 hours, $895 Government agencies and companies doing business

  20. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Iowa adopted regulations in 2003 that generally require rate-regulated electric utilities to disclose to customers the fuel mix and estimated emissions, in pounds per megawatt-hour (MWh), of...

  1. Name____________________________________________ ID #______________________________ Course Semester Taken Hours Grade Course Semester Taken Hours Grade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Name____________________________________________ ID #______________________________ Course Semester *MATH 152 4 STAT 302 3 Course Semester Taken Hours Grade KINE 199 1 S/U KINE 198 1 Course Semester Taken

  2. Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in the steel sector in key developing countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Phylipsen, Dian; Worrell, Ernst

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    intensities and the carbon emission factor for each process.through fuel switching. Carbon emissions factors used infor reduction in carbon emissions was slightly larger than

  3. Project Management Foundation 21 hours, $895

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama in Huntsville, University of

    Project Management Foundation 21 hours, $895 The fundamental project management processes. In group exercises, participants gain an understanding of how the project management processes are used during each phase of a project to build a better, more effective project plan. Topics Include

  4. Inventories, Employment and Hours Marzio Galeotti a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    Inventories, Employment and Hours Marzio Galeotti a , Louis J. Maccini ,*b , Fabio Schiantarelli c that integrates inventory and labor decisions. We extend a model of inventory behavior to include a detailed and effort per worker. We estimate jointly the Euler equations for inventories and employment, a labor

  5. SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS Spring Semester 20072008 OPERATIONS RESEARCH 2 hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    four will be counted. 1 (i) A company owns a steam turbine power generating plant that generates its steam from coal. It wishes to maximise the steam output. This, however, may result in emission that does per hour. The plant receives two grades of pul- verised coal, C1 and C2, for use in the steam plant

  6. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow III, William R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model Inputs Emissions Factors CO2 Emission factor for grid tonne CO2/MWh)  CO2 Emission factor for fuel  (tonne CO2/TJ)Improvements and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the

  7. Abstract--This paper proposes a multi-hour thermal load dispatch model (24-hour time horizon) controlling NOx emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad CatĂłlica de Chile)

    and the Netherlands are among the most advanced countries in relation to environmental pollution control. USA pioneered the Clean Air Act (CAA) in 1963 which established a criteria pollutants list considered dangerous of this pollutant, damage and control, can be obtained from [12]. These developments in US environmental regulations

  8. DOE's Office of Science Awards 18 Million Hours of Supercomputing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    16,000 hours for a pilot study of Parkinson's disease to 5 million hours to study protein folding. Six of the projects received awards of 1 million or more processor-hours. DOE's...

  9. Faculty Office Hours Fall 2014 Aberle, James

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yanchao

    Faculty Office Hours Fall 2014 Aberle, James GWC 326 01:30 PM 02:45 PMM T W F to Tuesday is through:30 AMR to Coleman, James BYENG 450 08:45 AM 09:45 AMT R to By Appointment Cotter, Jeff GWC 424 03:15 PM:00 AM 09:30 AMF to Or at a time arranged via e-mail to reisslein@asu.edu Rodriguez, Armando GWC 352 10

  10. General Education Coursework: Credit Hours General Education Coursework: Credit Hours MATH 211 4 MATH 212 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    340 3 CEE 350 3 CEE 335 1 CEE 304 3 CEE 240 3 Interpreting the Past 3 Major Coursework: Credit Hours sheet does not include the University's General Education Language and Culture Requirement. Additional

  11. Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 6/1/13 to 6/30/13

  12. 20130416_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 4/16/13.

  13. Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data 20130731

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 7/1/13 to 7/31/13.

  14. 20140430_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 April to 30 April 2014.

  15. Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 6/1/13 to 6/30/13

  16. 20130416_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 4/16/13.

  17. 20140430_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 April to 30 April 2014.

  18. Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data 20130731

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 7/1/13 to 7/31/13.

  19. Bradbury Science Museum announces winter opening hours

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M.ExtracellularBradbury Science Museum winter hours Bradbury

  20. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Iron and Steel Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow III, William R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction PotentialsModel Inputs Emissions Factors CO2 Emission factor for grid electricity (tonne CO2/MWh)  CO2 Emission factor for fuel (

  1. Application of positive matrix factorization to on-road measurements for source apportionment of diesel- and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornhill, D. A.

    The goal of this research is to quantify diesel- and gasoline-powered motor vehicle emissions within the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) using on-road measurements captured by a mobile laboratory combined with positive ...

  2. International Minor in Engineering: Scandinavian Studies Language: maximum of 12 semester hours # of sem hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    semester hours including one 300- or 400-level course and one Political Science/Economics course FR 418 and European Cinema 3 492 New Scandinavian Cinema 3 496 Special Topics in Scandinavian Studies Political Science/Economics Courses: ACE 451 Economics of International Development 3 455 International

  3. International Minor in Engineering: Japanese Studies Language: maximum of 12 semester hours # of sem hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    to Classical Japanese 3 409 Social Science Reading in Japanese 3 (H) 440/441 Fourth Year Japanese I/II 3 Other: minimum of 9 semester hours including one 300- or 400-level course and one Political Science (same as EALC 402) 3 MACS 466 Japanese Cinema (same as EALC 466) 3 EALC 250 Introduction to Japanese

  4. International Minor in Engineering: Germanic Studies Language: maximum of 12 semester hours # of sem hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    hours including one 300- or 400-level course and one Political Science/Economics course ANTH 488 Modern Realism to Expressionism 3 473 1920s to Today 3 493/494 German Cinema I/II (same as MACS 493/494) 3 496 in Musicology 3 PHIL 325 Recent European Philosophy 3 (H) Approved Political Science/Economics Courses: ACE 451

  5. Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours March 11, 2013 - 12:03pm Addthis Safety inspections are a key element in a nuclear...

  6. The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    emissions index, we use conversion factors. To determine theof Energy. 11 This conversion factor includes only thebe using different conversion factors for electricity in

  7. GPA CALCULATION GPA = QUALITY POINTS DIVIDED BY QUALITY HOURS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    . THIS IS THE TOTAL QUALITY POINTS THAT YOU THINK YOU WILL EARN THIS SEMESTER. TO PLAY WHAT IFGPA CALCULATION WORKSHEET GPA = QUALITY POINTS DIVIDED BY QUALITY HOURS #1 QUALITY HOURS (THROUGH LAST TERM) = __________ #2 QUALITY POINTS (THROUGH LAST TERM) = __________ #3 QUALTIY HOURS CURRENTLY

  8. 24-hours ahead global irradiation forecasting using Multi-Layer Cyril Voyant1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ; it is shown that the most relevant is based on a multi- output MLP using endogenous and exogenous input data ahead. In the case of solar plants, the driving factor is the global solar irradiation (sum of direct and diffuse solar radiation projected on a plane (Wh/m˛)). This paper focuses on the 24-hours ahead forecast

  9. 6, 57735796, 2006 Vehicular emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    be partly responsible for lower CO2 and higher CO and NO emission factors. Also, a fast reduction the emission (in g/km) of key and non-regulated pollutants, such as CO2, CO, NO, SO2, NH3, HCHO, NMHC, dur-10 of pollutants, even from a super ultra-low emission vehicle (SULEV). The emissions of HC's, NOx, CO20 and CO2

  10. Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry and Physics Vehicular emission of volatile organicY. , and Huang, Y. S. : Emission factors and characteristicslight-duty vehicle emissions, Environ. Sci. Technol. , 30,

  11. A stochastic technique for synthesis of hourly precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huddle, John Paul

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 1. Classes of amounts of hourly precipitation 2. Possible sequences of wet and dry states during six periods when the last period is dry 3. Scheme of the sixth-order model Page 21 Observed frequencies of hourly precipitation by cl. ass 5...-5) were equal to 1 hr. Time (t-6) ends with the hour immediately preceding the hour represented by time (t-5). The time (t-6) was defined as wet or dry depending on whether precipitation was recorded during any hour of this period. The complete...

  12. Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House...

  13. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentialsand Its Impact on CO2 Emission," Iron & Steel, 2010, 45(5):Emissions Factors CO2 Emission factor for grid electricity (

  14. Electrical and Production Load Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, T.; Heffington, W. M.

    , Texas Abstract Load factors and operating hours of small and medium-sized industrial plants are analyzed to classify shift-work patterns and develop energy conservation diagnostic tools. This paper discusses two types of electric load factors... for each shift classification within major industry groups. The load factor based on billing hours (ELF) increases with operating hours from about 0.4 for a nominal one shift operation, to about 0.7 for around-the-clock operation. On the other hand...

  15. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988–Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

  16. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

    2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988–Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

  17. Did you know? are thrown away every hour.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    17Trees 6weeks Plastic beverage bottles OR Every month,we throw out enough glass bottles and jars,but not many people realize it. Run a TV for three hours. A 100-watt light bulb for four hours. Used plastic soda & juice bottles are used to make: carpets insulating materi- als in clothes sleeping bags

  18. HUMAN RESOURCES MANUAL SECTION 4: NON-STUDENT HOURLY EMPLOYEES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HUMAN RESOURCES MANUAL SECTION 4: NON-STUDENT HOURLY EMPLOYEES 1 | P a g e S e c t i o n 4 will be notified by the Human Resources Department as non-student hourly employees approach their employment limits is submitted to the Human Resources Department by March and October for each school term of each year

  19. General Education and Major Coursework: Credit Hours General Education and Major Coursework: Credit Hours ENGN 110 2 ECE 111 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : 128 ** Meets philosophy and ethics general education requirement. Electrical engineering majors mustGeneral Education and Major Coursework: Credit Hours General Education and Major Coursework: Credit (C or better required) 3 PHYS 231N 4 COMM 101R 3 General Education and Major Coursework: Credit Hours

  20. Report of 1,000 Hour Catalyst Longevity Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel M. Ginosar

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a 1,000 hour, high-pressure, catalyst longevity test for the decomposition of concentrated sulfuric acid. The reaction is used for both the sulfur-iodine (S-I) cycle and hybrid sulfur cycle. By the time of the delivery date of April 17, 2009, for project milestone no. 2NIN07TC050114, the 1% Pt/TiO2 catalyst had been in the reaction environment for 658 hours. During the first 480 hours of testing, the catalyst activity provided stable, near-equilibrium yields of 46.8% SO2 and 22.8% O2. However, product yields declined at sample exposure times >480 hours. At 658 hours of operation, catalyst activity (based on oxygen yield) declined to 57% relative to the stable period of catalyst activity. Thus, as of April 17, this catalyst did not provide the desired stability level of <10% degradation per 1,000 hours. The experiment was terminated on April 27, after 792 hours, when a fitting failed and the catalyst was displaced from the reactor such that the sample could not be recovered. Oxygen conversion at the end of the experiment was 12.5% and declining, suggesting that at that point, catalyst activity had decreased to 54% of the initial level.

  1. Published: 18 hours ago, 15:31 EST, May 08, 2007 Mechanoluminescence event yields novel emissions,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    exceed the speed of sound. Crystal particles suspended in a sonicated liquid collide and fracture, the use of sound energy to agitate particles or other substances, causes high intensity collisions of crystal particles in liquid slurries. The resulting mechanoluminescence is an order of magnitude brighter

  2. Department of Energy's Paducah Site Reaches Million-Hour Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a core value" attitude. "Our team adheres to the concept that we will only achieve productivity through safety," LATA Kentucky Project Manager Mark Duff said. "The million-hour...

  3. Balancing Authority Cooperation Concepts - Intra-Hour Scheduling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsaker, Matthew; Samaan, Nader; Milligan, Michael; Guo, Tao; Liu, Guangjuan; Toolson, Jacob

    2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this study was to understand, on an Interconnection-wide basis, the effects intra-hour scheduling compared to hourly scheduling. Moreover, the study sought to understand how the benefits of intra-hour scheduling would change by altering the input assumptions in different scenarios. This report describes results of three separate scenarios with differing key assumptions and comparing the production costs between hourly scheduling and 10-minute scheduling performance. The different scenarios were chosen to provide insight into how the estimated benefits might change by altering input assumptions. Several key assumptions were different in the three scenarios, however most assumptions were similar and/or unchanged among the scenarios.

  4. Pay and Leave Administration and Hours of Duty

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the management of pay, including overtime pay and compensatory time, leave administration, time and attendance reporting, and hours of duty. Cancels DOE O 322.1B and DOE O 535.1

  5. Pay and Leave Administration and Hours of Duty

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the management of pay, including overtime and compensatory time, leave administration, and hours of duty. Cancels DOE O 322.1A. Canceled by DOE O 322.1C.

  6. Verification of hourly forecasts of wind turbine power output

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wegley, H.L.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A verification of hourly average wind speed forecasts in terms of hourly average power output of a MOD-2 was performed for four sites. Site-specific probabilistic transformation models were developed to transform the forecast and observed hourly average speeds to the percent probability of exceedance of an hourly average power output. (This transformation model also appears to have value in predicting annual energy production for use in wind energy feasibility studies.) The transformed forecasts were verified in a deterministic sense (i.e., as continuous values) and in a probabilistic sense (based upon the probability of power output falling in a specified category). Since the smoothing effects of time averaging are very pronounced, the 90% probability of exceedance was built into the transformation models. Semiobjective and objective (model output statistics) forecasts were made compared for the four sites. The verification results indicate that the correct category can be forecast an average of 75% of the time over a 24-hour period. Accuracy generally decreases with projection time out to approx. 18 hours and then may increase due to the fairly regular diurnal wind patterns that occur at many sites. The ability to forecast the correct power output category increases with increasing power output because occurrences of high hourly average power output (near rated) are relatively rare and are generally not forecast. The semiobjective forecasts proved superior to model output statistics in forecasting high values of power output and in the shorter time frames (1 to 6 hours). However, model output statistics were slightly more accurate at other power output levels and times. Noticeable differences were observed between deterministic and probabilistic (categorical) forecast verification results.

  7. Optimal irreversible stimulated emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D Valente; Y Li; J P Poizat; J M Gerard; L C Kwek; M F Santos; A Auffeves

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the dynamics of an initially inverted atom in a semi-infinite waveguide, in the presence of a single propagating photon. We show that atomic relaxation is enhanced by a factor of 2, leading to maximal bunching in the output field. This optimal irreversible stimulated emission is a novel phenomenon that can be observed with state-of-the-art solid-state atoms and waveguides. When the atom interacts with two one-dimensional electromagnetic environments, the preferential emission in the stimulated field can be exploited to efficiently amplify a classical or a quantum state.

  8. General Education and Major Coursework: Credit Hours General Education and Major Coursework: Credit Hours MET 120 3 MET 240 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coursework: Credit Hours MET 300 3 MET 330 3 MET 310 3 MET 335W 1 MET 320 3 MET 350 3 EET 305 3 MET 370 (co-requisite with MET 386) 3 EET 350 3 MET 386 (co-requisite with MET 370) 1 EET 355 1 ENMA 480 3 Minor**** 3 General (15 credits) TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 127 Does not include the University's General Education Language

  9. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

  10. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, M.; Heath, G. A.; O'Donoughue, P.; Vorum, M.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessments (LCAs) of utility-scale coal-fired electricity generation systems focuses on reducing variability and clarifying central tendencies in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening 270 references for quality LCA methods, transparency, and completeness yielded 53 that reported 164 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. These estimates for subcritical pulverized, integrated gasification combined cycle, fluidized bed, and supercritical pulverized coal combustion technologies vary from 675 to 1,689 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh) (interquartile range [IQR]= 890-1,130 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh; median = 1,001) leading to confusion over reasonable estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from coal-fired electricity generation. By adjusting published estimates to common gross system boundaries and consistent values for key operational input parameters (most importantly, combustion carbon dioxide emission factor [CEF]), the meta-analytical process called harmonization clarifies the existing literature in ways useful for decision makers and analysts by significantly reducing the variability of estimates ({approx}53% in IQR magnitude) while maintaining a nearly constant central tendency ({approx}2.2% in median). Life cycle GHG emissions of a specific power plant depend on many factors and can differ from the generic estimates generated by the harmonization approach, but the tightness of distribution of harmonized estimates across several key coal combustion technologies implies, for some purposes, first-order estimates of life cycle GHG emissions could be based on knowledge of the technology type, coal mine emissions, thermal efficiency, and CEF alone without requiring full LCAs. Areas where new research is necessary to ensure accuracy are also discussed.

  11. HYPERPARAMETER ESTIMATION FOR EMISSION COMPUTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granada, Universidad de

    HYPERPARAMETER ESTIMATION FOR EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY DATA A. LĂłpez (a) , R. Molina (b) (a limited due to several factors. These factors include the need of greater computational time than to the projection data to obtain two-dimensional slices or cross sections (images) of activity distribution. #12

  12. China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Hongyou

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conversion Factors methodology as well as conversion factors used for the CO 2related emissions. Conversion Factors This study uses the

  13. An Improved Procedure for Developing Calibrated Hourly Simulation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bou-Saada, T. E.; Haberl, J. S.

    in Washington, D.C. Nine months of hourly whole-building electricity data and site-specific weather data were measured and used with the DOE- 2. ID building simulation program to test the new techniques. Use of the new calibration procedures were able to produce... study building was simulated with DOE-2.ID and calibrated using hourly measured whole-building electricity data and ambient weather conditions to demonstrate the new techniques. Findings from Applying the New Techniques The important new calibration...

  14. Renewable Energies program (6 credit hour) Option A: 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simaan, Nabil

    Renewable Energies program (6 credit hour) Option A: 11 Option B: The program is organized by t Spanish Institute and the Asso program on renewable energy will provide students with advanced knowledge. opportunities: option A- two renewable energies; option B include on-site visits to renewable energy generation

  15. Folding Proteins at 500 ns/hour with Work Queue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thain, Douglas

    in part to the unbiased nature of these simulations: the low-energy regions of the free-energy landscape to achieve an aggregate sampling rate of over 500 ns/hour. As a comparison, a single process typically are oversampled while the (arguably more interesting) high-energy tran- sition regions are rarely observed

  16. ECE 3301: General Electrical Engineering Credit / Contact hours: 3 / 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    ECE 3301: General Electrical Engineering Credit / Contact hours: 3 / 3 Course coordinator: Mary Baker Textbook(s) and/or other required material: Hambley, Allan R., Electrical Engineering ­ Principles and Applications, fourth edition, Prentice Hall, 2007. Catalog description: Analysis of electric circuits

  17. Aegis Combat and Weapon Systems Overview 24 hours, $1495

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fork, Richard

    SEprocessensuresthatsystemsaredevelopedtomeet affordable, operationally effective, and timely mission objectives. FocusonengineeringtheWeaponAegis Combat and Weapon Systems Overview 24 hours, $1495 Launched from the Advanced Surface Missile that led to the initiation of Aegis. Topics Include: · AegisOverviewandHistory · AegisBMD · AegisWeapon

  18. 2009-2010 Communication Studies Curriculum Hours PREREQUISITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    2009-2010 Communication Studies Curriculum Hours PREREQUISITES First Year Communication and Information 150 3 ___ Communication Studies 201 3 ___ Communication and Information 150 English 101, 102 6 Arts and Humanities Elective 3 ___ General Elective 1 ___ TOTAL 30 Second Year Communication Studies

  19. 2007-2008 Communication Studies Curriculum Year Hours PREREQUISITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    2007-2008 Communication Studies Curriculum Year Hours PREREQUISITES First Year Communication and Information 150 3 ___ Communication Studies 201 3 ___ Communication and Information 150 English 101, 102 6 Arts and Humanities Elective 3 ___ General Elective 1 ___ TOTAL 30 Second Year Communication Studies

  20. 2011-12 Communication Studies Curriculum Hours PREREQUISITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    2011-12 Communication Studies Curriculum Hours PREREQUISITES First Year English 101, 102 6 ___ ___ TOTAL 30 Second Year Communication Studies 201 3 ___ 5 Communication Studies 210, 240, 250 6 Year Communication Studies 312 3 ___ Communication Studies 201 Communication Studies 342 3

  1. 2008-2009 Communication Studies Curriculum Hours PREREQUISITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    2008-2009 Communication Studies Curriculum Hours PREREQUISITES First Year Communication and Information 150 3 ___ Communication Studies 201 3 ___ Communication and Information 150 English 101, 102 6 Arts and Humanities Elective 3 ___ General Elective 1 ___ TOTAL 30 Second Year Communication Studies

  2. 2010-11 Communication Studies Curriculum Hours PREREQUISITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    2010-11 Communication Studies Curriculum Hours PREREQUISITES First Year English 101, 102 6 ___ ___ TOTAL 30 Second Year Communication Studies 201 3 ___ 5 Communication Studies 210, 240, 250 6 Year Communication Studies 312 3 ___ Communication Studies 201 Communication Studies 342 3

  3. 2012-13 Communication Studies Curriculum Hours PREREQUISITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    2012-13 Communication Studies Curriculum Hours PREREQUISITES First Year English 101*, 102* 6 ___ ___ TOTAL 30 Second Year Communication Studies 201 3 ___ 5 Communication Studies 210*, 240*, 250 6 Third Year Communication Studies 312 3 ___ Communication Studies 201 Communication Studies 342 3

  4. BRASENOSE COLLEGE 8-HOUR STIPENDIARY LECTURERSHIP IN PHILOSOPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    BRASENOSE COLLEGE OXFORD 8-HOUR STIPENDIARY LECTURERSHIP IN PHILOSOPHY FURTHER PARTICULARS in Philosophy at Brasenose College, Oxford. The post is tenable from 1 October 2013 (finishing date: 31st information about the College can be found at www.bnc.ox.ac.uk. Brasenose has a strong tradition in Philosophy

  5. Pay and Leave Administration and Hours of Duty

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the management of pay, including overtime pay and compensatory time, leave administration, time and attendance reporting, and hours of duty. Cancels DOE O 322.1B and DOE O 535.1. Admin Chg 1, dated 5-10-12, cancels DOE O 322.1C.

  6. Storing hydroelectricity to meet peak-hour demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenti, M.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on pumped storage plants which have become an effective way for some utility companies that derive power from hydroelectric facilities to economically store baseload energy during off-peak hours for use during peak hourly demands. According to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in Palo Alto, Calif., 36 of these plants provide approximately 20 gigawatts, or about 3 percent of U.S. generating capacity. During peak-demand periods, utilities are often stretched beyond their capacity to provide power and must therefore purchase it from neighboring utilities. Building new baseload power plants, typically nuclear or coal-fired facilities that run 24 hours per day seven days a week, is expensive, about $1500 per kilowatt, according to Robert Schainker, program manager for energy storage at the EPRI. Schainker the that building peaking plants at $400 per kilowatt, which run a few hours a day on gas or oil fuel, is less costly than building baseload plants. Operating them, however, is more expensive because peaking plants are less efficient that baseload plants.

  7. BIOLOGY 650 (credit 2 hours) Animal Physiology LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Robin L.

    BIOLOGY 650 (credit 2 hours) Animal Physiology LABORATORY Spring 2011 Instructor: ROBIN COOPER , Ph role of ion channels and transporters in regulation of the membrane potential will be covered in great-neuron communication through electrical and chemical synapses will be examined in live preparations. The historical

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne microbial emissions Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and microbial activity (or soil emissions... statistics and emission factors Sinton and18 Fridley, 2000. The microbial source for NOx has been estimated... sources, 60%...

  9. Factors associated with presenting >12 hours after symptom onset of acute myocardial infarction among Veteran men

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDermott, Kelly; Maynard, Charles; Trivedi, Ranak; Lowy, Elliott; Fihn, Stephan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that you may have a heart attack or die suddenly? ” andworry about having a heart attack? Never Rarely OccasionallyVHA: Time is Life for Heart Attack”] Thus, there is evidence

  10. Factors associated with presenting >12 hours after symptom onset of acute myocardial infarction among Veteran men

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDermott, Kelly; Maynard, Charles; Trivedi, Ranak; Lowy, Elliott; Fihn, Stephan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    four percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) capableinfarction; PCI percutaneous coronary intervention; CABGinfarction; PCI percutaneous coronary intervention; CABG

  11. Fuel-Based On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Fuel-Based On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions Inventory for the Denver Metropolitan Area Sajal S of Denver 2101 E. Wesley Ave. Denver, CO 80208 #12;Mobile Source Emissions Inventory Methods MOBILE emission factors -g/mile uncertain Vehicle miles traveled -very uncertain Speed correction factors Inventory

  12. Regional GHG Emissions O tlook Greenhouse Gas and the Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6/5/2013 1 Regional GHG Emissions O tlook Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Symposium Regional GHG Emissions ­ Outlook June 4, 2013 Steven Simmons CO2 Emission Outlook for the Pacific NW (ID-MT- OR-WA) Key Factors that determine Emissions Levels 1 Demand & Conservation 50 60 70 2 1. Demand

  13. Detecting very long-lived gravitational-wave transients lasting hours to weeks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thrane, Eric; Christensen, Nelson

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility of very long-lived gravitational-wave transients (and detector artifacts) lasting hours to weeks. Such very long signals are both interesting in their own right and as a potential source of systematic error in searches for persistent signals, e.g., from a stochastic gravitational-wave background. We review possible mechanisms for emission on these time scales and discuss computational challenges associated with their detection: namely, the substantial volume of data involved in a search for very long transients can require vast computer memory and processing time. These computational difficulties can be addressed through a form of data compression known as coarse-graining, in which information about short time spans is discarded in order to reduce the computational requirements of a search. Using data compression, we demonstrate an efficient radiometer (cross-correlation) algorithm for the detection of very long transients. In the process, we identify features of a very long transie...

  14. International Minor in Engineering: Russian/Eastern European Studies Language: maximum of 12 semester hours # of sem hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    semester hours including one 300- or 400-level course and one Political Science/Economics course BULG 482;POL 245 Survey of Polish Lit (same as CWL 245) 3 446 Problems of Polish Lit 3 RUSS 219 Russian Cinema & E European Science Fiction (same as CWL 117) 3 277 Slavic Literature Survey(same as CWL 277) 3 419

  15. Monday 16 June 09:30 Macroeconomics. 14:30 Advanced Econometrics 1 (2 hours).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Monday 16 June 09:30 Macroeconomics. 14:30 Advanced Econometrics 1 (2 hours). Tuesday 17 June 09 2 (2 hours). 14:30 Advanced Econometrics 2 (2 hours). Friday 20 June 09:30 Advanced Microeconomics 1

  16. IPCC Emission Factor Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany:Information IDS Climate Change andSmart Grids

  17. Emission Factors (EMFAC) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The followingDirectLow CarbonOpen1Model |Rural PublicEMFAC) Jump

  18. Energy Conservation3. Lab Spaces 8 hours ago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    Home1. Topics2. Energy Conservation3. Story4. Powered by Lab Spaces 8 hours ago 3-dimensional view://topics.treehugger.com/article/0cywbNJgWneQp?q=Energy+Conserv... 1 of 2 1/6/2012 9:05 PM #12;Related Quotes " The measurements were http://topics.treehugger.com/article/0cywbNJgWneQp?q=Energy+Conserv... 2 of 2 1/6/2012 9:05 PM #12;

  19. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

  20. 20140201-0228_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Feb to 28 Feb 2014.

  1. 20140101-0131_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Jan to 31 Jan 2014.

  2. 20131001-1031_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 1 Oct 2013 to 31 Oct 2013.

  3. 20140501-0531_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 May to 31 May 2014.

  4. 20130801-0831_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 8/1/13 to 8/31/13.

  5. 20130901-0930_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 1 September 2013 to 30 September 2013.

  6. 20130501-20130531_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from May 2013

  7. 20131101-1130_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Nov to 30 Nov 2013.

  8. 20131201-1231_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Dec to 31 Dec 2013.

  9. 20140301-0331_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Mar to 31 Mar 2014.

  10. 20140601-0630_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 June to 30 June 2014.

  11. 20140701-0731_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 July to 31 July 2014.

  12. 20140201-0228_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Feb to 28 Feb 2014.

  13. 20131101-1130_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Nov to 30 Nov 2013.

  14. 20140301-0331_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Mar to 31 Mar 2014.

  15. 20131001-1031_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 1 Oct 2013 to 31 Oct 2013.

  16. 20140601-0630_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 June to 30 June 2014.

  17. 20131201-1231_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Dec to 31 Dec 2013.

  18. 20130801-0831_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 8/1/13 to 8/31/13.

  19. 20130501-20130531_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from May 2013

  20. 20140701-0731_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 July to 31 July 2014.

  1. 20140101-0131_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Jan to 31 Jan 2014.

  2. 20140501-0531_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 May to 31 May 2014.

  3. 20130901-0930_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 1 September 2013 to 30 September 2013.

  4. NREL: Education Center - Hours, Directions, and Contact Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | National Nuclearover two ContinuumSolarHours, Directions, and

  5. Gate Hours & Services | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor'sshort version) Thelong version)shortGate Hours &

  6. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Hours & Scheduling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium:andNationalCNMS Hours of Operation The CNMS is

  7. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPACT EMISSIONS HEV PHEV marginal power plant is a coalpower uses relatively little coal, but in other cases emissions

  8. Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of fuel output. By definition, the energy consumption of theEnergy Accounting ..6 2.2 Definitioncycle. Definition of FFC Factors for Energy and Emissions

  9. Seventy-five hours of coordinated videomagnetograph observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Haiman; Zirin, H.; Patterson, A.; Al, Guoxiang; Zhang, Hongqi (Big Bear Solar Observatory, Pasadena, CA (USA); Beijing Observatory (People's Republic of China))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Videomagnetograph observations obtained between September 24 and 29, 1987 are presented which illustrate the evolution of magnetic flux surrounding a stable sunspot. It is found that the dominant sunspot mainly ejects magnetic fields of opposite sign, and that the surrounding plage fields steadily contract and retreat inward toward the umbra, resulting in shrinking and weakening of the spot and plage. The extent of the moat is shown to be reduced by 50 percent in a 75-hour period, with the principal loss of flux probably due to concellation at the main neutral line. Five subflares were noted, three occurring prior to cancellation of the magnetic elements at the inversion line and two occurring during the development and disappearance of an ephemeral bipolar region. 25 refs.

  10. MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM STORED PIG SLURRY S. Espagnol1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2 MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM STORED PIG SLURRY S. Espagnol1 , L. Loyon2 , F. Guiziou2 , P to measure emissions factors of ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O) methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from stored pig slurry and measured the variations of the emissions in time and space. In 2006, dynamic

  11. EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast- Portfolio Manager Office Hours, Focus Topic: Weather Data and Metrics

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Portfolio Manager "Office Hours" is a live webinar that gives all users an opportunity to ask their questions directly to EPA in an open forum. In 2014, Office Hours will be held once a month. We...

  12. Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak-Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Annika

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    top graph) as a percent of the total average energy usage ofgraph) as a percentage of each hour’s average energy usagegraph: first, kWh savings; second, normalized savings as a percent of the total average energy usage

  13. Course: M.S. in Library and Information Science Test Code: PLA (Forenoon) Duration: 2 hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Course: M.S. in Library and Information Science Test Code: PLA (Forenoon) Duration: 2 hours Science)-2013 Sub: Library & Information Science Test Code: PLA Duration: 2 hours 1) If p/q = 33 what

  14. EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast: Portfolio Manager Office Hours, Focus Topic: Sharing Forward and Transfer Ownership

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Portfolio Manager "Office Hours" is a live webinar that gives all users an opportunity to ask their questions directly to EPA in an open forum. In 2014, Office Hours will be held once a month. We...

  15. A Model to Predict Work-Related Fatigue Based on Hours of Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Model to Predict Work-Related Fatigue Based on Hours of Work Gregory D. Roach, Adam Fletcher, and Drew Dawson ROACH GD, FLETCHER A, DAWSON D. A model to predict work- related fatigue based on hours

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - after-hours power status Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University Holidays On-Call Support During business hours... : Contact the Campus Help Desk at 581-4000. After hours support: Contact the Campus Help Desk at 581... % of the time...

  17. Road traffic accidents in Kathmandużan hour of education yields a glimmer of hope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basnet, Bibhusan; Vohra, Rais; Bhandari, Amit; Pandey, Subash

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. : Road traffic accidents in Kathmandu— an hour ofOpen Access Road traffic accidents in Kathmandu—an hour ofnumber of road traffic accidents in the year 2012 decreased

  18. Field Emission and Nanostructure of Carbon Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merkulov, V.I.; Lowndes, D.H.; Baylor, L.R.

    1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of field emission measurements of various forms of carbon films are reported. It is shown that the films nanostructure is a crucial factor determining the field emission properties. In particular, smooth, pulsed-laser deposited amorphous carbon films with both high and low sp3 contents are poor field emitters. This is similar to the results obtained for smooth nanocrystalline, sp2-bonded carbon films. In contrast, carbon films prepared by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HE-CVD) exhibit very good field emission properties, including low emission turn-on fields, high emission site density, and excellent durability. HF-CVD carbon films were found to be predominantly sp2-bonded. However, surface morphology studies show that these films are thoroughly nanostructured, which is believed to be responsible for their promising field emission properties.

  19. Detecting very long-lived gravitational-wave transients lasting hours to weeks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Thrane; Vuk Mandic; Nelson Christensen

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility of very long-lived gravitational-wave transients (and detector artifacts) lasting hours to weeks. Such very long signals are both interesting in their own right and as a potential source of systematic error in searches for persistent signals, e.g., from a stochastic gravitational-wave background. We review possible mechanisms for emission on these time scales and discuss computational challenges associated with their detection: namely, the substantial volume of data involved in a search for very long transients can require vast computer memory and processing time. These computational difficulties can be addressed through a form of data compression known as coarse-graining, in which information about short time spans is discarded in order to reduce the computational requirements of a search. Using data compression, we demonstrate an efficient radiometer (cross-correlation) algorithm for the detection of very long transients. In the process, we identify features of a very long transient search (related to the rotation of the Earth) that make it more complicated than a search for shorter transient signals. We implement suitable solutions.

  20. Documentation of the Hourly Time Series NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Documentation of the Hourly Time Series from the NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Initial condition 1 Jan 1979, 0Z Record 1: f00: forecast at first time step of 3 mins Record 2: f01: forecast (either averaged over 0 to 1 hour, or instantaneous at 1 hour) Record 3: f02: forecast (either

  1. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Utility-Scale Wind Power: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, S. L.; Heath, G. A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale wind power systems was performed to determine the causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening of approximately 240 LCAs of onshore and offshore systems yielded 72 references meeting minimum thresholds for quality, transparency, and relevance. Of those, 49 references provided 126 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. Published estimates ranged from 1.7 to 81 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with median and interquartile range (IQR) both at 12 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh. After adjusting the published estimates to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the total range was reduced by 47% to 3.0 to 45 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh and the IQR was reduced by 14% to 10 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, while the median remained relatively constant (11 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh). Harmonization of capacity factor resulted in the largest reduction in variability in life cycle GHG emission estimates. This study concludes that the large number of previously published life cycle GHG emission estimates of wind power systems and their tight distribution suggest that new process-based LCAs of similar wind turbine technologies are unlikely to differ greatly. However, additional consequential LCAs would enhance the understanding of true life cycle GHG emissions of wind power (e.g., changes to other generators operations when wind electricity is added to the grid), although even those are unlikely to fundamentally change the comparison of wind to other electricity generation sources.

  2. Vehicle Emissions Review - 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Emissions Review - 2011 (so far) Tim Johnson October 4, 2011 DOE DEER Conference, Detroit JohnsonTV@Corning.com 2 Summary * California LD criteria emission regs are tightening....

  3. 2008 Guidelines to Defra's GHG Conversion Factors Guidelines to Defra's GHG Conversion Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basis 5 Burning oil is also known as kerosene or paraffin used for heating systems. Aviation Turbine biomass heating systems. The emission factors are based on the factor provided in SAP2005, Table 12. Page - Imports and Exports Last updated: Jun-05 Total emissions (kg CO2) Total electricity produced Total heat

  4. Multiwavelength Thermal Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

  5. Daily and 3-hourly variability in global fire emissions and consequences for atmospheric model predictions of carbon monoxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of biomass burning in South?America, Int. J. Remote Sens. ,D24303 fire season in South America, J. Geophys. Res. , 103(across North, South and Central America, Remote Sens.

  6. Emissions from US waste collection vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maimoun, Mousa A., E-mail: mousamaimoun@gmail.com [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Reinhart, Debra R. [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Gammoh, Fatina T. [Quality Department, Airport International Group, Amman (Jordan); McCauley Bush, Pamela [Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? Life-cycle emissions for alternative fuel technologies. ? Fuel consumption of alternative fuels for waste collection vehicles. ? Actual driving cycle of waste collection vehicles. ? Diesel-fueled waste collection vehicle emissions. - Abstract: This research is an in-depth environmental analysis of potential alternative fuel technologies for waste collection vehicles. Life-cycle emissions, cost, fuel and energy consumption were evaluated for a wide range of fossil and bio-fuel technologies. Emission factors were calculated for a typical waste collection driving cycle as well as constant speed. In brief, natural gas waste collection vehicles (compressed and liquid) fueled with North-American natural gas had 6–10% higher well-to-wheel (WTW) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to diesel-fueled vehicles; however the pump-to-wheel (PTW) GHG emissions of natural gas waste collection vehicles averaged 6% less than diesel-fueled vehicles. Landfill gas had about 80% lower WTW GHG emissions relative to diesel. Biodiesel waste collection vehicles had between 12% and 75% lower WTW GHG emissions relative to diesel depending on the fuel source and the blend. In 2011, natural gas waste collection vehicles had the lowest fuel cost per collection vehicle kilometer travel. Finally, the actual driving cycle of waste collection vehicles consists of repetitive stops and starts during waste collection; this generates more emissions than constant speed driving.

  7. Saving Power at Peak Hours (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    California needs new, responsive, demand-side energy technologies to ensure that periods of tight electricity supply on the grid don't turn into power outages. Led by Berkeley Lab's Mary Ann Piette, the California Energy Commission (through its Public Interest Energy Research Program) has established a Demand Response Research Center that addresses two motivations for adopting demand responsiveness: reducing average electricity prices and preventing future electricity crises. The research seeks to understand factors that influence "what works" in Demand Response. Piette's team is investigating the two types of demand response, load response and price response, that may influence and reduce the use of peak electric power through automated controls, peak pricing, advanced communications, and other strategies.

  8. Atmospheric particulate emissions from dry abrasive blasting using coal slag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaskar Kura; Kalpalatha Kambham; Sivaramakrishnan Sangameswaran; Sandhya Potana [University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal slag is one of the widely used abrasives in dry abrasive blasting. Atmospheric emissions from this process include particulate matter (PM) and heavy metals, such as chromium, lead, manganese, nickel. Quantities and characteristics of PM emissions depend on abrasive characteristics and process parameters. Emission factors are key inputs to estimate emissions. Experiments were conducted to study the effect of blast pressure, abrasive feed rate, and initial surface contamination on total PM (TPM) emission factors for coal slag. Rusted and painted mild steel surfaces were used as base plates. Blasting was carried out in an enclosed chamber, and PM was collected from an exhaust duct using U.S. Environment Protection Agency source sampling methods for stationary sources. Results showed that there is significant effect of blast pressure, feed rate, and surface contamination on TPM emissions. Mathematical equations were developed to estimate emission factors in terms of mass of emissions per unit mass of abrasive used, as well as mass of emissions per unit of surface area cleaned. These equations will help industries in estimating PM emissions based on blast pressure and abrasive feed rate. In addition, emissions can be reduced by choosing optimum operating conditions. 40 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Intra-hour wind power variability assessment using the conditional range metric : quantification, forecasting and applications.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutsika, Thekla

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The research presented herein concentrates on the quantification, assessment and forecasting of intra-hour wind power variability. Wind power is intrinsically variable and, due to the… (more)

  10. Y-12 Construction hits one million man-hour mark without a lost...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Construction hits one million man-hour mark without a lost-time accident | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - after-hours care instructions Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    after hours access? yes no AUP Number... Supervisor's Signature Submitted Occupational Health Form to Animal Care and Use 608 Boyd Graduate Studied... Building ... Source:...

  12. Safety profile and pharmacokinetic analyses of the anti-CTLA4 antibody tremelimumab administered as a one hour infusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as a one hour infusion. Journal of Translational Medicineadministered as a one hour infusion Antoni Ribas 1* , Jasonclinic at a fixed rate infusion, resulting in very prolonged

  13. BP's Perspective on Emissions Purdue Emissions Trading Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BP's Perspective on Emissions Trading Purdue Emissions Trading Workshop April 30, 2010 Mark - Government policies can create a carbon price via three primary mechanisms: - Emissions trading (BP's strong

  14. Excess Emissions (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This regulation establishes requirements for a source whose operation results in an excess emission and to establish criteria for a source whose operation results in an excess emission to claim an...

  15. Allocating emissions permits in cap-and-trade programs: Theory and evidence Preliminary.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowlie, Meredith

    emissions trading program are used to analyze these relationships empirically. I ...nd robust evidence an important a factor in the widespread adoption of emissions trading programs. More recently, a third design

  16. Emissions Trading and Social Justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farber, Daniel A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    David  M.  Driesen,  Does  Emissions  Trading  Encourage  Jason  Coburn,  Emissions  Trading   and   Environmental  Szambelan,  U.S.  Emissions  Trading  Markets  for  SO 2  

  17. Forecasting the Hourly Ontario Energy Price by Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    1 Forecasting the Hourly Ontario Energy Price by Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines H. In this paper, the MARS technique is applied to forecast the hourly Ontario energy price (HOEP). The MARS models values of the latest pre- dispatch price and demand information, made available by the Ontario

  18. Sample 8 Semester Plan for NRES Students need 130 hours to graduate.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, Angela

    resource systems with emphasis on the ecology, biology, conservation, and management of fish and wildlifeSample 8 Semester Plan for NRES Students need 130 hours to graduate. Year 11 Fall Semester ACES 101 Public Speaking2 IB 103 Intro to Plant Biology Statistics3 or Cultural Studies4 Total Hours Hrs 3 1 3-4 4

  19. Optimal Multi-scale Capacity Planning under Hourly Varying Electricity Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Optimal Multi-scale Capacity Planning under Hourly Varying Electricity Prices Sumit Mitra Ignacio;2 Motivation of this work · Deregulation of the electricity markets caused electricity prices to be highly? (retrofit) · Challenge: Multi-scale nature of the problem! Hourly varying electricity prices vs. 10-15 years

  20. Cloudy Sky Version of Bird's Broadband Hourly Clear Sky Model (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation on Bird's Broadband Hourly Clear Sky Model given by NREL's Daryl Myers at SOLAR 2006. The objective of this report is to produce ''all sky'' modeled hourly solar radiation. This is based on observed cloud cover data using a SIMPLE model.

  1. STUDENT HOURLY OFFICE ASSISTANT Position available with the History of Cartography Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    STUDENT HOURLY OFFICE ASSISTANT Position available with the History of Cartography Project Hours · Must be enrolled UW student; work study funding accepted · Experience with Word, Excel, database To apply, submit a detailed letter of application and resume to Beth Freundlich at: History of Cartography

  2. Short Term Hourly Load Forecasting Using Abductive Networks R. E. Abdel-Aal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel-Aal, Radwan E.

    Short Term Hourly Load Forecasting Using Abductive Networks R. E. Abdel-Aal Center for Applied for this purpose. This paper proposes using the alternative technique of abductive networks, which offers with statistical and empirical models. Using hourly temperature and load data for five years, 24 dedicated models

  3. Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time Earth Hour 2009: March 28, 8:30-9:30 PM Local Time March 27, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis John Lippert The city of Greenbelt, Maryland,...

  4. Stairwells are lit 24 hours per day regardless of occupancy. In stairwells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    initial cost and publicize availability to lighting designers and contractors · Publicize energy savingsStairwells are lit 24 hours per day regardless of occupancy. In stairwells with high-wattage light fixtures (T12s or T8s), 24-hour use can lead to a significant and unnecessary waste of electricity

  5. Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Derivation of average cost of emission reduction by blending?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend is, ?+ ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect to unblended

  6. College Of Wooster 2012 Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Coal and Natural Gas Combustion Default Values From EPA Greenhouse Gas Rule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Mark A.

    56410 CO2 = 1 X 10 -3 X Fuel X HHV X EF Where CO2 = Annual CO2 mass emissions for the specific fuel type high heat value. EF =Fuel default CO2 Emission Factor from Table C-1Page 56410 CO2 Coal CO2 = 1 X 10 -3 Default CO2 Emission Factor For Bituminous Coal = 93.40 kg/mmbtu Default CH4 Emission Factor

  7. Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Aslam K. Khalil

    2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min × 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

  8. Ammonia emission inventory for the state of Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Maser, Colette R.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is the only significant gaseous base in the atmosphere and it has a variety of impacts as an atmospheric pollutant, including the formation of secondary aerosol particles: ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate. NH{sub 3} preferentially forms ammonium sulfate; consequently ammonium nitrate aerosol formation may be limited by the availability of NH{sub 3}. Understanding the impact of emissions of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen on visibility, therefore, requires accurately determined ammonia emission inventories for use in air quality models, upon which regulatory and policy decisions increasingly depend. This report presents an emission inventory of NH{sub 3} for the state of Wyoming. The inventory is temporally and spatially resolved at the monthly and county level, and is comprised of emissions from individual sources in ten categories: livestock, fertilizer, domestic animals, wild animals, wildfires, soil, industry, mobile sources, humans, and publicly owned treatment works. The Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory was developed using the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Ammonia Model as framework. Current Wyoming-specific activity data and emissions factors obtained from state agencies and published literature were assessed and used as inputs to the CMU Ammonia Model. Biogenic emissions from soils comprise about three-quarters of the Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory, though emission factors from soils are highly uncertain. Published emission factors are scarce and based on limited measurements. In Wyoming, agricultural land, rangeland, and forests comprise 96% of the land area and essentially all of the estimated emissions from soils. Future research on emission rates of NH{sub 3} for these land categories may lead to a substantial change in the magnitude of soil emissions, a different inventory composition, and reduced uncertainty in the inventory. While many NH{sub 3} inventories include annual emissions, air quality modeling studies require finer temporal resolution. Published studies indicate higher emission rates from soils and animal wastes at higher temperatures, and temporal variation in fertilizer application. A recent inverse modeling study indicates temporal variation in regional NH{sub 3} emissions. Monthly allocation factors were derived to estimate monthly emissions from soils, livestock and wild animal waste based on annual emission estimates. Monthly resolution of NH{sub 3} emissions from fertilizers is based on fertilizer sales to farmers. Statewide NH{sub 3} emissions are highest in the late spring and early summer months.

  9. Emissions Benefits of Distributed Generation in the Texas Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, SW

    2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    One potential benefit of distributed generation (DG) is a net reduction in air emissions. While DG will produce emissions, most notably carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides, the power it displaces might have produced more. This study used a system dispatch model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to simulate the 2012 Texas power market with and without DG. This study compares the reduction in system emissions to the emissions from the DG to determine the net savings. Some of the major findings are that 85% of the electricity displaced by DG during peak hours will be simple cycle natural gas, either steam or combustion turbine. Even with DG running as baseload, 57% of electricity displaced will be simple cycle natural gas. Despite the retirement of some gas-fired steam units and the construction of many new gas turbine and combined cycle units, the marginal emissions from the system remain quite high (1.4 lb NO{sub x}/MWh on peak and 1.1 lb NO{sub x}/MWh baseload) compared to projected DG emissions. Consequently, additions of DG capacity will reduce emissions in Texas from power generation in 2012. Using the DG exhaust heat for combined heat and power provides an even greater benefit, since it eliminates further boiler emissions while adding none over what would be produced while generating electricity. Further studies are warranted concerning the robustness of the result with changes in fuel prices, demands, and mixes of power generating technology.

  10. Anomalous Microwave Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kogut

    1999-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved knowledge of diffuse Galactic emission is important to maximize the scientific return from scheduled CMB anisotropy missions. Cross-correlation of microwave maps with maps of the far-IR dust continuum show a ubiquitous microwave emission component whose spatial distribution is traced by far-IR dust emission. The spectral index of this emission, beta_{radio} = -2.2 (+0.5 -0.7) is suggestive of free-free emission but does not preclude other candidates. Comparison of H-alpha and microwave results show that both data sets have positive correlations with the far-IR dust emission. Microwave data, however, are consistently brighter than can be explained solely from free-free emission traced by H-alpha. This ``anomalous'' microwave emission can be explained as electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The anomalous component at 53 GHz is 2.5 times as bright as the free-free emission traced by H-alpha, providing an approximate normalization for models with significant spinning dust emission.

  11. Measurement of vehicle emissions and the associated dispersion near roadways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hlavinka, M. W

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    halance I, echnique sufl'ers I&vo disadva&i&, ages: (1) the emission factor may &&nly l&e calcula4cd for exis&, ing roads and (2) I, he analys4 &nusI, have accuraLe air quality, I, raflic, and inel, eorological da4a to estimal, e the emission rate...

  12. Predicting Future Hourly Residential Electrical Consumption: A Machine Learning Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Richard E [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Parker, Lynne Edwards [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Whole building input models for energy simulation programs are frequently created in order to evaluate specific energy savings potentials. They are also often utilized to maximize cost-effective retrofits for existing buildings as well as to estimate the impact of policy changes toward meeting energy savings goals. Traditional energy modeling suffers from several factors, including the large number of inputs required to characterize the building, the specificity required to accurately model building materials and components, simplifying assumptions made by underlying simulation algorithms, and the gap between the as-designed and as-built building. Prior works have attempted to mitigate these concerns by using sensor-based machine learning approaches to model energy consumption. However, a majority of these prior works focus only on commercial buildings. The works that focus on modeling residential buildings primarily predict monthly electrical consumption, while commercial models predict hourly consumption. This means there is not a clear indicator of which techniques best model residential consumption, since these methods are only evaluated using low-resolution data. We address this issue by testing seven different machine learning algorithms on a unique residential data set, which contains 140 different sensors measurements, collected every 15 minutes. In addition, we validate each learner's correctness on the ASHRAE Great Energy Prediction Shootout, using the original competition metrics. Our validation results confirm existing conclusions that Neural Network-based methods perform best on commercial buildings. However, the results from testing our residential data set show that Feed Forward Neural Networks, Support Vector Regression (SVR), and Linear Regression methods perform poorly, and that Hierarchical Mixture of Experts (HME) with Least Squares Support Vector Machines (LS-SVM) performs best - a technique not previously applied to this domain.

  13. Calibration of Predicted Hourly Zone-Level Supply Air Flows with Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihai, A.; Zmeureanu, R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the chemical composition, then sends a signal to the control system to increase the ventilation rate, if necessary. This system cannot be modeled in eQuest. The null hypothesis H0 is true only if the t-value is less than tcritical; if t-value is greater..., daily and monthly calibration analysis: CV-RMSE[%] vs. t-test CV-RMSE [%] Zone Interval Time step t t,cr 2.1 NE Summer Hourly 18.8 Daily 9.5 Monthly 4.2 3 days Hourly 24.2 2.4 SW Summer Hourly 28.4 Daily 12.7 Monthly 4...

  14. A Search for Pulsed TeV Gamma-Ray Emission from the Crab Pulsar using the Whipple High Resolution GRANITE III Camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kildea

    2003-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a search for pulsed TeV emission from the Crab pulsar using 97 hours of data recorded with the high-resolution GRANITE III camera of the Whipple 10 m gamma-ray telescope.

  15. A Search for Pulsed TeV Gamma-Ray Emission from the Crab Pulsar using the Whipple High Resolution GRANITE III Camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kildea, J

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a search for pulsed TeV emission from the Crab pulsar using 97 hours of data recorded with the high-resolution GRANITE III camera of the Whipple 10 m gamma-ray telescope.

  16. Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Date Report No. 3: Diesel Fuel Sulfur Effects on Particulate Matter Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

    1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim report covers the effects of diesel fuel sulfur level on particulate matter emissions for four technologies.

  17. Museum Hours

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challengeMultiscale Subsurface Biogeochemical Modeling MultiscaleMuseum

  18. The California Climate Action Registry: Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Muritshaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We find that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

  19. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

  20. Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 Tim Johnson October 16, 2012 2 Environmental Technologies Summary * Regulations - LEVIII finalized, Tier 3? RDE in Europe developing and very...

  1. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.41

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.41 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated April 10, 2009, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  2. ANTH 376: GENOMICS & ANTHROPOLOGY 4 credit hours (satisfies an SC requirement)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ANTH 376: GENOMICS & ANTHROPOLOGY 4 credit hours (satisfies an SC variation, health and evolution. Extended Course Description The Human Genome Project and recent advances in genome sequencing techniques have made it possible

  3. LBNL-53729-Revised After-hours Power Status of Office Equipment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-53729-Revised After-hours Power Status of Office Equipment and Energy Use of Miscellaneous of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;LBNL-53729-Revised i Table of Contents Table of Contents

  4. Question of the Week: How Are You Observing Earth Hour? | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Sunday, people across the country will spring forward an hour, marking the start to Daylight Saving Time. | Photo courtesy of iStock Photo, WoodyUpstate. Top 8 Things You Didn't...

  5. Is the hourly data I get from NREL's PV Watts program adjusted...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    get from NREL's PV Watts program adjusted for daylight savings time. Home I take the hourly AC output numbers and apply them to a program I built that assigns a dollar value to the...

  6. NREL: News - NREL Finds Up to 6-cent per Kilowatt-Hour Extra...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    714 NREL Finds Up to 6-cent per Kilowatt-Hour Extra Value with Concentrated Solar Power The greater the penetration of renewables in California, the greater the value of CSP with...

  7. Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Construction hits one ... Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time accident Posted: August 30, 2012 - 5:30pm The B&W Y-12 Direct-Hire Construction team has...

  8. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.50

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.50 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  9. Mercury emissions from municipal solid waste combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines emissions of mercury (Hg) from municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion in the United States (US). It is projected that total annual nationwide MSW combustor emissions of mercury could decrease from about 97 tonnes (1989 baseline uncontrolled emissions) to less than about 4 tonnes in the year 2000. This represents approximately a 95 percent reduction in the amount of mercury emitted from combusted MSW compared to the 1989 mercury emissions baseline. The likelihood that routinely achievable mercury emissions removal efficiencies of about 80 percent or more can be assured; it is estimated that MSW combustors in the US could prove to be a comparatively minor source of mercury emissions after about 1995. This forecast assumes that diligent measures to control mercury emissions, such as via use of supplemental control technologies (e.g., carbon adsorption), are generally employed at that time. However, no present consensus was found that such emissions control measures can be implemented industry-wide in the US within this time frame. Although the availability of technology is apparently not a limiting factor, practical implementation of necessary control technology may be limited by administrative constraints and other considerations (e.g., planning, budgeting, regulatory compliance requirements, etc.). These projections assume that: (a) about 80 percent mercury emissions reduction control efficiency is achieved with air pollution control equipment likely to be employed by that time; (b) most cylinder-shaped mercury-zinc (CSMZ) batteries used in hospital applications can be prevented from being disposed into the MSW stream or are replaced with alternative batteries that do not contain mercury; and (c) either the amount of mercury used in fluorescent lamps is decreased to an industry-wide average of about 27 milligrams of mercury per lamp or extensive diversion from the MSW stream of fluorescent lamps that contain mercury is accomplished.

  10. Computer Code Gives Astrophysicists First Full Simulation of Star's Final Hours

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Andy Nonaka

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The precise conditions inside a white dwarf star in the hours leading up to its explosive end as a Type Ia supernova are one of the mysteries confronting astrophysicists studying these massive stellar explosions. But now, a team of researchers, composed of three applied mathematicians at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and two astrophysicists, has created the first full-star simulation of the hours preceding the largest thermonuclear explosions in the universe.

  11. Calculating Your GPA Grade point value per credit hour is assigned as follows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Divide total quality points (calculated from step 1) by total credit hours earned For Example Finding GPA.8 Totals 20 64.0 GPA= Total Quality Points Total Credit Hours = 64 3.2 20 = GPA= 3.2 *All marks of P, P*, N 101 4 ECON 201 4 ECON 202 4 ACTG 211 4 ACTG 213 4 Totals 20 GPA= Total Quality Points Total Credit

  12. Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, Steven K

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  13. Trends in on-road vehicle emissions of ammonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kean, A.J.; Littlejohn, D.; Ban-Weiss, G.A.; Harley, R.A.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Lunden, M. M.

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Motor vehicle emissions of ammonia have been measured at a California highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. Between 1999 and 2006, light-duty vehicle ammonia emissions decreased by 38 {+-} 6%, from 640 {+-} 40 to 400 {+-} 20 mg kg{sup -1}. High time resolution measurements of ammonia made in summer 2001 at the same location indicate a minimum in ammonia emissions correlated with slower-speed driving conditions. Variations in ammonia emission rates track changes in carbon monoxide more closely than changes in nitrogen oxides, especially during later evening hours when traffic speeds are highest. Analysis of remote sensing data of Burgard et al. (Environ Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 7018-7022) indicates relationships between ammonia and vehicle model year, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide. Ammonia emission rates from diesel trucks were difficult to measure in the tunnel setting due to the large contribution to ammonia concentrations in a mixed-traffic bore that were assigned to light-duty vehicle emissions. Nevertheless, it is clear that heavy-duty diesel trucks are a minor source of ammonia emissions compared to light-duty gasoline vehicles.

  14. Extended silicate dust emission in PG QSOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Schweitzer; B. Groves; H. Netzer; D. Lutz; E. Sturm; A. Contursi; R. Genzel; L. J. Tacconi; S. Veilleux; D. -C. Kim; D. Rupke; A. J. Baker

    2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the origin of the silicate emission observed in PG QSOs, based on observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Scenarios based on the unified model suggest that silicate emission in AGN arises mainly from the illuminated faces of the clouds in the torus at temperatures near sublimation. However, detections of silicate emission in Type 2 QSOs, and the estimated cool dust temperatures, argue for a more extended emission region.To investigate this issue we present the mid-infrared spectra of 23 QSOs. These spectra, and especially the silicate emission features at ~10 and ~18 mu can be fitted using dusty narrow line region (NLR) models and a combination of black bodies. The bolometric luminosities of the QSOs allow us to derive the radial distances and covering factors for the silicate-emitting dust. The inferred radii are 100-200 times larger than the dust sublimation radius, much larger than the expected dimensions of the inner torus. Our QSO mid-IR spectra are consistent with the bulk of the silicate dust emission arising from the dust in the innermost parts of the NLR.

  15. The Measurement of Trace Emissions and Combustion Characteristics for a Mass Fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    32 The Measurement of Trace Emissions and Combustion Characteristics for a Mass Fire Ronald A of emissions from biomass burning on global climate. While the burning of biomass constitutes a large fraction of world emis- sions, there are insufficient data on the combustion efficiency, emission factors, and trace

  16. Statistical Image Reconstruction Methods for Simultaneous Emission/Transmission PET Scans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdogan, Hakan

    Statistical Image Reconstruction Methods for Simultaneous Emission/Transmission PET Scans Hakan are necessary for estimating the attenuation correction factors (ACFs) to yield quantitatively accu- rate PET to recon- struct lower noise PET emission images from simultaneous trans- mission/emission scans

  17. Global inventory of nitrogen oxide emissions constrained by space-based observations of NO2 columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Kelly

    Global inventory of nitrogen oxide emissions constrained by space-based observations of NO2 columns NO + NO2), and combine these with a priori information from a bottom- up emission inventory (with error and a factor of 2 over remote regions. We derive a top-down NOx emission inventory from the GOME data by using

  18. Estimation and Reduction Methodologies for Fugitive Emissions from Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scataglia, A.

    .0214 Compressor Seals Gas/Vapor 0.228 Pressure Relief Seals Gas/Vapor 0.104 Flanges All 0.00083 Open-Ended Lines All 0.0017 Sampling Connections All 0.0150 Table 1. Average Emission Factors for Fugitive Emissions (kg/hr/source). The product of the emission...Tssion Factor Emission Factor Val ves Gas a LLb HL c 0.0451 0.0852 0.00023 d 0.00048 0.00171 0.00023 Pump Sea Is LL HL 0.437 0.3885 0.0120 0.0135 Compressor Seal se Pressure ReI ief Valves Flanges Open -Ended Lines Gas Gas All All 1...

  19. Accretion disk and ionized absorber of the 9.7-hour dipping black hole binary MAXI J1305-704

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shidatsu, Megumi; Nakahira, Satoshi; Done, Chris; Morihana, Kumiko; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Mihara, Tatehiro; Hori, Takafumi; Negoro, Hitoshi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Ebisawa, Ken; Matsuoka, Masaru; Serino, Motoko; Yoshikawa, Tatsuhito; Nagayama, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results from X-ray studies of the newly discovered black hole candidate MAXI J1305-704 based on Suzaku and Swift observations in the low/hard and high/soft states, respectively. The long Suzaku observation shows two types of clear absorption dips, both of which recur on a dip interval of 9.74 +- 0.04 hours, which we identify with the orbital period. There is also partially ionized absorption in the non-dip (persistent) emission in both the high/soft state and, very unusually, the low/hard state. However, this absorption (in both states) has substantially lower ionization than that seen in other high inclination systems, where the material forms a homogeneous disk wind. Here instead the absorption is most probably associated with clumpy, compact structures associated with the dipping material, which we see uniquely in this source likely because we view it at a very large inclination angle. A large inclination angle is also favored, together with a low black hole mass, to explain the high disk tem...

  20. Spontaneous Emission Rate Enhancement Using Optical Antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Nikhil

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of  Spontaneous  Emission  in  a  Semiconductor  nanoLED,”  emission  rate  enhancement  using  the  Fluorescent  Emission  by  Lattice   Resonances  in  

  1. Historical Sulfur Dioxide Emissions 1850-2000: Methods and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Andres, Robert; Conception , Elvira; Lurz, Joshua

    2004-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A global, self-consistent estimate of sulfur dioxide emissions over the last one and a half century were estimated by using a combination of bottom-up and best available inventory methods including all anthropogenic sources. We find that global sulfur dioxide emissions peaked about 1980 and have generally declined since this time. Emissions were extrapolated to a 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} grid for the time period 1850-2000 at annual resolution with two emission height levels and by season. Emissions are somewhat higher in the recent past in this new work as compared with some comprehensive estimates. This difference is largely due to our use of emissions factors that vary with time to account for sulfur removals from fossil fuels and industrial smelting processes.

  2. Reducing Open Cell Landfill Methane Emissions with a Bioactive Alternative Daily

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helene Hilger; James Oliver; Jean Bogner; David Jones

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane and carbon dioxide are formed in landfills as wastes degrade. Molecule-for-molecule, methane is about 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the earth's atmosphere, and thus, it is the methane emissions from landfills that are scrutinized. For example, if emissions composed of 60% methane and 40% carbon dioxide were changed to a mix that was 40% methane and 60% carbon dioxide, a 30% reduction in the landfill's global warming potential would result. A 10% methane, 90% carbon dioxide ratio will result in a 75% reduction in global warming potential compared to the baseline. Gas collection from a closed landfill can reduce emissions, and it is sometimes combined with a biocover, an engineered system where methane oxidizing bacteria living in a medium such as compost, convert landfill methane to carbon dioxide and water. Although methane oxidizing bacteria merely convert one greenhouse gas (methane) to another (carbon dioxide), this conversion can offer significant reductions in the overall greenhouse gas contribution, or global warming potential, associated with the landfill. What has not been addressed to date is the fact that methane can also escape from a landfill when the active cell is being filled with waste. Federal regulations require that newly deposited solid waste to be covered daily with a 6 in layer of soil or an alternative daily cover (ADC), such as a canvas tarp. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of immobilizing methane oxidizing bacteria into a tarp-like matrix that could be used for alternative daily cover at open landfill cells to prevent methane emissions. A unique method of isolating methanotrophs from landfill cover soil was used to create a liquid culture of mixed methanotrophs. A variety of prospective immobilization techniques were used to affix the bacteria in a tarp-like matrix. Both gel encapsulation of methanotrophs and gels with liquid cores containing methanotrophs were readily made but prone to rapid desiccation. Bacterial adsorption onto foam padding, natural sponge, and geotextile was successful. The most important factor for success appeared to be water holding capacity. Prototype biotarps made with geotextiles plus adsorbed methane oxidizing bacteria were tested for their responses to temperature, intermittent starvation, and washing (to simulate rainfall). The prototypes were mesophilic, and methane oxidation activity remained strong after one cycle of starvation but then declined with repeated cycles. Many of the cells detached with vigorous washing, but at least 30% appeared resistant to sloughing. While laboratory landfill simulations showed that four-layer composite biotarps made with two different types of geotextile could remove up to 50% of influent methane introduced at a flux rate of 22 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, field experiments did not yield high activity levels. Tests revealed that there were high hour-to-hour flux variations in the field, which, together with frequent rainfall events, confounded the field testing. Overall, the findings suggest that a methanotroph embedded biotarp appears to be a feasible strategy to mitigate methane emission from landfill cells, although the performance of field-tested biotarps was not robust here. Tarps will likely be best suited for spring and summer use, although the methane oxidizer population may be able to shift and adapt to lower temperatures. The starvation cycling of the tarp may require the capacity for intermittent reinoculation of the cells, although it is also possible that a subpopulation will adapt to the cycling and become dominant. Rainfall is not expected to be a major factor, because a baseline biofilm will be present to repopulate the tarp. If strong performance can be achieved and documented, the biotarp concept could be extended to include interception of other compounds beyond methane, such as volatile aromatic hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents.

  3. Statistical correlation between hourly and daily values of solar radiation on horizontal surface at sea level in the Italian climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    219- Statistical correlation between hourly and daily values of solar radiation on horizontal- nalières du rayonnement solaire. Abstract. 2014 The knowledge of hourly data of solar radiation is required data measured in Italian stations and propose a method to estimate hourly solar radiation

  4. Contraction & Convergence: UK carbon emissions and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    the EU's emissions trading scheme will do little to mitigate carbon emissions 4) Aviation growth must emissions. Keywords Contraction & Convergence; aviation; emissions trading; passengers; carbon dioxide #12

  5. Emission Abatement System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bromberg, Leslie (Sharon, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Rabinovich, Alexander (Swampscott, MA)

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

  6. Developing hourly weather data for locations having only daily weather data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talbert, S.G.; Herold, K.E.; Jakob, F.E.; Lundstrom, D.K.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology was developed to modify an hourly TMY weather tape to be representative of a location for which only average daily weather parameters were avilable. Typical hourly and daily variations in solar flux, and other parameters, were needed to properly exercise a computer model to predict the transient performance of a solar controlled greenhouse being designed for Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The starting point was a TMY tape for Yuma, Arizona, since the design temperatures for summer and winter are nearly identical for Yuma and Riyadh. After comparing six of the most important weather variables, the hourly values on the Yuma tape were individually adjusted to give the same overall daily average conditions as existed in the long-term Riyadh data. Finally, a statistical analysis was used to confirm quantitatively that the daily variations between the long term average values for Riyadh and the modified TMY weather tape for Yuma matched satisfactorily.

  7. Sub-Hour Solar Data for Power System Modeling From Static Spatial Variability Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.; Ibanez, E.; Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High penetration renewable integration studies need high quality solar power data with spatial-temporal correlations that are representative of a real system. This paper will summarize the research relating sequential point-source sub-hour global horizontal irradiance (GHI) values to static, spatially distributed GHI values. This research led to the development of an algorithm for generating coherent sub-hour datasets that span distances ranging from 10 km to 4,000 km. The algorithm, in brief, generates synthetic GHI values at an interval of one-minute, for a specific location, using SUNY/Clean Power Research, satellite-derived, hourly irradiance values for the nearest grid cell to that location and grid cells within 40 km.

  8. Emission Standards for Contaminants (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations list emissions standards for various contaminants, and contain special requirements for anaerobic lagoons. These regulations also describe alternative emissions limits, which may...

  9. Optical emission in magnetically confined laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, X. K.; Lu, Y. F.; Gebre, T.; Ling, H.; Han, Y. X. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0511 (United States)

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetically confined laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was investigated by studying the optical emission from laser-induced plasma plumes expanding across an external transverse magnetic field. KrF excimer laser pulses with a pulse duration of 23 ns and a wavelength of 248 nm were used to produce plasmas from Al, Cu, and Co targets. Various optical emission lines obtained from Al and Cu targets show an obvious enhancement in the intensity of optical emission when a magnetic field of {approx}0.8 T is applied, while the optical emission lines from Co targets show a decrease in the optical emission intensity. The enhancement factors of optical emission lines were measured to be around 2 for the Al and Mn (impurity) lines from Al targets, and 6-8 for Cu lines from Cu targets. Temporal evolution of the optical emission lines from the Al samples shows a maximum enhancement in emission intensity at time delays of 8-20 {mu}s after the incident laser pulse, while from the Cu targets it shows a continuous enhancement at time delays of 3-20 {mu}s after the pulse. The enhancement in the optical emission from the Al and Cu plasmas was presumably due to the increase in the effective plasma density as a result of magnetic confinement. The decrease in the emission intensity from the Co plasmas was suggested to be due to the decrease of effective plasma density as a result of the magnetic force.

  10. Intelligent field emission arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Ching-yin, 1973-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field emission arrays (FEAs) have been studied extensively as potential electron sources for a number of vacuum microelectronic device applications. For most applications, temporal current stability and spatial current ...

  11. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  12. Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute sets goals for the reduction of statewide greenhouse gas emissions by at least 15 percent by 2015, 30 percent by 2025, and 80 percent by 2050, calculated relative to 2005 levels. These...

  13. Computer Code Gives Astrophysicists First Full Simulation of Star's Final Hours

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Applin, Bradford

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The precise conditions inside a white dwarf star in the hours leading up to its explosive end as a Type Ia supernova are one of the mysteries confronting astrophysicists studying these massive stellar explosions. But now, a team of researchers, composed of three applied mathematicians at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and two astrophysicists, has created the first full-star simulation of the hours preceding the largest thermonuclear explosions in the universe. http://www.lbl.gov/cs/Archive/news091509.html

  14. Numerical simulation of hourly temperatures at Webb Air Force Base, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James Edward

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , with time of year, of the autocorrelation coefficient, and a first-order kharkov chain. Fourier (harmonic) analysis was used extensively in the development of the model and the reverse adjusted normal transformation was used to transform a normal... for by the 1st, 365th, 730th, and 1095th barmonics, 17 Vai~ es of the parameters used to generate the mean hourly temperature. Percent of the variance of the standard devia- tion of hourly temperature, accounted for by the 1st and 36th harmonics. 24...

  15. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  16. Nitric oxide emissions from the high-temperature viscous boundary layers of hypersonic aircraft within the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, S.B.; Lewis, M.J.; Dickerson, R.R. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors study the nitric oxide emission characteristics of supersonic aircraft resulting from heating of viscous boundary layers along the skin of the aircraft. Previous study has concentrated on nitric oxide emissions coming from combustion products from the scramjet engines. This work shows that above mach 8, emissions from viscous heating become a significant factor in total emission of nitric oxide. Above mach 16 it becomes the dominant source of emission.

  17. On the Detectability of Prompt Coherent GRB Radio Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -P. Macquart

    2007-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Both induced Compton scattering and induced Raman scattering strongly limit the observability of the extremely bright (emission recently predicted to emanate from gamma-ray bursts. Induced Compton scattering is the main limiting factor when the region around the progenitor is not dense but when one still considers the scattering effect of the a tenuous circumburst ISM. For a medium of density 0.01 n_{0.01} cm^{-3} and a path length L_{kpc} kpc and emission that is roughly isotropic in its rest frame the brightness temperature is limited to emission occurs. Thus, for a burst at distance D the predicted emission is only visible if the jet is ultra-relativistic, with Gamma > 10^3 (D/100 Mpc), or if the intrinsic opening angle of the emission is extremely small. Thus the presence or absence of such radio emission provides an excellent constraint on the Lorentz factor of the GRB outflow during the very early stages of its outburst. Induced Raman scattering imposes an even more stringent limit independent of the emission opening angle, but only effective if GRB emission must propagate through a dense progenitor wind within ~ 10^{15} cm from the blast center.

  18. Emissions estimation for lignite-fired power plants in Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nurten Vardar; Zehra Yumurtaci [Yildiz Technical University Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The major gaseous emissions (e.g. sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide), some various organic emissions (e.g. benzene, toluene and xylenes) and some trace metals (e.g. arsenic, cobalt, chromium, manganese and nickel) generated from lignite-fired power plants in Turkey are estimated. The estimations are made separately for each one of the thirteen plants that produced electricity in 2007, because the lignite-fired thermal plants in Turkey are installed near the regions where the lignite is mined, and characteristics and composition of lignite used in each power plant are quite different from a region to another. Emission factors methodology is used for the estimations. The emission factors obtained from well-known literature are then modified depending on local moisture content of lignite. Emission rates and specific emissions (per MWh) of the pollutants from the plants without electrostatic precipitators and flue-gas desulfurization systems are found to be higher than emissions from the plants having electrostatic precipitators and flue -gas desulfurization systems. Finally a projection for the future emissions due to lignite-based power plants is given. Predicted demand for the increasing generation capacity based on the lignite-fired thermal power plant, from 2008 to 2017 is around 30%. 39 refs., 13 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. Chemistry 109 (3 credit hours) Honors General Chemistry Lecture, Part I; Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyle, Robert

    of the book are available at the University Bookstore. Corequisite: CHE 129 ­ Honors General Chemistry introduce you to all areas of chemistry: physical, organic, inorganic, quantum, biophysical, and analyticalChemistry 109 (3 credit hours) Honors General Chemistry Lecture, Part I; Fall 2014 Instructor

  20. Doctoral Program in Finance: Curriculum Fall FIN 7935 Finance Research Forum (1 credit hour)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foroosh, Hassan

    Doctoral Program in Finance: Curriculum First Year Fall FIN 7935 Finance Research Forum (1 credit of Finance Spring FIN 7935 Finance Research Forum (1 credit hour) ECO 6424 Econometrics I ECO 7116 Microeconomic Theory II FIN 7807 Seminar in Corporate Finance Attend FCTL Teaching Workshop for Doctoral

  1. Hourly Temperature Forecasting Using Abductive Networks R. E. Abdel-Aal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel-Aal, Radwan E.

    , Saudi Arabia Abstract: Hourly temperature forecasts are important for electrical load forecasting temperatures, Artificial intelligence. Dr. R. E. Abdel-Aal, P. O. Box 1759, KFUPM, Dhahran 31261 Saudi Arabia e appropriate actions such as spraying protective fungicides (Francis, 2000; Kim et al., 2002). Road weather

  2. DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE Instructions for Completing the Master's Project (0 Credit Hours)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE Instructions for Completing the Master's Project (0 Credit Hours) All students not electing to submit a thesis for the master's degree in Computer Engineering or Electrical Engineering must complete a Master's Project according to one of the following plans

  3. Avoiding the Rush Hours: WiFi Energy Management via Traffic Isolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    Avoiding the Rush Hours: WiFi Energy Management via Traffic Isolation Justin Manweiler Duke.rc@duke.edu ABSTRACT WiFi continues to be a prime source of energy consumption in mobile devices. This paper observes that, despite a rich body of research in WiFi energy management, there is room for improvement. Our key

  4. Graduation (research) project procedures -After the student completes 100 credit hours he may register for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduation (research) project procedures - After the student completes 100 credit hours he may register for the graduation project module, and after registering this module and obtaining the approval of the adviser and registrar the procedures will begin according to the following: - 1) The student shall attend

  5. Daily Texan April 1, 2014 Keeping Tower dark for Earth Hour was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    of the University's Energy and Water Conservation program, said the Tower going dark was a gesture similarDaily Texan April 1, 2014 Keeping Tower dark for Earth Hour was intended to raise awareness British thermal units, of natural gas. According to the University's Utilities and Energy Management

  6. Changes in the fatty acid composition of goat milk fat after a 48-hour fast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    milking was analysed. A total of 10 samples was taken from each goat and cooled. Milk samples 1-6 wereChanges in the fatty acid composition of goat milk fat after a 48-hour fast Anne-Marie MASSART, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. Summary. Five lactating goats were milked twice daily. After a control period

  7. From the Big Bang to the Higgs Boson in Less Than an Hour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    From the Big Bang to the Higgs Boson in Less Than an Hour Jeffrey D neutrino Z0 W + W -g gluon (8) photon Z boson W bosons Quarks Leptons H Higgs boson Gauge bosons (force field quanta) Higgs boson and vacuum expectation value Strong force EM force Weak force #12;Par7cles

  8. From the Big Bang to the Higgs Boson in Less Than an Hour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    From the Big Bang to the Higgs Boson in Less Than an Hour Jeffrey D H Higgs boson Gauge bosons (force field quanta) Higgs boson and vacuum expectation value Strong) photon Z boson W bosons H Higgs boson Gauge bosons (force field quanta) Higgs boson and vacuum

  9. WARMING TRENDS IN THE TAHOE HAPPY HOUR WITH ROBERT COATS, PH.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    to the causes of global warming lie at the national and international level, addressing the consequencesWARMING TRENDS IN THE TAHOE BASIN HAPPY HOUR WITH ROBERT COATS, PH.D. (HYDROIKOS LTD.) Date scientists agree that the earth's atmosphere and oceans are warming and the consequences will fall somewhere

  10. 0 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 Fermentation (hours)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    0 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 Fermentation (hours) rpm Do Wet cell weight (g/L) Feed Rate (ml/L) Expon. (Wet cell weight (g/L)) Figure 2. Fermentation profile of a Fed-Batch conducted in the CBR Fermentation, succinate, propionate isobutyrate , and acetate by gas chromatography. They can be removed from the media

  11. Cost-efficient staffing under annualized hours Egbert van der Veen1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    . Our model is able to address various business questions regard- ing tactical workforce planning. In this paper we integrate two (tactical) workforce planning problems. The `annualized hours' problem workforce planning problems, as discussed in the previous para- graph. Second, with our model, several

  12. Hourly and daily variations of xylem sapflow in sweet chestnut coppices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hourly and daily variations of xylem sapflow in sweet chestnut coppices using a thermal measurement in the thinned coppice. Materials and Methods A xylem sapflow measurement sensor com- prises two cylindrical u (°C). Psychrometer and net-radiometer were in- stalled on a tower in the thinned coppice

  13. Thirty states sign ITER nuclear fusion plant deal 1 hour, 28 minutes ago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirty states sign ITER nuclear fusion plant deal 1 hour, 28 minutes ago Representatives of more than 30 countries signed a deal on Tuesday to build the world's most advanced nuclear fusion reactor nuclear reactors, but critics argue it could be at least 50 years before a commercially viable reactor

  14. Mongolian Nomads and Climate Change Happy Hour with Dr. Clyde Goulden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    Mongolian Nomads and Climate Change Happy Hour with Dr. Clyde Goulden Date: Friday, December 8 by the World Bank to study the impacts of nomadic pastoralism and climate change on the Hovsgol watershed," published by Backhuys Publ., with 28 chapters by scientists from Mongolia, Russia, Japan, the United States

  15. Date of Accident: _____/_____/________ Day of Week: __________________ Hour: _____:______ AM / PM TIME VEHICLE ACCIDENT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Page 1/2 Date of Accident: _____/_____/________ Day of Week: __________________ Hour: _____:______ AM / PM TIME VEHICLE ACCIDENT REPORT TO BE USED BY ALL STATE AGENCIES to make immediate report of all motor vehicle accidents involving State employees, vehicles, equipment or where highways could result

  16. BME BIOMEDICAL IMAGING CONCENTRATION F12 MS: 30 total credit hours minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    BME BIOMEDICAL IMAGING CONCENTRATION ­ F12 MS: 30 total credit hours minimum Advisor: Luis Hernandez-Garcia, Ph.D. (hernan@umich.edu) Biomedical Imaging: BIOMEDE 5161 Medical Imaging Systems (3) (I)2 General: BIOMEDE 500 Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1) (I,II) BIOMEDE 550 Ethics and Enterprise (1) (I

  17. BME BIOMEDICAL IMAGING CONCENTRATION F11 MS: 30 total credit hours minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    BME BIOMEDICAL IMAGING CONCENTRATION ­ F11 MS: 30 total credit hours minimum Advisor: Luis Hernandez-Garcia, Ph.D. (hernan@umich.edu) Biomedical Imaging: BIOMEDE 5161 Medical Imaging Systems (3) (I)2 General: BIOMEDE 500 Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1) (I,II) BIOMEDE 550 Ethics and Enterprise (1) (I

  18. Dispersion modeling for prediction of emission factors for cattle feedyards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parnell, Sarah Elizabeth

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Upon implementation of the Federal Clean Air Act and with the anticipated increase in resources of state air pollution regulatory agencies, regulation of air quality will expand to agricultural production and processing industries. This expansion...

  19. Module: Emission Factors for Deforestation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithun Jump to: navigation,InformationModula

  20. Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The following text09-0018-CXBasinDeseretDevelopingthe MekongEnergy

  1. Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Ukraine | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The following text09-0018-CXBasinDeseretDevelopingthe

  2. Reconstruction efficiency and discovery potential of a Mediterranean neutrino telescope: A simulation study using the Hellenic Open University Simulation & Reconstruction (HOURS) package

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsirigotis, A G; Tzamarias, S E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the evaluation of the performance of a Mediterranean very large volume neutrino telescope. We present results of our studies concerning the capability of the telescope in detecting/discovering galactic (steady point sources) and extragalactic, transient (Gamma Ray Bursts) high energy neutrino sources as well as measuring ultra high energy diffuse neutrino fluxes. The neutrino effective area and angular resolution are presented as a function of the neutrino energy, and the background event rate (atmospheric neutrinos and muons) is estimated. The discovery potential of the neutrino telescope is evaluated and the experimental time required for a significant discovery of potential neutrino emitters (known from their gamma ray emission, assumedly produced by hadronic interactions) is estimated. For the simulation we use the HOU Reconstruction & Simulation (HOURS) software package.

  3. Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation for the California climate action registry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Murtishaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We fi nd that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

  4. PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION FROM STRATIFIED JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ono, Masaomi; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong [Astrophysical Big Bang Laboratory, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi [Department of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Pe'er, Asaf [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mizuta, Akira [KEK Theory Center, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Harikae, Seiji, E-mail: hito@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Quants Research Department, Financial Engineering Division, Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley Securities Co., Ltd., Mejirodai Bldg., 3-29-20 Mejirodai, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8688 (Japan)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore photospheric emissions from stratified two-component jets, wherein a highly relativistic spine outflow is surrounded by a wider and less relativistic sheath outflow. Thermal photons are injected in regions of high optical depth and propagated until the photons escape at the photosphere. Because of the presence of shear in velocity (Lorentz factor) at the boundary of the spine and sheath region, a fraction of the injected photons are accelerated using a Fermi-like acceleration mechanism such that a high-energy power-law tail is formed in the resultant spectrum. We show, in particular, that if a velocity shear with a considerable variance in the bulk Lorentz factor is present, the high-energy part of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) photon spectrum can be explained by this photon acceleration mechanism. We also show that the accelerated photons might also account for the origin of the extra-hard power-law component above the bump of the thermal-like peak seen in some peculiar bursts (e.g., GRB 090510, 090902B, 090926A). We demonstrate that time-integrated spectra can also reproduce the low-energy spectrum of GRBs consistently using a multi-temperature effect when time evolution of the outflow is considered. Last, we show that the empirical E{sub p}-L{sub p} relation can be explained by differences in the outflow properties of individual sources.

  5. Controlled spontaneous emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jae-Seung Lee; Mary A. Rohrdanz; A. K. Khitrin

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of spontaneous emission is studied by a direct computer simulation of the dynamics of a combined system: atom + radiation field. The parameters of the discrete finite model, including up to 20k field oscillators, have been optimized by a comparison with the exact solution for the case when the oscillators have equidistant frequencies and equal coupling constants. Simulation of the effect of multi-pulse sequence of phase kicks and emission by a pair of atoms shows that both the frequency and the linewidth of the emitted spectrum could be controlled.

  6. Practical guide: Tools and methodologies for an oil and gas industry emission inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, C.C. [C-K Associates, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Killian, T.L. [Conoco, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During the preparation of Title V Permit applications, the quantification and speciation of emission sources from oil and gas facilities were reevaluated to determine the {open_quotes}potential-to-emit.{close_quotes} The existing emissions were primarily based on EPA emission factors such as AP-42, for tanks, combustion sources, and fugitive emissions from component leaks. Emissions from insignificant activities and routine operations that are associated with maintenance, startups and shutdowns, and releases to control devices also required quantification. To reconcile EPA emission factors with test data, process knowledge, and manufacturer`s data, a careful review of other estimation options was performed. This paper represents the results of this analysis of emission sources at oil and gas facilities, including exploration and production, compressor stations and gas plants.

  7. Generalized Emission Functions for Photon Emission from Quark-Gluon Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Suryanarayana

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effects on photon emission from the quark gluon plasma have been studied as a function of photon mass, at a fixed temperature of the plasma. The integral equations for the transverse vector function (${\\bf \\tilde{f}(\\tilde{p}_\\perp)}$) and the longitudinal function ($\\tilde{g}({\\bf \\tilde{p}_\\perp})$) consisting of multiple scattering effects are solved by the self consistent iterations method and also by the variational method for the variable set \\{$p_0,q_0,Q^2$\\}, considering the bremsstrahlung and the $\\bf aws$ processes. We define four new dynamical scaling variables, $x^b_T$,$x^a_T$,$x^b_L$,$x^a_L$ for bremsstrahlung and {\\bf aws} processes and analyse the transverse and longitudinal components as a function of \\{$p_0,q_0,Q^2$\\}. We generalize the concept of photon emission function and we define four new emission functions for massive photon emission represented by $g^b_T$, $g^a_T$, $g^b_L$, $g^a_L$. These have been constructed using the exact numerical solutions of the integral equations. These four emission functions have been parameterized by suitable simple empirical fits. In terms of these empirical emission functions, the virtual photon emission from quark gluon plasma reduces to one dimensional integrals that involve folding over the empirical $g^{b,a}_{T,L}$ functions with appropriate quark distribution functions and the kinematic factors. Using this empirical emission functions, we calculated the imaginary part of the photon polarization tensor as a function of photon mass and energy.

  8. Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Data Report No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

    1999-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim data report summarizes results as of August, 1999, on the status of the test programs being conducted on three technologies: lean-NO{sub x} catalysts, diesel particulate filters and diesel oxidation catalysts.

  9. Long term performance of 137 stack gas continuous emission monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hebert, R.P. (Scott Environmental Tech., Inc., San Bernardino, CA); Mitchell, W.J.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance data were obtained on 137 monitors representing a total operating time of 1,600,000 hours. The monitors were classified as follows: 74 NO/sub x/, 37 SO/sub 2/, 7 combination NO/sub x//SO/sub 2/, 8 O/sub 2/, and 11 opacity. Results show that data processor failure accounted for 84% of O/sub 2/, 74% of the opacity, and 61% of the combination SO/sub 2//NO/sub x/ continuous emission monitor malfunctions. Each of these three types of moniters had the same average malfunction time (17 hours). Data from one source, a refinery, estimated operation, calibration, and maintenance costs to be $70,000/yr/monitor. (JMT)

  10. Emissions Trading and Air Toxics Emissions: RECLAIM and Toxics Regulation in the South Coast Air Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Nancy J.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fugitive emissions in an emissions trading program, as theexists between an emissions trading program that allows aircreation of other ROC emissions trading programs. JOURNAL OF

  11. Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Data Question | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPowerRaftColumbiaCommercial and Residential Hourly

  12. Secondary emission gas chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. In'shakov; V. Kryshkin; V. Skvortsov

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    For a hadron calorimeter active element there is considered a gaseous secondary emis-sion detector (150 micron gap, 50 kV/cm). Such one-stage parallel plate chamber must be a radiation hard, fast and simple. A model of such detector has been produced, tested and some characteristics are presented.

  13. CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSION REDUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    .5 Primary Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions for Selected US Chemical Subsectors in 1994 ...............................................................................................................16 Table 2.7 1999 Energy Consumption and Specific Energy Consumption (SEC) in the U.S. Cement Efficiency Technologies and Measures in Cement Industry.................22 Table 2.9 Energy Consumption

  14. Graphene Coating Coupled Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Graphene Coating Coupled Emission A COMSET, A single sheet of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms, called of graphene and its unique properties, I will present amplification of surface graphene-Ag hybrid films which when graphene is used as the spacer layer in a conventional Ag- harnessed the nonlinear properties

  15. Reliability analysis of solar photovoltaic system using hourly mean solar radiation data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moharil, Ravindra M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yeshwantrao Chavan College of Engineering, Nagpur, Maharashtra (India); Kulkarni, Prakash S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology, South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440011, Maharashtra (India)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the hourly mean solar radiation and standard deviation as inputs to simulate the solar radiation over a year. Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) technique is applied and MATLAB program is developed for reliability analysis of small isolated power system using solar photovoltaic (SPV). This paper is distributed in two parts. Firstly various solar radiation prediction methods along with hourly mean solar radiation (HMSR) method are compared. The comparison is carried on the basis of predicted electrical power generation with actual power generated by SPV system. Estimation of solar photovoltaic power using HMSR method is close to the actual power generated by SPV system. The deviation in monsoon months is due to the cloud cover. In later part of the paper various reliability indices are obtained by HMSR method using MCS technique. Load model used is IEEE-RTS. Reliability indices, additional load hours (ALH) and additional power (AP) reduces exponentially with increase in load indicates that a SPV source will offset maximum fuel when all of its generated energy is utilized. Fuel saving calculation is also investigated. Case studies are presented for Sagardeep Island in West Bengal state of India. (author)

  16. Development of a Web-based Emissions Reduction Calculator for Green Power Purchases from Texas Wind Energy Providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Gilman, D.; Haberl, J.; Culp, C.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEVELOPMENT OF A WEB-BASED, EMISSIONS REDUCTION CALCULATOR FOR GREEN POWER PURCHASES FROM TEXAS WIND ENERGY PROVIDERS Zi Liu, Ph.D. Research Engineer Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. Professor/Assc. Director Juan... that have been developed to calculate the emissions reductions from electricity provided by wind energy providers in the Texas ERCOT region, including an analysis of actual hourly wind power generated from a wind turbine in Randall County, Texas...

  17. Allocation of emission rights Economic incentives for emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for all countries High cost effectiviness:High cost effectiviness: International Emission trading Fairness NAM Department of Physical Resource Theory #12;Financial flows from emissions trading 450 ppmGDP SAS CPA WEU NAM Department of Physical Resource Theory #12;Financial flows from emissions trading 450

  18. The Tropical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment: overview and airborne fire emission factor measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    methanol, ace- tone, acetonitrile, and hydrogen cyanide,ratios of many VOC to acetonitrile, which is thought to beMS species and PM 10 acetonitrile acetaldehyde acrylonitrile

  19. Inverse modeling of emissions for local photo-oxidant pollution : Testing a new methodology with kriging constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Inverse modeling of emissions for local photo-oxidant pollution : Testing a new methodology. Abstract For chemistry-transport models operating at regional scales, surface emissions are the input data a methodology to optimize surface emissions at local scale i.e. to compute correction factors for the available

  20. Analysis of black carbon and carbon monoxide observed over the Indian Ocean: Implications for emissions and photochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    and known emission factors for black carbon (BC) from South Asia yields 0.7 Tg yrĂ?1 (upper limit of about 1 Global Change: Atmosphere (0315, 0325); KEYWORDS: Soot, black carbon, CO, emissions, India Citation of black carbon and carbon monoxide observed over the Indian Ocean: Implications for emissions

  1. Fugitive SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions from a smelter complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciccone, A. [BOVAR Environmental, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Storbeck, J. [Falconbridge Ltd., Ontario (Canada)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions released into the local air shed from industrial facilities typically fall into one of two categories, namely point or fugitive sources. The first refers to emissions released directly through stacks or similar devices designed to direct or control emissions. These emissions are readily measured with the aid of standard stack sampling methods or techniques. The latter refers to emissions released into the atmosphere without control of flow or quantities that cannot be measured directly or easily using standard methods. As part of Falconbridge`s efforts to minimize the environmental impact on the community, a fugitive emission monitoring program was designed and implemented to quantify SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions during routine process operations at the Smelter Plant. The monitoring program consisted of simultaneous and continuous temperature and velocity measurements along with continuous SO{sub 2} monitoring and semi-continuous particulate measurements at 8 locations along the Roof Monitor. These measurements were made over 6 days, 24 hours per day. The emission data were correlated with process information and activities to statistically determine the contribution of each process to the emission inventory.

  2. Field emission from organic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kymissis, Ioannis, 1977-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field emission displays (FEDs) show great promise as high performance flat panel displays. The light emission process is efficient, long lifetimes are possible with high brightness, and bright passive matrix displays can ...

  3. Emission altitude in radio pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kijak

    2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a method of estimation of emission altitudes using observational data - precise measurements of pulse profile widths at low intensity level. The analysis of emission altitudes obtained using this method for a large number of pulsars gives constraints that should be useful for theory of coherent pulsar emission. It seems that radio emission originates at altitudes of about few percent of the light cylinder and that they depend on frequency, pulsar period and period derivative.

  4. Emission Controls for Heavy-Duty Trucks

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DEER Conference Emission Controls for Heavy-Duty Trucks Overview Emission Standards - US and Worldwide Technology Options for Meeting Emissions System Integration ...

  5. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahl, Linnea

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    470E-20Ě1 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Prepared by:Environmental Protection Agency, National Emission Standardsfor Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From

  6. Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cameron KC. Nitrous oxide emissions from two dairy pastureand land use on N 2 O emissions from an imperfectly drainedoptions for N 2 O emissions from differently managed

  7. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation RyanEnergy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation Ryanand/or site-attributable carbon emissions at commercial and

  8. 2010 Guidelines to Defra / DECC's GHG Conversion Factors for Company Reporting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is available on the Defra website and has been produced by Nikolas Hill (AEA) for the Department of Energy) 34 Direct Emissions from Light Goods Vehicles (LGVs) 38 Direct Emissions from Rail Freight 39 Direct 57 Other bioenergy 58 Waste 59 X. OVERSEAS ELECTRICITY EMISSION FACTORS (ANNEX 10) 63 Summary

  9. Prompt optical emission and synchrotron self-absorption constraints on emission site of GRBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Rong-Feng

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We constrain the distance of the Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) prompt emission site from the explosion centre, R, by determining the location of the electron's self absorption frequency in the GRB prompt optical-to-X/gamma-ray spectral energy distribution, assuming that the optical and the gamma-ray emissions are among the same synchrotron radiation continuum of a group of hot electrons. All possible spectral regimes are considered in our analysis. The method has only two assumed parameters, namely, the bulk Lorentz factor of the emitting source Gamma, and the magnetic field strength B in the emission region (with a weak dependence). We identify a small sample of 4 bursts that satisfy the following three criteria: (1) they all have simultaneous optical and gamma-ray detections in multiple observational time intervals; (2) they all show temporal correlations between the optical and gamma-ray light curves; and (3) the optical emission is consistent with belonging to the same spectral component as the gamma-ray emission...

  10. On the spectrum of soil moisture from hourly to interannual scales Gabriel G. Katul,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    model can be derived for the soil moisture content energy spectrum (Es( f ), where f is frequencyOn the spectrum of soil moisture from hourly to interannual scales Gabriel G. Katul,1,2 Amilcare 22 May 2007. [1] The spectrum of soil moisture content at scales ranging from 1 hour to 8 years

  11. PDSF Office Hours 1/23/14 from 2:30 to 4:00 pm at LBNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2314 from 2:30 to 4:00 pm at LBNL PDSF Office Hours 12314 from 2:30 to 4:00 pm at LBNL January 22, 2014 (0 Comments) PDSF office hours will be from 2:30 to 4:00 pm in 50B-2222...

  12. PDSF Office Hours 10/17/13 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm at LBNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    01713 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm at LBNL PDSF Office Hours 101713 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm at LBNL October 7, 2013 (0 Comments) I have biweekly office hours on Thursdays at LBNL. The...

  13. Generating 24-Hour ECG, BP and Respiratory Signals with Realistic Linear and Nonlinear Clinical Characteristics Using a Nonlinear Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McSharry, Patrick E.

    Generating 24-Hour ECG, BP and Respiratory Signals with Realistic Linear and Nonlinear Clinical, London School of Economics, London, UK Abstract A nonlinear model for generating lifelike human ECG it to three ordinary differential equations, the model generates a 24-hour ECG signal. Using both standard

  14. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, Alicia L. (Knoxville, TN); Griffith, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); West, Brian H. (Kingston, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO.sub.x emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO.sub.x produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  15. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Dorsey, G.F.; West, B.H.

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO{sub x} emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO{sub x} produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  16. 4, 507532, 2004 Emission uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and Physics Discussions Impact of different emission inventories on simulated tropospheric ozone over China The importance of emission inventory uncertainty on the simulation of summertime tro- pospheric Ozone over China has been analyzed using a regional chemical transport model. Three independent emissions inventories

  17. 5, 94059445, 2005 Methane emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 5, 9405­9445, 2005 Methane emissions from SCIAMACHY observations J. F. Meirink et al. Title and Physics Discussions Sensitivity analysis of methane emissions derived from SCIAMACHY observations through, 9405­9445, 2005 Methane emissions from SCIAMACHY observations J. F. Meirink et al. Title Page Abstract

  18. 5, 243270, 2008 Methane emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 5, 243­270, 2008 Methane emissions from plant biomass I. Vigano et al. Title Page Abstract and temperature on the emission of methane from plant biomass and structural components I. Vigano 1 , H. van.roeckmann@phys.uu.nl) 243 #12;BGD 5, 243­270, 2008 Methane emissions from plant biomass I. Vigano et al. Title Page Abstract

  19. 6, 68416852, 2006 Methane emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 6, 6841­6852, 2006 Methane emission from savanna grasses E. Sanhueza and L. Donoso Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions Methane emission from tropical savanna Trachypogon sp. grasses E. Sanhueza;ACPD 6, 6841­6852, 2006 Methane emission from savanna grasses E. Sanhueza and L. Donoso Title Page

  20. Coronal emission lines as thermometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judge, Philip G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coronal emission line intensities are commonly used to measure electron temperatures using emission measure and/or line ratio methods. In the presence of systematic errors in atomic excitation calculations and data noise, the information on underlying temperature distributions is fundamentally limited. Increasing the number of emission lines used does not necessarily improve the ability to discriminate between different kinds of temperature distributions.

  1. Electrochemical sharpening of field emission tips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for sharpening field emitter tips by electroetching/polishing. In gated field emitters, it is very important to initiate electron emission at the lowest possible voltage and thus the composition of the emitter and the gate, as well as the emitter-gate structure, are important factors. This method of sharpening the emitter tips uses the grid as a counter electrode in electroetching of the emitters, which can produce extremely sharp emitter tips as well as remove asperities and other imperfections in the emitters, each in relation to the specific grid hole in which it resides. This has the effect of making emission more uniform among the emitters as well as lowering the turn-on voltage.

  2. Gas Turbine Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederick, J. D.

    technology developers and electric utilities will share emissions reductions in the coming era of pollution allowance trading is becoming prominent on the agendas of strategic planners at technology vendors and the electric power industry ??? ? (1...., "Authority to Construct for Badger Creek Limited," Kern County Air Pollution Control District, Bakersfield.. Ca., June 20, 1989. 3) Wark, K. and Warner, C. F., Air Pollution - Its Origin and Control, Harper and Row, New York, New York, 1976, pp. 453...

  3. Analysis of Emission Shapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Danielewicz

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Shapes of relative emission sources can be accessed by expanding shapes of correlations at low relative velocities in pair center of mass in Cartesian harmonics. Coefficients of expansion for correlations are related to the respective coefficients of expansion for the sources through one dimensional integral transforms involving properties of pair relative wavefunctions. The methodology is illustrated with analyses of NA49 and PHENIX correlation data.

  4. Analysis of Emission Shapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danielewicz, P

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shapes of relative emission sources can be accessed by expanding shapes of correlations at low relative velocities in pair center of mass in Cartesian harmonics. Coefficients of expansion for correlations are related to the respective coefficients of expansion for the sources through one dimensional integral transforms involving properties of pair relative wavefunctions. The methodology is illustrated with analyses of NA49 and PHENIX correlation data.

  5. Evaluating point and process fugitive emission sources of particulate matter from feed mills associated with cattle feed yards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demny, Michael Alan

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    . 843 kg/m' (0. 0526 lb/ft') and 2688 m/min (8820 fpm), respectively. Since the dimensions of the rectangular exhaust duct were 27. 9x35. 6 cendmeters (I lx14 inches), the volume rate of flow of air handled by this cyclone was determined to be 267 m.... Emission factors for feed mills (Shannon et al. , 1974) Table 2. 1988 AP-42 emission factors for feed mills Table 3. Intemn AP-42 emission actors for grain elevators 12 Table 4. Proposed emission factors for feed mills 14 Table 5. Source sampling...

  6. Associations of health, physical activity and weight status with motorised travel and transport carbon dioxide emissions: a cross-sectional, observational study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Anna; Brand, Christian; Ogilvie, David; on behalf of the iConnect consortium

    2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    (petrol ICE, diesel ICE, LPG ICE, petrol HEV), engine size (2 litres) and vehicle age. The ‘most used vehicle’ reported by the participants was taken as the reference vehicle for the emissions analysis. Where one or more... fleet average of petrol and diesel car emissions factors. Multiplying total distance travelled by these speed-emissions factors gave us an estimate of the total ‘hot’ emissions for each vehicle when the engine was warmed up. As a final adjustment...

  7. Syllabus for EK 335: Introduction to Environmnetal Engineering Science 4 hours/week

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollution modelling Pollution Control Air pollution and Meterology 7. Global Change 1 week Greenhouse effect transport Water and waste water treatment Legislations 6. Air Pollution 2.5 weeks Emissions overview (industry, transportation, commercial and residential) Legislations Criteria and Toxic Air Pollutants

  8. SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS Spring Semester 20102011 OPERATIONS RESEARCH 2 hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    four will be counted. 1 (i) A company owns a steam turbine power generating plant that generates its steam from coal. It wishes to maximise the steam output. This, however, may result in emission that does receives two grades of pulverised coal, C1 and C2, for use in the steam plant. The two grades are usually

  9. SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS Spring Semester 20102011 ADVANCED OPERATIONS RESEARCH 2 hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , only your best four will be counted. 1 (i) A company owns a steam turbine power generating plant that generates its steam from coal. It wishes to maximise the steam output. This, however, may result in emission that does not meet the Environmental Protection Agency standards. The regulations limit sulphur dioxide

  10. 20K Hour GATEWAY Testing Results for I-35W Bridge Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy released a GATEWAY Demonstration report on the longer-term performance of an LED lighting system that was installed on the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis in September 2008 and represents one of the country’s oldest continuously operated exterior LED lighting installations. Prior to installation, two of the LED luminaires were tested, along with a third luminaire that was not installed on the bridge but was tested for 6,000 hours in a laboratory for comparison purposes.

  11. Evolution of Meteorological Base Models for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.S

    ESL-PA-13-11-01 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Energy Procedia 00 (2013) 000–000 www.elsevier.com/locate/procedia 2013 ISES Solar World Congress Evaluation of Meteorological Base Models... for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas Kee Han Kima,b*, Juan-Carlos Baltazarb, and Jeff S. Haberla,b aDepartment of Architecture, Texas A&M University, 3137 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3137, U.S.A. bEnergy Systems Laboratory, Texas A...

  12. Sub-Hourly Impacts of High Solar Penetrations in the Western United States: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Hummon, M.; Hodge, B. M.; Heaney, M.; King, J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents results of analysis on the sub-hourly impacts of high solar penetrations from the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2. Extreme event analysis showed that most large ramps were due to sunrise and sunset events, which have a significant predictability component. Variability in general was much higher in the high-solar versus high-wind scenario. Reserve methodologies that had already been developed for wind were therefore modified to take into account the predictability component of solar variability.

  13. SeizAlert could give patients 4.5 hour warning of seizure

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dr. Lee Hively and Kara Kruse

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    One percent of Americans, 3 million people, suffer from epilepsy. And their lives are about to be dramatically changed by scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For 15 years, Dr. Lee Hively has been working on "SeizAlert", a seizure-detecting device that resembles a common PDA. "It allows us to analyze scalp brain waves and give us up to 4.5 hours' forewarning of that event," he said. With the help of partner Kara Kruse, he's now able to help patients predict the previously unpredictable.

  14. Customer Strategies for Responding to Day-Ahead Market HourlyElectricity Pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Chuck; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan,Bernie; Boisvert, Dick; Cappers, Peter; Pratt, Donna; Butkins, Kim

    2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Real-time pricing (RTP) has been advocated as an economically efficient means to send price signals to customers to promote demand response (DR) (Borenstein 2002, Borenstein 2005, Ruff 2002). However, limited information exists that can be used to judge how effectively RTP actually induces DR, particularly in the context of restructured electricity markets. This report describes the second phase of a study of how large, non-residential customers' adapted to default-service day-ahead hourly pricing. The customers are located in upstate New York and served under Niagara Mohawk, A National Grid Company (NMPC)'s SC-3A rate class. The SC-3A tariff is a type of RTP that provides firm, day-ahead notice of hourly varying prices indexed to New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) day-ahead market prices. The study was funded by the California Energy Commission (CEC)'s PIER program through the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC). NMPC's is the first and longest-running default-service RTP tariff implemented in the context of retail competition. The mix of NMPC's large customers exposed to day-ahead hourly prices is roughly 30% industrial, 25% commercial and 45% institutional. They have faced periods of high prices during the study period (2000-2004), thereby providing an opportunity to assess their response to volatile hourly prices. The nature of the SC-3A default service attracted competitive retailers offering a wide array of pricing and hedging options, and customers could also participate in demand response programs implemented by NYISO. The first phase of this study examined SC-3A customers' satisfaction, hedging choices and price response through in-depth customer market research and a Constant Elasticity of Substitution (CES) demand model (Goldman et al. 2004). This second phase was undertaken to answer questions that remained unresolved and to quantify price response to a higher level of granularity. We accomplished these objectives with a second customer survey and interview effort, which resulted in a higher, 76% response rate, and the adoption of the more flexible Generalized Leontief (GL) demand model, which allows us to analyze customer response under a range of conditions (e.g. at different nominal prices) and to determine the distribution of individual customers' response.

  15. Attachment 3: Hourly Labor Rate Proposal, attachment 3, RFP RHT-5-52358

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program Cumulus Humilis Aerosol STATEMENT OF WORK6Hourly Labor

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: $0.06 per kilowatt-hour for solar electricity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwardsSafeguards andSan$0.06 per kilowatt-hour for solar

  17. A knife-edge array field emission cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, B.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    many cathode applications require a new type of cathode that is able to produce short pulsed electron beams at high emission current. Gated field emitter arrays of micrometer size are recognized as candidates to meet this need and have become the research focus of vacuum microelectronics. Existing fabrication methods produce emitters that are limited either in frequency response or in current emission. One reason is that the structure of these emitters are not sufficiently optimized. In this study, the author investigated the factors that affect the performance of field emitters. An optimum emitter structure, the knife-edge field emitter array, was developed from the analysis. Large field enhancement factor, large effective emission area, and small emitter capacitance are the advantages of the structure. The author next explored various options of fabricating the knife-edge emitter structure. He proposed a unique thin film process procedure and developed the fabrication techniques to build the emitters on (110) silicon wafers. Data from the initial cathode tests showed very low onset voltages and Fowler-Nordheim type emission. Emission simulation based on the fabricated emitter structure indicated that the knife-edge emitter arrays have the potential to produce high performance in modulation frequency and current emission. Several fabrication issues that await further development are discussed and possible solutions are suggested.

  18. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    , O3 lidar) R.B. Pierce NOAA/NESDIS Co-I AQ modeling, data assimilation R. Spurr RT Solutions, Inc. Co geostationary communications satellite with expected ~2019 launch Provides hourly daylight observations

  19. Partnerships to continue moving toward zero emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Partnerships to continue moving toward zero emissions Zero Emission transportation goals Zero Emission MAP makes available technical assistance to states and cities to support the growth of zero emission mobility markets. 1 Research shows

  20. Implementation of SB 1368 Emission Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ........................................................................................................ 18 Calculation of Biomass, Biogas or Landfill Net Emissions ..................................... 19

  1. Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines Professor David B. Kittelson Department Meeting Ultra Fine Particles in the Atmosphere 15 March 2000 Engine Exhaust Particle Emissions: Some Perkins Engine Company #12;Emissions of Ultrafine and Nanoparticles from Engines · Current emission

  2. Daily/Hourly Hydrosystem Operation : How the Columbia River System Responds to Short-Term Needs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The System Operation Review, being conducted by the Bonneville Power Administration, the US Army Corps of Engineers, and the US Bureau of Reclamation, is analyzing current and potential future operations of the Columbia River System. One goal of the System Operations Review is to develop a new System Operation Strategy. The strategy will be designed to balance the many regionally and nationally important uses of the Columbia River system. Short-term operations address the dynamics that affect the Northwest hydro system and its multiple uses. Demands for electrical power and natural streamflows change constantly and thus are not precisely predictable. Other uses of the hydro system have constantly changing needs, too, many of which can interfere with other uses. Project operators must address various river needs, physical limitations, weather, and streamflow conditions while maintaining the stability of the electric system and keeping your lights on. It takes staffing around the clock to manage the hour-to-hour changes that occur and the challenges that face project operators all the time.

  3. A thirty-two clock hour driver education classroom curriculum guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, William Lee

    2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A THIRTY-TWO CLOCK HOUR DRIVER EDUCATION CLASSROOM CURRICULUM GUIDE A R e c o r d o f St u d y by WILLIAM LEE RICHARDSON S u b m i t t e d t o t h e O f f i c e o f G r a d u a t e S t u d i e s o f Texas A&M U n i v e r s i t y i n p a r t i... a l f u l f i l l m e n t o f t h e r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r t h e de g r e e o f DOCTOR OF EDUCATION December 1990 M a j o r S u b j e c t : I n d u s t r i a l E d u c a t i o n A THIRTY-TWO CLOCK HOUR DRIVER EDUCATION CLASSROOM...

  4. Evaluation of candidate stirling engine heater tube alloys for 1000 hours at 760/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misencik, J.A.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six tubing alloys were endurance tested in a diesel-fired, Stirling engine simulator materials test rig for 1000 hours at 760/sup 0/C while pressurized at 17 to 21 MPa with either hydrogen or helium. The alloys tested were N-155, A-286, Incoloy 800, 19-9DL, Nitronic 40, and 316 stainless steel. All alloys were in the form of tubing with an outside diameter of 4.8 mm and a wall thickness of 0.8 mm. Hydrogen permeated rapidly through the walls of all six alloys when they were heated to 760/sup 0/C, and repressurization was required every 5 hours during rig testing. In contrast, helium was readily contained. Creep-rupture failures occurred in four of the six alloys pressurized with heluim and in two of the six alloys pressurized with hydrogen. Only two alloys survived the 1000-h endurance test with no failure, N-155 and 316 stainless steel. Stimulaneous exposure to either hydrogen or helium and the combustion environment at 21 MPa and 760/sup 0/C did not seriously degrade the tensile strength of the six alloys in tests at room temperature and 760/sup 0/C after exposure. Decreases in room-temperature ductility were noted and are attributed to aging rather than to hydrogen embrittlement or oxidation in three of the alloys. However, there may be a hydrogen embrittlement effect in the N-155, 19-9DL, and Nitronic 40 alloys.

  5. NV Energy Large-Scale Photovoltaic Integration Study: Intra-Hour Dispatch and AGC Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Meng, Da; Guo, Xinxin; Jin, Chunlian; Samaan, Nader A.

    2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainty and variability with photovoltaic (PV) generation make it very challenging to balance power system generation and load, especially under high penetration cases. Higher reserve requirements and more cycling of conventional generators are generally anticipated for large-scale PV integration. However, whether the existing generation fleet is flexible enough to handle the variations and how well the system can maintain its control performance are difficult to predict. The goal of this project is to develop a software program that can perform intra-hour dispatch and automatic generation control (AGC) simulation, by which the balancing operations of a system can be simulated to answer the questions posed above. The simulator, named Electric System Intra-Hour Operation Simulator (ESIOS), uses the NV Energy southern system as a study case, and models the system’s generator configurations, AGC functions, and operator actions to balance system generation and load. Actual dispatch of AGC generators and control performance under various PV penetration levels can be predicted by running ESIOS. With data about the load, generation, and generator characteristics, ESIOS can perform similar simulations and assess variable generation integration impacts for other systems as well. This report describes the design of the simulator and presents the study results showing the PV impacts on NV Energy real-time operations.

  6. Continuous hourly monitoring of inhalable particulates in ambient air near a multi-site petrochemical complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munro, T.S.; Brooks, W.R.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 1997, a co-operative of 12 refineries and petrochemical facilities operating in the Sarnia, Ontario area commissioned an inhalable particulate (PM{sub 10}) study to complement their comprehensive ongoing ambient air survey. This paper reviews the hourly data collected between March 1, 1997 and February 28, 1998. The monitors were located at existing air monitoring sites (selected on the basis of the local prevailing wind directions) situated north and south of the industrial sector. TEOM continuous particulate monitors fitted with PM{sub 10} inlets were used. For a three month period a second TEOM fitted with a PM{sub 2.5} inlet was located at one of the sites. The TEOM data as well as wind speed, direction, VOCs and other traditional air parameters were collected by a central computer/data acquisition system. Hourly and daily averages were calculated and related to wind speed and direction and other parameters. Directional, diurnal and seasonal patterns for PM{sub 10} are examined in this paper.

  7. Introduction to Photoelectron Emission Microscopy: Principles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Introduction to Photoelectron Emission Microscopy: Principles and Applications. Introduction to Photoelectron Emission Microscopy: Principles and Applications. Abstract: In the...

  8. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced Technologies Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced Technologies 2011 DOE...

  9. Sources of CO emissions in an HCCI engine: A numerical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhave, Amit; Kraft, Markus [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Montorsi, Luca [Department of Mechanical and Civil Engineering, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 41100 Modena (Italy); Mauss, Fabian [Division of Combustion Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factors influencing a reliable prediction of CO emissions in a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine are investigated using an improved probability density function (PDF)-based engine cycle model. A previously validated PDF-based stochastic reactor model is utilized to identify critical sources of CO emissions numerically. The full cycle model includes detailed chemical kinetics, accounts for the inhomogeneities in temperature and composition, and has been demonstrated to provide sufficiently reliable predictions of the combustion and engine parameters and emissions.

  10. Dilepton emission at temperature dependent baryonic quark-gluon plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Somorendro Singh; Yogesh Kumar

    2012-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A fireball of QGP is evoluted at temperature dependent chemical potential by a statistical model in the pionic medium. We study the dilepton emission rate at temperature dependent chemical potential (TDCP) from such a fireball of QGP. In this model, we take the dynamical quark mass as a finite value dependence on temparature and parametrization factor of the QGP evolution. The temperature and factor in quark mass enhance in the growth of the droplets as well as in the dilepton emission rates. The emission rate from the plasma shows dilepton spectrum in the intermediate mass region (IMR) of (1.0-4.0) GeV and its rate is observed to be a strong increasing function of the temperature dependent chemical potential for quark and antiquark annihilation.

  11. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  12. Emission control technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, Fumihiko

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental protection is indispensable for preserving the earth for later generations. Indeed, industrial development has made our life rich; however, it also accelerates environmental pollution. Above all, such global problems as acid rain caused by SOx and NOx emissions and air pollution caused by particulates have become serious in recent years. Countermeasures currently in service or under development for these problems include: upgrading of fuel-burning systems; conversion of energy sources to clean fuels; pretreatment of fuels; and flue gas treatment. This chapter focuses on technologies that treat flue gases including the circumstances of the development of the technologies.

  13. The use of satellite-measured aerosol optical depth to constrain biomass burning emissions source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Mian

    Spectroradiometer (MODIS) products, effective fuel load, and species emission factors as alternative inputs and daily versions, Fire Radiative Power (FRP)-based Quick Fire Emission Data set QFED, and 11 calculated, Earth Science Directorate, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 613, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA

  14. Regulated Emissions from Biodiesel Tested in Heavy-Duty Engines Meeting 2004 Emission Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R. L.; Tennant, C. J.; Hayes, R. R.; Black, S.; Ireland, J.; McDaniel, T.; Williams, A.; Frailey, M.; Sharp, C. A.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biodiesel produced from soybean oil, canola oil, yellow grease, and beef tallow was tested in two heavy-duty engines. The biodiesels were tested neat and as 20% by volume blends with a 15 ppm sulfur petroleum-derived diesel fuel. The test engines were the following: 2002 Cummins ISB and 2003 DDC Series 60. Both engines met the 2004 U.S. emission standard of 2.5 g/bhp-h NO{sub x}+HC (3.35 g/kW-h) and utilized exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). All emission tests employed the heavy-duty transient procedure as specified in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations. Reduction in PM emissions and increase in NO{sub x} emissions were observed for all biodiesels in all engines, confirming observations made in older engines. On average PM was reduced by 25% and NO{sub x} increased by 3% for the two engines tested for a variety of B20 blends. These changes are slightly larger in magnitude, but in the same range as observed in older engines. The cetane improver 2-ethyl hexyl nitrate was shown to have no measurable effect on NO{sub x} emissions from B20 in these engines, in contrast to observations reported for older engines. The effect of intake air humidity on NO{sub x} emissions from the Cummins ISB was quantified. The CFR NO{sub x}/humidity correction factor was shown to be valid for an engine equipped with EGR, operating at 1700 m above sea level, and operating on conventional or biodiesel.

  15. NOx Emission Reduction and its Effects on Ozone during the 2008 Olympic Games

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qing; Wang, Yuhang; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Zhen; Gustafson, William I.; Shao, Min

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We applied a daily-assimilated inversion method to estimate NOx (NO+NO2) emissions for June-September 2007 and 2008 on the basis of the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) observations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and model simulations using the Regional chEmistry and trAnsport Model (REAM). Over urban Beijing, rural Beijing, and the Huabei Plain, OMI column NO2 reductions are approximately 45%, 33%, and 14%, respectively, while the corresponding anthropogenic NOx emission reductions are only 28%, 24%, and 6%, during the full emission control period (July 20 – Sep 20, 2008). The emission reduction began in early July and was in full force by July 20, corresponding to the scheduled implementation of emission controls over Beijing. The emissions did not appear to recover after the emission control period. Meteorological change from summer 2007 to 2008 is the main factor contributing to the column NO2 decreases not accounted for by the emission reduction. Model simulations suggest that the effect of emission reduction on ozone concentrations over Beijing is relatively minor using a standard VOC emission inventory in China. With an adjustment of the model emissions to reflect in situ observations of VOCs in Beijing, the model simulation suggests a larger effect of the emission reduction.

  16. Elastic emission polishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  17. Zero emission coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

  18. Evaluation of T91 after 130,000 hours in service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swindeman, R.W.; Sikka, V.K.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.; Canonico, D.A. [ABB Combustion Engineering, Chattanooga, TN (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two superheater tubes fabricated from T91 were removed for evaluation after 130,000 hours service. Regions of interest included a hot section that replaced type 321 stainless steel, dissimilar welds to type 321 stainless steel safe ends, and cold bends. The evaluation consisted of metallography, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and precipitate analysis, hardness, tensile properties, creep, and stress rupture. Observed microstructure and properties of the tubing were compared with results on unexposed and thermally aged materials. Overall, the properties were similar to expectations. Substructural coarsening occurred which produced reductions in the short-time tensile and creep strength. However, ductility remained high. Corrosion was minimal, although somewhat greater on the fire side of the cold bend. Short oxide wedge cracks were observed at the dissimilar metal welds, and type 4 cracking was observed in an untempered region of a stainless steel attachment weld.

  19. 2500-Hour High Temperature Solid-Oxide Electrolyzer Long Duration Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. M. Stoots; J. E. O'Brien; K. G. Condie; L. Moore-McAteer; J. J. Hartvigsen; D. Larsen

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing the concept of using solid oxide fuel cells as electrolyzers for large-scale, high-temperature (efficient), hydrogen production. This program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Utilizing a fuel cell as an electrolyzer introduces some inherent differences in cell operating conditions. In particular, the performance of fuel cells operated as electrolyzers degrades with time faster. This issue of electrolyzer cell and stack performance degradation over time has been identified as a major barrier to technology development. Consequently, the INL has been working together with Ceramatec, Inc. (Salt Lake City, Utah) to improve the long-term performance of high temperature electrolyzers. As part of this research partnership, the INL conducted a 2500 hour test of a Ceramatec designed and produced stack operated in the electrolysis mode. This report will provide a summary of experimental results for this long duration test.

  20. High Temperature Solid-Oxide Electrolyzer 2500 Hour Test Results At The Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl Stoots; James O'Brien; Stephen Herring; Keith Condie; Lisa Moore-McAteer; Joseph J. Hartvigsen; Dennis Larsen

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing the concept of using solid oxide fuel cells as electrolyzers for large-scale, high-temperature (efficient), hydrogen production. This program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Utilizing a fuel cell as an electrolyzer introduces some inherent differences in cell operating conditions. In particular, the performance of fuel cells operated as electrolyzers degrades with time faster. This issue of electrolyzer cell and stack performance degradation over time has been identified as a major barrier to technology development. Consequently, the INL has been working together with Ceramatec, Inc. (Salt Lake City, Utah) to improve the long-term performance of high temperature electrolyzers. As part of this research partnership, the INL conducted a 2500 hour test of a Ceramatec designed and produced stack operated in the electrolysis mode. This paper will provide a summary of experimental results to date for this ongoing test.

  1. Performance of Blackglas{trademark} composites in 4000-hour oxidation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, S.; Gonczy, S. [AlliedSignal Inc., Des Plaines, IL (United States); McNallan, M.; Cox, A. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of long term (4000 hour) oxidation on the mechanical properties of Blackglas{trademark}-Nitrided Nextel{trademark}312 Ceramic Matrix Composites in the temperature range of 500{degrees} - 700{degrees}C was investigated. Flexure specimens of the title composites prepared using three different pyrolysis processes were subjected to oxidation in flowing dry air at 500{degrees}, 600{degrees}C, and 700{degrees}C. Samples were removed at several different time intervals for 3-point flexure analysis. Results indicate that processing conditions had very little effect on the oxidation resistance of this system. At 600{degrees} and 700{degrees}C the mechanical properties degrade continuously to a steady value about half the original flexure strength. At 500{degrees}C, material properties initially improve then begin to slowly degrade. Optical microscopy indicates that oxidation of the matrix begins at the matrix/fiber interface and microcracks and proceeds into the bulk of the matrix.

  2. Ionospheric effects during first 2 hours after the Chelyabinsk meteorite impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berngardt, O I; Zherebtsov, G A; Kusonski, O A; Grigorieva, S A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the analysis of ionospheric effects in the region close to the Chelyabinsk meteorite explosion at 03:20UT 2013 February 15 from the Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences (ISTP SB RAS) EKB radar data, and from the Institute of Geophysics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences (IG UB RAS) PARUS ionosonde data. Both instruments are located within the IG UB RAS Arti Observatory approximately 200 km northward from the estimated explosion site. According to the data obtained, the ionospheric disturbance caused by the meteorite flyby, explosion, and impact had high dynamics and amplitude. However, it obviously did not lead to a variation in the ionosphere mean parameters in the region above the disturbance center during the first 2 hours. Essential effects, however, were observed at more than 100-200 km from the explosion site and farther up to 1500 km.

  3. An Improved Procedure for Developing a Calibrated Hourly Simulation Model of an Electrically Heated and Cooled Commercial Buildling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bou-Saada, Tarek Edmond

    lighting, energy efficient heat pumps, a photovoltaic system, envelope measures, and a solar domestic water heating system. To accomplish this, a DOE-2 baseline model was calibrated to the measured hourly data and compared to a building model constructed...

  4. Probing Protoplanetary Disks with Silicate Emission: Where is the silicate emission zone?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Kessler-Silacci; C. P. Dullemond; J. -C. Augereau; B. Merin; V. C. Geers; E. F. van Dishoeck; N. J. Evans II; G. A. Blake; J. M. Brown

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results indicate that the grain size and crystallinity inferred from observations of silicate features may be correlated with spectral type of the central star and/or disk geometry. In this paper, we show that grain size, as probed by the 10 um silicate feature peak-to-continuum and 11.3-to-9.8 um flux ratios, is inversely proportional to log L_star. These trends can be understood using a simple two-layer disk model for passive irradiated flaring disks, CGPLUS. We find that the radius, R_10, of the 10 um silicate emission zone in the disk goes as (L_star/L_sun)^0.56, with slight variations depending on disk geometry (flaring angle, inner disk radius). The observed correlations, combined with simulated emission spectra of olivine and pyroxene mixtures, imply a grain size dependence on luminosity. Combined with the fact that R_10 is smaller for less luminous stars, this implies that the apparent grain size of the emitting dust is larger for low-luminositysources. In contrast, our models suggest that the crystallinity is only marginally affected, because for increasing luminosity, the zone for thermal annealing (assumed to be at T>800 K) is enlarged by roughly the same factor as the silicate emission zone. The observed crystallinity is affected by disk geometry, however, with increased crystallinity in flat disks. The apparent crystallinity may also increase with grain growth due to a corresponding increase in contrast between crystalline and amorphous silicate emission bands.

  5. field emission electron microprobe | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    field emission electron microprobe Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

  6. EMSL - field emission electron microprobe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    field-emission-electron-microprobe en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

  7. Biodiesel and Pollutant Emissions (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R.; Williams, A.; Ireland, J.; Hayes, B.

    2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Presents the results from three methods of testing--engine, chassis, and PEM--for testing nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from B20.

  8. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the state's 1997 electric utility restructuring legislation, Illinois established provisions for the disclosure of fuel mix and emissions data. All electric utilities and alternative...

  9. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginia’s 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity providers to disclose -- "to the extent feasible" -- fuel mix and emissions data regarding electric generation....

  10. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ohio's 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions to customers. Electric utilities and...

  11. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maryland’s 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires all electric companies and electricity suppliers to provide customers with details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of...

  12. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon's 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires electricity companies and electric service suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions of electric...

  13. Emissions trading under market imperfections.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lappi, Pauli

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??In this thesis we consider emissions trading under various market imperfections such as uncertainty over permit price, imperfect competition and noncompliance. First, we study the… (more)

  14. Emissions trading and technological change.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calel, Raphael

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Emissions trading programmes have grown in number and scope over the last forty years, and in the last decade they have become a centrepiece of… (more)

  15. Silicate emission in Orion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Cesarsky; A. P. Jones; J. Lequeux; L. Verstraete

    2000-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present mid-infrared spectro-imagery and high-resolution spectroscopy of the Orion bar and of a region in the Orion nebula. These observations have been obtained in the Guaranteed Time with the Circular Variable Filters of the ISO camera (CAM-CVF) and with the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS), on board the European Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Our data shows emission from amorphous silicate grains from the entire HII region and around the isolated O9.5V star Theta2 Ori A. The observed spectra can be reproduced by a mixture of interstellar silicate and carbon grains heated by the radiation of the hot stars present in the region. Crystalline silicates are also observed in the Orion nebula and suspected around Theta2 Ori A. They are probably of interstellar origin. The ionization structure and the distribution of the carriers of the Aromatic Infrared Bands (AIBs) are briefly discussed on the basis of the ISO observations.

  16. Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Data Report No. 2: NO{sub x} Adsorber Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

    1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim report discusses the results of the DECSE test program that demonstrates the potential of NOx adsorber catalyst technology across the range of diesel engine operation with a fuel economy penalty less than 4%.

  17. Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Data Report No. 4: Diesel Particulate Filters -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

    2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This is the fourth and final report for the DPF test program and covers the effect of diesel sulfur level on: a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF), and a continuously regenerating diesel particulate filter (CR-DPF).

  18. The impact of electricity market schemes on predictability being a decision factor in the wind farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The impact of electricity market schemes on predictability being a decision factor in the wind farm used criterion of capacity factor on the investment phase of a wind farm and on spatial planning, it is now recognized that accurate short-term forecasts of wind farms´ power output over the next few hours

  19. The impact of electricity market schemes on predictability being a decision factor in the wind farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The impact of electricity market schemes on predictability being a decision factor in the wind farm of capacity factor on the investment phase of a wind farm and on spatial planning in an electricity market, it is now recognized that accurate short-term forecasts of wind farms´ power output over the next few hours

  20. Going Mobile: Emissions Trading Gets a Boost from Mobile Source Emission Reduction Credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldschein, Perry S.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Going Mobile: Emissions Trading Gets a Boost From Mobilehave tested various emissions trading policies to supplementAn Analysis of EPA's Emissions Trading Program, 6 YALE J. ON

  1. A Plasma Instability Theory of Gamma-Ray Burst Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. J. Brainerd

    1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma instability theory is presented for the prompt radiation from gamma-ray bursts. In the theory, a highly relativistic shell interacts with the interstellar medium through the filamentation and the two-stream instabilities to convert bulk kinetic energy into electron thermal energy and magnetic field energy. The processes are not efficient enough to satisfy the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions, so a shock cannot form through this mechanism. Instead, the interstellar medium passes through the shell, with the electrons radiating during this passage. Gamma-rays are produced by synchrotron self-Compton emission. Prompt optical emission is also produced through this mechanism, while prompt radio emission is produced through synchrotron emission. The model timescales are consistent with the shortest burst timescales. To emit gamma-rays, the shell's bulk Lorentz factor must be greater than approximately 1000. For the radiative processes to be efficient, the interstellar medium density must satisfy a lower limit that is a function of the bulk Lorentz factor. Because the limits operate as selection effects, bursts that violate them constitute new classes. In particular, a class of optical and ultraviolet bursts with no gamma-ray emission should exist. The lower limit on the density of the interstellar medium is consistent with the requirements of the Compton attenuation theory, providing an explanation for why all burst spectra appear to be attenuated. Several tests of the theory are discussed, as are the next theoretical investigations that should be conducted.

  2. COMPILATION OF REGIONAL TO GLOBAL INVENTORIES OF ANTHROPOGENIC EMISSIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENKOVITZ,C.M.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mathematical modeling of the transport and transformation of trace species in the atmosphere is one of the scientific tools currently used to assess atmospheric chemistry, air quality, and climatic conditions. From the scientific but also from the management perspectives accurate inventories of emissions of the trace species at the appropriate spatial, temporal, and species resolution are required. There are two general methodologies used to estimate regional to global emissions: bottom-up and top-down (also known as inverse modeling). Bottom-up methodologies to estimate industrial emissions are based on activity data, emission factors (amount of emissions per unit activity), and for some inventories additional parameters (such as sulfur content of fuels). Generally these emissions estimates must be given finer sectoral, spatial (usually gridded), temporal, and for some inventories species resolution. Temporal and spatial resolution are obtained via the use of surrogate information, such as population, land use, traffic counts, etc. which already exists in or can directly be converted to gridded form. Speciation factors have been and are being developed to speciate inventories of NO{sub x}, particulate matter, and hydrocarbons. Top-down (inverse modeling) methodologies directly invert air quality measurements in terms of poorly known but critical parameters to constrain the emissions needed to explain these measurements; values of these parameters are usually computed using atmospheric transport models. Currently there are several strong limitations of inverse modeling, but the continued evolution of top-down estimates will be facilitated by the development of denser monitoring networks and by the massive amounts of data from satellite observations.

  3. X-ray Emission from Massive StarsX-ray Emission from Massive Stars David CohenDavid Cohen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    X-ray Emission from Massive StarsX-ray Emission from Massive Stars David CohenDavid Cohen/s)Velocity (km/s) #12;absorption emission emission occulted emission emission UV telescope side side front back #12;absorption emission emission occulted emission emission UV telescope side side front back #12;The

  4. EMISSIONS TO AIR OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    EMISSIONS TO AIR OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE Swansea University Estates Services Singleton Park Swansea to Air Department: Estates and Facilities Site: All Author: Ambreen Jahangir Approved by: Mark Durdin PURPOSE: To minimise emissions and discharges to air from boilers, fume cupboards, air conditioning

  5. Observation of CH4 and other Non-CO2 Green House Gas Emissions from California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Marc L.; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Riley, William J.; Andrews, Arlyn C.

    2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2006, California passed the landmark assembly bill AB-32 to reduce California's emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to global climate change. AB-32 commits California to reduce total GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, a reduction of 25 percent from current levels. To verify that GHG emission reductions are actually taking place, it will be necessary to measure emissions. We describe atmospheric inverse model estimates of GHG emissions obtained from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project. In collaboration with NOAA, we are measuring the dominant long-lived GHGs at two tall-towers in central California. Here, we present estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions obtained by statistical comparison of measured and predicted atmospheric mixing ratios. The predicted mixing ratios are calculated using spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and surface footprints, that provide a proportional relationship between the surface emissions and the mixing ratio signal at tower locations. The footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. Integral to the inverse estimates, we perform a quantitative analysis of errors in atmospheric transport and other factors to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated emissions. Regressions of modeled and measured mixing ratios suggest that total CH{sub 4} emissions are within 25% of the inventory estimates. A Bayesian source sector analysis obtains posterior scaling factors for CH{sub 4} emissions, indicating that emissions from several of the sources (e.g., landfills, natural gas use, petroleum production, crops, and wetlands) are roughly consistent with inventory estimates, but livestock emissions are significantly higher than the inventory. A Bayesian 'region' analysis is used to identify spatial variations in CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions within California. Although, only regions near the tower are significantly constrained by the tower measurements, CH{sub 4} emissions from the south Central Valley appear to be underestimated in a manner consistent with the under-prediction of livestock emissions. Finally, we describe a pseudo-experiment using predicted CH{sub 4} signals to explore the uncertainty reductions that might be obtained if additional measurements were made by a future network of tall-tower stations spread over California. These results show that it should be possible to provide high-accuracy estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions as a means to verify future emissions reductions.

  6. Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,JĂĽrgen

    Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation The power factor (PF) is defined as the ratio between the active power and the apparent power of a system. If the current and voltage are periodic with period , and [ ), then the active power is defined by ( ) ( ) (their inner product

  7. Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak-Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, Annika; Perry, Michael; Smith, Brian; Sullivan, Michael; Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The rollout of smart meters in the last several years has opened up new forms of previously unavailable energy data. Many utilities are now able in real-time to capture granular, household level interval usage data at very high-frequency levels for a large proportion of their residential and small commercial customer population. This can be linked to other time and locationspecific information, providing vast, constantly growing streams of rich data (sometimes referred to by the recently popular buzz word, “big data”). Within the energy industry there is increasing interest in tapping into the opportunities that these data can provide. What can we do with all of these data? The richness and granularity of these data enable many types of creative and cutting-edge analytics. Technically sophisticated and rigorous statistical techniques can be used to pull interesting insights out of this highfrequency, human-focused data. We at LBNL are calling this “behavior analytics”. This kind of analytics has the potential to provide tremendous value to a wide range of energy programs. For example, highly disaggregated and heterogeneous information about actual energy use would allow energy efficiency (EE) and/or demand response (DR) program implementers to target specific programs to specific households; would enable evaluation, measurement and verification (EM&V) of energy efficiency programs to be performed on a much shorter time horizon than was previously possible; and would provide better insights in to the energy and peak hour savings associated with specifics types of EE and DR programs (e.g., behavior-based (BB) programs). In this series, “Insights from Smart Meters”, we will present concrete, illustrative examples of the type of value that insights from behavior analytics of these data can provide (as well as pointing out its limitations). We will supply several types of key findings, including: • Novel results, which answer questions the industry previously was unable to answer; • Proof-of-concept analytics tools that can be adapted and used by others; and • Guidelines and protocols that summarize analytical best practices. This report focuses on one example of the kind of value that analysis of this data can provide: insights into whether behavior-based (BB) efficiency programs have the potential to provide peak-hour energy savings.

  8. QA procedures and emissions from nonstandard sources in AQUIS, a PC-based emission inventory and air permit manager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A.E.; Tschanz, J.; Monarch, M.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Air Quality Utility Information System (AQUIS) is a database management system that operates under dBASE IV. It runs on an IBM-compatible personal computer (PC) with MS DOS 5.0 or later, 4 megabytes of memory, and 30 megabytes of disk space. AQUIS calculates emissions for both traditional and toxic pollutants and reports emissions in user-defined formats. The system was originally designed for use at 7 facilities of the Air Force Materiel Command, and now more than 50 facilities use it. Within the last two years, the system has been used in support of Title V permit applications at Department of Defense facilities. Growth in the user community, changes and additions to reference emission factor data, and changing regulatory requirements have demanded additions and enhancements to the system. These changes have ranged from adding or updating an emission factor to restructuring databases and adding new capabilities. Quality assurance (QA) procedures have been developed to ensure that emission calculations are correct even when databases are reconfigured and major changes in calculation procedures are implemented. This paper describes these QA and updating procedures. Some user facilities include light industrial operations associated with aircraft maintenance. These facilities have operations such as fiberglass and composite layup and plating operations for which standard emission factors are not available or are inadequate. In addition, generally applied procedures such as material balances may need special treatment to work in an automated environment, for example, in the use of oils and greases and when materials such as polyurethane paints react chemically during application. Some techniques used in these situations are highlighted here. To provide a framework for the main discussions, this paper begins with a description of AQUIS.

  9. Methodology for Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Assessing Mitigation Options for On-Road Mobile Sources Project for the Houston-Galveston Area Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Methodology for Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Assessing Mitigation Options for On reductions in GHG, and b) use analytical tools/methods to assess the emissions reductions possible through and prioritized based on factors such as cost effectiveness, potential for emission reductions, and applicability

  10. Emissions of PCDD/Fs from municipal solid waste incinerators in China Yuwen Ni, Haijun Zhang, Su Fan, Xueping Zhang, Qing Zhang, Jiping Chen *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Emissions of PCDD/Fs from municipal solid waste incinerators in China Yuwen Ni, Haijun Zhang, Su February 2009 Available online 21 March 2009 Keywords: MSWIs PCDD/Fs Congener patterns Emission factor a b s t r a c t Gas emission of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD

  11. Prompt Optical Emission from Gamma-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Kehoe; Carl Akerlof; Richard Balsano; Scott Barthelmy; Jeff Bloch; Paul Butterworth; Don Casperson; Tom Cline; Sandra Fletcher; Fillippo Frontera; Galen Gisler; John Heise; Jack Hills; Kevin Hurley; Brian Lee; Stuart Marshall; Tim McKay; Andrew Pawl; Luigi Piro; Bill Priedhorsky; John Szymanski; Jim Wren

    1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) seeks to measure contemporaneous and early afterglow optical emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The ROTSE-I telescope array has been fully automated and responding to burst alerts from the GRB Coordinates Network since March 1998, taking prompt optical data for 30 bursts in its first year. We will briefly review observations of GRB990123 which revealed the first detection of an optical burst occurring during the gamma-ray emission, reaching 9th magnitude at its peak. In addition, we present here preliminary optical results for seven other gamma-ray bursts. No other optical counterparts were seen in this analysis, and the best limiting sensitivities are m(V) > 13.0 at 14.7 seconds after the gamma-ray rise, and m(V) > 16.4 at 62 minutes. These are the most stringent limits obtained for GRB optical counterpart brightness in the first hour after the burst. This analysis suggests that there is not a strong correlation between optical flux and gamma-ray emission.

  12. Emission Inventories and Projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streets, D. G.; van Aardenne, John; Battye, Bill; Garivait, Savitri; Grano, D.; Guenther, Alex; Klimont, Z.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Lu, Zifeng; Maenhout, Greet; Ohara, Toshimasa; Parrish, David J.; Smith, Steven J.; Vallack, Harry

    2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    When the Executive Body to the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution took the decision to establish the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF HTAP) in December 2004, it was on the basis of a growing understanding of the issues surrounding the hemispheric and intercontinental transport of air pollutants. It was recognised that whilst current regional emissions on their own created pollution levels that exceeded internationally-agreed air quality objectives, hemispheric transport could exacerbate local and regional air quality problems.Two particular pollutants of concern, and the focus of this report, are ozone and particulate matter (PM), known for their detrimental impacts on human health (these impacts and others are described in Chapter 5). There was well-documented evidence for the intercontinental transport of ozone and PM but, at that time, the significance of this intercontinental influence on the design of air pollution control policies was not well understood. The European Union, in drawing up its Thematic Strategy on Clean Air for Europe during 2004, became aware of the significance of intercontinental transport and the importance of sources of pollution beyond its borders and sphere of influence, in meeting its air quality goals.

  13. Generalized local emission tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katsevich, Alexander J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission tomography enables locations and values of internal isotope density distributions to be determined from radiation emitted from the whole object. In the method for locating the values of discontinuities, the intensities of radiation emitted from either the whole object or a region of the object containing the discontinuities are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the isotope density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) knowing pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object. In the method for determining the location of the discontinuity, the intensities of radiation emitted from an object are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the density discontinuity and the location .GAMMA. of the attenuation coefficient discontinuity. Pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object need not be known in this case.

  14. Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emissions 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Lovelace Respiratory Research...

  15. Figure 5.19. Light micrographs showing the microstructure of duplex rolled metal IC381 solution treated at 1300 C for 26 hours and then quenched into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    of duplex rolled metal IC381 solution treated at 1300 °C for 26 hours and then quenched into water the microstructure of duplex rolled metal IC373 solution treated at 1300 QC for 26 hours amI then quenched into water solution treated at 1300 QC for 26 hours and then quenched into water. The llleasured volullle fraction

  16. 1. Sending some rejection notes to deals that we are going to pass on.about 14 hours ago via web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    1. Sending some rejection notes to deals that we are going to pass on.about 14 hours ago via web 2 much action going on!about 14 hours ago via web 3. Just got new commitment from top tier venture firm for Series B funding for another portfolio company.about 14 hours ago via web 4. interview with a potential

  17. An overview of airborne radioactive emissions at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guevara, F.A.; Dvorak, R.F.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strict control is essential over any emissions of radioactivity in the ventilation exhaust from facilities where radioactive materials may become airborne. At Los Alamos National Laboratory there are 87 stacks exhausting ventilation air to the environment from operations with a potential for radioactive emissions. These stacks cover the diverse operations at all Laboratory facilities where radioactive materials are handled and require continuous sampling/monitoring to detect levels of contamination. An overview is presented of the operations, associated ventilation exhaust cleanup systems, and analysis of the emissions. In keeping with the as-low-as-reasonably-achievable concept, emissions of radionuclides are reduced whenever practicable. A specific example describing the reduction of emissions from the linear accelerator beam stop area at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility during 1985 by a factor of 8 over previous emissions is presented.

  18. The supply chain of CO2 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, S. J; Peters, G. P; Caldeira, K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In almost all cases, the emissions related to traded fuelsextraction (F Er ) and production (F Pr ) emissions (i.e. ,the net effect of emissions from traded fossil fuels; Top),

  19. Recent increases in global HFC-23 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions and sinks: 1990-2007, Rep.A. Lindley (2007), Global emissions of HFC-23 estimated to2009), Greenhouse Gas Emissions Data, http://unfccc.int/ghg_

  20. Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that energy use and CO2 emissions in developed countries w icap-and-trade program for CO2 emissions from the electricalout and "sequester" the CO2 emissions, though the cost and

  1. Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    estimated to produce CO2 emission reductions ranging frombetween low CO2 emissions and the reductions in the auto usea 16 percent reduction in CO2 traffic emissions within the

  2. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction in the Cementfor Fuel Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction in the Iron andElectricity Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction in the Iron

  3. Appendix: Mercury Emissions used in CAM-Chem/Hg model. 1. Anthropogenic emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Appendix: Mercury Emissions used in CAM-Chem/Hg model. 1. Anthropogenic emissions The anthropogenic emission of mercury is directly adopted from global mercury emission inventory [Pacyna et al., 2005]. The anthropogenic emissions are shown in annual averaged total mercury emissions. (Unit: µg/m2 /day) 2. Land

  4. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: U.S. emissions inventories Narasimhan K. Larkin a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: U.S. emissions inventories Narasimhan K. Larkin a: Fire emissions Emissions inventories Greenhouse gases a b s t r a c t Emissions from wildland fire fire emissions change considerably due to fluctuations from year to year with overall fire season

  5. Metabolic Engineering of Light and Dark Biochemical Pathways in Wild-Type and Mutant Strains of Synechocystis PCC 6803 for Maximal, 24-Hour Production of Hydrogen Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ely, Roger L.; Chaplen, Frank W.R.

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This project used the cyanobacterial species Synechocystis PCC 6803 to pursue two lines of inquiry, with each line addressing one of the two main factors affecting hydrogen (H2) production in Synechocystis PCC 6803: NADPH availability and O2 sensitivity. H2 production in Synechocystis PCC 6803 requires a very high NADPH:NADP+ ratio, that is, the NADP pool must be highly reduced, which can be problematic because several metabolic pathways potentially can act to raise or lower NADPH levels. Also, though the [NiFe]-hydrogenase in PCC 6803 is constitutively expressed, it is reversibly inactivated at very low O2 concentrations. Largely because of this O2 sensitivity and the requirement for high NADPH levels, a major portion of overall H2 production occurs under anoxic conditions in the dark, supported by breakdown of glycogen or other organic substrates accumulated during photosynthesis. Also, other factors, such as N or S limitation, pH changes, presence of other substances, or deletion of particular respiratory components, can affect light or dark H2 production. Therefore, in the first line of inquiry, under a number of culture conditions with wild type (WT) Synechocystis PCC 6803 cells and a mutant with impaired type I NADPH-dehydrogenase (NDH-1) function, we used H2 production profiling and metabolic flux analysis, with and without specific inhibitors, to examine systematically the pathways involved in light and dark H2 production. Results from this work provided rational bases for metabolic engineering to maximize photobiological H2 production on a 24-hour basis. In the second line of inquiry, we used site-directed mutagenesis to create mutants with hydrogenase enzymes exhibiting greater O2 tolerance. The research addressed the following four tasks: 1. Evaluate the effects of various culture conditions (N, S, or P limitation; light/dark; pH; exogenous organic carbon) on H2 production profiles of WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 2. Conduct metabolic flux analyses for enhanced H2 production profiles using selected culture conditions and inhibitors of specific pathways in WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 3. Create Synechocystis PCC 6803 mutant strains with modified hydrogenases exhibiting increased O2 tolerance and greater H2 production; and 4. Integrate enhanced hydrogenase mutants and culture and metabolic factor studies to maximize 24-hour H2 production.

  6. After-hours Power Status of Office Equipment and Inventory of Miscellaneous Plug-load Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberson, Judy A.; Webber, Carrie A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.; Pinckard, Margaret J.; Busch, John F.

    2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was conducted in support of two branches of the EPA ENERGY STAR program, whose overall goal is to reduce, through voluntary market-based means, the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the U.S. The primary objective was to collect data for the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program on the after-hours power state of computers, monitors, printers, copiers, scanners, fax machines, and multi-function devices. We also collected data for the ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings branch on the types and amounts of ''miscellaneous'' plug-load equipment, a significant and growing end use that is not usually accounted for by building energy managers. This data set is the first of its kind that we know of, and is an important first step in characterizing miscellaneous plug loads in commercial buildings. The main purpose of this study is to supplement and update previous data we collected on the extent to which electronic office equipment is turned off or automatically enters a low power state when not in active use. In addition, it provides data on numbers and types of office equipment, and helps identify trends in office equipment usage patterns. These data improve our estimates of typical unit energy consumption and savings for each equipment type, and enables the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program to focus future effort on products with the highest energy savings potential. This study expands our previous sample of office buildings in California and Washington DC to include education and health care facilities, and buildings in other states. We report data from twelve commercial buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania: two health care buildings, two large offices (> 500 employees each), three medium offices (50-500 employees), four education buildings, and one ''small office'' that is actually an aggregate of five small businesses. Two buildings are in the San Francisco Bay area of California, five are in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and five are in Atlanta, Georgia.

  7. Collaborative Emissions Research at EMSL | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collaborative Emissions Research at EMSL Collaborative Emissions Research at EMSL EMSL produced this video for the annual congressional science expo organized by the National User...

  8. Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI' Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro...

  9. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced Technologies...

  10. The supply chain of CO2 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, S. J; Peters, G. P; Caldeira, K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    emissions from traded fossil fuels; Top), production (F Pr )Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO 2 Emissions (Carbonfrom the burning of fossil fuels are conventionally

  11. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahl, Linnea

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL-470E-20Ě1 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Preparedfor Estimating Fugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides fromStandards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Radionuclides),

  12. Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy-related carbon emissions in manufacturing analysis and issues related to the energy use, energy efficiency, and carbon emission indicators.

  13. Materials Applications of Photoelectron Emission Microscopy....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a variety of photoexcitation sources including synchrotron emission, femtosecond laser pulses and conventional UV lamp emission. Each source has advantages, for example, fs...

  14. Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using KH-ACT Primary Breakup Model & Detailed Chemistry Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using KH-ACT Primary...

  15. Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems or GDI Engines Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems or GDI Engines 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  16. Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance of In-Use Diesel Retrofit Technologies from the National Clean Diesel Campaign Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction...

  17. International Emissions Trading: Design and Political Acceptability.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boom, Jan Tjeerd

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This thesis discusses the design and political acceptability of international emissions trading. It is shown that there are several designs options for emissions trading at… (more)

  18. Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation Model-Based Diesel Engine Control Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation...

  19. Detection of VHE Bridge emission from the Crab pulsar with the MAGIC Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saito, T Y; Hirotani, K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Crab pulsar is the only astronomical pulsed source detected above 100 GeV. The emission mechanism of very high energy gamma-ray pulsation is not yet fully understood, although several theoretical models have been proposed. In order to test the new models, we measured the light curve and the spectra of the Crab pulsar with high precision by means of deep observations. We analyzed 135 hours of selected MAGIC data taken between 2009 and 2013 in stereoscopic mode. In order to discuss the spectral shape in connection with lower energies, 4.6 years of Fermi-LAT data were also analyzed. The known two pulses per period were detected with a significance of 8.0 sigma and 12.6 sigma. In addition, significant bridge emission was found between the two pulses with 6.2 sigma. This emission can not be explained with the existing theories. These data can be used for testing new theoretical models.

  20. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island requires all entities that sell electricity in the state to disclose details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of their electric generation to end-use customers. This information...

  1. Anomalous Emission from HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Dickinson

    2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinning dust appears to be the best explanation for the anomalous emission that has been observed at $\\sim 10-60$ GHz. One of the best examples of spinning dust comes from a HII region in the Perseus molecular cloud. Observations of other HII regions also show tentative evidence for excess emission at frequencies $\\sim 30$ GHz, although at lower emissivity levels. A new detection of excess emission at 31 GHz in the HII region RCW175 has been made. The most plausible explanation again comes from spinning dust. HII regions are a good place to look for spinning dust as long as accurate radio data spanning the $\\sim 5-100$ GHz range is available.

  2. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In September 2002, the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission (PUC) issued an order requiring the state's regulated electric utilities to disclose to customers details on the fuel mix and emissions...

  3. Mobile fiber optic emission spectrograph

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, W.A.; Coleman, C.J.; McCarty, J.E.; Beck, R.S.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical Assistance Request HLW/DWPF-TAR-970064 asked SRTC to evaluate the use of a fiber optic coupled emission spectrometer. The spectrometer would provide additional ICP analyses in the DWPF laboratory.

  4. Trading quasi-emission permits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montero, Juan-Pablo

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I study the design of environmental policies for a regulator that has incomplete information on firms' emissions and costs of production and abatement (e.g., air pollution in cities with numerous small polluting sources). ...

  5. The Value of Emissions Trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Mort David.

    This paper estimates the value of international emissions trading, focusing attention on a here-to-fore neglected component: its value as a hedge against uncertainty. Much analysis has been done of the Kyoto Protocol and ...

  6. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michigan's Customer Choice and Electric Reliability Act of 2000 (P.A. 141) requires electric suppliers to disclose to customers details related to the fuel mix and emissions, in pounds per megawatt...

  7. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2001, Nevada enacted legislation requiring the state’s electric utilities to provide details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of electric generation to their customers. Utilities must...

  8. Private Lessons (24 Credit Hours) Hours Conducting (2 Credit Hours)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Performance Emphasis 6 IPA Proficiency Exam**** MUSC 4996 Private Lessons IV Music Performance Emphasis 6. Private piano study may not be substituted for Class Piano or the Piano Proficiency Exam. ****IPA Proficiency Exam: All voice performance emphasis students must pass the IPA Proficiency Exam before taking

  9. Time dependent particle emission from fission products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holloway, Shannon T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kawano, Toshihiko [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moller, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decay heating following nuclear fission is an important factor in the design of nuclear facilities; impacting a variety of aspects ranging from cooling requirements to shielding design. Calculations of decay heat, often assumed to be a simple product of activity and average decay product energy, are complicated by the so called 'pandemonium effect'. Elucidated in the 1970's this complication arises from beta-decays feeding high-energy nuclear levels; redistributing the available energy between betas and gammas. Increased interest in improving the theoretical predictions of decay probabilities has been, in part, motivated by the recent experimental effort utilizing the Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) to determine individual beta-decay transition probabilities to individual nuclear levels. Accurate predictions of decay heating require a detailed understanding of these transition probabilities, accurate representation of particle decays as well as reliable predictions of temporal inventories from fissioning systems. We will discuss a recent LANL effort to provide a time dependent study of particle emission from fission products through a combination of Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA) predictions of beta-decay probabilities, statistical Hauser-Feshbach techniques to obtain particle and gamma-ray emissions in statistical Hauser-Feshbach and the nuclear inventory code, CINDER.

  10. Diagnosing GRB Prompt Emission Site with Spectral Cut-Off Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayantara Gupta; Bing Zhang

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The site and mechanism of gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission is still unknown. Although internal shocks have been widely discussed as the emission site of GRBs, evidence supporting other emission sites have been also suggested recently, including the closer-in photosphere where the fireball becomes transparent and further-out radii near the fireball deceleration radius where magnetic dissipation may be important. With the successful operation of the GLAST experiment, prompt high energy emission spectra from many GRBs would be detected in the near future. We suggest that the cut-off energy of the prompt emission spectrum from a GRB depends on both the fireball bulk Lorentz factor and the unknown emission radius from the central engine. If the bulk Lorentz factor could be independently measured (e.g. from early afterglow observations), the observed spectral cutoff energy can be used to diagnose the emission site of gamma-rays. This would provide valuable information to understand the physical origin of the GRB promp emission.

  11. Experimental and cost analyses of a one kilowatt-hour/day domestic refrigerator-freezer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vineyard, E.A.; Sand, J.R.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past ten years, government regulations for energy standards, coupled with the utility industry`s promotion of energy-efficient appliances, have prompted appliance manufacturers to reduce energy consumption in refrigerator-freezers by approximately 40%. Global concerns over ozone depletion have also required the appliance industry to eliminate CFC-12 and CFC-11 while concurrently improving energy efficiency to reduce greenhouse emissions. In response to expected future regulations that will be more stringent, several design options were investigated for improving the energy efficiency of a conventionally designed, domestic refrigerator-freezer. The options, such as cabinet and door insulation improvements and a high-efficiency compressor were incorporated into a prototype refrigerator-freezer cabinet and refrigeration system. Baseline energy consumption of the original 1996 production refrigerator-freezer, along with cabinet heat load and compressor calorimeter test results, were extensively documented to provide a firm basis for experimentally measured energy savings. The goal for the project was to achieve an energy consumption that is 50% below in 1993 National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA) standard for 20 ft{sup 3} (570 l) units. Based on discussions with manufacturers to determine the most promising energy-saving options, a laboratory prototype was fabricated and tested to experimentally verify the energy consumption of a unit with vacuum insulation around the freezer, increased door thicknesses, a high-efficiency compressor, a low wattage condenser fan, a larger counterflow evaporator, and adaptive defrost control.

  12. Energy savings can be communicated in terms of kilowatt hours (energy), carbon (climate change) or pounds (cost).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAuley, Derek

    AIM Energy savings can be communicated in terms of kilowatt hours (energy), carbon (climate change) or pounds (cost). We want to know if these different communication units prime different motivations more broadly. This implies that considering carbon may result in wider changes in sustainable behaviour

  13. 650 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER DELIVERY, VOL. 26, NO. 2, APRIL 2011 Hourly Scheduling of DC Transmission Lines in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Yong

    Transmission Lines in SCUC With Voltage Source Converters Azim Lotfjou, Mohammad Shahidehpour, Fellow, IEEE transmission lines, se- curity-constrained unit commitment, voltage-source converters. NOMENCLATURE Index of ac;LOTFJOU et al.: HOURLY SCHEDULING OF DC TRANSMISSION LINES 651 , Vector of real and reactive power

  14. Accident/Incident Reporting Form & Investigation Report FAX COMPLETED FORM (Within 24 hours) TO: 519-661-2079 (82079)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    Accident/Incident Reporting Form & Investigation Report FAX COMPLETED FORM (Within 24 hours) TO ­ Accident/Incident Reporting Form PART A Name of Employee: ______________________________________ Employee: Report Only Accident Incident No Injury/Hazard First Aid Lost Time Non-Lost Time (If Report Only

  15. ISO observations of spirals: modelling the FIR emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simone Bianchi; Paul B. Alton; Jonathan I. Davies

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ISO observations at 200 micron have modified our view of the dust component in spiral galaxies. For a sample of seven resolved spirals we have retrieved a mean temperature of 20K, about 10K lower than previous estimates based on IRAS data at shorter wavelengths. Because of the steep dependence of far-infrared emission on the dust temperature, the dust masses inferred from ISO fluxes are a factor of 10 higher than those derived from IRAS data only, leading to gas-to-dust ratios close to the value observed in the Galaxy. The scale-length of the 200 micron emission is larger than for the IRAS 100 micron emission, with colder dust at larger distances from the galactic centre, as expected if the interstellar radiation field is the main source of dust heating. The 200 micron scale-length is also larger than the optical, for all the galaxies in the sample. This suggests that the dust distribution is more extended than that of the stars.A model of the dust heating is needed to derive the parameters of the dust distribution from the FIR emission. Therefore, we have adapted an existing radiative transfer code to deal with dust emission. Simulated maps of the temperature distribution within the dust disk and of the dust emission at any wavelength can be produced. The stellar spectral energy distribution is derived from observations in the ultraviolet, optical and near infrared. The parameters of the dust distribution (scale-lengths and optical depth) are chosen to reproduce the observed characteristics of the FIR emission, i.e. the shape of the spectrum, the flux and the spatial distribution. We describe the application of the model to one of the galaxies in the sample, NGC 6946.

  16. Effect of in-cylinder liquid fuel films on engine-out unburned hydrocarbon emissions for SI engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costanzo, Vincent S. (Vincent Stanley), 1979-

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nearly all of the hydrocarbon emissions from a modern gasoline-fueled vehicle occur when the engine is first started. One important contributing factor to this is the fact that, during this time, temperatures throughout ...

  17. 7, 68436902, 2007 An Asian emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 7, 6843­6902, 2007 An Asian emission inventory for the period 1980­2020 T. Ohara et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions An Asian emission inventory of anthropogenic emission sources 7, 6843­6902, 2007 An Asian emission inventory for the period 1980­2020 T. Ohara et al. Title Page

  18. Atmospheric Mercury: Emissions, Transport/Fate,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , global...) Is "emissions trading" workable and ethical? Is the recently promulgated Clean Air Mercury

  19. Emissions Trading: A Feasible Analysis for UBC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emissions Trading: A Feasible Analysis for UBC Vivian Hoffman, J Chisholm I. Introduction The GVRD environmental objectives are achieved. Emissions reduction credit trading (or emissions trading) is an example Valley (LFV). Section III describes the market-based instruments of emissions trading and facility

  20. Cost-Effective Reciprocating Engine Emissions Control and Monitoring for E&P Field and Gathering Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keith Hohn; Sarah R. Nuss-Warren

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes a project intended to identify, develop, test, and commercialize emissions control and monitoring technologies that can be implemented by E&P operators to significantly lower their cost of environmental compliance and expedite project permitting. Technologies were installed and tested in controlled laboratory situations and then installed and tested on field engines based on the recommendations of an industry-based steering committee, analysis of installed horsepower, analysis of available emissions control and monitoring technologies, and review of technology and market gaps. The industry-recognized solution for lean-burn engines, a low-emissions-retrofit including increased airflow and pre-combustion chambers, was found to successfully control engine emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub X}) and carbon monoxide (CO). However, the standard non-selective catalytic reduction (NSCR) system recognized by the industry was found to be unable to consistently control both NO{sub X} and CO emissions. The standard NSCR system was observed to produce emissions levels that changed dramatically on a day-to-day or even hour-to-hour basis. Because difficulties with this system seemed to be the result of exhaust gas oxygen (EGO) sensors that produced identical output for very different exhaust gas conditions, models were developed to describe the behavior of the EGO sensor and an alternative, the universal exhaust gas oxygen (UEGO) sensor. Meanwhile, an integrated NSCR system using an advanced, signal-conditioned UEGO sensor was tested and found to control both NO{sub X} and CO emissions. In conjunction with this project, advanced monitoring technologies, such as Ion Sense, and improved sensors for emissions control, such as the AFM1000+ have been developed and commercialized.

  1. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. P. Evans

    1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W?s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  2. Advanced Emission Control Development Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, A.P.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  3. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. P. Evans

    1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  4. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Holmes

    1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  5. Emissions of volatile organic compounds from stationary combustion sources: Numerical modeling capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seebold, J.G. [Chevron Research and Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States); Kee, R.J.; Lutz, A.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Senkan, S. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A collaborative research program initiated to study the emissions of a wide variety of chemical species from stationary combustion systems. These product species have been included in the Clean Air act legislation and their emissions must be rigidly controlled, but there is a need for much better understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms that produce and consume them. We are using numerical modeling study the chemical reactions and fluid mechanical factors that occur in industrial processes: we are examining systems including premixed and diffusion flames, stirred reactors and plug flow reactors in these modeling studies to establish the major factors leading to emissions of these chemicals. In addition, we are applying advanced laser diagnostic techniques to validate the model predictions and to study the possibilities of developing sophisticated sensors to detect emissions of undesirable species in real time. This paper will discuss the organization of this collaborative effort and its results to date.

  6. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, S.K.

    2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  7. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. K. Zohner

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  8. Air emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1994 emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report Presents the 1994 update of the Air Emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  9. Power Factor Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power factor control is a necessary ingredient in any successful Energy Management Program. Many companies are operating with power factors of 70% or less and are being penalized through the electrical utility bill. This paper starts by describing...

  10. Evaluation of emission-control devices at waferboard plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaught, C.C.

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document discusses emissions from wood-chip dryers and the candidate control devices that should be considered in a best available control technology analysis. Specifically, the document characterizes wood-chip dryer effluents and presents a general description, pollutant removal efficiencies, factors affecting performance, and cost for the wet electrostatic precipitator and the electrified filter bed. The document also presents information on controlling formaldehyde emissions from the press vents.

  11. Locomotive emission study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work for the report involved the estimation of the air pollution emissions arising from the operation of railroad locomotives in six non-attainment air management basins within California. The six air basins are the Bay Area, the Central Coast (which includes the North Central Coast and the South Central Coast basins), the South Coast, San Diego, San Joaquin, and the Sacramento Valley basins. In addition, the effort involved the development of information about the efficacy and cost of feasible control strategies for locomotive-generated air pollution emissions, for both long and short term implementation.

  12. Development of a local carbon dioxide emissions inventory based on energy demand and waste production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joao Gomes; Joana Nascimento; Helena Rodrigues [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the study that led to the development of a carbon dioxide emissions matrix for the Oeiras municipality, one of the largest Portuguese municipalities, located in the metropolitan area of Lisbon. This matrix takes into account the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to an increase of electricity demand in buildings as well as solid and liquid wastes treatment from the domestic and services sectors. Using emission factors that were calculated from the relationship between the electricity produced and amount of treated wastes, the GHC emissions in the Oeiras municipality were estimated for a time series of 6 yr (1998 - 2003). The obtained results showed that the electricity sector accounts for approximately 75% of the municipal emissions in 2003. This study was developed to obtain tools to base options and actions to be undertaken by local authorities such as energy planning and also public information. 11 refs., 12 tabs.

  13. Also visit my online sites on Facebook www.facebook.com/ceceiliajill or LinkedIn www.linkedin.com/in/ceceilia about 20 hours ago via web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    .linkedin.com/in/ceceilia about 20 hours ago via web Love the online Profile that ShannonKelly did in PennCareerServices @PennCareerDay http://ulife.vpul.upenn.edu/careerservices/blog/?cat=92 about 20 hours ago via web Looong drive out starting point. about 20 hours ago via web Time to go out and have fun but will continue to tweet

  14. Chemical composition of emissions from the Kuwait oil fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferek, R.J.; Hobbs, P.V.; Herring, J.A. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Laursen, K.K. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Weiss, R.E. [Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology, Beaverton, OR (United States); Rasmussen, R.A. [Radiance Research, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    1992-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne measurements in the smoke from the Kuwait oil fires in May and June 1991 indicate that the combined oil and gas emissions were equivalent to the consumption of about 4.6 million barrels of oil per day. The combustion was relatively efficient, with about 96% of the fuel carbon burned emitted as CO{sub 2}. Particulate smoke emissions averaged 2% of the fuel burned, of which about 20% was soot. About two-thirds of the mass of the smoke was accounted for by salt, soot, and sulfate. The salt most likely originated from oil field brines, which were ejected from the wells along with the oil. The salt accounts for the fact that many of the plumes were white. SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} were removed from the smoke at rates of about 6 and 22% per hour, respectively. The high salt and sulfate contents explain why a large fraction of the particles in the smoke were efficient cloud condensation nuclei. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanshan Xu; Wenxin Liu; Shu Tao [Peking University, Beijing (China). Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Environmental Sciences

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) listed as U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) priority pollutants from major sources in China were compiled. Geographical distribution and temporal change of the PAH emission, as well as emission profiles, are discussed. It was estimated that the total PAH emission in China was 25,300 tons in 2003. The emission profile featured a relatively higher portion of high molecular weight (HMW) species with carcinogenic potential due to large contributions of domestic coal and coking industry. Among various sources, biomass burning, domestic coal combustion, and the coking industry contributed 60%, 20%, and 16% of the total emission, respectively. Total emission, emission density, emission intensity, and emission per capita showed geographical variations. In general, the southeastern provinces were characterized by higher emission density, while those in western and northern China featured higher emission intensity and population-normalized emission. Although energy consumption in China went up continuously during the past two decades, annual emission of PAHs fluctuated depending on the amount of domestic coal consumption, coke production, and the efficiency of energy utilization. 47 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Headed out to dinner now and signing off for the night. If you have questions, tweet me at @adachen!17 hours ago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    's really come in handy over the last few years to reach out to ppl & learn 22 hours ago #BizTip: Add your

  17. Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 1, Main text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuchi, M.A. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents estimates of full fuel-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases from using transportation fuels and electricity. The data cover emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane organic compounds resulting from the end use of fuels, compression or liquefaction of gaseous transportation fuels, fuel distribution, fuel production, feedstock transport, feedstock recovery, manufacture of motor vehicles, maintenance of transportation systems, manufacture of materials used in major energy facilities, and changes in land use that result from using biomass-derived fuels. The results for electricity use are in grams of CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions per kilowatt-hour of electricity delivered to end users and cover generating plants powered by coal, oil, natural gas, methanol, biomass, and nuclear energy. The transportation analysis compares CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions, in grams per mile, from base-case gasoline and diesel fuel cycles with emissions from these alternative- fuel cycles: methanol from coal, natural gas, or wood; compressed or liquefied natural gas; synthetic natural gas from wood; ethanol from corn or wood; liquefied petroleum gas from oil or natural gas; hydrogen from nuclear or solar power; electricity from coal, uranium, oil, natural gas, biomass, or solar energy, used in battery-powered electric vehicles; and hydrogen and methanol used in fuel-cell vehicles.

  18. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffin, J.W.; Olsen, K.B.

    1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species. The method uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having an electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has an optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited in the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis. Optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis. 18 figs.

  19. Gas Emissions FLOODING THE LAND,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batiste, Oriol

    signif- icant sources of emissions of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and, in particular, methane to bacteria breaking down organic matter in the water. Methane, a much more powerful greenhouse gas than coal plants generating the same amounts of power. Dams and their associated reservoirs are globally

  20. Continuum Radio Emission and Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    and inversely proportional to the square of frequency and to temperature to the power 1.5. It is therefore discusses incoher­ ent emission from thermal plasma in the non­flaring so­ lar atmosphere; other relevant. The opacity of this mecha­ nism is proportional to the product of the electron and ion charge densities

  1. Educational Multiwavelength Atomic Emission Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazarenko, Alexander

    atomic absorption is the capability for simultaneous multielement analysis. It can be used colleges had acquired atomic absorption instruments by the year 1990.[2] In contrast, atomic emission with the acetylene-air flame source taken from an existing atomic absorption instrument. Two spectrometer units

  2. Identification of potential sources and source regions of fine ambient particles measured at Gosan background site in Korea using advanced hybrid receptor model combined with positive matrix factorization - article no. D22217

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, J.S.; Moon, K.J.; Kim, Y.J. [National Institute of Environmental Research, Inchon (Republic of Korea). Dept. of Air Quality Research

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The size- and time-resolved measurement of particulate trace elements was made using an eight-stage Davis Rotating Unit for Monitoring sampler and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence system from 29 March to 29 May in 2002 at Gosan, Korea, which is one of the representative background sites in east Asia. A sa result, continuous 3-hour average concentrations were obtained for 19 elements including S, Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Cl, Cu, Zn, Ti, K, Mn, Pb, Ni, V, Se, As, Rb, Cr, and Br. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) method was applied to the size-resolved aerosol data sets in order to identify the possible sources and to estimate their contribution to particulate matter mass in each size range. Twelve sources were then resolved in the fine size range ( 0.07 to 1.15 {mu}m), including continental aerosol, biomass burning, coal combustion, oil heating furnace, residual oil-fired boiler, municipal incineration, nonferrous metal source, ferrous metal source, gasoline vehicle, diesel vehicle, copper smelter, and volcanic emission. A newly developed hybrid receptor model, concentration, retention time, and source emission weighted trajectory (CRSWT) was then applied to the source intensities derived from the PMF analysis by incorporating meteorological and source inventory information of the study region in order to suggest the regional information of long-range transported fine aerosol sources. The CRSWT model was able to resolve highly potential source areas and pathways for the fine ambient aerosol at the Gosan background site.

  3. High-resolution emissions of CO{sub 2} from power generation in the USA - article no. G04008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petron, G.; Tans, P.; Frost, G.; Chao, D.L.; Trainer, M. [NOAA, Boulder, CO (United States). Earth Systems Research Laboratory

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity generation accounts for close to 40% of the U.S. CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel burning, making it the economic sector with the largest source of CO{sub 2}. Since the late 1990s, the Environmental Protection Agency Clean Air Markets Division (EPA CAMD) has kept a repository of hourly CO{sub 2} emission data for most power plants in the conterminous United States. In this study, the CAMD CO{sub 2} data are used to derive a high spatiotemporal resolution CO{sub 2} emissions inventory for the electricity generation sector (inventory available on request). Data from 1998 to 2006 have been processed. This unique inventory can be used to improve the understanding of the carbon cycle at fine temporal and spatial scales. The CAMD data set provides the first quantitative estimates of the diurnal and seasonal cycles of the emissions as well as the year to year variability. Emissions peak in the summertime owing to the widespread use of air conditioning. Summertime emissions are in fact highly correlated with the daily average temperature. In conjunction with the EPA Emissions and Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID), we have derived high-resolution maps of CO{sub 2} emissions by fossil fuel burned (coal, gas, oil) for the year 2004. The CAMD data set also reflects regional anomalies in power generation such as the August 2003 blackout in the northeastern United States and the 2000-2001 increase in production in California. We recommend that all sectors of the economy report similar high-resolution CO{sub 2} emissions because of their great usefulness both for carbon cycle science and for greenhouse gases emissions mitigation and regulation.

  4. QUANTIFICATION OF FUGITIVE REACTIVE ALKENE EMISSIONS FROM PETROCHEMICAL PLANTS WITH PERFLUOROCARBON TRACERS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SENUM,G.I.; DIETZ,R.N.

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies demonstrate the impact of fugitive emissions of reactive alkenes on the atmospheric chemistry of the Houston Texas metropolitan area (1). Petrochemical plants located in and around the Houston area emit atmospheric alkenes, such as ethene, propene and 1,3-butadiene. The magnitude of emissions is a major uncertainty in assessing their effects. Even though the petrochemical industry reports that fugitive emissions of alkenes have been reduced to less than 0.1% of daily production, recent measurement data, obtained during the TexAQS 2000 experiment indicates that emissions are perhaps a factor of ten larger than estimated values. Industry figures for fugitive emissions are based on adding up estimated emission factors for every component in the plant to give a total estimated emission from the entire facility. The dramatic difference between estimated and measured rates indicates either that calculating emission fluxes by summing estimates for individual components is seriously flawed, possibly due to individual components leaking well beyond their estimated tolerances, that not all sources of emissions for a facility are being considered in emissions estimates, or that there are known sources of emissions that are not being reported. This experiment was designed to confirm estimates of reactive alkene emissions derived from analysis of the TexAQS 2000 data by releasing perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) at a known flux from a petrochemical plant and sampling both the perfluorocarbon tracer and reactive alkenes downwind using the Piper-Aztec research aircraft operated by Baylor University. PFTs have been extensively used to determine leaks in pipelines, air infiltration in buildings, and to characterize the transport and dispersion of air parcels in the atmosphere. Over 20 years of development by the Tracer Technology Center (TTC) has produced a range of analysis instruments, field samplers and PFT release equipment that have been successfully deployed in a large variety of experiments. PFTs are inert, nontoxic, noncombustible and nonreactive. Up to seven unique PFTs can be simultaneously released, sampled and analyzed and the technology is well suited for determining emission fluxes from large petrochemical facilities. The PFT experiment described here was designed to quantitate alkene emissions from a single petrochemical facility, but such experiments could be applied to other industrial sources or groups of sources in the Houston area.

  5. Junction-based field emission structure for field emission display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A junction-based field emission display, wherein the junctions are formed by depositing a semiconducting or dielectric, low work function, negative electron affinity (NEA) silicon-based compound film (SBCF) onto a metal or n-type semiconductor substrate. The SBCF can be doped to become a p-type semiconductor. A small forward bias voltage is applied across the junction so that electron transport is from the substrate into the SBCF region. Upon entering into this NEA region, many electrons are released into the vacuum level above the SBCF surface and accelerated toward a positively biased phosphor screen anode, hence lighting up the phosphor screen for display. To turn off, simply switch off the applied potential across the SBCF/substrate. May be used for field emission flat panel displays.

  6. Development of a Web-based Emissions Reduction Calculator for Street Light and Traffic Light Retrofits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Gilman, D.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Episode Peak day for 1999 4 . In the design mode the energy and emissions savings are calculated based on the specific information the user provides about the lamp type, lamp code, wattage, and number of lamps for both pre-retrofit and post... for the whole year is 12 hours per day. Traffic Light Analysis: Design Mode Table 2 shows an example of the input information and calculation for traffic light design mode. For each project the user enters the lamp type, lamp code, wattage per lamp...

  7. Assessing historical global sulfur emission patterns for the period 1850--1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefohn, A.S. [A.S.L. and Associates, Helena, MT (United States); Husar, J.D.; Husar, R.B. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Center for Air Pollution Impact and Trend Analysis; Brimblecombe, P. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom)

    1996-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Anthropogenic sulfur dioxide emissions from energy-producing and metal production activities have become an important factor in better understanding the relationship between humans and the environment. Concerns about (1) acid rain effects on the environment and (2) anthropogenic aerosols affecting possible global change have prompted interest in the transformation and fate of sulfur in the environment. One step in assessing the importance of sulfur emissions is the development of a reliable regional emission inventory of sulfur as a function of time. The objective of this research effort was to create a homogeneous database for historical sulfur emission estimates for the world. The time from 1850--1990 was selected to include the period of industrialization form the time the main production of fuels and minerals began until the most recent year for which complete production data exist. This research effort attempts to correct some of the deficiencies associated with previous global sulfur emission estimates by (1) identifying those production activities that resulted in sulfur emissions by country and (2) calculating historical emission trends by country across years. An important component of this study was the comparison of the sulfur emission results with those of previous studies.

  8. Assessment of wind power predictability as a decision factor in the investment phase of wind farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Assessment of wind power predictability as a decision factor in the investment phase of wind farms Antipolis, France. Abstract The ability to predict wind power production over the next few hours to days is prerequisites for the secure and economic operation of power systems with high wind power penetration. From

  9. Heart. Author manuscript Cardiorespiratory risk factors as predictors of 40-year mortality in women

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Heart. Author manuscript Page /1 13 Cardiorespiratory risk factors as predictors of 40-year.7) mortality, while associations between 2-hour­ ­ glucose and all-cause 1.15 (1.1 1.2), coronary heart disease ; Cause of Death ; Cohort Studies ; Female ; Heart Diseases ; mortality ; physiopathology ; Humans ; Male

  10. Large methane emission upon spring thaw from natural wetlands in the northern permafrost region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Changchun [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Sun, Xiaoxin [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Sun, Li [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Miao, Yuqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Wang, Xianwei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Guo, Yuedong [Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The permafrost carbon climate feedback is one of the major mechanisms in controlling the climate ecosystem interactions in northern high latitudes. Of this feedback, methane (CH4) emission from natural wetlands is critically important due to its high warming potential. The freeze thaw transition has been confirmed to play an important role in annual CH4 budget, yet the magnitude of this effect is uncertain. An intensive field campaign was carried out in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China to estimate the CH4 emission in the spring freeze thaw transition period. The observation concluded that a large CH4 source was caused by spring thaw; the maximum hourly emission rate was 48.6 g C m 2 h 1, more than three orders of the regularly observed CH4 emission rate in the growing season. In some sporadically observed 'hot spots', the spring thawing effect contributed to a large CH4 source of 31.3 10.1 g C m 2, which is approximately 80% of the previously calculated annual CH4 emission in the same study area. If our results are typical for natural wetlands in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region, we estimate a global CH4 source strength of 0.5 1.0 Tg C (1 Tg =1012 g) caused by spring thaw in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region in the year 2011. Combining with available satellite and flask data, a regional extrapolation reaches a temporal pattern of CH4 emission during 2003 2009 which is consistent with recently observed changes in atmospheric CH4 concentration in the high latitudes. This suggests that the CH4 emission upon spring thaw in the high latitudes might be enhanced by the projected climate warming. These findings indicate that the spring thawing effect is an important mechanism in the permafrost carbon climate feedback and needs to be incorporated in Earth system models.

  11. Photon emission within the linear sigma model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Wunderlich; B. Kampfer

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Soft-photon emission rates are calculated within the linear sigma model. The investigation is aimed at answering the question to which extent the emissivities map out the phase structure of this particular effective model of strongly interacting matter.

  12. Dust Emission from the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Schnee; J. Li; A. A. Goodman; A. I. Sargent

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Using far-infrared emission maps taken by IRAS and Spitzer and a near-infrared extinction map derived from 2MASS data, we have made dust temperature and column density maps of the Perseus molecular cloud. We show that the emission from transiently heated very small grains and the big grain dust emissivity vary as a function of extinction and dust temperature, with higher dust emissivities for colder grains. This variable emissivity can not be explained by temperature gradients along the line of sight or by noise in the emission maps, but is consistent with grain growth in the higher density and lower temperature regions. By accounting for the variations in the dust emissivity and VSG emission, we are able to map the temperature and column density of a nearby molecular cloud with better accuracy than has previously been possible.

  13. ASSESSMENT OF BUILDING LIFECYLE CARBON EMISSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwok, George

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Even though the Carbon Capture & Sequestration Technologies (CC & ST) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology initiated carbon emission research in late 1990s (CSI, 2013), carbon emissions has only become a hot topic in the last decade...

  14. Quantifying avoided emissions from renewable generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Gabriel R. (Gabriel Rodriguez)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantifying the reduced emissions due to renewable power integration and providing increasingly accurate emissions analysis has become more important for policy makers in the age of renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and ...

  15. Global Mortality Attributable to Aircraft Cruise Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Britter, Rex E.

    Aircraft emissions impact human health though degradation of air quality. The majority of previous analyses of air quality impacts from aviation have considered only landing and takeoff emissions. We show that aircraft ...

  16. Smoke and Visible Emissions (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule establishes controls on smoke and visible emissions from certain sources.  This rule is not intended to preempt any more stringent controls on smoke and visible emissions provided in any...

  17. Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General analysis, and public education in global environmental change. It seeks to provide leadership;1 Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General Equilibrium

  18. Uncertainty in emissions projections for climate models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Mort David.; Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Mayer, Monika.; Reilly, John M.; Harnisch, Jochen.; Hyman, Robert C.; Sarofim, Marcus C.; Wang, Chien.

    Future global climate projections are subject to large uncertainties. Major sources of this uncertainty are projections of anthropogenic emissions. We evaluate the uncertainty in future anthropogenic emissions using a ...

  19. Absolute vs. intensity-based emission caps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny.

    Cap-and-trade systems limit emissions to some pre-specified absolute quantity. Intensity-based limits, that restrict emissions to some pre-specified rate relative to input or output, are much more widely used in environmental ...

  20. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act requires the Department of the Environment to publish and update an inventory of statewide greenhouse gas emissions for calendar year 2006 and requires...

  1. NUMBER OF CLINICAL HOURS IN THE NURSING PROGRAMS AND NATIONAL COUNCIL LICENSURE EXAMINATION FOR REGISTERED NURSES (NCLEX-RN) PASSING RATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longabach, Tanya

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    NUMBER OF CLINICAL HOURS IN THE NURSING PROGRAMS AND NATIONAL COUNCIL LICENSURE EXAMINATION FOR REGISTERED NURSES (NCLEX-RN) PASSING RATE By Tanya Longabach Submitted to the Department of Psychology and Research in Education... of the following thesis: NUMBER OF CLINICAL HOURS IN THE NURSING PROGRAMS AND NATIONAL COUNCIL LICENSURE EXAMINATION FOR REGISTERED NURSES (NCLEX-RN) PASSING RATE ________________________________ Vicki Peyton, Ph. D. Chairperson...

  2. Online Training Now Available -We are proud to offer EPA Accredited Lead-Safe Work Practices training online, which can take the place of the 6 hour classroom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    Online Training Now Available - We are proud to offer EPA Accredited Lead-Safe Work Practices training online, which can take the place of the 6 hour classroom instruction for the Lead RRP certification. Please note that a two hour hands-on training session is still required before you can obtain

  3. The high energy emission from black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. D. Caballero-Garcia; J. M. Miller; E. Kuulkers

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of the high energy emission (X-rays and gamma-rays) from black holes is still a matter of debate. We present new evidence that hard X-ray emission in the low/hard state may not be dominated by thermal Comptonization. We present an alternative scenario for the origin of the high energy emission that is well suited to explain the high energy emission from GRO J1655-40.

  4. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced Technologies Effects of Advanced Combustion Technologies on...

  5. Effects of Biodiesel on NOx Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A presentation about the effects of biodiesel on nitrogen oxide emissions presented at the ARB Biodiesel Workshop June 8, 2005.

  6. TEMPORAL VARIATION OF LFG EMISSION FROM DIFFERENT TYPES OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ). This reduction of the landfill gas (LFG) emissions requires the ability to measure low methane emissions methane emissions were observed only near the landfill gas

  7. Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction...

  8. Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Technology and Regulations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Technology and Regulations Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Technology and Regulations 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction...

  9. Thermal Efficiency Improvement While Meeting Emissions of 2007...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Improvement While Meeting Emissions of 2007, 2010 and Beyond Thermal Efficiency Improvement While Meeting Emissions of 2007, 2010 and Beyond 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  10. Retrofit Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Retrofit Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl Retrofit Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

  11. Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the Northeast Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the Northeast 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  12. Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

  13. The Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study Moving Forward with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Moving Forward with Assessing the Emissions and Health Effects of New Diesel Technology The Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study Moving Forward with Assessing the Emissions and...

  14. Design of Integrated Laboratory and Heavy-Duty Emissions Testing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Integrated Laboratory and Heavy-Duty Emissions Testing Center Design of Integrated Laboratory and Heavy-Duty Emissions Testing Center Both simulated and actual diesel emissions...

  15. An Automobile/Transit Emissions Evaluation of Southern California's Metrolink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Matthew J.; Tadi, Ramakrishna R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    percentile) Finn| Report: An Automobile~Transit EmissionsAn Automobile/Transit Emissions Evaluation of Southernregulation. or An Automobile/Transit Emissions Evaluation of

  16. Emissions Trading, Electricity Industry Restructuring, and Investment in Pollution Abatement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowlie, Meredith

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Foss, B . "Carbon Emissions Trading is New Weapon to BattleBehavior and the Emission Trading Market, Resources andof Sulfur Dioxide Emissions Trading." The Journal of

  17. Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT? Emission Control System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT Emission Control System for NOx and PM Emission Reduction in Retrofit Applications Part 1 Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT Emission...

  18. Diesel and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of Atmosphere...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of Atmosphere Composition and Health Responses to Inhaled Emissions Diesel and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of...

  19. Impact of Real-World Driving Characteristics on Vehicular Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NESAMANI, K.S.; SUBRAMANIAN, K.P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. and Mohan, M. , Emission Estimates and Trends (1990-Evo]ving Motor Nehicle Emission Modeling, Tlransportation P]Testing Automotive Exhaust Emission, Society of Automobile

  20. Consumption-based accounting of CO2 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, S. J; Caldeira, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in trade (EET) and therefore equals emissions embodied inexports (EEE) less emissions embodied in imports (EEI).re?ects the net export of emissions and a negative value