Sample records for hourly co2 nox

  1. Quantification of Variability and Uncertainty in Hourly NOx Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    to quantify variability and uncertainty for NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants. Data for hourly NOx Uncertainty, Variability, Emission Factors, Coal-Fired Power Plants, NOx emissions, Regression Models for different source categories, NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants are analyzed in this #12;2 paper

  2. NOVEL DATA ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE TO EVALUATE FIELD NOx AND CO2 CONTINUOUS EMISSION DATA, BASED ON THE EVALUATION OF: (1) AN OFF-ROAD DIESEL COMPACTOR RUNNING ON THREE FUEL TYPES AND (2) TWO COMPACTORS RUNNING ON DIESEL FUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra, Sergio

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In spite of being few in number, off-road vehicles have a significant contribution to air pollutants such as NOx and CO2. Engine dynamometer test cycles have been developed in an effort to better characterize the emissions ...

  3. NOx Adsorber (Lean NOx Trap) Fundamentals (Agreement #10049 ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    technology operation. - Chemical mechanisms of NOx adsorption, desorption, and reduction for inclusion in CLEERS models - emphasis this year: effect of CO 2 and H 2 O on NOx...

  4. Flue Gas Perification Utilizing SOx/NOx Reactions During Compression of CO2 Derived from Oxyfuel Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Fogash

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States wishes to decrease foreign energy dependence by utilizing the country’s significant coal reserves, while stemming the effects of global warming from greenhouse gases. In response to these needs, Air Products has developed a patented process for the compression and purification of the CO2 stream from oxyfuel combustion of pulverized coal. The purpose of this project was the development and performance of a comprehensive experimental and engineering evaluation to determine the feasibility of purifying CO2 derived from the flue gas generated in a tangentially fired coal combustion unit operated in the oxy-combustion mode. Following the design and construction of a 15 bar reactor system, Air Products conducted two test campaigns using the slip stream from the tangentially fired oxy-coal combustion unit. During the first test campaign, Air Products evaluated the reactor performance based on both the liquid and gaseous reactor effluents. The data obtained from the test run has enabled Air Products to determine the reaction and mass transfer rates, as well as the effectiveness of the reactor system. During the second test campaign, Air Products evaluated reactor performance based on effluents for different reactor pressures, as well as water recycle rates. Analysis of the reaction equations indicates that both pressure and water flow rate affect the process reaction rates, as well as the overall reactor performance.

  5. Regulation, Allocation, and Leakage in Cap-and-Trade Markets for CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Jim B; Chen, Yihsu

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Philippe Quirion. Co2 abatement, competitiveness andDaniel Kahn. Allocation of co2 emissions al- lowances in theA short-run case analysis of co2 leakage and nox and so2

  6. Promotional effect of CO2 on desulfation processes for pre-sulfated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Promotional effect of CO2 on desulfation processes for pre-sulfated Pt BaOAl2O3 lean NOx trap catalysts. Promotional effect of CO2 on desulfation processes for pre-sulfated Pt...

  7. CO2 interaction with geomaterials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guthrie, George D. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Al-Saidi, Wissam A. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Jordan, Kenneth D. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Voora, Vamsee, K. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Romanov, Vyacheslav N. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Lopano, Christina L (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Myshakin, Eugene M. (URS Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA); Hur, Tae Bong (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Warzinski, Robert P. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Lynn, Ronald J. (URS Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA); Howard, Bret H. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work compares the sorption and swelling processes associated with CO2-coal and CO2-clay interactions. We investigated the mechanisms of interaction related to CO2 adsortion in micropores, intercalation into sub-micropores, dissolution in solid matrix, the role of water, and the associated changes in reservoir permeability, for applications in CO2 sequestration and enhanced coal bed methane recovery. The structural changes caused by CO2 have been investigated. A high-pressure micro-dilatometer was equipped to investigate the effect of CO2 pressure on the thermoplastic properties of coal. Using an identical dilatometer, Rashid Khan (1985) performed experiments with CO2 that revealed a dramatic reduction in the softening temperature of coal when exposed to high-pressure CO2. A set of experiments was designed for -20+45-mesh samples of Argonne Premium Pocahontas No.3 coal, which is similar in proximate and ultimate analysis to the Lower Kittanning seam coal that Khan used in his experiments. No dramatic decrease in coal softening temperature has been observed in high-pressure CO2 that would corroborate the prior work of Khan. Thus, conventional polymer (or 'geopolymer') theories may not be directly applicable to CO2 interaction with coals. Clays are similar to coals in that they represent abundant geomaterials with well-developed microporous structure. We evaluated the CO2 sequestration potential of clays relative to coals and investigated the factors that affect the sorption capacity, rates, and permanence of CO2 trapping. For the geomaterials comparison studies, we used source clay samples from The Clay Minerals Society. Preliminary results showed that expandable clays have CO2 sorption capacities comparable to those of coal. We analyzed sorption isotherms, XRD, DRIFTS (infrared reflectance spectra at non-ambient conditions), and TGA-MS (thermal gravimetric analysis) data to compare the effects of various factors on CO2 trapping. In montmorillonite, CO2 molecules may remain trapped for several months following several hours of exposure to high pressure (supercritical conditions), high temperature (above boiling point of water) or both. Such trapping is well preserved in either inert gas or the ambient environment and appears to eventually result in carbonate formation. We performed computer simulations of CO2 interaction with free cations (normal modes of CO2 and Na+CO2 were calculated using B3LYP / aug-cc-pVDZ and MP2 / aug-cc-pVDZ methods) and with clay structures containing interlayer cations (MD simulations with Clayff potentials for clay and a modified CO2 potential). Additionally, interaction of CO2 with hydrated Na-montmorillonite was studied using density functional theory with dispersion corrections. The sorption energies and the swelling behavior were investigated. Preliminary modeling results and experimental observations indicate that the presence of water molecules in the interlayer region is necessary for intercalation of CO2. Our preliminary conclusion is that CO2 molecules may intercalate into interlayer region of swelling clay and stay there via coordination to the interlayer cations.

  8. CO2 sequestration | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CO2 sequestration CO2 sequestration Leads No leads are available at this time. Low-Temperature Carbon Monoxide Oxidation Catalysed by Regenerable Atomically Dispersed Palladium on...

  9. Toward Verifying Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions with the CMAQ Model: Motivation, Model Description and Initial Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zhen; Bambha, Ray P.; Pinto, Joseph P.; Zeng, Tao; Boylan, Jim; Huang, Maoyi; Lei, Huimin; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Shishi; Mao, Jiafu; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Shi, Xiaoying; Wei, Yaxing; Michelsen, Hope A.

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the urgent need for emission verification of CO2 and other greenhouse gases, we have developed regional CO2 simulation with CMAQ over the contiguous U.S. Model sensitivity experiments have been performed using three different sets of inputs for net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and two fossil fuel emission inventories, to understand the roles of fossil fuel emissions, atmosphere-biosphere exchange and transport in regulating the spatial and diurnal variability of CO2 near the surface, and to characterize the well-known ‘signal-to-noise’ problem, i.e. the interference from the biosphere on the interpretation of atmospheric CO2 observations. It is found that differences in the meteorological conditions for different urban areas strongly contribute to the contrast in concentrations. The uncertainty of NEE, as measured by the difference among the three different NEE inputs, has notable impact on regional distribution of CO2 simulated by CMAQ. Larger NEE uncertainty and impact are found over eastern U.S. urban areas than along the western coast. A comparison with tower CO2 measurements at Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) shows that the CMAQ model using hourly varied and high-resolution CO2 emission from the Vulcan inventory and CarbonTracker optimized NEE reasonably reproduce the observed diurnal profile, whereas switching to different NEE inputs significantly degrades the model performance. Spatial distribution of CO2 is found to correlate with NOx, SO2 and CO, due to their similarity in emission sources and transport processes. These initial results from CMAQ demonstrate the power of a state-of-the art CTM in helping interpret CO2 observations and verify fossil fuel emissions. The ability to simulate CO2 in CMAQ will also facilitate investigations of the utility of traditionally regulated pollutants and other species as tracers to CO2 source attribution.

  10. BNL | CO2 Laser

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CO2 Laser The ATF is one of the only two facilities worldwide operating picosecond, terawatt-class CO2 lasers. Our laser system consists of a picoseconds pulse-injector based on...

  11. CO2.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STORAGE & ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY Objective R MOTC can play a signifi cant role in carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage and enhanced oil recovery technology development and fi eld...

  12. EMSL - CO2 sequestration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    co2-sequestration en Low-Temperature Carbon Monoxide Oxidation Catalysed by Regenerable Atomically Dispersed Palladium on Alumina. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

  13. amine methanol, ether . Amine amine CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    IP [2012] 7 C O 2 (CO2) . CO2 amine methanol, ether . Amine amine CO2 CO2 .Amine CO2 (functional group) amine amine+ +promoter .Amine CO2 CO2 . . , methanol ether methanol, ether promoter CO2 CO2 H2S, COS CO2 . Methanol rectisol process, di-methylene ether polypropylene glycol selexol (-30oC) . CO2

  14. Method for reducing CO2, CO, NOX, and SOx emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu (Oak Ridge, TN); Li, Rongfu (Zhejiang, CH)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial combustion facilities are integrated with greenhouse gas-solidifying fertilizer production reactions so that CO.sub.2, CO, NO.sub.x, and SO.sub.x emissions can be converted prior to emission into carbonate-containing fertilizers, mainly NH.sub.4 HCO.sub.3 and/or (NH.sub.2).sub.2 CO, plus a small fraction of NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3 and (NH.sub.4).sub.2 SO.sub.4. The invention enhances sequestration of CO.sub.2 into soil and the earth subsurface, reduces N0.sub.3.sup.- contamination of surface and groundwater, and stimulates photosynthetic fixation of CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere. The method for converting CO.sub.2, CO, NO.sub.x, and SO.sub.x emissions into fertilizers includes the step of collecting these materials from the emissions of industrial combustion facilities such as fossil fuel-powered energy sources and transporting the emissions to a reactor. In the reactor, the CO.sub.2, CO, N.sub.2, SO.sub.x, and/or NO.sub.x are converted into carbonate-containing fertilizers using H.sub.2, CH.sub.4, or NH.sub.3. The carbonate-containing fertilizers are then applied to soil and green plants to (1) sequester inorganic carbon into soil and subsoil earth layers by enhanced carbonation of groundwater and the earth minerals, (2) reduce the environmental problem of NO.sub.3.sup.- runoff by substituting for ammonium nitrate fertilizer, and (3) stimulate photosynthetic fixation of CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere by the fertilization effect of the carbonate-containing fertilizers.

  15. his report summarizes the results of an analysis of CO2 production from the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    produced about 520 pounds of CO2 for each megawatt-hour of electricity generated, com- pared to 900 pounds for the Northwest to maintain or reduce its average per-megawatt-hour CO2 emission rate. In the base case of this study, which assumes implementation of the Council's Fifth Power Plan, the WECC CO2 emission rate

  16. NOx Adsorber (Lean NOx Trap) Fundamentals (Agreement #10049 ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Lean NOx Trap) Fundamentals (Agreement 10049 - PNNL Project 47120) NOx Adsorber (Lean NOx Trap) Fundamentals (Agreement 10049 - PNNL Project 47120) Presentation from the U.S....

  17. Developing the Fuels of the Future Road transport accounts for 21% of the CO2 emissions of the UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing the Fuels of the Future ·Road transport accounts for 21% of the CO2 emissions of the UK required to develop new fuels, reducing NOx, CO2, unburned hydrocarbons and particulates. All new secondary Where : ·One of the most important properties of a fuel. Affects many aspects of combustion. ·Defined

  18. Equilibrium and transport properties of CO2+N2O and CO2+NO mixtures. A molecular simulation and equation of state modelling study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    viscosities were determined for CO2+NOx mixtures. Due to the strong similarities between carbon dioxide simulation; Equation of state. 1. Introduction In Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) operations to a pure carbon dioxide. This may have impacts on the different stages of the CCS chain: capture

  19. Co2 geological sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu

    2004-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Human activities are increasingly altering the Earth's climate. A particular concern is that atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) may be rising fast because of increased industrialization. CO{sub 2} is a so-called ''greenhouse gas'' that traps infrared radiation and may contribute to global warming. Scientists project that greenhouse gases such as CO{sub 2} will make the arctic warmer, which would melt glaciers and raise sea levels. Evidence suggests that climate change may already have begun to affect ecosystems and wildlife around the world. Some animal species are moving from one habitat to another to adapt to warmer temperatures. Future warming is likely to exceed the ability of many species to migrate or adjust. Human production of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuels (such as at coal-fired power plants) is not likely to slow down soon. It is urgent to find somewhere besides the atmosphere to put these increased levels of CO{sub 2}. Sequestration in the ocean and in soils and forests are possibilities, but another option, sequestration in geological formations, may also be an important solution. Such formations could include depleted oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and deep saline aquifers. In many cases, injection of CO2 into a geological formation can enhance the recovery of hydrocarbons, providing value-added byproducts that can offset the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Before CO{sub 2} gas can be sequestered from power plants and other point sources, it must be captured. CO{sub 2} is also routinely separated and captured as a by-product from industrial processes such as synthetic ammonia production, H{sub 2} production, and limestone calcination. Then CO{sub 2} must be compressed into liquid form and transported to the geological sequestration site. Many power plants and other large emitters of CO{sub 2} are located near geological formations that are amenable to CO{sub 2} sequestration.

  20. CO2 Sequestration short course

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePaolo, Donald J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Cole, David R [The Ohio State University; Navrotsky, Alexandra [University of California-Davis; Bourg, Ian C [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the public’s interest and concern over the impact of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) on global warming and related climate change patterns, the course is a timely discussion of the underlying geochemical and mineralogical processes associated with gas-water-mineral-interactions encountered during geological sequestration of CO2. The geochemical and mineralogical processes encountered in the subsurface during storage of CO2 will play an important role in facilitating the isolation of anthropogenic CO2 in the subsurface for thousands of years, thus moderating rapid increases in concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and mitigating global warming. Successful implementation of a variety of geological sequestration scenarios will be dependent on our ability to accurately predict, monitor and verify the behavior of CO2 in the subsurface. The course was proposed to and accepted by the Mineralogical Society of America (MSA) and The Geochemical Society (GS).

  1. Low NOx combustion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Hisashi (Putnam Valley, NY); Bool, III, Lawrence E. (Aurora, NY)

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustion of hydrocarbon liquids and solids is achieved with less formation of NOx by feeding a small amount of oxygen into the fuel stream.

  2. Low NOx combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi; Hisashi (Putnam Valley, NY), Bool, III; Lawrence E. (Aurora, NY)

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustion of hydrocarbon liquids and solids is achieved with less formation of NOx by feeding a small amount of oxygen into the fuel stream.

  3. NOx Sensor Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and advanced testing facilities. - EmiSense LLC: licensed LLNL NOx technology and CRADA partners for continued development. Relevance - If 33% of U.S. drivers switched to...

  4. An Investigation of CO2 Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    An Investigation of CO2 Sequestration through Mineralization Conference on Sustainable Construction area and increased availability of CO2 for rapid carbonation. The hardened and carbonated materials Slag #12;Carbonation Chemistry Dissolution of CO2 in water. CO2(g) CO2(aq) Formation of carbonic acid

  5. Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels - Diesel Emissions Project (APBF-DEC): 2,000-Hour Performance of a NOx Adsorber Catalyst and Diesel Particle Filter System for a Medium-Duty, Pick-Up Diesel Engine Platform; Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presents the results of a 2,000-hour test of an emissions control system consisting of a nitrogen oxides adsorber catalyst in combination with a diesel particle filter, advanced fuels, and advanced engine controls in an SUV/pick-up truck vehicle platform.

  6. Surface CO2 leakage during the first shallow subsurface CO2 release experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, J.L.; Oldenburg, C.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    numbered 0-6. Plots of F CO2 measured along the surface wellin Figure 2. Figure 2. Log F CO2 maps for measurements madeof soil CO 2 flux (F CO2 ). The surface leakage onset,

  7. Predicting CO2-water interfacial tension under pressure and temperature conditions of geologic CO2 storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, L.C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E EPM2- TIP4P2005 PPL- TIP4P2005 Predicted (f) a P ? CO2 2SE? CO2 2SE? CO2 2SE ? CO2 2SE ? CO2 2SE ? CO2 2SE a Surface excess CO

  8. 8, 73737389, 2008 Scientists' CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 7373­7389, 2008 Scientists' CO2 emissions A. Stohl Title Page Abstract Introduction Publications on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 7373 #12;ACPD 8, 7373­7389, 2008 Scientists' CO2 substantial emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2). In this pa- per, the CO2 emissions of the employees working

  9. 6, 1092910958, 2006 Regional scale CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 10929­10958, 2006 Regional scale CO2 flux estimation using radon A. I. Hirsch Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions On using radon-222 and CO2 to calculate regional-scale CO2 fluxes A. I (Adam.Hirsch@noaa.gov) 10929 #12;ACPD 6, 10929­10958, 2006 Regional scale CO2 flux estimation using

  10. Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and airsea CO2 fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and air­sea CO2 fluxes in the northern for the estimation of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and air­sea CO2 fluxes in the northern South), respectively, the monthly pCO2 fields were computed. The derived pCO2 was compared with the shipboard pCO2

  11. MODELING AND CONTROL OF A O2/CO2 GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foss, Bjarne A.

    MODELING AND CONTROL OF A O2/CO2 GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE Lars Imsland Dagfinn Snarheim and control of a semi-closed O2/CO2 gas turbine cycle for CO2 capture. In the first part the process predictive control, Gas turbines, CO2 capture 1. INTRODUCTION Gas turbines are widely used for power

  12. CLEERS Activities: Diesel Soot Filter Characterization & NOx...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activities: Diesel Soot Filter Characterization & NOx Control Fundamentals CLEERS Activities: Diesel Soot Filter Characterization & NOx Control Fundamentals 2009 DOE Hydrogen...

  13. ATMOSPHERIC CO2 A GLOBAL LIMITING RESOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    Carbondioxideatmosphericburden,PgC Land use Fossil CO2 from land use emissions ­ not fossil fuel combustion ­ was the dominant CO2 Comparison of CO2 mixing ratio from fossil fuel combustion and land use changes 400 380 360 340 cores 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 Forcing,Wm -2 #12;ATMOSPHERIC CO2 EMISSIONS Time series 1700

  14. 5, 33133340, 2005 SCIAMACHY CO2 and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 5, 3313­3340, 2005 SCIAMACHY CO2 and aerosols S. Houweling et al. Title Page Abstract Evidence of systematic errors in SCIAMACHY-observed CO2 due to aerosols S. Houweling 1,2 , W. Hartmann 1 Commons License. 3313 #12;ACPD 5, 3313­3340, 2005 SCIAMACHY CO2 and aerosols S. Houweling et al. Title

  15. Samenvatting CO2 is het meest belangrijke broeikasgas. The concentratie van CO2 in de atmosfeer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van den Brink, Jeroen

    Samenvatting CO2 is het meest belangrijke broeikasgas. The concentratie van CO2 in de atmosfeer brandstoffen en veranderingen in landgebruik. Toenemende concentraties van CO2 in de atmosfeer zullen naar toename van CO2 in de atmosfeer op de dynamiek van de microbiële gemeenschap in de directe omgeving van de

  16. MAC-Kaust Project P1 CO2 Sequestration Modeling of CO2 sequestration including parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turova, Varvara

    MAC-Kaust Project P1 ­ CO2 Sequestration Modeling of CO2 sequestration including parameter identification and numerical simulation M. Brokate, O. A. PykhteevHysteresis aspects of CO2 sequestration modeling K-H. Hoffmann, N. D. Botkin Objectives and methods of CO2 sequestration There is a popular belief

  17. How secure is CO2 storage? Leakage mechanisms of natural CO2 reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How secure is CO2 storage? Leakage mechanisms of natural CO2 reservoirs Johannes Miocic, Stuart. The goal of CCS is to store carbon dioxide (CO2) in the subsurface for a long period of time (>10,000 yr).1 It is important that the stored CO2 does not leak from the reservoir to the surface . 3. Faults as leakage

  18. Surface controls on the characteristics of natural CO2 seeps: implications for engineered CO2 stores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    of the CO2 seeps is most strongly governed by the flow properties of the outcropping rocks, and local emerge where valleys erode into CO2 aquifers, and these are typically high flux seeps. Seep type is knownSurface controls on the characteristics of natural CO2 seeps: implications for engineered CO2

  19. Isothermal desulfation of pre-sulfated Pt-BaO/?-Al2O3 lean NOx...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NOx trap catalysts with H2: the effect of H2 concentration and the roles of CO2 and H2O."Applied Catalysis. B, Environmental 111-112(1):342-348. doi:10.1016j.apcatb.2011.10.017...

  20. A PILOT STUDY OF THE ACCURACY OF CO2 SENSORS IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William; Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors are often deployed in commercial buildings to obtain CO2 data that are used to automatically modulate rates of outdoor air supply. The goal is to keep ventilation rates at or above design requirements and to save energy by avoiding ventilation rates exceeding design requirements. However, there have been many anecdotal reports of poor CO2 sensor performance in actual commercial building applications. This study evaluated the accuracy of 44 CO2 sensors located in nine commercial buildings to determine if CO2 sensor performance, in practice, is generally acceptable or problematic. CO2 measurement errors varied widely and were sometimes hundreds of parts per million. Despite its small size, this study provides a strong indication that the accuracy of CO2 sensors, as they are applied and maintained in commercial buildings, is frequently less than needed to measure typical values of maximum one-hour-average indoor-outdoor CO2 concentration differences with less than a 20percent error. Thus, we conclude that there is a need for more accurate CO2 sensors and/or better sensor maintenance or calibration procedures.

  1. Modeling of CO2 storage in aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    santos,,,

    Feb 6, 2011 ... atmosphere, increasing its temperature (greenhouse effect). To minimize climate change impacts, geological sequestration of CO2 is an ...

  2. QGESS: CO2 Impurity Design Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    limits Component Unit (Max unless Otherwise noted) Carbon Steel Pipeline Enhanced Oil Recovery Saline Reservoir Sequestration Saline Reservoir CO 2 & H 2 S Co- sequestration...

  3. The supply chain of CO2 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, S. J; Peters, G. P; Caldeira, K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    emissions from traded fossil fuels; Top), production (F Pr )Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO 2 Emissions (Carbonfrom the burning of fossil fuels are conventionally

  4. Leadership in Low NOx/ Lochinvar Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheko, D.; Boston, S.; Moore, J.

    , Texas Nashville, Tennessee On April 19, 2000, the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission adopted statewide NOx emission limits for all natural gas-fired water heaters, boilers and process heaters with input rates of 2 million Btu/hr or less... for the purposes of generating efficient boilers, and process heaters having a BTU rating of up and environmentally friendly hot water production. to 2,000,000 BTU/hour within the state of Texas. Some readers of this paper may already be aware It's not everyday...

  5. NOx Abatement Research and Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Work * Identify factors limiting NOx conversion during low temperature operation with CO and hydrocarbon (HC) reductants - Goal is to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of...

  6. Capturing CO2 from Air Anca Timofte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    emissions through renewable fuels · Storage of fluctuating renewable energies · Short-term: Substitute concentrated CO2 from atmospheric air Renewable energy source for Climeworks and subsequent fuel synthesis in Greenhouses Beverage Carbonation CO2 Supply for Renewable Fuel Synthesis #12;5 Climeworks plant delivers

  7. Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage Jason Heinrich Working Paper Laboratory for Energy the deployment of CO2 storage technologies used in the marine environment. This paper will address some of the legal issues involved in ocean storage of carbon dioxide from a US perspective. The following paragraphs

  8. 2, 711743, 2006 Glacial CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CO2 change: a simple "hypsometric effect" on deep-ocean carbon sequestration? L. C. Skinner Godwin carbon sequestration, this mechanism may help to significantly reduce the "deficit" of explained glacialCPD 2, 711­743, 2006 Glacial CO2 sequestration L. C. Skinner Title Page Abstract Introduction

  9. Capturing CO2 via reactions in nanopores.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Kevin; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Tang, Z [University of Cincinnati; Dong, J. H. [University of Cincinnati

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This one-year exploratory LDRD aims to provide fundamental understanding of the mechanism of CO2 scrubbing platforms that will reduce green house gas emission and mitigate the effect of climate change. The project builds on the team member's expertise developed in previous LDRD projects to study the capture or preferential retention of CO2 in nanoporous membranes and on metal oxide surfaces. We apply Density Functional Theory and ab initio molecular dynamics techniques to model the binding of CO2 on MgO and CaO (100) surfaces and inside water-filled, amine group functionalized silica nanopores. The results elucidate the mechanisms of CO2 trapping and clarify some confusion in the literature. Our work identifies key future calculations that will have the greatest impact on CO2 capture technologies, and provides guidance to science-based design of platforms that can separate the green house gas CO2 from power plant exhaust or even from the atmosphere. Experimentally, we modify commercial MFI zeolite membranes and find that they preferentially transmit H2 over CO2 by a factor of 34. Since zeolite has potential catalytic capability to crack hydrocarbons into CO2 and H2, this finding paves the way for zeolite membranes that can convert biofuel into H2 and separate the products all in one step.

  10. 4, 23852405, 2007 CO2 and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 4, 2385­2405, 2007 CO2 and climate affect European carbon ballance R. Harrison and C. Jones Competing roles of rising CO2 and climate change in the contemporary European carbon balance R. Harrison and C. Jones Met Office, Hadley Centre for Climate Change, Exeter, EX1 3PB, UK Received: 13 April 2007

  11. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry Cordatos

    2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Overview of an ongoing, 2 year research project partially funded by APRA-E to create a novel, synthetic analogue of carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it into a membrane for removal of CO2 from flue gas in coal power plants. Mechanism background, preliminary feasibility study results, molecular modeling of analogue-CO2 interaction, and program timeline are provided.

  12. Prospects for Subsurface CO2 Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Prospects for Subsurface CO2 Sequestration Abbas Firoozabadi and Philip Cheng Dept. of Chemical in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). Keywords: CO2 sequestration, mixing, diffusion coal in the future. Coal has a high carbon to hydrogen ratio while natural gas, the premium fuel

  13. Study of CO2 Mobility Control in Heterogeneous Media Using CO2 Thickening Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Yousef, Zuhair

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2 injection is an effective method for performing enhanced oil recovery (EOR). There are several factors that make CO2 useful for EOR, including promoting swelling, reducing oil viscosity, decreasing oil density, and vaporizing and extracting...

  14. Dynamics of CO2 fluxes and concentrations during a shallow subsurface CO2 release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field facility located in Bozeman, Montana provides the opportunity to test methods to detect, locate, and quantify potential CO2 leakage from geologic storage sites. From 9 July to 7 August 2008, 0.3 t CO2 d{sup -1} were injected from a 100-m long, {approx}2.5 m deep horizontal well. Repeated measurements of soil CO2 fluxes on a grid characterized the spatio-temporal evolution of the surface leakage signal and quantified the surface leakage rate. Infrared CO2 concentration sensors installed in the soil at 30 cm depth at 0 to 10 m from the well and at 4 cm above the ground at 0 and 5 m from the well recorded surface breakthrough of CO2 leakage and migration of CO2 leakage through the soil. Temporal variations in CO2 concentrations were correlated with atmospheric and soil temperature, wind speed, atmospheric pressure, rainfall, and CO2 injection rate.

  15. Sustainable Carbon Sequestration: Increasing CO2-Storage Efficiency through a CO2-Brine Displacement Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akinnikawe, Oyewande

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2 sequestration is one of the proposed methods for reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and therefore mitigating global climate change. Few studies on storing CO2 in an aquifer have been conducted on a regional scale. This study...

  16. Sustainable Carbon Sequestration: Increasing CO2-Storage Efficiency through a CO2-Brine Displacement Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akinnikawe, Oyewande

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2 sequestration is one of the proposed methods for reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and therefore mitigating global climate change. Few studies on storing CO2 in an aquifer have been conducted on a regional scale. This study...

  17. Measurement and Characterization of NOx Adsorber Regeneration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NOx Adsorber Regeneration and Desulfation Measurement and Characterization of NOx Adsorber Regeneration and Desulfation 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Oak Ridge National...

  18. Proceedings: 2000 NOx Controls Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2000 EPRI workshop on nitrogen oxide (NOx) controls for utility boilers provided a medium for member utilities to augment their knowledge of recent operating experience and developments on NOx control technologies. The event focused on improving methods of compliance with emission regulations mandated by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 without jeopardizing efficiency and plant performance.

  19. Interpreting Remote Sensing NOx Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Interpreting Remote Sensing NOx Measurements Robert Slott, Consultant, Donald Stedman and Saj tailpipe emissions (HC, CO, NOx) are changing with time hUse remote sensing hMeasurements in at least 4 of the year at each location hUniform QC/QA and data reporting Paper # 2001-01-3640 #12;Remote Sensing

  20. Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: SO2, Nox, CO2

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report responds to a request received from Senator David McIntosh on June 29, 2000 to analyze the impacts on energy consumers and producers of coordinated strategies to reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide at U.S. power plants.

  1. Propane-Diesel Dual Fuel for CO2 and Nox Reduction | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+ ReportEnergy National SolarPublicationsofDepartment

  2. co2 capture | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Dates: June 23-26, 2015 Registration Fee: 360.00 Venue: 300 West Station Square Drive Pittsburgh, PA 15219-1122 Phone: (412)261-2000...

  3. Version 3.0 SOP 4 --p(CO2) October 12, 2007 (p(CO2))

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Version 3.0 SOP 4 -- p(CO2) October 12, 2007 91 SOP 4 (p(CO2)) - 1. . microatmospheres . (20°C 250-2000 µatm) (mole fraction) . 2. CO2 (mole fraction) . 2 2(CO ) (CO( ) . . Frit . #12;October 12, 2007 SOP 4 -- p(CO2) Version 3.0 92 CO2 CO2 2 . p(CO2) (1) . 4. 3

  4. Atmospheric CO2 concentrations during ancient greenhouse climates were similar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations during ancient greenhouse climates were similar to those predicted atmospheric CO2 concentrations (½CO2atm) during Earth's ancient greenhouse episodes is essential for accurately predicting the response of future climate to elevated CO2 levels. Empirical estimates of ½CO2atm

  5. Hopewell Beneficial CO2 Capture for Production of Fuels, Fertilizer and Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    UOP; Honeywell Resins & Chemicals; Honeywell Process Solutions; Aquaflow Bionomics Ltd

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    For Phase 1 of this project, the Hopewell team developed a detailed design for the Small Scale Pilot-Scale Algal CO2 Sequestration System. This pilot consisted of six (6) x 135 gallon cultivation tanks including systems for CO2 delivery and control, algal cultivation, and algal harvesting. A feed tank supplied Hopewell wastewater to the tanks and a receiver tank collected the effluent from the algal cultivation system. The effect of environmental parameters and nutrient loading on CO2 uptake and sequestration into biomass were determined. Additionally the cost of capturing CO2 from an industrial stack emission at both pilot and full-scale was determined. The engineering estimate evaluated Amine Guard technology for capture of pure CO2 and direct stack gas capture and compression. The study concluded that Amine Guard technology has lower lifecycle cost at commercial scale, although the cost of direct stack gas capture is lower at the pilot scale. Experiments conducted under high concentrations of dissolved CO2 did not demonstrate enhanced algae growth rate. This result suggests that the dissolved CO2 concentration at neutral pH was already above the limiting value. Even though dissolved CO2 did not show a positive effect on biomass growth, controlling its value at a constant set-point during daylight hours can be beneficial in an algae cultivation stage with high algae biomass concentration to maximize the rate of CO2 uptake. The limited enhancement of algal growth by CO2 addition to Hopewell wastewater was due at least in part to the high endogenous CO2 evolution from bacterial degradation of dissolved organic carbon present at high levels in the wastewater. It was found that the high level of bacterial activity was somewhat inhibitory to algal growth in the Hopewell wastewater. The project demonstrated that the Honeywell automation and control system, in combination with the accuracy of the online pH, dissolved O2, dissolved CO2, turbidity, Chlorophyll A and conductivity sensors is suitable for process control of algae cultivation in an open pond systems. This project concluded that the Hopewell wastewater is very suitable for algal cultivation but the potential for significant CO2 sequestration from the plant stack gas emissions was minimal due to the high endogenous CO2 generation in the wastewater from the organic wastewater content. Algae cultivation was found to be promising, however, for nitrogen remediation in the Hopewell wastewater.

  6. Growth, CO2 Consumption, and H2 Production of Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413-U under Different Irradiances and CO2 Concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berberoglu, Halil; Barra, Natasha; Pilon, Laurent; Jay, Jenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase Medium Irradiance ? H2 ? CO2 Maximum Reported Ratesa) Specific CO 2 uptake rate, ? CO2 (kg CO 2 /kg dry cell/h)

  7. Selection of coals of different maturities for CO2 Storage by modelling of CH4 and CO2 adsorption isotherms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    rue de la Férollerie, 45072 Orléans Cedex, France Abstract CO2 injection in unmineable coal seams capacities on various coals for the future modelling of CO2 injection in coal seams. Keywords: CO2 storage is estimated from 3 up to 200 GtCO2 therefore CO2 storage in coal seams is one of the potential types

  8. System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Geologic Storage of CO2, in Carbon Dioxide Capture forFormations - Results from the CO2 Capture Project: GeologicBenson, Process Modeling of CO2 Injection into Natural Gas

  9. Satellite remote sounding of mid-tropospheric CO 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Y. L. Yung (2006), CO 2 in the upper troposphere:derivatives with application to CO 2 , Geophys. Res. Lett. ,feasibility of monitoring CO 2 from high-resolution infrared

  10. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WITH SITE SCREENING AND SELECTION FOR CO 2 STORAGE D. A.77 ASSESSING AND EXPANDING CO 2 STORAGE CAPACITY IN DEPLETEDFOR CO 2 GEOLOGICAL STORAGE IN CENTRAL COAL BASIN (NORTHERN

  11. Measurement and Characterization of Lean NOx Adsorber Regeneration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lean NOx Adsorber Regeneration and Desulfation and Controlling NOx from Multi-mode Measurement and Characterization of Lean NOx Adsorber Regeneration and Desulfation and...

  12. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONSTRAIN CO2 INJECTION FEASIBILITY: TEAPOT DOME EOR PILOTEOR, and coupled process modeling will investigate the total system including preliminary estimates of CO2

  13. abiotic co2 flows: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into the potential behavior and the operational parameters of CO2 sequestration at CO2-EOR s... Dai, Zhenxue; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna; Middleton, Richard; Pan, Feng; Jia,...

  14. af co2 fra: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into the potential behavior and the operational parameters of CO2 sequestration at CO2-EOR s... Dai, Zhenxue; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna; Middleton, Richard; Pan, Feng; Jia,...

  15. Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadharajan, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F Monitoring studies above EOR-CO2 fields Weyburn-MidaleTexas •? Over 30 years of CO2-EOR •? Sampled outside of

  16. Modeling CO2 Sequestration in a Saline Reservoir and Depleted...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling CO 2 Sequestration in a Saline Reservoir and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate The Regional CO 2 Sequestration Potential of The Ozark Plateau Aquifer System,...

  17. Reaction of Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2 with Forsterite...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2 with Forsterite: Evidence for Magnesite Formation at Low Temperatures. Reaction of Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2 with Forsterite: Evidence for...

  18. Exsolution Enhanced Oil Recovery with Concurrent CO2 Sequestration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exsolution Enhanced Oil Recovery with Concurrent CO2 Sequestration. Exsolution Enhanced Oil Recovery with Concurrent CO2 Sequestration. Abstract: A novel EOR method using...

  19. Cryogenic CO2 Formation on Oxidized Gold Clusters Synthesized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cryogenic CO2 Formation on Oxidized Gold Clusters Synthesized via Reactive Layer Assisted Deposition. Cryogenic CO2 Formation on Oxidized Gold Clusters Synthesized via Reactive...

  20. From CO2 to Methanol via Novel Nanocatalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From CO2 to Methanol via Novel Nanocatalysts Print Researchers have found novel nanocatalysts that lower the barrier to converting carbon dioxide (CO2)-an abundant greenhouse...

  1. Geologic CO2 sequestration inhibits microbial growth | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    community and could improve overall efficiency of CO2 sequestration. The Science Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in deep subsurface environments has received...

  2. numerical methodology to model and monitor co2 sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    santos,,,

    CO2 sequestration is a means of mitigating the greenhouse effect [1]. Geologic sequestration involves injecting CO2 into a target geologic formation at depths ...

  3. Variations in 13 C discrimination during CO2 exchange by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as to differential diffusivities of 13 CO2 and 12 CO2 in air (Farquhar, O'Leary & Berry 1982; O'Leary 1984

  4. 10 MW Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, Craig

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test project was to demonstrate the inherent efficiencies of a supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) power turbine and associated turbomachinery under conditions and at a scale relevant to commercial concentrating solar power (CSP) projects, thereby accelerating the commercial deployment of this new power generation technology. The project involved eight partnering organizations: NREL, Sandia National Laboratories, Echogen Power Systems, Abengoa Solar, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Electric Power Research Institute, Barber-Nichols, and the CSP Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The multi-year project planned to design, fabricate, and validate an s-CO2 power turbine of nominally 10 MWe that is capable of operation at up to 700°C and operates in a dry-cooled test loop. The project plan consisted of three phases: (1) system design and modeling, (2) fabrication, and (3) testing. The major accomplishments of Phase 1 included: Design of a multistage, axial-flow, s-CO2 power turbine; Design modifications to an existing turbocompressor to provide s-CO2 flow for the test system; Updated equipment and installation costs for the turbomachinery and associated support infrastructure; Development of simulation tools for the test loop itself and for more efficient cycle designs that are of greater commercial interest; Simulation of s-CO2 power cycle integration into molten-nitrate-salt CSP systems indicating a cost benefit of up to 8% in levelized cost of energy; Identification of recuperator cost as a key economic parameter; Corrosion data for multiple alloys at temperatures up to 650ºC in high-pressure CO2 and recommendations for materials-of-construction; and Revised test plan and preliminary operating conditions based on the ongoing tests of related equipment. Phase 1 established that the cost of the facility needed to test the power turbine at its full power and temperature would exceed the planned funding for Phases 2 and 3. Late in Phase 1 an opportunity arose to collaborate with another turbine-development team to construct a shared s-CO2 test facility. The synergy of the combined effort would result in greater facility capabilities than either separate project could produce and would allow for testing of both turbine designs within the combined budgets of the two projects. The project team requested a no-cost extension to Phase 1 to modify the subsequent work based on this collaborative approach. DOE authorized a brief extension, but ultimately opted not to pursue the collaborative facility and terminated the project.

  5. CO2 Compression | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Siteandscience, and8Critical4CO2 Compression CO2

  6. Development of Novel CO2 Adsorbents for Capture of CO2 from Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fauth, D.J.; Filburn, T.P. (University of Hartford, West Hartford, CT); Gray, M.L.; Hedges, S.W.; Hoffman, J.; Pennline, H.W.; Filburn, T.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capturing CO2 emissions generated from fossil fuel-based power plants has received widespread attention and is considered a vital course of action for CO2 emission abatement. Efforts are underway at the Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory to develop viable energy technologies enabling the CO2 capture from large stationary point sources. Solid, immobilized amine sorbents (IAS) formulated by impregnation of liquid amines within porous substrates are reactive towards CO2 and offer an alternative means for cyclic capture of CO2 eliminating, to some degree, inadequacies related to chemical absorption by aqueous alkanolamine solutions. This paper describes synthesis, characterization, and CO2 adsorption properties for IAS materials previously tested to bind and release CO2 and water vapor in a closed loop life support system. Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA), acrylonitrile-modified tetraethylenepentamine (TEPAN), and a single formulation consisting of TEPAN and N, N’-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine (BED) were individually supported on a poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate and examined. CO2 adsorption profiles leading to reversible CO2 adsorption capacities were obtained using thermogravimetry. Under 10% CO2 in nitrogen at 25°C and 1 atm, TEPA supported on PMMA over 60 minutes adsorbed ~3.2 mmol/g{sorbent} whereas, TEPAN supported on PMMA along with TEPAN and BED supported on PMMA adsorbed ~1.7 mmol/g{sorbent} and ~2.3 mmol/g{sorbent} respectively. Cyclic experiments with a 1:1 weight ratio of TEPAN and BED supported on poly (methyl methacrylate) beads utilizing a fixed-bed flow system with 9% CO2, 3.5% O2, nitrogen balance with trace gas constituents were studied. CO2 adsorption capacity was ~ 3 mmols CO2/g{sorbent} at 40°C and 1.4 atm. No beneficial effect on IAS performance was found using a moisture-laden flue gas mixture. Tests with 750 ppmv NO in a humidified gas stream revealed negligible NO sorption onto the IAS. A high SO2 concentration resulted in incremental loss in IAS performance and revealed progressive degrees of “staining” upon testing. Adsorption of SO2 by the IAS necessitates upstream removal of SO2 prior to CO2 capture.

  7. Porous Hexacyanometalates for CO2 capture applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motkuri, Radha K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Prussian blue analogues of M3[Fe(CN)6]2 x H2O (where M=Fe, Mn and Ni) were synthesized, characterized and tested for their gas sorption capabilities. The sorption studies reveal that, these Prussian blue materials preferentially sorb CO2 over N2 and CH4 at low pressure (1bar).

  8. Ocean Acidification: The Other CO2 Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childress, Michael J.

    reserved 1941-1405/09/0115-0169$20.00 Key Words biogeochemistry, calcification, carbon dioxide, climate of calcium carbonate saturation states, which impacts shell-forming marine organisms from plankton to benthic for marine organisms to adapt to increasing CO2 and broader implications for ocean ecosystems are not well

  9. Aquifer Management for CO2 Sequestration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anchliya, Abhishek

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage of carbon dioxide is being actively considered for the reduction of green house gases. To make an impact on the environment CO2 should be put away on the scale of gigatonnes per annum. The storage capacity of deep saline aquifers...

  10. Projecting human development and CO2 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Luís; Kropp, Jürgen P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate cumulative CO2 emissions during the period 2000 to 2050 from developed and developing countries based on the empirical relationship between CO2 per capita emissions (due to fossil fuel combustion and cement production) and corresponding HDI. In order to project per capita emissions of individual countries we make three assumptions which are detailed below. First, we use logistic regressions to fit and extrapolate the HDI on a country level as a function of time. This is mainly motivated by the fact that the HDI is bounded between 0 and 1 and that it decelerates as it approaches 1. Second, we employ for individual countries the correlations between CO2 per capita emissions and HDI in order to extrapolate their emissions. This is an ergodic assumption. Third, we let countries with incomplete data records evolve similarly as their close neighbors (in the emissions-HDI plane, see Fig. 1 in the main text) with complete time series of CO2 per capita emissions and HDI. Country-based emissions estimates a...

  11. Plant-Wide NOx Reduction Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baukal, C.; Waibel, D.; Webster, T.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the public's awareness increased, industry began looking for new strategies to curb NOx emissions. The strategies for reducing NOx are discussed next. Table 1 shows a summary of common NOx control technologies [1]. Table 1 NOx reduction technologies... for NOx Control, in Industrial Combustion Technologies, ed. by M.A. Lukasiewicz, American Society of Metals, Warren, PA, pp. 345-350, 1986. 7. A. Garg, Trimming NOx, Chem Eng., Vol. 99, No. 11, pp. 122-124, 1992. 8. C.E. Baukal, Industrial Combustion...

  12. Northern California CO2 Reduction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hymes, Edward

    2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    C6 Resources LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Shell Oil Company, worked with the US Department of Energy (DOE) under a Cooperative Agreement to develop the Northern California CO2 Reduction Project. The objective of the Project is to demonstrate the viability of using Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) to reduce existing greenhouse gas emissions from industrial sources on a large-scale. The Project will capture more than 700,000 metric tonnes of CO2 per year, which is currently being vented to the atmosphere from the Shell Martinez Refinery in Contra Costa County. The CO2 will be compressed and dehydrated at the refinery and then transported via pipeline to a sequestration site in a rural area in neighboring Solano County. The CO2 will be sequestered into a deep saline formation (more than two miles underground) and will be monitored to assure secure, long-term containment. The pipeline will be designed to carry as much as 1,400,000 metric tonnes of CO2 per year, so additional capacity will be available to accommodate CO2 captured from other industrial sources. The Project is expected to begin operation in 2015. The Project has two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive design basis for the Project. The Cooperative Agreement with the DOE provided cost sharing for Phase 1 and the opportunity to apply for additional DOE cost sharing for Phase 2, comprising the design, construction and operation of the Project. Phase 1 has been completed. DOE co-funding is provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. As prescribed by ARRA, the Project will stimulate the local economy by creating manufacturing, transportation, construction, operations, and management jobs while addressing the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at an accelerated pace. The Project, which will also assist in meeting the CO2 reduction requirements set forth in California?s Climate Change law, presents a major opportunity for both the environment as well as the region. C6 Resources is conducting the Project in collaboration with federally-funded research centers, such as Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and Lawrence Livermore National Lab. C6 Resources and Shell have identified CCS as one of the critical pathways toward a worldwide goal of providing cleaner energy. C6 Resources, in conjunction with the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), has conducted an extensive and ongoing public outreach and CCS education program for local, regional and state-wide stakeholders. As part of a long term relationship, C6 Resources will continue to engage directly with community leaders and residents to ensure public input and transparency. This topical report summarizes the technical work from Phase 1 of the Project in the following areas: ? Surface Facility Preliminary Engineering: summarizes the preliminary engineering work performed for CO2 capture, CO2 compression and dehydration at the refinery, and surface facilities at the sequestration site ? Pipeline Preliminary Engineering: summarizes the pipeline routing study and preliminary engineering design ? Geologic Sequestration: summarizes the work to characterize, model and evaluate the sequestration site ? Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (MVA): summarizes the MVA plan to assure long-term containment of the sequestered CO2

  13. Conversion of CO2 into Commercial Materials Using Carbon Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Jian-Ping; Peters, Jonathan; Lail, Marty; Mobley, Paul; Turk, Brian

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, our research focused on developing reaction chemistry that would support using carbon as a reductant for CO2 utilization that would permit CO2 consumption on a scale that would match or exceed anthropomorphic CO2 generation for energy production from fossil fuels. Armed with the knowledge that reactions attempting to produce compounds with an energy content greater than CO2 would be thermodynamically challenged and/or require significant amounts of energy, we developed a potential process that utilized a solid carbon source and recycled the carbon to effectively provide infinite time for the carbon to react. During testing of different carbon sources, we found a wide range of reaction rates. Biomass-derived samples had the most reactivity and coals and petcoke had the lowest. Because we had anticipated this challenge, we recognized that a catalyst would be necessary to improve reaction rates and conversion. From the data analysis of carbon samples, we recognized that alkali metals improved the reaction rate. Through parametric testing of catalyst formulations we were able to increase the reaction rate with petcoke by a factor of >70. Our efforts to identify the reaction mechanism to assist in improving the catalyst formulation demonstrated that the catalyst was catalyzing the extraction of oxygen from CO2 and using this extracted oxygen to oxidize carbon. This was a significant discovery in that if we could modify the catalyst formulation to permit controlled the oxidation, we would have a very power selective oxidation process. With selective oxidation, CO2 utilization could be effective used as one of the process steps in making many of the large volume commodity chemicals that support our modern lifestyles. The key challenges for incorporating these functionalities into the catalyst formulation were to make the oxidation selective and lower the temperature required for catalytic activity. We identified four catalyst families that had the potential to meet these challenges. Initial screening of the catalyst families did show that the reduction/oxidation activity did occur at lower temperatures and that these catalysts were able to cause carbon chain growth as well as C—C cleavage. A preliminary techno-economic feasibility of using petcoke/catalyst to produce a CO-rich syngas product was completed and showed significant economic promise. Testing of the different catalyst families demonstrated that Catalyst A was able to stably produce 5 sccm of ethylene/gram of catalyst at 900°C for one hour. For dry methane reforming, our Catalyst 4 was able to achieve production rates of > 10 sccm of CO and > 3 sccm of H2 per gram of catalyst at 600°C and 350 psig. Based on these developments, the potential for CO2 utilization in the production of large volume commodity chemicals is very promising.

  14. Root-derived CO2 efflux via xylem stream rivals soil CO2 efflux.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubrey, Doug, P.; Teskey, Robert, O.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    • Respiration consumes a large portion of annual gross primary productivity in forest ecosystems and is dominated by belowground metabolism. Here, we present evidence of a previously unaccounted for internal CO2 flux of large magnitude from tree roots through stems. If this pattern is shown to persist over time and in other forests, it suggests that belowground respiration has been grossly underestimated. • Using an experimental Populus deltoides plantation as a model system, we tested the hypothesis that a substantial portion of the CO2 released from belowground autotrophic respiration remains within tree root systems and is transported aboveground through the xylem stream rather than diffusing into the soil atmosphere. • On a daily basis, the amount of CO2 that moved upward from the root system into the stem via the xylem stream (0.26 mol CO2 m?2 d?1) rivalled that which diffused from the soil surface to the atmosphere (0.27 mol CO2 m?2 d?1). We estimated that twice the amount of CO2 derived from belowground autotrophic respiration entered the xylem stream as diffused into the soil environment. • Our observations indicate that belowground autotrophic respiration consumes substantially more carbohydrates than previously recognized and challenge the paradigm that all root-respired CO2 diffuses into the soil atmosphere.

  15. CO2 Storage and Sink Enhancements: Developing Comparable Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO2 Storage and Sink Enhancements: Developing Comparable Economics B.R. Bock1 , R.G. Rhudy2 , and H technologies and practices under development for CO2 storage and sink enhancement, including options. For the geologic and ocean storage options, CO2 capture costs from another project were added to the costs of CO2

  16. Original article Limitation of photosynthetic activity by CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Limitation of photosynthetic activity by CO2 availability in the chloroplasts to resistances opposing the CO2 fluxes in the mesophyll of tree leaves. To validate this assertion, values of CO2 CO2 assimilation and respiration rate measurement, and using the known electron requirements (four

  17. CO2 levels during the greenhouse of the Paleocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    CO2 levels during the greenhouse of the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) Francesca A. Mc, Boulder #12;Estimating paleopCO2 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 Meter Level, start of CIE=0 pCO2 pCO2 values using different calculation methods Bulk nalk For the past 250 years human

  18. CO2 enrichment increases carbon and nitrogen input from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO2 enrichment increases carbon and nitrogen input from fine roots in a deciduous forest Colleen2 Ecological Society of America, 2008 #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;+ [CO2] #12;+ Net primary production + [CO2] #12;+ Net primary production + [CO2] + C and N storage in biomass #12;+ Net primary production

  19. Cost Assessment of CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeboah, F. E.; Yegulalp, T. M.; Singh, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost Assessment of CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation Frank E. Yeboah Tuncel M. Yegulalp Harmohindar Singh Research Associate Professor Professor Center for Energy Research... them carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). This paper assesses the cost of sequestering CO 2 produced by a ZEC power plant using solid sequestration process. INTRODUCTION CO 2 is produced when electrical energy is generated using conventional fossil...

  20. Cost Assessment of CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeboah, F. E.; Yegulalp, T. M.; Singh, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost Assessment of CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation Frank E. Yeboah Tuncel M. Yegulalp Harmohindar Singh Research Associate Professor Professor Center for Energy Research... them carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). This paper assesses the cost of sequestering CO 2 produced by a ZEC power plant using solid sequestration process. INTRODUCTION CO 2 is produced when electrical energy is generated using conventional fossil...

  1. CO2 Sequestration Modeling Using Pattern Recognition and Data Mining;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration process is to ensure a sustained confinement of the injected CO2CO2 Sequestration Modeling Using Pattern Recognition and Data Mining; Case Study of SACROC field, USA Abstract Capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrial and energy-related sources and depositing

  2. Control of NOx by combustion process modifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ber?, J. M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical and experimental study was carried out to determine lower bounds of NOx emission from staged combustion of a 0.7%N #6 fuel oil. Thermodynamic and chemical kinetic calculations have shown minimum NOx emissions ...

  3. NOx adsorber and method of regenerating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Endicott, Dennis L. (Peoria, IL); Verkiel, Maarten (Metamora, IL); Driscoll, James J. (Dunlap, IL)

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    New technologies, such as NOx adsorber catalytic converters, are being used to meet increasingly stringent regulations on undesirable emissions, including NOx emissions. NOx adsorbers must be periodically regenerated, which requires an increased fuel consumption. The present disclosure includes a method of regenerating a NOx adsorber within a NOx adsorber catalytic converter. At least one sensor positioned downstream from the NOx adsorber senses, in the downstream exhaust, at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations a plurality of times during a regeneration phase. The sensor is in communication with an electronic control module that includes a regeneration monitoring algorithm operable to end the regeneration phase when a time rate of change of the at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations is after an expected plateau region begins.

  4. Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and Produce Biofuel Feedstock Tryg Lundquist Cal Poly State of the Industry and Growth · Algae's Role in WW Treatment · CO2's New Role · Research at Cal Poly · Future Work/MG 0.3 MGD average flow per facility #12;Reclaimed Algae Bacteria O2 CO2 N Organics N P CO2 P CO2 Waste

  5. The response of soil CO2 ux to changes in atmospheric CO2, nitrogen supply and plant diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    The response of soil CO2 ¯ux to changes in atmospheric CO2, nitrogen supply and plant diversity J O. Paul, MN 55108 USA Abstract We measured soil CO2 ¯ux over 19 sampling periods that spanned two growing three major anthropogenic global changes: atmos- pheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, nitrogen (N

  6. An estimate of monthly global emissions of anthropogenic CO2: Impact on the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    An estimate of monthly global emissions of anthropogenic CO2: Impact on the seasonal cycle of anthropogenic CO2 are presented. Approximating the seasonal CO2 emission cycle using a 2-harmonic Fourier series with regions of strong anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Citation: Erickson, D. J., III, R. T. Mills, J. Gregg, T. J

  7. Reducing NOx in Fired Heaters and Boilers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, A.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -6, 2000 Reducing NOx in Fired Heaters Air Pollution Control and Boilers Keeping the environment clean Presented by Ashutosh Garg Furnace Improvements Low cost solutions for fired heaters Trace compounds ? Nitric oxides ? Carbon monoxide ? Sulfur... million BTU ? These levels can be achieved by Ultra Low NOx burners or FGR in boilers. ? Primary products of combustion ? Carbon dioxide ? Water vapors ? Oxygen ? Nitrogen ? Trace compounds NOx emissions ? NOx or Oxides of Nitrogen have...

  8. Buildings, Commissioning, Efficiency, Comfort, and CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge, D. E.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    comfort, optimize energy use and identify retrofits for existing commercial and institutional buildings and central plant facilities. It includes the entire commissioning process from assessment through implementation and subsequent follow-up as necessary...Buildings, Commissioning, Efficiency, Comfort, and CO2 Asian Pacific Building Commissioning Conference ICEBONovember 8, 2006Shenzhen, ChinaPresented ByDavid E. ClaridgeEnergy Systems LaboratoryTexas A&M University Commissioning New Buildings...

  9. Continuous CO2 extractor and methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None listed

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this CRADA was to assist in technology transfer from Russia to the US and assist in development of the technology improvements and applications for use in the U.S. and worldwide. Over the period of this work, ORNL has facilitated design, development and demonstration of a low-pressure liquid extractor and development of initial design for high-pressure supercritical CO2 fluid extractor.

  10. Aquifer Management for CO2 Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anchliya, Abhishek

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    to the Computer Modeling Group (CMG) and Kappa Engineering for providing the uninterrupted license of the software packages. I am grateful to Mr. Bob Brugman from CMG for his help with the GEM-GHG (Green House Gas) module of CMG. I would like to extend my... biological sinks of CO 2 and decreasing the carbon intensity of fossil fuels should be considered. Out of all the potential mitigation options for stabilizing atmospheric GHG concentrations, including injection into deep oceans, depleted oil reservoirs...

  11. 10-MW Supercritical-CO2 Turbine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet describes a 10-megawatt supercritical carbon dioxide turbine project, awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The research team, led by NREL, intends to showcase the turbomachinery for a new cycle—the supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) Brayton cycle. The cycle is being optimized and tested at conditions representing dry cooling in desert environments, thereby accurately simulating real-world concentrating solar power system operating conditions.

  12. Uncertainty analyses of CO2 plume expansion subsequent to wellbore CO2 leakage into aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Bacon, Diana H.; Engel, David W.; Lin, Guang; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Fang, Zhufeng

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we apply an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to CO2 sequestration problems. In one scenario, we look at the risk of wellbore leakage of CO2 into a shallow unconfined aquifer in an urban area; in another scenario, we study the effects of reservoir heterogeneity on CO2 migration. We combine various sampling approaches (quasi-Monte Carlo, probabilistic collocation, and adaptive sampling) in order to reduce the number of forward calculations while trying to fully explore the input parameter space and quantify the input uncertainty. The CO2 migration is simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). For computationally demanding simulations with 3D heterogeneity fields, we combined the framework with a scalable version module, eSTOMP, as the forward modeling simulator. We built response curves and response surfaces of model outputs with respect to input parameters, to look at the individual and combined effects, and identify and rank the significance of the input parameters.

  13. Transient studies of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Next-generation coal-fired power plants need to consider the option for CO2 capture as stringent governmental mandates are expected to be issued in near future. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants are more efficient than the conventional coal combustion processes when the option for CO2 capture is considered. However, no IGCC plant with CO2 capture currently exists in the world. Therefore, it is important to consider the operability and controllability issues of such a plant before it is commercially built. To facilitate this objective, a detailed plant-wide dynamic simulation of an IGCC plant with 90% CO2 capture has been developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics{reg_sign}. The plant considers a General Electric Energy (GEE)-type downflow radiant-only gasifier followed by a quench section. A two-stage water gas shift (WGS) reaction is considered for conversion of CO to CO2. A two-stage acid gas removal (AGR) process based on a physical solvent is simulated for selective capture of H2S and CO2. Compression of the captured CO2 for sequestration, an oxy-Claus process for removal of H2S and NH3, black water treatment, and the sour water treatment are also modeled. The tail gas from the Claus unit is recycled to the SELEXOL unit. The clean syngas from the AGR process is sent to a gas turbine followed by a heat recovery steam generator. This turbine is modeled as per published data in the literature. Diluent N2 is used from the elevated-pressure ASU for reducing the NOx formation. The heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is modeled by considering generation of high-pressure, intermediate-pressure, and low-pressure steam. All of the vessels, reactors, heat exchangers, and the columns have been sized. The basic IGCC process control structure has been synthesized by standard guidelines and existing practices. The steady state results are validated with data from a commercial gasifier. In the future grid-connected system, the plant should satisfy the environmental targets and quality of the feed to other sections, wherever applicable, without violating the operating constraints, and without sacrificing the efficiency. However, it was found that the emission of acid gases may far exceed the environmental targets and the overshoot of some of the key variables may be unacceptable under transient operation while following the load. A number of operational strategies and control configurations is explored for achieving these stringent requirements. The transient response of the plant is also studied by perturbing a number of key inputs.

  14. A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Units Current Plant MEA CO 2 Recovery O 2 fired, Direct CO 2 Compression` MEA/MDEA CO 2 Recovery Steam

  15. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION (PCOR) PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; Daniel J. Daly; Lynette L. de Silva; John A. Harju; Melanie D. Jensen; Erin M. O'Leary; Wesley D. Peck; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period of October 1, 2003, through September 30, 2005, the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, identified geologic and terrestrial candidates for near-term practical and environmentally sound carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations in the heartland of North America. The PCOR Partnership region covered nine states and three Canadian provinces. The validation test candidates were further vetted to ensure that they represented projects with (1) commercial potential and (2) a mix that would support future projects both dependent and independent of CO2 monetization. This report uses the findings contained in the PCOR Partnership's two dozen topical reports and half-dozen fact sheets as well as the capabilities of its geographic information system-based Decision Support System to provide a concise picture of the sequestration potential for both terrestrial and geologic sequestration in the PCOR Partnership region based on assessments of sources, sinks, regulations, deployment issues, transportation, and capture and separation. The report also includes concise action plans for deployment and public education and outreach as well as a brief overview of the structure, development, and capabilities of the PCOR Partnership. The PCOR Partnership is one of seven regional partnerships under Phase I of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The PCOR Partnership, comprising 49 public and private sector members, is led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota. The international PCOR Partnership region includes the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba and the states of Montana (part), Wyoming (part), North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

  16. co2-transport | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., ..., ,+ . :,2013 NETL CO2 CaptureTransport Cost

  17. Coupled reservoir-geomechanical analysis of CO2 injection and ground deformations at In Salah, Algeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO 2 sequestration; In Salah; geomechanics; ground surfaceCO 2 injection, geomechanics, and ground surface

  18. INFLUENCE OF CAPILLARY PRESSURE ON CO2 STORAGE AND MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    volume - 1 + + = + - 1 + = : 2 solubility in brine : 2 formation volume factor : brine formation volume factor The Black-Oil formulation = - - = - - Darcy's Empirical Law + = 1 - = : capillary pressure brine brine CO2 CO2 #12;· The numerical solution was obtained

  19. atmospheric co2 face: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Duke Forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) study. Rates of An Katul, Gabriel 11 Soil carbon sequestration in a pine forest after 9 years of atmospheric CO2 enrichment...

  20. air co2 enrichment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with increasing CO2 between ambient (1.0x California at Santa Cruz, University of 13 Soil carbon sequestration in a pine forest after 9 years of atmospheric CO2 enrichment...

  1. Formation Damage due to CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed, Ibrahim Mohamed 1984-

    2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is defined as the removal of gas that would be emitted into the atmosphere and its subsequent storage in a safe, sound place. CO2 sequestration in underground formations is currently being considered to reduce...

  2. Near Miscible CO2 Application to Improve Oil Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bui, Ly H.

    2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for enhanced oil recovery is a proven technology. CO2 injection is normally operated at a pressure above the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP), which is determined by crude oil composition and reservoir conditions...

  3. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    157 WELL INTEGRITY IN CO 2 ENVIRONMENTS: PERFORMANCE, RISK,of CO 2 injection, wells integrity and long term behavior ofcan compromise the well integrity and thus its functional

  4. Quantum Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays | netl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of carbon dioxide (CO2). The minerals may affect the reservoir storage capacity as well as the integrity of its natural seals such as caprock formations. CO2 interaction...

  5. From CO2 to Methanol via Novel Nanocatalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From CO2 to Methanol via Novel Nanocatalysts From CO2 to Methanol via Novel Nanocatalysts Print Wednesday, 03 December 2014 00:00 Researchers have found novel nanocatalysts that...

  6. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as Heat Transmission...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    problems of aqueous fluids, make heretofore inaccessible energy resources available for human use, and provide ancillary benefits by using and storing CO2. A CO2-based EGS is...

  7. Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadharajan, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    projects based CO 2 enhanced oil recovery in the US. Energydeveloped for CO 2 -enhanced oil recovery. In: 16th SPE/DOEpurposes such as enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced

  8. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T.

    CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate First Quarterly Report 2007 Quarterly Progress of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing

  9. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T.

    CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Fourth Quarterly Report 2006 Quarterly Progress of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing

  10. Formation Damage due to CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed, Ibrahim Mohamed 1984-

    2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    the amount of CO2 emitted into the atmosphere. However, a better understanding of the chemical and physical interactions between CO2, water, and formation rock is necessary before sequestration. These interactions can be evaluated by the change in mineral...

  11. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WITH HETEROGENEITY IN OIL AND GAS RESERVOIRS APPLIED TO CO 2sedimentary basins, oil and gas fields, and industrial CO 2Harr, C.L. , 1996, Paradox oil and gas potential of the Ute

  12. CO2 capture processes in power plants - Le captage du CO2 dans les centrales thermiques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakib Bouallou

    2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This review is devoted to assess and compare various processes aiming at recover CO2 from power plants fed with natural gas (NGCC) and pulverized coal (PC). These processes are post combustion CO2 capture using chemical solvents, natural gas reforming for pre-combustion capture and oxy-fuel combustion with cryogenic recovery of CO2. These processes were evaluated to give some clues for choosing the best option for each type of power plant. The comparison of these various concepts suggests that, in the short and medium term, chemical absorption is the most interesting process for NGCC power plants. For CP power plants, oxy-combustion can be a very interesting option, as well as post-combustion capture by chemical solvents.

  13. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow III, William R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model Inputs Emissions Factors CO2 Emission factor for grid tonne CO2/MWh)  CO2 Emission factor for fuel  (tonne CO2/TJ)Improvements and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the

  14. electroseismic monitoring of co2 sequestration: a finite element ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabio Zyserman

    Keywords: Electroseismic Modeling, Poroelasticity, CO2 sequestration, Finite element methods. 2000 AMS ... carbon dioxide emissisons into the atmosphere.

  15. Gravity monitoring of CO2 movement during sequestration: Model studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasperikova, E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    form of enhanced petroleum production as CO 2 is injected.for monitoring production in petroleum reservoirs. The cost

  16. CO2 stabilization, climate change and the terrestrial carbon sink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Andrew

    CO2 stabilization, climate change and the terrestrial carbon sink A N D R E W W H I T E , * M E L V, Hybrid v4.1, with a subdaily timestep, was driven by increasing CO2 and transient climate output from scenarios were used: (i) IS92a, giving 790 ppm CO2 by 2100, (ii) CO2 stabilization at 750 ppm by 2225

  17. Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadharajan, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential CO 2 storage and water extraction projects based on the effort’s findings DOE’s Interagency CCS

  18. Gravity monitoring of CO2 movement during sequestration: Model studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasperikova, E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    combined CO 2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestrationMODEL The enhanced oil recovery (EOR)/sequestration

  19. NERSC Franklin Hours Used Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Franklin Hours Used Franklin Hours Used 2011 Franklin Usage in Hours 2011 Franklin Usage in Hours 2010 2010 Franklin Usage in Hours 2009 2009 Franklin Usage in Hours 2007-2008 2008...

  20. CO2 Injection in the Subsurface Kjetil Haugen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    fuel. Nevertheless, natural gas combustion results in sub- stantial quantities of CO2. Instead Warming Fossil fuels produce CO2 upon combustion. CO2 is a greenhouse gas and contributes to global warm. Thus, replacing oil and coal with less carbon-intensive natural gas, is probably the fastest way

  1. Post-Combustion CO2 Capture 11 -13 July 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Workshop 11 - 13 July 2010 Tufts European Center Talloires, France Institute | | Clean Air Task Force | | Asia Clean Energy Innovation Initiative | #12;Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Workshop 11 - 13 July 2010 Talloires, France PROCEEDINGS: Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Workshop

  2. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Navajo SandstonebrineCO2 interaction: implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Chen

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Navajo Sandstone­brine­CO2 interaction: implications for geological carbon to the injected CO2 is largely unknown. Experiments involving the reac- tion of Navajo Sandstone with acidic brine experiment examined sandstone interaction with CO2-impregnated brine; the second experiment examined

  3. A Numerical Investigation of Wettability Alteration during Immiscible CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossain, M. Enamul

    A Numerical Investigation of Wettability Alteration during Immiscible CO2 Flooding Process, April 2012 #12;2 Table of Contest Abstract 3 Introduction 3 Literature Review 5 CO2 Flooding 7 New alteration during CO2 flooding. However, limited research on numerical and/or analytical modeling

  4. Original article Interactive effects of elevated CO2, O3,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Interactive effects of elevated CO2, O3, and soil water deficit on spring wheat of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2), ozone (O3), and soil water deficit on spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv consisting of two O3levels (ambient and 1.5-times ambient) in combination with two CO2levels (ambient

  5. Cimpor inventa nova frmula para reduzir pegada de CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Cimpor inventa nova fórmula para reduzir pegada de CO2 CIMENTO. A Cimpor descobriu uma nova fórmula para produzir ci- mento que lhe permitirá reduzir a pegada de CO 2 em 25%. Segundo as contas da as fábricas do grupo, seriam emitidos menos quatro milhões de toneladas de CO 2 por ano, o que permitiria uma

  6. results and benefits... Birmingham Cutting your CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everest, Graham R

    results and benefits... Birmingham Cutting your CO2 Birmingham City Council July 2007 c a s e s t u of the BirminghamCutting CO2 campaign, news items, display materials etc. · Advising on pledge gathering materials system was launched in July 2007 as part of the `Birmingham Cutting Your CO2' campaign. By the end

  7. Aquatic primary production in a high-CO2 world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fussman, Gregor

    Aquatic primary production in a high-CO2 world Etienne Low-De´carie, Gregor F. Fussmann, and Graham-Penfield, Montreal, QC, H3A 1B1, Canada Here, we provide a review of the direct effect of increas- ing CO2 on aquatic: the assessment of theories about limitation of productivity and the integration of CO2 into the co

  8. CO2 Emissions Mitigation and Technological Advance: An

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PNNL-18075 CO2 Emissions Mitigation and Technological Advance: An Updated Analysis of Advanced/2003) #12;PNNL-18075 CO2 Emissions Mitigation and Technological Advance: An Analysis of Advanced Technology of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at 450 parts per million by volume (ppmv) and 550 ppmv in MiniCAM. Each

  9. CO2-avskiljning med syrgasfrbrnning -nya tekniska mjligheter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemurell, Stefan

    CO2-avskiljning med syrgasförbränning - nya tekniska möjligheter Klas Andersson Avd. Energiteknik Chalmers Tekniska Högskola Chalmers Energikonferens 14 december 2012 #12;· Combustion and CO2 capture with power and industrial sectors #12;Air-Fuel Combustion Air Fuel Flue gas CO2: 10-20 % N2: 60

  10. Central serotonin neurons are required for arousal to CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Central serotonin neurons are required for arousal to CO2 Gordon F. Buchanana,b,1 and George B neurons are stimulated by CO2, and sero- tonin activates thalamocortical networks, we hypothesized any arousal response to inhalation of 10% CO2 (with 21% O2 in balance N2) but had normal arousal

  11. Center for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    climate change, reduced GHGs, improved air quality, CO2 reduction & sequestration, and carbon offsets. #12 for the development of a technology for the carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in non-air entrained concreteCenter for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN NON-AIR ENTRAINED CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik

  12. Acid Gas Capture Using CO2-Binding Organic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Rainbolt, James E.; Zheng, Feng

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Current chemical CO2 scrubbing technology is primarily aqueous alkanolamine based. These systems rapidly bind CO2 (forming water-soluble carbamate and bicarbonate salts) however, the process has serious disadvantages. The concentration of monoethanolamine rarely exceeds 30 wt % due to the corrosive nature of the solution, and this reduces the maximum CO2 volumetric (?108 g/L) and gravimetric capacity (?7 wt%) of the CO2 scrubber. The ?30 wt % loading of ethanolamine also means that a large excess of water must be pumped and heated during CO2 capture and release, and this greatly increases the energy requirements especially considering the high specific heat of water (4 j/g-1K-1). Our approach is to switch to organic systems that chemically bind CO2 as liquid alkylcarbonate salts. Our CO2-binding organic liquids have higher CO2 solubility, lower specific heats, potential for less corrosion and lower binding energies for CO2 than aqueous systems. CO2BOLs also reversibly bind and release mixed sulfur oxides. Furthermore the CO2BOL system can be direct solvent replacements for any solvent based CO2 capture systems because they are commercially available reagents and because they are fluids they would not require extensive process re-engineering.

  13. Chemical Looping Combustion for inherent CO2 capture in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluate CLC using syngas as fuel Effect of fuel Effect of operating conditions Use CLC for CO2-capture Reactor System O2,N2 CO2,H2O To CO2 recovery and compression #12;15 Clean syngas from different gasifiers

  14. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T.

    CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate First Quarterly Report 2006 Quarterly Progress the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous.................................................................................................................................... 8 Task 1 ­ Modeling Performance of Absorption/Stripping of CO2 with Aqueous K2CO3 Promoted

  15. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T.

    CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Third Quarterly Report 2006 Quarterly Progress of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing...................................................................................................................................11 Task 1 ­ Modeling Performance of Absorption/Stripping of CO2 with Aqueous K2CO3 Promoted

  16. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T.

    CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Second Quarterly Report 2006 Quarterly Progress of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing.................................................................................................................................. 10 Task 1 ­ Modeling Performance of Absorption/Stripping of CO2 with Aqueous K2CO3 Promoted

  17. CO2 exposure at pressure impacts metabolism and stress responses in the model sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Hoyt, David W.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Alderson, Paul A.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Tucker, Abigail E.; Walter, Eric D.; Linggi, Bryan E.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Taylor, Ronald C.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration drives physical and geochemical changes in deep subsurface environments that impact indigenous microbial activities. The combined effects of pressurized CO2 on a model sulfate-reducing microorganism, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, have been assessed using a suite of genomic and kinetic measurements. Novel high-pressure NMR time-series measurements using 13C-lactate were used to track D. vulgaris metabolism. We identified cessation of respiration at CO2 pressures of 10 bar, 25 bar, 50 bar, and 80 bar. Concurrent experiments using N2 as the pressurizing phase had no negative effect on microbial respiration, as inferred from reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Complementary pressurized batch incubations and fluorescence microscopy measurements supported NMR observations, and indicated that non-respiring cells were mostly viable at 50 bar CO2 for at least four hours, and at 80 bar CO2 for two hours. The fraction of dead cells increased rapidly after four hours at 80 bar CO2. Transcriptomic (RNA-Seq) measurements on mRNA transcripts from CO2-incubated biomass indicated that cells up-regulated the production of certain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine) following CO2 exposure at elevated pressures, likely as part of a general stress response. Evidence for other poorly understood stress responses were also identified within RNA-Seq data, suggesting that while pressurized CO2 severely limits the growth and respiration of D. vulgaris cells, biomass retains intact cell membranes at pressures up to 80 bar CO2. Together, these data show that geologic sequestration of CO2 may have significant impacts on rates of sulfate reduction in many deep subsurface environments where this metabolism is a key respiratory process.

  18. Study of CO2 Mobility Control Using Cross-linked Gel Conformance Control and CO2 Viscosifiers in Heterogeneous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Shuzong

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2 has been widely used as a displacement fluid in both immiscible and miscible displacement processes to obtain tertiary recovery from the field. There are several problems associated with the application of CO2 flooding, especially when...

  19. Directed Technical Change and the Adoption of CO2 Abatement Technology: The Case of CO2 Capture and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otto, Vincent M.

    This paper studies the cost effectiveness of combining traditional environmental policy, such as CO2 trading schemes, and technology policy that has aims of reducing the cost and speeding the adoption of CO2 abatement ...

  20. Research Project on CO2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources: Water Quality Effects Caused by CO2 Intrusion into Shallow Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, Jens

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in Response to CO2 Leakage from Deep Geologicalstudy mineral trapping for CO2 disposal in deep arenaceousconstituents as function of P(CO2)? function of P(CO2)? – –

  1. NOx Reduction through Efficiency Gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benz, R.; Thompson, R.; Staedter, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approach, Fifth Edition, McGraw-Hill, June 2005 Kuo, K. K., Principles of Combustion 2 nd Edition, Wiley, January 2005 Erickson, K. T., Plant-Wide Process Control, 1 st Edition, Wiley, April 2005 ESL-IE-07-05-42 Proceedings... putting financial stress on steam generation plants to adhere to environmental regulations we provide an incentive to do so. The simplicity and elegance of the CompuNOx system minimizes system changes. Control related changes consist...

  2. INTEGRATING MEA REGENERATION WITH CO2 COMPRESSION AND PEAKING TO REDUCE CO2 CAPTURE COSTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T.

    system with no compression heat recovery, CO2 vapor recompression heat recovery, and multipressure stripping with and without vapor recompression heat recovery. These configurations were simulated using of power for sale to the grid based on 500 MW unit ) clearly outweighed the modest increases in capital

  3. Rate Determination of the CO2* Chemiluminescence Reaction CO + O + M = CO2* + M

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopp, Madeleine Marissa, 1987-

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    flame characteristics, such as fuel consumption rate, heat release rate, and H-atom concentration. In 2002, Kim et al. [2] made detailed spectral measurements in SI, HCCI, and SCCI engines from various excited state species and determined that CO2...

  4. Predicting CO2-water interfacial tension under pressure and temperature conditions of geologic CO2 storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, L.C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    within ± 15% of nominal P. EPM2-SPC/E DZ- SPC/E PPL-SPC/EEPM2- TIP4P2005 PPL- TIP4P2005 Predicted (f) a P ? CO2 2SE ?to C and O atoms (Table 1). The PPL model (In Het Panhuis et

  5. CINETIQUES DE SORPTION DU CO2 DANS LE CADRE DU STOCKAGE GEOLOGIQUE DU CO2 DANS LE CHARBON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    PROCESSES OF CO2 SORPTION FOR CO2 STORAGE IN COAL SEAMS Delphine CHARRIERE1, 2 , Zbigniew POKRYSZKA1 storage in coal seams and the enhancement on coalbed methane production requires information on the gas sorption mechanism of kinetics. In this work, both sorption kinetics of CO2 and CH4 are studied onto a coal

  6. NOx reduction in gas turbine combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Nak Won

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NOx REDUCTION IN GAS TURBINE COMBUSTORS A Thesis by Nak Won Sung Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fullfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Mechanical... Engineering NOx REDUCTION IN GAS TURBINE COMBUSTORS A Thesis by Nak Won Sung Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committe (Head of Department) (Member) August 1976 "40308 (Member) 1 1. 1 ABSTRACT NOx Reduction in Gas Turbine...

  7. Midday values of gross CO2 flux and light use efficiency during satellite overpasses can be used to directly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    days when the ground was obscured by cloud cover. Since vegetation carbon exchange can be very dynamic there was a relationship between photosynthetic rates and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for half hour data effect on daily gross CO2 exchange than would have been expected. Conversely, the saturation

  8. Plasma Assisted Catalysis System for NOx Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 NOXTECH NOXTECH PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYSIS SYSTEM FOR NOx REDUCTION BY NOXTECH With the Support & Cooperation of DOE Noxtech, Inc. *Delaware Corporation registered to do business...

  9. Sequestration of Dissolved CO2 in the Oriskany Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilmore, R.M.; Allen, D.E. (Salem State College, Salem, MA); McCarthy-Jones, J.R.; Hedges, S.W.; Soong, Yee

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted to determine the solubility of CO2 in a natural brine solution of the Oriskany formation under elevated temperature and pressure conditions. These data were collected at temperatures of 22 and 75 °C and pressures between 100 and 450 bar. Experimentally determined data were compared with CO2 solubility predictions using a model developed by Duan and Sun (Chem. Geol. 2003, 193, 257-271). Model results compare well with Oriskany brine CO2 solubility data collected experimentally, suggesting that the Duan and Sun model is a reliable tool for estimating solution CO2 capacity in high salinity aquifers in the temperature and pressure range evaluated. The capacity for the Oriskany formation to sequester dissolved CO2 was calculated using results of the solubility models, estimation of the density of CO2 saturated brine, and available geographic information system (GIS) information on the formation depth and thickness. Results indicate that the Oriskany formation can hold approximately 0.36 gigatonnes of dissolved CO2 if the full basin is considered. When only the region where supercritical CO2 can exist (temperatures greater than 31° C and pressures greater than 74 bar) is considered, the capacity of the Oriskany formation to sequester dissolved CO2 is 0.31 gigatonnes. The capacity estimate considering the potential to sequester free-phase supercritical CO2 if brine were displaced from formation pore space is 8.8 gigatonnes in the Oriskany formation.

  10. Supersonic Technology for CO2 Capture: A High Efficiency Inertial CO2 Extraction System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPACCT Project: Researchers at ATK and ACENT Laboratories are developing a device that relies on aerospace wind-tunnel technologies to turn CO2 into a condensed solid for collection and capture. ATK’s design incorporates a special nozzle that converges and diverges to expand flue gas, thereby cooling it off and turning the CO2 into solid particles which are removed from the system by a cyclonic separator. This technology is mechanically simple, contains no moving parts and generates no chemical waste, making it inexpensive to construct and operate, readily scalable, and easily integrated into existing facilities. The increase in the cost to coal-fired power plants associated with introduction of this system would be 50% less than current technologies.

  11. Improved Efficiency of Miscible CO2 Floods and Enhanced Prospects for CO2 Flooding Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, Reid B.; Schechter, David S.

    1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to improve the efficiency of miscible CO2 floods and enhance the prospects for flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. This report provides results of the second year of the three-year project that will be exploring three principles: (1) Fluid and matrix interactions (understanding the problems). (2) Conformance control/sweep efficiency (solving the problems. 3) Reservoir simulation for improved oil recovery (predicting results).

  12. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow III, William R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factors CO2 Emission factor for grid electricity  (tonne CO2 Savings Figure 6. 2010-2030 Electricity and Electricity-Base CO 2 Emissions

  13. Estimation of CO2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodologies and Uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L. , 2006. Discussion of CO2 emission reduction in ChineseFurther discussion of CO2 emission reduction in Chinesecalculation method of CO2 emissions of cement production.

  14. Power Generating Stationary Engines Nox Control: A Closed Loop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generating Stationary Engines Nox Control: A Closed Loop Control Technology Power Generating Stationary Engines Nox Control: A Closed Loop Control Technology Poster presented at...

  15. Selective reduction of NOx in oxygen rich environments with plasma...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalysis for Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Heavy-Duty NOx Emissions Control: Reformer-Assisted vs. Plasma-Facilitated Lean NOx Catalysis Dynamometer Evaluation of...

  16. An Experimental Investigation of the Origin of Increased NOx...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NOx Emissions When Fueling a Heavy-Duty Compression-Ignition Engine with Soy Biodiesel An Experimental Investigation of the Origin of Increased NOx Emissions When Fueling...

  17. Measurement and Characterization of Lean NOx Adsorber Regeneration...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    parks.pdf More Documents & Publications Synergies of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion and Lean NOx Trap Catalysts Measurement and Characterization of Lean NOx Adsorber Regeneration...

  18. Deactivation mechanisms of NOx storage materials arising from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    mechanisms of NOx storage materials arising from thermal aging and sulfur poisoning Deactivation mechanisms of NOx storage materials arising from thermal aging and sulfur poisoning...

  19. Retrofit Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl Retrofit Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

  20. Three-Dimensional Composite Nanostructures for Lean NOx Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Three-Dimensional Composite Nanostructures for Lean NOx Emission Control Monolithic Metal Oxide based Composite Nanowire Lean NOx Emission Control...

  1. Monolithic Metal Oxide based Composite Nanowire Lean NOx Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Monolithic Metal Oxide based Composite Nanowire Lean NOx Emission Control Catalysts Monolithic Metal Oxide based Composite Nanowire Lean NOx Emission Control Catalysts Presents...

  2. Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies A virtual O2 sensor for...

  3. NOx Abatement Research and Development CRADA with Navistar Incorporate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NOx Abatement Research and Development CRADA with Navistar Incorporated NOx Abatement Research and Development CRADA with Navistar Incorporated 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and...

  4. Functionality of Commercial NOx Storage-Reduction Catalysts and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Catalysis Research: Fundamental SulfationDesulfation Studies of Lean NOx Traps CumminsORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines...

  5. Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-combustion CO2 Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Shiguang; Shou, S.; Pyrzynski, Travis; Makkuni, Ajay; Meyer, Howard

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes scientific/technical progress made for bench-scale membrane contactor technology for post-combustion CO2 capture from DOE Contract No. DE-FE-0004787. Budget Period 1 (BP1) membrane absorber, Budget Period 2 (BP2) membrane desorber and Budget Period 3 (BP3) integrated system and field testing studies have been completed successfully and met or exceeded the technical targets (? 90% CO2 removal and CO2 purity of 97% in one membrane stage). Significant breakthroughs are summarized below: BP1 research: The feasibility of utilizing the poly (ether ether ketone), PEEK, based hollow fiber contractor (HFC) in combination with chemical solvents to separate and capture at least 90% of the CO2 from simulated flue gases has been successfully established. Excellent progress has been made as we have achieved the BP1 goal: ? 1,000 membrane intrinsic CO2 permeance, ? 90% CO2 removal in one stage, ? 2 psi gas side pressure drop, and ? 1 (sec)-1 mass transfer coefficient. Initial test results also show that the CO2 capture performance, using activated Methyl Diethanol Amine (aMDEA) solvent, was not affected by flue gas contaminants O2 (~3%), NO2 (66 ppmv), and SO2 (145 ppmv). BP2 research: The feasibility of utilizing the PEEK HFC for CO2-loaded solvent regeneration has been successfully established High CO2 stripping flux, one order of magnitude higher than CO2 absorption flux, have been achieved. Refined economic evaluation based on BP1 membrane absorber and BP2 membrane desorber laboratory test data indicate that the CO2 capture costs are 36% lower than DOE’s benchmark amine absorption technology. BP3 research: A bench-scale system utilizing a membrane absorber and desorber was integrated into a continuous CO2 capture process using contactors containing 10 to 20 ft2 of membrane area. The integrated process operation was stable through a 100-hour laboratory test, utilizing a simulated flue gas stream. Greater than 90% CO2 capture combined with 97% CO2 product purity was achieved throughout the test. Membrane contactor modules have been scaled from bench scale 2-inch diameter by 12-inch long (20 ft2 membrane surface area) modules to 4-inch diameter by 60-inch long pilot scale modules (165 ft2 membrane surface area). Pilot scale modules were tested in an integrated absorption/regeneration system for CO2 capture field tests at a coal-fired power plant (Midwest Generation’s Will County Station located in Romeoville, IL). Absorption and regeneration contactors were constructed utilizing high performance super-hydrophobic, nano-porous PEEK membranes with CO2 gas permeance of 2,000 GPU and a 1,000 GPU, respectively. Field tests using aMDEA solvent achieved greater than 90% CO2 removal in a single stage. The absorption mass transfer coefficient was 1.2 (sec)-1, exceeding the initial target of 1.0 (sec)-1. This mass transfer coefficient is over one order of magnitude greater than that of conventional gas/liquid contacting equipment. The economic evaluation based on field tests data indicates that the CO2 capture cost associated with membrane contactor technology is $54.69 (Yr 2011$)/tonne of CO2 captured when using aMDEA as a solvent. It is projected that the DOE’s 2025 cost goal of $40 (Yr 2011$)/tonne of CO2 captured can be met by decreasing membrane module cost and by utilizing advanced CO2 capture solvents. In the second stage of the field test, an advanced solvent, Hitachi’s H3-1 was utilized. The use of H3-1 solvent increased mass transfer coefficient by 17% as compared to aMDEA solvent. The high mass transfer coefficient of H3-1 solvent combined with much more favorable solvent regeneration requirements, indicate that the projected savings achievable with membrane contactor process can be further improved. H3-1 solvent will be used in the next pilot-scale development phase. The integrated absorption/regeneration process design and high performance membrane contactors developed in the current bench-scale program will be used as the base technology for future pilot-scale development.

  6. Uncertainty quantification for CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Zhenxue; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna; Middleton, Richard; Pan, Feng; Jia, Wei; Lee, Si-Yong; McPherson, Brian; Ampomah, William; Grigg, Reid

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study develops a statistical method to perform uncertainty quantification for understanding CO2 storage potential within an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) environment at the Farnsworth Unit of the Anadarko Basin in northern Texas. A set of geostatistical-based Monte Carlo simulations of CO2-oil-water flow and reactive transport in the Morrow formation are conducted for global sensitivity and statistical analysis of the major uncertainty metrics: net CO2 injection, cumulative oil production, cumulative gas (CH4) production, and net water injection. A global sensitivity and response surface analysis indicates that reservoir permeability, porosity, and thickness are the major intrinsic reservoir parameters that control net CO2 injection/storage and oil/gas recovery rates. The well spacing and the initial water saturation also have large impact on the oil/gas recovery rates. Further, this study has revealed key insights into the potential behavior and the operational parameters of CO2 sequestration at CO2-EOR s...

  7. Supported polyethylenimine adsorbents for CO2 capture from flue gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fauth, D.J.; Gray, M.L.; Pennline, H.W.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anthropogenic CO2 emissions produced from fossil fuel combustion are believed to contribute to undesired consequences in global climate. Major contributors towards CO2 emissions are fossil fuel-fired power plants for electricity production. For this reason, CO2 capture from flue gas streams together with permanent sequestration in geologic formations is being considered a viable solution towards mitigation of the major greenhouse gas1. Technologies based on chemical absorption with alkanolamines have been assessed for first generation CO2 post-combustion capture primarily due to its advanced stage of development. However, limitations associated with these chemical solvents (i.e., low CO2 loadings, amine degradation by oxygen, equipment corrosion) manifest themselves in high capital and operating costs with reduced thermal efficiencies. Therefore, necessary design and development of alternative, lower cost approaches for CO2 capture from coal-fired combustion streams are warranted.

  8. 8, 49114947, 2008 NOx-induced ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 8, 4911­4947, 2008 NOx-induced ozone loss processes B. Vogel et al. Title Page Abstract Chemistry and Physics Discussions Model simulations of stratospheric ozone loss caused by enhanced on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 4911 #12;ACPD 8, 4911­4947, 2008 NOx-induced ozone loss

  9. Minimize NOx using only combustion control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penterson, C.A.; Hules, K.R. [Riley Power Inc. (United States)

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The retrofit of a 600 MW opposed wall-fired utility boiler with low-NOx, dual air zone burners and overfire air cut the Wyoming PRB coal burner's NOx output by nearly half. The key to the project's success from the design stage through final testing and boiler tuning was CFD modeling. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (EFRC) - Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary The objective of the DOE Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (NCGC) is to use new investigative tools, combined with experiments...

  11. The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geomechanics of CO 2 storage in deep sedimentaryThis paper provides a review of the geomechanics andmodeling of geomechanics associated with geologic carbon

  12. Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadharajan, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO 2 Geological Storage and Ground Water Resources U.S.and Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC) State and Federal Statutes Storage,

  13. Advanced Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Prepared for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Prepared for the Clean Air Task Force under a grant from...................................................................................... 3 2. Current Status of Post-Combustion Capture

  14. accelerating co2 emissions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    based on the empirical relationship between CO2 per capita emissions (due to fossil fuel combustion and cement production) and corresponding HDI. In order to project per capita...

  15. Consumption-based accounting of CO2 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, S. J; Caldeira, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soviet Union (Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, and Russia),kg CO 2 /$GDP FSS Ukraine Kazakhstan Iran East Asia BelarusAsia China South Africa Kazakhstan Malaysia Russia Thailand

  16. The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strain and microseismicity, well integrity, caprock sealingstrain and microseismicity, well integrity, caprock sealingactions. 7 WELLBORE INTEGRITY The well design of a deep CO 2

  17. Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadharajan, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts Investigating Water Extraction •! LLNL –! Active CObenefits of various water extraction, treatment, and reuseof CO 2 storage and water extraction scenarios –! Technical

  18. Influence of capillary pressure on CO2 storage and monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gabriela

    solutions to mitigate the greenhouse effect. We are interested in analyzing the influence of capillary pressure on CO2 in- jection, storage and monitoring in saline ...

  19. Micromodel Investigations of CO2 Exsolution from Carbonated Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of CO2 Exsolution from Carbonated Water in Sedimentary Rocks. Abstract: In this study, carbon dioxide exsolution from carbonated water is directly observed under reservoir...

  20. CO2 exposure at pressure impacts metabolism and stress responses...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the model sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Abstract: Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration drives physical and geochemical changes in deep...

  1. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2as Heat Transmission...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program eere.energy.gov * The project started in FY10 * Collaboration between LBNL (Pruess) and INL (Redden) - Berkeley leads modeling, CO 2 -brine flow and heat...

  2. Quantum Alloys Offer Prospects for CO2 Management Technologies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    radical new catalysts capable of converting CO2 emissions into fuels, chemicals, and plastics. Their unique discovery involves shrinking gold into a system consisting of just 25...

  3. atmospheric co2 content: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3...

  4. atmospheric co2 concentrations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3...

  5. atmospheric co2 concentration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3...

  6. atmospheric co2 laser: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3...

  7. atmospheric co2 measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3...

  8. atmospheric co2 variations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3...

  9. atmospheric co2 mixing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3...

  10. LIBRARY SERVICES LIBRARY HOURS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    LIBRARY SERVICES LIBRARY HOURS Up-to-date library hours are posted at http Wesleyan ID that is linked to the library circulation database is needed to charge out library materials to visit the Circulation Office in Olin Library 115 to set up their borrowing privileges. If you have

  11. ORNL/CDIAC-160 Climatological Distributions of pH, pCO2, Total CO2, Alkalinity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORNL/CDIAC-160 NDP-094 Climatological Distributions of pH, pCO2, Total CO2, Alkalinity, and CaCO3, Alkalinity, and CaCO3 Saturation in the Global Surface Ocean. ORNL/CDIAC-160, NDP-094. Carbon Dioxide, total CO2 concentration (TCO2), and the degree of CaCO3 saturation for the global surface ocean waters

  12. A Theoretical Study of CO2 Anions on Anatase (101) Surface. ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CO2 Anions on Anatase (101) Surface. A Theoretical Study of CO2 Anions on Anatase (101) Surface. Abstract: Binding configurations of CO2 and CO2 - on perfect and oxygen-deficient...

  13. Inducinga CO2 leak into ashallow aquifer (CO2FieldLab EUROGIA+ project): Monitoring the CO2 plume in groundwaters.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (saline aquifer, depleted oil/gas reservoir), aquifers are ubiquitousin the overlying sedimentary pile in case of unwanted CO2leakages from a storage site. Independently from the nature of the reservoir

  14. Solid molecular basket sorbent for CO2 capture from gas streams with low CO2 concentration at ambient conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiaoxing [Pennsylvania State University; Ma, Xiaoliang [Pennsylvania State University; Schwartz, Viviane [ORNL; Clark, Jason C [ORNL; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL; Zhao, Shuqi [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Xu, Xiaochun [Pennsylvania State University; Song, Chunshan [Pennsylvania State University

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a solid molecular basket sorbent, 50 wt% PEI/SBA-15 was studied for CO2 capture from gas streams with low CO2 concentration at ambient conditions. The sorbent was able to effectively and selectively capture CO2 from a gas stream containing 1% CO2 at 75 C, with a breakthrough and saturation capacity of 63.1 and 66.7 mg/g, respectively, and a selectivity of 14 for CO2/CO and 185 for CO2/Ar. The sorption performance of the sorbent was influenced greatly by the operating temperature. The CO2-TPD study showed that the sorbent could be regenerated at mild conditions (50-110 C) and was stable in the cyclical operations for at least 20 cycles. Furthermore, the possibility for CO2 capture from air using the PEI/SBA-15 sorbent was studied by FTIR and proved by TPD. A capacity of 22.5 mg/g was attained at 75 C via TPD method using a simulated air with 400 ppmv CO2 in N2.

  15. Leakage and Sepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneCO 2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites, Vadose Zoneseepage from geologic carbon sequestration sites may occur.

  16. EGS rock reactions with Supercritical CO2 saturated with water and water saturated with Supercritical CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earl D. Mattson; Travis L. McLing; William Smith; Carl Palmer

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EGS using CO2 as a working fluid will likely involve hydro-shearing low-permeability hot rock reservoirs with a water solution. After that process, the fractures will be flushed with CO2 that is maintained under supercritical conditions (> 70 bars). Much of the injected water in the main fracture will be flushed out with the initial CO2 injection; however side fractures, micro fractures, and the lower portion of the fracture will contain connate water that will interact with the rock and the injected CO2. Dissolution/precipitation reactions in the resulting scCO2/brine/rock systems have the potential to significantly alter reservoir permeability, so it is important to understand where these precipitates form and how are they related to the evolving ‘free’ connate water in the system. To examine dissolution / precipitation behavior in such systems over time, we have conducted non-stirred batch experiments in the laboratory with pure minerals, sandstone, and basalt coupons with brine solution spiked with MnCl2 and scCO2. The coupons are exposed to liquid water saturated with scCO2 and extend above the water surface allowing the upper portion of the coupons to be exposed to scCO2 saturated with water. The coupons were subsequently analyzed using SEM to determine the location of reactions in both in and out of the liquid water. Results of these will be summarized with regard to significance for EGS with CO2 as a working fluid.

  17. Novel CO2 Foam Concepts and Injection Schemes for Improving CO2 Sweep Efficiency in Sandstone and Carbonate Hydrocarbon Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Quoc; Hirasaki, George; Johnston, Keith

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We explored cationic, nonionic and zwitterionic surfactants to identify candidates that have the potential to satisfy all the key requirements for CO2 foams in EOR. We have examined the formation, texture, rheology and stability of CO2 foams as a function of the surfactant structure and formulation variables including temperature, pressure, water/CO2 ratio, surfactant concentration, salinity and concentration of oil. Furthermore, the partitioning of surfactants between oil and water as well as CO2 and water was examined in conjunction with adsorption measurements on limestone by the Hirasaki lab to develop strategies to optimize the transport of surfactants in reservoirs.

  18. Single photon ionization of van der Waals clusters with a soft x-ray laser: ,,CO2...n and ,,CO2...n,,H2O...m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    Single photon ionization of van der Waals clusters with a soft x-ray laser: ,,CO2...n and ,,CO2...n 2006; published online 20 October 2006 Pure neutral CO2 n clusters and mixed CO2 n H2O m clustersV. The distribution of pure CO2 n clusters decreases roughly exponentially with increasing cluster size. During

  19. Greener Solvent Selection and Solvent Recycling for CO2 Capture Economically removing CO2 from the flue gases of coal-fired power plants would alleviate concerns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Arie, Jezekiel

    to remove CO2 from dilute gas streams because they have very high affinity for CO2. Unfortunately high solvents that balance high affinity for CO2 with ease of solvent recovery and reuse. Because the numberGreener Solvent Selection and Solvent Recycling for CO2 Capture Economically removing CO2 from

  20. Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Others* Air Conditioner Frozen Scenario Total CO2 EmissionsCO2 Emissions (million tonnes CO2)Improvement Scenario Total CO2 Emissions *Others include:

  1. Development of Novel CO2 Adsorbents for Capture of CO2 from Flue Gas

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451 CleanFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASENovel CO 2

  2. Intercomparison of simulation models for CO2 disposal in underground storage reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Law, David; Oldenburg, Curt

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil recovery (EOR) using CO2 requires an understanding ofexperience with using CO2 for EOR projects (SPE, 1999), and

  3. Quantifying Regional Economic Impacts of CO2 Intensity Targets in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Da

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To address rising energy use and CO2 emissions, China’s leadership has enacted energy and CO2 intensity

  4. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2 mitigation potential and costs in China's electricityCO2 mitigation potential and costs in China's electricity

  5. Original article Responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and nitrogen supply of Quercus* School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, 326 Newins-Ziegler Hall, Gainesville. Elevated [CO2] increased biomass production only in the high-N treatment. Fine root/foliage mass ratio

  6. Comprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Richard Y.

    , carbon sequestration, ecosystem, multi-tier, multi-modal, multi-scale, self organized, sensor array to comprehensively monitor ecosystem carbon sequestration. The network consists of CO2, Weather (pressureComprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems and Its Relation

  7. HYDROMECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION FOR SITE SELECTION IN CO2 PERMANENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    -BarcelonaTech), Barcelona, Spain 3 Energy City Foundation (CIUDEN), Spanish Government CO2 Geological Storage Programme (Vilarrasa et al., 2011, Energy Procedia) Trees killed by CO2 leakage in Mammoth Mountains (Farrar et al EQUATIONS Mass conservation equation Darcy's law Momentum balance Effective stress Hooke's law (linear

  8. The contribution of CO2 capture and storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The contribution of CO2 capture and storage to a sustainable energy system Policy brief the prospects of CO2 capture and storage (CCS) technologies in the power sector. Based on the results of 10. The uncertainties, particularly in storage capacities, are large. Using conservative estimates in line with the IPCC

  9. European and Global Perspectives for CO2 Capture and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    European and Global Perspectives for CO2 Capture and Storage Heleen Groenenberg, Martine Uyterlinde, ECN Policy Studies, The Netherlands Abstract CO2 capture and storage (CCS) is increasingly mentioned a large point source, compression, transport and subsequent storage in a geological reservoir, the ocean

  10. Ex post evaluations of CO2 based taxes: a survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    of fossil fuels, and which are introduced with the explicit intention of abating CO2 emissions. This paper and, especially, subsidies, has been called into question. Secondly, the CO2-based taxes themselves and subsidies), it is unlikely that they have been cost-effective (in the sense of attaining their environmental

  11. Distribution of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distribution of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean C. L. Sabine,1 R. A. Feely,2 R. M. Key,3 J] This work presents an estimate of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean based on measurements from the WOCE tracers; 9355 Information Related to Geographic Region: Pacific Ocean; KEYWORDS: Pacific Ocean

  12. arbon dioxide (CO2 atmosphere has increased by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    responsive to rising atmospheric CO2 concentration than C3 species. In the southwestern United States substrate for photosynthetic energy acquisition by life, the process of using light energy to combine CO2 surface and scale up to affect the landscape water balance. Thus, through its impacts on plant water use

  13. The Energy and CO2 Emissions Impact of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for developing renewable electricity--wind, solar, and biomass-- would require expansion on an unprecedentedThe Energy and CO2 Emissions Impact of Renewable Energy Development in China Xiliang Zhang, Tianyu://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 The Energy and CO2 Emissions Impact of Renewable Energy Development

  14. Oxidation in Environments with Elevated CO2 Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon H. Holcomb

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from fossil energy power productions focus primarily on either pre- or post-combustion removal of CO2. The research presented here examines corrosion and oxidation issues associated with two types of post-combustion CO2 removal processes—oxyfuel combustion in refit boilers and oxyfuel turbines.

  15. Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects Within The Frame Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3 Contents Abstract 2 1 Introduction 6 1.1 Problem background

  16. Chemical Impact of Elevated CO2on Geothermal Energy Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a two phase project to assess the geochemical impact of CO2on geothermal energy production by: analyzing the geochemistry of existing geothermal fields with elevated natural CO2; measuring realistic rock-water rates for geothermal systems using laboratory and field-based experiments to simulate production scale impacts.

  17. Variations in 13 C discrimination during CO2 exchange1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    exchange. Observed 13 were described well by the classical model of5 Farquhar, O'Leary & Berry (1982 enzymes, as well as to differential diffusivities of 13 CO2 and 12 CO2 in air9 (O'Leary, 1984; Farquhar, O'Leary

  18. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T.

    CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Third Quarterly Report 2005 Quarterly Progress absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K2CO3 promoted by piperazine. Modeling.................................................................................................................................. 11 Task 1 ­ Modeling Performance of Absorption/Stripping of CO2 with Aqueous K2CO3 Promoted

  19. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T.

    CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Fourth Quarterly Report 2005 Quarterly Progress absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K2CO3 promoted by piperazine. In Campaign.................................................................................................................................... 9 Task 1 ­ Modeling Performance of Absorption/Stripping of CO2 with Aqueous K2CO3 Promoted

  20. Recovery Act: Innovative CO2 Sequestration from Flue Gas Using Industrial Sources and Innovative Concept for Beneficial CO2 Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dando, Neal; Gershenzon, Mike; Ghosh, Rajat

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    field testing of a biomimetic in-duct scrubbing system for the capture of gaseous CO2 coupled with sequestration of captured carbon by carbonation of alkaline industrial wastes. The Phase 2 project, reported on here, combined efforts in enzyme development, scrubber optimization, and sequestrant evaluations to perform an economic feasibility study of technology deployment. The optimization of carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme reactivity and stability are critical steps in deployment of this technology. A variety of CA enzyme variants were evaluated for reactivity and stability in both bench scale and in laboratory pilot scale testing to determine current limits in enzyme performance. Optimization of scrubber design allowed for improved process economics while maintaining desired capture efficiencies. A range of configurations, materials, and operating conditions were examined at the Alcoa Technical Center on a pilot scale scrubber. This work indicated that a cross current flow utilizing a specialized gas-liquid contactor offered the lowest system operating energy. Various industrial waste materials were evaluated as sources of alkalinity for the scrubber feed solution and as sources of calcium for precipitation of carbonate. Solids were mixed with a simulated sodium bicarbonate scrubber blowdown to comparatively examine reactivity. Supernatant solutions and post-test solids were analyzed to quantify and model the sequestration reactions. The best performing solids were found to sequester between 2.3 and 2.9 moles of CO2 per kg of dry solid in 1-4 hours of reaction time. These best performing solids were cement kiln dust, circulating dry scrubber ash, and spray dryer absorber ash. A techno-economic analysis was performed to evaluate the commercial viability of the proposed carbon capture and sequestration process in full-scale at an aluminum smelter and a refinery location. For both cases the in-duct scrubber technology was compared to traditional amine- based capture. Incorporation of the laboratory results showed that for the application at the aluminum smelter, the in-duct scrubber system is more economical than traditional methods. However, the reverse is true for the refinery case, where the bauxite residue is not effective enough as a sequestrant, combined with challenges related to contaminants in the bauxite residue accumulating in and fouling the scrubber absorbent. Sensitivity analyses showed that the critical variables by which process economics could be improved are enzyme concentration, efficiency, and half-life. At the end of the first part of the Phase 2 project, a gate review (DOE Decision Zero Gate Point) was conducted to decide on the next stages of the project. The original plan was to follow the pre-testing phase with a detailed design for the field testing. Unfavorable process economics, however, resulted in a decision to conclude the project before moving to field testing. It is noted that CO2 Solutions proposed an initial solution to reduce process costs through more advanced enzyme management, however, DOE program requirements restricting any technology development extending beyond 2014 as commercial deployment timeline did not allow this solution to be undertaken.

  1. ENHANCING THE ATOMIC-LEVEL UNDERSTANDING OF CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION MECHANISMS VIA ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.V.G. Chizmeshya; M.J. McKelvy; G.H. Wolf; R.W. Carpenter; D.A. Gormley; J.R. Diefenbacher; R. Marzke

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fossil fuels currently provide 85% of the world's energy needs, with the majority coming from coal, due to its low cost, wide availability, and high energy content. The extensive use of coal-fired power assumes that the resulting CO2 emissions can be vented to the atmosphere. However, exponentially increasing atmospheric CO2 levels have brought this assumption under critical review. Over the last decade, this discussion has evolved from whether exponentially increasing anthropogenic CO2 emissions will adversely affect the global environment, to the timing and magnitude of their impact. A variety of sequestration technologies are being explored to mitigate CO2 emissions. These technologies must be both environmentally benign and economically viable. Mineral carbonation is an attractive candidate technology as it disposes of CO2 as geologically stable, environmentally benign mineral carbonates, clearly satisfying the first criteria. The primary challenge for mineral carbonation is cost-competitive process development. CO2 mineral sequestration--the conversion of stationary-source CO2 emissions into mineral carbonates (e.g., magnesium and calcium carbonate, MgCO3 and CaCO3)--has recently emerged as one of the most promising sequestration options, providing permanent CO2 disposal, rather than storage. In this approach a magnesium-bearing feedstock mineral (typically serpentine or olivine; available in vast quantities globally) is specially processed and allowed to react with CO2 under controlled conditions. This produces a mineral carbonate which (1) is environmentally benign, (2) already exists in nature in quantities far exceeding those that could result from carbonating the world's known fossil fuel reserves, and (3) is stable on a geological time scale. Minimizing the process cost via optimization of the reaction rate and degree of completion is the remaining challenge. As members of the DOE/NETL managed National Mineral Sequestration Working Group we have already significantly improved our understanding of mineral carbonation. Group members at the Albany Research Center have recently shown that carbonation of olivine and serpentine, which naturally occurs over geological time (i.e., 100,000s of years), can be accelerated to near completion in hours. Further process refinement will require a synergetic science/engineering approach that emphasizes simultaneous investigation of both thermodynamic processes and the detailed microscopic, atomic-level mechanisms that govern carbonation kinetics. Our previously funded Phase I Innovative Concepts project demonstrated the value of advanced quantum-mechanical modeling as a complementary tool in bridging important gaps in our understanding of the atomic/molecular structure and reaction mechanisms that govern CO2 mineral sequestration reaction processes for the model Mg-rich lamellar hydroxide feedstock material Mg(OH)2. In the present simulation project, improved techniques and more efficient computational schemes have allowed us to expand and augment these capabilities and explore more complex Mg-rich, lamellar hydroxide-based feedstock materials, including the serpentine-based minerals. These feedstock materials are being actively investigated due to their wide availability, and low-cost CO2 mineral sequestration potential. Cutting-edge first principles quantum chemical, computational solid-state and materials simulation methodology studies proposed herein, have been strategically integrated with our new DOE supported (ASU-Argonne National Laboratory) project to investigate the mechanisms that govern mineral feedstock heat-treatment and aqueous/fluid-phase serpentine mineral carbonation in situ. This unified, synergetic theoretical and experimental approach has provided a deeper understanding of the key reaction mechanisms than either individual approach can alone. We used ab initio techniques to significantly advance our understanding of atomic-level processes at the solid/solution interface by elucidating the origin of vibrational, electronic, x-ray and electron energy loss sp

  2. Exsolution Enhanced Oil Recovery with Concurrent CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuo, Lin; Benson, Sally M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel EOR method using carbonated water injection followed by depressurization is introduced. Results from micromodel experiments are presented to demonstrate the fundamental principles of this oil recovery method. A depressurization process (1 MPa/hr) was applied to a micromodel following carbonated water injection (Ca ? 10-5). The exsolved CO2 in water-filled pores blocked water flow in swiped portions and displaced water into oil-filled pores. Trapped oil after the carbonated water injection was mobilized by sequentially invading water. This method's self-distributed mobility control and local clogging was tested in a sandstone sample under reservoir conditions. A 10% incremental oil recovery was achieved by lowering the pressure 2 MPa below the CO2 liberation pressure. Additionally, exsolved CO2 resides in the pores of a reservoir as an immobile phase with a high residual saturation after oil production, exhibiting a potential synergy opportunity between CO2 EOR and CO2 sequestration

  3. Plant-Wide NOx Reduction Strategies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baukal, C.; Waibel, D.; Webster, T.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (adapted from ref. 1). Technology Approximate Reduction (%) Approximate Emissions (lb/MMBtu) Standard Burners Base Case 0.14 Low-NOx Burners (LNB) 60% 0.06 Ultra-Low-NOx- Burners (ULNB) 80 – 95% 0.007 – 0.03 Flue Gas Recirculation 55% 0..., and oxidizer switching. Fuel switching is simply replacing a more polluting fuel with a less polluting fuel. For example, fuel oils generally contain some organically-bound nitrogen that produces fuel NOx. Natural gas does not normally contain any...

  4. Diffusion of CO2 During Hydrate Formation and Dissolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franklin M. Orr, Jr.

    2002-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were performed to measure the rate of diffusion of CO2 through hydrate films. Hydrate films were created in a capillary tube, and the growth of the hydrate film was measured. Difficulties were encountered in creating hydrate repeatedly, and some non-uniform growth of the films was observed. Sufficient observations were obtained to demonstrate that hydrate growth occurs preferentially on the hydrate/water side of the interface, rather than at the hydrate/CO2 interface. Diffusion coefficients were estimated from observations of the rate of growth of the hydrate film along with estimates of the solubility of CO2 in water and of the concentration gradient across the hydrate layer. The experimental observations indicate that hydrate formation occurs much more rapidly at the hydrate water interface than at the hydrate/CO2 interface. Any growth of hydrate at the CO2/hydrate interface was too slow to be observed at the time scale of the experiments. That observation is consistent with the idea that CO2 can move more easily through the hydrate, presumably by hopping between hydrate cages, than water can move through the hydrate, presumably by lattice hopping. Estimated diffusion coefficients were in the range 1-3E-06 cm2/sec. Those values are about an order of magnitude lower than the diffusion coefficient for CO2 in liquid water, but four orders of magnitude larger than the value for diffusion of CO2 in a solid. The rate of diffusion through the hydrate controls both the creation of new hydrate at the hydrate/water interface and the rate at which CO2 dissolves in the liquid water and diffuses away from the hydrate layer. Formation of a hydrate layer reduces the rate at which CO2 dissolves in liquid water.

  5. Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) with CO2 as heat transmission fluid--A scheme for combining recovery of renewable energy with geologic storage of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Could Sequestration of CO2 be Combined with the DevelopmentTOUGH2 Code for Studies of CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers,and J. Ennis- King. CO2-H2O Mixtures in the Geological

  6. Odors that Modify CO2 Receptor Activity in Insects and Their Effect on Innate CO2-Mediated Behavior and Neuronal Plasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Stephanie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intermediates in Insect CO2 Sensory Systems. Science Certel,2007). The molecular basis of CO2 reception in Drosophila.J. (2004). Floral CO2 Reveals Flower Profitability to Moths.

  7. Ris Energy Report 6 CO2 capture and storage 2 6.1 What is CO2 capture and storage?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2 Gas, oil Air O2 H2 Raw material Gas, ammonia, steel Air/O2 Steam Figure 15: the three main to produce more Co2 per unit of product than a plant without CCS (upper bar). With ef- fective Co2 removal mines. The last two of these, known re- spectively as enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced coal bed

  8. GAS HYDRATE EQUILIBRIA FOR CO2-N2 AND CO2-CH4 GAS MIXTURES, EXPERIMENTS AND MODELLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    steelmaking plants, gas or coal power plants, chemical plants or natural gas production plants. Facing are by definition localized at the plants, like e.g. steelmaking plants, gas or coal power plants, chemical plants be in the order of several cubic meters of CO2 per second. In power plants, the concentration of CO2 is generally

  9. Predicting PVT data for CO2brine mixtures for black-oil simulation of CO2 geological storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Predicting PVT data for CO2­brine mixtures for black-oil simulation of CO2 geological storage efficiency of the black-oil approach promote application of black-oil simulation for large-scale geological into geological formations has been considered as a potential method to mitigate climate change. Accurate

  10. Measurements of fluxes of water vapour, CO2 and pCO2 are obtained from a coastal site in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurements of fluxes of water vapour, CO2 and pCO2 are obtained from a coastal site in Sweden study national reports UK The first eleven SOLAS projects supported by the Natural Environment Research the atmosphere, including biological interactions affecting DMS production and the role of upwelling in trace gas

  11. Gas Hydrate Equilibria for CO2-N2 and CO2-CH4 gas mixtures Experimental studies and Thermodynamic Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Gas Hydrate Equilibria for CO2-N2 and CO2-CH4 gas mixtures ­ Experimental studies and Thermodynamic of experimental data on the phase equilibrium of gas hydrates in the presence of binary gas mixtures comprising CO of the gas phase as well as the hydrate phase without the need to sample the hydrate. The experimental

  12. Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Preliminary Report: Intergrated Nox Emissions Savings from EE/RE Programs Statewide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Lewis, C.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J..; Degelman, L.; McKelvey, K.; Clardige, D.; Ellis, S.; Kim, H.; Zilbershtein. G.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the integrated total electricity savings from all programs are: ? Annual electricity savings is 13,354,918 MWh/year (3,723 tons-NOx/year) and ? OSD electricity savings is 36,079 MWh/day, which would be a 1,503 MW average hourly load reduction during the OSD... period (9.89 tons-NOx/day). By 2013, the integrated total electricity savings from all programs are: ? Annual electricity savings will be 15,391,293 MWh/year (4,296 tons-NOx/year) and ? OSD electricity savings will be 41,691 MWh/day, which would be a...

  13. Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) Preliminary Report: Integrated Nox Emissions Savings from EE/RE Programs Statewide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Zilbershtein, G.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Clardige, D.; Parker, P.; Ellis, S.; Kim, H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for this purpose. In 2012, the integrated total electricity savings from all programs are: ? Annual electricity savings is 16,413,917 MWh/year (4,609 tons-NOx/year) and ? OSD electricity savings is 44,366 MWh/day, which would be a 1,849 MW average hourly... load reduction during the OSD period (12.35 tons-NOx/day). By 2013, the integrated total electricity savings from all programs are: ? Annual electricity savings will be 17,661,268 MWh/year (4,959 tons-NOx/year) and ? OSD electricity savings...

  14. Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) Preliminary Report: Integrated NOx Emissions Savings from EE/RE Programs Statewide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Gilman, D.; Baltazar, J. C.; Lewis, C.; McKelvey, K.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Degelman, L.; Liu, Z.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    specially prepared for this purpose. In 2009, the cumulative total annual electricity savings from all programs is 25,585,081 MWh/year (15,327 tons-NOx/year). The total cumulative OSD electricity savings from all programs is 70,442 MWh/day, which would... be a 2,935 MW average hourly load reduction during the OSD period (40.72 tons-NOx/day). By 2013, the total cumulative annual electricity savings from will be 31,979,929 MWh/year (19,314 tons-NOx/year). The total cumulative OSD electricity savings...

  15. Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Lean Natural Gas Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Ponnusamy, Senthil [ORNL; Ferguson, Harley Douglas [ORNL; Williams, Aaron M [ORNL; Tassitano, James B [ORNL

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed energy is an approach for meeting energy needs that has several advantages. Distributed energy improves energy security during natural disasters or terrorist actions, improves transmission grid reliability by reducing grid load, and enhances power quality through voltage support and reactive power. In addition, distributed energy can be efficient since transmission losses are minimized. One prime mover for distributed energy is the natural gas reciprocating engine generator set. Natural gas reciprocating engines are flexible and scalable solutions for many distributed energy needs. The engines can be run continuously or occasionally as peak demand requires, and their operation and maintenance is straightforward. Furthermore, system efficiencies can be maximized when natural gas reciprocating engines are combined with thermal energy recovery for cooling, heating, and power applications. Expansion of natural gas reciprocating engines for distributed energy is dependent on several factors, but two prominent factors are efficiency and emissions. Efficiencies must be high enough to enable low operating costs, and emissions must be low enough to permit significant operation hours, especially in non-attainment areas where emissions are stringently regulated. To address these issues the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission launched research and development programs called Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) and Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (ARICE), respectively. Fuel efficiency and low emissions are two primary goals of these programs. The work presented here was funded by the ARES program and, thus, addresses the ARES 2010 goals of 50% thermal efficiency (fuel efficiency) and <0.1 g/bhp-hr emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). A summary of the goals for the ARES program is given in Table 1-1. ARICE 2007 goals are 45% thermal efficiency and <0.015 g/bhp-hr NOx. Several approaches for improving the efficiency and emissions of natural gas reciprocating engines are being pursued. Approaches include: stoichiometric engine operation with exhaust gas recirculation and three-way catalysis, advanced combustion modes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition, and extension of the lean combustion limit with advanced ignition concepts and/or hydrogen mixing. The research presented here addresses the technical approach of combining efficient lean spark-ignited natural gas combustion with low emissions obtained from a lean NOx trap catalyst aftertreatment system. This approach can be applied to current lean engine technology or advanced lean engines that may result from related efforts in lean limit extension. Furthermore, the lean NOx trap technology has synergy with hydrogen-assisted lean limit extension since hydrogen is produced from natural gas during the lean NOx trap catalyst system process. The approach is also applicable to other lean engines such as diesel engines, natural gas turbines, and lean gasoline engines; other research activities have focused on those applications. Some commercialization of the technology has occurred for automotive applications (both diesel and lean gasoline engine vehicles) and natural gas turbines for stationary power. The research here specifically addresses barriers to commercialization of the technology for large lean natural gas reciprocating engines for stationary power. The report presented here is a comprehensive collection of research conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on lean NOx trap catalysis for lean natural gas reciprocating engines. The research was performed in the Department of Energy's ARES program from 2003 to 2007 and covers several aspects of the technology. All studies were conducted at ORNL on a Cummins C8.3G+ natural gas engine chosen based on industry input to simulate large lean natural gas engines. Specific technical areas addressed by the research include: NOx reduction efficiency, partial oxidation and reforming chemistry, and the effects of sulfur poisons on the partial oxidation

  16. PVTx properties of the CO2H2O and CO2H2ONaCl systems below 647 K: Assessment of experimental data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    PVTx properties of the CO2­H2O and CO2­H2O­NaCl systems below 647 K: Assessment of experimental-composition (PVTx) properties for the CO2­H2O and CO2­H2O­NaCl systems. This paper presents a comprehensive review. Keywords: CO2 sequestration; PVTx properties; Volume; Density; Thermodynamic modeling 1. Introduction CO2­H

  17. Impact of realistic hourly emissions profiles on air pollutants concentrations modelled with CHIMERE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Impact of realistic hourly emissions profiles on air pollutants concentrations modelled Keywords: Atmospheric composition European air quality Anthropogenic emissions a b s t r a c t Regional inputs data like anthropogenic surface emissions of NOx, VOCs and particulate matter. These emissions

  18. CO2 Capture with Liquid-to-Solid Absorbents: CO2 Capture Process Using Phase-Changing Absorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPACCT Project: GE and the University of Pittsburgh are developing a unique CO2 capture process in which a liquid absorbent, upon contact with CO2, changes into a solid phase. Once in solid form, the material can be separated and the CO2 can be released for storage by heating. Upon heating, the absorbent returns to its liquid form, where it can be reused to capture more CO2. The approach is more efficient than other solventbased processes because it avoids the heating of extraneous solvents such as water. This ultimately leads to a lower cost of CO2 capture and will lower the additional cost to produce electricity for coal-fired power plants that retrofit their facilities to include this technology.

  19. L:\\SEO\\SEOGN\\WORK-STUDY\\SWS\\SWS11\\EarningsChart.xls Hourly Rate 10 Hours 15 Hours 20 Hours 25 Hours 30 Hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    L:\\SEO\\SEOGN\\WORK-STUDY\\SWS\\SWS11\\EarningsChart.xls Hourly Rate 10 Hours 15 Hours 20 Hours 25 Hours, 2011 through September 4, 2011, the entire Summer Program). Summer 2011 Earnings Chart #12;L:\\SEO,200 $9,000 $10,800 $25.00 $3,750 $5,625 $7,500 $9,375 $11,250 #12;L:\\SEO\\SEOGN\\WORK-STUDY\\SWS\\SWS11

  20. Abstract--This paper proposes a multi-hour thermal load dispatch model (24-hour time horizon) controlling NOx emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    pioneered the Clean Air Act (CAA) in 1963 which established a criteria pollutants list considered dangerous and the Netherlands are among the most advanced countries in relation to environmental pollution control. USA in 1970 to set the uniform national standards for air quality, to create the Environmental Protection

  1. Combustion-Assisted CO2 Capture Using MECC Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Steven R [ORNL; Gray, Dr. Joshua R. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Aiken, S.C.; Brinkman, Dr. Kyle S. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Aiken, S.C.; Huang, Dr. Kevin [University of South Carolina, Columbia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed Electron and Carbonate ion Conductor (MECC) membranes have been proposed as a means to separate CO2 from power plant flue gas. Here a modified MECC CO2 capture process is analyzed that supplements retentate pressurization and permeate evacuation as a means to create a CO2 driving force with a process assisted by the catalytic combustion of syngas on the permeate side of the membrane. The combustion reactions consume transported oxygen, making it unavailable for the backwards transport reaction. With this change, the MECC capture system becomes exothermic, and steam for electricity production may be generated from the waste heat. Greater than 90% of the CO2 in the flue gas may be captured, and a compressed CO2 product stream is produced. A fossil-fueled power plant using this process would consume 14% more fuel per unit electricity produced than a power plant with no CO2 capture system, and has the potential to meet U.S. DOE s goal that deployment of a CO2 capture system at a fossil-fueled power plant should not increase the cost of electricity from the combined facility by more than 30%.

  2. Et notat til "det elektriske CO2 projekt". Med udgangspunkt i de studerendes CO2 tips analyseres CO2 emissionen i de forskellige belysningssituationer. De forskellige tips ses p projektets hjemmeside

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Et notat til "det elektriske CO2 projekt". Med udgangspunkt i de studerendes CO2 tips analyseres CO2 emissionen i de forskellige belysningssituationer. De forskellige tips ses på projektets hjemmeside www.co2tips.dk Indholdsfortegnelse EL-FORBRUG TIL BELYSNING I HUSHOLDNINGER

  3. Methanogenic Conversion of CO2 Into CH4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, S.H., Ferry, J.G., Schoell, M.

    2012-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This SBIR project evaluated the potential to remediate geologic CO2 sequestration sites into useful methane gas fields by application of methanogenic bacteria. Such methanogens are present in a wide variety of natural environments, converting CO2 into CH4 under natural conditions. We conclude that the process is generally feasible to apply within many of the proposed CO2 storage reservoir settings. However, extensive further basic R&D still is needed to define the precise species, environments, nutrient growth accelerants, and economics of the methanogenic process. Consequently, the study team does not recommend Phase III commercial application of the technology at this early phase.

  4. Co2(CO)8 Mediated PausonKhand Reaction (PKR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    1 Co2(CO)8 Mediated Pauson­Khand Reaction (PKR) Nathan Bennett May 11, 2009 R1 R2 R5 R6R4 R3 + Co2(CO)8 Promoter / Solvent CO atmosphere O R1 R2 R6 R5 R3 R4 X n R R' (n = 1-3) X = O, NR'', CR''2 Co2(CO)8 Promoter / Solvent CO atmosphere X n R O R' Pauson-Khand Reaction (PKR) General Information R1 R

  5. Applications of mineral carbonation to geological sequestration of CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, William K.; Rush, G.E.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological sequestration of CO2 is a promising near-term sequestration methodology. However, migration of the CO2 beyond the natural reservoir seals could become problematic, thus the identification of means to enhance the natural seals could prove beneficial. Injection of a mineral reactant slurry could provide a means to enhance the natural reservoir seals by supplying the necessary cations for precipitation of mineral carbonates. The subject study evaluates the merit of several mineral slurry injection strategies by conduct of a series of laboratory-scale CO2 flood tests on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone from the Illinois Basin.

  6. Plasma-Activated Lean NOx Catalysis for Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2002deeraardahl.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty NOx Emissions Control: Reformer-Assisted vs. Plasma-Facilitated Lean NOx Catalysis Selective reduction of NOx in...

  7. OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David R. Thompson; Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional wisdom says adding oxygen to a combustion system enhances product throughput, system efficiency, and, unless special care is taken, increases NOx emissions. This increase in NOx emissions is typically due to elevated flame temperatures associated with oxygen use leading to added thermal NOx formation. Innovative low flame temperature oxy-fuel burner designs have been developed and commercialized to minimize both thermal and fuel NOx formation for gas and oil fired industrial furnaces. To be effective these systems require close to 100% oxy-fuel combustion and the cost of oxygen is paid for by fuel savings and other benefits. For applications to coal-fired utility boilers at the current cost of oxygen, however, it is not economically feasible to use 100% oxygen for NOx control. In spite of this conventional wisdom, Praxair and its team members, in partnership with the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory, have developed a novel way to use oxygen to reduce NOx emissions without resorting to complete oxy-fuel conversion. In this concept oxygen is added to the combustion process to enhance operation of a low NOx combustion system. Only a small fraction of combustion air is replaced with oxygen in the process. By selectively adding oxygen to a low NOx combustion system it is possible to reduce NOx emissions from nitrogen-containing fuels, including pulverized coal, while improving combustion characteristics such as unburned carbon. A combination of experimental work and modeling was used to define how well oxygen enhanced combustion could reduce NOx emissions. The results of this work suggest that small amounts of oxygen replacement can reduce the NOx emissions as compared to the air-alone system. NOx emissions significantly below 0.15 lbs/MMBtu were measured. Oxygen addition was also shown to reduce carbon in ash. Comparison of the costs of using oxygen for NOx control against competing technologies, such as SCR, show that this concept offers substantial savings over SCR and is an economically attractive alternative to purchasing NOx credits or installing other conventional technologies. In conjunction with the development of oxygen based low NOx technology, Praxair also worked on developing the economically enhancing oxygen transport membrane (OTM) technology which is ideally suited for integration with combustion systems to achieve further significant cost reductions and efficiency improvements. This OTM oxygen production technology is based on ceramic mixed conductor membranes that operate at high temperatures and can be operated in a pressure driven mode to separate oxygen with infinite selectivity and high flux. An OTM material was selected and characterized. OTM elements were successfully fabricated. A single tube OTM reactor was designed and assembled. Testing of dense OTM elements was conducted with promising oxygen flux results of 100% of target flux. However, based on current natural gas prices and stand-alone air separation processes, ceramic membranes do not offer an economic advantage for this application. Under a different DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement, Praxair is continuing to develop oxygen transport membranes for the Advanced Boiler where the economics appear more attractive.

  8. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project during the period from 10/1/2001 through 01/02/2006. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, our efforts during this project were focused on the selection of candidate organisms and growth surfaces and initiating long-term tests in the bench-scale and pilot-scale bioreactor test systems. Specific results and accomplishments for the program include: (1) CRF-2 test system: (a) Sampling test results have shown that the initial mass of algae loaded into the Carbon Recycling Facility Version 2 (CRF-2) system can be estimated with about 3% uncertainty using a statistical sampling procedure. (b) The pressure shim header pipe insert design was shown to have better flow for harvesting than the drilled-hole design. (c) The CRF-2 test system has undergone major improvements to produce the high flow rates needed for harvesting (as determined by previous experiments). The main changes to the system are new stainless steel header/frame units, with increased flow capacity and a modified pipe-end-sealing method to improve flow uniformity, and installation and plumbing for a new high flow harvesting pump. Qualitative system tests showed that the harvesting system performed wonderfully, cleaning the growth surfaces within a matter of seconds. (d) Qualitative tests have shown that organisms can be repopulated on a harvested section of a bioreactor screen, demonstrating that continuous bioreactor operation is feasible, with continuous cycles of harvesting and repopulating screens. (e) Final preparations are underway for quantitative, long-term tests in the CRF-2 with weekly harvesting. (2) Pilot-scale test system: (a) The construction of the pilot-scale bioreactor was completed, including the solar collector and light distribution system. Over the course of the project, the solar collector used in the light delivery system showed some degradation, but performed well overall. (b) Testing confirmed that algae can be grown in a sustainable fashion in the pilot bioreactor, even with intermittent availability of sunlight. (c) The pilot-scale tests indicated that algal growth rate followed photon delivery during productivity testing. (3) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (a) The aeration of growth media with 5% CO{sub 2} in air stimulates cyanobacterial growth 10-20 times over that with air alone. It is possible that the rate of the stimulation of cyanobacterial growth in the CRF will be higher because cyanobacteria will be grown as a biofilm. We plan to increase the concentration to 15% CO{sub 2} in air. (b) Tests have shown a doubling time of the cyanobacterial culture of about 7.5 hours with illumination of about 170 {micro}mol m{sup -2} sec{sup -1}. All lower levels of illumination led to a decrease in the cyanobacterial growth rate. (c) Macroscopical and microscopical observations suggest that the culture of this isolate undergoes significant morphological changes after 60-70 hours of incubation in the batch culture mode. First of all, the culture begins to clump. This clumping could lead to the decrease of effective illumination of culture and may reflect a medium alkalinization. (d) Organization of our collection of the thermophilic cyanobacteria isolated from Yellowstone National Park has resulted in 13 unialgal cultures of thermophilic cyanobacteria. (e) A new species (even probably a new genus) of cyanobacteria, 5.2 s. c. 1, isolated from LaDuke Spring in Great Yellowstone Basin, demonstrates an elevated resistance to some compounds of iron. This might be very important for our project, because plant gases may have elevated amount of iron. Our study of the effect of different concentration of FeCl{sub 3}* 6H{sub 2}O on the growth of the 5.2 s.c.1 isolate showed that iron additions stimulated rather then inhibited the growth of the isolate. Because of this we would recommend this isolate for further experiments. (f) The shape of the Chlorogloeopsis siderophila cells (cyanobacteria) was found to be affected b

  9. Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (EFRC) - Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager (Energy Sciences Area, LBNL) An organization chart of the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 Research Teams: Thrust 1: Fractured Shale Ian Bourg, Thrust 1 Lead,...

  10. co2-use-reuse | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    provide economic benefits for fossil fuel-fired power plants or industrial processes. CO2 utilization through enhanced oil recovery (EOR) could also be pursued as a means to...

  11. Canada’s Bitumen Industry Under CO2 Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Y.-H. Henry

    We investigate the effects of implementing CO2 emissions reduction policies on Canada’s oil sands industry, the largest of its kind in the world. The production of petroleum products from oils sands involves extraction of ...

  12. atmospheric co2 enrichment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Soil carbon sequestration in a pine forest after 9 years of atmospheric CO2 enrichment...

  13. High Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to estimate the total magmatic or metamorphic CO2 released from such areas. To assess the performance of accumulation chamber systems at fluxes one to three orders of magnitude...

  14. Implications of "peak oil" for atmospheric CO2 and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kharecha, P A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peaking of global oil production may have a large effect on future atmospheric CO2 amount and climate change, depending upon choices made for subsequent energy sources. We suggest that, if estimates of oil and gas reserves by the Energy Information Administration are realistic, it is feasible to keep atmospheric CO2 from exceeding approximately 450 ppm, provided that future exploitation of the huge reservoirs of coal and unconventional fossil fuels incorporates carbon capture and sequestration. Existing coal-fired power plants, without sequestration, must be phased out before mid-century to achieve this limit on atmospheric CO2. We also suggest that it is important to "stretch" oil reserves via energy efficiency, thus avoiding the need to extract liquid fuels from coal or unconventional fossil fuels. We argue that a rising price on carbon emissions is probably needed to keep CO2 beneath the 450 ppm ceiling.

  15. Electron Transfer Dynamics in Photocatalytic CO2 Conversion ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    etc.) to slowly convert stored CO2 into more useful products such as methane and methanol. Photocatalysis is the acceleration of a light-induced reaction in the presence of a...

  16. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quantitative models enables linking risk to the failure of a specific component, for ex- ample using sensitivity analysis.analysis of the Risks associated to well leakage: aquifer contamination and CO 2 release. Quantitative

  17. THERMOCATALYTIC CO2-FREE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN FROM HYDROCARBON FUELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the process efficiency. However these impurities may result in contamination of hydrogen by CO, CO2 and H2S which should be removed from the product gas using methanation and H2S scrubbing steps, respectively. 11

  18. Modeling the release of CO2 in the deep ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liro, Christopher R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea of capturing and disposing of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants has recently received attention as a possible mitigation strategy to counteract potential global warming due ...

  19. System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO 2 escapes the reservoir through the abandoned well. Theof the abandoned well and the gas reservoir is calculated by4 reservoir 1.e-12 1.e-14 8.4e-4 Fracture or abandoned well

  20. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in depleted or abandoned oil and gas reservoirs; how- ever,abandoned wells represent a potentially direct route from reservoirabandoned in the 1930s with no barrier installed after it encountered a natural CO 2 reservoir

  1. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in depleted or abandoned oil and gas reservoirs; how- ever,oil well abandoned in the 1930s with no barrier installed after it encountered a natural CO 2 reservoir

  2. The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs, unminable coaltakes place in depleted oil or gas reservoirs (IAE, 2003).of CO 2 in depleted oil and gas reservoirs. J Can Pet

  3. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IN DEPLETED AND NEAR- DEPLETED OIL RESERVOIRS V. A. KuuskraaDEPLETED AND NEAR-DEPLETED OIL RESERVOIRS Vello A. Kuuskraaof CO 2 in a depleted oil reservoir: an overview,

  4. CO2 MONITORING FOR DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transactions 105(2). Emmerich, S. J. and A. K. Persily (Fisk and de Almeida 1998; Emmerich and Persily 2001), CO 2Fisk and de Almeida 1998; Emmerich and Persily 2001; Apte

  5. Bees, Balloons, Pollen Used as Novel CO2 Monitoring Approach

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Researchers at the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory have discovered an innovative way to use bees, pollen, and helium-filled balloons to verify that no carbon dioxide (CO2) leaks from carbon sequestration sites.

  6. DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A comprehensive study of 11 geologic formations suitable for permanent underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is contained in a new manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  7. Novel CO2-Thickeners for Improved Mobility Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enick, Dr. Robert M.; Beckman, Dr. Eric J.; Hamilton, Dr. Andrew

    2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract was to design, synthesize, and characterize thickening agents for dense carbon dioxide and to evaluate their solubility and viscosity-enhancing potential in CO2.

  8. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon dioxide-enhanced oil recovery project as a prototypeCO 2 injection for enhanced oil recovery. Indeed, most near-as well as Enhanced Oil Recovery projects. REFERENCES

  9. Improving CO2 Efficiency for Recovering Oil in Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, Reid B.; Svec, Robert K.

    2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The work strived to improve industry understanding of CO2 flooding mechanisms with the ultimate goal of economically recovering more of the U.S. oil reserves. The principle interests are in the related fields of mobility control and injectivity.

  10. Geologic controls influencing CO2 loss from a leaking well.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Polly L.; Martinez, Mario J.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Klise, Katherine A.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection of CO2 into formations containing brine is proposed as a long-term sequestration solution. A significant obstacle to sequestration performance is the presence of existing wells providing a transport pathway out of the sequestration formation. To understand how heterogeneity impacts the leakage rate, we employ two dimensional models of the CO2 injection process into a sandstone aquifer with shale inclusions to examine the parameters controlling release through an existing well. This scenario is modeled as a constant-rate injection of super-critical CO2 into the existing formation where buoyancy effects, relative permeabilities, and capillary pressures are employed. Three geologic controls are considered: stratigraphic dip angle, shale inclusion size and shale fraction. In this study, we examine the impact of heterogeneity on the amount and timing of CO2 released through a leaky well. Sensitivity analysis is performed to classify how various geologic controls influence CO2 loss. A 'Design of Experiments' approach is used to identify the most important parameters and combinations of parameters to control CO2 migration while making efficient use of a limited number of computations. Results are used to construct a low-dimensional description of the transport scenario. The goal of this exploration is to develop a small set of parametric descriptors that can be generalized to similar scenarios. Results of this work will allow for estimation of the amount of CO2 that will be lost for a given scenario prior to commencing injection. Additionally, two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations are compared to quantify the influence that surrounding geologic media has on the CO2 leakage rate.

  11. CO2 Emissions Mitigation and Technological Advance: An

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PNNL-18075 CO2 Emissions Mitigation and Technological Advance: An Updated Analysis of Advanced/2003) #12;PNNL-18075 CO2 Emissions Mitigation and Technological Advance: An Analysis of Advanced Technology electricity 16.9 29.0 44.7 65.7 89.2 114.3 145.2 174.8 EJ/yr building trad biomass 23.5 29.9 32.1 27.9 22.9 17

  12. CO2 Removal using a Synthetic Analogue of Carbonic Anhydrase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry Cordatos

    2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Project attempts to develop a synthetic analogue for carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it in a membrane for separation of CO2 from coal power plant flue gas. Conference poster presents result of first 9 months of project progress including concept, basic system architecture and membrane properties target, results of molecular modeling for analogue - CO2 interaction, and next steps of testing analogue resistance to flue gas contaminants.

  13. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Iron and Steel Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow III, William R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in theUS $/GJ- saved) CO2 Emissions Reduction (Mt CO 2 ) CCF RankUS$/GJ- saved) CO2 Emissions Reduction (Mt CO 2 ) * The

  14. Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray Chamberland; Aku Raino; David Towle

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    For more than two decades, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has developed a range of low cost, in-furnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes ALSTOM's internally developed TFS 2000 firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As of 2004, more than 200 units representing approximately 75,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with ALSTOM low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coals to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coals, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing (retrofit) boiler equipment. If enacted, proposed Clear Skies legislation will, by 2008, require an average, effective, domestic NOx emissions rate of 0.16 lb/MMBtu, which number will be reduced to 0.13 lb/MMBtu by 2018. Such levels represent a 60% and 67% reduction, respectively, from the effective 2000 level of 0.40 lb/MMBtu. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. In light of these needs, ALSTOM, in cooperation with the DOE, is developing an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner which, when integrated with ALSTOM's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems, will provide a means to achieve less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx at less than 3/4 the cost of an SCR with low to no impact on balance of plant issues when firing a high volatile bituminous coal. Such coals can be more economic to fire than subbituminous or Powder River Basin (PRB) coals, but are more problematic from a NOx control standpoint as existing firing system technologies do not provide a means to meet current or anticipated regulations absent the use of an SCR. The DOE/ALSTOM program performed large pilot scale combustion testing in ALSTOM's Industrial Scale Burner Facility (ISBF) at its U.S. Power Plant Laboratories facility in Windsor, Connecticut. During this work, the near-field combustion environment was optimized to maximize NOx reduction while minimizing the impact on unburned carbon in ash, slagging and fouling, corrosion, and flame stability/turn-down under globally reducing conditions. Initially, ALSTOM utilized computational fluid dynamic modeling to evaluate a series of burner and/or near field stoichiometry controls in order to screen promising design concepts in advance of the large pilot scale testing. The third and final test, to be executed, will utilize several variants of the best nozzle tip configuration and compare performance with 3 different coals. The fuels to be tested will cover a wide range of coals commonly fired at US utilities. The completion of this work will provide sufficient data to allow ALSTOM to design, construct, and demonstrate a commercial version of an enhanced combustion low NOx pulverized coal burner. A preliminary cost/performance analysis of the developed enhanced combustion low NOx burner applied to ALSTOM's state-of-the-art TFS 2000 firing system was performed to show that the burner enhancements is a cost effective means to reduce NOx.

  15. Dynamic micro-mapping of CO2 sorption in coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Cheng, Gang [ORNL; Mastalerz, Maria [Indiana Geological Survey

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have applied X-ray and neutron small-angle scattering techniques (SAXS, SANS and USANS) to study the interaction between fluids and porous media in the particular case of sub- and super-critical CO2 sorption in coal. These techniques are demonstrated to give unique, pore-size-specific insights into the kinetics of CO2 sorption in a wide range of coal pores (nano to meso), and to provide data that may be used to determine the density of the sorbed CO2. We observed densification of the adsorbed CO2 by a factor up to five compared to the free fluid at the same (p,T) conditions. Our results indicate that details of CO2 sorption into coal pores differ greatly between different coals and depend on the amount of mineral matter dispersed in the coal matrix: a purely organic matrix absorbs more CO2 per unit volume than one contaminated with mineral matter, but mineral matter markedly accelerates the sorption kinetics.

  16. Modeling long-term CO2 storage, sequestration and cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of numerical and analytical models to the problem of storage, sequestration and migration of carbon dioxide in geologic formations is discussed. A review of numerical and analytical models that have been applied to CO2 sequestration are presented, as well as a description of frameworks for risk analysis. Application of models to various issues related to carbon sequestration are discussed, including trapping mechanisms, density convection mixing, impurities in the CO2 stream, changes in formation porosity and permeability, the risk of vertical leakage, and the impacts on groundwater resources if leakage does occur. A discussion of the development and application of site-specific models first addresses the estimation of model parameters and the use of natural analogues to inform the development of CO2 sequestration models, and then surveys modeling that has been done at two commercial-scale CO2 sequestration sites, Sleipner and In Salah, along with a pilot-scale injection sites used to study CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers (Frio) and an experimental site designed to test monitoring of CO2 leakage in the vadose zone (ZERT Release Facility).

  17. CO2 leakage up from a geological storage site to shallow fresh groundwater: CO2-water-rock interaction assessment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CO2 leakage up from a geological storage site to shallow fresh groundwater: CO2-water repository requires the investigation of the potential CO2 leakage back into fresh groundwater, particularly sensitive monitoring techniques in order to detect potential CO2 leaks and their magnitude as well

  18. NERSC Carver Hours Used Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carver Hours Used Carver Hours Used Hopper Usage Chart Hopper Usage Chart Date Hours Used (in millions) Percent of Maximum Possible (24 hoursday) 12152014 161.25 84.75 1214...

  19. Life Cycle Inventory of CO2 in an Enhanced Oil Recovery System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    identified as a method of sequestering CO2 recovered from power plants. In CO2- flood EOR, CO2 is injected in EOR projects, thus reducing the amount of CO2 emitted into the atmosphere. This claim, however with sequestration via CO2- flood EOR under a number of different scenarios and explores the impact of various

  20. Intracranial Pressure Variation Associated with Changes in End-Tidal CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intracranial Pressure Variation Associated with Changes in End-Tidal CO2 Sunghan Kim, James Mc that the partial pressure of arterial CO2 (PaCO2) can affect cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and therefore ICP. The end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2) is usually monitored by clinicians as a proxy for PaCO2. We show

  1. Heavy-Duty NOx Emissions Control: Reformer-Assisted vs. Plasma...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NOx Emissions Control: Reformer-Assisted vs. Plasma-Facilitated Lean NOx Catalysis Heavy-Duty NOx Emissions Control: Reformer-Assisted vs. Plasma-Facilitated Lean NOx Catalysis...

  2. Effect of Thermal Aging on NO oxidation and NOx storage in a...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Aging on NO oxidation and NOx storage in a Fully-Formulated Lean NOx Trap Effect of Thermal Aging on NO oxidation and NOx storage in a Fully-Formulated Lean NOx Trap...

  3. Abstract Atmospheric CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) was as low as 18 Pa during the Pleistocene and is projected to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonovics, Janis

    Abstract Atmospheric CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) was as low as 18 Pa during the Pleistocene and is projected to increase from 36 to 70 Pa CO2 before the end of the 21st century. High pCO2 often increases the growth and repro- duction of C3 annuals, whereas low pCO2 decreases growth and may reduce or prevent

  4. Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China’s 2008 Thermal Electricity Sector CO 2 Emissions byheat. Share of thermal electricity sector’s CO 2 emissionsheat. Share of thermal electricity sector’s CO 2 emissions

  5. Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondary accumulation at shallow depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large Releases from CO2 Storage Reservoirs: Analogs,S.T. Nelson. Natural Leaking CO2-charged Systems as AnalogsY. Sano, and H.U. Schmincke. CO2-rich Gases from Lakes Nyos

  6. On CO2 Behavior in the Subsurface, Following Leakage from a Geologic Storage Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 - 16, 1987. Skinner, L. CO2 Blowouts: An Emerging Problem,Assessment for Underground CO2 Storage, paper 234, presentedReservoir Performance Risk in CO2 Storage Projects, paper

  7. A Theoretical Study of CO2 Anions on Anatase (101) Surface. ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications A Theoretical Study of CO2 Anions on Anatase (101) Surface. A Theoretical Study of CO2 Anions on Anatase (101) Surface. Abstract: Binding configurations of CO2 and...

  8. Does low stomatal conductance or photosynthetic capacity enhance growth at elevated CO2 in Arabidopsis thaliana?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Easlon, Hsien M; Carlisle, Eli; McKay, John K; Bloom, Arnold J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    enhance growth at elevated CO 2 ? To whom correspondence mayDoes low g enhance growth at elevated CO 2 ? Does lowenhance growth at elevated CO 2 in Arabidopsis thaliana?

  9. Single-well Low Temperature CO2- based Engineered Geothemal System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Single-well Low Temperature CO2- based Engineered Geothemal System Single-well Low Temperature CO2- based Engineered Geothemal System Single-well Low Temperature CO2- based...

  10. Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China's 2008 Total CO 2 Emissions from Energy Consumption:10. China's 2008 Total CO 2 Emissions from Energy: Sectoral16 Table 11. China's 2008 CO 2 Emissions from Energy:

  11. DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000032 The Immobility of CO2 in Marine Sediments Beneath 1500

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrag, Daniel

    to capture CO2 produced at indus- trial facilities and approaches to inject the CO2 into geologic of buoyant CO2 in terrestrial reservoirs that often contain fractures, faults, and abandoned wells and may

  12. Automobile Fuel; Economy and CO2 Emissions in Industrialized Countries: Troubling Trends through 2005/6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schipper, Lee

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Implications. J. ofcommitment to reduce CO2 emissions from new passenger carsACEA’s Commitment on CO2 Emission Reductions from Passenger

  13. Regulation, Allocation, and Leakage in Cap-and-Trade Markets for CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Jim B; Chen, Yihsu

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Daniel Kahn. Allocation of co2 emissions al- lowances in theRasmussen. Allocation of co2 emissions permits: A generalthe aggregate annual CO2 emissions for each of the key

  14. Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2050 China Energy and CO2 Emissions Report. Science Press,Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China’s CementEnergy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China’s Cement

  15. Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of unadjusted energy-related CO2 emissions is attributed toEMISSIONS- T C EMISSIONS -T CO2 TOTAL Energy EmissionsEMISSIONS- T C EMISSIONS -T CO2 Coal Coke and Other

  16. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China Energy and CO2 Emissions Report (CEACER). Beijing:Oil consumption and CO2 emissions in China’s road transport:Growth, Oil Demand and CO2 Emissions through 2050. Report

  17. Challenges and opportunities in accounting for non-energy use CO2 emissions: an editorial comment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric; Sathaye, Jayant

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon dioxide (NEU-CO2) emissions, represent a signi?cantSimply described, NEU-CO2 emissions are generated via twoData permitting, NEU-CO2 emissions arising from energy

  18. Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China’s CementEnergy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China’s Cementenergy savings and CO2 emission reduction potentials are

  19. Cummins/ORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CumminsORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines CumminsORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel...

  20. Characterization of NOx Species in Dehydrated and Hydrated Na...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NOx Species in Dehydrated and Hydrated Na- and Ba-Y, FAU Zeolites Formed in NO Adsorption. Characterization of NOx Species in Dehydrated and Hydrated Na- and Ba-Y, FAU Zeolites...

  1. Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging of BaOtheta- Al2O3NiAl(100). Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging of BaOtheta- Al2O3...

  2. Cutting NOx from Diesel Engines with Membrane-Generated Nitrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cutting NOx from Diesel Engines with Membrane-Generated Nitrogen-Enriched Air Cutting NOx from Diesel Engines with Membrane-Generated Nitrogen-Enriched Air 2005 Diesel Engine...

  3. Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) gridded data products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabine, Christopher [NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory; Hankin, S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Koyuk, H [Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, University of Washington; Bakker, D C E [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Pfeil, B [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen; Uni Research AS, Bergen, Norway; Olsen, A [Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, UNIFOB AS, Bergen, Norway; Metzl, N [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Kozyr, Alexander [ORNL; Fassbender, A [School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Manke, A [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Malczyk, J [Jetz Laboratory, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University; Akl, J [CSIRO Wealth from Oceans Flagship, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia; Alin, S R [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Bellerby, R G J [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Borges, A [University of Liege, Chemical Oceanography Unit, Institut de Physique, Liege, Belgium; Boutin, J [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Brown, P J [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Cai, W-J [Department of Marine Sciences, University of Georgia; Chavez, F P [Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA; Chen, A [Institute of Marine Geology and Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Cosa, C [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Feely, R A [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Gonzalez-Davila, M [Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria,; Goyet, C [Institut de Modélisation et d'Analyse en Géo-Environnement et Santé, Université de Perpignan; Hardman-Mountford, N [CSIRO, Marine and Atmospheric Research, Wembley, Western Australia, Australia; Heinze, C [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Hoppema, M [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany; Hunt, C W [Ocean Process Analysis Lab, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire; Hydes, D [National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK; Ishii, M [Japan Meteorological Agency, Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan; Johannessen, T [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Key, R M [Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey; Kortzinger, A [GEOMAR, Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Kiel, Germany; Landschutzer, P [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Lauvset, S K [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Lefevre, N [Université Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Lenton, A [Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia; Lourantou, A [Université Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Merlivat, L [Université Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Midorikawa, T [Nagasaki Marine Observatory, Nagasaki, Japan; Mintrop, L [MARIANDA, Kiel, Germany; Miyazaki, C [Faculty of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Hokkaido, Japan; Murata, A [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka, Japan; Nakadate, A [Marine Division, Global Environment and Marine Department, Japan Meteorological Agency, Tokyo, Japan; Nakano, Y [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka, Japan; Nakaoka, S [National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), Tsukuba, Japan; Nojiri, Y [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan; et al.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A well documented, publicly available, global data set for surface ocean carbon dioxide (CO2) parameters has been called for by international groups for nearly two decades. The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) project was initiated by the international marine carbon science community in 2007 with the aim of providing a comprehensive, publicly available, regularly updated, global data set of marine surface CO2, which had been subject to quality control (QC). SOCAT version 1.5 was made public in September 2011 and holds 6.3 million quality controlled surface CO2 data from the global oceans and coastal seas, spanning four decades (1968 2007). The SOCAT gridded data is the second data product to come from the SOCAT project. Recognizing that some groups may have trouble working with millions of measurements, the SOCAT gridded product was generated to provide a robust regularly spaced fCO2 product with minimal spatial and temporal interpolation which should be easier to work with for many applications. Gridded SOCAT is rich with information that has not been fully explored yet, but also contains biases and limitations that the user needs to recognize and address.

  4. CO2-selective, Hybrid Membranes by Silation of Alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luebke, D.R.; Pennline, H.W.

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid membranes are feasible candidates for the separation of CO2 from gas produced in coal-based power generation since they have the potential to combine the high selectivity of polymer membranes and the high permeability of inorganic membranes. An interesting method for producing hybrid membranes is the silation of an inorganic membrane. In this method, trichloro- or alkoxy-silanes interact with hydroxyl groups on the surface of ?-AlO3 or TiO2, binding organic groups to that surface. By varying the length of these organic groups on the organosilane, it should be possible to tailor the effective pore size of the membrane. Similarly, the addition of “CO2-phillic” groups to the silating agent allows for the careful control of surface affinity and the enhancement of surface diffusion mechanisms. This method of producing hybrid membranes selective to CO2 was first attempted by Hyun [1] who silated TiO2 with phenyltriethoxysilane. Later, Way [2] silated ?-AlO3 with octadecyltrichlorosilane. Both researchers were successful in producing membranes with improved selectivity toward CO2, but permeability was not maintained at a commercially applicable level. XPS data indicated that the silating agent did not penetrate into the membrane pores and separation actually occurred in a thin “polymer-like” surface layer. The present study attempts to overcome the mass transfer problems associated with this technique by producing the desired monolayer coverage of silane, and thus develop a highly-permeable CO2-selective hybrid membrane.

  5. Weeks Island gravity stable CO2 pilot: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, J.R.; Perry, G.E.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Weeks Island ''S'' sand Reservoir B (''S'' RB) gravity-stable CO2 field test was completed during February 1988. Injection started in October 1978 and production began in January 1981 in this high-permeability, steeply-dipping sandstone reservoir. About 264,000 barrels of oil or 65 percent of the starting volume has been recovered. A 24-percent pore-volume slug of CO2 mixed with about six mole percent of natural gas (mostly methane) was injected at the start of the pilot. Since 1983, produced CO2 plus hydrocarbon gases have been recycled. CO2 usage statistics are 9.34 MCF/BO with recycle and 3.24 MCF/BO based on purchased CO2. Previous annual reports document the pilot design, implementation, and early results for the 1977 to June 1981 time period. This report is a review of early pilot history and a more detailed account of the post June 1981 results and overall interpretation. A reservoir-simulation history match of pilot performance plus core and log data from a 1983 swept-zone evaluation well are described in this report. A brief description of the production facility and an account of the corrosion control program are also included. 11 refs., 34 figs.

  6. CO2 Sequestration in Unmineable Coal Seams: Potential Environmental Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedges, S.W.; Soong, Yee; McCarthy Jones, J.R.; Harrison, D.K.; Irdi, G.A.; Frommell, E.A.; Dilmore, R.M.; Pique, P.J.; Brown, T.D

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An initial investigation into the potential environmental impacts of CO2 sequestration in unmineable coal seams has been conducted, focusing on changes in the produced water during enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) production using a CO2 injection process (CO2-ECBM). Two coals have been used in this study, the medium volatile bituminous Upper Freeport coal (APCS 1) of the Argonne Premium Coal Samples series, and an as-mined Pittsburgh #8 coal, which is a high volatile bituminous coal. Coal samples were reacted with either synthetic produced water or field collected produced water and gaseous carbon dioxide at 40 ?C and 50 bar to evaluate the potential for mobilizing toxic metals during CO2-ECBM/sequestration. Microscopic and x-ray diffraction analysis of the post-reaction coal samples clearly show evidence of chemical reaction, and chemical analysis of the produced water shows substantial changes in composition. These results suggest that changes to the produced water chemistry and the potential for mobilizing toxic trace elements from coalbeds are important factors to be considered when evaluating deep, unmineable coal seams for CO2 sequestration.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of CO2 Formation in Interstellar Ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arasa, Carina; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Kroes, Geert-Jan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2 ice is one of the most abundant components in ice-coated interstellar ices besides H2O and CO, but the most favorable path to CO2 ice is still unclear. Molecular dynamics calculations on the ultraviolet photodissociation of different kinds of CO-H2O ice systems have been performed at 10 K in order to demonstrate that the reaction between CO and an OH molecule resulting from H2O photodissociation through the first excited state is a possible route to form CO2 ice. However, our calculations, which take into account different ice surface models, suggest that there is another product with a higher formation probability ((3.00+-0.07)x10-2), which is the HOCO complex, whereas the formation of CO2 has a probability of only (3.6+-0.7)x10-4. The initial location of the CO is key to obtain reaction and form CO2: the CO needs to be located deep into the ice. The HOCO complex becomes trapped in the cold ice surface in the trans-HOCO minimum because it quickly loses its internal energy to the surrounding ice, preventi...

  8. The United States has put more CO2 into the atmosphere than anybody else, but without too much trouble we now can take the lead in slowing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    coal-fired power plants, which produce just over half of U.S. electricity and much more CO2 than any this argument they probably think in terms of familiar air pollution, such as sulfur dioxide. Once it enters the atmosphere, normal pollution stays there only a few hours or days. Carbon dioxide is not like that. Much

  9. CATALYST CATALYSTADSORBENT ADSORBENT HCS + H2O H2 + CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    - CO2 Adsorbent Effect of Membrane Properties On HAMR performance 3.190.3883--H2O --54.30.0248Ar --67 CATALYST CATALYSTADSORBENT ADSORBENT C O 2CO2 CO2 CO2 HCS + H2O H2 + CO2 Mork Family Department of Chemical using hydrotalcite-type CO2 adsorbents and nanoporous H2-selective carbon molecular sieve membranes (CMS

  10. Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Towle; Richard Donais; Todd Hellewell; Robert Lewis; Robert Schrecengost

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    For more than two decades, Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom) has developed a range of low cost, infurnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes Alstom's internally developed TFS 2000{trademark} firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy. As of the date of this report, more than 270 units representing approximately 80,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with Alstom low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coal to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coal, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing boiler equipment. On March 10, 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR). CAIR requires 25 Eastern states to reduce NOx emissions from the power generation sector by 1.7 million tons in 2009 and 2.0 million tons by 2015. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. The overall objective of the work is to develop an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner, which, when integrated with Alstom's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems will provide a means to achieve: Less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a high volatile Eastern or Western bituminous coal, Less than 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a subbituminous coal, NOx reduction costs at least 25% lower than the costs of an SCR, Validation of the NOx control technology developed through large (15 MWt) pilot scale demonstration, and Documentation required for economic evaluation and commercial application. During the project performance period, Alstom performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and large pilot scale combustion testing in its Industrial Scale Burner Facility (ISBF) at its U.S. Power Plant Laboratories facility in Windsor, Connecticut in support of these objectives. The NOx reduction approach was to optimize near-field combustion to ensure that minimum NOx emissions are achieved with minimal impact on unburned carbon in ash, slagging and fouling, corrosion, and flame stability/turn-down. Several iterations of CFD and combustion testing on a Midwest coal led to an optimized design, which was extensively combustion tested on a range of coals. The data from these tests were then used to validate system costs and benefits versus SCR. Three coals were evaluated during the bench-scale and large pilot-scale testing tasks. The three coals ranged from a very reactive subbituminous coal to a moderately reactive Western bituminous coal to a much less reactive Midwest bituminous coal. Bench-scale testing was comprised of standard ASTM properties evaluation, plus more detailed characterization of fuel properties through drop tube furnace testing and thermogravimetric analysis. Bench-scale characterization of the three test coals showed that both NOx emissions and combustion performance are a strong function of coal properties. The more reactive coals evolved more of their fuel bound nitrogen in the substoichiometric main burner zone than less reactive coal, resulting in the potential for lower NOx emissions. From a combustion point of view, the more reactive coals also showed lower carbon in ash and CO values than the less reactive coal at any given main burner zone stoichiometry. According to bench-scale results, the subbituminous coal was found to be the most amenable to both low NOx, and acceptably low combustibles in the flue gas, in an air staged low NOx system. The Midwest bituminous coal, by contrast, was predicted to be the most challenging of the three coals, with the Western bituminous coal predicted to beh

  11. Intra-Hour Scheduling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes | National NuclearInterlibrary LoanSafeguardsInternshipsintra-hour

  12. Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to install flue-gas desulphurization, NOx reduction, and aefficiency flue gas desulphurization and de-NO x to meet

  13. Thermal desorption of CH4 retained in CO2 ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Luna; C. Millan; M. Domingo; M. A. Satorre

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2 ices are known to exist in different astrophysical environments. In spite of this, its physical properties (structure, density, refractive index) have not been as widely studied as those of water ice. It would be of great value to study the adsorption properties of this ice in conditions related to astrophysical environments. In this paper, we explore the possibility that CO2 traps relevant molecules in astrophysical environments at temperatures higher than expected from their characteristic sublimation point. To fulfil this aim we have carried out desorption experiments under High Vacuum conditions based on a Quartz Crystal Microbalance and additionally monitored with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer. From our results, the presence of CH4 in the solid phase above the sublimation temperature in some astrophysical scenarios could be explained by the presence of several retaining mechanisms related to the structure of CO2 ice.

  14. Thermal desorption of CH4 retained in CO2 ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luna, R; Domingo, M; Satorre, M A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2 ices are known to exist in different astrophysical environments. In spite of this, its physical properties (structure, density, refractive index) have not been as widely studied as those of water ice. It would be of great value to study the adsorption properties of this ice in conditions related to astrophysical environments. In this paper, we explore the possibility that CO2 traps relevant molecules in astrophysical environments at temperatures higher than expected from their characteristic sublimation point. To fulfil this aim we have carried out desorption experiments under High Vacuum conditions based on a Quartz Crystal Microbalance and additionally monitored with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer. From our results, the presence of CH4 in the solid phase above the sublimation temperature in some astrophysical scenarios could be explained by the presence of several retaining mechanisms related to the structure of CO2 ice.

  15. air-sea co2 flux: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into the potential behavior and the operational parameters of CO2 sequestration at CO2-EOR s... Dai, Zhenxue; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna; Middleton, Richard; Pan, Feng; Jia,...

  16. The Influence of a CO2 Pricing Scheme on Distributed Energy Resources in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Influence of a CO2 Pricing Scheme on Distributed Energy5. Regional Results for the CO2 Pricing Scheme no-invest

  17. New Directions: Potential Climate and Productivity Benefits from CO2 Capture in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gall, Elliott T; Nazaroff, William W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    air capture technologies. Although the carbon in metaboliccarbon footprint of commercial build- ings through active CO 2 capture. For dilute CO 2 levels, adsorption technologies

  18. Diesel Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance Diesel Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance Cost effective reduction of legislated emissions...

  19. Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CO2 emissions from external production of electricityCO2) emissions from fossil fuel combustion, as well as the consumption of large amount of electricity,

  20. Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuel combustion, as wellCO2 emissions (including cement process and fossil fuel combustion

  1. Use of experience curves to estimate the future cost of power plants with CO2 capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Antes, Matt; Berkenpas, Michael; Davison, John

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004. Experience curves for power plant emission controlassessments of fossil fuel power plants with CO 2 capturethe future cost of power plants with CO 2 capture Edward S.

  2. Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondary accumulation at shallow depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    adiabatic (= no external heat supply) expansion of CO 2 toCO 2 without external heat supply will cause temperatures toenables more sustained heat supply from the surroundings,

  3. Automobile Fuel; Economy and CO2 Emissions in Industrialized Countries: Troubling Trends through 2005/6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schipper, Lee

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s Commitment on CO2 Emission Reductions from Passenger Cars.is a small extra reduction in CO2 emissions per km due to a

  4. Modeling of NOx formation in circular laminar jet flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siwatch, Vivek

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    -premixed isolated circular laminar jet flame. The jet consists of the fuel rich inner region and the O2 rich outer region. The model estimates both thermal NOx and prompt NOx assuming single step kinetics for NOx formation and a thin flame model. Further the amount...

  5. SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Babcock and Wilcox`s (B and W) SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} process effectively removes SOx, NOx and particulate (Rox) from flue gas generated from coal-fired boilers in a single unit operation, a high temperature baghouse. The SNRB technology utilizes dry sorbent injection upstream of the baghouse for removal of SOx and ammonia injection upstream of a zeolitic selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst incorporated in the baghouse to reduce NOx emissions. Because the SOx and NOx removal processes require operation at elevated gas temperatures (800--900 F) for high removal efficiency, high-temperature fabric filter bags are used in the baghouse. The SNRB technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B and W tested the SNRB pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R.E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B and W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB process. The SNRB facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993. About 2,300 hours of high-temperature operation were achieved. The main emissions control performance goals of: greater than 70% SO{sub 2} removal using a calcium-based sorbent; greater than 90% NOx removal with minimal ammonia slip; and particulate emissions in compliance with the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) of 0.03 lb/million Btu were exceeded simultaneously in the demonstration program when the facility was operated at optimal conditions. Testing also showed significant reductions in emissions of some hazardous air pollutants.

  6. A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies forefficiency and CO2 Emission- reduction Technologies forefficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies The

  7. Adsorption and Strain: The CO2-Induced Swelling of Coal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Adsorption and Strain: The CO2-Induced Swelling of Coal M. Vandamme1 , L. Brochard2 , B. Lecampion3.07.014 #12;Abstract Enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM) consists in injecting carbon dioxide in coal gets adsorbed at the surface of the coal pores, which causes the coal to swell. This swelling

  8. THERMOCATALYTIC CO2-FREE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    remain limited .... until some cost effective carbon sequestration option for distributed production production of hydrogen and carbon from hydrocarbon fuels with minimal CO2 emissions. Relevance. It is significantly more challenging to cost effectively sequester these [distributed] smaller volume carbon emissions

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF MIXED CO2-TBPB HYDRATE FOR REFRIGERATION APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CHARACTERIZATION OF MIXED CO2-TBPB HYDRATE FOR REFRIGERATION APPLICATIONS Pascal Clain , Anthony storage and distribution in refrigeration applications. Previous studies show that these hydrates are able.s] INTRODUCTION Secondary refrigeration is a method using a neutral fluid for cold distribution in order

  10. Carbonation: An Efficient and Economical Process for CO2 Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Carbonation: An Efficient and Economical Process for CO2 Sequestration Tarun R Naik1 and Rakesh sequestration. Most of the studies related to the carbonation are limited to its effects on corrosion. The possibility of using carbonation process as a direct means for carbon dioxide sequestration is yet

  11. SecuestrodeCO2enestructurasgeolgicas Modelacin numrica de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Kioto Responsables del 55% de las emisiones se comprometen reducir en 5% el total de emisiones respecto forma diferente A España le corresponde no aumentar en mas de 15% sus emisiones respecto a 1990 En 2006enestructurasgeológicas Una forma de disminuir emisiones: Almacenamiento de CO2 en estructuras geológicas Yacimientos de

  12. Challenges in elevated CO2 experiments on forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Bangor, UK 8 Queens College, City University of New York, NY, USA 9 Lund University, Lund, Sweden 10 concentrations in future experiments to better predict the effects of climate change? Plantations and natural. Forest ecosystems under climate change Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most important greenhouse gas emitted

  13. CO2 as a raw material for chemistry : an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    to chemical products capable of being energy vectors (CH3OH, CH3OCH3, EtOH, ... ) · Access to chemical intermediates from biomass · CO2 accelerates production of biomass · Ex microalgae biofuel, chemicals, .. · Ex energy: 803 kJ/mol ( 192 kcal/mol) #12;Paris, 09/07/20139 Chemical valorisations : an industrial

  14. Reduction of CO2 emissions and utilization of slag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    emissions is 314 #12;CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. Con- crete and steel manufacturers produce from carbonate-free slag products (Slag2PCC Plus) Hiilidioksidipäästöjen vähentäminen ja Email: ron.zevenhoven@abo.fi Abstract By producing precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) from a carbonate

  15. ACID GASES IN CO2-RICH SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chialvo, Ariel A [ORNL] [ORNL; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL] [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University] [Ohio State University

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of species behavior involving dilute fluid environments has been crucial for the advance of modern solvation thermodynamics through molecular-based formalisms to guide the development of macroscopic regression tools in the description of fluid behavior and correlation of experimental data (Chialvo 2013). Dilute fluid environments involving geologic formations are of great theoretical and practical relevance regardless of the thermodynamic state conditions. The most challenging systems are those involving highly compressible and reactive confined environments, i.e., where small perturbations of pressure and/or temperature can trigger considerable density changes. This in turn can alter significantly the species solvation, their preferential solvation, and consequently, their reactivity with one another and with the surrounding mineral surfaces whose outcome is the modification of the substrate porosity and permeability, and ultimately, the integrity of the mineral substrates. Considering that changes in porosity and permeability resulting from dissolution and precipitation phenomena in confined environments are at the core of the aqueous CO2-mineral interactions, and that caprock integrity (e.g., sealing capacity) depends on these key parameters, it is imperative to gain fundamental understanding of the mineral-fluid interfacial phenomena and fluid-fluid equilibria under mineral confinement at subsurface conditions. In order to undertand the potential effects of acid gases as contaminants of supercritical CO2 streams, in the next section we will discuss the thermodynamic behavior of CO2 fluid systems by addressing two crucial issues in the context of carbon capture, utilization and sequestration (CCUS) technologies: (i) Why should we consider (acid gas) CO2 impurities? and (ii) Why are CO2 fluid - mineral interactions of paramount relevance?

  16. Evaluation of Gas Reburning & Low NOx Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler Performance and Economics Report Gas Reburning-Low NOx Burner System Cherokee Station Unit 3 Public Service Company of Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NOX reduction (70%) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was performed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado Bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NOX emission level of 0.73 lb/106 Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50%. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NOX in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NOX emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. Toward the end of the program, a Second Generation gas injection system was installed. Higher injector gas pressures were used that eliminated the need for flue gas recirculation as used in the first generation design. The Second Generation GR resulted in similar NOX reduction performance as that for the First Generation. With an improvement in the LNB performance in combination with the new gas injection system , the reburn gas could be reduced to 12.5% of the total boiler heat input to achieve al 64?40 reduction in NO, emissions. In addition, the OFA injectors were modified to provide for better mixing to lower CO emissions.

  17. ULTRA LOW NOx INTEGRATED SYSTEM FOR NOx EMISSION CONTROL FROM COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galen H. Richards; Charles Q. Maney; Richard W. Borio; Robert D. Lewis

    2002-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories, working in concert with ALSTOM Power's Performance Projects Group, has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient NOx control technologies for retrofit to pulverized coal fired utility boilers. The objective of this project was to develop retrofit NOx control technology to achieve less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx (for bituminous coals) and 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx (for subbituminous coals) from existing pulverized coal fired utility boilers at a cost which is at least 25% less than SCR technology. Efficient control of NOx is seen as an important, enabling step in keeping coal as a viable part of the national energy mix in this century, and beyond. Presently 57% of U.S. electrical generation is coal based, and the Energy Information Agency projects that coal will maintain a lead in U.S. power generation over all other fuel sources for decades (EIA 1998 Energy Forecast). Yet, coal-based power is being strongly challenged by society's ever-increasing desire for an improved environment and the resultant improvement in health and safety. The needs of the electric-utility industry are to improve environmental performance, while simultaneously improving overall plant economics. This means that emissions control technology is needed with very low capital and operating costs. This project has responded to the industry's need for low NOx emissions by evaluating ideas that can be adapted to present pulverized coal fired systems, be they conventional or low NOx firing systems. The TFS 2000{trademark} firing system has been the ALSTOM Power Inc. commercial offering producing the lowest NOx emission levels. In this project, the TFS 2000{trademark} firing system served as a basis for comparison to other low NOx systems evaluated and was the foundation upon which refinements were made to further improve NOx emissions and related combustion performance. Three coals were evaluated during the bench-scale and large pilot-scale testing tasks. The three coals ranged from a very reactive Powder River Basin coal (PRB) to a moderately reactive Midwestern bituminous coal (HVB) to a less reactive medium volatile Eastern bituminous coal (MVB). Bench-scale testing was comprised of standard ASTM properties evaluation, plus more detailed characterization of fuel properties through drop tube furnace testing and thermogravimetric analysis.

  18. Rechargeable Li/CO2O2 (2 : 1) battery and Li/CO2 Yali Liu, Rui Wang, Yingchun Lyu, Hong Li* and Liquan Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    Rechargeable Li/CO2­O2 (2 : 1) battery and Li/CO2 battery Yali Liu, Rui Wang, Yingchun Lyu, Hong Li* and Liquan Chen A Li/CO2­O2 (2 : 1, volume ratio) battery and a Li/CO2 battery with discharging specific capacities of 1808 mA h gÀ1 and 1032 mA h gÀ1 , respectively, are reported. Li2CO3 is the main discharge

  19. THE ECONOMICS OF CO2 SEPARATION AND CAPTURE Howard J. Herzog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    economic source of CO2, especially for use in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations where CO2 is injected the price of oil dropped in the mid-1980s, the recovered CO2 was too expensive for EOR operations, forcingTHE ECONOMICS OF CO2 SEPARATION AND CAPTURE Howard J. Herzog Principal Research Engineer MIT Energy

  20. The Anthropogenic Perturbation of Atmospheric CO2 and the Climate System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortunat, Joos

    of carbon dioxide (CO2), a powerful greenhouse gas (GHG), are redistributed within the climate system

  1. Soil CO2 production and surface flux at four climate observatories in eastern Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil CO2 production and surface flux at four climate observatories in eastern Canada David Risk the climatic controls on soil respiration. We use subsurface CO2 concentrations, surface CO2 flux and detailed physical monitoring of the subsurface regime to examine physical controls on soil CO2 production. Results

  2. Observations and simulations of synoptic, regional, and local variations in atmospheric CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Observations and simulations of synoptic, regional, and local variations in atmospheric CO2 Jih] Synoptic events may play an important role in determining the CO2 spatial distribution and temporal 2001, which had the most significant CO2 concentration variation in our case pool. The CO2

  3. Constraint of the CO2 rise by new atmospheric carbon isotopic measurements during the last deglaciation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappellaz, Jérôme

    Click Here for Full Article Constraint of the CO2 rise by new atmospheric carbon isotopic increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) during the last glacialinterglacial climatic transition remain debated. We analyzed the parallel evolution of CO2 and its stable carbon isotopic ratio (d13 CO2

  4. CO2 Capture and Utilization for Enhanced Oil Poul Jacob Vilhelmsen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO2 Capture and Utilization for Enhanced Oil Recovery Poul Jacob Vilhelmsen1 , William Harrar2 Hørsholm Denmark 1 Abstract CO2 is an international theme and the cap-and-trade systems under. A possible technical step to reduce atmospheric emissions is CO2 capture and the utilisation of the CO2

  5. CO2 efflux from Amazonian headwater streams represents a significant fate for deep soil respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    CO2 efflux from Amazonian headwater streams represents a significant fate for deep soil respiration amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, while the magnitude of CO2 degassing from small streams remains a major was as terrestrially-respired CO2 dissolved within soils, over 90% of which evaded to the atmosphere within headwater

  6. Edinburgh Research Explorer Can seasonal and interannual variation in landscape CO2 fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Can seasonal and interannual variation in landscape CO2 fluxes be detected by atmospheric observations of CO2 concentrations made at a tall tower? Citation for published in landscape CO2 fluxes be detected by atmospheric observations of CO2 concentrations made at a tall tower

  7. Physical controls on the isotopic composition of soil-respired CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physical controls on the isotopic composition of soil-respired CO2 Nick Nickerson1 and Dave Risk1] Measurement of the isotopic composition of soil and soil-respired CO2 (d13 CO2) has become an invaluable tool in understanding the effects of diffusive transport on soil CO2 isotopic composition, it is crucial

  8. Large CO2 disequilibria in tropical lakes Humberto Marotta,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Large CO2 disequilibria in tropical lakes Humberto Marotta,1,2 Carlos M. Duarte,2 Sebastian Sobek,3 November 2009. [1] On the basis of a broad compilation of data on pCO2 in surface waters, we show tropical lakes to be, on average, far more supersaturated and variable in CO2 (geometric mean ± SE pCO2 = 1804

  9. Quantum Leaps in CO2 Detection Robert Byrne, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Quantum Leaps in CO2 Detection Robert Byrne, Ph.D. USF chemical oceanographers are making quantum. #12;Quantum Leaps in CO2 Detection Robert Byrne, Ph.D. When deployed on shipboard our shipboard leaps in measuring carbon dioxide (CO2) in the oceans and measuring the interactions of CO2 between

  10. A numerical procedure to model and monitor CO2 sequestration in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    sequestration over very long periods of time. · The analysis of CO2 underground storage safety in the long term procedure to model and monitor CO2 sequestration in aquifers ­ p. #12;Introduction. I · Storage of CO2 (31.6C, 7.38 MPa). · First industrial scale CO2 injection project: Sleipner gas field (North Sea

  11. A numerical procedure to model and monitor CO2 sequestration in aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    sequestration over very long periods of time. The analysis of CO2 underground storage safety in the long term procedure to model and monitor CO2 sequestration in aquifers ­ p. #12;Introduction. I Storage of CO2 (31.6C, 7.38 MPa). First industrial scale CO2 injection project: Sleipner gas field (North Sea

  12. Mathematical models as tools for probing long-term safety of CO2 storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reservoirs, with large capacity for CO 2 storage (Bradshaw and Dance, 2004; Bachu, 2008). Improperly abandoned

  13. Spatial Disaggregation of CO2 Emissions for the State of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity Generation/CHP Residential Commercial Industrial Agricultural Transportation Percent of county CO2 emissions

  14. Production of Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal with CO2 Capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Production of Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal with CO2 Capture Princeton University: Tom use (transportation and heating) responsible for ~2/3 of global CO2 emissions · CO2 capture energy carriers are needed: electricity and hydrogen. · If CO2 sequestration is viable, fossil fuel

  15. Enhancement of CO2/N2 selectivity in a metal-organic framework by cavity modification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are a strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from industrial processes. Burning of fossil fuel to generate electricity is a major source of CO2 in the atmosphere, but the capture and sequestration of CO2 from flue gasEnhancement of CO2/N2 selectivity in a metal-organic framework by cavity modification Youn-Sang Bae

  16. Extracting CO2 from seawater: Climate change mitigation and renewable liquid fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Extracting CO2 from seawater: Climate change mitigation and renewable liquid fuel Matthew Eisaman and their impact · Technology: Extracting CO2 from seawater · Application: Renewable liquid fuel #12;Outline: Renewable liquid fuel #12;The data on atmospheric CO2 2000 years ago http://cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/co2

  17. Wavelength dependence of prepulse laser beams on EUV emission from CO2 reheated Sn plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Wavelength dependence of prepulse laser beams on EUV emission from CO2 reheated Sn plasma J. R. The expanding plume was then reheated by a 35 ns CO2 laser operating at 10.6 m. The role of prepulse wavelength, Tanaka et al.11 demonstrated the advantages of using a CO2 laser for generating higher CE. The CO2 LPP

  18. Carbonation of alkaline paper mill waste to reduce CO2 greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montes-Hernandez, German

    Carbonation of alkaline paper mill waste to reduce CO2 greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere of anthropogenic emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere such as CO2, CH4, N2O and CFCs. The CO2 emissions to reflect, adsorb and emit the solar energy. However, the continuous emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere

  19. 3D modelling of the early Martian Climate under a denser CO2 atmosphere: Temperatures and CO2 ice clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forget, Francois; Millour, Ehouarn; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Kerber, Laura; Leconte, Jeremy; Marcq, Emmanuel; Haberle, Robert M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the basis of geological evidence, it is often stated that the early martian climate was warm enough for liquid water to flow on the surface thanks to the greenhouse effect of a thick atmosphere. We present 3D global climate simulations of the early martian climate performed assuming a faint young sun and a CO2 atmosphere with pressure between 0.1 and 7 bars. The model includes a detailed radiative transfer model using revised CO2 gas collision induced absorption properties, and a parameterisation of the CO2 ice cloud microphysical and radiative properties. A wide range of possible climates is explored by using various values of obliquities, orbital parameters, cloud microphysic parameters, atmospheric dust loading, and surface properties. Unlike on present day Mars, for pressures higher than a fraction of a bar, surface temperatures vary with altitude because of the adiabatic cooling and warming of the atmosphere when it moves vertically. In most simulations, CO2 ice clouds cover a major part of the planet...

  20. Stomatal proxy record of CO2 concentrations from the last termination suggests an important role for CO2 at climate change transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wohlfarth, Barbara

    Stomatal proxy record of CO2 concentrations from the last termination suggests an important role for CO2 at climate change transitions Margret Steinthorsdottir a,*, Barbara Wohlfarth a , Malin E2 reconstruction Betula nana Sweden a b s t r a c t A new stomatal proxy-based record of CO2

  1. 1M. Panahi, S. Skogestad ' Optimal Operation of a CO2 Capturing Plant for a Wide Range of Disturbances' Optimal Operation of a CO2 Capturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    1M. Panahi, S. Skogestad ' Optimal Operation of a CO2 Capturing Plant for a Wide Range of Disturbances' Optimal Operation of a CO2 Capturing Plant for a Wide Range of Disturbances Mehdi Panahi Sigurd Skogestad 18.10.2011 AIChE Annual Meeting #12;2M. Panahi, S. Skogestad ' Optimal Operation of a CO2

  2. ULTimateCO2 : A FP7 European Project dedicated to the understanding of the long term fate of geologically stored CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ULTimateCO2 : A FP7 European Project dedicated to the understanding of the long term fate of geologically stored CO2 Audigane, P.1 , Brown, S.2 , Dimier A.3 , Frykman P.4 , Gherardi F.5 , Le Gallo Y.6 Recherches Géologiques et minières - France 2 CO2SENSE limited, United Kingdom 3 EIFER, EIFER europaisches

  3. Experimental assessment of CO2-mineral-toxic ion interactions in a1 simplified freshwater aquifer: Implications for CO2 leakage from deep2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Experimental assessment of CO2-mineral-toxic ion interactions in a1 simplified freshwater aquifer: Implications for CO2 leakage from deep2 geological storage3 4 German Montes-Hernandez*a , François Renarda, b : 10.1021/es3053448 #12;2 Abstract1 The possible intrusion of CO2 into a given freshwater aquifer due

  4. Semi-analytical model of brine and CO2 leakage through an abandoned plugged well. Applications for determining an Area of Review and CO2 leakage rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Semi-analytical model of brine and CO2 leakage through an abandoned plugged well. Applications for determining an Area of Review and CO2 leakage rate Arnaud Réveillère, Jérémy Rohmer, Frédéric Wertz / contact the leak, and of CO2,g as a first approach. Compared to the state of the art, it adds the possibility

  5. Experimental Assessment of CO2Mineral-Toxic Ion Interactions in a Simplified Freshwater Aquifer: Implications for CO2 Leakage from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that remobilization of trace elements by CO2 intrusion is not a universal physicochemical effect. In fact goethite, a decrease in pH resulting from CO2 intrusion could reactivate the adsorption of Se(IV) and As(V) if goethite, arsenite As(III) is significantly adsorbed on goethite, but is partially remobilized by CO2 intrusion

  6. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Iron and Steel Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow III, William R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction PotentialsModel Inputs Emissions Factors CO2 Emission factor for grid electricity (tonne CO2/MWh)  CO2 Emission factor for fuel (

  7. Incorporating the Effect of Price Changes on CO2-Equivalent Emissions From Alternative-Fuel Lifecycles: Scoping the Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    function of CO2 taxes (or CO2 emission limits) 10 . b) Taxesrefinery process areas CO2 emissions from the control of COfertilizer use. CH4 and CO2 emissions from soil (parameters

  8. A method for quick assessment of CO2 storage capacity in closed and semi-closed saline formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.; Tsang, C.F.; Rutqvist, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    buoyancy effects, residual water saturation, etc. (Bachu and1 ) Residual CO 2 saturation Residual water saturation CO 2

  9. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factors CO2 Emission factor for grid electricity (tonnePotential for Electricity Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction

  10. Economically Efficient Operation of CO2 Capturing Process Part I: Self-optimizing Procedure for Selecting the Best Controlled Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    the greenhouse gas CO2 that causes global warming. Due to the effect of CO2 emissions on global warming

  11. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in theElectricity Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction in the Iron

  12. Biomimetic Membrane for CO2 Capture from Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael C. Trachtenberg

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    These Phase III experiments successfully addressed several issues needed to characterize a permeator system for application to a pulverized coal (PC) burning furnace/boiler assuming typical post-combustion cleanup devices in place. We completed key laboratory stage optimization and modeling efforts needed to move towards larger scale testing. The SOPO addressed six areas. Task 1--Post-Combustion Particle Cleanup--The first object was to determine if the Carbozyme permeator performance was likely to be reduced by particles (materials) in the flue gas stream that would either obstruct the mouth of the hollow fibers (HF) or stick to the HF bore wall surface. The second, based on the Acceptance Standards (see below), was to determine whether it would be preferable to clean the inlet gas stream (removing acid gases and particulates) or to develop methods to clean the Carbozyme permeator if performance declined due to HF block. We concluded that condensation of particle and particulate emissions, in the heat exchanger, could result in the formation of very sticky sulfate aerosols with a strong likelihood of obtruding the HF. These must be managed carefully and minimized to near-zero status before entering the permeator inlet stream. More extensive post-combustion cleanup is expected to be a necessary expense, independent of CO{sub 2} capture technology This finding is in agreement with views now emerging in the literature for a variety of CO{sub 2} capture methods. Task 2--Water Condensation--The key goal was to monitor and control temperature distributions within the permeator and between the permeator and its surroundings to determine whether water condensation in the pores or the HF bore would block flow, decreasing performance. A heat transfer fluid and delivery system were developed and employed. The result was near isothermal performance that avoided all instances of flow block. Direct thermocouple measurements provided the basis for developing a heat transfer model that supports prediction of heat transfer profiles for larger permeators Tasks 3. 4.1, 4.2--Temperature Range of Enzymes--The goal was to determine if the enzyme operating temperature would limit the range of thermal conditions available to the capture system. We demonstrated the ability of various isozymes (enzyme variants) to operate from 4-85 C. Consequently, the operating characteristics of the enzyme are not a controlling factor. Further, any isozyme whose upper temperature bound is at least 10 C greater than that of the planned inlet temperature will be stable under unanticipated, uncontrolled 'hiccups' in power plant operation. Task 4.4, 4.4--Examination of the Effects of SOx and NOx on Enzyme Activity (Development of Flue Gas Composition Acceptance Standards)--The purpose was to define the inlet gas profile boundaries. We examined the potential adverse effects of flue gas constituents including different acids from to develop an acceptance standard and compared these values to actual PC flue gas composition. Potential issues include changes in pH, accumulation of specific inhibitory anions and cations. A model was developed and validated by test with a SO{sub 2}-laden stream. The predicted and actual data very largely coincided. The model predicted feed stream requirements to allow continuous operation in excess of 2500 hours. We developed operational (physical and chemical) strategies to avoid or ameliorate these effects. Avoidance, the preferred strategy (noted above), is accomplished by more extensive cleanup of the flue gas stream. Task 5--Process Engineering Model--We developed a process-engineering model for two purposes. The first was to predict the physical and chemical status at each test point in the design as a basis for scale-up. The second was to model the capital and operating cost of the apparatus. These were accomplished and used to predict capex, opex and cost of energy. Task 6--Preliminary Commercialization Plan--We carried out analyses of the market and the competition by a variety of parameters. The conclusion was that there is a l

  13. Photodesorption of ices I: CO, N2 and CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karin I. Oberg; Ewine F. van Dishoeck; Harold Linnartz

    2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A longstanding problem in astrochemistry is how molecules can be maintained in the gas phase in dense inter- and circumstellar regions. Photodesorption is a non-thermal desorption mechanism, which may explain the small amounts of observed cold gas in cloud cores and disk mid-planes. This paper aims to determine the UV photodesorption yields and to constrain the photodesorption mechanisms of three astrochemically relevant ices: CO, N2 and CO2. In addition, the possibility of co-desorption in mixed and layered CO:N2 ices is explored. The ice photodesorption is studied experimentally under ultra high vacuum conditions and at 15-60 K using a hydrogen discharge lamp (7-10.5 eV). The ice desorption during irradiation is monitored by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy of the ice and simultaneous mass spectrometry of the desorbed molecules. Both the UV photodesorption yields per incident photon and the photodesorption mechanisms are molecule specific. CO photodesorbs without dissociation from the surface layer of the ice. N2, which lacks an electronic transition in this wavelength range, has a photodesorption yield that is more than an order of magnitude lower. This yield increases significantly due to co-desorption when N2 is mixed in with or layered on top of CO ice. CO2 photodesorbs through dissociation and subsequent recombination from the top 10 layers of the ice. At low temperatures (15-18 K) the derived photodesorption yields are 2.7x10^-3 and CO2 photodesorption yield is 1.2x10^-3x(1-e^(-X/2.9)) + 1.1x10^-3x(1-e^(-X/4.6)) molecules photon-1, where X is the ice thickness in monolayers and the two parts of the expression represent a CO2 and CO photodesorption pathway.

  14. Separation of CO2 from flue gas using electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennline, H.W; Granite, E.J.; Luebke, D.R; Kitchin, J.R; Landon, J.; Weiland, L.M.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Past research with high temperature molten carbonate electrochemical cells has shown that carbon dioxide can be separated from flue gas streams produced by pulverized coal combustion for power generation, However, the presence of trace contaminants, i.e" sulfur dioxide and nitric oxides, will impact the electrolyte within the cell. If a lower temperature cell could be devised that would utilize the benefits of commercially-available, upstream desulfurization and denitrification in the power plant, then this CO2 separation technique can approach more viability in the carbon sequestration area, Recent work has led to the assembly and successful operation of a low temperature electrochemical cell. In the proof-of-concept testing with this cell, an anion exchange membrane was sandwiched between gas-diffusion electrodes consisting of nickel-based anode electrocatalysts on carbon paper. When a potential was applied across the cell and a mixture of oxygen and carbon dioxide was flowed over the wetted electrolyte on the cathode side, a stream of CO2 to O2 was produced on the anode side, suggesting that carbonate/ bicarbonate ions are the CO2 carrier in the membrane. Since a mixture of CO 2 and 02 is produced, the possibility exists to use this stream in oxy-firing of additional fuel. From this research, a novel concept for efficiently producing a carbon dioxide rich effiuent from combustion of a fossil fuel was proposed. Carbon dioxide and oxygen are captured from the flue gas of a fossilfuel combustor by one or more electrochemical cells or cell stacks. The separated stream is then transferred to an oxy-fired combustor which uses the gas stream for ancillary combustion, ultimately resulting in an effluent rich in carbon dioxide, A portion of the resulting flow produced by the oxy-fired combustor may be continuously recycled back into the oxy-fired combustor for temperature control and an optimal carbon dioxide rich effluent.

  15. New Houston NOx Rules: Implications and Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cascone, R.

    Capex $MM NOx Reduction Tons/yr Net Cost NPV10 $MM Case 1 4 50 3.6 a. Defer 1 year 4.2 loss due to delay 0.6 b. Defer 2 years 5.4 loss due to delay 1.7 c. Defer 3 years 8.5 loss due to delay 4.8 Case 2 35 750 31.8 a. Defer 1 year 42...

  16. NOx sensor development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock,Departmentsensor development NOx sensor

  17. IMPLEMENTING A NOVEL CYCLIC CO2 FLOOD IN PALEOZOIC REEFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan; A. Wylie

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycled CO2 will be used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 pinnacle reef (Otsego County) in the Michigan Basin. Contract negotiations by our industry partner to gain access to the CO2 supply have been completed and the State of Michigan has issued an order to allow operation of the project. Injection of CO2 is scheduled to begin in February, 2004. Subsurface characterization is being completed using well log tomography animations and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in two reefs, the Belle River Mills and Chester 18 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the normalized gamma ray and core permeability and core porosity curves is showing trends that indicate significant heterogeneity and compartmentalization in these reservoirs associated with the original depositional fabric of the rocks. Digital and hard copy data continues to be compiled for the Niagaran reefs in the Michigan Basin. Technology transfer took place through technical presentations regarding visualization of the heterogeneity of the Niagaran reefs. An oral presentation was given at the AAPG Eastern Section Meeting and a booth at the same meeting was used to meet one-on-one with operators.

  18. Consumption, Not CO2 emissions: Reframing Perspectives on Climate Change and Sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harriss, Robert; Shui, Bin

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stunning documentary film titled “Mardi Gras: Made in China” provides an insightful and engaging perspective on the globalization of desire for material consumption. Tracing the life cycle of Mardi Gras beads from a small factory in Fuzhou, China to the streets of the Mardi Gras celebration in New Orleans the viewer grasps the near universal human desire to strive for an affluent lifestyle. David Redmon, an independent film maker, follows the beads' genealogy back to the industrial town of Fuzhou, China, to the factory that is the world's largest producer of Mardi Gras beads and related party trinkets. He explores how these frivolous and toxic products affect the people who make them and those who consume them. Redmon captures the daily reality of a Chinese manufacturing facility. It’s workforce of approximately 500 teenage girls, and a handful of boys, live like prisoners in a fenced-in compound. These young people, often working 16-hour days, are constantly exposed to styrene, a chemical known to cause cancer — all for about 10 cents an hour. In addition to indoor pollution, the decrepit coal-fired manufacturing facilities are symbolic of China’s fast rise to the world’s top producer of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.1 The process of industrialization and modernization in China is happening at an unprecedented rate and scale.

  19. Three-Dimensional Composite Nanostructures for Lean NOx Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emission Control Catalysts Three-Dimensional Composite Nanostructures for Lean NOx Emission Control Ultra-efficient, Robust and Well-defined Nano-Array based Monolithic Catalysts...

  20. Three-Dimensional Composite Nanostructures for Lean NOx Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Monolithic Metal Oxide based Composite Nanowire Lean NOx Emission Control Catalysts Ultra-efficient, Robust and Well-defined Nano-Array based Monolithic...

  1. NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation This report provides the results of an...

  2. Cummins/ORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CumminsORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cummins-ORNLFEERC Emissions CRADA:...

  3. Novel Application of Air Separation Membranes Reduces NOx Emissions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    permeation of gases using an air separation membrane. Can be retrofitted to existing engines Significantly reduces NOx emissions (as much as 70%) with just a 2% nitrogen...

  4. H2-Assisted NOx Traps: Test Cell Results Vehicle Installations

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Sam Crane August 28, 2003 H 2 -Assisted NOx Traps: Test Cell Results Vehicle Installations 2 Project Objectives * Determine Advantages of H 2 Assisted NO x Trap Regeneration *...

  5. Durability Evaluation of an Integrated Diesel NOx Adsorber A...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Desulfurization Fuel Filter Development of NOx Adsorber System for Dodge Ram 2007 Heavy duty Pickup Truck Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Technology and Regulations...

  6. Enhanced High and Low Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    High and Low Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Materials 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

  7. Effect of reductive treatments on Pt behavior and NOx storage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    represent a promising approach to meet increasingly stringent NOx emission regulations on diesel and other lean-burn engines. Pt material properties, including dispersion and...

  8. Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx Storage/Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace026peden2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx StorageReduction (NSR) Materials...

  9. Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx Storage/Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Meeting ace026peden2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx StorageReduction (NSR) Materials Enhanced High and Low...

  10. Dynamometer Evaluation of Plasma-Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Dynamometer Evaluation of Plasma- Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction February 20, 2003 CRADA Protected Document and Data 2 Introduction * Engine dynamometer evaluation of...

  11. Cummins/ORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cummins-ORNLFEERC Emissions CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines CumminsORNL-FEERC...

  12. Spatiotemporal Distribution of NOx Storage: a Factor Controlling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    LNT & SCR CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR CumminsORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines...

  13. Dynamometer Evaluation of Plasma-Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Plasma-Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Ford Motor Company 2003deerhoard.pdf More Documents & Publications Plasma Assisted Catalysis...

  14. Development on simultaneous reduction system of NOx and PM from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    system of NOx and PM from a diesel engine 2003 DEER Converence Presentation: Toyota Motor Corporation 2003deerwatanabe.pdf More Documents & Publications An Improvement of...

  15. aluminosilicates nox reduction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the CompuNOx system focus on a controls approach to minimize emissions without exposing steam generation plants to an unbearable financial burden. With minimal system changes we...

  16. Lean NOx Reduction with Dual Layer LNT/SCR Catalysts

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    emerging 2 NSRSCR Technology Goal: Reduce PGM & minimize fuel penalty in meeting NOx emission targets (adapted from Gandhi et al., US Patent, 2007) 3 Fundamental Issues for Dual...

  17. STOMP Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases: STOMP-CO2 and STOMP-CO2e Guide: Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; McGrail, B. Peter; Watson, David J.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) guide document describes the theory, use, and application of the STOMP-CO2 and STOMP-CO2e operational modes. These operational modes of the STOMP simulator are configured to solve problems involving the sequestration of CO2 in geologic saline reservoirs. STOMP-CO2 is the isothermal version and STOMP-CO2e is the nonisothermal version. These core operational modes solve the governing conservation equations for component flow and transport through geologic media; where, the STOMP-CO2 components are water, CO2 and salt and the STOMP-CO2e operational mode also includes an energy conservation equation. Geochemistry can be included in the problem solution via the ECKEChem (Equilibrium-Conservation-Kinetic-Equation Chemistry) module, and geomechanics via the EPRMech (Elastic-Plastic-Rock Mechanics) module. This addendum is designed to provide the new user with a full guide for the core capabilities of the STOMP-CO2 and -CO2e simulators, and to provide the experienced user with a quick reference on implementing features. Several benchmark problems are provided in this addendum, which serve as starting points for developing inputs for more complex problems and as demonstrations of the simulator’s capabilities.

  18. Effects of CO2 on H2O band profiles and band strengths in mixed H2O:CO2 ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karin I. Oberg; Helen J. Fraser; A. C. Adwin Boogert; Suzanne E. Bisschop; Guido W. Fuchs; Ewine F. van Dishoeck; Harold Linnartz

    2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    H2O is the most abundant component of astrophysical ices. In most lines of sight it is not possible to fit both the H2O 3 um stretching, the 6 um bending and the 13 um libration band intensities with a single pure H2O spectrum. Recent Spitzer observations have revealed CO2 ice in high abundances and it has been suggested that CO2 mixed into H2O ice can affect relative strengths of the 3 um and 6 um bands. We used laboratory infrared transmission spectroscopy of H2O:CO2 ice mixtures to investigate the effects of CO2 on H2O ice spectral features at 15-135 K. We find that the H2O peak profiles and band strengths are significantly different in H2O:CO2 ice mixtures compared to pure H2O ice. In all H2O:CO2 mixtures, a strong free-OH stretching band appears around 2.73 um, which can be used to put an upper limit on the CO2 concentration in the H2O ice. The H2O bending mode profile also changes drastically with CO2 concentration; the broad pure H2O band gives way to two narrow bands as the CO2 concentration is increased. This makes it crucial to constrain the environment of H2O ice to enable correct assignments of other species contributing to the interstellar 6 um absorption band. The amount of CO2 present in the H2O ice of B5:IRS1 is estimated by simultaneously comparing the H2O stretching and bending regions and the CO2 bending mode to laboratory spectra of H2O, CO2, H2O:CO2 and HCOOH.

  19. Diesel Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    has been integrated into the engine design to target SULEV NMHC compliance Pre turbo catalysts for low NMOG Small LNT due to low absolute NOx mass reduction required...

  20. NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Bockelie; Kevin Davis; Connie Senior Darren Shino; Dave Swenson; Larry Baxter; Calvin Bartholomew; William Hecker; Stan Harding

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the seventeenth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DEFC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for boilers firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program. The SCR slipstream reactor was assembled and installed at Plant Gadsden this quarter. Safety equipment for ammonia had not been installed at the end of the quarter, but will be installed at the beginning of next quarter. The reactor will be started up next quarter. Four ECN corrosion probes were reinstalled at Gavin and collected corrosion data for approximately one month. Two additional probes were installed and removed after about 30 hours for future profilometry analysis. Preliminary analysis of the ECN probes, the KEMA coupons and the CFD modeling results all agree with the ultrasonic tube test measurements gathered by AEP personnel.

  1. NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Bockelie; Kevin Davis; Connie Senior; Darren Shino; Dave Swenson; Larry Baxter; Calvin Bartholomew; William Hecker; Stan Harding

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the eighteenth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DEFC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for boilers firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program. Safety equipment for ammonia for the SCR slipstream reactor at Plant Gadsden was installed. The slipstream reactor was started and operated for about 1400 hours during the last performance period. Laboratory analysis of exposed catalyst and investigations of the sulfation of fresh catalyst continued at BYU. Thicker end-caps for the ECN probes were designed and fabricated to prevent the warpage and failure that occurred at Gavin with the previous design. A refurbished ECN probe was successfully tested at the University of Utah combustion laboratory. Improvements were implemented to the software that controls the flow of cooling air to the ECN probes.

  2. Fuel Consumption and NOx Trade-offs on a Port-Fuel-Injected SI...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consumption and NOx Trade-offs on a Port-Fuel-Injected SI Gasoline Engine Equipped with a Lean-NOx Trap Fuel Consumption and NOx Trade-offs on a Port-Fuel-Injected SI Gasoline...

  3. Combining Low-Temperature Combustion with Lean-NOx Trap Yields...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Temperature Combustion with Lean-NOx Trap Yields Progress Toward Targets of Efficient NOx Control for Diesels Combining Low-Temperature Combustion with Lean-NOx Trap Yields...

  4. NOx Uptake Mechanism on Pt/BaO/Al2O3 Catalysts. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Al2O3 Catalysts. NOx Uptake Mechanism on PtBaOAl2O3 Catalysts. Abstract: The NOx adsorption mechanism on PtBaOAl2O3 catalysts was investigated by performing NOx storage...

  5. Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the building/street scale for a large US city

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurney, Kevin R.; Razlivanov, I.; Song, Yang; Zhou, Yuyu; Benes, Bedrich; Abdul- Massih, Michel

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to advance the scientific understanding of carbon exchange with the land surface, build an effective carbon monitoring system and contribute to quantitatively-based U.S. climate change policy interests, fine spatial and temporal quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions, the primary greenhouse gas, is essential. Called the ‘Hestia Project’, this research effort is the first to use bottom-up methods to quantify all fossil fuel CO2 emissions down to the scale of individual buildings, road segments, and industrial/electricity production facilities on an hourly basis for an entire urban landscape. a large city (Indianapolis, Indiana USA). Here, we describe the methods used to quantify the on-site fossil fuel CO2 emissions across the city of Indianapolis, Indiana. This effort combines a series of datasets and simulation tools such as a building energy simulation model, traffic data, power production reporting and local air pollution reporting. The system is general enough to be applied to any large U.S. city and holds tremendous potential as a key component of a carbon monitoring system in addition to enabling efficient greenhouse gas mitigation and planning. We compare our estimate of fossil fuel emissions from natural gas to consumption data provided by the local gas utility. At the zip code level, we achieve a bias adjusted pearson r correlation value of 0.92 (p<0.001).

  6. Gulf of Mexico Miocene CO2 Site Characterization Mega Transect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meckel, Timothy; Trevino, Ramon

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project characterized the Miocene-age sub-seafloor stratigraphy in the near-offshore portion of the Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Texas coast. The large number of industrial sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) in coastal counties and the high density of onshore urbanization and environmentally sensitive areas make this offshore region extremely attractive for long-term storage of carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sources (CCS). The study leverages dense existing geologic data from decades of hydrocarbon exploration in and around the study area to characterize the regional geology for suitability and storage capacity. Primary products of the study include: regional static storage capacity estimates, sequestration “leads” and prospects with associated dynamic capacity estimates, experimental studies of CO2-brine-rock interaction, best practices for site characterization, a large-format ‘Atlas’ of sequestration for the study area, and characterization of potential fluid migration pathways for reducing storage risks utilizing novel high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic surveys. In addition, three subcontracted studies address source-to-sink matching optimization, offshore well bore management and environmental aspects. The various geologic data and interpretations are integrated and summarized in a series of cross-sections and maps, which represent a primary resource for any near-term commercial deployment of CCS in the area. The regional study characterized and mapped important geologic features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone, the regionally extensive Marginulina A and Amphistegina B confining systems, etc.) that provided an important context for regional static capacity estimates and specific sequestration prospects of the study. A static capacity estimate of the majority of the Study area (14,467 mi2) was estimated at 86 metric Gigatonnes. While local capacity estimates are likely to be lower due to reservoir-scale characteristics, the offshore Miocene interval is a storage resource of National interest for providing CO2 storage as an atmospheric emissions abatement strategy. The natural petroleum system was used as an analog to infer seal quality and predict possible migration pathways of fluids in an engineered system of anthropogenic CO2 injection and storage. The regional structural features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone) that exert primary control on the trapping and distribution of Miocene hydrocarbons are expected to perform similarly for CCS. Industrial?scale CCS will require storage capacity utilizing well?documented Miocene hydrocarbon (dominantly depleted gas) fields and their larger structural closures, as well as barren (unproductive, brine?filled) closures. No assessment was made of potential for CO2 utilization for enhanced oil and gas recovery. The use of 3D numerical fluid flow simulations have been used in the study to greatly assist in characterizing the potential storage capacity of a specific reservoir. Due to the complexity of geologic systems (stratigraphic heterogeneity) and inherent limitations on producing a 3D geologic model, these simulations are typically simplified scenarios that explore the influence of model property variability (sensitivity study). A specific site offshore San Luis Pass (southern Galveston Island) was undertaken successfully, indicating stacked storage potential. Downscaling regional capacity estimates to the local scale (and the inverse) has proven challenging, and remains an outstanding gap in capacity assessments. In order to characterize regional seal performance and identify potential brine and CO2 leakage pathways, results from three high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic datasets acquired by the study using novel HR3D (P-Cable) acquisition system showed steady and significant improvements in data quality because of improved acquisition and processing technique. Finely detailed faults and stratigraphy in the shallowest 1000 milliseconds (~800 m) of data allowed for the identification and mapping of unconformable surfaces including what is probably

  7. CO2 Heat Pump Water Heater | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The BigSidingState6Report, March003MEAM,ofCO2 Heat Pump

  8. CO2 Injection Begins in Illinois | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The BigSidingState6Report, March003MEAM,ofCO2 Heat

  9. CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The BigSidingState6Report, March003MEAM,ofCO2

  10. CO2 Heat Pump Water Heater | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding Removal OngoingCERCLA SitesCHICAGOof Energy CNG in OKC:CO2

  11. Pre-Combustion CO2 Control | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical Information STIP MapNotes:4DAQPre-Combustion CO2

  12. Shell Future Fuels and CO2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAirPower Partners Wind FarmSheep Valleyand CO2

  13. 2015 CO2 Capture Technology Meeting | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, 2014 2014February 2015June5 CO2 Capture

  14. co2 capture meeting | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., ..., ,+ . :,2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology

  15. co2-saline-storage | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., ..., ,+ . :,2013 NETL CO2 Capture

  16. co2-use-reuse | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., ..., ,+ . :,2013 NETL CO2 CaptureTransport

  17. co2_ch4exchange | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., ..., ,+ . :,2013 NETL CO2 CaptureTransport12

  18. From CO2 to Methanol via Novel Nanocatalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof Energy Forrestal NTFusion Energy SciencesFrom CO2 to

  19. From CO2 to Methanol via Novel Nanocatalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof Energy Forrestal NTFusion Energy SciencesFrom CO2 toFrom

  20. From CO2 to Methanol via Novel Nanocatalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof Energy Forrestal NTFusion Energy SciencesFrom CO2

  1. Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Ronald; Wicks, John; Perry, Christopher

    2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian “Clinton” sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test (“Huff-n-Puff”) was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a “Clinton”-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day “soak” period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the “Clinton” sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent, gradual flashout of the CO2 within the reservoir during the ensuing monitored production period; and (D) a large amount of CO2 continually off-gassed from wellhead oil samples collected as late as 3½ months after injection. After the test well was returned to production, it produced 174 bbl of oil during a 60-day period (September 22 to November 21, 2008), which represents an estimated 58 percent increase in incremental oil production over preinjection estimates of production under normal, conditions. The geologic model was used in a reservoir simulation model for a 700-acre model area and to design a pilot to test the model. The model was designed to achieve a 1-year response time and a five-year simulation period. The reservoir simulation modeling indicated that the injection wells could enhance oil production and lead to an additional 20 percent recovery in the pilot area over a five-year period. The base case estimated that by injecting 500 MCF per day of CO2 into each of the four corner wells, 26,000 STBO would be produced by the central producer over the five-year period. This would compare to 3,000 STBO if a new well were drilled without the benefit of CO2 injection. This study has added significant knowledge to the reservoir characterization of the “Clinton” in the ECOF and succeeded in identifying a range on CO2-EOR potential. However, additional data on fluid properties (PVT and swelling test), fractures (oriented core and microseis), and reservoir characteristics (relative permeability, capillary pressure, and wet ability) are needed to further narrow the uncertainties and refine the reservoir model and simulation. After collection of this data and refinement of the model and simulation, it is recommended that a larger scale cyclic- CO2 injection test be conducted to better determine the efficacy of CO2-EOR in the “Clinton” reservoir in the ECOF.

  2. Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Riley; John Wicks; Christopher Perry

    2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian 'Clinton' sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test ('Huff-n-Puff') was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a 'Clinton'-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day 'soak' period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the 'Clinton' sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent, gradual flashout of the CO2 within the reservoir during the ensuing monitored production period; and (D) a large amount of CO2 continually off-gassed from wellhead oil samples collected as late as 3 1/2 months after injection. After the test well was returned to production, it produced 174 bbl of oil during a 60-day period (September 22 to November 21, 2008), which represents an estimated 58 percent increase in incremental oil production over preinjection estimates of production under normal, conditions. The geologic model was used in a reservoir simulation model for a 700-acre model area and to design a pilot to test the model. The model was designed to achieve a 1-year response time and a five-year simulation period. The reservoir simulation modeling indicated that the injection wells could enhance oil production and lead to an additional 20 percent recovery in the pilot area over a five-year period. The base case estimated that by injecting 500 MCF per day of CO2 into each of the four corner wells, 26,000 STBO would be produced by the central producer over the five-year period. This would compare to 3,000 STBO if a new well were drilled without the benefit of CO2 injection. This study has added significant knowledge to the reservoir characterization of the 'Clinton' in the ECOF and succeeded in identifying a range on CO2-EOR potential. However, additional data on fluid properties (PVT and swelling test), fractures (oriented core and microseis), and reservoir characteristics (relative permeability, capillary pressure, and wet ability) are needed to further narrow the uncertainties and refine the reservoir model and simulation. After collection of this data and refinement of the model and simulation, it is recommended that a larger scale cyclic-CO2 injection test be conducted to better determine the efficacy of CO2-EOR in the 'Clinton' reservoir in the ECOF.

  3. Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition System Design for CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    with low production rates such as CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR). This paper proposes a SCADA systemSupervisory Control and Data Acquisition System Design for CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Xie Lu College

  4. Assessing velocity and impedance changes due to CO2 saturation using interferometry on repeated seismic sources.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , Barcelona : Spain (2010)" #12;Introduction The role played by the industrial emission of carbon dioxide (CO2) in climate change has been well documented. Geological sequestration is a process to store CO2

  5. Advanced Development Of The Coal Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coal Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation ADECOS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Advanced Development Of The Coal-Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation (ADECOS) Place:...

  6. CO2 - Based Demand-Controlled Ventilation Control Strategies for Multi-Zone HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nassif, N.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2-based demand-controlled ventilation DCV strategy offers a great opportunity to reduce energy consumption in HVAC systems while providing the required ventilation. However, implementing CO2-based DCV under ASHRAE 62.1.2004 through 2010...

  7. 10. The Influence of Atmospheric CO2, Temperature, and Water on the Abundance of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehleringer, Jim

    BP sugars, starch phosphoenol pyruvate CO2 C4 acid pyruvate CO2 C4 acid PGA RuBP sugars, starch Figure 10 pathways contributing to global primary productivity, with Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM), a third

  8. Structure and Dynamics of Forsterite-scCO2/H2O Interfaces as...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forsterite-scCO2H2O Interfaces as a Function of Water Content. Structure and Dynamics of Forsterite-scCO2H2O Interfaces as a Function of Water Content. Abstract: Molecular...

  9. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates Accompanying Acidic CO2-Saturated Brine Flow in Sandstone Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    1 Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates Accompanying Acidic CO2-Saturated Brine Flow in Sandstone models. As a step toward this, network flow models were used to simulate the flow of CO2-saturated brine

  10. 9,997,638 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of April 9, 2015 | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  11. Effects of Hydration and Oxygen Vacancy on CO2 Adsorption and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydration and Oxygen Vacancy on CO2 Adsorption and Activation on ?-Ga2O3(100). Effects of Hydration and Oxygen Vacancy on CO2 Adsorption and Activation on ?-Ga2O3(100)....

  12. Structure and Dynamics of CO2 on Rutile TiO2(110)-1×1....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure and Dynamics of CO2 on Rutile TiO2(110)-1×1. Abstract: Adsorption, binding, and diffusion of CO2 molecules on rutile TiO2(110) model surfaces was...

  13. 9,805,742 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 27, 2015...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  14. 9,981,117 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of April 2, 2015 | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  15. Forsterite [Mg2SiO4)] Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forsterite Mg2SiO4) Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in situ High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Study. Forsterite Mg2SiO4) Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in situ...

  16. Spatio-temporal changes in CO2 emissions during the second ZERT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spatio-temporal changes in CO2 emissions during the second ZERT injection, August-September 2008. Spatio-temporal changes in CO2 emissions during the second ZERT injection,...

  17. Active Oxygen Vacancy Site for Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenati...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxygen Vacancy Site for Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation on In2O3(110): A DFT Study. Active Oxygen Vacancy Site for Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation on...

  18. CO2 interaction with aquifer and seal on geological timescales: the Miller oilfield, UK North Sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jiemin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) has been identified as a feasible technology to reduce CO2 emissions whilst permitting the continued use of fossil fuels. Injected CO2 must remain efficiently isolated from the atmosphere ...

  19. Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation over a Pd4/In2O3 Model...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation over a Pd4In2O3 Model Catalyst: A Combined DFT and Kinetic Study. Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation over a Pd4In2O3 Model Catalyst: A...

  20. Influence of Rock Types on Seismic Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Carbonate Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mammadova, Elnara

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ) techniques such as high pressure CO2 injection may normally be required to recover oil in place in carbonate reservoirs. This study addresses how different rock types can influence the seismic monitoring of CO2 sequestration in carbonates. This research...

  1. Catalytic roles of Co0 and Co2+ during steam reforming of ethanol...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    roles of Co0 and Co2+ during steam reforming of ethanol on CoMgO catalysts . Catalytic roles of Co0 and Co2+ during steam reforming of ethanol on CoMgO catalysts . Abstract:...

  2. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on "CO2 Sequestration Geophysics"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lumley, D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on “CO 2 Sequestration Geophysics” David Lumley (U. W.on “CO 2 Sequestration Geophysics” was held August 23-27,sequestration: Model Studies: Geophysics, 73, WA105-WA112.

  3. FOSSIL ENERGY, CO2, CLIMATE CHANGE, AND THE AEROSOL PROBLEM Stephen E. Schwartz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been masked by the aerosol cooling forcing. Allowable future CO2 emissions so as not to commit of the greenhouse gas forcing due to cooling forcing by tropospheric aerosols; as aerosols, unlike CO2, are short

  4. 9,355,469 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of January 29, 2015...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  5. 9,449,421 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 12, 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  6. Influence of Rock Types on Seismic Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Carbonate Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mammadova, Elnara

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ) techniques such as high pressure CO2 injection may normally be required to recover oil in place in carbonate reservoirs. This study addresses how different rock types can influence the seismic monitoring of CO2 sequestration in carbonates. This research...

  7. On Leakage andSeepage of CO2 from Geologic Storage Sites intoSurface Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Lewicki, J.L.

    2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture ofanthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) and its storage in deep geologicformations. The processes of CO2 seepage into surface water aftermigration through water-saturated sediments are reviewed. Natural CO2 andCH4 fluxes are pervasive in surface-water environments and are goodanalogues to potential leakage and seepage of CO2. Buoyancy-driven bubblerise in surface water reaches a maximum velocity of approximately 30 cms-1. CO2 rise in saturated porous media tends to occur as channel flowrather than bubble flow. A comparison of ebullition versus dispersive gastransport for CO2 and CH4 shows that bubble flow will dominate overdispersion in surface water. Gaseous CO2 solubility in variable-salinitywaters decreases as pressure decreases leading to greater likelihood ofebullition and bubble flow in surface water as CO2 migratesupward.

  8. The Copolymerization of CO_(2) and Cyclic Ethers and Their Degradation Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Sheng-Hsuan

    2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    couplings of epoxides and CO_(2) to produce polycarbonates has received attention from researchers. In this dissertation, metal catalyzed CO_(2)/cyclic ether copolymerization, depolymerization of polycarbonates, and the equilibria between polycarbonate...

  9. 10,045,885 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of April 16, 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE’s Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is equivalent to the...

  10. 10,180,047 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of May 28, 2015 | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

  11. DOE-Funded Project Testing Laser CO2 Monitoring at Carbon Storage...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE-Funded Project Testing Laser CO2 Monitoring at Carbon Storage Site DOE-Funded Project Testing Laser CO2 Monitoring at Carbon Storage Site June 3, 2015 - 8:44am Addthis Photo...

  12. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    He, et. al. 2005. “Oil consumption and CO2 emissions inHe, et. al. 2005. “Oil consumption and CO2 emissions inin all types of oil consumption are needed to reduce crude

  13. Mathematical models as tools for probing long-term safety of CO2 storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for CO2 geological storage, Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control,1008, DOI Bachu, S. CO2 Storage in Geological Media: Role,R.H. Worden. Geological Storage of Carbon Dioxide, in: S.J.

  14. Properties of CO2-Rich Pore Fluids and Their Effect on Porosity Evolution in EGS Rocks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Quantify key parameters critically needed for developing and validating numerical modeling of chemical interactions between EGS reservoir rocks and supercritical CO2and CO2-rich aqueous fluids.

  15. Oldenburg and Pan CO2 as Cushion Gas for CAES 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    as Cushion Gas for CAES 2 Options Available http://www.princeton.edu/~cmi/resources/stabwedge.htm 3 Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) (From IPCC Special Report on CO2 Capture and Storage) #12;Oldenburg and Pan CO2

  16. NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jost O.L. Wendt

    2002-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NOx concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NOx and low NOx combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). Tradeoffs between CO2 control, NOx control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined. Previous research has yielded data on trace metal partitioning for MSS by itself, with natural gas assist, for coal plus MSS combustion together, and for coal alone. We have re-evaluated the inhalation health effects of ash aerosol from combustion of MSS both by itself and also together with coal. We have concluded that ash from the co-combustion of MSS and coal is very much worse from an inhalation health point of view, than ash from either MSS by itself or coal by itself. The reason is that ZnO is not the ''bad actor'' as had been suspected before, but the culprit is, rather, sulfated Zn. The MSS supplies the Zn and the coal supplies the sulfur, and so it is the combination of coal and MSS that makes that process environmentally bad. If MSS is to be burned, it should be burned without coal, in the absence of sulfur.

  17. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 41- Nox Budget Trading Program (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations establish a budget trading program for nitrogen oxide emissions, setting NOx budget units for generators and an NOx Allowance Tracking System to account for emissions. These...

  18. Synergies of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion and Lean NOx Trap...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Synergies of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion and Lean NOx Trap Catalysts Synergies of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion and Lean NOx Trap Catalysts investigation of potential...

  19. Durability of NOx Absorbers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E TDrew Bittner About Us DrewDualLight-Duty2of NOx

  20. A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO 2the inventory of most hazardous trace elements are capturedequilibrium concentrations of hazardous trace elements in

  1. Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) with CO2 as heat transmission fluid--A scheme for combining recovery of renewable energy with geologic storage of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO 2Fluid, Proceedings, World Geothermal Congress 2010, Bali,Remain? Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 17,

  2. Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) with CO2 as heat transmission fluid--A scheme for combining recovery of renewable energy with geologic storage of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We find that in a fractured reservoir, CO 2 breakthrough atfor a hypothetical fractured reservoir with parameterswater-saturated fractured reservoir at temperature and

  3. China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heater Residential CO2 Emissions (Mt CO2) 2020 ResidentialEnergy Industrial Sector CO2 Emissions (Mt CO2) IndustrialFigure 5. Power Sector CO2 Emissions by Scenario E3 Max Tech

  4. Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    risk from surface CO2 seeps. Data were elicited from Googas (17), a web-based catalogue of degassing

  5. Continuous active-source seismic monitoring of CO2 injection in a brine aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, Thomas M.; Solbau, Ray D.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Benson, Sally M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTERPRETATION The injection of CO 2 causes a decrease in seismicseismic monitoring during injection. Although quantitative interpretation

  6. A Framework for Environmental Assessment of CO2 Capture and Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathre, Roger

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    increased electricity generation from other power plants inplants require the capture of more CO 2 per unit of electricity generation.

  7. 6.11 Atmospheric CO2 and O2 During the Phanerozoic: Tools, Patterns, and Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    6.11 Atmospheric CO2 and O2 During the Phanerozoic: Tools, Patterns, and Impacts DL Royer, Wesleyan.11.2 Models for Atmospheric CO2 and O2 Estimation 251 6.11.2.1 Key Principles 251 6.11.2.2 GEOCARB Models 252.11.2.2.5 Estimates of CO2 and O2 from the GEOCARB model 254 6.11.2.3 Other Models for CO2 and O2 Reconstruction 254 6

  8. Mathematical models as tools for probing long-term safety of CO2 storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    where CO 2 used for enhanced oil recovery has broken throughformations for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) has been

  9. A Feasibility Study of Non-Seismic Geophysical Methods for Monitoring Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasperikova, Erika; Hoversten, G. Michael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    combined CO 2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestrationis introduced for enhanced oil/gas recovery or for geologic

  10. IMPLEMENTING A NOVEL CYCLIC CO2 FLOOD IN PALEOZOIC REEFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan; A. Wylie

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycled CO2 will be used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 pinnacle reef (Otsego County) in the Michigan Basin. We began injecting CO2 in the Dover 35 field into the Salling-Hansen 4-35A well on May 6, 2004. Subsurface characterization is being completed using well log tomography animations and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in three reefs, the Belle River Mills, Chester 18, and Dover 35 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester 18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the log porosity, normalized gamma ray, core permeability, and core porosity curves is showing trends that indicate significant heterogeneity and compartmentalization in these reservoirs associated with the original depositional fabric of the rocks. Digital and hard copy data continues to be compiled for the Niagaran reefs in the Michigan Basin. Technology transfer took place through technical presentations regarding visualization of the heterogeneity of the Niagaran reefs. Oral presentations were given at the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council workshop, Michigan Oil and Gas Association Conference, and Michigan Basin Geological Society meeting. A technical paper was submitted to the Bulletin of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists on the characterization of the Belle River Mills Field.

  11. IMPLEMENTING A NOVEL CYCLIC CO2 FLOOD IN PALEOZOIC REEFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan; A. Wylie

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycled CO2 will be used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Charlton 6 pinnacle reef (Otsego County) in the Michigan Basin. Contract negotiations by our industry partner to gain access to this CO2 that would otherwise be vented to the atmosphere are near completion. A new method of subsurface characterization, log curve amplitude slicing, is being used to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in two reefs, the Belle River Mills and Chester 18 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester18 fields are being used as typefields because they have excellent log-curve and core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the normalized gamma ray curves is showing trends that may indicate significant heterogeneity and compartmentalization in these reservoirs. Digital and hard copy data continues to be compiled for the Niagaran reefs in the Michigan Basin. Technology transfer took place through technical presentations regarding the log curve amplitude slicing technique and a booth at the Midwest PTTC meeting.

  12. IMPLEMENTING A NOVEL CYCLIC CO2 FLOOD IN PALEOZOIC REEFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; W. quinlan; A. Wylie

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycled CO2 is being used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 Niagaran pinnacle reef located in Otsego County, Michigan. CO2 injection in the Dover 35 field into the Salling-Hansen 4-35A well began on May 6, 2004. A second injection well, the Salling-Hansen 1-35, commenced injection in August 2004. Oil production in the Pomerzynski 5-35 producing well increased from 9 BOPD prior to operations to an average of 165 BOPD in December, 2004 and has produced at an average rate of 61 BOPD (Jan-Dec, 2005). The Salling-Hansen 4-35A also produced during this reporting period an average of 29 BOPD. These increases have occurred as a result of CO2 injection and the production rate appears to be stabilizing. CO2 injection volume has reached approximately 2.18 BCF. The CO2 injection phase of this project has been fully operational since December 2004 and most downhole mechanical issues have been solved and surface facility modifications have been completed. It is anticipated that filling operations will run for another 6-12 months from July 1, 2005. In most other aspects, the demonstration is going well and hydrocarbon production has been stabilized at an average rate of 57 BOPD (July-Dec, 2005). Our industry partners continue to experiment with injection rates and pressures, various downhole and surface facility mechanical configurations, and the huff-n-puff technique to develop best practices for these types of enhanced recovery projects. Subsurface characterization was completed using well log tomography and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in the Belle River Mills, Chester 18, Dover 35, and Dover 36 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester 18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the log porosity, normalized gamma ray, core permeability, and core porosity curves are showing trends that indicate significant heterogeneity and compartmentalization in these reservoirs associated with the original depositional fabric and pore types of the carbonate reservoir rocks. Accumulated pressure data supports the hypothesis of extreme heterogeneity in the Dover 35. Some intervals now have pressure readings over 2345 psig (April 29, 2005) in the A-1 Carbonate while nearby Niagaran Brown intervals only show 1030 psig (March 7, 2005). This is a pressure differential over 1300 psig and suggests significant vertical barriers in the reef, consistent with the GR tomography modeling. Digital and hard copy data have been compiled for the Niagaran reefs in the Michigan Basin, including a detailed summary of 20 fields in the vicinity of the demonstration well. Technology transfer took place through technical presentations regarding visualization of the reservoir heterogeneity in these Niagaran reefs. Oral presentations were given at two Petroleum Technology Transfer Council workshops, a Michigan Oil and Gas Association Conference, a Michigan Basin Geological Society meeting, and the Eastern American Association of Petroleum Geologist's Annual meeting. In addition, we met with our industry partners several times during the first half of 2005 to communicate and discuss the reservoir characterization and field site aspects of the demonstration project. A technical paper was published in the April 2005 issue of the AAPG Bulletin on the characterization of the Belle River Mills Field.

  13. NOx reduction by electron beam-produced nitrogen atom injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deactivated atomic nitrogen generated by an electron beam from a gas stream containing more than 99% N.sub.2 is injected at low temperatures into an engine exhaust to reduce NOx emissions. High NOx reduction efficiency is achieved with compact electron beam devices without use of a catalyst.

  14. Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ISF 2.8 during FTP-75 are too high for current state of the art NOx AT to meet T2B2 emission levels * Reduction in engine out NOx emissions from 2 gmi to 0.4 gmi allows for...

  15. Author's personal copy Antioxidant capacity reduced in scallions grown under elevated CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paré, Paul W.

    ) of scallion extracts was determined using a radical cation scavenging assay. Both elevated CO2 and increasing that increasing atmo- spheric [CO2] enhances water use efficiency because of reduced stomatal conductance and antioxidant activity of the harvested fruits (Wang, 2006). However, reports regarding elevated CO2 effects

  16. An Introduction to CO2 Separation and Capture Technologies Howard Herzog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recovery (EOR) operations where CO2 is injected into oil reservoirs to increase the mobility of the oil andAn Introduction to CO2 Separation and Capture Technologies Howard Herzog MIT Energy Laboratory August, 1999 In general, to economically sequester CO2 produced from power plants, one must first produce

  17. USING TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC MEASUREMENTS TO IMPROVE FLOW MODELING OF CO2 INJECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marly. The EOR process in the RCP section of the Weyburn Field uses CO2 and water injection to displaceUSING TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC MEASUREMENTS TO IMPROVE FLOW MODELING OF CO2 INJECTION IN THE WEYBURN, particularly CO2. Time lapse seismic monitoring has motivated changes to the reservoir description in a flow

  18. ACOUSTIC IMPEDANCE INVERSION FOR STATIC AND DYNAMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF A CO2 EOR PROJECT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ACOUSTIC IMPEDANCE INVERSION FOR STATIC AND DYNAMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF A CO2 EOR PROJECT, POSTLE of the CO2 flood performance at Postle field. The use of traditional P-wave reflectivity data correlate to the roll-out of the CO2 flood program from south to north. When interpreted in conjunction

  19. Surface and Subsurface Geochemical Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Surface and Subsurface Geochemical Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil C. Magnier1, V Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil -- This paper presents a surface and subsurface geochemical survey of the Buracica EOR-CO2 field onshore Brazil. We adopted a methodology coupling the stable

  20. A numerical procedure to model and monitor CO2 sequestration in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    area of research. o We present a methodology integrating numerical simulation of CO2 -brine o The simultaneous flow of brine and CO2 is described by the well-known Black in the brine but the brine is not allowed to vaporize into the CO2 phase. o This formulation uses