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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Chronic disease management: a business intelligence perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chronic disease management is one of the main areas in healthcare that Health Knowledge Management (HKM) can provide beneficial outcomes. Information Communication Technology (ICT) enabled Chronic disease management network (cdmNet) delivers comprehensive ... Keywords: business intelligence, chronic disease management, data mining

Leelani Kumari Wickramasinghe, Damminda Alahakoon, Michael Georgeff, Peter Schattner, Daswin De Silva, Oshadi Alahakoon, Akuh Adaji, Kay Jones, Am Leon Piterman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats will cover the effect of different dietary fats on the development of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancers, inflammation, and immune functions. ...

3

Chronic Beryllium Disease Awareness Card and Web Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chronic Beryllium Disease Awareness Card and Web Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Awareness The U.S Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) has...

4

Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) meets the requirements and management practices of federal regulation 10 CFR 850, 'Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP).' This revision of the LLNL CBDPP incorporates clarification and editorial changes based on lessons learned from employee discussions, observations and reviews of Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and commercial industry beryllium (Be) safety programs. The information is used to strengthen beryllium safety practices at LLNL, particularly in the areas of: (1) Management of small parts and components; and (2) Communication of program status to employees. Future changes to LLNL beryllium activities and on-going operating experience will be incorporated into the program as described in Section S, 'Performance Feedback.'

Lee, S

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

5

Status Report, Department of Energy's Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Status Report, Department of Energy's Chronic Beryllium Disease Status Report, Department of Energy's Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program - February 2006 Status Report, Department of Energy's Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program - February 2006 February 2006 Report on Implementation of 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program During calendar year 2005, the Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance, evaluated the effectiveness of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chronic beryllium disease protection programs (CBDPPs) at five sites as part of regularly scheduled inspections. These reviews focused on site programs for ensuring that workers are protected in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 850. This report summarizes the observations, insights, and lessons learned from

6

Status Report, Department of Energy's Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Status Report, Department of Energy's Chronic Beryllium Disease Status Report, Department of Energy's Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program - February 2006 Status Report, Department of Energy's Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program - February 2006 February 2006 Report on Implementation of 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program During calendar year 2005, the Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance, evaluated the effectiveness of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chronic beryllium disease protection programs (CBDPPs) at five sites as part of regularly scheduled inspections. These reviews focused on site programs for ensuring that workers are protected in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 850. This report summarizes the observations, insights, and lessons learned from

7

Title 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wednesday Wednesday December 8, 1999 Part III Department of Energy 10 CFR Part 850 Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program; Final Rule VerDate 29-OCT-99 10:58 Dec 07, 1999 Jkt 190000 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\A08DE0.189 pfrm04 PsN: 08DER3 68854 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 235 / Wednesday, December 8, 1999 / Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 850 [Docket No. EH-RM-98-BRYLM] RIN 1901-AA75 Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program AGENCY: Office of Environment, Safety and Health, Department of Energy. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) is today publishing a final rule to establish a chronic beryllium disease prevention program (CBDPP) to reduce the number of workers currently exposed to beryllium in the course of their work at DOE facilities managed by

8

LLNL Chronic Beryllium Disease Protection Program Effectiveness Review, March 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LLNL-2011-03-25 LLNL-2011-03-25 Site: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Effectiveness Review Dates of Activity : 03/14/2011 - 03/25/2011 Report Preparer: Marvin Mielke Activity Description/Purpose: The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Livermore Site Office (LSO) chartered a team to conduct an effectiveness review of the issues identified with the LLNL Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP). The team included members and observers from LLNL, LSO, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and the

9

LLNL Chronic Beryllium Disease Protection Program Effectiveness Review, March 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LLNL-2011-03-25 LLNL-2011-03-25 Site: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Effectiveness Review Dates of Activity : 03/14/2011 - 03/25/2011 Report Preparer: Marvin Mielke Activity Description/Purpose: The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Livermore Site Office (LSO) chartered a team to conduct an effectiveness review of the issues identified with the LLNL Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP). The team included members and observers from LLNL, LSO, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and the

10

Development of a smart e-health portal for chronic disease management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In developed countries, chronic disease now accounts for more than 75% of health care expenditure and nearly an equivalent percentage of disease related deaths. In response to these changes in disease demographics and the economic imperatives caused ... Keywords: chronic disease, decision support, e-health portal

Maryam Haddad; Girija Chetty

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oversight Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program February 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of...

12

A common interface to transfer data between telemedicine devices and smartphones for monitoring of chronic diseases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important part of chronic patients care is continuous monitoring of relevant parameters according to a particular disease. The subject of the work is an implementation of a common interface to exchange data between various medical devices and smartphones ... Keywords: Bluetooth, Java Android programming, Java programming, chronic disease, mobile care, smartphone

Jacek Da?da; Dominik Kobylarz

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Dynamic Policy Modeling for Chronic Diseases: Metaheuristic-Based Identification of Pareto-Optimal Screening Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a risk-group oriented chronic disease progression model embedded within a metaheuristic-based optimization of the policy variables. Policy-makers are provided with Pareto-optimal screening schedules for risk groups by considering cost and ... Keywords: chronic disease policy analysis, decision analysis, dynamic resource allocation, health care, metaheuristics, multicriteria optimization, prevention

Marion S. Rauner; Walter J. Gutjahr; Kurt Heidenberger; Joachim Wagner; Joseph Pasia

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

General Counsel Legal Interpretation Regarding Medical Removal Protection Benefits Pursuant to 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following document is the Office of the General Counsel (GC) interpretation regarding Medical Removal Protection Benefits Pursuant to 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program.

15

Independent Oversight Inspection of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program June 2010 Office of Independent Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS x Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program | i Abbreviations iii Executive Summary v 1 Introduction 1 2 Management and Oversight 3 3 Findings Requiring Corrective Action 14 4 Conclusions and Cross-Cutting Opportunities for Improvement 17 Appendix A - Supplemental Information 23 Appendix B - Background Information 26 Appendix C - AdvanceMed Hanford Beryllium Medical Support Program 32 Appendix D - CH2M-Hill Plateau Remediation Company 48 Appendix E - Mission Support Alliance 57 Appendix F - Washington Closure Hanford 71

16

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 15 Perinatal Supplementation of Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids as a Strategy to Prevent Adult Diseases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 15 Perinatal Supplementation of Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids as a Strategy to Prevent Adult Diseases Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pr

17

Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program, February 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Independent Oversight Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program February 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope...................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results.................................................................................................................................... 2

18

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 19 Functionalities and Production with Biocatalysis of Two Highly Polyunsaturated Phospholipids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 19 Functionalities and Production with Biocatalysis of Two Highly Polyunsaturated Phospholipids Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

19

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 16 Health Benefits of Dietary Diacylglycerol In Practical Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 16 Health Benefits of Dietary Diacylglycerol In Practical Use Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of

20

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 1 Seeking Better Dietary Fats for Human Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 1 Seeking Better Dietary Fats for Human Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 1 Seeki

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 2 Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids And Cancer Cachexia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 2 Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids And Cancer Cachexia Health Nutrition Biochemistry Omega 3 eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

22

Impact of Palivizumab on RSV Hospitalizations for Children with Hemodynamically Significant Congenital Heart Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in infants with congenital heart disease. Pediatrics 114:children with congenital heart disease. The Cardiac StudySigni?cant Congenital Heart Disease Ruey-Kang R. Chang •

Chang, Ruey-Kang R.; Chen, Alex Y.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

DOE G 440.1-7A, Implementation Guide for use with 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Department of Energy (DOE) has established regulatory requirements for the Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) in Title 10 of the Code of ...

2001-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

24

Low Prevalence of Chronic Beryllium Disease among Workers at a Nuclear Weapons Research and Development Facility  

SciTech Connect

To study the prevalence of beryllium sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) in a cohort of workers from a nuclear weapons research and development facility. We evaluated 50 workers with BeS with medical and occupational histories, physical examination, chest imaging with HRCT (N=49), and pulmonary function testing. Forty of these workers also underwent bronchoscopy for bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and transbronchial biopsies. The mean duration of employment at the facility was 18 yrs and the mean latency (from first possible exposure) to time of evaluation was 32 yrs. Five of the workers had CBD at the time of evaluation (based on histology or HRCT); three others had evidence of probable CBD. These workers with BeS, characterized by a long duration of potential Be exposure and a long latency, had a low prevalence of CBD.

Arjomandi, M; Seward, J P; Gotway, M B; Nishimura, S; Fulton, G P; Thundiyil, J; King, T E; Harber, P; Balmes, J R

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

25

The Effects of Anti-Hypertensive Drugs Evaluated Using Markov Modelling for Northern Ireland Chronic Kidney Disease Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to use Markov modelling to investigate survival for particular types of kidney patients in relation to their exposure to anti-hypertensive treatment drugs. In order to monitor kidney function an intuitive three point assessment ... Keywords: Markov Modelling, Chronic Kidney Disease, Anti-Hypertensive Drugs

Andrea Rainey; Karen Carins; Adele Marshall; Michael Quinn; Gerard Savage; Damian Fogarty

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Neonatal chronic lung disease in extremely immature baboons. Am J Respir Crit Care Med  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A borderline viability model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD)/chronic lung disease of infancy (CLD) with pathophysiologic parameters consistent with those in extremely immature humans with BPD/CLD is described. After prenatal steroid treatment of pregnant dams, 12 premature baboons were delivered by cesarean-section at 125 d (term gestation, 185 d), treated with exogenous surfactant, and maintained on appropriate oxygen and positive pressure ventilation for at least 1 to 2 mo. In spite of appropriate oxygenation (median FI O2 at 28 d ? 0.32; range, 0.21 to 0.50) and ventilatory strategies to prevent volutrauma, the baboons exhibited pulmonary pathologic lesions known to occur in extremely immature humans of less than 1,000 g: alveolar hypoplasia, variable saccular wall fibrosis, and minimal, if any, airway disease. The CLD baboon lungs showed significantly decreased alveolization and internal surface area measurements when compared with term and term ? 2-mo air-breathing controls. A decrease in capillary vasculature was evident by PECAM staining, accompanied by dysmorphic changes. Significant elevations of TNF-?, IL-6, IL-8 levels, but not of IL-1 ? and IL-10, in tracheal aspirate fluids were present at various times during the period of ventilatory support, supporting a role for mediator-induced autoinflammation. IL-8 levels were elevated in necropsy lavages of animals with significant lung infection. This model demonstrates that impaired alveolization

Jacqueline J. Coalson; Vicki T. Winter; Theresa Siler-khodr; Bradley A. Yoder

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

doi:10.4061/2011/747861 Review Article Metabolic Syndrome, Chronic Kidney Disease, and Cardiovascular Disease: A Dynamic and Life-Threatening Triad  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The metabolic syndrome (MS) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have both become global public health problems, with increasing social and economic impact due to their high prevalence and remarkable impact on morbidity and mortality. The causality between MS and CKD, and its clinical implications, still does remain not completely understood. Moreover, prophylactic and therapeutic interventions do need to be properly investigated in this field. Herein, we critically review the existing clinical evidence that associates MS with renal disease and cardiovascular disease, as well as the associated pathophysiologic mechanisms and actual treatment options. 1.

Mário Raimundo; Joséantónio Lopes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Office of Health, Safety and Security Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Follow-up Review of the Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program May 2011 June 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results .................................................................................................................................... 1

29

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 7 Dietary Conjugated Linolenic Acid Modifies Body Fat Mass, and Serum and Liver Lipid Levels in Rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 7 Dietary Conjugated Linolenic Acid Modifies Body Fat Mass, and Serum and Liver Lipid Levels in Rats Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

30

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseCh 10 Suppression of Leukotriene B4 Generation by ex vivo Neutrophils Isolated from Asthma Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Ch 10 Suppression of Leukotriene B4 Generation by ex vivo Neutrophils Isolated from Asthma Patients Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

31

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 4 A Clinically Relevant Lipid Model for South African Patients with Laryngeal Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 4 A Clinically Relevant Lipid Model for South African Patients with Laryngeal Cancer Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downlo

32

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 18 Is There a Role for Conjugated Linoleic Acid to Aid in the Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 18 Is There a Role for Conjugated Linoleic Acid to Aid in the Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes? Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

33

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 3 Chemopreventive Effect of Bitter Gourd Seed Oil Rich in Conjugated Linolenic Acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 3 Chemopreventive Effect of Bitter Gourd Seed Oil Rich in Conjugated Linolenic Acid Health Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Nutrition Press Downloa

34

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 17 Docosahexaenoic Acid Intake and Lipid peroxidation in Retinal Membranes of Rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 17 Docosahexaenoic Acid Intake and Lipid peroxidation in Retinal Membranes of Rats Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Download

35

Suppressed Expression of T-Box Transcription Factors is Involved in Senescence in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global health problem. The etiology of COPD has been associated with apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. However, understanding of the molecular interactions that modulate COPD pathogenesis remains only partly resolved. We conducted an exploratory study on COPD etiology to identify the key molecular participants. We used information-theoretic algorithms including Context Likelihood of Relatedness (CLR), Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNE), and Inferelator. We captured direct functional associations among genes, given a compendium of gene expression profiles of human lung epithelial cells. A set of genes differentially expressed in COPD, as reported in a previous study were superposed with the resulting transcriptional regulatory networks. After factoring in the properties of the networks, an established COPD susceptibility locus and domain-domain interactions involving protein products of genes in the generated networks, several molecular candidates were predicted to be involved in the etiology of COPD. These include COL4A3, CFLAR, GULP1, PDCD1, CASP10, PAX3, BOK, HSPD1, PITX2, and PML. Furthermore, T-box (TBX) genes and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A), which are in a direct transcriptional regulatory relationship, emerged as preeminent participants in the etiology of COPD by means of senescence. Contrary to observations in neoplasms, our study reveals that the expression of genes and proteins in the lung samples from patients with COPD indicate an increased tendency towards cellular senescence. The expression of the anti-senescence mediators TBX transcription factors, chromatin modifiers histone deacetylases, and sirtuins was suppressed; while the expression of TBX-regulated cellular senescence markers such as CDKN2A, CDKN1A, and CAV1 was elevated in the peripheral lung tissue samples from patients with COPD. The critical balance between senescence and anti-senescence factors is disrupted towards senescence in COPD lungs.

Acquaah-Mensah, George; Malhotra, Deepti; Vulimiri, Madhulika; McDermott, Jason E.; Biswal, Shyam

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

36

Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than -860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with {>=}20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan); Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

38

ENERGY STAR Score for Hospitals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hospitals in the United States Page 1 ENERGY STAR Score for Hospitals in the United States Technical Reference OVERVIEW The ENERGY STAR Score for Hospitals applies to general...

39

Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease April 2011 This document provides a listing of medical facilities within the United States with experience in evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). Because the medical community at large is not experienced in the evaluation and treatment of individuals with CBD, this list is offered to individuals in the Former Worker Medical Screening Program who have received an abnormal Beryllium Lymphocyte Proliferation Test and may need further medical monitoring for CBD. Former Worker Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease More Documents & Publications

40

Pervasive Computing for Hospital, Chronic, and Preventive Care  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An emerging area of great impact and significance is the application of pervasive computing technologies in healthcare. Pervasive healthcare refers to the set of technologies designed to seamlessly integrate health education, interventions, and monitoring ...

Monica Tentori; Gillian R. Hayes; Madhu Reddy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

HumanoidHospital Sustainable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HHO HumanoidHospital Nanoscale Science Nano-Bio Interface Sustainable Energy Renewable Materials, students, or applicants for admission or employment on the basis of race, gender, disability, age, veteran

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

42

The genetics of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cities in China, non-smoker emphysema death rates are almost 100 times greater than those of the non-smoker in the USA [4]. Exposure to dust in the coal and gold mining industries, and to gas in cadmium mining, has been linked to the development... number of well-charac- terised affected relatives; either extended pedigrees or nuclear families can be used. One of our research groups (EKS) has been focusing on linkage analysis of extended pedigrees of patients with severe, early-onset COPD. A genome...

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

43

LLNL Chronic Beryllium Disease Protection Program Effectiveness...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LLNL-2011-03-25 Site: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report...

44

Hospitals - Medical - Backup Generator Problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the investigation of problems while testing a backup generator at a hospital.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Hospital Renovations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hospital Renovations Hospital Renovations Hospital Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:53pm Addthis Renewable Energy Options for Hospital Renovations Solar Water Heating Geothermal Heat Pumps Biomass Heating Photovoltaics (PV) Hospitals have a range of energy needs that vary from a typical building, and a number of renewable energy options may make more sense for a hospital, including process and biomass heating, photovoltaics (PV), and sustainability. Process Heating Options When a facility requires process heat, there are a number of renewable energy options. High-temperature solar water heating can provide process-level steam or heat, or a traditional solar water heating system or a geothermal heat pumps can be used to pre-heat the fluid to reduce energy requirements to reach necessary temperatures.

46

The Hospital’s role within a regional disaster response: A Comparison study of an urban hospital versus a rural hospital.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The goal of this research is to evaluate the hospital's role in a regional disaster response. It focuses on identifying the level of the hospital's… (more)

Alshehri, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Building Technologies Office: Hospital Energy Alliance Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Buildings Commercial Buildings Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Hospital Energy Alliance Videos to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Hospital Energy Alliance Videos on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Hospital Energy Alliance Videos on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Hospital Energy Alliance Videos on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Hospital Energy Alliance Videos on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Hospital Energy Alliance Videos on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Hospital Energy Alliance Videos on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities Partner with DOE Better Buildings Challenge Better Buildings Alliance

48

Table 8: Water Consumption Information for Large Hospitals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Water Consumption Information for Large Hospitals, 2007 Table H8. RSEs for Water Consumption Information for Large Hospitals, 2007 Number of Large Hospital Buildings

49

Lyme Disease Lyme Borreliosis,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lyme disease is a tickborne illness that results from infection with members of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. These organisms are maintained in wild animals, but they can affect humans and some species of domesticated animals. Lyme disease was first recognized in the 1970s, when a cluster of juvenile arthritis cases was investigated in the U.S., but its symptoms can be found in European historical records as far back as the early 20th century. This disease has also been detected in Australia, parts of Asia, the province of Ontario, Canada, and recently, the Amazon region of Brazil. Lyme disease in people is readily cured with antibiotics during the initial stage of the illness, when an unusual rash often aids disease recognition. However, people whose infections remain untreated sometimes develop chronic arthritis, neurological signs and other syndromes. Lyme disease in domesticated animals is still poorly understood, and no distinctive rash seems to occur. The illness is best characterized in the dog, where arthritis and nephropathy appear to be the most common sequelae. Clinical signs attributed to Lyme disease have also been reported in other species including horses and cattle.

Lyme Arthritis; Erythema Migrans

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Prevalence rate of thyroid diseases among autopsy cases of the atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima, 1951-1985  

SciTech Connect

To examine the radiogenic risk of latent thyroid cancer, thyroid adenoma, colloid/adenomatous goiter and chronic thyroiditis, the date for 3821 subjects collected in the course of autopsies of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima from 1951 to 1985 by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) were analyzed using a logistic model. About 80% of the autopsies were performed at RERF and the remainder at local hospitals. The frequencies of the above diseases were not associated with whether the underlying cause of death was cancer. However, note that our results may be influenced by potentially biasing factors associated with autopsy selection. The relative frequency of latent thyroid cancer (greatest dimension {le}1.5 cm but detectable on a routine microscopic slide of the thyroid gland) increased as the radiation dose increased and was about 1.4-fold greater at 1 Gy than in the 0-Gy dose group. The relative occurrence of thyroid adenoma also increased as radiation dose increased, and was about 1.5-fold greater at 1 Gy than in the 0-Gy dose group. Sex, age at the time of the bombing or period of observation did not significantly modify the radiogenic risks for thyroid adenoma or latent thyroid cancer. No statistically significant association was found between radiation exposure and the rates of colloid/adenomatous goiter and chronic thyroiditis. The possible late effect of atomic bomb radiation on the frequency of benign thyroid diseases is discussed on the basis of these data. 38 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Yoshimoto, Yasuhiko; Ezaki, Haruo [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Etoh, Ryozo [Fukuyama Hospital, Kagoshima (Japan); Hiraoka, Toshio [Kawaishi Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Akiba, Suminori [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Fracture risk assessment in patients with chronic kidney disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 8, 2011 ... population, but the utility of these measurements in patients with CKD, and ... density testing, both by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and by peripheral ... One potential way to decrease the economic costs, morbidity, and ... mineralization, volume, linear growth, or strength — the abnormality of bone ...

52

Geothermal conversion at Veterans Hospital, Boise, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geothermal resource near the Veterans Administration Hospital facilities in Boise, Idaho, has been used since the turn of the century for space heating of homes. A plan for using this resource in some of the Veterans Hospital facilities is discussed. Preliminary cost estimates are presented, economic evaluation criteria are given, and heating system alternatives for the facilities are compared.

Engen, I.A.; Metzger, S.W.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Wildlife Diseases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some wildlife diseases can be transmitted to humans. This leaflet explains the causes and symptoms of rabies, giardiasis, bubonic plague, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Lyme disease, tularemia, leptospirosis and histoplasmosis.

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

54

2007 CBECS Large Hospital Building List of Tables  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

End Uses in Large Hospitals Table H3: End Use Equipment in Large Hospitals Table H4: Lighting and Window Features in Large Hospitals Table H5: Major Fuels Usage for Large...

55

FACTORS AFFECTING RURAL KENTUCKY PATIENTS HOSPITAL CHOICE AND BYPASS BEHAVIOR.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the underutilization of rural hospitals in Kentucky. The authors study hospital and patient characteristics to determine why and how rural patients bypass… (more)

He, Xiao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

57

Hospital Energy Benchmarking Guidance - Version 1.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Region Benchmarks 1 Source & notes HOSPITAL BUILDING ENERGYbenchmarks are based on hospital energy end use estimates presented on LBNL’s EnergyIQ commercial building

Singer, Brett C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Memorial Hospital - NY 0...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Memorial Hospital - NY 0-16 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MEMORIAL HOSPITAL (NY.0-16 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name:...

59

Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature...

60

Drug Inventory Control : Case: Thai International Hospital Mahasarakham.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This final thesis was conducted for Thai International Hospital Maharakham, a medium sized private hospital, located in the northeastern region of Thailand. Since drug expenditure… (more)

Theptong, Jutamas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago�s recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work.

William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Energy-efficient hospitals: DOE-assisted retrofit projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Features of energy conservation programs at hospitals to improve energy efficiency are described. The DOE Institutional Conservation Program provides matching grants to hospitals and other public institutions to develop, implement, and manage projects to improve energy efficiency within their facilities. Information on DOE grants awarded to the hospitals, measures implemented by the hospitals for energy recovery and energy conservation, savings accomplished, project costs, estimated annual savings, and approximate payback period are discussed for the following hospitals: Saint Joseph, Towson, Maryland; Bronson Methodist, Kalamazoo, Michigan; Albany General Hospital, Albany, Oregon; Saint Vincent's Medical Center, Jacksonville, Florida; DePaul Community Health Center, Bridgeton, Missouri; Woodland Memorial Hospital, Woodland, California. (MCW)

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Percutaneous Endovascular Treatment of Chronic Iliac Artery Occlusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and radiological long-term results of recanalization of chronic occluded iliac arteries with balloon angioplasty and stent placement.Methods: Sixty-nine occluded iliac arteries (mean length 8.1 cm; range 4-16 cm) in 67 patients were treated by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement. Evaluations included clinical assesment according to Fontaine stages, Doppler examinations with ankle-brachial index (ABI) and bilateral lower extremity arteriograms. Wallstent and Cragg vascular stents were inserted for iliac artery recanalization under local anesthesia. Follow-up lasted 1-83 months (mean 29.5 months).Results: Technical success rate was 97.1% (67 of 69). The mean ABI increased from 0.46 to 0.85 within 30 days after treatment and was 0.83 at the most recent follow-up. Mean hospitalization time was 2 days and major complications included arterial thrombosis (3%), arterial rupture (3%) and distal embolization (1%). During follow-up 6% stenosis and 9% thrombosis of the stents were observed. Clinical improvement occurred in 92% of patients. Primary and secondary patency rates were 75% and 95%, respectively.Conclusion: The long-term patency rates and clinical benefits suggest that percutaneous endovascular revascularization with metallic stents is a safe and effective treatment for patients with chronic iliac artery occlusion.

Carnevale, F. C. [Institute of Radiology, University of Sao Paulo, Department of Interventional Radiology (Brazil)], E-mail: fcarnevale@uol.com.br; De Blas, Mariano; Merino, Santiago; Egana, Jose M. [Hospital De Guipuzcoa, Department of Radiology (Spain); Caldas, Jose G.M.P. [Institute of Radiology, University of Sao Paulo, Department of Interventional Radiology (Brazil)

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Category:Hospital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hospital Hospital Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Building Type Media in category "Hospital" The following 77 files are in this category, out of 77 total. SVHospital Bismarck ND Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (North Dakota).png SVHospital Bismarck ND... 68 KB SVHospital International Falls MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVHospital Internation... 84 KB SVHospital LA CA City of Los Angeles California (Utility Company).png SVHospital LA CA City ... 88 KB SVHospital Memphis TN City of Memphis Tennessee (Utility Company).png SVHospital Memphis TN ... 69 KB SVHospital Minneapolis MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVHospital Minneapolis... 85 KB SVHospital Minot ND Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (North Dakota).png

65

Neurological Disease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron and neurodegenerative disease Iron and neurodegenerative disease A novel technique to study intracerebral iron oxide particles associated with Alzheimer's, Huntington's, and Parkinson's diseases has been developed. Researchers crafted a system of mirrors and lenses to tap one of the high-brightness x-ray sources at the Advanced Photon Source for the purpose of analyzing brain tissue. Mark Davidson (left in the photo), University of Florida, and Joanna Collingwood, Keele University in the United Kingdom (UK, who is supported by a UK Alzheimer's Society Research Fellowship and Dunhill Medical Trust), align a sample of Alzheimer's brain tissue at the microfocus facility, MR-CAT, beamline 10-ID. According to Davidson: "Unusual iron mineral nanoscale deposits have been associated with many neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's,

66

Parkinson's Disease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parkinson's Disease Parkinson's Disease Name: saabsaab Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: I am interested in collecting information on Parkinson's Disease. Can you help me? Replies: Some possible sources include a neuroscience reference, a neurology text, a neurologist, neuroanatomy references. Basically Parkinson's disease is a movement disorder. It gets more and more difficult to move. One of the primary brain lesions associated with this disease is a shrinkage of an area in the brain stem called the substantia nigra. This is thought to be associated with the neurotransmitter dopamine and there seems to decreased production of the dopamine in this area. Some medications do seem to help including a dopamine replacement medicine called Sinemet. There are some new medicines coming out that may also help. Another exciting area is trying to get new dopamine cells to grow in the substantia nigra area, one way is to insert a needle into the area and inject immature nerve cells into the area and hope they will grow up to be mature dopamine producers, so far it is still considered somewhat experimental. The disease is thought to be caused by progressive cell loss. Some cases have been caused by people who synthesized drugs to abuse and they made a mistake and a bunch of young people took the drug and ended up with the disease. The silver lining of this is that this drug also will do the same thing in rats, so now there is an animal model for Parkinson's.

67

Differentiating the hospital supply chain for enhanced performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis determines how to design the supply chain policies in a hospital for the wide array of products that exist there. This research was done through interviewing staff and analyzing data of two hospitals implementing ...

DeScioli, Derek T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Oregon Hospital Heats Up with a Biomass Boiler | Department of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oregon Hospital Heats Up with a Biomass Boiler Oregon Hospital Heats Up with a Biomass Boiler December 27, 2012 - 4:30pm Addthis Using money from the Recovery Act, Blue Mountain...

69

Coordinating Pediatric Medical Care during an Influenza Pandemic - Hospital Workbook  

SciTech Connect

This workbook is intended to assist hospitals with coordinating medical care for pediatric influenza-like illness across their community.

HCTT CHE

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Understanding Information Technology Change in the Hospital Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hospitals have long provided some of the most diverse and shifting loads utilities must service. Today, one of the biggest drivers of changing electricity use among hospitals is the varying demands of hospital information technology systems. This report describes changes facing hospitals today and discusses whether advances in information technology (IT) systems are likely to create greater demands on electric providers and for electricity and thus provide inroads to new utility products and services.

1997-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

71

2007 CBECS Large Hospital Building FAQs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

FAQs Main Report | Methodology | FAQ | FAQs Main Report | Methodology | FAQ | List of Tables CBECS 2007 - Release date: August 17, 2012 How were the data collected for this study? These data were collected with the 2007 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). See the 2007 CBECS Large Hospital Building Methodology Report for details. Why are you publishing estimates only for large hospitals and not the rest of the commercial building population? A majority of the 2007 CBECS buildings were sampled from a frame that used a less expensive experimental method to update the 2003 frame for new construction. After careful analysis, EIA determined that the buildings sampled from this experimental frame were not representative of the commercial building population and therefore the 2007 CBECS sample as a

72

Implementation process of management control systems in the municipally owned hospitals: in the case of Nagasaki prefectural hospitals in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to describe and explore management reforms in the municipally owned hospitals in Nagasaki prefecture, Japan, based on 'levers of control' framework (Simons, 1995). The hospitals are changing their strategy ... Keywords: Japan, Local Public Enterprise Law, healthcare, levers of control, management control systems, management reform, municipally owned hospitals

Takahito Kondo; Hiromasa Okada

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Building Technologies Office: Researching Energy Use in Hospitals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researching Energy Use Researching Energy Use in Hospitals to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Researching Energy Use in Hospitals on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Researching Energy Use in Hospitals on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Researching Energy Use in Hospitals on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Researching Energy Use in Hospitals on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Researching Energy Use in Hospitals on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Researching Energy Use in Hospitals on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database

74

Commercial Reference Building: Hospital | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

09 09 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278309 Varnish cache server Commercial Reference Building: Hospital Dataset Summary Description Commercial reference buildings provide complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. Included here is data pertaining to the reference building type Hospital for each of the 16 climate zones, and each of three construction categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings.The dataset includes four key components: building summary, zone summary, location summary and a picture. Building summary includes details about: form, fabric, and HVAC. Zone summary includes details such as: area, volume, lighting, and occupants for all types of zones in the building. Location summary includes key building information as it pertains to each climate zone, including: fabric and HVAC details, utility costs, energy end use, and peak energy demand.In total, DOE developed 16 reference building types that represent approximately 70% of commercial buildings in the U.S.; for each type, building models are available for each of the three construction categories. The commercial reference buildings (formerly known as commercial building benchmark models) were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories.Additional data is available directly from DOE's Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Website, including EnergyPlus software input files (.idf) and results of the EnergyPlus simulations (.html).

75

Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center  

SciTech Connect

Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work. The new green building houses the hospital's Family Medicine Residency Program and Specialty Medical Offices. The residency program has been vital in attracting new, young physicians to this medically underserved area. The new outpatient center will also help to allure needed medical providers to the community. The facility also has areas designated to women's health and community education. The Community Education Conference Room will provide learning opportunities to area residents. Emphasis will be placed on conserving resources and protecting our environment, as well as providing information on healthcare access and preventive medicine. The new Medical Office Building was constructed with numerous energy saving features. The exterior cladding of the building is an innovative, locally-manufactured precast concrete panel system with integral insulation that achieves an R-value in excess of building code requirements. The roof is a 'green roof' covered by native plantings, lessening the impact solar heat gain on the building, and reducing air conditioning requirements. The windows are low-E, tinted, and insulated to reduce cooling requirements in summer and heating requirements in winter. The main entrance has an air lock to prevent unconditioned air from entering the building and impacting interior air temperatures. Since much of the traffic in and out of the office building comes from the adjacent Jackson Park Hospital, a pedestrian bridge connects the two buildings, further decreasing the amount of unconditioned air that enters the office building. The HVAC system has an Energy Efficiency Rating 29% greater than required. No CFC based refrigerants were used in the HVAC system, thus reducing the emission of compounds that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. In addition, interior light fixtures employ the latest energy-efficient lamp and ballast technology. Interior lighting throughout the building is operated by sensors that will automatically turn off lights inside a room when the room is unoccupied. The electrical traction elevators use less energy than typical elevators, and they are made of 95% recycled material. Further, locally manufactured products were used throughout, minimizing the amount of energy required to construct this building. The primary objective was to construct a 30,000 square foot medical office building on the Jackson Park Hospital campus that would comply with newly adopted City of Chicago green building codes focusing on protecting the environment and conserving energy and resources. The energy saving systems demonstrate a state of the-art whole-building approach to energy efficient design and construction. The energy efficiency and green aspects of the building contribute to the community by emphasizing the environmental and economic benefits of conserving resources. The building highlights the integration of Chicago's new green building codes into a poor, inner city neighborhood project and it is designed to attract medical providers and physicians to a medically underserved area.

William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center  

SciTech Connect

Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work. The new green building houses the hospital's Family Medicine Residency Program and Specialty Medical Offices. The residency program has been vital in attracting new, young physicians to this medically underserved area. The new outpatient center will also help to allure needed medical providers to the community. The facility also has areas designated to women's health and community education. The Community Education Conference Room will provide learning opportunities to area residents. Emphasis will be placed on conserving resources and protecting our environment, as well as providing information on healthcare access and preventive medicine. The new Medical Office Building was constructed with numerous energy saving features. The exterior cladding of the building is an innovative, locally-manufactured precast concrete panel system with integral insulation that achieves an R-value in excess of building code requirements. The roof is a 'green roof' covered by native plantings, lessening the impact solar heat gain on the building, and reducing air conditioning requirements. The windows are low-E, tinted, and insulated to reduce cooling requirements in summer and heating requirements in winter. The main entrance has an air lock to prevent unconditioned air from entering the building and impacting interior air temperatures. Since much of the traffic in and out of the office building comes from the adjacent Jackson Park Hospital, a pedestrian bridge connects the two buildings, further decreasing the amount of unconditioned air that enters the office building. The HVAC system has an Energy Efficiency Rating 29% greater than required. No CFC based refrigerants were used in the HVAC system, thus reducing the emission of compounds that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. In addition, interior light fixtures employ the latest energy-efficient lamp and ballast technology. Interior lighting throughout the building is operated by sensors that will automatically turn off lights inside a room when the room is unoccupied. The electrical traction elevators use less energy than typical elevators, and they are made of 95% recycled material. Further, locally manufactured products were used throughout, minimizing the amount of energy required to construct this building. The primary objective was to construct a 30,000 square foot medical office building on the Jackson Park Hospital campus that would comply with newly adopted City of Chicago green building codes focusing on protecting the environment and conserving energy and resources. The energy saving systems demonstrate a state of the-art whole-building approach to energy efficient design and construction. The energy efficiency and green aspects of the building contribute to the community by emphasizing the environmental and economic benefits of conserving resources. The building highlights the integration of Chicago's new green building codes into a poor, inner city neighborhood project and it is designed to attract medical providers and physicians to a medically underserved area.

William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Hospital | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hospital Hospital Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Hospital Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-hospital.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-hospital.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-hospital.zip More Documents & Publications Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Large office

78

Building Green in Greensburg: Kiowa County Memorial Hospital  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorial Hospital The original Kiowa County Hospital was destroyed in the May 2007 tornado. The new hospital's design team took one of the most energy- intensive building types and designed a first-of-its kind energy-efficient hospital, while still meeting functional and safety requirements. Completed in March 2010, the hospital is built to achieve the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED ® ) Platinum designation. The 50,000-square-foot building includes 15 acute-care beds, rural health and specialty clinics, an emergency department with two trauma rooms, physical/occupational therapy and radiology departments, a laboratory, and other support areas. The new hospital is projected to be 32% more energy efficient

79

Application of Thermal Storage, Peak Shaving and Cogeneration for Hospitals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy costs of hospitals can be managed by employing various strategies to control peak electrical demand (KW) while at the same time providing additional security of operation in the event that an equipment failure or a disruption of power from the electric utility occurs. Some electric utilities offer their customers demand (KW) reduction rate incentives. Many hospitals have additional emergency back-up needs for electrical energy. Demand is relatively constant in many hospitals due to high internal loads. These factors coupled with the present competitive alternate fuel market and present opportunities for hospitals to significantly reduce operating costs and provide additional stand-by or back-up electric sources. This paper employs a hospital case study to define and illustrate three energy planning strategies applicable to hospitals. These strategies are peak shaving, thermal storage, cogeneration and/or paralleling with the electric utility.

McClure, J. D.; Estes, J. M.; Estes, M. C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond the scope of this video and requires either additional specific areas of competency or more hours of training

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Hospital Energy Benchmarking Guidance - Version 1.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

major building energy services and systems: - Cooling (equipment and other energy-intensive services are additionalBtu) + energy to distribute service within hospital (Btu of

Singer, Brett C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

New York-Presbyterian Hospital's Corporate Energy Policy & Guidelines...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New York-Presbyterian Hospital's Corporate Energy Policy & Guidelines Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing...

83

Department of Energy Announces the Launch of the Hospital Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hospitals use 836 trillion BTUs of energy annually and have more than 2.5 times the energy intensity and carbon dioxide emissions of commercial office buildings, producing...

84

Impact of the Internet on Tourism and Hospitality in Kenya.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis gives an insight into the importance of the use of the Internet in tourism and hospitality industries in Kenya. The aim of this… (more)

Njung'e, Mercyanne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Rebuilding it Better: Greensburg, Kansas, Kiowa County Memorial Hospital (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This brochure details the sustainable and green aspects of the LEED Platinum-designed Kiowa County Memorial Hospital in Greensburg, Kansas.

Not Available

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Building Green in Greensburg: Kiowa County Memorial Hospital  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Kiowa County Memorial Hospital building in Greensburg, Kansas.

87

Hospital Triage in First Hours After Nuclear or Radiological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hospital Triage in the First 24 Hours after a Nuclear or Radiological Disaster Medical professionals with the Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) at the...

88

2007 CBECS Large Hospital Building Methodology Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology Report Main Report | Methodology Report Main Report | Methodology | FAQ | List of Tables CBECS 2007 - Release date: August 17, 2012 Data Collection The data in the Energy Characteristics and Energy Consumed in Large Hospital Buildings in the United States in 2007 report and accompanying tables were collected in the 2007 round of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). CBECS is a quadrennial survey is conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide basic statistical information about energy consumption and expenditures in United States commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings. The survey was conducted in two phases, the Building Characteristics Survey and the Energy Supplier Survey. The Building Characteristics Survey collects information about selected

89

IAQ in Hospitals - Better Health through Indoor Air Quality Awareness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quality air is fundamental to people's health and well-being. Indoor air quality is an important issue from both a social and economic point of view. Continual advances in medicine and technology necessitate constant reevaluation of the air-conditioning needs of hospital and medical facilities. The application of air conditioning to health facilities presents many problems not encountered in the usual comfort air conditioning design. Hospital air conditioning assumes a more important role than just the promotion of comfort. Studies show that patients in controlled environment generally have more rapid physical improvement than do those in uncontrolled environment. Air quality at hospitals needs special precautions during design and maintenance stage to prevent infections from spreading. 50% of all illnesses are either caused by, or aggravated by, polluted indoor air. The main objective of this paper is to critically review and summarize the available information about IAQ particularly in health care industries. Symptoms of poor IAQ in a building, contaminants causing poor IAQ, features of HVAC systems for a hospital for better IAQ are briefly discussed in this paper. Strategies to improve indoor air quality in hospitals and the current international research to improve indoor air quality are reported in this paper. Based on the extensive interactions with different stake holders of a hospital it is concluded that maintenance of proper indoor quality in a hospital needs meticulous team work among the various members of the hospital at various stages .

Al-Rajhi, S.; Ramaswamy, M.; Al-Jahwari, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Potential geothermal energy applications for Idaho Elks Rehabilitation Hospital  

SciTech Connect

Several potential applications of geothermal energy for the Idaho Elks Rehabilitation Hospital are outlined. A brief background on the resource and distribution system, is provided; which hospital heating systems should be considered for potential geothermal retrofit is discussed; and technical and economic feasibility are addressed.

Austin, J.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Editorial: AI planning and scheduling in the medical hospital environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hospital management is a hard task due to the complexity of the organization, the costly infrastructure, the specialized services offered to different patients and the need for prompt reaction to emergencies. Artificial Intelligence planning and scheduling ... Keywords: Artificial Intelligence, Hospital management, Medical therapy, Planning, Scheduling

Constantine D Spyropoulos

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Researching Energy Use in Hospitals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings » Research Projects » Researching Energy Use Commercial Buildings » Research Projects » Researching Energy Use in Hospitals Researching Energy Use in Hospitals The Building Technologies Office (BTO) is monitoring hospitals to help facility and energy managers identify ways to save energy. Hospital professionals find it challenging to identify "energy hogs" in their buildings because the industry lacks actual energy use data for mechanical systems and devices. Professionals have asked for real-world information to identify cost-effective energy saving opportunities. This research ultimately will help hospitals improve energy efficiency, freeing up funding to improve healthcare services. Photo of a radiology technician assisting a patient into a 64-slice CT Scanner for diagnostic testing.

93

Chronic pharmacologic inhibition of EGFR leads to cardiac dysfunction in C57BL/6J mice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molecule-targeted therapies like those against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are becoming widely used in the oncology clinic. With improvements in treatment efficacy, many cancers are being treated as chronic diseases, with patients having prolonged exposure to several therapies that were previously only given acutely. The consequence of chronic suppression of EGFR activity may lead to unexpected toxicities like altered cardiac physiology, a common organ site for adverse drug effects. To explore this possibility, we treated C57BL/6J (B6) mice with two EGFR small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), irreversible EKB-569 and reversible AG-1478, orally for 3 months. In B6 female mice, chronic exposure to both TKIs depressed body weight gain and caused significant changes in left ventricular (LV) wall thickness and cardiac function. No significant differences were observed in heart weight or cardiomyocyte size but histological analysis revealed an increase in fibrosis and in the numbers of TUNEL-positive cells in the hearts from treated female mice. Consistent with histological results, LV apoptotic gene expression was altered, with significant downregulation of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2l1. Although there were no significant differences in any of these endpoints in treated male mice, suggesting sex may influence susceptibility to TKI mediated toxicity, the LVs of treated male mice had significant upregulation of Egf, Erbb2 and Nppb over controls. Taken together, these data suggest that chronic dietary exposure to TKIs may result in pathological and physiological changes in the heart.

Barrick, Cordelia J. [Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Yu Ming [Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Program in Oral Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Chao, H.-H. [Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Threadgill, David W. [Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Program in Oral Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)], E-mail: dwt@med.unc.edu

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Effect of chronic high-dose exogenous cortisol on hippocampal neuronal number in aged nonhuman primates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chronic exposure to increased glucocorticoid concentrations appears to lower the threshold for hippocampal neuronal degeneration in the old rat. It has been proposed that increased brain exposure to glucocorticoids may lower the threshold for hippocampal neuronal degeneration in human aging and Alzheimer’s disease. Here, we asked whether chronic administration of high-dose cortisol to older nonhuman primates decreases hippocampal neuronal number as assessed by unbiased stereological counting methodology. Sixteen Macaca nemestrina (pigtailed macaques) from 18 to 29 years of age were age-, sex-, and weight-matched into pairs and randomized to receive either high-dose oral hydrocortisone (cortisol) acetate (4–6 mg/kg/d) or placebo in twice daily palatable treats for 12 months. Hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal activity was monitored by measuring plasma adrenocorticotropin and cortisol,

James B. Leverenz; Charles W. Wilkinson; Molly Wamble; Shannon Corbin; Jo Ellen Grabber; Murray A. Raskind; Elaine R. Peskind

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Multi-zone modeling of Thermal Comfort and Energy Consumption of a hospital ward.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Hospital is of interest when consider its especial function. Because of the obviously different between the normal residential buildings, the requirement of hospitals’ indoor… (more)

Xie, Tian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. Residences Title A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. Residences Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-5267E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Phillip N. Price, Max H. Sherman, and Brett C. Singer Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 120 Start Page 216 Pagination 216-222 Date Published 11/2011 Keywords air toxics, criteria pollutants, DALYs, exposure, impact assessment, indoor air pollutants, indoor air quality Abstract Background: Indoor air pollutants (IAPs) cause multiple health impacts. Prioritizing mitigation options that differentially impact individual pollutants and comparing IAPs to other environmental health hazards requires a common metric of harm. Objectives: The objective was to demonstrate a methodology to quantify and compare health impacts from IAPs. The methodology is needed to assess population health impacts of large-scale initiatives - including energy efficiency upgrades and ventilation standards - that affect indoor air quality (IAQ). Methods: Available disease incidence and disease impact models for specific pollutant-disease combinations were synthesized with data on measured concentrations to estimate the chronic heath impact, in Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs), due to inhalation of a subset of IAPs in U.S. residences. Model results were compared to independent estimates of DALYs lost due to disease. Results: PM2.5, acrolein, and formaldehyde accounted for the vast majority of DALY losses caused by IAPs considered in this analysis, with impacts on par or greater than estimates for secondhand tobacco smoke and radon. Confidence intervals of DALYs lost derived from epidemiology-based response functions are tighter than those derived from toxicology-based, inter-species extrapolations. Statistics on disease incidence in the US indicate that the upper-bound confidence interval for aggregate IAP harm is implausibly high. Conclusions: The demonstrated approach may be used to assess regional and national initiatives that impact IAQ at the population level. Cumulative health impacts from inhalation in U.S. residences of the IAPs assessed in this study are estimated at 400-1100 DALYs annually per 100,000 people.

97

Characterization of Chronic Enteropathies in Dogs by Use of Fecal and Urinary N-methylhistamine Concentrations and Serum Methylmalonic Acid Concentrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-invasive markers that are clinically useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of canine chronic enteropathies are scarce. The first aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of cobalamin deficiency on a cellular level in dogs with chronic gastrointestinal disease by measuring serum methylmalonic acid (MMA) concentrations. Hypocobalaminemia has been associated with a negative outcome in dogs with chronic enteropathies, but the prevalence of cellular cobalamin deficiency is unknown. The second aim of this study was to determine the utility of fecal and urinary concentrations of N-methylhistamine (NMH) as a marker of gastrointestinal inflammation and disease activity in dogs with chronic enteropathies. Serum MMA concentrations were measured in healthy control dogs to establish a reference interval, which was calculated to be 415-1,193 nmol/L. Measurement of MMA concentrations in 555 serum samples from dogs with varying cobalamin concentrations showed a significant increase (p<0.05) in dogs with hypocobalaminemia. In a prospective group of 56 dogs with chronic enteropathies, 36% had decreased serum cobalamin concentrations, five of which (9% of 56 dogs) had increased serum MMA concentrations. We conclude that hypocobalaminemia is commonly seen in dogs with chronic gastrointestinal disease, but does not always appear to be associated with cellular cobalamin deficiency. In 47 dogs with chronic enteropathies, fecal and urinary NMH concentrations were increased in 21% and 27%, respectively, indicating that mast cell degranulation plays a role in a subset of dogs with chronic enteropathies. However fecal and urinary NMH concentrations did not correlate with each other, or with the clinical activity index. Urinary NMH concentrations correlated significantly with serum CRP concentrations, and were also significantly associated with severity of duodenal mucosal inflammation (p=0.008). The lack of correlation with the clinical activity index suggests that degranulation of mast cells only plays a role in some dogs with chronic enteropathies. Also, these results suggest that NMH alone may not be a good marker for clinical disease activity in dogs with chronic enteropathies. Due to its linear association with serum CRP and severity of mucosal inflammation, urinary NMH concentrations may be a better marker of intestinal inflammation than fecal NMH concentrations.

Berghoff, Nora

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Enforcement Letter, Stony Brook University Hospital - April 15, 1999 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stony Brook University Hospital - April 15, Stony Brook University Hospital - April 15, 1999 Enforcement Letter, Stony Brook University Hospital - April 15, 1999 April 15, 1999 Issued to Stony Brook University Hospital related to a Failed Interlock at the Radiation Therapy Facility at the Brookhaven National Laboratory This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of the facts and circumstances concerning an event at the Radiation Therapy Facility (RTF) occurring in March 1998. In November 1998, DOE conducted an investigation to determine whether violations of DOE's nuclear safety rules associated with the event had occurred. The resulting Investigation Summary Report was transmitted to you on February 19, 1999. On March 11, 1999, you participated in an Enforcement Conference, along with Brookhaven

99

Modesto Memorial Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Memorial Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Memorial Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Modesto Memorial Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Modesto Memorial Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Modesto, California Coordinates 37.6390972°, -120.9968782° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

100

St. Mary's Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mary's Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Mary's Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name St. Mary's Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility St. Mary's Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Pierre, South Dakota Coordinates 44.3683156°, -100.3509665° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Input modeling for hospital simulation models using electronic messages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health care organizations function in a complex, non-integrated setting, yet the coordination of information, tasks, and equipment across multiple units is essential for productive operations. A variety of simulation models of hospitals exist; however, ...

Renata A. Konrad; Mark A. Lawley

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Energy Star for Hospitals 2011 Update: Progression or Regression?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Star performance rating system for buildings has achieved widespread adoption in the building sector as a standard benchmark for energy performance. In 2011, the U.S. EPA released an updated technical methodology for its Energy Star performance rating system for hospitals, shifting how the score is calculated. The new rating system, similar to the previous rating system, is still a poor metric for benchmarking hospitals and should be used with caution. The aim of this paper is to critique the methodology used in the Energy Star for Hospitals 2011 Update. The paper reviews the changes between the 2001 methodology and 2011 methodology, how Energy Star views usage of different fuel types in its score, and lastly items that did not change in the 2011 hospital methodology update which are still causing confusion amongst Energy Star users and are causing significant error in the Energy Star score calculations.

Travis, B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Story County Hospital Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Story County Hospital Wind Farm Facility Story County Hospital Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Story County Hospital Developer Story County Hospital Energy Purchaser Alliant/IES Utilities Location NV - Story County IA Coordinates 42.016808°, -93.453238° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.016808,"lon":-93.453238,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

104

Surprise Valley Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Surprise Valley Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Surprise Valley Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Cedarville, California Coordinates 41.5290606°, -120.1732781° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

105

Marlin Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marlin Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Marlin Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Marlin Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Marlin Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Marlin, Texas Coordinates 31.3062874°, -96.8980439° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

106

Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating Location Boise, Idaho Coordinates 43.6135002°, -116.2034505° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

107

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this User's Guide is to provide instructors with an overview of the key points covered in the video. The Student Handout portion of this Guide is designed to assist the instructor in reviewing those points with students. The Student Handout should be distributed to students after the video is shown and the instructor should use the Guide to facilitate a discussion on key activities and duties at the scene. PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT More Documents & Publications Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient

108

Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Warm Springs State Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Warm Springs, Montana Coordinates 46.1813145°, -112.78476° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

109

Indian Valley Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Valley Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Indian Valley Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Indian Valley Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Greenville, California Coordinates 40.1396126°, -120.9510675° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

110

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Billings Hospital - Small Animal  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Billings Hospital - Small Animal Billings Hospital - Small Animal Facility - University of Chicago - IL 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Billings Hospital, Small Animal Facility, University of Chicago (IL 01) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP due to limited scope of activities and 15 day half-life of P-32 Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Small Animal Facility, U. of Chicago IL.01-1 Location: University of Chicago , Chicago , Illinois IL.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1979 IL.01-1 Site Operations: Nature of operations is not clear. Portions of Billings Hospital were reported to have been used as an animal research facility. IL.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated IL.01-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Phosphorus - 32 IL.01-1

111

Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, Kiowa County Memorial Hospital |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, Kiowa County Memorial Hospital Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, Kiowa County Memorial Hospital Jump to: navigation, search Name Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, Kiowa County Memorial Hospital Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Focus Area Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Water Conservation, Renewable Energy, Wind Phase Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Resource Type Case studies/examples Availability Publicly available--Free Publication Date 8/1/2010 Website http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/b Locality Greensburg, Kansas References Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, Kiowa County Memorial Hospital[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Highlights 3 Environmental Aspects

112

DOE Launches EnergySmart Hospitals to Promote Improved Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

year, hospitals spent more than 5 billion on energy costs with more than 2.5 times the energy intensity and carbon dioxide emissions of commercial office buildings. Unlike many...

113

Tailored hospital supply chain for greater return on investment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cost of healthcare has been increasing over the past several years. From 1997 to 2002, the average cost for hospital stays increased 24 percent. The increase in healthcare cost can be explained by malpractice law suits ...

Jan, Paul Jenq-Haw

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Reducing preventable adverse drug events in hospital settings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been estimated that on average, every patient admitted to a hospital is subject to at least one medication error per day (IOM, 2006). Errors may occur during various stages of the Medication Use System; a system ...

Ramos, Gregg (Gregg Allen)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Ensemble-based methods for forecasting census in hospital units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Koestler et al. BMC Medical Research Methodology 2013, 13:67in hospital units. BMC Medical Research Methodology 2013 13:Koestler et al. BMC Medical Research Methodology 2013, 13:67

Koestler, Devin C; Ombao, Hernando; Bender, Jesse

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Institutional expansion, community relations, and the hospital next door  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hospitals play many roles in a city: alternately, they may be caretakers of the sick, economic engines, intellectual hubs, major employers, and neighbors. This last role has evolved greatly over the last 45 years. The ...

Solheim, Karla Nyreen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Improving product availability in hospitals : the role of inventory inaccuracies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All players in the healthcare industry face increasing public and political pressure to improve quality of care and control costs. Hospitals, on the frontline of this challenge, face nursing shortages and financial ...

Opolon, David C. (David Cyrille)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Energy Market Profiles: Hospital Buildings, Equipment, and Energy Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report profiles the U.S. healthcare market on size and energy-related characteristics and provides energy benchmarking data that can be used to make meaningful comparisons between healthcare facilities. The intent of the report is to provide both utility and hospital managers with a better understanding of the key characteristics of the healthcare market and enhance their abilities to assess how well their facilities are performing relative to hospitals with similar energy equipment.

1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

119

Energy Department's Hospital Energy Alliance Helps Partner Save Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department's Hospital Energy Alliance Helps Partner Save Department's Hospital Energy Alliance Helps Partner Save Energy and Money Energy Department's Hospital Energy Alliance Helps Partner Save Energy and Money September 4, 2012 - 2:57pm Addthis Gundersen Health System teamed up with La Crosse County to turn methane gas from the county's landfill into electricity and heat for the Gundersen Lutheran - Onalaska Campus, making it the first-known energy independent medical campus in the U.S. | Photo courtesy of Gundersen Health System. Gundersen Health System teamed up with La Crosse County to turn methane gas from the county's landfill into electricity and heat for the Gundersen Lutheran - Onalaska Campus, making it the first-known energy independent medical campus in the U.S. | Photo courtesy of Gundersen Health System.

120

Distributed Generation Study/Wyoming County Community Hospital | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming County Community Hospital Wyoming County Community Hospital < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Warsaw, New York Site Description Institutional-Hospital/Health Care Study Type Long-term Monitoring Technology Internal Combustion Engine Prime Mover Waukesha VGF L36GSID Heat Recovery Systems Built-in Fuel Natural Gas System Installer Gerster Trane System Enclosure Indoor System Application Combined Heat and Power Number of Prime Movers 1 Stand-alone Capability Seamless Power Rating 560 kW0.56 MW 560,000 W 560,000,000 mW 5.6e-4 GW 5.6e-7 TW Nominal Voltage (V) 480 Heat Recovery Rating (BTU/hr) 1000000 Cooling Capacity (Refrig/Tons) Origin of Controller 3rd Party Off-the-Shelf Component Integration Customer Assembled Start Date 2001/09/26

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Veterans Health Administration 2008 Hospital Report Card - Quality of Care  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Veterans Health Administration 2008 Hospital Report Card - Quality of Care Veterans Health Administration 2008 Hospital Report Card - Quality of Care - Populations Consumer Data Apps Challenges Resources About Blogs Let's Talk Feedback Consumer You are here Data.gov » Communities » Consumer » Data Veterans Health Administration 2008 Hospital Report Card - Quality of Care - Populations Dataset Summary Description Report to the Appropriations Committee of the United States House of Representatives in Response to Conference Committee Report to PL 110-186. In an effort to provide a snapshot of the quality of care provided at VA health care facilities, this report includes information about waiting times, staffing level, infection rates, surgical volumes, quality measures, patient satisfaction, service availability and complexity, accreditation status, and patient safety. The data in this report have been drawn from multiple sources across VHA. This dataset represents the quality of care for defined populations: Gender, Geriatric, Disabled, Homeless, and patients with Mental Health Diagnosis.

122

Energy Department's Hospital Energy Alliance Helps Partner Save Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department's Hospital Energy Alliance Helps Partner Save Department's Hospital Energy Alliance Helps Partner Save Energy and Money Energy Department's Hospital Energy Alliance Helps Partner Save Energy and Money September 4, 2012 - 2:57pm Addthis Gundersen Health System teamed up with La Crosse County to turn methane gas from the county's landfill into electricity and heat for the Gundersen Lutheran - Onalaska Campus, making it the first-known energy independent medical campus in the U.S. | Photo courtesy of Gundersen Health System. Gundersen Health System teamed up with La Crosse County to turn methane gas from the county's landfill into electricity and heat for the Gundersen Lutheran - Onalaska Campus, making it the first-known energy independent medical campus in the U.S. | Photo courtesy of Gundersen Health System.

123

Energy Characteristics and Energy Consumed in Large Hospital Buildings in  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Characteristics and Energy Consumed in Large Hospital Buildings in Energy Characteristics and Energy Consumed in Large Hospital Buildings in the United States in 2007 Main Report | Methodology | FAQ | List of Tables CBECS 2007 - Release date: August 17, 2012 Hospitals consume large amounts of energy because of how they are run and the many people that use them. They are open 24 hours a day; thousands of employees, patients, and visitors occupy the buildings daily; and sophisticated heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems control the temperatures and air flow. In addition, many energy intensive activities occur in these buildings: laundry, medical and lab equipment use, sterilization, computer and server use, food service, and refrigeration. The 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) data showed

124

Hospital Energy Benchmarking Guidance - Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes an energy benchmarking framework for hospitals. The document is organized as follows. The introduction provides a brief primer on benchmarking and its application to hospitals. The next two sections discuss special considerations including the identification of normalizing factors. The presentation of metrics is preceded by a description of the overall framework and the rationale for the grouping of metrics. Following the presentation of metrics, a high-level protocol is provided. The next section presents draft benchmarks for some metrics; benchmarks are not available for many metrics owing to a lack of data. This document ends with a list of research needs for further development.

Singer, Brett C.

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

125

Hospital laundry standards and energy conservation: a program plan  

SciTech Connect

A program plan describing required research and experimental plans for establishing a proposed revision of hospital laundry standards is presented. An extension of the literature search done by Hittman and Associates was done to see whether the quality of the finished laundry could be maintained under revised standards. Consideration was given to stain removal, whiteness, and sanitation. An extensive review of published literature on standards is included. There is room for energy conservation measures in the hospital laundry, but it is noted that energy conservation measures must be accompanied by care and practicality in their implementation.

Battles, D.R.; Vesley, D.; Banks, R.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

REVIEW P2 receptors and chronic pain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract There is abundant evidence that extracellular ATP and other nucleotides have an important role in pain signaling at both the periphery and in the CNS. The focus of attention now is on the possibility that endogenous ATP and its receptor system might be activated in chronic pathological pain states, particularly in neuropathic and inflammatory pain. Neuropathic pain is often a consequence of nerve injury through surgery, bone compression, diabetes or infection. This type of pain can be so severe that even light touching can be intensely painful; unfortunately, this state is generally resistant to currently available treatments. In this review, we summarize the role of ATP receptors, particularly the P2X 4, P2X 3 and P2X 7 receptors, in neuropathic and inflammatory pain. The expression of P2X4 receptors in the spinal cord is enhanced in spinal microglia after peripheral nerve injury, and blocking pharmacologically and suppressing molecularly P2X4 receptors produce a reduction of the neuropathic pain behaviour. Understanding the key roles of these ATP receptors may lead to new strategies for the management of intractable chronic pain. Key words allodynia. ATP. microglia. neuropathic pain.

Kazuhide Inoue; K. Inoue

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SPECIAL DISTRICTS HOSPITALS & PUBLIC CARE COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SPECIAL DISTRICTS HOSPITALS & PUBLIC CARE COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES F O 2004 www.energy.ca.gov/efficiency/partnership Call (916) 654-4147 #12;The Energy Partnership Program Whether you are building a new facility, renovating an existing one, or want to reduce your energy bills

128

New Functional Imaging Technology to Differentiate between Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Heart Failure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improvement of congestive heart failure: a pilot study. BMCtesting and the accuracy of heart failure diagnosis in theemergency department. Circ Heart Fail. 2010 Jan;3(1):104-10.

Pollack, Charles V.; Slattery, David E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Chronic disease and early exposure to air-borne mixtures: 1. The environmental quality database  

SciTech Connect

This is the first in a continuing study examining the impact of early exposure to air-borne mixtures of chemicals from industrial sources on the etiology of cancer. The Environmental Quality Database (EQDB) contains lifetime residential histories for about 20,000 cases in 18 rare or poorly understood sites and about 5000 controls. The EQDB contains all known industrial point sources in about 50 U.S.-SIC code operating in Canada, all geolocated, from 1993 to about 1950. Cases and controls were collected in 1993-1995. Both source-centric and case-centric searching is possible. It is possible to search all instances of a source-type or only one. Three features of the design are the management of mobility and latency as epidemiological confounders and a considerable simplification of Retrospective Exposure Assessment by using the RASH relative potency methodology. 42 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

James Argo [IntrAmericas Centre for Environment and Health, Wolfe Island, ON (Canada)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Chronic disease and early exposure to air-borne mixtures. 2. Exposure assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is part of a larger study of the impact of early exposure to releases from industry on the etiology of cancer. Releases from all kraft and sulfite mills, coke ovens, oil refineries, copper, nickel, and lead/zinc smelters operating in Canada during the exposure period of 1967-1970 have been determined. All plumes have been expressed in g BaP eq/d using the RASH methodology. The releases have been divided into process, boiler fuel, dioxin, and SO{sub 2} emissions. Combustion sources have been defined with FIREv6.23. Dioxin congenors are expected in all source types when the boiler fuel is heavy fuel oil, wood or wood bark, or coal. All about 90 communities examined have an inverted sex ratio. 53 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

James Argo [IntrAmericas Centre for Environment and Health, Wolfe Island, ON (Canada)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Developing effective chronic disease interventions in Africa: insights from Ghana and Cameroon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.8 61.3 11 18 Physical Activity (insufficient in last 7 days) 7.8 13.2 - - Fruit and Vegetable Intake (insufficient intake) 39.6 38.2 - - Overweight prevalence (women) - 17.2 - 20.6 Obesity prevalence (women) 8.1 8.2 Sources: *IDF, 2003, cited by Mbanya... ) the majority of programme recipients remembered key aspects of the nutrition and healthy lifestyles messages; (2) the easiest lifestyles to adopt were drinking more water and eating more fruits and vegetables, a challeng- ing lifestyle was increasing physical...

de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Boynton, Petra; Atanga, Lem L

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

132

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Burden in California and Southern California, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Source: 2011 California Behavioral Risk Factorthe University of California, or collaborating organizationsfunders. Endnotes State of California Department of Public

Meng, Ying-Ying; Pickett, Melissa C.; Induni, Marta; Ryan-Ibarra, Suzanne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Health vlogger-viewer interaction in chronic illness management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health video blogs (vlogs) allow individuals with chronic illnesses to share their stories, experiences, and knowledge with the general public. Furthermore, health vlogs help in creating a connection between the vlogger and the viewers. In this work, ... Keywords: chronic illness management, communication, health vlogs, patient-centered, video blogging, youtube

Leslie S. Liu; Jina Huh; Tina Neogi; Kori Inkpen; Wanda Pratt

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hospital waste management and toxicity evaluation: A case study  

SciTech Connect

Hospital waste management is an imperative environmental and public safety issue, due to the waste's infectious and hazardous character. This paper examines the existing waste strategy of a typical hospital in Greece with a bed capacity of 400-600. The segregation, collection, packaging, storage, transportation and disposal of waste were monitored and the observed problematic areas documented. The concentrations of BOD, COD and heavy metals were measured in the wastewater the hospital generated. The wastewater's toxicity was also investigated. During the study, omissions and negligence were observed at every stage of the waste management system, particularly with regard to the treatment of infectious waste. Inappropriate collection and transportation procedures for infectious waste, which jeopardized the safety of staff and patients, were recorded. However, inappropriate segregation practices were the dominant problem, which led to increased quantities of generated infectious waste and hence higher costs for their disposal. Infectious waste production was estimated using two different methods: one by weighing the incinerated waste (880 kg day{sup -1}) and the other by estimating the number of waste bags produced each day (650 kg day{sup -1}). Furthermore, measurements of the EC{sub 50} parameter in wastewater samples revealed an increased toxicity in all samples. In addition, hazardous organic compounds were detected in wastewater samples using a gas chromatograph/mass spectrograph. Proposals recommending the application of a comprehensive hospital waste management system are presented that will ensure that any potential risks hospital wastes pose to public health and to the environment are minimized.

Tsakona, M.; Anagnostopoulou, E. [Laboratory of Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management, Department of Environmental Engineers, Technical University of Crete, GR-73100 Polytechnioupolis, Chania, Crete (Greece); Gidarakos, E. [Laboratory of Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management, Department of Environmental Engineers, Technical University of Crete, GR-73100 Polytechnioupolis, Chania, Crete (Greece)], E-mail: gidarako@mred.tuc.gr

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Decisionmaking in hospital earthquake evacuation: Does distance from the epicenter matter?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

status of hospitals that does not depend on intactis one option. This study does not have the ability toUsing larger distances does not make sense, as no hospital

Schultz, Carl H. MD; Koenig, Kristi L. MD; Lewis, Roger J. MD, PhD

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The Dutch Elm Disease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dutch Elm Disease Dutch Elm Disease Nature Bulletin No. 411-A March 20, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE DUTCH ELM DISEASE The American elm, far and away our most popular and important shade tree, is facing its most threatening enemy, the Dutch Elm Disease. A large part of them seem to be doomed unless up-to-date methods of control are used. In New England the appearance of whole towns has been changed by the loss of gigantic elms along entire streets. This same havoc is being repeated in most eastern states and, now, as far west as Missouri. The first diseased tree in Illinois was found downstate fifteen years ago. Since then, the infection has spread over most of the state, reaching the Chicago region in 1954.

137

Large Hospital 50% Energy Savings: Technical Support Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

867 867 September 2010 Large Hospital 50% Energy Savings: Technical Support Document Eric Bonnema, Daniel Studer, Andrew Parker, Shanti Pless, and Paul Torcellini National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-550-47867 September 2010 Large Hospital 50% Energy Savings: Technical Support Document Eric Bonnema, Daniel Studer, Andrew Parker, Shanti Pless, and Paul Torcellini Prepared under Task No. BEC7.1309 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

138

Energy recovery solves hospital's problem  

SciTech Connect

A heat recovery system for a hospital heating-ventilation-air conditioning installation is described. The system design allows for recovery of energy in the laundry exhaust air, distribution of supply air to the patient care wing, easy access for servicing, and economic feasibility. A rotary energy recovery wheel was selected as the energy recovery device because of its performance and economical advantages. The unit work continuously without difficulty during the severe winter of 1976. (PMA)

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Tools of Toyota Lean/Rapid Improvement Events which are successful and contribute to quality improvement in a hospital.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Quality healthcare in hospitals is a serious concern for patients; complications related to medical errors are on the rise. Hospitals are beginning to look… (more)

Cardillo, Janet K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

HOSPITAL VENTILATION STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: A REVIEW OF GOVERNMENTAL AND PRIVATE AGENCY ENERGY CONSERVATION INITIATIVES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a recent research project originally concerned with review of governmental initiatives for changes to hospital design and operation standards at both the federal and state levels. However. it quickly became apparent that concern with energy conservation was not impacting hospital environmental standards, especially at the state level, irrespective of the energy implications. Consequently, the study was redirected to consider all energy conservation initiatives directed toward design and operating practices unique to the hospital environment. The scope was limited to agency programs (i.e., not undertaken at the initiative of individual hospitals), applicable to non-federal public and private hospitals.

Banks, Robert S.; Rainer, David

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Chronic Health Damage of Air Pollutants in U  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in .S. Residences U J.M. Logue 1 , P.N. Price, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division November 2011...

142

Effects of chronic copper exposure on development and survival...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variation in sensitivity among species. Environ Pollut 154:291-297. 42. Fort DJ, Stover EL, Rogers RL, Copley HF, Morgan LA, Elicia RF. 2000. Chronic boron or copper...

143

Campath, calcineurin inhibitor reduction and chronic allograft nephropathy (3C) study: background, rationale, and study protocol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hospital, Cosham, Portsmouth PO6 3LY, UK. 9Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Prescot Street, Liverpool L7 8XN, UK. 10Royal Free Hospital, Pond Street, London NW3 2QG, UK. 11University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Clifford Bridge Road...

Haynes, Richard; Baigent, Colin; Harden, Paul; Landray, Martin; Akyol, Murat; Asderakis, Argiris; Baxter, Alex; Bhandari, Sunil; Chowdhury, Paramit; Clancy, Marc; Emberson, Jonathan; Gibbs, Paul; Hammad, Abdul; Herrington, Will; Jayne, Kathy; Jones, Gareth; Krishnan, Nithya; Lay, Michael; Lewis, David; Macdougall, Iain; Nathan, Chidambaram; Neuberger, James; Newstead, Chas; Pararajasingam, Ravi; Puliatti, Carmelo; Rigg, Keith; Rowe, Peter; Sharif, Adnan; Sheerin, Neil; Sinha, Sanjay; Watson, Chris; Friend, Peter; The 3C Study Collaborative Group

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

144

Rebuilding it Better: Greensburg, Kansas, Kiowa County Memorial Hospital (Brochure) (Revised)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kiowa County Memorial Hospital Kiowa County Memorial Hospital The original Kiowa County Hospital was destroyed in the tornado and rebuilt green. In fact, the hospital's design team took one of the most energy-intensive building types and designed a first-of-its kind energy-efficient hospital, while still meeting functional and safety requirements. The 50,000 square-foot building includes 15 acute-care beds, rural health and specialty clinics, an emergency department with two trauma rooms, physical/occu- pational therapy and radiology departments, a laboratory, and other support areas. The new hospital in Greensburg is projected to achieve more than 40% energy savings when compared to a hospital built to standard code thanks to features such as an on-site wind turbine. REBUILDING IT BETTER: GREENSBURG, KANSAS

145

Oregon Hospital Heats Up with a Biomass Boiler | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oregon Hospital Heats Up with a Biomass Boiler Oregon Hospital Heats Up with a Biomass Boiler Oregon Hospital Heats Up with a Biomass Boiler December 27, 2012 - 4:30pm Addthis Using money from the Recovery Act, Blue Mountain Hospital replaced one of its 1950s crude oil boilers with a wood-pellet boiler -- saving the hospital about $100,000 a year in heating costs. | Photo courtesy of the Oregon Department of Energy. Using money from the Recovery Act, Blue Mountain Hospital replaced one of its 1950s crude oil boilers with a wood-pellet boiler -- saving the hospital about $100,000 a year in heating costs. | Photo courtesy of the Oregon Department of Energy. Julie McAlpin Communications Liaison, State Energy Program Why biomass? Wood was the first energy source used and man's main fuel source until the Industrial Revolution.

146

Ticks and Human Diseases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

species: principally the Rocky Mountain Wood Tick in the west, and the American Dog Tick here and in eastern states. Tularemia, or rabbit fever, is a disease which is...

147

Dogs and Human Diseases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diseases Name: Doris Status: Other Grade: 9-12 Location: OK Date: NA Question: Can a dog contact the shingles or chicken pox virus from a human? Replies: Hi Doris, Great...

148

Emerging Technologies Associates, Inc. (ETA) / Sharp Grossmont Hospital:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emerging Technologies Associates, Inc. (ETA) / Sharp Grossmont Emerging Technologies Associates, Inc. (ETA) / Sharp Grossmont Hospital: SPP Success Story Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

149

Microsoft Word - WRSTSD-Hospital-MELs-Final-LBL-Report.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Miscellaneous and Electronic Evaluation of Miscellaneous and Electronic Device Energy Use in Hospitals Douglas R. Black, Steven M. Lanzisera, Judy Lai, Richard E. Brown, Brett C. Singer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Group Berkeley, CA 94720 September 2012 This work was funded by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program Contract No. DE09000037, through the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. LBNL-6084E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither

150

C: Applying the Toyota Production System to a Hospital Pharmacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the early results of an action research project to apply the principles of the Toyota Production System to a hospital pharmacy. We demonstrate that work systems can be improved through Bowen and Spear’s [3] Rules-in-Use: defining activities better, making simpler and more direct connections, and/or smoothing pathways. We also extend this work by introducing a problem-solving tool to facilitate process improvement. The paper will describe the interventions attempted, the results, and implications for applying the Rules-in-Use to health care environments.

Durward K. Sobek; Cindy Jimmerson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Developing a master plan for hospital solid waste management: A case study  

SciTech Connect

Disposal of about 1750 tons of solid wastes per day is the result of a rapid population growth in the province of Khuzestan in the south west of Iran. Most of these wastes, especially hospital solid wastes which have contributed to the pollution of the environment in the study area, are not properly managed considering environmental standards and regulations. In this paper, the framework of a master plan for managing hospital solid wastes is proposed considering different criteria which are usually used for evaluating the pollution of hospital solid waste loads. The effectiveness of the management schemes is also evaluated. In order to rank the hospitals and determine the share of each hospital in the total hospital solid waste pollution load, a multiple criteria decision making technique, namely analytical hierarchy process (AHP), is used. A set of projects are proposed for solid waste pollution control and reduction in the proposed framework. It is partially applied for hospital solid waste management in the province of Khuzestan, Iran. The results have shown that the hospitals located near the capital city of the province, Ahvaz, produce more than 43% of the total hospital solid waste pollution load of the province. The results have also shown the importance of improving management techniques rather than building new facilities. The proposed methodology is used to formulate a master plan for hospital solid waste management.

Karamouz, Mohammad [School of Civil Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: karamouz@ut.ac.ir; Zahraie, Banafsheh [School of Civil Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: bzahraie@ut.ac.ir; Kerachian, Reza [School of Civil Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: kerachian@ut.ac.ir; Jaafarzadeh, Nemat [Faculty of Health Science, University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: n_jaafarzadeh@yahoo.com; Mahjouri, Najmeh [School of Environmental Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mahjouri@ut.ac.ir

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Epidemiology of Multiple Sclerosis in Scotland: Inferences from Hospital Admissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurological disorder with a highly characteristic disease distribution. Prevalence and incidence in general increase with increasing distance from the equator. Similarly the female to male sex ratio increases with increasing latitude. Multiple possible risk factors have been hypothesised for this epidemiological trend, including human leukocyte antigen allele frequencies, ultraviolet exposure and subsequent vitamin D levels, smoking and Epstein-Barr virus. In this study we undertook a study of medical records across Scotland on an NHS health board level of resolution to examine the epidemiology of MS in this region. Methods and Results: We calculated the number and rate of patient-linked hospital admissions throughout Scotland between 1997 and 2009 from the Scottish Morbidity Records. We used weighted-regression to examine correlations between these measures of MS, and latitude and smoking prevalence. We found a highly significant relationship between MS patient-linked admissions and latitude (r weighted by standard error (r sw) = 0.75, p = 0.002). There was no significant relationship between smoking prevalence and MS patient-linked admissions. Discussion: There is a definite latitudinal effect on MS risk across Scotland, arising primarily from an excess of female MS patients at more Northerly latitudes. Whether this is a true gradient or whether a threshold effect may apply at particular

Adam E. H; Lynne Jarvis; Ryan Mclaughlin; Anastasia Fries; George C. Ebers; Sreeram V

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A 3-D Link between Antibiotic Resistance and Brain Disease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A 3-D Link between Antibiotic Resistance and Brain Disease A 3-D Link between Antibiotic Resistance and Brain Disease The story of what makes certain types of bacteria resistant to a specific antibiotic has a sub-plot that gives insight into the cause of a rare form of brain degeneration among children, according to investigators at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. The story takes a twist as key differences among the structures of its main molecular characters disappear and reappear as they are assembled in the cell. The story is based on a study of the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of an enzyme called pantothenate kinase, which triggers the first step in the production coenzyme A (CoA), a molecule that is indispensable to all forms of life. Enzymes are proteins that speed up biochemical reactions. CoA plays a pivotal role in the cells' ability to extract energy from fatty

154

Continuous Commissioning® Opportunities in Hospital and Laboratory Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper compiles the Continuous Commissioning® (CC®) costs, savings, and opportunities implemented in 20 hospital and laboratory commissioning projects involving 48 buildings. The potential savings and costs from 25 CC assessments of 36 buildings are also analyzed and compared with the results of the implemented projects. The results from these projects including deficiencies and commissioning measures identified, and the cost and savings associated with CC are discussed. Case studies are also presented. For the 20 completed hospital and laboratory CC projects, the median (average) pre-CC energy cost was $3.44/ft2 ($4.46/ft2) [$36.98/m2 ($48.06/m2)] with median (average) energy cost savings of $0.84/ft2 ($1.19/ft2) [$9.03/m2 ($12.80/m2)] or 20% (26%). The median (average) potential savings identified in the 25 CC assessments were $0.41/ft2 ($0.44/ft2) [$4.36/m2 ($4.72/m2)] or 15% (16%). The lower savings identified in the assessments may result from the conservatism inherent in an incomplete identification of all potential measures during the assessments, or may result from some other factor.

Jones, A.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Deng, S.; Wei, G.; Zeig, G.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Large Hospital 50% Energy Savings: Technical Support Document  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Support Document documents the technical analysis and design guidance for large hospitals to achieve whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 and represents a step toward determining how to provide design guidance for aggressive energy savings targets. This report documents the modeling methods used to demonstrate that the design recommendations meet or exceed the 50% goal. EnergyPlus was used to model the predicted energy performance of the baseline and low-energy buildings to verify that 50% energy savings are achievable. Percent energy savings are based on a nominal minimally code-compliant building and whole-building, net site energy use intensity. The report defines architectural-program characteristics for typical large hospitals, thereby defining a prototype model; creates baseline energy models for each climate zone that are elaborations of the prototype models and are minimally compliant with Standard 90.1-2004; creates a list of energy design measures that can be applied to the prototype model to create low-energy models; uses industry feedback to strengthen inputs for baseline energy models and energy design measures; and simulates low-energy models for each climate zone to show that when the energy design measures are applied to the prototype model, 50% energy savings (or more) are achieved.

Bonnema, E.; Studer, D.; Parker, A.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Department of Energy Announces the Launch of the Hospital Energy Alliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Launch of the Hospital Energy the Launch of the Hospital Energy Alliance to Increase Energy Efficiency in the Healthcare Sector Department of Energy Announces the Launch of the Hospital Energy Alliance to Increase Energy Efficiency in the Healthcare Sector April 29, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today the launch of the Hospital Energy Alliance (HEA), an industry-led partnership between the DOE and national healthcare sector leaders to promote the integration of advanced energy efficiency and renewable technologies in hospital design, construction, retrofit, operations, and maintenance. DOE's Richard F. Moorer joined American Hospital Association President and Chief Executive Officer Richard J. Umbdenstock and other national industry

157

CHANGES OF ARTERIAL BLOOD PRESSURE IN ACUTE RADIATION DISEASE  

SciTech Connect

Acute experiments were done in cats and chronic experiments in dogs. The cats were subjected to whole-body x irradiation with a dose of 1500 r, and were examined on the third day after irradiation, when radiation disease was fully developed. Reflexes from the baro- and chemoreceptors were investigated, and arterial blood pressure was recorded in the irradiated cats after intravenous administration of adrenaline, noradrenaline, serotonin, acetylcholine, histamine, Regitine, atropine, or Pendiomid. Dogs were subjected to whole-body irradiation with 800 r,; changes in arterial blood pressure, which occurred after the administration of neurohormones, were investigated before and after irradiation. Pressor reflexes in irradiated cats, elicited by clamping and unclamping of both common carotid arteries, corresponded to a rise from 129.6 to 141.4 mm Hg, as compared to pressor reflexes in nonirradiated cats from 106.6 to 146. Reflexes from carotid sinus chemoreceptors evoked by 0.5% KCl were also weaker in irradiated cats. The results of both the acute and chronic experiments indicate that circulatory changes occur in radiation disease. The changes mainly involve responses of the circulatory system to neurohormones and stimulation of vascular baro- and chemoreceptors. (TCO)

Ryzewski, J.

1962-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Power Quality Investigation at a Midwest Hospital: Magnetic Resonance Imaging System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, a Midwest hospital contacted its electric utility about malfunctions involving imaging systems including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). The MRI system was the primary concern for the hospital. The MRI system was manufactured by a leading imaging system manufacturer and the CT system was manufactured by another leading imaging system manufacturer. To begin investigating the problem, the hospital requested that power-line monitoring be conducted at the facility. Th...

2007-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

159

Chronic Health Damage of Air Pollutants in U  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Method to Estimate the Chronic Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in .S. Residences U J.M. Logue 1 , P.N. Price, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division November 2011 Funding was provided by the U.S. Dept. of Energy Building Technologies Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy under DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231; by the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control through Interagency Agreement I-PHI-01070, and by the California Energy Commission through Contract 500-08-061. LBNL Report Number 5267E 1 Corresponding author: jmlogue@lbl.gov Logue et al, A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. Residences LBNL-5267E

160

Hospital remedies architect's lighting overdesign for $22k: installs current limiters  

SciTech Connect

St. Luke's Hospital in Racine, Wisconsin is spending $22,000 to install current limiters in the fluorescent lamps of a new wing after finding that the architectural firm overdesigned the lighting fixtures so much that the hospital's lighting expenses were 50% higher than necessary. The hospital expects an 8-month payback on the current limiters. The hospital's corridor lighting reached 45-55 footcandles (fc), when only three fc are required for emergency lighting and 15 for corridor lighting. Representatives of the architectural firm argued that the design did not exceed state wattage requirements.

Ponczak, G.

1984-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Rebuilding it Better: Greensburg, Kansas, Kiowa County Memorial Hospital (Brochure) (Revised)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This brochure details the sustainable and green aspects of the LEED Platinum-designed Kiowa County Memorial Hospital in Greensburg, Kansas.

162

Gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease, 45 patients with various glomerulopathies, excluding lupus nephritis and renal vasculitis, were studied. Persistent renal visualization 48 hours after the gallium injection, a positive scintigram, was graded as + (less than), ++ (equal to), and +++ (greater than) the hepatic uptake. Positive scintigrams were seen in ten of 16 cases of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, six of 11 cases of proliferative glomerulonephritis, and one case of minimal change, and one of two cases of membranous nephropathy; also in three of six cases of sickle glomerulopathy, two cases of diabetic neuropathy, one of two cases of amyloidosis, and one case of mild chronic allograft rejection. The 25 patients with positive scans were younger than the 20 with negative scans (31 +/- 12 v 42 +/- 17 years; P less than 0.01), and exhibited greater proteinuria (8.19 +/- 7.96 v 2.9 +/- 2.3 S/d; P less than 0.01) and lower serum creatinine values (2 +/- 2 v 4.1 +/- 2.8 mg/dL; P less than 0.01). The amount of proteinuria correlated directly with the intensity grade of the gallium image (P less than 0.02), but there was no correlation between the biopsy diagnosis and the outcome of the gallium scan. It was concluded that gallium scintigraphy is not useful in the differential diagnosis of the glomerular diseases under discussion. Younger patients with good renal function and heavy proteinuria are likely to have a positive renal scintigram regardless of the underlying glomerulopathy.

Bakir, A.A.; Lopez-Majano, V.; Levy, P.S.; Rhee, H.L.; Dunea, G.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Sharp Recanalization for Chronic Left Iliac Vein Occlusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Endovascular treatment has emerged as a first-line treatment for venous occlusions, but is sometimes challenging with conventional approaches. This article describes a helpful technique using a Roesch-Uchida needle to cross a chronic occlusion of the iliac vein when conventional techniques have failed.

Ito, Nobutake, E-mail: nobutake@rad.med.keio.ac.jp; Isfort, Peter; Penzkofer, Tobias [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital (Germany); Grommes, Jochen; Greiner, Andreas [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Vascular Surgery, University Hospital (Germany); Mahnken, Andreas [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital (Germany)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Web Sites about Infectious Disease Web Sites about Infectious Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web Sites about Infectious Disease Web Sites about Infectious Disease Stanford Center for Tuberculosis Research-Site Links http://molepi.stanford.edu/tblinks.html Virology on the World Wide Web http://www.idsociety.org/ file:///C|/Program%20Files/Adobe/Adobe%20Dreamweav...nks/Web%20Sites%20about%20Infectious%20Disease

de Lijser, Peter

165

Estimation of the evacuation time in an emergency situation in hospitals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a prediction model is presented that estimates the evacuation time in an emergency situation for hospitals. The model is generic enough to be used in various hospital settings. This model can provide incident managers with estimates of ... Keywords: Emergency event, Evacuation modeling, Resource allocation, Resource management, Simulation

Davood Golmohammadi; Daniel Shimshak

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

MEDICAL COLLEGE OF WISCONSIN AFFILIATED HOSPITALS, INC. Registrar Confirmation of Medical School Graduation form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEDICAL COLLEGE OF WISCONSIN AFFILIATED HOSPITALS, INC. Registrar Confirmation of Medical School Graduation form The Medical College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals, Inc (MCWAH) requires primary verification of your medical school graduation. Please complete and send this form to your Medical School

167

Interactive visualization of hospital contact network data on multi-touch displays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hospital infections cost the lives of more than 100,000 people in the United States every year. Understanding how infections spread in hospitals is critical to reducing this problem. To help in this endeavor, we developed an interactive, multi-touch ... Keywords: contact-networks, epidemiology, healthcare, information visualization, multi-touch, visual analytics

Thomas E. Hansen; Juan Pablo Hourcade; Alberto Segre; Chris Hlady; Philip Polgreen; Chris Wyman

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Applying the Toyota Production System to a Hospital Pharmacy Durward K. Sobek, II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applying the Toyota Production System to a Hospital Pharmacy Durward K. Sobek, II Dept research project to apply the principles of the Toyota Production System to a hospital pharmacy. We. Keywords: Toyota Production System, health care, lean manufacturing 1. Introduction The Toyota Production

Sobek II, Durward K.

169

Department of Industrial Engineering Fall 2010 Electronic Medical Records at Jersey Shore Hospital  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

space savings which occur due to changes in equipment. The time and cost savings associated, which have an estimated cost $35,583.74 and will lead to a savings of 36.85% of previously utilized Hospital Overview The Jersey Shore Hospital is currently in the process of transitioning from paper medical

Demirel, Melik C.

170

Critical factors of hospital adoption on CRM system: Organizational and information system perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent rapid increase in the amount of medical information has pushed hospitals to confront an essential issue which is how to utilize healthcare information technology to improve healthcare services quality. Customer relationship management system ... Keywords: Customer relationship management, Healthcare information technology, Hospitals, Information systems adoption

Shin-Yuan Hung; Wei-Hsi Hung; Chia-An Tsai; Shu-Chen Jiang

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Large Hospitals - 50% Energy Savings  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Large Hospitals: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-LH) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-LH is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in large hospitals over levels achieved by following Standard 90.1-2004. The AEDG-LH was created for a 'standard' mid- to large-size hospital, typically at least 100,000 ft2, but the strategies apply to all sizes and classifications of new construction hospital buildings. Its primary focus is new construction, but recommendations may be applicable to facilities undergoing total renovation, and in part to many other hospital renovation, addition, remodeling, and modernization projects (including changes to one or more systems in existing buildings).

Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

HOSPITAL VENTILATION STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: A SUMMARY OF THE LITERATURE WITH CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS, FY 78 FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

67: 49-57, CANZLER, B. Air conditioning in the hospital. 39(CECCATELLI, M. Air conditioning plant for operating suites.1973. CLARK, R. P. Air conditioning in hospital wards and

DeRoos, R.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Clinical Presentation of Patients Diagnosed Post-Operatively with Appendicitis at Private Hospitals in Southern Puerto Rico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hospitals in Southern Puerto Rico Carlos Garcia-Gubern, MD;Luke’s Episcopal Hospital, Ponce, Puerto Rico; Ponce Schoolof Medicine, Ponce, Puerto Rico Objective: The goal of our

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity and Chromosome Instability Induction in TK6 Cells Schwartz J.L. 1 , Jordan R. 1 , Slovic J. 1 , Moruzzi A. 1 , Kimmel R. 2 , and Liber, H.L. 3 1 University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado There are a number of cell responses that can be detected after low dose radiation exposures including the adaptive response, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability. The relationship between these different phenomena is unknown. In this study, we measured adaptive responses, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell model, TK6, where we could genetically modify radiation responses by either over-expression of BCL-2 or deletion of TP53. TK6

175

Chemical and physical property of rice straw waste and hospital sewage sludge in turned windrow aeration system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most sewage sludge from hospital wastewater treatment plants in Northern Thailand are also being to incinerator and agricultural fields. Land application of hospital sewage sludge has serious effects on environmental. The main goal of this investigation ... Keywords: co-composting, hospital sewage sludge, rice straw waste, turned windrow aeration

Khajornsak Sopajaree; Apisit Sancom

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Causal Inference and Prediction in Health Studies: Environmental Exposures and Schistosomiasis, HIV-1 Genotypic Susceptibility Scores and Virologic Suppression, and Risk of Hospital Readmission for Heart Failure Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hospitalization for congestive heart failure among Medicarepredictors of readmission for heart failure: a systematicof hospital readmission for heart failure: development of a

Sudat, Sylvia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Genetics of motor neuron disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The number of genes associated with motor neuron degen- eration has increased ... Motor neurons are affected in a large number of neurologic diseases

178

Differentiating Lyme Disease from Syphilis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of the humoral response to the flagellin protein of Borrelia burgdorferi: cloning of regions capable of differentiating Lyme disease from syphilis.

J M Robinson; T J Pilot-matias; S D Pratt; C B Patel; T S Bevirt; J C Hunt; J. Clin Microbiol; Terry S. Bevirt; J. C. Hunt

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

2007 CBECS Large Hospital Building FAQs: 2003-2007 Comparison Graphs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

FAQs: 2003-2007 Comparison Graphs Main FAQs: 2003-2007 Comparison Graphs Main Report | Methodology | FAQ | List of Tables CBECS 2007 - Release date: August 17, 2012 Jump to: Figure 1 | Figure 2 | Figure 3 | Figure 4 | Figure 5 Figure 1 Number of Large Hospital Buildings and 95% Confidence Intervals by Census Region, 2003 and 2007 Figure 2 Total Floorspace and 95% Confidence Intervals in Large Hospital Buildings by Census Region, 2003 and 2007 Figure 3 Major Fuel Intensity and 95% Confidence Intervals by Census Region, 2003 and 2007 Figure 4 Electricity Intensity and 95% Confidence Intervals in Large Hospital Buildings by Census Region, 2003 and 2007 Figure 5 Natural Gas Intensity and 95% Confidence Intervals in Large Hospital Buildings by Census Region, 2003 and 2007 Specific questions on this product may be directed to:

180

System transferability of public hospital facility management between Germany and Iran.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The subject of this PhD-thesis is the transferability of Facility Management (FM) by using the example of hospitals in Germany and Iran. The intention is… (more)

Banedj-Schafii, Mandana

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A plan for Metropolitan State Hospital : imagery as a therapy for an institution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is both text and illustration to describe the process of transforming a state mental institution from an outdated, outmoded, conventional hospital into a living community. The goal of the project is to develop ...

McMurrin, Sterling James

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

NREL Technical Reports Guide the Way to 50% Energy Savings in Hospitals, Office Buildings (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed two technical reports that provide recommendations to help designers and operators of large office buildings and hospitals achieve at least a 50% energy savings using existing technology.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Air Distribution Systems and Cross-Infection Risk in the Hospital...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Distribution Systems and Cross-Infection Risk in the Hospital Sector Speaker(s): Peter V. Nielsen Date: November 28, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of...

184

Peribronchiolar fibrosis in lungs of cats chronically exposed to diesel exhaust  

SciTech Connect

This study reports the quantitative changes in the pulmonary proximal acinar region following chronic exposure to diesel exhaust and following an additional 6 months in clean air. Cats (13 months of age) from a minimum disease colony were exposed to clean air (eight cats for 27 months and nine cats for 33 months), diesel exhaust for 8 hours/day, 7 days/week (nine cats for 27 months), or diesel exhaust for 27 months followed by 6 months in clean air (10 cats). Morphologic and morphometric evaluation using light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed two major exposure-related lesions in proximal acinar regions of lungs of cats: peribronchiolar fibrosis associated with significant increases in lymphocytes, fibroblasts, and interstitial macrophages containing diesel particulate-like inclusions and bronchiolar epithelial metaplasia associated with the presence of ciliated and basal cells and alveolar macrophages containing diesel particulate-like inclusions. Peribronchiolar fibrosis was greater at the end of the 6 months in clean air following exposure, whereas the bronchiolar epithelial metaplasia was most severe at the end of exposure. Following an additional 6 months in clean air the epithelium more closely resembled the control epithelial cell population. The labeling index of terminal bronchiolar epithelium was significantly increased at the end of exposure but was not significantly different from controls or exposed cats following an additional 6 months in clean air. The ultrastructural appearance of epithelial cells remained relatively unchanged following diesel exhaust exposure with the exception of diesel particulate-like inclusions.

Hyde, D.M.; Plopper, C.G.; Weir, A.J.; Murnane, R.D.; Warren, D.L.; Last, J.A.; Pepelko, W.E.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Transfers from UW Hospital to Another State Agency See 230.29 (2) Wis. Stats. information on UW Hospital Authority employees not being eligible as state employee transfers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transfers from UW Hospital to Another State Agency See 230.29 (2) Wis. Stats. information on UW (Administered By ETF) State Agency- Classified Handling of Employee benefits: · No new choice of health plan to Category 1 as employee has "0" sick leave when coming to a State Agency. · According to Personnel Rule

Sheridan, Jennifer

186

Examining Public Health System Responses to the Chronic Diseases of HIV/AIDS and Diabetes: Experiences from Mexico and Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Cohn, Health reform in Brazil: lessons to consider. Am JPetersen, M.L. , et al. , Brazil, in The HIV Pandemic: localof the AIDS epidemic in Brazil: principal epidemiological

Gidi, Virginia Eve

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Examining Public Health System Responses to the Chronic Diseases of HIV/AIDS and Diabetes: Experiences from Mexico and Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generations of reform in Mexico. Lancet, 2003. 362(9396): p.Carillo, and J.J. García, Mexico, in World Health Systems:Secretaria de Salud de Mexico and et al, Numeralia 2008:

Gidi, Virginia Eve

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Predisposing factors of chronic low back pain (CLBP) among sedentary office workers (SOW) in Nairobi, Kenya.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Chronic low back pain is a highly prevalent condition in industrialized nations. It is associated with activity limitations, disability, has significant economic impact on society… (more)

Mukandoli, Kumuntu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A Model for Interprofessional Health Disparities Education: Student-Led Curriculum on Chronic Hepatitis B Infection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the medical curriculum: developing and evaluating anInterprofessional Hepatitis B Curriculum S145 21. DiemersEducation: Student-Led Curriculum on Chronic Hepatitis B

Sheu, Leslie C.; Toy, Brian C.; Kwahk, Emanuel; Yu, Albert; Adler, Joshua; Lai, Cindy J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Google Maps -highland hospital rochester new york http://maps.google.com/ 1 of 2 9/29/05 13:21  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google Maps - highland hospital rochester new york http://maps.google.com/ 1 of 2 9/29/05 13 Hospital: Gift Shop 1000 South Ave, Rochester, NY 14620 (585) 341-8040 - 1.4 mi S Google Maps highland hospital rochester new york #12;Google Maps - highland hospital rochester new york http://maps.google

Richmond, Michael W.

191

Choline, Phospholipids, Health, and Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proceedings of the 7th International Congress on Phospholipids. Choline, Phospholipids, Health, and Disease Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food food

192

Hospital Triage in the First 24 Hours after a Nuclear or Radiological Disaster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hospital Triage in the First 24 Hours after a Nuclear or Radiological Disaster Hospital Triage in the First 24 Hours after a Nuclear or Radiological Disaster Berger, ME; Leonard, RB; Ricks, RC; Wiley, AL; Lowry, PC; Flynn, DF Abstract: This article addresses the problems emergency physicians would face in the event of a nuclear or radiological catastrophe. It presents information about what needs to be done so that useful information will be gathered and reasonable decisions made in the all important triage period. A brief introductory explanation of radiation injury is followed by practical guides for managing the focused history, physical exam, laboratory tests, initial treatment, and disposition of victims of acute radiation syndrome and combined injury. The guides are not intended to serve as a hospital's "emergency

193

Determinants of job satisfaction among hospital pharmacists and their intent to leave using Herzberg's two-factor theory.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This dissertation presents a quantitative analysis of the determinants of job satisfaction among hospital pharmacists using F. Herzberg's ( Work and Nature of Man,… (more)

Nyame-Mireku, Michael Nana

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 3. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presented are the project description, list of participants, and system specifications for the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities--30% Guide  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities.

Bonnema, E.; Doebber, I.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

From cars to care : A literature study of the diffusion of Lean from Toyota to the Norwegian hospital setting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Background: During the past 10 years, Norwegian hospitals has subjected to frequent organizational changes. One organizational method or idea that is currently diffusing in the… (more)

Pettersen, Guri Lise

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Healthcare Strategic Management: The Impact of State and Federal Funding Levels on the Implementation of Strategic Plans at Tennessee Hospitals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to determine hospital executive managements perceptions of how turbulence in the politico-legal sector of the macroenvironment impacted the strategic… (more)

Byington, Randy Lee

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Using mobile health to support the chronic care model: developing an institutional initiative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Self-management support and team-based care are essential elements of the Chronic Care Model but are often limited by staff availability and reimbursement. Mobile phones are a promising platform for improving chronic care but there are few examples of ...

Shantanu Nundy, Jonathan J. Dick, Anna P. Goddu, Patrick Hogan, Chen-Yuan E. Lu, Marla C. Solomon, Arnell Bussie, Marshall H. Chin, Monica E. Peek

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Eur Heart J . Author manuscript Chronic heart rate reduction with ivabradine improves systolic function of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eur Heart J . Author manuscript Page /1 11 Chronic heart rate reduction with ivabradine improves systolic function of the reperfused heart through a dual mechanism involving a direct mechanical effect the adaptations of left ventricular function and calcium handling to chronic heart rate reduction with ivabradine

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

200

SPP sales flyer for hospitality and hotels | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hospitality and hotels hospitality and hotels Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder Technical documentation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Impact of Continuous Commissioning® on the Energy Star® Rating of Hospitals and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Re-commissioning, retro-commissioning, Continuous Commissioning® (CC®) are examples of successful systematic processes implemented in buildings to reduce overall building energy consumption, and improve efficiency of systems and their operations and control. The impact of the Continuous Commissioning® Process on the Energy Star® Rating (ESR) of office buildings and hospitals is examined in this thesis. The improvement in performance of a building, and subsequently its ESR, is found to be influenced by its initial ESR, while its location has no impact on improvement. The improvement in ESR is observed to be almost linearly proportional to the percentage of energy saved. For 10% - 20% reductions in energy use typical of the CC® process, the ESR is increased by 10-19 ESR ranks for office buildings and by 13 - 26 ESR ranks for hospitals. The CC® process is found to potentially enable an office building of average initial ESR of 62 and a hospital of average initial ESR of 55, located anywhere in the US, to be eligible to achieve ESR of 75 and consequently the Energy Star recognition. The improvement of ESR is a function of the initial ESR and the building type; hence it is observed to be different for hospitals and office buildings in the study. For hospital and office building models occupying 100,000 ft² of floor area each, a difference of about 30% in the ESR improvement (greater for hospitals) is observed. The energy intensities may be different for buildings with same ESRs that have different location and/or type. An averaged maximum difference of energy intensity of approximately 10% is observed to exist for identical buildings and of the same type but located at different locations. Hospitals are observed to be more than twice as energy intensive as office buildings for the same location and equal ESRs. ESR plotted against % energy savings at site reveals the stepped nature of ESR system. At specific initial ESR and corresponding % savings a reduction of up to approximately 1% for office buildings and up to 1.5% for hospitals does not change the respective ESRs for the model set of buildings in the study.

Kulkarni, Aditya Arun

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Exploratory Use of Microaerosol Decontamination Technology (PAEROSOL) in Enclosed, Unoccupied Hospital Setting  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study was to validate the previously observed high biological kill performance of PAEROSOL, a semi-dry, micro-aerosol decontamination technology, against common HAI in a non-human subject trial within a hospital setting of Madigan Army Medical Center (MAMC) on Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Tacoma, Washington. In addition to validating the disinfecting efficacy of PAEROSOL, the objectives of the trial included a demonstration of PAEROSOL environmental safety, (i.e., impact to hospital interior materials and electronic equipment exposed during testing) and PAEROSOL parameters optimization for future deployment.

Rainina, Evguenia I.; McCune, D. E.; Luna, Maria L.; Cook, J. E.; Soltis, Michele A.; Demons, Samandra T.; Godoy-Kain, Patricia; Weston, J. H.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

203

AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Fourth quarterly report, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project objective is to design, construct, install, provide operator training and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. This unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing lower cost steam for heating and possibly cooling (absorption chiller) and operation of a steam turbine-generator for limited power generation while providing efficient destruction of both general and infectious hospital waste. The steam generated is as follows: Steam =20,000 lb/hr; Temperature = 353 F (saturated); Pressure= 125 psig; Steam quality = 98.5%

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

L'Hospital-type rules for monotonicity and limits: Discrete case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assuming that a "derivative" ratio rho:=f'/g' of the ratio r:=f/g of differentiable functions f and g is monotonic (that is, rho is increasing or decreasing), it was shown in previous papers that then r can switch at most once, from decrease to increase or vice versa. In the present paper, "discrete" versions of such l'Hospital-type rules for monotonicity (as well as "discrete" versions of l'Hospital's rules for limits) are obtained, for functions f and g defined on an interval of integers.

Iosif Pinelis

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

205

Cross-workplace perspectives: relating studies from hospitals to an oil and gas workplace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This discussion paper highlights how two apparently contrasting professions - an oil and gas refinery operator and a hospital nurse - share similar properties in how they collaborate, communicate and use artifacts. We relate literature on the nursing ... Keywords: collaboration, cooperative work, oil and gas, pervasive computing, workplace study

Clint Heyer; Ingeborg Grønning

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Online scheduling of pick-up and delivery tasks in hospitals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: The aim of this study was to develop an algorithm for scheduling pick-up and delivery tasks in hospitals. The number of jobs and the dynamic nature of the problem, in having jobs arriving over time, makes the use of information technology ... Keywords: Decision making, Graph theory, Operations research, Personnel staffing and scheduling, Transportation of patients

Christian Fiegl; Carsten Pontow

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Quality site seasonal report: Cherokee Indian Hospital, SFBP 4058, December 1984 through April 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The active solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) and space heating system at the Cherokee Indian Hospital was designed and constructed as part of the Solar in Federal Buildings Program (SFBP). This retrofitted system is one of eight of the systems in the SFBP selected for quality monitoring. The purpose of this monitoring effort is to document the performance of quality state-of-the-art solar systems in large federal building applications. The hospital serves the Qualla Reservation of the Cherokee Indian Tribe in Cherokee, North Carolina, near the eastern entrance to the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. Solar energy is used to preheat domestic hot water (the cafeteria is the principal load) and for space heating. The hospital is expected to have a normal year-round occupancy of 200 people (patients, medical and maintenance personnel) with some 2775 expected visitors per year. The drainback solar system has 320 Owens-Illinois evacuated-tube collectors with a gross area of 5517 square feet. Solar energy is stored in a 6335-gallon storage tank. Solar energy from storage is supplied to a 700-gallon DHW preheat tank through a heat exchanger in the storage tank, and directly to heat exchangers in the heating ducts. Auxiliary energy is supplied by two large oil-fired boilers. Performance of the system at the Cherokee Indian Hospital during the period December 1984 through April 1985 are reported.

Raymond, M.G.

1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Point-to-Point Verification of Monitored Sensors at Reynolds Army Clinic and Hospital Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A point-to-point verification of the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system of the Reynolds Army Community Hospital (RACH) in Fort Sill, Oklahoma was done by the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) of Texas A&M University. Work began on January 12, 2004 and was completed on July 2, 2004. The facility consists of a clinic section having 212,000 sq.ft and a hospital section with 300,100 sq.ft. Both sections are contained in one building for a total of 512,000 sq.ft. The clinic section of the facility is occupied from 0700 hours – 1700 hours while the hospital side operates 24/7. Verification of the facility began shortly after the completion of a $2 million upgrade of the Energy Management Control System (EMCS) by Johnson Controls from their existing 8540 pneumatic system to a direct digital control (DDC) Metasys version 12.0 system. Only the points read by the control system and used for control sequencing were verified. In the following sections of this report detailed information will be provided for the type of equipment used for the point-to-point verification and calibration, calibration tolerances for the devices requiring calibration, areas that require attention prior to calibration, and calibration procedures. The remaining sections will focus on the central plant, clinic, and hospital areas. Each section will contain individual field data for each component tested and calibrated.

Martinez, J.; Linenschmidt, S.; Turner, D.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Embedding conformance checking in a process intelligence system in hospital environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Process intelligence is an effective means to analyze and improve business processes in companies with high degree of automation. Hospitals are also facing high pressure to be profitable with ever decreasing available funds in a stressed healthcare sector, ... Keywords: conformance checking, process modeling in healthcare, visualization and monitoring healthcare processes

Kathrin Kirchner; Nico Herzberg; Andreas Rogge-Solti; Mathias Weske

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Evaluation of AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this program is to expand the use of coal by utilizing CFB (circulating fluidized bed) technology to provide an environmentally safe method for disposing of waste materials. Hospitals are currently experiencing a waste management crisis. In many instances, they are no longer permitted to burn pathological and infectious wastes in incinerators. Older hospital incinerators are not capable of maintaining the stable temperatures and residence times necessary in order to completely destroy toxic substances before release into the atmosphere. In addition, the number of available landfills which can safely handle these substances is decreasing each year. The purpose of this project is to conduct necessary research investigating whether the combustion of the hospital wastes in a coal-fired circulating fluidized bed boiler will effectively destroy dioxins and other hazardous substances before release into the atmosphere. If this is proven feasible, in light of the quantity of hospital wastes generated each year, it would create a new market for coal -- possibly 50 million tons/year.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Letter to the Editor : Rapidly-deployed small tent hospitals: lessons from the earthquake in Haiti.  

SciTech Connect

The damage to medical facilities resulting form the January 2010 earthquake in haiti necessitated the establishment of field tent hospitals. Much of the local medical infrastructure was destroyed or limited operationally when the Fast Israel Rescue and Search Team (FIRST) arrived in Haiti shortly after the January 2010 earthquake. The FIRST deployed small tent hospitals in Port-au-Prince and in 11 remote areas outside of the city. Each tent was set up in less than a half hour. The tents were staffed with an orthopedic surgeon, gynecologists, primary care and emergency care physicians, a physician with previous experience in tropical medicine, nurses, paramedics, medics, and psychologists. The rapidly deployable and temporary nature of the effort allowed the team to treat and educate, as well as provide supplies for, thousands of refugees throughout Haiti. In addition, a local Haitian physician and his team created a small tent hospital to serve the Petion Refugee Camp and its environs. FIRST personnel also took shifts at this hospital.

Rosen, Y.; Gurman , P.; Verna, E.; Elman , N.; Labor, E. (Materials Science Division); (Superior NanoBioSystems LLC); (Fast Israeli Rescue & Search Team); (Clinique Adonai); (Mass. Inst. Tech.); (Univ. Haifa)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Neurological Findings of Lyme Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neurologic involvement of Lyme disease typically consists of meningitis, cranial neuropathy, and radiculoneuritis, alone or in combination, lasting for months. From 1976 to 1983, we studied 38 patients with Lyme meningitis. Headache and mild neck stiffness, which fluctuated in intensity, and lymphocytic pleocytosis were the common findings. Half of the patients also had facial palsies, which were unilateral in 12 and bilateral in seven. In addition, 12 patients had motor and/or sensory radiculoneuropathies; asymmetric weakness of extremities was the most common finding. Although incomplete presentations of neurologic involvement of Lyme disease may be confused with other entities, the typical constellation of neurologic symptoms represents a unique clinical picture. Three major types of lesions comprise the neurological manifestations of Lyme disease: meningitis, cranial neuropathy, and radiculoneuritis [1]. These three may occur alone or in combination (Fig. 1). In this report, we describe thirty-eight patients who had meningitis sometimes accompanied by cranial neuropathy and/or peripheral radiculoneuropathy, as reported in depth elsewhere [2]. We believe that this constellation of symptoms is unique among neurological diseases.

Andrew R. Pachner; Allen C. Steere

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

A study of organizational alignment at a Boston area hospital and its effects on patient throughput in the peri-operative areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capacity is an ongoing issue when managing hospital resources. Looking at the hospital as a supply chain of care services provided to the patient enables us to better evaluate problems such as delays on a systems level. A ...

Campbell, Sarah K. (Sarah Katharine)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Transcranial LED therapy for cognitive dysfunction in chronic, mild traumatic brain injury: Two case reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases are presented, where cognitive function improved following treatment with transcranial light emitting diodes (LEDs). At age 59, P1 had closed-head injury from a motor vehicle ...

Hamblin, Michael R.

215

THE BEHAVIOUR OF VASCILAR REACTIONS IN ACUTE IRRADIATION DISEASE  

SciTech Connect

Acute experiments were made with cats, and chronic experiments with dogs. The a cute experiments numbered 377 and concerned 65 rats of either sex and different weights in urethan anesthesia. Another 22 cats were used for 65 control experiments. The cats received a total dose of 1500 r from a therapeutic x-ray unit. The conditions were: distance, 60 cm; O.5 mm copper filter; 160 kv; 20 ma; 29 r/min. The cats were examined on the third day after irradiation, when the irradiation disease picture was developed. Vascular reflexes from the interoceptors of the carotid sinus were investigated after Heymans's method, reflexes from the interoceptors of spleen and intestinal loop vessels after Czernigowski's method, and reflexes from interoceptors of hind-leg vessels after the author's method. Adrenaline, noradrenaline, serotonin, acetylcho-line, potassium chloride, and lactic acid were used to stimulate interoceptors. To stimulate the proximal section of the sciatic nerve and peripheral part of the splanchnic nerve, electric current was used --3 to 6 volts, 20 ma, 20 sec. Furthermore, arterial blood pressure was measured in irradiated cats after intravenous administration of adrenaline, noradrenaline, serotonin, acetylcholine, or histamine. Experiments were also made with cats poisoned with phentolamine, atropine, or pendiomid. The experimental material was analyzed statistically. Chronic experiments numbered 165 and concerned 6 dogs. Before irradiation, the dogs were opperated upon after the author's method to enable blood pressure to be measured by intravascular technique, and subsequently standards of arterial blood pressure reaction to adrenaline, noradrenaline, serotonin, acetylcholine, and histamine were determin+d. In the experiments, the dogs received a total dose of 800 r from a therapeutic x ray unit. Conditions were: distance, 80 cm; O.5 mm Cu filter; l60 Kv; 20 ma; 21 r/min. Alrterial blood pressure reaction to the above neurohormones was investigated in the irradiated dogs daily. Experiments with dogs poisoned with phentolamine or pendiomid were also carried out. The experiments referred to showed ionizing radiation to reduce considerably reflexes from vascular chemoreceptors to neurohormones, potassium chloride, and lactic acid. In irradiated cats, pressor reflexes from carotid sinus mechanoreceptors were diminished, and so were pressor reflexes to electric stimulation of the sciatic and splanchnic nerves. Neurohormones, such as adrenaline and noradrenaline, caused in cats and dogs lower-than-standard effects. Depressor effects of serotonin were in irradiated and noniirradiated cats equal in strength. In dogs, on the other hand, pressor effects of serotonin diminished in strength with the progress of irradiation disease. Pressure fall evoked by aby acetylcholine and histamine was the same in irradiated and nonirradiated cats and dogs, but of considerably longer duration in irradiated animals. Phentolamine diminished pressor effects of adrenaline in irradiated cats and dogs, and also weakened in dogs the pressor effects of serotonin. Atropine and phentolamine increased in irradiated cats and dogs pressor effects of adrenaline and noradrenaline, and pressor effects of serotonin in dogs. It was concluded that in acute irradiation disease the adrenergic part of the autonomic nervous system, first of all sensory and vasomotor terminals, is injured. Also, preserved vasomotor reflexes, even though weakened, enable in this disease an influence to be exerted on the functional efficiency of the circulatory system. (auth)

Ryzewski, J.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Mogre, Gadh, and Chattopadhyay: Using Survey Data to Design a RFID Centric Service System for Hospitals Service Science 1(3), pp. 189-206, 2009 SSG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the hospital using similar RIFD readers and by tagging their products. The data path between the blood

California at Los Angeles, University of

217

Evaluation of rule effectiveness and positive predictive value of clinical rules in a Dutch clinical decision support system in daily hospital pharmacy practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction: Our advanced clinical decision support (CDS) system, entitled 'adverse drug event alerting system' (ADEAS), is in daily use in our hospital pharmacy. It is used by hospital pharmacists to select patients at risk of possible adverse drug ... Keywords: Adverse drug events, Clinical decision support systems, Clinical pharmacy services, Clinical rules, Evaluation studies, Hospital pharmacy services, Medication safety, Positive predictive value, Rule effectiveness, University hospitals

Mirjam K. Rommers, Juliëtte Zwaveling, Henk-Jan Guchelaar, Irene M. Teepe-Twiss

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Energy Conservation Recommendations, Implementation Costs, and Projected Paybacks for Georgia's Targeted Schools and Hospitals Conservation Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the past year the Georgia Tech Research Institute performed technical assistance studies on over 100 school and hospital buildings under a program funded by the Governor's Office of Energy Resources. This program is known as the Targeted Schools and Hospitals Program because its objective is to involve facilities which have never participated in the traditional DOE funded Institutional Conservation Program (ICP) due to economic hardships. The program was specifically directed at non-participants by providing fully funded energy surveys on qualifying facilities. The energy surveys were conducted by the Georgia Tech Research Institute under contract with the Office of Energy Resources. This paper presents results on the range of energy conservation recommendations made and the number of occurrences in the total population as well as the typical percentage energy savings. This data can be used in forecasting the expected types of recommendations and energy reduction potential for a large population of institutional buildings.

Brown, M. L.; Moore, D. M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Air Distribution Systems and Cross-Infection Risk in the Hospital Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Distribution Systems and Cross-Infection Risk in the Hospital Sector Air Distribution Systems and Cross-Infection Risk in the Hospital Sector Speaker(s): Peter V. Nielsen Date: November 28, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Rongxin Yin We protect ourselves from airborne cross-infection in the indoor environment by supplying fresh air to the room by natural or mechanical ventilation. The air is distributed in the room according to different principles as e.g. mixing ventilation, downward ventilation, displacement ventilation, etc. A large amount of air is supplied to the room to ensure dilution of airborne infection. The talk discusses both the macroenvironment and the microenvironment. The macroenvironment is the conditions created by the air distribution system, and the microenvironment is the conditions created by the local flow around persons in combination

220

90.1 Prototype Building Models Hospital | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hospital Hospital The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

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221

Scoping Report: Advanced Technologies for Multi-Load Washers in Hospitality and Healthcare  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this demonstration project is to quantify the energy savings and water efficiency potential of commercial laundry wastewater recycling systems and low-temperature detergent supply systems to help promote the adoption of these technologies in the commercial sector. This project will create a set of technical specifications for efficient multi-load laundry systems (both new and retrofit) tailored for specific applications and/or sectors (e.g., hospitality, health care). The specifications will be vetted with the appropriate Better Buildings Alliance (BBA) members (e.g., Commercial Real Estate Energy Alliance, Hospital Energy Alliance), finalized, published, and disseminated to enable widespread technology transfer in the industry and specifically among BBA partners.

Parker, Graham B.; Boyd, Brian K.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Goetzler, W.; Foley, K. J.; Sutherland, T. A.

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

222

LED Surgical Task Lighting Scoping Study: A Hospital Energy Alliance Project  

SciTech Connect

Tungsten-halogen (halogen) lamps have traditionally been used to light surgical tasks in hospitals, even though they are in many respects ill-suited to the application due to the large percentage of radiant energy outside the visible spectrum and issues with color rendering/quality. Light-emitting diode (LED) technology offers potential for adjustable color and improved color rendition/quality, while simultaneously reducing side-effects from non-visible radiant energy. It also has the potential for significant energy savings, although this is a fairly narrow application in the larger commercial building energy use sector. Based on analysis of available products and Hospital Energy Alliance member interest, it is recommended that a product specification and field measurement procedure be developed for implementation in demonstration projects.

Tuenge, Jason R.

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

223

other hospital U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There's no other hospital like it U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES · National the laboratory into better health and health care has been the Clinical Center's focus since the facility Institutes of Health 2008D I R E C T O R ' S A N N U A L R E P O R T · N I H C L I N I C A L C E N T E R P R

224

Sonoma State Hospital, Eldridge, California, geothermal-heating system: conceptual design and economic feasibility report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sonoma State Mental Hospital, located in Eldridge, California, is presently equipped with a central gas-fired steam system that meets the space heating, domestic hot water, and other heating needs of the hospital. This system is a major consumer of natural gas - estimated at 259,994,000 cubic feet per year under average conditions. At the 1981 unit gas rate of $0.4608 per therm, an average of $1,258,000 per year is required to operate the steam heating system. The hospital is located in an area with considerable geothermal resources as evidenced by a number of nearby hot springs resorts. A private developer is currently investigating the feasibility of utilizing geothermally heated steam to generate electricity for sale to the Pacific Gas and Electric Company. The developer has proposed to sell the byproduct condensed steam to the hospital, which would use the heat energy remaining in the condensate for its own heating needs and thereby reduce the fossil fuel energy demand of the existing steam heating system. The geothermal heating system developed is capable of displacing an estimated 70 percent of the existing natural gas consumption of the steam heating system. Construction of the geothermal fluid distribution and collection system and the retrofits required within the buildings are estimated to cost $1,777,000. Annual expenses (operation and maintenance, insurance, and geothermal fluid purchase) have been estimated to be $40,380 per year in 1981 dollars. The proposed geothermal heating system could then be completely paid for in 32 months by the savings in natural gas purchases that would result.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Circulating pump impeller: Presbyterian Intercommunity Hospital, Klamath Falls, Oregon, geothermal heating system. Failure analysis report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Presbyterian Intercommunity Hospital located in Klamath Falls, Oregon utilizes geothermal fluid pumped from its own well to provide space heat and domestic hot water. During an inspection of the heating system after a chemical cleaning of the heat exchangers, the circulating pump was dismantled to replace its seals which were found to be leaking. At that time, the impeller was found to contain many cracks. The analysis of those cracks and a scale sample removed from the impeller is presented. (MHR)

Mitchell, D.A.; Ellis, P.F.

1979-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

Enthalpy Wheels Come of Age: Applying Energy Recovery Ventilation to Hospitality Venues in Hot, Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy recovery ventilation systems, including rotary heat exchangers or enthalpy wheels, utilize mature technologies that are routinely applied in commercial buildings. Energy recovery is particularly important in buildings with significant outdoor air intake requirements and has recently become widely accepted in applications such as schools and theatres. Hospitality applications including restaurants, bars, casinos and similar settings also stand to benefit from application of the technology, however, there is a lack of experience and therefore of accepted guidance in these applications. Furthermore, the unique challenges inherent in the variety of hospitality venues may limit appropriate use of the technology. Applying energy recovery ventilation to hospitality venues in hot, humid climates need not be complex. This paper proposes guidelines that can facilitate application of the technology by specifiers or other construction professionals. These guidelines address evaluation of typical projects for the suitability of energy recovery, selection of appropriate energy recovery ventilation technology, and criteria for successful application of enthalpy wheels. Examples of applications developed for different mechanical systems and building types are provided. The literature describing the opportunities and limitations associated with enthalpy wheels is summarized and referenced. Installation, operation, and maintenance insights are presented, derived from the body of industry experience with enthalpy wheels.

Wellford, B. W.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Development of a Vaccine for Bacterial Kidney Disease in Salmon, 1986 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bacterial kidney disease (BRD) has been and remains a chronic contributory problem limiting the productivity of salmon of the Columbia River Basin. Control of this disease will not come easily, but it would lead to a tremendous increase in the health and numbers of salmon populations. Vaccination of salmon of Renibacterium salmoninarum (KDB) is a potentially successful method of controlling this disease. To date, however, no successful vaccine has been developed for general use. A possible solution to this problem,and thus the goal of this research, is to isolate the antigenic components of KDB and enhance their ability to activate the host defenses. This will be accomplished by the chemical modification of these antigens with potent immunomodulatory substances. These modified antigens will then be tested for their effectiveness in inducing immunity to BKD and thereby preventing the disease. The goal of the project's third year was to test the immunogenicity and prophylactic value in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) of various chemical conjugates of Renibacterium salmoninarum cells and major antigens. This was accomplished by assessing the serum antibody response, the cellular immune response (cellular proliferation), and the kinetics of mortality after Lethal injections of the bacterium. An important facet of this research is the identification and isolation of virulence factors. These studies are not only important to the dissection of the mechanism of pathogenesis of bacterial kidney disease, but the purification of such a factor(s) will insure the production of a more potent vaccine. The studies completed this year have: (1) identified antigenic material which protect; (2) identified antigenic material which can exacerbate the disease; (3) identified a possibly major mechanism of pathogenesis via the interference with antibody; (4) the general ability to produce delineated a western blot technique for identification of infected fish; (5) described the use of monoclonal antibodies for antigenic analysis; and (6) identified an unusual and dramatic effect of R. salmoninarum cells on phagocytic function.

Kaattari, Stephen L.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Hospitality Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Library Information Library Information If you live on-site and would like to receive a Longwood Library card, you may go to the BNL Research Library, Bldg 477 to pick up an application. You must show your BNL ID badge at the desk. If you live in Mt. Sinai, Sound Beach, Miller Place, or Rocky Point, you are able to choose your library depending on your address. i.e. Miller Place residents can choose Comsewogue or Port Jefferson Village; Longwood Schools use Longwood Library; Mastics/Moriches/Shirley use the Shirley Library. You must bring proof of address to obtain a library card. All of the libraries have wonderful children/family/career/and other adult programs that are normally free or low cost. Local Libraries Address Telephone Baiting Hollow Free Library 4 Warner Drive

229

Hospitality Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Family Safety Family Safety BNL requires that you OBEY ALL SIGNS & POSTING. Failure to do so may result in disciplinary action or dismissal. IF YOU DO NOT BELONG IN AN AREA, DO NOT ENTER, DO NOT TOUCH, KEEP OUT!! Emergency Telephone Numbers Emergency - Dial 2222 or 911 from a Laboratory telephone if someone is experiencing an emergency health concern. Emergency from pay phones or cell phones, dial 631-344-2222 BNL Information Hotline - 344-INFO (4636) check for delayed openings due to inclement weather Poison Control - 1-800-222-1222 Non-emergency: BERA/Recreation/Quality of Life Office, Ext. 5090 BNL Clinic: Ext. 3670 National Safety Council: www.nsc.org American Red Cross: www.redcross.org Proper Way to Sneeze Apartment Residents Upon sounding of the BNL site sirens, residents of the apartment area shall proceed indoors, close all windows and doors, and await further instructions from the Fire Dept or the Local Emergency Coordinator (LEC). The front entrance of the housing units displays the building manager and emergency contacts.

230

Coronary Heart Disease, Hypertension, Stroke, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coronary Heart Disease, Hypertension, Stroke, and Diabetes #12;Coronary Heart Disease: Overview by atherosclerosis ­ Narrowing of coronary arteries, the vessels that supply the heart · Disease process: coronary and arms Myocardial infarction - heart attack, ischemia - local blood supply decreased resulting in cell

Meagher, Mary

231

Effects of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation on urinary eicosanoids in canine chronic renal failure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Changes in renal eicosanoids may be an index of disease progression or response to therapy in chronic renal failure (CRF). This study measured urinary thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentrations in control and CRF dogs fed protein/phosphorus restricted diets and supplemented with safflower (SFO) and menhaden fish (MFO) oils. Control dogs (n= 1 7) and CRF dogs (n=32) were assigned to one of three diets (WC, LPC, LPD) for basal diet acclimation. A crossover design was then implemented for oil supplementation, which included a 3 week washout period. Dietary compliance was determined by analysis of serum phospholipid fatty acid composition. Free-catch urine samples were collected for TXB2 and PGE2 determinations by ELISA, with PGE2 being first extracted on C 1 8silica columns. Values were normalized by urinary creatinine (UrCr) concentrations. A PGE2:TXB2 ratio was calculated as an index of renal vasodilation. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was determined at each sample period. Increased levels of PGE2 were found for control dogs compared to CRF dogs at study entry (P=0.00003) and after basal diet acclimation (P=0.003). Among all dogs, a decrease in PGE2 was found with MFO (P=0.03). Similarly, a decrease in PGE2 was found in MPC/MFO control dogs (P=0.05). In LPD/SFO CRF dogs, PGE2 was increased (P=0.02). Thromboxane B2 was unchanged for dogs. Individual responses showed a tendency for PGE2 to decrease with UTO and increase with SFO. There was an increase in GFR in CRF dogs after SFO. Decreased PGE2:TXB2 ratios were found for CRF dogs as compared to control dogs pre-basal diet period (P=0.0003) and after diet acclimation (P=0.006) for all diets combined. Differences after diet acclimation for the individual diets were not significant. No significant differences of ratios were found by paired t-test for oil supplements. It is concluded that decreased PGE2:TXB2 ratios may be an index of increased vasoconstriction in CRF canines. Safflower oil supplementation may increase renal vasodilation by increasing urinary PGE2, while TXB2 remains unchanged. Whether this effect is sufficient to overcome overall vasoconstrictive influences in failing kidneys remains to be established. If so, SFO may alter the progression of CRF as predicted by the hyperfiltration theory.

Crocker, Raquel Cristina

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Composition and production rate of pharmaceutical and chemical waste from Xanthi General Hospital in Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied pharmaceutical and chemical waste production in a Greek hospital. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total pharmaceutical waste was 12.4 {+-} 3.90 g/patient/d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total chemical waste was 5.8 {+-} 2.2 g/patient/d. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to determine the composition and production rates of pharmaceutical and chemical waste produced by Xanthi General Hospital in Greece (XGH). This information is important to design and cost management systems for pharmaceutical and chemical waste, for safety and health considerations and for assessing environmental impact. A total of 233 kg pharmaceutical and 110 kg chemical waste was collected, manually separated and weighed over a period of five working weeks. The total production of pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Total pharmaceutical waste was classified in three categories, vial waste comprising 51.1%, syringe waste with 11.4% and intravenous therapy (IV) waste with 37.5% w/w of the total. Vial pharmaceutical waste only was further classified in six major categories: antibiotics, digestive system drugs, analgesics, hormones, circulatory system drugs and 'other'. Production data below are presented as average (standard deviation in parenthesis). The unit production rates for total pharmaceutical waste for the hospital were 12.4 (3.90) g/patient/d and 24.6 (7.48) g/bed/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for vial waste 6.4 (1.6) g/patient/d and 13 (2.6) g/bed/d, (2) for syringe waste 1.4 (0.4) g/patient/d and 2.8 (0.8) g/bed/d and (3) for IV waste 4.6 (3.0) g/patient/d and 9.2 (5.9) g/bed/d. Total chemical waste was classified in four categories, chemical reagents comprising 18.2%, solvents with 52.3%, dyes and tracers with 18.2% and solid waste with 11.4% w/w of the total. The total production of chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Thus, the sum of pharmaceutical and chemical waste was 5.7% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. The unit production rates for total chemical waste for the hospital were 5.8 (2.2) g/patient/d and 1.1 (0.4) g/exam/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for reagents 1.7 (2.4) g/patient/d and 0.3 (0.4) g/examination/d, (2) for solvents 248 (127) g/patient/d and 192 (101) g/examination/d, (3) for dyes and tracers 4.7 (1.4) g/patient/d and 2.5 (0.9) g/examination/d and (4) for solid waste 54 (28) g/patient/d and 42 (22) g/examination/d.

Voudrias, Evangelos, E-mail: voudrias@env.duth.gr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, GR-671 00 Xanthi (Greece); Goudakou, Lambrini; Kermenidou, Marianthi; Softa, Aikaterini [Department of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, GR-671 00 Xanthi (Greece)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Comparison of LEED to Non-LEED Certified Hospitals with Regards to Patient Perspective and Financial Indicators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As natural resources are decreasing and environmental pollution is increasing, the buildings that play an important role in this problem should be constructed sustainably so their affects are kept to a minimum. Hospitals operate 24 hours a day and 7 days a week, therefore they are one of the largest energy consumers. Hence designers have started to design healthcare facilities according to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) criteria, believing that it will reduce waste production, energy consumption and increase patient satisfaction by creating brighter and less stressful facilities. To understand if the claims are correct or not, this thesis first studied the results of the patient survey, Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and System (HCAHPS), undertaken at most of the hospitals in the U.S., and compares the results to LEED and non-LEED certified hospitals. To find answers for the claims related to the financial benefits, this thesis compared three financial indicators; cost of operation of plant, profitability, and inpatient revenue. In the cases where there is a large enough sample size, a t-test is used to compare two groups, however when the sample size was not large enough, two groups are compared based on their means. For the cost of operation of plant and profitability, non-LEED certified hospitals are performing better. However, the patient satisfaction and inpatient revenues are significantly higher at the LEED-certified hospitals.

Ulusoy, Eren

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Development of a Vaccine for Bacterial Kidney Disease in Salmon, 1985 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bacterial kidney disease (BRD) has been and remains a chronic contributory problem limiting the productivity of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. Control of this disease will not come easily, but it would lead to a tremendous increase in the health and numbers of salmon populations. Vaccination of salmon to Renibacterium salmoninarum (KDB) is a potentially successful method of controlling this disease. To date, however, no successful vaccine has been developed for general use. A possible solution to this problem, and thus the goal of this research, is to isolate the antigenic components of KDB and enhance their ability to activate the host defenses. This will be accomplished by the chemical modification of these antigens with potent immunomodulatory substances. These modified antigens will then be tested for their effectiveness in inducing immunity to BKD and thereby preventing the disease. The goal of the project's second year was to chemically modify the major antigens of Renibacteirium salmoninarum, immunize coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), and to test the immunogenicity of the preparations used. Immunogenicity of the antigenic material was tested by (1) admixture experiments, using whole KD cells with muramyl dipepetide, Vibrio anguillarum extract, E. coli lipopolysaccharide, or Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Freund's complete adjuvant. In addition to these goals a number of important techniques have been developed in order to facilitate the production of the vaccine. These procedures include: (1) the use of the soluble antigen for diagnosis in the ELISA and Western blot analysis, (2) detection of salmonid anti-KD antibodies by an ELISA technique, (3) detection of cellular immune responses to the soluble antigen, and (4) development of immersion challenge procedures for bacterial kidney disease (BKD).

Kaattari, Stephen L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Geothermal heating project at St. Mary's Hospital, Pierre, South Dakota. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

St. Mary's Hospital, Pierre, South Dakota, with the assistance of the US Department of Energy, drilled a 2176 ft well into the Madison Aquifer ot secure 108/sup 0/F artesian flow water at 385 gpm (475 psig shut-in pressure). The objective was to provide heat for domestic hot water and to space heat 163,768 sq. ft. Cost savings for the first three years were significant and, with the exception of a shutdown to replace some corroded pipe, the system has operated reliably and continuously for the last four years.

Not Available

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Geothermal heating project at St. Mary's Hospital, Pierre, South Dakota. Final report  

SciTech Connect

St. Mary's Hospital, Pierre, South Dakota, with the assistance of the US Department of Energy, drilled a 2176 ft well into the Madison Aquifer ot secure 108/sup 0/F artesian flow water at 385 gpm (475 psig shut-in pressure). The objective was to provide heat for domestic hot water and to space heat 163,768 sq. ft. Cost savings for the first three years were significant and, with the exception of a shutdown to replace some corroded pipe, the system has operated reliably and continuously for the last four years.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

A Multicellular Basis for the Origination of Blast Crisis in Chronic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multicellular Basis for the Origination of Blast Crisis in Chronic Multicellular Basis for the Origination of Blast Crisis in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Philip Hahnfeldt Tufts University School of Medicine Abstract Among radiation-induced cancers, some leukemias, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) have especially high excess relative risks. CML, sporadic or radiogenic, is also thought to be comparatively very well understood. Accordingly, CML is considered an important model for assessing radiogenic cancer risk. CML is characterized by a specific chromosome translocation, the BCR-ABL fusion gene, and it has been widely postulated that an advanced stage, CML blast crisis originates mainly via cell-autonomous mechanisms such as secondary mutations or genomic instability. However, there is growing evidence that intercellular interactions can play a critical role

238

Radiation Therapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Does Hospital Surgical Volume Matter? A Population-Based Study in Taiwan  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine the association between hospital surgical volume and the use of radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in Taiwan. Methods and Materials: We used claims data from the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan (1997-2005) in this retrospective population-based study. We identified patients with breast cancer, receipt of BCS, use of radiation, and the factors that could potentially associated with the use of RT from enrollment records, and the ICD-9 and billing codes in claims. We conducted logistic regression to examine factors associated with RT use after BCS, and performed subgroup analyses to examine whether the association differs by medical center status or hospital volumes. Results: Among 5,094 patients with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer who underwent BCS, the rate of RT was significantly lower in low-volume hospitals (74% vs. 82%, p < 0.01). Patients treated in low-volume hospitals were less likely to receive RT after BCS (odds ratio = 0.72, 95% confidence interval = 0.62-0.83). In addition, patients treated after the implementation of the voluntary pay-for-performance policy in 2001 were more likely to receive RT (odds ratio = 1.23; 95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.45). Subgroup analyses indicated that the high-volume effect was limited to hospitals accredited as non-medical centers, and that the effect of the pay-for-performance policy was most pronounced among low-volume hospitals. Conclusions: Using population-based data from Taiwan, our study concluded that hospital surgical volume and pay-for-performance policy are positively associated with RT use after BCS.

Chien, Chun-Ru [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, and School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Pan, I-Wen [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tsai, Yi-Wen [Center of Health Policy Research and Development, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Institute of Health and Welfare Policy, National Yang-Ming University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Teressa [Center of Health Policy Research and Development, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Liang, Ji-An [Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, and School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Shih, Ya-Chen Tina, E-mail: yashih@mdanderson.org [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Investigations of Altered Aquatic Ecosystems: Biomonitoring, Disease, and Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

removal of lizards on Lyme disease risk. Proceedings of thereservoirs intervenes in the Lyme disease cycle. Proceedings

Lunde, Kevin Bryce

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Detection of chronic respiratory bronchiolitis in oxidant-exposed populations: Analogy to tobacco smoke exposure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies in nonhuman primates indicate that one pathophysiologic consequence of ozone exposure is chronic bronchiolitis in terminal bronchioles. Modeling dosimetry suggests that a similar phenomenon is possible in humans. These findings may constitute an important analogy to the respiratory bronchiolitis that is associated with tobacco smoking in young adults. This analogy could form the basis for future research related to chronic respiratory health effects of ozone. The smoking data are reviewed and several research strategies are proposed that will be developed more fully in subsequent articles in this volume. 15 refs.

Bates, D.V. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Quarterly report, August--October 1995  

SciTech Connect

The project objective is to design, construct, install provide operator training and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. This unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing lower cost steam for heating and possibly cooling (absorption chiller) and operation of a steam turbine-generator for limited power generation. This would permit full capacity operation of the FBC year round in spite of the VA laundry that was shut down as well as efficient destruction of both general and infectious hospital waste and steam generation. The State permitting process required for construction will be completed in early November to allow installation and construction to be completed. Operating permits will be obtained after construction has been completed. A request for proposal for stack sampling and biospore tests was released to four (4) vendors in mid-October. The proposals shall be reviewed during November and the stack sampler will be selected. Funding was approved as of August 1, 1995. Construction and installation resumed on August 21, 1995 at the LVAMC. Construction and installation continues and will be completed by late December 1995.

Stuart, J.M.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Torbett-Hutchings-Smith Memorial Hospital geothermal-system demonstration at Marlin, Texas. Final design report  

SciTech Connect

The final design and economics of the Torbett-Hutchings-Smith (THS) Memorial Hospital geothermal heating system at Marlin, Texas are outlined. A brief description of the existing heating system, an overview of the geothermal retrofit, and the results of an economic analysis are included. It is estimated that the geothermal heating system will displace approximately 84 percent of the hospital's average annual natural gas consumption. In summer conditions, approximately 45 gpm of geothermal fluid will be utilized at a wellhead temperature of 139/sup 0/F. In peak demand winter conditions, approximately 160 gpm will be utilized at a wellhead temperature of 148/sup 0/F. The geothermal fluid temperature drop across the system will range from about 5/sup 0/F in summer to over 45/sup 0/F during winter. Total capital costs for the system are estimated to be $673,000, including the production well, a geothermal equipment room, engineering and architectural costs, and all equipment. The average annual natural gas savings are expected to be $28,200 while average annual operating and maintenance costs are estimated to be $7750. A before tax life cycle economic analysis of the THS system shows the breakeven period (BEP) of 29 years falling slightly below the 30 year expected life. This BEP is significantly influenced by the developmental nature of this project and by its lack of tax incentives.

1980-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

243

Risk associated with hospital rooms contaminated with 131I by patients being treated for thyroid carcinoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iodine-131 contamination is known to be present in hospital rooms that are used to confine patients being treated with quantities of 1311 in excess of 1. 1 GBq. These activities of 13 'I are used as a post-surgical follow-up procedure to a thyroidectomy as a means of treating thyroid cancer. Previous studies have indicated the extent of contamination in hospital rooms being used during these procedures. However, contamination has not been related to risk. This paper quantifies the risk in terms of effective dose equivalent to members of the public and personnel from 1311 contamination when only minimal precautions are taken to contain the contamination during the 1311 thyroid cancer treatment procedure. Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) calculations using the NRC published dose models for surface contamination results in public exposures of less than 2.7 uSv per patient and personnel exposures of less than 2.1 uSv yr-1. Maximum TEDE to the public considering the detectable limits of portable area survey equipment indicated a worst case exposure of 340 uSv per patient. As a result, conservative protective measures utilized by many institutions, such a lining the room with plastic, appear not to be warranted.

Jones, David Maurice

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Chronic heart rate reduction with ivabradine improves systolic function of the reperfused heart through a dual mechanism involving a direct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chronic heart rate reduction with ivabradine improves systolic function of the reperfused heart.berdeaux@inserm.fr inserm-00500900,version1-12Jul2010 Author manuscript, published in "European heart journal 2010 function and calcium handling to chronic heart rate reduction with ivabradine in the reperfused heart

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

245

Cellular Immune Findings in Lyme Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From 1981 through 1983, we did the first testing of cellular immunity in Lyme disease. Active established Lyme disease was often associated with lymphopenia, less spontaneous suppressor cell activity than normal, and a heightened response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin and Lyme spirochetal antigens. Thus, a major feature of the immune response during active disease seems to be a lessening of suppression, but it is not yet known whether this response plays a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. Lyme disease, a tick-borne spirochetosis [1], is associated with characteristic immune findings. Elevated serum IgM levels in patients with active erythema chronicum migrans (ECM) predict subsequent nervous system, heart, or joint involvement, and serial determinations of IgM are generally the best laboratory indicator of disease activity [2]. In addition, patients with nervous system or joint abnormalities have an increased frequency of the B-cell alloantigen, DR2 [3]. During the last three summers, from 1981 through 1983, we performed the first tests of cellular immunity in Lyme disease. We report here that active Lyme disease is often associated with lymphopenia, less spontaneous suppressor cell activity than normal,

Leonard H. Sigal; Craig M. Moffat; Allen C. Steere; John; M. Dwyer, Ph.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The extent of chronic marine oil pollution in southeastern Newfoundland waters assessed through beached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history of oil spills. In: Proceedings from the Oil Symposium on The Effects of Oil on Wildlife, Herndon female Harlequin Ducks in relation to history of contamination by the Exxon Valdez oil spill. JournalThe extent of chronic marine oil pollution in southeastern Newfoundland waters assessed through

Jones, Ian L.

247

A multi-criteria assessment of scenarios on thermal processing of infectious hospital wastes: A case study for Central Macedonia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Greece more than 14,000 tonnes of infectious hospital waste are produced yearly; a significant part of it is still mismanaged. Only one off-site licensed incineration facility for hospital wastes is in operation, with the remaining of the market covered by various hydroclave and autoclave units, whereas numerous problems are still generally encountered regarding waste segregation, collection, transportation and management, as well as often excessive entailed costs. Everyday practices still include dumping the majority of solid hospital waste into household disposal sites and landfills after sterilization, still largely without any preceding recycling and separation steps. Discussed in the present paper are the implemented and future treatment practices of infectious hospital wastes in Central Macedonia; produced quantities are reviewed, actual treatment costs are addressed critically, whereas the overall situation in Greece is discussed. Moreover, thermal treatment processes that could be applied for the treatment of infectious hospital wastes in the region are assessed via the multi-criteria decision method Analytic Hierarchy Process. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis was performed and the analysis demonstrated that a centralized autoclave or hydroclave plant near Thessaloniki is the best performing option, depending however on the selection and weighing of criteria of the multi-criteria process. Moreover the study found that a common treatment option for the treatment of all infectious hospital wastes produced in the Region of Central Macedonia, could offer cost and environmental benefits. In general the multi-criteria decision method, as well as the conclusions and remarks of this study can be used as a basis for future planning and anticipation of the needs for investments in the area of medical waste management.

Karagiannidis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papageorgiou, A., E-mail: apapa@auth.g [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Perkoulidis, G. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Sanida, G. [3rd Health Region Administration (Macedonia), 16 Aristotelous Str, GR-54623 Thessaloniki (Greece); Samaras, P. [Technological Education Institution of West Macedonia, Department of Pollution Control Technologies, 50100 Kozani (Greece)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Quarterly progress report, August 1--October 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The project objective is to design, construct, install, provide operator training and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. This unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing lower cost steam for heating and possibly cooling (absorption chiller) and operation of a steam turbine-generator for limited power generation while providing efficient destruction of both general and infectious hospital waste. The steam generated as follows: (1) Steam = 20,000 lb/hr, (2) Temperature = 353 F (saturated), (3) Pressure = 125 psig, and (4) Steam quality = {approximately}98.5%.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Chronic low-level arsenic exposure causes gender-specific alterations in locomotor activity, dopaminergic systems, and thioredoxin expression in mice  

SciTech Connect

Arsenic (As) is a toxic metalloid widely present in the environment. Human exposure to As has been associated with the development of skin and internal organ cancers and cardiovascular disorders, among other diseases. A few studies report decreases in intelligence quotient (IQ), and sensory and motor alterations after chronic As exposure in humans. On the other hand, studies of rodents exposed to high doses of As have found alterations in locomotor activity, brain neurochemistry, behavioral tasks, and oxidative stress. In the present study both male and female C57Bl/6J mice were exposed to environmentally relevant doses of As such as 0.05, 0.5, 5.0, or 50 mg As/L of drinking water for 4 months, and locomotor activity was assessed every month. Male mice presented hyperactivity in the group exposed to 0.5 mg As/L and hypoactivity in the group exposed to 50 mg As/L after 4 months of As exposure, whereas female mice exposed to 0.05, 0.5, and 5.0 mg As/L exhibited hyperactivity in every monthly test during As exposure. Furthermore, striatal and hypothalamic dopamine content was decreased only in female mice. Also decreases in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and cytosolic thioredoxin (Trx-1) mRNA expression in striatum and nucleus accumbens were observed in male and female mice, respectively. These results indicate that chronic As exposure leads to gender-dependent alterations in dopaminergic markers and spontaneous locomotor activity, and down-regulation of the antioxidant capacity of the brain.

Bardullas, U.; Limon-Pacheco, J.H.; Giordano, M. [Departamento de Neurobiologia Conductual y Cognitiva, Instituto de Neurobiologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Queretaro, Queretaro, 76230 (Mexico); Carrizales, L. [Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Av. Venustiano Carranza 2405, Col. Lomas los Filtros, San Luis Potosi, 78210, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Mendoza-Trejo, M.S. [Departamento de Neurobiologia Conductual y Cognitiva, Instituto de Neurobiologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Queretaro, Queretaro, 76230 (Mexico); Rodriguez, V.M. [Departamento de Neurobiologia Conductual y Cognitiva, Instituto de Neurobiologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Queretaro, Queretaro, 76230 (Mexico)], E-mail: vermire@yahoo.com

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Cat-scratch disease simulating lyphoma  

SciTech Connect

Cat-scratch disease is the most common cause of benign lymphadenopathy in children and young adults. Rare cases of systemic involvement with deep adenopathy with or without hepatic and/or splenic involvement have been reported. We present an unusual case of cat-scratch disease with imaging findings indistinguishable from lymphoma. Cat-scratch disease should be considered as a possible benign etiology for adenopathy with hepatic or splenic nodules in a young patient, especially if the involved nodes are tender. 5 refs., 1 fig.

Wong, T.Z.; Kruskal, J.; Kane, R.A.; Trey, G. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

REVEALING HEREDITARY DISEASES p.6 SLU GOES GLOBAL p.21  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the transmission of infectious disease to humans, particularly vectorborne diseases such as malaria and Lyme that suggest increasing rates of Borrelia burgdorferi tick infection, the pathogen associated with Lyme disease disease: effects of host diversity and community composition on Lyme disease risk. Proceedings

252

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and its association with infection among infants hospitalized in neonatal intensive care units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Many studies have evaluated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections during single hospitalizations and subsequent readmissions to the same institution. None have assessed the comprehensive burden of MRSA infection in the period after hospital discharge while accounting for healthcare utilization across institutions. Methodology/Principal Findings: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adult patients insured by Harvard Pilgrim Health Care who were newly-detected to harbor MRSA between January 1991 and December 2003 at a tertiary care medical center. We evaluated all MRSA-attributable infections associated with hospitalization in the year following new detection, regardless of hospital location. Data were collected on comorbidities, healthcare utilization, mortality and MRSA outcomes. Of 591 newly-detected MRSA carriers, 23 % were colonized and 77 % were infected upon detection. In the year following detection, 196 (33%) patients developed 317 discrete and unrelated MRSA infections. The most common infections were pneumonia (34%), soft tissue (27%), and primary bloodstream (18%) infections. Infections occurred a median of 56 days post-detection. Of all infections, 26 % involved bacteremia, and 17 % caused MRSA-attributable death. During the admission where MRSA was newly-detected, 14 % (82/576) developed subsequent infection. Of those surviving to discharge, 24 % (114/ 482) developed post-discharge infections in the year following detection. Half (99/185, 54%) of post-discharge infections caused readmission, and most (104/185, 55%) occurred over 90 days post-discharge.

Susan S. Huang; Virginia L. Hinrichsen; Rupak Datta; Laura Spurchise; Irina Miroshnik; Richard Platt

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Continuing Medical Education (CME) www.princetonhcs.org A University Hospital Affiliate of UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson Medical School  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuing Medical Education (CME) www.princetonhcs.org A University Hospital Affiliate of UMDNJ ­ Robert Wood Johnson Medical School The Office of Continuing Medical Education presents the Department shall be able to: 1. Review the history of medical marijuana advocacy and legislation in New Jersey. 2

Rowley, Clarence W.

254

The optimal approach for parameter settings based on adjustable contracting capacity for the hospital supply chain logistics system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper establishes a simulation model for the supply chain of the hospital logistic system (SCHLS) based on the dynamic Taguchi method. The model derives optimal factor level combinations in the SCHLS setting when establishing adjustable contracting ... Keywords: Genetic algorithm (GA), Neural network (NN), Supply chain (SC), Taguchi method

Hung-Chang Liao; Hsu-Hwa Chang

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Evaluation of AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital wastes. Technical report, January 1989--August 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this program is to expand the use of coal by utilizing CFB (circulating fluidized bed) technology to provide an environmentally safe method for disposing of waste materials. Hospitals are currently experiencing a waste management crisis. In many instances, they are no longer permitted to burn pathological and infectious wastes in incinerators. Older hospital incinerators are not capable of maintaining the stable temperatures and residence times necessary in order to completely destroy toxic substances before release into the atmosphere. In addition, the number of available landfills which can safely handle these substances is decreasing each year. The purpose of this project is to conduct necessary research investigating whether the combustion of the hospital wastes in a coal-fired circulating fluidized bed boiler will effectively destroy dioxins and other hazardous substances before release into the atmosphere. If this is proven feasible, in light of the quantity of hospital wastes generated each year, it would create a new market for coal -- possibly 50 million tons/year.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Employing post-DEA Cross-evaluation and Cluster Analysis in a Sample of Greek NHS Hospitals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To increase Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) discrimination of efficient Decision Making Units (DMUs), by complementing "self-evaluated" efficiencies with "peer-evaluated" cross-efficiencies and, based on these results, to classify the DMUs using cluster ... Keywords: Benchmarking, Cluster analysis, Cross-efficiency, Data envelopment analysis, Hospital

Angeliki Flokou; Nick Kontodimopoulos; Dimitris Niakas

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Penbook: bringing pen+paper interaction to a tablet device to facilitate paper-based workflows in the hospital domain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many contexts, pen and paper are the ideal option for collecting information despite the pervasiveness of mobile devices. Reasons include the unconstrained nature of sketching or handwriting, as well as the tactility of moving a pen over a paper that ... Keywords: hospital, multi-display device, pen input, projection

Christian Winkler; Julian Seifert; Christian Reinartz; Pascal Krahmer; Enrico Rukzio

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Visualizing Brain Metals in Health and Disease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visualizing Brain Metals in Health and Visualizing Brain Metals in Health and Disease figure 1 Fig. 1. Rapid-scanning x-ray fluorescence mapping ex perimental setup. Synchrotron x-rays at 11 keV passed through a 50 µm aperture (Ap). The beam intensity was monitored with a N2-filled ion chamber (I0). The brain slice was mounted vertically on a motorized stage (St) at 45° to the incident x-ray beam and raster scanned in the beam. A 13-element Ge detector (Ge) was positioned at a 90° angle to the beam. We all require iron, copper and zinc for normal brain function but metal metabolism becomes dysregulated in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Metals accumulate in Alzheimer's dementia and Parkinson's disease and are deficient in Menkes disease. Whether excess metals appear as a cause or a

259

Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation for Preventing Infectious Disease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation for Preventing Infectious Disease Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation for Preventing Infectious Disease Transmission Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: February 19, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 The transmission of tuberculosis (TB) and other infectious diseases in health-care buildings has been a recognized hazard for decades. Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) of upper room air is used as an engineering control method to prevent the spread of airborne infectious disease. Under full-scale conditions, the efficacy of UVGI for inactivating airborne bacterial spores and active cells was evaluated. A test room fitted with a modern UVGI system was used to conduct bio-aerosol inactivation experiments. UVGI efficacy can be affected by environmental factors such as relative humidity (RH), and air mixing

260

Metabolic Prosthesis for Treating Ischemic Diseases  

ORNL researchers have developed a new approach for treating ischemic diseases that will deliver oxygen directly to affected tissues by electrolysis of body fluids. Numerous treatments currently exist or have been proposed for treating ischemic ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Molecular pathogenesis of Helicobacter hepaticus induced liver disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Helicobacter hepaticus infection of A/JCr mice is a model of liver cancer resulting from chronic active inflammation. We monitored hepatic global gene expression profiles and correlated them to histological liver lesions ...

Boutin, Samuel R., 1952-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The Mediterranean Diet: A Protective Effect on Coronary Heart Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Death and Coronary Heart Disease. Cambridge, Mass:the epidemiology of coronary heart disease. JAMA. 1957;164:and long-term coronary heart disease mortality in different

Paravar, Tara

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Behavioral impulsivity and hallucinations : insights from Parkinson's disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related degenerative disease of the brain, characterized by motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms. Neurologists and neuroscientists now understand that several symptoms of the disease, ...

Ashourian, Paymon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

A Multicellular Basis for the Origination of Blast Crisis in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multicellular Basis for the Origination of Blast Crisis in Multicellular Basis for the Origination of Blast Crisis in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Philip Hahnfeldt 1 , Lynn Hlatky 1 , Rainer Sachs 2 1 Center of Cancer Systems Biology, St. Elizabeth's Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA; and 2 Department of Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley, CA Among radiation-induced cancers, some leukemias, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) have especially high excess relative risks. CML, sporadic or radiogenic, is also thought to be comparatively very well understood. Accordingly, CML is considered an important model for assessing radiogenic cancer risk. CML is characterized by a specific chromosome translocation, the BCR-ABL fusion gene, and it has been widely postulated that an advanced

265

Permanent alterations in muscarinic receptors and pupil size produced by chronic atropinization in kittens  

SciTech Connect

Chronic mydriasis was induced in six kittens (four monocular, two binocular) and two adult cats (both monocular) by the daily topical application of atropine. Both the kittens and the adult cats were atropinized for a 13-week period with the treatment regimen beginning at the time of eye opening for the kittens. Pupil size measurements, obtained 1 year after the atropinization were discontinued, revealed that, although the pupils of the adult cats were normal, the pupils of the kittens' treated eyes were consistently smaller than pupils in control eyes. The status of the muscarinic receptors in the kittens' irides was investigated using /sup 3/H-QNB binding assays. In comparison with iris muscle homogenates from the control eyes, those from the treated eyes demonstrated an eightfold increase in the number of receptor binding sites. The results indicate that pupil size can be altered permanently by chronic mydriasis initiated early in the life of a kitten and that the permanent change in pupil size may result, in part, from a type of permanent supersensitivity response in the muscle following chronic blockade of muscarinic transmission by atropine.

Smith, E.L.; Redburn, D.A.; Harwerth, R.S.; Maguire, G.W.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

SOCIAL SUPPORT: MEDIATORS AND MODERATORS OF DEPRESSION IN A SPINAL CORD INJURY SAMPLE WITH CHRONIC PAIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chronic pain and depression are frequently co-reported secondary complications following spinal cord injury (SCI) that impact multiple psychosocial domains. This study investigated the contribution of pain intensity, perceived stress, pain coping strategies, pain interference, and social support in depression and sought to identify mediator and moderator effects in the pain-depression relationship among persons with chronic SCI pain. Perceived stress, pain coping strategies, and pain interference were proposed as likely mediators of pain intensity and depression. Different types of social support were proposed as likely moderators of pain intensity and depression. The SCI sample consisted of 60 people with chronic pain who completed measures of pain intensity, perceived stress, pain coping strategies, pain interference, social support, and depression. Demographic and injury-related factors were also examined as confounding variables. Occupational status, positive reframing, behavioral disengagement, self-blame, emotional support, perceived stress, and pain interference were associated with depression, with 7% of variance in depression accounted for by occupational status, 19 % of variance in

Michael W. Wilson; J. Scott Richards; Timothy R. Elliott; Warren T. Jackson; Adrian Hal Thurstin; Rudy Vuchinich; Michael W. Wilson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Plasma Concentrations of/3-Endorphin, Adrenocorticotropic Hormone, and Cortisol in Drinking and Abstinent Chronic Alcoholics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concentrations of l~-endorphin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and cortisol in drinking and abstinent chronic alcoholics. ALCOHOL 12(6) 525-529, 1995.-Previous studies of the relationship between the endogenous opioid system and alcohol consumption have reported contradictory results. To shed light on this connection, we compared plasma concentrations of B-endorphin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and cortisol in 70 alcoholic persons after different periods of abstinence and a group of 80 control subjects. Plasma B-endorphin was decreased in alcoholics (18.61 _+ 1.38 vs. 39.31 + 3.44 pg/ml), even after more than 10 years ' abstinence. This effect may be mediated by the tetrahydroisoquinoline system, and may thus result from chronic alcohol consumption. On the other hand, lowered circulating concentrations of/3-endorphin may be a cause, rather than an effect, of alcoholism. Plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol did not differ in alcoholics and controls (19.29 ± 1.66 vs. 13.27 _+ 1.85 pg/ml for ACTH, 20.37 ~ 0.78 vs. 17.22 _ 0.64 ng/ml for cortisol), and thus appear to have no relation with chronic alcohol consumption. Adrenocorticotropic hormone Alcoholism /3-Endorphins Cortisol Tetrahydroisoquinolines THE RELATIONSHIP between alcohol consumption, abuse, and dependence, and the endogenous opioid system (EOS) has been investigated frequently (7,8,10,24,28,34). Although the findings have been contradictory, it nonetheless appears clear

J. L. Del Arbol; L J. C. Aguirre; J. Raya; J. Rico; M. E. Ruiz-requenat; M. T. Miranda

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Women and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Facts on Women and Heart Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States. In 2006, 315,930 women died from it. 1 ? Heart disease killed 26 % of the women who died in 2006—more than one in every four. 1 Although heart disease is sometimes thought of as a "man's disease, " around the same number of women and men die each year of heart disease in the United States. Unfortunately, 36 % of women did not perceive themselves to be at risk for heart disease in a 2005 survey. 2 Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women of most racial/ethnic groups in the United States, including African Americans, American Indians or Alaska Natives, Hispanics, and whites. For Asian American women, heart disease is second only to cancer. 3 In 2006, about 6.9 % of all white women, 8.8 % of black women, and 6.6 % of Mexican American women were living with coronary heart disease. 4

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Characteristics, Welfare Use and Material Hardship Among California AFDC Households with Disabled and Chronically Ill Family Members  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Families with Severely Disabled Members, 262 cases weightedA F D C Households with Disabled and Chronically 111 Familylevels. 1'he treatment o f disabled individuals in these

Meyers, Marcia k.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Improved Cognitive Function After Transcranial, Light-Emitting Diode Treatments in Chronic, Traumatic Brain Injury: Two Case Reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objective: Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases, where cognition improved following treatment with red and near-infrared light-emitting diodes (LEDs), applied transcranially to forehead and scalp areas, are ...

Naeser, Margaret A.

271

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.8 Hospitals and Medical Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Hospitals, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 89.1 25.2 3.9 13.5 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are designed to provide a consistent baseline to compare building performance in energy-use simulations. The benchmark building had 241,263 square feet and 5 floors. Benchmark interior lighting energy = 16.36 thousand Btu/SF. Interior equipment energy consumption = 15.15 thousand Btu/SF. Ventilation includes energy used by fans and heat rejection systems.

272

An indoor radon survey of the X-ray rooms of Mexico City hospitals  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of measurements of indoor radon concentrations in the X-ray rooms of a selection of hospitals in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The metropolitan area of Mexico City is Mexico's largest metropolitan area by population; the number of patients requiring the use of X-rays is also the highest. An understanding of indoor radon concentrations in X-ray rooms is necessary for the estimation of the radiological risk to which patients, radiologists and medical technicians are exposed. The indoor radon concentrations were monitored for a period of six months using nuclear track detectors (NTD) consisting of a closed-end cup system with CR-39 (Lantrack Registered-Sign ) polycarbonate as detector material. The indoor radon concentrations were found to be between 75 and 170 Bq m{sup -3}, below the USEPA-recommended indoor radon action level for working places of 400 Bq m{sup -3}. It is hoped that the results of this study will contribute to the establishment of recommended action levels by the Mexican regulatory authorities responsible for nuclear safety.

Juarez, Faustino [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000, Mexico. Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito (Mexico); Reyes, Pedro G. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000 (Mexico); Espinosa, Guillermo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D.F. Cp.04510 (Mexico)

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

273

Plague Histeria: A Historical Perspective Of The Neurological Component Of Infectious Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Jennifer A. Nields. 1994. “Lyme disease: a neuropsy-of neurolog- ical disease. Lyme disease is a very common

Arnell, Monica

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Global climate change and infectious diseases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of global climate change on infectious diseases are hypothetical until more is known about the degree of change in temperature and humidity that will occur. Diseases most likely to increase in their distribution and severity have three-factor (agent, vector, and human being) and four-factor (plus vertebrate reservoir host) ecology. Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes may move northward and have more rapid metamorphosis with global warming. These mosquitoes transmit dengue virus, and Aedes aegypti transmits yellow fever virus. The faster metamorphosis and a shorter extrinsic incubation of dengue and yellow fever viruses could lead to epidemics in North America. Vibrio cholera is harbored persistently in the estuaries of the U.S. Gulf Coast. Over the past 200 years, cholera has become pandemic seven times with spread from Asia to Europe, Africa, and North America. Global warming may lead to changes in water ecology that could enhance similar spread of cholera in North America. Some other infectious diseases such as LaCrosse encephalitis and Lyme disease are caused by agents closely dependent on the integrity of their environment. These diseases may become less prominent with global warming because of anticipated modification of their habitats. Ecological studies will help as to understand more fully the possible consequences of global warming. New and more effective methods for control of vectors will be needed. 12 refs., 1 tab.

Shope, R. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

THE PATHOGENESIS OF ALEUTIAN DISEASE OF MINK I. IN VlVO VIRAL REPLICATION AND THE HOST ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aleutian disease (AD) is a common chronic virus disease of mink, which may cause serious economic losses to commercial ranchers. The most consistent and striking feature of AD is that once a mink has been infected with Aleutian disease virus (ADV), infectious virus may be recovered from the serum, organs, and urine for the remainder of the animal's life (1-4). ADV in the serum of such mink has been shown to exist as an infectious virus-antibody complex (5). The primary lesion of AD is a systemic proliferation of plasma cells. A marked hypergammaglobulinemia, which may change into a monoclonal gammopathy, is secondary to the plasma cell proliferation (6-8). Glomerulonephritis, degenerative arterial lesions, and proliferation of intrahepatic bile ducts are frequently seen in AD (9-11). The markedly increased gamma globulin in AD is the result of overproduction, and has been found to have some degree of specificity (7, 12, 13). However, except for the infectious complexes, antibody to ADV antigens has not been previously demonstrated. The present study was undertaken to define the early and late stages of

Vmal Antigen; Austin E. Larsen; Helen G. Porter

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Neural networks for longitudinal studies in Alzheimer's disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: Alzheimer's disease affects a growing population of elderly people today. The predictions about the course of the disease is a key component of health care decision making for patients with Alzheimer's. The physician's prognosis and predicted ... Keywords: Disease course, Longitudinal, Misclassification, Mixed effects, Neurodegenerative diseases, Prognosis, Random effects

Reeti Tandon; Sudeshna Adak; Jeffrey A. Kaye

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A Computational Model of Mitigating Disease Spread in Spatial Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the problem of disease spreading and containment in spatial networks, where the computational model is capable of detecting disease progression to initiate processes mitigating infection spreads. This paper focuses on disease spread ... Keywords: Computational Epidemiology, Computer Viruses, Disease Progression, Forest Fires, Spatial Networks

Taehyong Kim; Kang Li; Aidong Zhang; Surajit Sen; Murali Ramanathan

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Review Lyme disease and current aspects of immunization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lyme disease is a tick-borne multisystem disease that affects primarily the skin, nervous system, heart and joints. At least three species of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, namely Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia garinii, and Borrelia afzelii, can cause the disease. This review will focus mainly on the pathophysiology of Lyme arthritis, the long-term outcome of Lyme disease, and the recently licensed vaccine against Lyme disease.

Thomas Kamradt

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Chemicals for Plant Disease Control at Home  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication helps retailers and consumers identify products that control plant diseases. To clear up confusion about the names of the chemicals, the publication cross-references their common names with their chemical terms. It also lists the products commonly available in Texas retail stores and the companies that sell fungicides in small packages for homeowners.

Ong, Kevin

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

Gallium-positive Lyme disease myocarditis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the course of a work-up for fever of unknown origin associated with intermittent arrhythmias, a gallium scan was performed which revealed diffuse myocardial uptake. The diagnosis of Lyme disease myocarditis subsequently was confirmed by serologic titers. One month following recovery from the acute illness, the abnormal myocardial uptake completely resolved.

Alpert, L.I.; Welch, P.; Fisher, N.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Lyme disease in an experimental mouse model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research was directed at developing a murine model for the investigation of Lyme disease. This study sought to define the route of inoculation necessary to establish infection or disease in susceptible C3H/HeJ mice and also, to determine the virulence of four Borrelia burgdorferi isolates. Further, the influence of MHC Class I and Class 11 genes of the mouse H-2 complex on the susceptibility and/or resistance to Lyme disease was studied. This thesis demonstrates the development of multisysternic infection in the mouse model, namely, dermatological, cardiac, and arthritic lesions in C3HJHeJ mouse. It also demonstrates the involvement of Class I genes (K and D regions) and Class 11 genes (I-A and I-E regions) of the mouse H-2 complex on the quantitative antibody titers. This was achieved by using genetically stable B IO congenic and recombinant strains. The data presented in this thesis strongly supports use of C3HJHeJ and BIO congenic and recombinant strains as potential laboratory animal models for Lyme disease research.

Reddy, Sunitha

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Treatment of Anthrax Disease Frequently Asked Questions  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a summary of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on the treatment of anthrax disease caused by a wide-area release of Bacillus anthracis spores as an act bioterrorism. These FAQs are intended to provide the public health and medical community, as well as others, with guidance and communications to support the response and long-term recovery from an anthrax event.

Judd, Kathleen S.; Young, Joan E.; Lesperance, Ann M.; Malone, John D.

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

283

STUDY OF A CASE OF CHRONIC PROFESSIONAL IRRADIATION. PROVISIONAL DETERMINATION OF THE EFFECTS OF THIS IRRADIATION  

SciTech Connect

The case of a chemist submitted to professional chronic irradiation, in the absence of a physical check doses received, was studied to estimate the deleterious effects of this irradiation on the patient and his descent. No connection was found between the observed symptoms and this irradiation. The health of the patient did not seem to be affected in any important way. The only objective symptom, a depression of the spermatogenesis, was followed by spectacular recuperation. In the absence of objective symptoms, it is felt that there is no reason to fear genetic consequences neither for the patient nor for his offspring. (auth)

Minet, P.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 5. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii for September 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presented are the data accumulated during September 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Information technology to support improved care for chronic illness. Journal of general internal medicine, 22 Suppl 3(0):425– 430  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BACKGROUND: In populations with chronic illness, outcomes improve with the use of care models that integrate clinical information, evidence-based treatments, and proactive management of care. Health information technology is believed to be critical for efficient implementation of these chronic care models. Health care organizations have implemented information technologies, such as electronic medical records, to varying degrees. However, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the relative impact of specific informatics technologies on chronic illness care. OBJECTIVE: To summarize knowledge and increase expert consensus regarding informatics components that support improvement in chronic illness care. Design: A systematic review of the literature was performed. “Use

Er S. Young; Edmund Chaney; Rebecca Shoai; Mary K. Goldstein

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Network Influences on Chronic Illness Care in Large Physician Organizations: A study of the California managed care network in 2001 and 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Behavior and Organizational Studies in Health Care:Building organizational capacity: A cornerstone of healthhealth system performance for chronic illness care requires increasing organizational

McCurdy, Rodney Keith

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.8 Hospitals and Medical Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Hospitals, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 34.6 40.7 88.9 85.4 1.8 1.8 20.0 21.0 Houston 2A 42.1 48.0 89.5 86.9 2.2 2.1 19.6 20.8 Phoenix 2B 42.2 48.6 82.1 80.2 2.0 1.9 20.7 21.9 Atlanta 3A 45.8 53.9 83.7 82.1 2.5 2.5 19.0 20.6 Los Angeles 3B 45.4 46.9 75.4 71.0 2.5 2.4 18.5 18.8 Las Vegas 3B 40.9 48.0 69.5 69.0 2.2 2.2 18.5 21.2 San Francisco 3C 49.2 52.8 66.5 64.1 2.8 2.7 17.1 18.0 Baltimore 4A 49.0 60.3 79.8 79.7 2.8 2.7 18.2 19.8 Albuquerque 4B 36.2 42.6 56.1 55.4 2.8 2.7 18.7 20.1 Seattle 4C 50.5 61.2 65.4 64.6 3.0 2.9 17.5 18.6 Chicago 5A 52.5 55.9 67.3 64.0 3.1 3.0 17.8 18.0 Boulder 5B 39.1 41.1 52.6 50.1 3.0 3.0 18.1 18.2 Minneapolis 6A 55.7 60.5 59.7 56.9 3.3 3.2 17.3 17.5 Helena 6B 45.5 49.4 48.4 46.0 3.3 3.2 17.3 17.4 Duluth 7 59.8 64.0 50.6 47.2 3.6 3.5 16.9 16.5 Fairbanks 8 86.9 91.1

288

Development and evaluation of an implantable chronic DC stimulation and measurement probe for nerve regeneration studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The beneficial effects of chronic DC electrical stimulation upon peripheral nervous system (PNS) regeneration of injured nerve has been adequately confirmed, yet few attempts have been made to quantify the relevant stimulus parameter. The localized electric field strength and current densities produced by the injection of electrical current through inhomogenous structures in the region of the nerve are the acknowledged parameter of interest. However, because of the difficulties inherent in measuring these values, researchers have previously chosen to characterize stimulus in terms of raw current supplied to nerve injuries. Attempts to quantify field strength or current densities in vivo were based on assumptions which idealize the conductive media as being isotropic. The actual field strength or current density induced by the applied current is seldom directly measured in-vivo. This research seeks to evaluate the design of an implantable DC stimulator capable of delivering a constant, stable and measurable electrical stimulus across a defined region of nerve, and for the purpose of measuring the bulk tissue resistivity and electrical field strength in the defined region in a chronic regime. From this information, current density within the region can be measured and controlled, providing a stimulation parameter which can be correlated to nerve regeneration. Such a probe will prove very useful in ongoing research which evaluates the effects of applied electrical fields upon nerve regeneration.

Macha, Douglas Bryan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Quarterly progress report, November 1, 1994--January 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project objective is to design, construct, install, and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon, Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. The unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing inexpensive and efficient destruction of both general and infectious medical waste and steam generation. Progress to date on several tasks is described. These are: Task 1.A-1.D, Design; Equipment purchase and fabrication; Installation; and Shredder system verification. Other tasks to be undertaken are: Start-up; Obtaining permits; Procuring coal, limestone and ash disposal contracts; and Conducting on-year test program. Project costs are enumerated.

Stuart, J.M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Women and Heart Disease: Neglected Directions for Future Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

009-9110-0 Women and Heart Disease: Neglected Directions forage 65, women have less heart disease than men. For many1980s showed a lower risk of heart attacks in postmenopausal

Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Characterization of a Drosophila model of Huntington's disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurological disorder caused by a polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat expansion in the huntingtin (Htt) protein. The disease is characterized by neurodegeneration and formation ...

Lee, Wyan-Ching Mimi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation book has four main focuses and sections. Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats divis

293

Infectious Disease Modeling of Social Contagion in Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many behavioral phenomena have been found to spread interpersonally through social networks, in a manner similar to infectious diseases. An important difference between social contagion and traditional infectious diseases, ...

Hill, Alison Lynn

294

Increase in Diarrheal Disease Associated with Arsenic Mitigation in Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Kosek M, Bern C, Guerrant RL (2003) The global burden of diarrhoeal disease, as estimated from studies

van Geen, Alexander

295

Review: A review of advanced techniques for detecting plant diseases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diseases in plants cause major production and economic losses in agricultural industry worldwide. Monitoring of health and detection of diseases in plants and trees is critical for sustainable agriculture. To the best of our knowledge, there is no sensor ... Keywords: GC-MS, Imaging techniques, Plant diseases, Spectroscopy, Volatile profiling

Sindhuja Sankaran; Ashish Mishra; Reza Ehsani; Cristina Davis

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Cluster analysis of genome-wide expression differences in disease-unaffected ileal mucosa in inflammatory bowel diseases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whole human genome (Agilent) expression profiling was conducted on disease-unaffected ileal RNA collected from the proximal margin of resected ileum from 47 ileal Crohn's disease (CD), 27 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 25 control patients without inflammatory ...

Tianyi Zhang; Robert A. DeSimone; Hongyan Chen; Christina M. Hamm; Jeffrey Yuan; Qing Qing Gong; Steven R. Hunt; Themistocles Dassopoulos; Rodney D. Newberry; Daniel N. Frank; Charles E. Robertson; Norman R. Pace; Erica Sodergren; George Weinstock; Xiangmin Jiao; Wei Zhu; Ellen Li

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 7 Dietary Fatty Acids in Cardiovascular Disease in Women  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 7 Dietary Fatty Acids in Cardiovascular Disease in Women Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

298

Stability Analysis of a Simplified Yet Complete Model for Chronic Myelegenous Leukemia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the asymptotic behavior of a partial differential equation (PDE) model for hematopoiesis. This PDE model is derived from the original agent-based model formulated by (Roeder et al., Nat. Med., 2006), and it describes the progression of blood cell development from the stem cell to the terminally differentiated state. To conduct our analysis, we start with the PDE model of (Kim et al, JTB, 2007), which coincides very well with the simulation results obtained by Roeder et al. We simplify the PDE model to make it amenable to analysis and justify our approximations using numerical simulations. An analysis of the simplified PDE model proves to exhibit very similar properties to those of the original agent-based model, even if for slightly different parameters. Hence, the simplified model is of value in understanding the dynamics of hematopoiesis and of chronic myelogenous leukemia, and it presents the advantage of having fewer parameters, which makes comparison with both experimental data and alternative...

Jauffret, Marie Doumic; Perthame, Benoît

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Quarterly progress report, May 1--July 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The project objective is to design, construct, install, provide operator training and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon, Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. This unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing lower cost steam for heating and possibly cooling (absorption chiller) and operation of a steam turbine-generator for limited power generation. This would permit full capacity operation of the FBC year round in spite of the VA laundry that was shut down as well as efficient destruction of both general and infectious hospital waste and steam generation. On February 3, 1995 Donlee notified Lebanon VA and DOE-METC that additional funding would be required to complete the project. This funding, in the amount of $1,140,127, is needed to complete the facility, start-up and shakedown the facility, perform the test program and write the final report. After review DOE-METC approved funding in the amount of $1,246,019 to be available August 1, 1995. This report describes each task of the project and its status.

Stuart, J.M.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

Urinary trichloroacetic acid levels and semen quality: A hospital-based cross-sectional study in Wuhan, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Toxicological studies indicate an association between exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) and impaired male reproductive health in animals. However, epidemiological evidence in humans is still limited. We conducted a hospital-based cross-sectional study to investigate the effect of exposure to DBPs on semen quality in humans. Between May 2008 and July 2008, we recruited 418 male partners in sub-fertile couples seeking infertility medical instruction or assisted reproduction services from the Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China. Major semen parameters analyzed included sperm concentration, motility, and morphology. Exposure to DBPs was estimated by their urinary creatinine-adjusted trichloroacetic (TCAA) concentrations that were measured with the gas chromatography/electron capture detection method. We used linear regression to assess the relationship between exposure to DBPs and semen quality. According to the World Health Organization criteria (health in Chinese populations still warrants further investigations. - Research highlights: {yields} No association between DBPs exposure and semen quality was found. {yields} Effects of DBPs exposure on male reproductive health need further investigations. {yields} Intra-individual variability of urinary TCAA should be considered in the future.

Xie, Shao-Hua [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No. 13 Hangkong Road, 430030 Wuhan (China) [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No. 13 Hangkong Road, 430030 Wuhan (China); The Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Li, Yu-Feng [Reproductive Medicine Center, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)] [Reproductive Medicine Center, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Tan, Yin-Feng [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No. 13 Hangkong Road, 430030 Wuhan (China) [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No. 13 Hangkong Road, 430030 Wuhan (China); The Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Zheng, Dan [The Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China) [The Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Institute of Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Liu, Ai-Lin; Xie, Hong [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No. 13 Hangkong Road, 430030 Wuhan (China) [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No. 13 Hangkong Road, 430030 Wuhan (China); The Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); and others

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Analysis of Dose Response for Circulatory Disease After Radiotherapy for Benign Disease  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the shape of the dose-response for various circulatory disease endpoints, and modifiers by age and time since exposure. Methods and Materials: This was an analysis of the US peptic ulcer data testing for heterogeneity of radiogenic risk by circulatory disease endpoint (ischemic heart, cerebrovascular, other circulatory disease). Results: There were significant excess risks for all circulatory disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.082 (95% CI 0.031-0.140), and ischemic heart disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.102 (95% CI 0.039-0.174) (both p = 0.01), and indications of excess risk for stroke. There were no statistically significant (p > 0.2) differences between risks by endpoint, and few indications of curvature in the dose-response. There were significant (p < 0.001) modifications of relative risk by time since exposure, the magnitude of which did not vary between endpoints (p > 0.2). Risk modifications were similar if analysis was restricted to patients receiving radiation, although the relative risks were slightly larger and the risk of stroke failed to be significant. The slopes of the dose-response were generally consistent with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in occupationally and medically exposed groups. Conclusions: There were excess risks for a variety of circulatory diseases in this dataset, with significant modification of risk by time since exposure. The consistency of the dose-response slopes with those observed in radiotherapeutically treated groups at much higher dose, as well as in lower dose-exposed cohorts such as the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and nuclear workers, implies that there may be little sparing effect of fractionation of dose or low-dose-rate exposure.

Little, Mark P., E-mail: mark.little@nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Kleinerman, Ruth A. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mabuchi, Kiyohiko [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Osseous Biopsy in Children With Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report the safety and diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MRI)-guided core biopsy of osseous lesions in children with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) that were visible on MRI but were occult on radiography and computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of MRI-guided osseous biopsy performed in seven children (four girls and three boys; mean age 13 years (range 11 to 14) with CRMO was performed. Indication for using MRI guidance was visibility of lesions by MRI only. MRI-guided procedures were performed with 0.2-Tesla (Magnetom Concerto; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany; n = 5) or 1.5-T (Magnetom Espree; Siemens; n = 2) open MRI systems. Core needle biopsy was obtained using an MRI-compatible 4-mm drill system. Conscious sedation or general anesthesia was used. Parameters evaluated were lesion visibility, technical success, procedure time, complications and microbiology, cytology, and histopathology findings. Results: Seven of seven (100%) targeted lesions were successfully visualized and sampled. All obtained specimens were sufficient for histopathological analysis. Length of time of the procedures was 77 min (range 64 to 107). No complications occurred. Histopathology showed no evidence of malignancy, which was confirmed at mean follow-up of 50 months (range 28 to 78). Chronic nonspecific inflammation characteristic for CRMO was present in four of seven (58%) patients, and edema with no inflammatory cells was found in three of seven (42%) patients. There was no evidence of infection in any patient. Conclusion: MRI-guided osseous biopsy is a safe and accurate technique for the diagnosis of pediatric CRMO lesions that are visible on MRI only.

Fritz, Jan, E-mail: jfritz9@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Tzaribachev, Nikolay [University Children's Hospital, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology (Germany); Thomas, Christoph [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Wehrmann, Manfred [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Pathology (Germany); Horger, Marius S. [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Carrino, John A. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Koenig, Claudius W.; Pereira, Philippe L. [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

An ontology-based personalization of health-care knowledge to support clinical decisions for chronically ill patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chronically ill patients are complex health care cases that require the coordinated interaction of multiple professionals. A correct intervention of these sort of patients entails the accurate analysis of the conditions of each concrete patient and the ... Keywords: Health care personalization, Medical decision support systems, Ontologies

David RiañO; Francis Real; Joan Albert LóPez-Vallverdú; Fabio Campana; Sara Ercolani; Patrizia Mecocci; Roberta Annicchiarico; Carlo Caltagirone

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Smoking and Ischemic Heart Disease Disparities Between Studies, Genders, Times, and Socioeconomic Strata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

predictors of coronary heart disease among women. Americanon the risk for coronary heart disease even stronger thanx Smoking and Ischemic Heart Disease Disparities Between

Leistikow, Bruce N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

NREL Technical Reports Guide the Way to 50% Energy Savings in Hospitals, Office Buildings (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

existing technologies, designers and operators of large existing technologies, designers and operators of large buildings could slash national energy use across a broad range of climates. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed two technical reports that provide recommendations to help designers and opera- tors of large office buildings and hospitals achieve at least a 50% energy savings using existing technology. Strategies for 50% Energy Savings in Large Office Buildings found that a 50% energy savings can be realized in both low- and high-rise office buildings in a broad range of U.S. climates. Large Hospital 50% Energy Savings details how energy savings from 50.6% to 61.3% can be attained in large hospitals across all eight U.S. climate zones. To reach these energy efficiency

306

Social media marketing in the hospitality industry: The role of benefits in increasing brand community participation and the impact of participation on consumer trust and commitment toward hotel and restaurant brands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Online community is an effective tool for building the relationship with consumers. Many hospitality firms (i.e., hotels and restaurants) have utilized online communities a new… (more)

Kang, Juhee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Acute and chronic toxicity of uranium compounds to Ceriodaphnia-Daphnia dubia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study to determine the acute and chronic toxicity of uranyl nitrate, hydrogen uranyl phosphate, and uranium dioxide to the organism Ceriodaphnia dubia was conducted. The toxicity tests were conducted by two independent environmental consulting laboratories. Part of the emphasis for this determination was based on concerns expressed by SCDHEC, which was concerned that a safety factor of 100 must be applied to the previous 1986 acute toxicity result of 0.22 mg/L for Daphnia pulex, This would have resulted in the LETF release limits being based on an instream concentration of 0.0022 mg/L uranium. The NPDES Permit renewal application to SCDHEC utilized the results of this study and recommended that the LETF release limit for uranium be based an instream concentration of 0.004 mg/L uranium. This is based on the fact that the uranium releases from the M-Area LETF will be in the hydrogen uranyl phosphate form, or a uranyl phosphate complex at the pH (6--10) of the Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility effluent stream, and at the pH of the receiving stream (5.5 to 7.0). Based on the chronic toxicity of hydrogen uranyl phosphate, a lower uranium concentration limit for the Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility outfall vs. the existing NPDES permit was recommended: The current NPDES permit ``Guideline`` for uranium at outfall M-004 is 0.500 mg/L average and 1.0 mg/L maximum, at a design flowrate of 60 gpm. It was recommended that the uranium concentration at the M-004 outfall be reduced to 0.28 mg/L average, and 0.56 mg/L, maximum, and to reduce the design flowrate to 30 gpm. The 0.28 mg/L concentration will provide an instream concentration of 0.004 mg/L uranium. The 0.28 mg/L concentration at M-004 is based on the combined flows from A-014, A-015, and A-011 outfalls (since 1985) of 1840 gpm (2.65 MGD) and was the flow rate which was utilized in the 1988 NPDES permit renewal application.

Pickett, J.B.; Specht, W.L.; Keyes, J.L.

1993-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

What Connects Rat Tails to Cancer and Heart Disease?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What Connects Rat Tails to Cancer and Heart Disease? Collagen is the main (and most abundant) protein in all mammalian connective tissues, including those of the heart, lungs,...

309

Optimization Methods for Disease Prevention and Epidemic Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 29, 2013 ... Abstract: This paper investigates problems of disease prevention and epidemic control (DPEC), in which we optimize two sets of decisions: (i) ...

310

The political economy of health: death, disease and distribution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Death and disease exact a heavy toll on citizens in democracies. In response, citizens expect elected politicians to alleviate their suffering by providing public health… (more)

Meserve, Stephen A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Genomics of emerging infectious disease: A PLoS collection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Origins and evolutionary genomics of the 2009 swine-originan Infectious Diseases Genomics Project predict and preventRavel J (2009) The role of genomics in the identification,

Eisen, Jonathan A; MacCallum, Catriona J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

High-Resolution Serum Proteomic Profiling of Alzheimer Disease Samples Reveals Disease- Specific, Carrier-Protein–Bound Mass Signatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Researchers typically search for disease markers using a “targeted ” approach in which a hypothesis about the disease mechanism is tested and experimental results either confirm or disprove the involvement of a particular gene or protein in the disease. Recently, there has been interest in developing disease diagnostics based on unbiased quantification of differences in global patterns of protein and peptide masses, typically in blood from individuals with and without disease. We combined a suite of methods and technologies, including novel sample preparation based on carrier-protein capture and biomarker enrichment, highresolution mass spectrometry, a unique cohort of wellcharacterized persons with and without Alzheimer disease (AD), and powerful bioinformatic analysis, that add statistical and procedural robustness to biomarker discovery from blood. Methods: Carrier-protein–bound peptides were isolated from serum samples by affinity chromatography, and peptide mass spectra were acquired by a matrixassisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) orthogo-

Mary F. Lopez; Alvydas Mikulskis; Scott Kuzdzal; David A. Bennett; Jeremiah Kelly; Eva Golenko; Joseph Dicesare; Eric Denoyer; Wayne F. Patton; Richard Ediger; Tillmann Ziegert; Christopher Lynch; Susan Kramer; Gordon R. Whiteley; Michael R. Wall; David P. Mannion; John S. Rakitan; Gershon M. Wolfe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Implementing Scanned Medical Record Systems in Australia: A Structured Case Study on Envisioned Changes to Elective Admissions Process in a Victorian Hospital  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, influenced by the pervasive power of technology, standards and mandates, Australian hospitals have begun exploring digital forms of keeping this record. The main rationale is the ease of accessing different data sources at the same time ... Keywords: Australia, Change Management, Elective Admission Process, Electronic Health Records, Process Redesign, Scanned Medical Records, Victoria

Elise McAuley, Chandana Unnithan, Sofie Karamzalis

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Demonstration of Meaningful Use and Data Collection Hospital-based Eligible Professionals P a g e | 3Interaction with Other Programs—e-Prescribing References  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modification or addition to CMS in accordance with the discussion in II.A.2.c. of this proposed rule. EP/Eligible Hospital Objective: Protect electronic health information maintained using certified EHR technology through the implementation of appropriate technical capabilities. EP/Eligible Hospital Measure: Conduct or review a security risk analysis in accordance with the requirements under 45 CFR 164.308(a)(1) and implement security updates as necessary. The capability to protect electronic health information maintained using certified EHR technology is included in the certification standards for certified EHR technology (to be defined by ONC in its upcoming interim final rule). Meaningful use seeks to ensure that those capabilities are utilized. While certified EHR technology provides tools for protecting health information, it is not a full protection solution. Processes and possibly tools outside the scope of certified EHR technology are required. Therefore, for the Stage 1 criteria of meaningful use we propose that EPs and eligible hospitals conduct or review a security risk analysis of certified EHR technology and implement updates as necessary at least once prior to the end of the EHR reporting period and attest to that conduct or review. The testing could occur prior to the beginning of the EHR reporting period. This is to ensure that the certified EHR technology is playing its role in the overall strategy of the EP or eligible hospital in protecting health information. TABLE 2—STAGE 1

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Simulation and optimization of the pre-hospital care system of the National University of Mexico using travelling salesman problem algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid methodology was developed in this project, using optimization and simulation techniques to analyze efficiency in a pre-hospital healthcare system offered by Emergency Medical Technicians (TUMs) or paramedics. This healthcare is offered in the ... Keywords: optimization, prehospital service, shorthest route, travelling salesman problem

Esther Segura Pérez; Luis Altamirano Yepez; Idalia Flores de la Mota

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Upregulation of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptors in Dopamine D2 Receptor Knockout Mice Is Reversed by Chronic Forced Ethanol Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The anatomical proximity of the cannabinoid type 1 (CNR1/CB1R) and the dopamine D2 receptors (DRD2), their ability to form CB1R-DRD2 heteromers, their opposing roles in locomotion, and their involvement in ethanol's reinforcing and addictive properties prompted us to study the levels and distribution of CB1R after chronic ethanol intake, in the presence and absence of DRD2. We monitored the drinking patterns and locomotor activity of Drd2+/+ and Drd2-/- mice consuming either water or a 20% (v/v) ethanol solution (forced ethanol intake) for 6 months and used the selective CB1 receptor antagonist [{sup 3}H]SR141716A to quantify CB1R levels in different brain regions with in vitro receptor autoradiography. We found that the lack of DRD2 leads to a marked upregulation (approximately 2-fold increase) of CB1R in the cerebral cortex, the caudate-putamen, and the nucleus accumbens, which was reversed by chronic ethanol intake. The results suggest that DRD2-mediated dopaminergic neurotransmission and chronic ethanol intake exert an inhibitory effect on cannabinoid receptor expression in cortical and striatal regions implicated in the reinforcing and addictive properties of ethanol.

Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K.; Gopez, V.; Delis, F.; Michaelides, M.; Grand, D.K.; Wang, G.-J.; Kunos, G.; Volkow, N.D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Wardropper, J. (2006) "Hospitals Built by the Owners of Industry, For Their Workers, in Great Britain 1840-1950". Rosetta 1: 22-30 http://www.rosetta.bham.ac.uk/Issue_01/Wardropper.htm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the work force. Hospitals identified, in Great Britain, were associated with mineral mining; the coal from the Company coal mines, brick works and foundry, and their injuries included crushed hands industry. It was found that the following industries often had hospitals for their workers: mining, civil

Miall, Chris

318

A hybrid tele-diagnosis system on fish disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish disease diagnosis is a complicated process and requires high level of expertise, an expert system for fish disease diagnosis is considered as an effective tool to help fish farmers. However, many farmers have no computers and are not able to access ... Keywords: call centre, expert system, group decision support system, machine learning

Daoliang Li; Wei Zhu; Zetian Fu

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Computational intelligence techniques: a study of scleroderma skin disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of microarray gene expression data from patients with and without scleroderma skin disease using computational intelligence and visual data mining techniques. Virtual reality spaces are used for providing unsupervised ... Keywords: Scleroderma disease, clustering, differential evolution, genetic programming, genomics, grid computing, hybrid evolutionary-classical optimization, particle swarm optimization, rough sets, similarity structure preservation, virtual reality spaces, visual data mining

Julio J. Valdes; Alan J. Barton

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

DISEASE SUPPRESSION WITH COMPOST: HISTORY, PRINCIPLES AND FUTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composts have been used for centuries to maintain soil fertility and plant health. Even so, the mechanisms by which diseases are controlled by composts are just now being elucidated. This paper reviews the recent history on control of plant diseases with composts. Furthermore, the present state of knowledge in this field is reviewed. Finally, potential future opportunities for

Harry A. J. Hoitink; Professor Emeritus; Ligia Zuniga De Ramos; Senior Fullbright

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Computer aided diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease using component based SVM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder first affecting memory functions and then gradually affecting all cognitive functions with behavioural impairments and eventually causing death. Functional brain imaging as ... Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Computer aided diagnosis, Single photon emission computed tomography, Support vector machines

I. A. Illán; J. M. Górriz; M. M. López; J. Ramírez; D. Salas-Gonzalez; F. Segovia; R. Chaves; C. G. Puntonet

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Do changes in traditional coronary heart disease risk factors over time explain the association between socio-economic status and coronary heart disease?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

case-control study. Heart 2009, Franks P, Tancredi DJ,status in coronary heart disease risk estimation. Ann Famstatus and coronary heart disease risk prediction. JAMA

Franks, Peter; Winters, Paul C; Tancredi, Daniel J; Fiscella, Kevin A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Proteins' Amazing Origami Powers: Insight for Potential Disease Treatments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proteins' Amazing Origami Powers: Insight for Potential Disease Proteins' Amazing Origami Powers: Insight for Potential Disease Treatments Proteins' Amazing Origami Powers: Insight for Potential Disease Treatments October 4, 2011 - 12:46pm Addthis This is a visualization of drug molecules ("parade day-like balloons") in a simulated attack of the ribbon-like protein fibrils that are believed to be the cause of Alzheimer’s disease. Click here to see more amazing supercomputer simulations. | Image courtesy of ORNL. This is a visualization of drug molecules ("parade day-like balloons") in a simulated attack of the ribbon-like protein fibrils that are believed to be the cause of Alzheimer's disease. Click here to see more amazing

324

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of chronic exposure results with the MACCS reactor accident consequence model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the chronic exposure pathways associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 75 imprecisely known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: crop growing season dose, crop long-term dose, water ingestion dose, milk growing season dose, long-term groundshine dose, long-term inhalation dose, total food pathways dose, total ingestion pathways dose, total long-term pathways dose, total latent cancer fatalities, area-dependent cost, crop disposal cost, milk disposal cost, population-dependent cost, total economic cost, condemnation area, condemnation population, crop disposal area and milk disposal area. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: dry deposition velocity, transfer of cesium from animal feed to milk, transfer of cesium from animal feed to meat, ground concentration of Cs-134 at which the disposal of milk products will be initiated, transfer of Sr-90 from soil to legumes, maximum allowable ground concentration of Sr-90 for production of crops, fraction of cesium entering surface water that is consumed in drinking water, groundshine shielding factor, scale factor defining resuspension, dose reduction associated with decontamination, and ground concentration of 1-131 at which disposal of crops will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season.

Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Johnson, J.D.; Rollstin, J.A. [Gram, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shiver, A.W.; Sprung, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

The effects of chronic nitrogen fertilization on alpine tundra soil microbial communities: implications for carbon and nitrogen cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many studies have shown that changes in nitrogen (N) availability affect primary productivity in a variety of terrestrial systems, but less is known about the effects of the changing N cycle on soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition. We used a variety of techniques to examine the effects of chronic N amendments on SOM chemistry and microbial community structure and function in an alpine tundra soil. We collected surface soil (0-5 cm) samples from five control and five long-term N-amended plots established and maintained at the Niwot Ridge Long-term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Samples were bulked by treatment and all analyses were conducted on composite samples. The fungal community shifted in response to N amendments, with a decrease in the relative abundance of basidiomycetes. Bacterial community composition also shifted in the fertilized soil, with increases in the relative abundance of sequences related to the Bacteroidetes and Gemmatimonadetes, and decreases in the relative abundance of the Verrucomicrobia. We did not uncover any bacterial sequences that were closely related to known nitrifiers in either soil, but sequences related to archaeal nitrifiers were found in control soils. The ratio of fungi to bacteria did not change in the N-amended soils, but the ratio of archaea to bacteria dropped from 20% to less than 1% in the N-amended plots. Comparisons of aliphatic and aromatic carbon compounds, two broad categories of soil carbon compounds, revealed no between treatment differences. However, G-lignins were found in higher relative abundance in the fertilized soils, while proteins were detected in lower relative abundance. Finally, the activities of two soil enzymes involved in N cycling changed in response to chronic N amendments. These results suggest that chronic N fertilization induces significant shifts in soil carbon dynamics that correspond to shifts in microbial community structure and function.

Nemergut, Diana R [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Townsend, Alan R [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Taylor, John [University of California, Berkeley; Sattin, Sarah R [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Freeman, Kristen R [University of Colorado, Boulder; Fierer, Noah [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Neff, Jason [University of Colorado, Boulder; Bowman, William D [University of Colorado, Boulder; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Weintraub, Michael N [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Schmidt, Steven K. [University of Colorado

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The functional status and well being of people with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome and their carers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access The functional status and well being of people with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome and their carers Luis C Nacul1,2*, Eliana M Lacerda1, Peter Campion3, Derek Pheby4, Maria de L Drachler5, José C... :61-84. 11. Ware JE Jr, Kosinski M, Bjorner JB, Turner-Bowker DM, Gandek B, Maruish ME: User’s manual for the SF-36v2™ health survey Lincoln: QualityMetric Incorporated; 2007. 12. Buchwald D, Pearlman T, Umali J, Schmaling K, Katon W: Functional status...

Nacul, Luis C; Lacerda, Eliana M; Campion, Peter; Pheby, Derek; Drachler, Maria de L; Leite, Jose C; Poland, Fiona; Howe, Amanda; Fayyaz, Shagufta; Molokhia, Mariam

2011-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

327

Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms Los Alamos researchers demonstrated improved technical methods capable of directly counting small RNA molecules in pathogenic (disease-causing) bacteria. June 17, 2013 Artist's concept of the fluorescence labeling and detection of small RNA in pathogenic bacteria. Artist's concept of the fluorescence labeling and detection of small RNA in pathogenic bacteria. The new technique reduced the number of false positives, which improved the accuracy of the count statistics, and it significantly reduced the image processing time. Small molecules of RNA (tens to hundreds of nucleotides in length) play a key regulatory role in bacteria. Due to their small size, directly

328

Retinal Diseases: Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retinal Diseases: Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa Retinal Diseases: Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is an eye disease primarily affecting the central vision regions in people age 60 and older. According to the Macular Degeneration Research Fund, a case of AMD is diagnosed in the United States every 3 minutes. Each year, 1.2 million of the estimated 12 million people with AMD will suffer severe vision loss. Patients with AMD have dark areas in their vision caused by fluid leakage or bleeding in the macula, the center of the retina that produces the sharpest vision. The brain initially compensates for these dark patches. Early cellular dysfunction or spotting in the macula may go undetected until the disease is in advanced stages.

329

Medicating race : heart disease and durable preoccupations with difference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation is an examination of intersections of race, pharmaceuticals, and heart disease over the course of the 20th century and today. Each of these parts has had a dynamic history, and when they are invoked ...

Pollock, Anne, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Indoor CO2 and Communicable Disease Transmission in Offices and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor CO2 and Communicable Disease Transmission in Offices and Non-Industrial Environments Speaker(s): Don Milton Date: October 16, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

331

Threshold Relative Humidity Duration Forecasts for Plant Disease Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Duration of high relative humidity periods is an important component of many plant disease development models. Performance of forecasts of this quantity, based on the model output statistics 3-h temperature and dewpoint forecasts produced by the ...

Daniel S. Wilks; Karin W. Shen

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Simulating Lyme disease using parallel discrete event simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lyme Disease affects many people in the northeastern United States. One of the most important mech anisms that sustains the epidemic is the interaction between white-footed mice (Peromyscus leuco pus) and deer ticks (Ixodes scapularis). When mice move ...

Ewa Deelman; Boleslaw K. Szymanski; Thomas Caraco

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Accelerating Spatially Explicit Simulations of Spread of Lyme Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The factors influencing spread of Lyme disease are often studied using computer-based simulations and spatially explicit models. However, simulating large and complex models is a time consuming task, even when parallel simulation techniques are employed. ...

Dhananjai M. Rao; Philip A. Wilsey

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Classification and Localisation of Diabetic-Related Eye Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Retinal exudates are a characteristic feature of many retinal diseases such as Diabetic Retinopathy. We address the development of a method to quantitatively diagnose these random yellow patches in colour retinal images automatically. After a colour ...

Alireza Osareh; Majid Mirmehdi; Barry T. Thomas; Richard Markham

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

6 DISEASE-PRONE CROWS Study of inbred crows has  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the determinants of transmission of diseases to humans, non- human animals, or plants; the spread of pathogens processing methods such as molding, forging, casting, welding, hydroforming, composite layup, and other

Keinan, Alon

336

Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

337

Hospital Energy Benchmarking Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of metrics, a high-level protocol is provided. The next section presents draft benchmarks for some metrics; benchmarks are not available for many metrics owing to a lack of...

338

Hompage, Hospitality Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BNL Home BNL: Departments | Science | ESS&H | Newsroom | Administration | Visitors | Directory search Go Find People Site Details Homepage Calendar of Events BNL Resources Library...

339

Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Using Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) to identify opportunities to ... uses the results, which are segmented by job classifications and work ...

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

340

Hospitality resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Rheumatic Heart Disease and Beta-hemolytic Streptococci in Salvador, Brazil: A Study of Slum Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Africa. S Afrthe chain that links the heart to the throat? Lancet Infectchildren with rheumatic heart disease. J Thorac Cardiovasc

Tartof, Sara Yee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease - model intercomparison  

SciTech Connect

Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly infectious vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by foot-and-mouth disease virus. It spreads by direct contact between animals, by animal products (milk, meat and semen), by mechanical transfer on people or fomites and by the airborne route - with the relative importance of each mechanism depending on the particular outbreak characteristics. Over the years a number of workers have developed or adapted atmospheric dispersion models to assess the risk of foot-and-mouth disease virus spread through the air. Six of these models were compared at a workshop hosted by the Institute for Animal Health/Met Office during 2008. A number of key issues emerged from the workshop and subsequent modelling work: (1) in general all of the models predicted similar directions for 'at risk' livestock with much of the remaining differences strongly related to differences in the meteorological data used; (2) determination of an accurate sequence of events is highly important, especially if the meteorological conditions vary substantially during the virus emission period; and (3) differences in assumptions made about virus release, environmental fate, and subsequent infection can substantially modify the size and location of the downwind risk area. Close relationships have now been established between participants, which in the event of an outbreak of disease could be readily activated to supply advice or modelling support.

Gloster, J; Jones, A; Redington, A; Burgin, L; Sorensen, J H; Turner, R; Dillon, M; Hullinger, P; Simpson, M; Astrup, P; Garner, G; Stewart, P; D'Amours, R; Sellers, R; Paton, D

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

343

Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program February 23, 2005 - 10:27am Addthis Former employees of DOE vendors eligible for free screening WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced the Department of Energy (DOE) will expand a beryllium screening program to include former employees of now-defunct DOE beryllium vendor companies across the country. Beryllium is a component used in nuclear weapons built by the Department of Energy. "Through no fault of their own, these Cold Warriors were left out in the cold when their former employers went out of business. By expanding this screening program, President Bush and the Department of Energy honor these

344

Investigation of saliva of patients with periodontal disease using NAA  

SciTech Connect

In this study the non-stimulated whole saliva of 26 healthy subjects (mean age 33.9 {+-} 11.0 years, range: 26 to 49 years) and 11 patients with periodontal disease (mean age 41.7 {+-} 11.5 years; range 29 to 55 years) was investigated using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique. The samples were obtained from donors at Sao Paulo city (Brazil). The analyses were performed in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 (3.5-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP (Brazil). Considerable changes in Ca and S saliva's level were identified in patients with periodontal disease suggesting they can be used as monitors of periodontal diseases.

Zamboni, C. B.; Metairon, S.; Medeiros, I. M. M. A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN - CNEN/SP Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242- 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lewgoy, H. R. [Universidade Anhanguera Bandeirante, UNIBAN R. Maria Candida, 1813, Bloco G / 6o andar - 02071-013 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

345

Centriacinar alterations in lungs of cats chronically exposed to diesel exhaust  

SciTech Connect

This study describes the morphologic changes in the centriacinar regions of lungs following long-term exposure of cats to diesel exhaust. Nine male cats (13 months of age) from a minimal disease colony were exposed to diesel exhaust for 8 hours/day, 7 days/week for 27 months. Eight cats were exposed to filtered air. Following exposure, the animals were killed by exsanguination and the lungs and trachea removed from the chest by thoracotomy, weighed, and fixed via tracheal cannula with glutaraldehyde/paraformaldehyde (550 mOsmoles, pH 7.4) at 30 cm of pressure. Centriacinar regions were selected from fixed tissue, the airways bisected, and complementary tissue halves processed by a large block method for high resolution light microscopy and for scanning electron microscopy. Compared with controls, diesel-exposed cats had lower fresh lung and kidney weights and lower fixed volumes of the right cranial lobe. The volume fractions of pulmonary parenchyma and nonparenchyma were unchanged. Epithelium of terminal and respiratory bronchioles in exposed cats consisted of three types of cells (ciliated, basal, and Clara cells), compared with only one type (Clara cells) in controls. Carbon-laden macrophages were found filling alveolar and interstitial spaces in exposed animals. Type 2 pneumocyte hyperplasia was present in proximal interalveolar septa. More distal alveolar ducts and the majority of the rest of the parenchyma were unchanged from controls. We concluded that exposure to diesel exhaust produces changes in both epithelial and interstitial tissue compartments and that the focus of these lesions in peripheral lung is the centriacinar region where alveolar ducts join terminal conducting airways.

Plopper, C.G.; Hyde, D.M.; Weir, A.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease April...

347

Detecting disease genes based on semi-supervised learning and protein-protein interaction networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: Predicting or prioritizing the human genes that cause disease, or ''disease genes'', is one of the emerging tasks in biomedicine informatics. Research on network-based approach to this problem is carried out upon the key assumption of ''the ... Keywords: Disease gene neighbours, Disease-causing gene prediction, Multiple data resources integration, Protein-protein interaction network, Semi-supervised learning

Thanh-Phuong Nguyen; Tu-Bao Ho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 5 Fatty Acids in Corn Oil: Role in Heart Disease Prevention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 5 Fatty Acids in Corn Oil: Role in Heart Disease Prevention Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

349

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 22 Fatty Acids in Immunomodulation: Role in Disease Prevention and Causation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 22 Fatty Acids in Immunomodulation: Role in Disease Prevention and Causation Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press D

350

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 2 Nutrition and Cardiovascular Disease in American Indians and Alaska Natives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 2 Nutrition and Cardiovascular Disease in American Indians and Alaska Natives Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

351

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 8 Free Fatty Acids: Role in Insulin Resistance, Type 2 Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 8 Free Fatty Acids: Role in Insulin Resistance, Type 2 Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

352

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 18 Fatty Acids in Membrane Lipids: Role in Disease Causation and Prevention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 18 Fatty Acids in Membrane Lipids: Role in Disease Causation and Prevention Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Do

353

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 13 Trans and Other Fatty Acids: Role in Diabetic Disease and Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 13 Trans and Other Fatty Acids: Role in Diabetic Disease and Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadab

354

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 9 Gender Differences in Gene Expression Due to Fatty Acids: Role in Atherosclerosis and Cardiovascular Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 9 Gender Differences in Gene Expression Due to Fatty Acids: Role in Atherosclerosis and Cardiovascular Disease Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Bio

355

Comparing disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression in Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression in Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus William Liu 1 , Benjamin Haley 1 , Mary J. Kwasny 2 , Tatjana Paunesku 1 , Gayle Woloschak 1 1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 2. Department of Preventative Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 From 1969 to 1992, the Janus program at Argonne National Laboratory performed a large series of radiobiology experiments, examining the effects of varying doses of neutron and gamma radiation on two disparate species of mice, Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus. Much of this data has since been digitized and made freely accessible online. This study aims to revisit

356

The New Reid Hospital and Health Care Services Physical Plant: An Analysis of Prospective Roles for Richmond Power & Light in Plant Privatization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Richmond Power & Light Company (RP&L) is a community-owned electric utility serving the City of Richmond, Indiana, and other customers. As the largest municipal utility in Indiana, RP&L maintains a keen focus on and strong commitment to the health and vitality of the community it serves. Reid Hospital and Healthcare Services (Reid), the facility that provides health care to Richmond and the surrounding community, is planning the construction of a new health care center to replace the current facility. Li...

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

CHRONIC CONSUMPTION OF ETHANOL LEADS TO SUBSTANTIAL CELL DAMAGE IN CULTURED RAT ASTROCYTES IN CONDITIONS PROMOTING ACETALDEHYDE ACCUMULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — Aims: This study aimed at comparing the cerebral cytotoxicity of ethanol and its main metabolite acetaldehyde after acute or chronic exposures of rat astrocytes in primary culture. Methods: Cytotoxicity was evaluated on the cell reduction of viability (MTT reduction test) and on the characterization of DNA damage by single cell gel electrophoresis (or comet assay). Results: Changes in astrocyte survival and in DNA integrity only occurred when the astrocytes were chronically exposed to ethanol (20 mM; 3, 6 or 9 days). On the other hand, viability and DNA integrity were deeply affected by acute exposure to acetaldehyde. Both effects were dependent on the concentration of acetaldehyde. The cytotoxic effect of acetaldehyde was also indirectly evaluated after modifications of the normal ethanol metabolism by the use of different inducers or inhibitors. In presence of ethanol, the concomitant induction of catalase (i.e. by glucose oxidase) and inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase (i.e. by methylene blue) led to acetaldehyde accumulation within cells. It was followed by both a reduction in viability and a substantial increase in DNA strand breaks. Conclusions: These data were thus consistent with a possible predominant role of acetaldehyde during brain ethanol metabolism. On the other hand, the effects observed after AMT could also suggest a possible direct ethanol effect and a role for free radical attacks. These data were thus consistent with a possible predominant role of acetaldehyde during brain ethanol metabolism. On the other hand, the effects observed after AMT could also suggest a possible direct ethanol effect and a role for free radical attacks.

N. Signorini-allibe; B. Gonthier; F. Lamarche; H. Eysseric; L. Barret

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Job Title: 2 PhD positions, Marie Curie Initial Training Network (ITN) on Chronic DNA Damage in Ageing Reference: EMBO Young Investigator PHD position  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Job Title: 2 PhD positions, Marie Curie Initial Training Network (ITN) on Chronic DNA DamageD candidates will be part of a Marie Curie Initial Training Network (ITN) that aims to implement an integrated defects in genome maintenance thus pointing towards damage in (nuclear) DNA as a major culprit of ageing

359

Printed in the USA 0730-7268/02 $9.00 ?.00 ASSESSING THE GENOTOXICITY OF CHRONIC ENVIRONMENTAL IRRADIATION BY USING MITOCHONDRIAL DNA HETEROPLASMY IN THE BANK VOLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—This study was designed to investigate whether or not chronic exposure to Chornobyl radiation poses a molecular genetic risk to mammals by examining a relatively rapidly evolving genetic system, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). More mtDNA mutations (?19%) and an increase in mtDNA heteroplasmy (?5%) occurred in the cytochrome b gene of an exposed mother–embryo set when compared to a relatively unexposed mother–embryo set. However, this increase was not statistically significant (p ? 0.05). Our results, in conjunction with previous molecular genetic research on small mammals from Chornobyl, suggest that chronic exposure to environmental ionizing radiation does not increase the number of nucleotide substitutions, as predicted by studies using acute or subacute exposures. Thus, cumulative models of radiation risk would not appear to follow simple linear functions derived from high doses and dose rates. The equivocal nature of research regarding the effects of the Chornobyl accident indicates that future research is warranted such that models of chronic environmental exposure can be developed or refined. Although additional study is required to properly validate mtDNA heteroplasmy as a useful effect biomarker, examination of these data does not indicate that a significant risk to mtDNA exists in native rodents chronically exposed to both internal and external radiation. Keywords—Mitochondrial DNA Clethrionomys Vole Radiation Chernobyl/Chornobyl

Jeffrey K. Wickliffe; Ronald K. Chesser; Brenda E. Rodgers; Robert J. Baker

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Managing Complexity: Disease Control as a Complex Adaptive System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trends in computer and communications technologies are enabling increased globalization and integration of enterprises, and corresponding increases of enterprise complexity.ï¾ ï¾ This article addresses management of this complexity using a complex adaptive ... Keywords: complex adaptive systems, disease control, strategic management, complexity, system models

William B. Rouse

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Virus Specificity in Disease Systems: Are Species Redundant?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

studies have stressed the prevalence of viruses in natural plant populations (e.g., Power and Remold 1996 the growth, survivorship, and reproduction of nondomesticated plants (Friess and Maillet 1996, 1997; FunayamaChapter 17 m Virus Specificity in Disease Systems: Are Species Redundant? Alison G. Power

Flecker, Alex

362

452 Plant Disease / Vol. 82 No. 5 A. R. Biggs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

452 Plant Disease / Vol. 82 No. 5 A. R. Biggs West Virginia University, Kearneysville G. G. Grove with information sharing in plant pathology extension via the World Wide Web; (ii) provide background on hardware of current and future web-based technologies that potentially influence extension plant pathology. West

Biggs, Alan R.

363

Ensemble transcript interaction networks: A case study on Alzheimer's disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systems biology techniques are a topic of recent interest within the neurological field. Computational intelligence (CI) addresses this holistic perspective by means of consensus or ensemble techniques ultimately capable of uncovering new and relevant ... Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Bayesian network classifiers, High-throughput data, Interaction networks

RubéN ArmañAnzas; Pedro LarrañAga; Concha Bielza

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Investigation of the Integration of Interstitial Building Spaces on Costs and Time of Facility Maintenance for U.S. Army Hospitals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Medical Department (AMEDD) has used the interstitial building system (IBS) as a design component for some of the hospitals in its healthcare infrastructure portfolio. Department of Defense (DoD) leadership is aware of increases in healthcare costs and understands the importance of safely reducing costs, which may be possible through design initiatives. An analysis was performed on facility maintenance metrics for ten different U.S. Army hospitals, including IBS design and conventional / non-interstitial building system (NIBS) design. Statistical analysis indicated a significant difference in cost and time data between IBS and NIBS for most of the building systems considered (HVAC, electrical, plumbing, and interior). Scheduled maintenance for the plumbing building system was not found to have a significant difference in costs; scheduled maintenance for the HVAC and plumbing building system was not found to have a significant difference in time expended. The data in this study showed that facility maintenance cost and time were generally lower for IBS than NIBS. Time spent (and associated cost) for scheduled maintenance of the electrical and plumbing building systems were slightly higher in IBS, though not significantly higher for plumbing. It may be easier to reach the plumbing and electrical building systems due to the greater accessibility afforded by IBS design. While a cost premium is estimated for integrating IBS design, the savings provided by life cycle facility maintenance is estimated to be up to three and a half times the initial cost premium.

Leveridge, Autumn Tamara

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

LANL spinoff receives NIH grant for respiratory disease diagnostic device  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL spinoff receives NIH grant LANL spinoff receives NIH grant LANL spinoff receives NIH grant for respiratory disease diagnostic device Mesa Tech has been awarded a grant to develop an inexpensive, instrument-free, nucleic-acid testing device to diagnose various respiratory diseases in record time. October 19, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

366

Women and Heart Disease: Neglected Directions for Future Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Before age 65, women have less heart disease than men. For many years, estrogen was the most popular explanation for this female advantage, and observational studies through the 1980s showed a lower risk of heart attacks in postmenopausal women taking “replacement” estrogen. But the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), the first placebo-controlled trials of hormone therapy with the size and statistical power necessary to study clinical cardiovascular outcomes, did not confirm the hormone-healthy heart hypothesis. Now, at least 5 years later, the most unexpected WHI result may be how resilient the estrogen hypothesis has been. Where, beyond estrogen therapy, should we go from here to explain the striking sex differences in heart disease rates? A broader spectrum of research about the female cardiovascular advantage and its translation is needed.

Elizabeth Barrett-connor

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Perspectives Editorial Guest Editorial Emerging Diseases Threaten Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

suddenly, sending shockwaves throughout public health systems and economies worldwide. By July 2003, 8,439 cases had been reported worldwide, with 812 deaths; the economic impacts were estimated to be $50–$100 billion (U.S.) (Newcomb 2003). Although public attention was focused on this explosive pandemic, more than 30 such diseases new to medicine have emerged since 1976 [World Health Organization (WHO) 1996]. Historically, waves of infections have often accompanied periods of social and environmental transition (Epstein 1992). Such upsurges include influenza in the aftermath of World War I and the plague during the Middle Ages. Tuberculosis, smallpox, and cholera appeared in concert among the teeming urban centers of Charles Dickens’s 19thcentury England. In the past three decades, previously unknown diseases have surfaced at a pace without precedent in the annals of medicine. Indeed, such a

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

ALS: a disease of motor neurons and their nonneuronal neighbors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a late-onset progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons. The etiology of most ALS cases remains unknown, but 2 % of instances are due to mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Since sporadic and familial ALS affects the same neurons with similar pathology, it is hoped that therapies effective in mutant SOD1 models will translate to sporadic ALS. Mutant SOD1 induces non-cell-autonomous motor neuron killing by an unknown gain of toxicity. Selective vulnerability of motor neurons likely arises from a combination of several mechanisms, including protein misfolding, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage, defective axonal transport, excitotoxicity, insufficient growth factor signaling, and inflammation. Damage within motor neurons is enhanced by damage incurred by nonneuronal neighboring cells, via an inflammatory response that accelerates disease progression. These findings validate therapeutic approaches aimed at nonneuronal cells.

Séverine Boillée; Christine V; E Velde; Don W. Clevel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Commentary Meningococcal disease: identifying high-risk cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the previous issue of Critical Care, Vermont and colleagues presented a simple but well-executed observational study describing the levels of chemokines in the serum of 58 children with meningococcal sepsis. The chemokine levels correlated with disease severity and outcome. Significant correlations were demonstrated between admission chemokine levels and the Paediatric Risk of Mortality score, the Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy score, the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score and laboratory parameters of disease severity. Additionally, nonsurvivors had much higher levels of chemokines compared with survivors, and the chemokine levels predicted mortality with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. The findings are important as they indicate a possible mechanism for risk stratification in future trials of novel therapies in human sepsis, which as yet have not

David Inwald; Mark Peters

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Analysis of Heart Diseases Dataset using Neural Network Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the important techniques of Data mining is Classification. Many real world problems in various fields such as business, science, industry and medicine can be solved by using classification approach. Neural Networks have emerged as an important tool for classification. The advantages of Neural Networks helps for efficient classification of given data. In this study a Heart diseases dataset is analyzed using Neural Network approach. To increase the efficiency of the classification process parallel approach is also adopted in the training phase.

Rani, K Usha

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Travel and migration associated infectious diseases morbidity in Europe, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infect 2009, 11:1177-1185. 19. NaTHNaC Clinical Update: Tropical Cyclone Nargis in Myanmar - advice for relief workers and other travellers to affected areas. 2008 [http:// www.nathnac.org/pro/clinical_updates/cyclonemyanmar_070508.htm], (Accessed January... ://www.eurotravnet.eu, a network of clinical specialists in tropical and travel medicine was founded in 2008, to assist the European Centre for Dis- ease Prevention & Control (ECDC) for the detection, verification, assessment and communication of commu- nicable diseases...

Field, Vanessa; Gautret, Philippe; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Burchard, Gerd-Dieter; Caumes, Eric; Jensenius, Mogens; Castelli, Francesco; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Weld, Leisa; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio; de Vries, Peter; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Loutan, Louis; Parola, Philippe; Network, the EuroTravNet

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

372

Towards landscape design guidelines for reducing Lyme disease risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background Incidence of Lyme disease in the US continues to grow. Low-density development is also increasing in endemic regions, raising questions about the relationship between development pattern and disease. This study sought to model Lyme disease incidence rate using quantitative, practical metrics of regional landscape pattern. The objective was to progress towards the development of design guidelines that may help minimize known threats to human and environmental health. Methods Ecological analysis was used to accommodate the integral landscape variables under study. Case data derived from passive surveillance reports across 12 counties in the US state of Maryland during 1996–2000; 2137 cases were spatially referenced to residential addresses. Major roads were used to delineate 514 landscape analysis units from 0.002 to 580 km 2. Results The parameter that explained the most variation in incidence rate was the percentage of land-cover edge represented by the adjacency of forest and herbaceous cover [R 2 5 0.75; rate ratio 5 1.34 (1.26–1.43); P, 0.0001]. Also highly significant was the percentage of the landscape in forest cover (cumulative R 2 5 0.82), which exhibited a quadratic relationship with incidence rate. Modelled relationships applied throughout the range of landscape sizes. Conclusions Results begin to provide quantitative landscape design parameters for reducing casual peridomestic contact with tick and host habitat. The final model suggests that clustered forest and herbaceous cover, as opposed to high forest-herbaceous interspersion, would minimize Lyme disease risk in low-density residential areas. Higher-density development that precludes a large percentage of forestherbaceous edge would also limit exposure.

Laura E Jackson; Elizabeth D Hilborn; James C Thomas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Lyme Disease in New Jersey, 1978-1982  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occurred in a four-township area in central Monmouth County. The proportion of cases with arthritis decreased in 1982 because of early antibiotic treatment and better reporting of milder cases. The proportion of cases with positive serology increased with severity of the clinical syndrome. About 25 percent of patients had exposure to ticks because of occupations that required outdoor activities. Lyme disease is a growing public health problem in New Jersey.

G. Stephen Bowen; Terry L. Schulze, Ph.D.; William; L. Parkin; Dr. P. H

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Uncoupling at the GABA(A) receptor with chronic ethanol in the rat medial septum/diagonal band (MS/DB)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Functional tolerance to ethanol and physical dependence are thought to involve central nervous system (CNS) adaptive changes in the function of neurotransmitter systems which resist the initial intoxicating actions of ethanol. Increasing evidence suggests that the y-aminobutyric acid typeA(GABA,) receptor is one target of ethanol where such adaptive changes by the CNS may occur. Adaptation could occur by downregulation of GABAAreceptor number or uncoupling of the GABAAreceptor sensitivity to ethanol and related CNS depressants. These agents which show cross-tolerance and dependence with ethanol are allosteric modulators at the GABAAreceptor. Uncoupling is the decrease in the activity of an allosteric modulator at the receptor without a change in receptor number after prolonged exposure to either the agonist or allosteric modulator. Varying results have been obtained when looking at uncoupling at the GABAAreceptor with chronic drug treatment. The goal of this project was to determine-tine whether allosteric potentiation of GABAAreceptors by a benzodiazepine, a novel anticonvulsant or a neurosteroid is uncoupled by chronic ethanol treatment which may contribute to functional tolerance and physical dependence. Chronic ethanol was not found to induce an uncoupling of the potentiation seen with rnidazolam (0. I and 1. 0 liM), loreclezole (10 [uM), or allopregnanolone (0. I uM) to 3 uM GABA. However, the higher concentration of allopregnanolone (1.0 [uM) did show potentiation of the 3 uM GABA response in the chronically ethanol treated cells. In contrast, an increased potentiation was seen with midazolam (0. I uM) and GABA (0. I uM) in the ethanol treated cells. No potentiation was seen of 30 liM GABA response with any of the allosteric modulators tested. Therefore, it does not appear that chronic ethanol uncoupled potentiation of loreciezole or 0. I [uM allopregnanolone acting by general allosteric mechanisms. However, the higher (1 [uM concentration of allopregnanolone, which is thought to be capable of directly activating the GABAAreceptor, did show uncoupling of potentiation with cells chronically exposed to ethanol; this finding is consistent with an adaptive change in GABAAreceptor function.

Wallace, Kathleen Allison

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS IN A NATURAL POPULATION OF CHIRONOMUS TENTANS EXPOSED TO CHRONIC LOW-LEVEL ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION  

SciTech Connect

The salivary gland chromosomes of Chironomus tentans larvae collected from White Oak Creek, an area contaminated by radioactive waste from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and from six uncontaminated areas were examined for chromosomal aberrations. White Oak Creek populations were exposed to absorbed doses as high as 230 rads per year or about 1000 times background. Chromosomal maps were constructed to make a general comparison of the banding pattern of the salivary chromosomes of the C. tentans in the East Tennessee area with those of Canada and Europe. These maps were used as a reference in scoring aberrations. Fifteen different chromosomal aberrations were found in 365 larvae taken from the irradiated population as compared with five different aberrations observed in 356 larvae from six control populations, but the mean number of aberrations per larva did not differ in any of the populations. The quantitative amount of heterozygosity was essentially the same in the irradiated and the control population, but there were three times the variety of chromosomal aberrations found in the irradiated area. From this evidence it was concluded that chronic low-level irradiation from radioactive waste was increasing the variability of chromosomal aberrations without significantly increasing the frequency. It was also concluded that chromosomal polymorphism can be maintained in a natural population without superiority of the heterozygous individuals. (C.H.)

Blaylock, B G; Auerbach, S I; Nelson, D J

1964-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

376

CHRONIC IRRADIATION OF SCOTS PINE TREES (PINUS SYLVESTRIS) IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE: DOSIMETRY AND RADIOBIOLOGICAL EFFECTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To identify effects of chronic internal and external radiation exposure for components of terrestrial ecosystems, a comprehensive study of Scots pine trees in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone was performed. The experimental plan included over 1,100 young trees (up to 20 years old) selected from areas with varying levels of radioactive contamination. These pine trees were planted after the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mainly to prevent radionuclide resuspension and soil erosion. For each tree, the major morphological parameters and radioactive contamination values were identified. Cytological analyses were performed for selected trees representing all dose rate ranges. A specially developed dosimetric model capable of taking into account radiation from the incorporated radionuclides in the trees was developed for the apical meristem. The calculated dose rates for the trees in the study varied within three orders of magnitude, from close to background values in the control area (about 5 mGy y{sup -1}) to approximately 7 Gy y{sup -1} in the Red Forest area located in the immediate vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site. Dose rate/effect relationships for morphological changes and cytogenetic defects were identified and correlations for radiation effects occurring on the morphological and cellular level were established.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Metabolism of selenium (Se) in rats chronically poisoned with D- or L-selenomethionine (SeMet), selenite or selenate  

SciTech Connect

L-SeMet is a potential cancer chemoprevention agent for humans. Little difference was seen in the acute toxicity of L vs. D-SeMet in rats. To study chronic toxicity, weanling male rats were fed purified diets containing 2.5, 5.0 or 10 ppm Se as L-SeMet, D-SeMet, Na/sub 2/SeO/sub 3/ or Na/sub 2/SeO/sub 4/ for 6 weeks. Controls received 0.1 ppm Se as selenite. All rats fed 10 ppm Se died within 29 days. Se fed as D-SeMet was retained in the tissues as strongly as L-SeMet. Rats fed D or L-SeMet deposited large amounts of Se in muscle not reflected by proportionate increases in either plasma or RBC Se. Therefore, attempts to follow increases in Se body burden in individuals supplemented with large doses of L-SeMet by monitoring plasma or whole blood Se levels should be interpreted with caution.

McAdam, P.A.; Levander, O.A.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Mapping local hippocampal changes in Alzheimer's disease and normal ageing with MRI at 3 Tesla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mapping local hippocampal changes in Alzheimer's disease and normal ageing with MRI at 3 Tesla and Alzheimer's disease based on high resolution MRI at 3 Tesla. T1-weighted images were acquired from 19

Thompson, Paul

379

A common allele on chromosome 9 associated with coronary heart disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. Appleyard, European Heart Journal 3, Suppl H. , H1 (associated with Coronary Heart Disease in whites. Minor9 associated with coronary heart disease Ruth McPherson 1* ,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

The power of linkage analysis of a disease-related endophenotype using asymmetrically ascertained sib pairs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linkage study of a qualitative disease endophenotype in a sample of sib pairs, consisting of one disease affected proband and one sibling is considered. The linkage statistic compares marker allele sharing with the proband in siblings with an abnormal ...

Heejong Sung; Fei Ji; Deborah L. Levy; Steven Matthysse; Nancy Role Mendell

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study Final Report June 21, 2002 #12;Communications Plan for releasing the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study Final Report Table of Contents Introduction ........................................................................................................ 15 Hanford Area Public

382

ORIGINAL PAPER Invading with biological weapons: the role of shared disease in ecological invasion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Theory has been developed that examines the role of infectious disease in ecological invasions for particular natural systems. However, a general understanding of the role that shared disease may play in invasions is lacking. Here, we develop a strategic theoretical framework to determine the role of disease, in addition to competition, in ecological invasions and the expansion of species ’ spatial range. We investigate the effect of different disease parameters on the replacement time of a native species by an alien invader. The outcome is critically dependent on the relative effects that the disease has on the two species and less dependent on the basic epidemiological characteristics of the interaction. This framework is also used to investigate the effect of disease on the spatial spread of the invader. Our results show an interesting phenomenon where a wave of disease spreads through the landscape ahead of the wave of replacement. Keywords Disease models. Spatial. Multi-species. Ecological invasions. Squirrelpox. Travelling waves

Sally S. Bell; Andrew White; Jonathan A. Sherratt; Mike Boots

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Computational, statistical and graph-theoretical methods for disease mapping and cluster detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Epidemiology, the study of disease risk factors in populations, emerged between the 16th and 19th centuries in response to terrifying epidemics of infectious diseases such as yellow fever, cholera and bubonic plague. ...

Wieland, Shannon Christine

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

DCGene: a novel predicting approach of the disease related genes on functional annotation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disease Candidate Genes (DCGene) is an advanced system for predicting the disease related genes, It is a novel computational approach by using the GO annotation information. The performance of the DCGene is evaluated in a set containing 1057 test samples, ...

Yuan Fang; Hui Wang

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

CLIMATE CHANGE FUEL CELL PROGRAM 200 kW - PC25C FUEL CELL POWER PLANT FOR THE ST.-AGNES-HOSPITAL, BOCHOLT, GERMANY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the beginning of the Year 2001, the Saint-Agnes-Hospital in Bocholt, Germany, operates a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) to provide the base load of electrical power as well as heat in Winter and air conditioning in Summer. The project was made possible by federal funding from the U.S. Department of Energy as well as by a strategic alliance with the local utility company, the Bocholter Energie- und Wasserversorgung GmbH (BEW), and with the gas supplier of BEW, the Thyssengas GmbH. The fuel cell power plant is combined with an absorption chiller. It is highly efficient and has an excellent power to heat ratio. The operation during the first Year went smoothly and nearly free of trouble.

Dipl.-Ing. Knut Stahl

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2013 SOYBEAN DISEASE CONTROL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-20.5 2 (42) Rust + other diseases Quilt Xcel SE Azoxystrobin + Propiconazole 14 - 21 2 (42) Rust + other

Stuart, Steven J.

387

Publications Forest Research publishes a wide range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. will be hospitable to insects and the diseases they spread (like malaria, St. Louis encephalitis, Lyme disease

388

The picture of health: map-based, collaborative spatio-temporal disease tracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disease outbreaks are intimately tied to geographic locations and to times, and as a result, health-related GIS along with open, Web-based data sources are increasingly crucial for public health. One such data source, ProMED-mail, offers disease reports ... Keywords: GIS, disease tracking, geotagging, spatio-temporal

Rongjian Lan; Michael D. Lieberman; Hanan Samet

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Utilization of Discretization method on the diagnosis of optic nerve disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optic nerve disease is an important disease that appears commonly in public. In this paper, we propose a hybrid diagnostic system based on discretization (quantization) method and classification algorithms including C4.5 decision tree classifier, ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, C4.5 decision tree classifier, Discretization method, Hybrid systems, Least square support vector machine, Optic nerve disease, VEP signals

Kemal Polat; Sad?k Kara; Ay?egül Güven; Salih Güne?

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

I N T H I S I S S U E Lyme disease communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I N T H I S I S S U E · Lyme disease communication to countryside users · Providing public benefits in private woodlands, causes of wildfires in South Wales and communicating animal disease (Lyme) risks in rural areas within a framework of risk communication. It focuses on Lyme disease, an infection caused

391

Research Summary Assessing and communicating animal disease risks for countryside users  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

initially on Lyme disease, an infection caused by a spiral bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi that is found in a number of wild animal hosts and which can be transferred to humans by infected ticks. Lyme disease in Lyme disease resulting from changes in environmental factors mdevelop appropriate risk assessment

392

SVM feature selection for classification of SPECT images of Alzheimer's disease using spatial information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alzheimer's disease is the most frequent type of dementia for elderly patients. Due to aging populations, the occurrence of this disease will increase in the next years. Early diagnosis is crucial to be able to develop more powerful treatments. Brain ... Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Mathematical programming, Medical imaging, Support vector machines

Glenn Fung; Jonathan Stoeckel

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Computational intelligence for genetic association study in complex diseases: review of theory and applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comprehensive evaluation of common genetic variations through association of SNP structure with common complex disease in the genome-wide scale is currently a hot area in human genome research thanks for the recent development of the Human Genome ... Keywords: SNP, common complex diseases, computational intelligence, disease mapping, epistasis, genetic association, genetic variations, haplotype data, human genome research, single nucleotide polymorphisms

Arpad Kelemen; Athanasios V. Vasilakos; Yulan Liang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Heart . Author manuscript Effects of depressive symptoms and coronary heart disease and their  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heart . Author manuscript Page /1 11 Effects of depressive symptoms and coronary heart disease separately in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and in populations healthy at study inception and CHD status. OBJECTIVE To examine effects of depressive symptoms and coronary heart disease

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

395

Eur Heart J. Author manuscript History of coronary heart disease and cognitive performance in midlife: the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eur Heart J. Author manuscript Page /1 9 History of coronary heart disease and cognitive: Archana Singh-Manoux Abstract Aims Some studies show coronary heart for this association. Coronary heart disease is a global problem, with the risk of disease shown to increase as12

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

396

New England Foot and Mouth Disease Tabletop Exercise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Multiscale Epidemiologic/Economic Simulation and Analysis (MESA) Decision Support System (DSS) is the product of investments that began in FY05 by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate and continue today with joint funding by both DHS and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). The DSS consists of a coupled epidemiologic/economic model, a standalone graphical user interface (GUI) that supports both model setup and post-analysis, and a Scenario Bank archive to store all content related to foreign animal disease (FAD) studies (Figure 1). The MESA epi model is an object-oriented, agent-based, stochastic, spatio-temporal simulator that parametrically models FAD outbreaks and response strategies from initial disease introduction to conclusion over local, regional, and national scales. Through its output database, the epi model couples to an economic model that calculates farm-level impacts from animal infections, responsive control strategies and loss of trade. The MESA architecture contains a variety of internal models that implement the major components of the epi simulation, including disease introduction, intra-herd spread, inter-herd spread (direct and indirect), detection, and various control strategies (movement restrictions, culling, vaccination) in a highly configurable and extensible fashion. MESA will produce both overall and daily summary statistics for the outbreak, epidemic curves, and costs associated with the outbreak. This information can be used to reconstruct and analyze the course of the outbreak. Geographical information produced by MESA can be used to produce maps and movies as visual aids to understand the distribution characteristics of a simulated outbreak.

Hullinger, P

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

Full-spectrum disease response : beyond just the flu.  

SciTech Connect

Why plan beyond the flu: (1) the installation may be the target of bioterrorism - National Laboratory, military base collocated in large population center; and (2) International Airport - transport of infectious agents to the area - Sandia is a global enterprise and staff visit many foreign countries. In addition to the Pandemic Plan, Sandia has developed a separate Disease Response Plan (DRP). The DRP addresses Category A, B pathogens and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The DRP contains the Cities Readiness Initiative sub-plan for disbursement of Strategic National Stockpile assets.

Knazovich, Michael Ward; Cox, Warren B.; Henderson, Samuel Arthur

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The Diet-Heart Hypothesis: a critical appraisal of the relationship between diet and coronary artery disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease. JAMA. 2002;288:M. Fish consumption and coronary heart disease mortality: aacid and risk of ischemic heart disease among women. Am J

Jurewitz, Daniel L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Cent Eur J Public Health 2011; 19 (1): 5459 Smoking practiceS in Jordanian people  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dr Shanthi Mendis, coordinator of WHO's Chronic Diseases Prevention and Management unit. "Medication

400

SENSITIZATION AND EXACERBATION OF ALLERGIC DISEASES BY DIESEL ENGINE PARTICLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most studies of the health effects of diesel exhaust have focused on the controversial issue of its role in cancer. However, recently the role of combustion products such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP) in modulating the immune response has garnered much attention. In particular the effect of DEP on allergic and asthmatic diseases has been the focus of many studies. A link between industrialization and allergic disease has long been presumed. Indeed, only 50 years after the first recorded reported case of allergy in 1819, Charles Blackely wrote that the ''hay-fever epidemic'' was associated with the movement of people from the country into the cities. Ishizaki et al. (1987) found that people in Japan living on busy roads lined with cedar trees have more allergies to cedar than residents living on similar streets with much less traffic. Since that time other epidemiological studies have reported similar findings. Kramer, et al., showed that hay fever is greater in residential areas with heavy truck traffic, while Weiland, et al., reported that allergic symptoms correlate with the distance of residences to roads with heavy traffic.

Diaz-Sanchez, David

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Loss of Hsp70 Exacerbates Pathogenesis But Not Levels of Fibrillar Aggregates in a Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Endogenous protein quality control machinery has long been suspected of influencing the onset and progression of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of misfolded proteins. Huntington's disease (HD) ...

Lindquist, Susan

402

Bead-based microfluidic immunoassay for diagnosis of Johne's disease  

SciTech Connect

Microfluidics technology offers a platform for development of point-of-care diagnostic devices for various infectious diseases. In this study, we examined whether serodiagnosis of Johne s disease (JD) can be conducted in a bead-based microfluidic assay system. Magnetic micro-beads were coated with antigens of the causative agent of JD, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The antigen-coated beads were incubated with serum samples of JD-positive or negative serum samples and then with a fluorescently-labeled secondary antibody (SAB). To confirm binding of serum antibodies to the antigen, the beads were subjected to flow cytometric analysis. Different conditions (dilutions of serum and SAB, types of SAB, and types of magnetic beads) were optimized for a great degree of differentiation between the JD-negative and JD-positive samples. Using the optimized conditions, we tested a well-classified set of 155 serum samples from JD negative and JD-positive cattle by using the bead-based flow cytometric assay. Of 105 JD-positive samples, 63 samples (60%) showed higher antibody binding levels than a cut-off value determined by using antibody binding levels of JD-negative samples. In contrast, only 43-49 JD-positive samples showed higher antibody binding levels than the cut-off value when the samples were tested by commercially-available immunoassays. Microfluidic assays were performed by magnetically immobilizing a number of beads within a microchannel of a glass microchip and detecting antibody on the collected beads by laser-induced fluorescence. Antigen-coated magnetic beads treated with bovine serum sample and fluorescently-labeled SAB were loaded into a microchannel to measure the fluorescence (reflecting level of antibody binding) on the beads in the microfluidic system. When the results of five bovine serum samples obtained with the system were compared to those obtained with the flow cytometer, a high level of correlation (linear regression, r2 = 0.994) was observed. In a further experiment, we magnetically immobilized antigen-coated beads in a microchannel, reacted the beads with serum and SAB in the channel, and detected antibody binding to the beads in the microfluidic system. A strong antibody binding in JD-positive serum was detected, whereas there was only negligible binding in negative control experiments. Our data suggest that the bead-based microfluidic system may form a basis for development of an on-site serodiagnosis of JD. Key Words: Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis, Johne s disease, microfluidics, lab-on-a-chip.

Wadhwa, Ashutosh [University of Tennessee, Center for Wildlife Health, Department of Forestry; Foote, Robert [ORNL; Shaw, Robert W [ORNL; Eda, Shigetoshi [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Modifying Proteins to Combat Disease | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Higher Temperature at the Earth's Core Higher Temperature at the Earth's Core Clues about Rheumatoid Arthritis Damage Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Modifying Proteins to Combat Disease JANUARY 22, 2013 Bookmark and Share Structure of the human PRMT5:MEP50 hetero-octameric complex bound to a substrate peptide and a cofactor analog. Cartoon representations of the PRMT5 monomers are colored blue, green, wheat, and yellow, while the MEP50 molecules are in red. Highlighted in stick representation are the substrate peptide derived from histone H3 in magenta, and the cofactor analog in orange. Transmitting from one generation to the next the genetic message encoded in

404

Heart Rate Variability in Mice with Coronary Heart Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat fluctuation of the heart rate, is a noninvasive test that measures the autonomic regulation of the heart. Assessment of HRV has been shown to predict the risk of mortality in patients after an acute myocardial infarction. Recently, the Krieger lab at MIT developed genetically engineered double knockout (dKO) mice that develop coronary artery disease accompanied by spontaneous myocardial infarctions and die at a very young age. This thesis investigated whether HRV could function as a prognostic indicator in the dKO mouse. A novel method for estimating physiological state of the mouse from the electrocardiogram using an innovative activity index was developed in order to compare HRV variables at different times while controlling for physiologic state. Traditional time and frequency domain variables were used to assess the prognostic power of HRV. Results have shown that none of the HRV variables were helpful in predicting

Laurence Zapanta; Roger G. Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Subintimal Angioplasty of Long Chronic Total Femoropopliteal Occlusions: Long-Term Outcomes, Predictors of Angiographic Restenosis, and Role of Stenting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to report the results of a prospective single-center study analyzing the long-term clinical and angiographic outcomes of subintimal angioplasty (SIA) for the treatment of chronic total occlusions (CTOs) of the femoropopliteal artery. Materials and Methods: Patients with severe intermittent claudication or critical limb ischemia (CLI) were enrolled in the study. All lesions were treated with SIA and provisional stenting. Primary end points were technical success, patient survival, limb salvage, lesion primary patency, angiographic binary restenosis (>50%), and target lesion revascularization (TLR). Regular clinical and angiographic follow-up was set at 6 and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Study end points were calculated with life-table survival analysis. Proportional-hazards regression analysis with a Cox-model was applied to adjust for confounding factors of heterogeneity. Results: Between May 2004 and July 2009, 98 patients (105 limbs, patient age 69.3 {+-} 9.9 years) were included in the study. Technical success rate was 91.4% with a lesion length of 121 {+-} 77 mm. Limb-salvage and survival rates were 88.7% and 84.1% at 3 years, respectively. After 12, 24, and 36 months, primary patency was 80.1%, 42.3%, and 29.0%, angiographic binary restenosis was 37.2%, 68.6%, and 80.0%, and TLR was 84.8%, 73.0%, and 64.5%, respectively. CLI was the only adverse predictor for decreased primary patency (hazard ratio [HR] 0.36; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.16-0.80, p = 0.012), whereas significantly less restenosis was detected after spot stenting of the entry and/or re-entry site (HR 0.31; 95% CI 0.10-0.89, p = 0.01 and HR 0.20; 95% CI 0.07-0.56, p = 0.002, respectively). Conclusions: Subintimal angioplasty is a safe and effective revascularization technique for the treatment of CTOs of the femoropopliteal artery. Provisional stenting may have a role at the subintimal entry or true lumen re-entry site.

Siablis, Dimitris, E-mail: siablis@upatras.gr; Diamantopoulos, Athanasios; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Spiliopoulos, Stavros [Patras University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Angiography Suite (Greece); Kagadis, George C. [Patras School of Medicine, Department of Medical Physics (Greece); Papadoulas, Spyros [Patras University Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery (Greece); Karnabatidis, Dimitris [Patras University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Angiography Suite (Greece)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Direct utilization of geothermal resources at Warm Springs State Hospital, Warm Springs, Montana. Final report, January 31, 1979-June 30, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several decades ago the water from a natural hot spring was piped to the Warm Springs State Hospital barn and greenhouse and eventually into the domestic water supply for showers. The Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC) funded a feasibility study on potential development of the geothermal resource from monies originating from coal severence taxes. The results of the feasibility study were subsequently utilized in obtaining a $721,122 award from the Department of Energy Program Opportunity Notice (PON) program to identify and develop the geothermal resource at Warm Springs. The study included environmental and legal considerations, geophysical surveys, and the subsequent development of the resource. The well produces 60 to 64 gpm of 154/sup 0/F geothermal water which is utilized in a heat exchanger to heat domestic water. The system became fully operational on January 13, 1983 and the calculated yearly energy savings represent approximately 17.6 million cubic feet of natural gas which is equivalent to $77,000, based on current prices.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Nitric oxide and carbon monoxide in cigarette smoke in the development of cardiorespiratory disease in smokers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in General and Geriatric Medicine, West Suffolk Hospital . 1985 - 1986 . 3) Consultant Physician in General and Geriatric Medicine, Huntingdon District Health Au~hority. 1986. Acknowledgements I am most grateful to the East Anglian Regional Health... was starting in Virginia. Growing was also started at that time in other parts of the world where the climate was suitable e.g. Turkey (Akehurst 1981). During the 18th century snuff became the most popular way of taking tobacco but the habit rapidly...

Borland, Colin David Ross

1988-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

408

Altered mental status, an unusual manifestation of early disseminated Lyme disease: A case report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Early disseminated Lyme disease can have a myriad of central nervous system manifestations. These run the gamut from meningitis to radiculopathy and cranial neuropathy. Here we present a case that manifested with only acute mental status change in the setting of central nervous system involvement with Lyme disease. A paucity of other central nervous system manifestations is rare, especially with positive serum and cerebrospinal fluid markers. This article underscores the importance of a high index of clinical suspicion in detection of Lyme disease related manifestations in endemic areas. Background Lyme disease is a multisystem inflammatory disease caused by spirochetes, known collectively as Borrelia burgdorferi, which are spread by the bite of infected Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease was first described in studies of an outbreak of "juvenile rheumatoid arthritis " in Connecticut [1]. It is endemic in the states of Massachusetts, Connecticut,

Shiven B Chabria; Jock Lawrason

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Gene by Disease Interaction on Orbitofrontal Gray Matter in Cocaine Addiction  

SciTech Connect

Chronic cocaine use has been associated with structural deficits in brain regions having dopamine receptive neurons. However, the concomitant use of other drugs and common genetic variability in monoamine regulation present additional structural variability. We therefore examined variations in gray matter volume (GMV) as a function of lifetime drug use and the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) genotype in cocaine use disorders (CUD) and healthy controls.

Alia-Klein, N.; Alia-Klein, N.; Parvaz, M.A.; Woicik, P.A.; Konova, A.; Maloney, T.; Shumay, E.; Wang, R.; Telang, F.; Biegon, A.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

2010-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

410

Nutrition and Biochemistry of PhospholipidsChapter 2 Stimulation of Lipases and Phospholipases in Alzheimer Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutrition and Biochemistry of Phospholipids Chapter 2 Stimulation of Lipases and Phospholipases in Alzheimer Disease Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf ...

411

Development of an ELISA to determine Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) capsid protein antibody titers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) is a naturally occurring, autonomous parvovirus that is capable of infecting some members of the Mustelidae family. Although this virus… (more)

Pennick, Kate Elizabeth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Development of a Method for the Detection of Aleutian Mink Disease Virus in Water Samples.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) causes significant loss to the mink industry in Nova Scotia (NS). Contaminated water is a speculated virus source therefore my… (more)

Larsen, Sophie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Methods of treating parkinson's disease using viral vectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of delivering viral vectors, particularly recombinant AAV virions, to the CNS are provided. Also provided are methods of treating Parkinson's Disease.

Bankiewicz, Krys (Garrett Park, MD); Cunningham, Janet (Alameda, CA)

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

414

Nutrition and Biochemistry of PhospholipidsChapter 11 The Benefits of Lecithin on Cardiovascular Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutrition and Biochemistry of Phospholipids Chapter 11 The Benefits of Lecithin on Cardiovascular Disease Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of

415

Compost teas and compost amended container media for plant disease control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The primary goal of this dissertation research was to assess the use of compost for the control of several foliar and soil borne diseases commercially… (more)

[No author

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Efficacy of compost amendments and extracts in the control of foliar disease in organic tomato production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Effects of compost amendments and extracts on tomato foliar disease severity and yield were assessed in greenhouse and field experiments. Aerated and nonaerated compost tea… (more)

Murray, William Kraft.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Edge effects, not connectivity, determine the incidence and development of a foliar fungal plant disease.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a model plant-pathogen system in a large-scale habitat corridor experiment, we found that corridors do not facilitate the movement of wind-dispersed plant pathogens, that connectivity of patches does not enhance levels of foliar fungal plant disease, and that edge effects are the key drivers of plant disease dynamics. Increased spread of infectious disease is often cited as a potential negative effect of habitat corridors used in conservation, but the impacts of corridors on pathogen movement have never been tested empirically. Using sweet corn (Zea mays) and southern corn leaf blight (Cochliobolus heterostrophus) as a model plant-pathogen system, we tested the impacts of connectivity and habitat fragmentation on pathogen movement and disease development at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, USA. Over time, less edgy patches had higher proportions of diseased plants, and distance of host plants to habitat edges was the greatest determinant of disease development. Variation in average daytime temperatures provided a possible mechanism for these disease patterns. Our results show that worries over the potentially harmful effects of conservation corridors on disease dynamics are misplaced, and that, in a conservation context, many diseases can be better managed by mitigating edge effects.

Johnson, Brenda, L.; Haddad, Nick, M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Development and application of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics methods for disease biomarker identification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human societies face diverse health challenges including a rapidly aging population, rising incidence of metabolic disease, and increasing antibiotic resistance. These problems involve complex interactions between genes ...

Tong, Lily Victoria

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 21 Carotenoids and Cadiovascular Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 21 Carotenoids and Cadiovascular Disease Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   Downloadable pd

420

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 12 Lycopene and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 12 Lycopene and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   Download

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Conventional and molecular assays aid diagnosis of crop diseases and fungicide resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

orchards in California. Crop Protec Ma Z, Yoshimura MA,assays aid diagnosis of crop diseases and fungicidemonitor, diagnose and quantify crop pathogens. We have also

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

HOSPITAL ENERGY AUDITS: A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R.A. and Werden. R.G. "Energy Bank: Veterans Administra-and Industry. Energy You Can Bank On. Denver, Colorado: 1978

Pollack, R. I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

HOSPITAL ENERGY AUDITS: A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guidelines for Solid Waste Boiler Sys- tems: Veteransreduce gas consumption by 3%; and boiler turbulators (infire tube boilers) can save 10% heat loss. Price. S.G. Air

Pollack, R. I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

HOSPITAL ENERGY AUDITS: A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the performance of the solar heating and/or cooling system.the use of solar energy for heating water, heating space,including solar water hea ting, space heating. and air

Pollack, R. I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

HOSPITAL ENERGY AUDITS: A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar energy for heating water, heating space, cooling buildings,a solar system capable of heating and cooling the building.building load, and weather data to predict the performance of the solar heating

Pollack, R. I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

HOSPITAL ENERGY AUDITS: A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a single "management of energy usage" index. The initialbills will indicate energy usage over a period. and data4) a management energy usage index was developed from the

Pollack, R. I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

HOSPITAL ENERGY AUDITS: A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D.H. "Hidden Energy Costs: Oil and Gas Raw Materials inoperating cost to $12.000 annually ($7.200 for oil and $electric annual cost savings over the gas or oil systems are

Pollack, R. I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

HOSPITAL ENERGY AUDITS: A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system in the area of alternative energy sources, it wassavings. The energy saving alternatives verify the the needstudied, and alternative Stirling total energy systems were

Pollack, R. I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Hospitality: Looking for Energy Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recommendations begin with no- and low-cost improvements, and also take advantage of capital investments and longer-term strategies that make financial sense. > Calculate...

430

HOSPITAL ENERGY AUDITS: A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1i Heating, Piping & Air Conditioning 1977 January; 49 :53-Heating, Piping & Air Conditioning 1977 August; 49:65-6.Heating, Piping & Air Conditioning 1977 Sep- tember; 49:57-

Pollack, R. I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

HOSPITAL ENERGY AUDITS: A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration. "Solar Energy for Health Care Institutions."Stathis 9 Florida." "Solar Energy ~_~~~~;""c;C Shows Fuel,prepare to use solar energy in order to achieve savings and

Pollack, R. I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

HOSPITAL ENERGY AUDITS: A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life-cycle Budgeting . ! £ Energy Problems: Life- cycle Costwith their urgent energy problems: 1) to organize a united~6. With emergence of the energy problem, much more must be

Pollack, R. I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

HOSPITAL ENERGY AUDITS: A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reflecting glass; and the reuse of waste energy. The heatefficiency for saving waste energy from exhaust air, doesof 1976. Eotvos Energy Waste Lorand Lorand. Tudomanyegyetem.

Pollack, R. I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

HOSPITAL ENERGY AUDITS: A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J.W. "Professional Energy Audit Points Way to $100,000to) I '-.J Spielvogel (Energy Audits) W I Stein Stroeh Total1974 February; 18:57-9. "Energy Audit Procedures. Ii Federal

Pollack, R. I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

How someone with a neuromuscular disease experiences operating a PC (and how to successfully counteract that)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the experiences of the first author, who has been diagnosed with the neuromuscular disease Friedreich's Ataxia more than 25 years ago, with the innovative approach to human-computer interaction characterized by the software tool ... Keywords: Friedreich's Ataxia, ambiguous keyboard, dysarthria, human-computer interaction, keyboard replacement, mouse emulator, neuromuscular disease, word prediction

Torsten Felzer, Stephan Rinderknecht

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

A medical game changer New device shows early promise for detecting heart disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fall 2012 A medical game changer New device shows early promise for detecting heart disease It as a functional test for people at high risk of developing heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United for enhancing auscultation (listening to heart sounds). Her husband, Robert Guion, was a convenient, good

Minnesota, University of

437

Interdisciplinary design of an electronic organizer for persons with alzheimer's disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of cognitive problems, it is very difficult for individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) to manage their time. Consequently, they are dependent on their caregivers or use pen-and-paper organizers, both of which have limitations. A more interesting ... Keywords: alzheimer's disease, compensatory memory device, electronic organizer, interdisciplinary approach, memory deficits

Hélène Imbeault; Hélène Pigot; Nathalie Bier; Lise Gagnon; Nicolas Marcotte; Sylvain Giroux; Tamas Fülöp

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Predicting Severity of Parkinson's Disease from Speech Meysam Asgari and Izhak Shafran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of progression of the disease. There is a growing interest in home-based assessment tools for measuring severity applications such as in home-based assessment or in telemonitoring of Parkinson's disease. I. INTRODUCTION. Not surprisingly, there has been a growing interest in creating tools and methods for alternative home-based

Shafran, Izhak

439

Proceedings of the 2nd workshop on lyme disease in the Southeast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume provides author prepared abstracts of oral presentation at the Second Workshop on Lyme Disease in the Southeast head in Raleigh, North Carolina September 7-9, 1993. The 33 presentations covered various aspects of the epidemic including geographical distribution of various species of ticks, transmission risks, Lyme Disease epidemiology, and taxonomic aspects.

Apperson, C.S. [ed.] [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Entomology; Levine, J.F. [ed.] [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology; Snoddy, E.L. [ed.] [Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, AL (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

440

Projecting independent components of SPECT images for computer aided diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Finding sensitive and appropriate technologies for early detection of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) are of fundamental importance to develop early treatments. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) images are non-invasive observation tools ... Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Computer aided diagnosis, Independent Component Analysis, Supervised learning, Support vector machine

I. Álvarez Illán; J. M. Górriz; J. Ramírez; D. Salas-Gonzalez; M. López; F. Segovia; P. Padilla; C. G. Puntonet

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Differential automatic diagnosis between Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia based on perfusion SPECT images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are among the most frequent neurodegenerative cognitive disorders, but their differential diagnosis is difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate an automatic method returning ... Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Brain SPECT, Computer-aided diagnosis, Frontotemporal dementia, k-Nearest neighbours

Jean-François Horn; Marie-Odile Habert; Aurélie Kas; Zoulikha Malek; Philippe Maksud; Lucette Lacomblez; Alain Giron; Bernard Fertil

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Neurobiology of Disease Loss of ALS2 Function Is Insufficient to Trigger Motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neurobiology of Disease Loss of ALS2 Function Is Insufficient to Trigger Motor Neuron Degeneration, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the most common motor neuron disease, is caused by a selective loss of motor neurons in the CNS. MutationsintheALS2

Blackshaw, Seth

443

Coronary Heart Disease: Overview #1 Killer in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Coronary Heart Disease: Overview · #1 Killer in the U.S. · Accounts for more than one in five, the vessels that supply the heart · Disease process: coronary atherosclerosis (plagues in artery) involves flow, shortage of oxygen, pain that radiates across the chest and arms Myocardial infarction - heart

Meagher, Mary

444

Lyme Disease In New York State: Spatial Pattern At A Regional Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lyme disease occurs commonly in New York State, but its geographic distribution is heterogeneous. For each of nine consecutive years, incidence rates from 57 New York State counties were subjected to spatial autocorrelation analysis. Although the epidemic advanced during the study period, the analyses reveal a consistent pattern of spatial dependence. The correlation distance, the distance over which incidence rates covary positively, remained near 120 km over the nine years. A local spatial analysis around Westchester County, a major disease focus, indicated that the global correlation distance matched the extent of the most intense local clustering; statistically weaker clustering extended to 200 km from Westchester. Analyzing the spatial character of the epidemic may reveal the epizootic processes underlying patterns in human infection, and may help identify a spatial scale for regional control of disease. Lyme disease remains the most frequently reported vector-borne disease in the Northern Hemisphere, and the world's most common tick-borne infection.

Stephan Glavanakov; Dennis J. White; Thomas Caraco; Andrei Lapenis; George Robinson; Boleslaw K. Szymanski; William; A. Maniatty

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Development of polymerase chain reaction primer sets for diagnosis of Lyme disease and for species-specific identification of Lyme disease isolates by 16S rRNA signature nucleotide analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

polymerase chain reaction primer sets for diagnosis of Lyme disease and for species-specific identification of Lyme disease isolates by 16S rRNA signature nucleotide analysis.

R T Marconi; C F Garon; Richard T. Marconi; Claude; F. Garon

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Postoperative Radiotherapy After Surgical Resection of Thymoma: Differing Roles in Localized and Regional Disease  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry data to determine the impact of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) for thymoma and thymic carcinoma (T/TC). Methods and Materials: Patients with surgically resected localized (LOC) or regional (REG) malignant T/TC with or without PORT were analyzed for overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) by querying the SEER database from 1973-2005. Patients dying within the first 3 months after surgery were excluded. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate analyses with Cox proportional hazards were performed. Results: A total of 901 T/TC patients were identified (275 with LOC disease and 626 with REG disease). For all patients with LOC disease, PORT had no benefit and may adversely impact the 5-year CSS rate (91% vs. 98%, p = 0.03). For patients with REG disease, the 5-year OS rate was significantly improved by adding PORT (76% vs. 66% for surgery alone, p = 0.01), but the 5-year CSS rate was no better (91% vs. 86%, p = 0.12). No benefit was noted for PORT in REG disease after extirpative surgery (defined as radical or total thymectomy). On multivariate OS and CSS analysis, stage and age were independently correlated with survival. For multivariate CSS analysis, the outcome of PORT is significantly better for REG disease than for LOC disease (hazard ratio, 0.167; p = 0.001). Conclusions: Our results from SEER show that PORT for T/TC had no advantage in patients with LOC disease (Masaoka Stage I), but a possible OS benefit of PORT in patients with REG disease (Masaoka Stage II-III) was found, especially after non-extirpative surgery. The role of PORT in T/TC needs further evaluation.

Forquer, Jeffrey A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Rong Nan [Department of Public Health, Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Fakiris, Achilles J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Loehrer, Patrick J. [Department of Hematology Oncology, Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Johnstone, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Heart DiseaseHeart Disease--Learn to Love YourLearn to Love Your Michael McKee, M.D.Michael McKee, M.D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heart DiseaseHeart Disease-- Learn to Love YourLearn to Love Your HeartHeart Michael McKee, M.D.Michael McKee, M.D. March 19, 2010March 19, 2010 #12;GoalsGoals ·· Learn more about heart disease for yourself andLearn more about heart disease for yourself and for your studentsfor your students ·· Learn

Goldman, Steven A.

448

Losartan attenuates chronic cigarette smoke exposure-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats: Possible involvement of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chronic cigarette smoking induces pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by largely unknown mechanisms. Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known to function in the development of PAH. Losartan, a specific angiotensin II receptor antagonist, is a well-known antihypertensive drug with a potential role in regulating angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2), a recently found regulator of RAS. To determine the effect of losartan on smoke-induced PAH and its possible mechanism, rats were daily exposed to cigarette smoke for 6 months in the absence and in the presence of losartan. Elevated right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), thickened wall of pulmonary arteries with apparent medial hypertrophy along with increased angiotensin II (Ang II) and decreased ACE2 levels were observed in smoke-exposed-only rats. Losartan administration ameliorated pulmonary vascular remodeling, inhibited the smoke-induced RVSP and Ang II elevation and partially reversed the ACE2 decrease in rat lungs. In cultured primary pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from 3- and 6-month smoke-exposed rats, ACE2 levels were significantly lower than in those from the control rats. Moreover, PASMCs from 6-month exposed rats proliferated more rapidly than those from 3-month exposed or control rats, and cells grew even more rapidly in the presence of DX600, an ACE2 inhibitor. Consistent with the in vivo study, in vitro losartan pretreatment also inhibited cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced cell proliferation and ACE2 reduction in rat PASMCs. The results suggest that losartan may be therapeutically useful in the chronic smoking-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling and PAH and ACE2 may be involved as part of its mechanism. Our study might provide insight into the development of new therapeutic interventions for PAH smokers.

Han Suxia; He Guangming; Wang Tao; Chen Lei; Ning Yunye; Luo Feng; An Jin; Yang Ting; Dong Jiajia; Liao Zenglin; Xu Dan [Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, and Department of Respiratory Medicine, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Wen Fuqiang, E-mail: wenfuqiang.scu@gmail.co [Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, and Department of Respiratory Medicine, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Borrelia afzelii and Two Borrelia garinii Lyme Disease Agent Isolates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human Lyme disease is commonly caused by several species of spirochetes in the Borrelia genus. In Eurasia these species are largely Borrelia afzelii, B. garinii, B. burgdorferi, and B. bavariensis sp. nov. Whole-genome sequencing is an excellent tool for investigating and understanding the influence of bacterial diversity on the pathogenesis and etiology of Lyme disease. We report here the whole-genome sequences of four isolates from two of the Borrelia species that cause human Lyme disease, B. afzelii isolates ACA-1 and PKo and B. garinii isolates PBr and Far04.

Casjens, S.R.; Dunn, J.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W.-G.; Luft, B. J.; Fraser-Liggett, C. M.; Schutzer, S. E.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Coral Health and Disease: A Comparison of Cook's and Opunohu Bays in Mo'orea,French Polynesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coral and coralline algae  disease/lesions  in  the and  nutrients.   Many species of algae also carry  disease­assessed for substrate, algae, and coral composition as 

Shea, Alessandra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

CORAL HEALTH AND DISEASE: A COMPARISON OF COOK’S AND ‘OPUNOHU BAYS IN MOOREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coral and coralline algae  disease/lesions  in  the and  nutrients.   Many species of algae also carry  disease­assessed for substrate, algae, and coral composition as 

Shea, Alessandra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Scenarios, personas and user stories: User-centered evidence-based design representations of communicable disease investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Despite years of effort and millions of dollars spent to create unified electronic communicable disease reporting systems, the goal remains elusive. A major barrier has been a lack of understanding by system designers of communicable disease ... Keywords: Communicable disease reporting, Human centered design, Information workflow, Personas, Public health informatics

Anne M. Turner, Blaine Reeder, Judith Ramey

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

What's Strange About Recent Events (WSARE): An Algorithm for the Early Detection of Disease Outbreaks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional biosurveillance algorithms detect disease outbreaks by looking for peaks in a univariate time series of health-care data. Current health-care surveillance data, however, are no longer simply univariate data streams. Instead, a wealth of spatial, ...

Weng-Keen Wong; Andrew Moore; Gregory Cooper; Michael Wagner

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Monitoring Motor Fluctuations in Patients With Parkinson's Disease Using Wearable Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a pilot study to assess the feasibility of using accelerometer data to estimate the severity of symptoms and motor complications in patients with Parkinson's disease. A support vector ...

Patel, Shyamal

455

Development of Regional Models that Use Meteorological Variables for Predicting Stripe Rust Disease on Winter Wheat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological variables can be used to predict stripe rust, a disease of wheat caused by Puccinia striiformis West., at Lind, Pullman, and Walla Walla, Washington and Pendleton, Oregon in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Regional ...

Stella Melugin Coakley; William S. Boyd; Roland F. Line

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Automated MRI measures identify individuals with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mild cognitive impairment can represent a transitional state between normal ageing and Alzheimer's disease. Non-invasive diagnostic methods are needed to identify mild cognitive impairment individuals for early therapeutic ...

Desikan, Rahul S.

457

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 3 Fish Oils and Stroke  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 3 Fish Oils and Stroke Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Fish Oils and St

458

Participatory epidemiology : harnessing the HealthMap platform for community-based disease outbreak monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to increasing global trade and travel along with a range of environmental factors, emerging infectious diseases such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), drug-resistant tuberculosis, and 2009 HiNi continue to ...

Freifeld, Clark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Cognition in healthy aging and Parkinson's disease : structural and functional integrity of neural circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation documents how healthy aging and Parkinson's disease (PD) affect brain anatomy and physiology and how these neural changes relate to measures of cognition and perception. While healthy aging and PD are ...

Ziegler, David A. (David Allan)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 1 Trans Fatty Acid Effects on Cardiovascular Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 1 Trans Fatty Acid Effects on Cardiovascular Disease Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS 7D1218959FAE1721B6FEA28

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & EChapter 6 Serum Ascorbic Acid and Disease Prevalence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & E Chapter 6 Serum Ascorbic Acid and Disease Prevalence Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Serum Ascorbic Ac

462

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & EChapter 19 Vitamin E in Disease Prevention and Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & E Chapter 19 Vitamin E in Disease Prevention and Therapy Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 19 Vitamin E in

463

Computational studies of tau protein : implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tau protein is the primary constituent of protein aggregates known as neurofibrillary tangles, a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies suggest that tau protein may play a contributing role in ...

Huang, Austin V., 1980-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & EChapter 7 Vitamin C Status and Cardiovascular Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & E Chapter 7 Vitamin C Status and Cardiovascular Disease Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 7 Vitamin C Status

465

Oxidation-specific epitopes are targets of innate natural antibodies : potential implications in health and disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Disease by Meng-Yun Sandy Chou Doctor of Philosophy inSciences by Meng-Yun Sandy Chou Committee in charge:Victor Nizet Copyright Meng-Yun Sandy Chou, 2009 All rights

Chou, Meng-Yun Sandy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Incidence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Southeast Iran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background and Aims: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a well-known consequence of chronic liver disease (CLD). The aim of this study was to extract the HCC incidence rate in the province of Kerman, located in southern part of Iran, and compare the data with other parts of the country. Materials and Methods: All medical records related to HCC were collected through hospitals or outpatient services in public or private centers. The records of all oncology, radiotherapy, and pathology centers in Kerman province were actively searched between 1999 and 2006. The annual incidence of HCC around the country was calculated, using the

A Rticle; Sodaif Darvish Moghaddam; Ali-akbar Haghdoost; Seyed Hamed Hoseini; Rashid Ramazani; Mohammad Rezazadehkermani

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

GMM based SPECT image classification for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a novel classification method of SPECT images based on Gaussian mixture models (GMM) for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. The aims of the model-based approach for density estimation is to automatically select regions of interest (ROIs) ... Keywords: 87.19.xr, 87.57.R-, 87.57.nm, 87.57.uh, Alzheimer's disease, EM algorithm, Gaussian mixture model, SPECT, Support vector machines (SVMs)

J. M. Górriz; F. Segovia; J. Ramírez; A. Lassl; D. Salas-Gonzalez

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

RADIOACTIVE IODINE IN THE TREATMENT OF HYPERTHYROIDISM (EXPERIENCE AT THE TORONTO GENERAL HOSPITAL, 1950-58). PART III. POSSIBLE BIOLOGICAL HAZARDS FROM RADIOACTIVE IODINE THERAPY  

SciTech Connect

A review of 542 hyperthyroid patients treated by I/sup 131/ at the Toronto General Hospital between 1950 and 1955 is presented. This group included 403 patients with diffuse hyperplastic goitre and 139 patients with toxic nodular goitre. The method for assessing the initial dose of I/sup 131/ is described. In general, patients with toxic nodular goitres received much larger doses. Of the diffuse hyperplastic group 72% were cured with one dose, the remainder requiring two or more doses. A greater percentage of the toxic nodular group required only one dose. No cases of complete resistance to 1/sup 131/ therapy were encountered. Permanent hypothyroidism was produced in 16.3% of those so treated, but in 6.5% it was very mild. The incidence of clinical hypothyroidism was much lower in the toxic nodular group than in the diffuse hyperplastic group. There was a continuing incidence of late hypothyroidism, occurring years after therapy; some of these patients had undergone a transient period of hypothyroidism shortly after treatment, then recovered for some years. Factors possibly related to the response to treatment and to the development of hypothyroidism have been analyzed. Recurrent hyperthyroidism after thyroidectomy was associated with a significant increase in the incidence of post-I/sup 131/ hypothyroidism, while pretreatment with artithyroid drugs seemed to reduce radiosensitivity in the diffuse group. No late recurrences of hyperthyroidism were noted. Twenty-one deaths occurred within two years of therapy. In most, there was no obvious relation to therapy, while in none was there a clear-out cause-and-effect relationship to I/sup 131/ therapy. Nevertheless, elderly or very ill patients should be treated only after they have been rendered euthyroid by antithyroid drugs. Fertility has not been affected by I/sup 131/ therapy, but the use of this isotope in pregnancy is contraindicated because of the possible ill effects on the fetas. The possibility of genetic effects appears to be negligible, as judged by the gonadal radiation doses received in I/sup 131/ therapy. The fear of carcinoma of the thyroid likewise appears to be receding if the therapy is utilized only in adults. Leukemia has been reported in 14 instances. However, the statistical import is not clear, since the total number of cases of leukemia and of persons treated by I/sup 131/ is not known. It may be that there is a slight increase in the incidence of leukemia following radioactive treatment, comparable to that possibly induced by certain diagnostic radiological procedures, but this is insufficient to warrant any change in policy regarding the use of I/sup 131/ After consideration of these hypothetical dangers, it is concluded that the use of radioactive iodine is a safe, effective form of therapy for adult, nonpregnant hyperthyroid patients, and is to be preferred to surgical thyroidectomy. 108 references. (auth)

Volpe, R.; Schatz, D.L.; Scott, A.; Peller, J.A.; Vale, J.M.; Ezrin, C.; Johnston, M.W.

1961-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

469

Diagnostic evaluation of a multiplexed RT-PCR microsphere array assay for the detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus and look-alike disease viruses  

SciTech Connect

A high-throughput multiplexed assay was developed for the differential laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) from viruses which cause clinically similar diseases of livestock. This assay simultaneously screens for five RNA and two DNA viruses using multiplexed reverse transcription PCR (mRT-PCR) amplification coupled with a microsphere hybridization array and flow-cytometric detection. Two of the seventeen primer-probe sets included in this multiplex assay were adopted from previously characterized real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays for FMDV. The diagnostic accuracy of the mRT-PCR was evaluated using 287 field samples, including 248 (true positive n= 213, true negative n=34) from suspect cases of foot-and-mouth disease collected from 65 countries between 1965 and 2006 and 39 true negative samples collected from healthy animals. The mRT-PCR assay results were compared with two singleplex rRT-PCR assays, using virus isolation with antigen-ELISA as the reference method. The diagnostic sensitivity of the mRT-PCR assay for FMDV was 93.9% [95% C.I. 89.8-96.4%], compared to 98.1% [95% C.I. 95.3-99.3%] for the two singleplex rRT-PCR assays used in combination. In addition, the assay could reliably differentiate between FMDV and other vesicular viruses such as swine vesicular disease virus and vesicular exanthema of swine virus. Interestingly, the mRT-PCR detected parapoxvirus (n=2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (n=2) in clinical samples, demonstrating the screening potential of this mRT-PCR assay to identify viruses in FMDV-negative material not previously recognized using focused single-target rRT-PCR assays.

Hindson, B J; Reid, S M; Baker, B R; Ebert, K; Ferris, N P; Bentley Tammero, L F; Lenhoff, R J; Naraghi-Arani, P; Vitalis, E A; Slezak, T R; Hullinger, P J; King, D P

2007-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

470

Epidemiological and Clinical Features of 1,149 Persons with Lyme Disease Identified by Laboratory-Based Surveillance in Connecticut  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3,098 persons with suspected Lyme disease; 1,149 were defined as cases. Lyme disease incidence in Connecticut towns ranged from none to 1,407 cases per 100,000 population in 1985. A comparison of 1985 data with data from 1977 epidemiologic studies indicated that incidence increased by 129 percent to 453 percent in towns previously known to be endemic for Lyme disease and that Lyme disease had spread northward into towns thought to be free of Lyme disease in 1977. Children aged five to 14 years had the highest incidence. Of persons with Lyme disease, 83 percent had erythema migrans, 24 percent had arthritis, 8 percent had neurologic sequelae, and 2 percent had cardiac sequelae. The distribution of symptoms was age-dependent: case-persons Lyme disease is increasing in incidence and geographic distribution in Connecticut. Of those with Lyme disease, children may be more likely than adults to develop arthritis and have it as their first major disease manifestation. Lyme disease, discovered in 1975 in Connecticut, is now endemic in at least 19

Lyle R. Petersen; A Anne H. Sweeney; Patricia J. Checko; C Louis; A. Magnarelli, Ph.D.; Patricia A. Mshar; C Robert; A. Gunn; James; L. Hadler

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Nonlinear Dynamics of Infectious Diseases Transfer with Possible Applications for Tubercular Infection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we model a nonlinear dynamics of infectious diseases transfer. Particularly, we study possible applications to tubercular infection in models with different profiles (peak values) of the population density dependence on spatial coordinates. Our approach is based on the well known method of instantons which has been used by the authors to describe kinetics of adiabatic chemical reactions as a function of the heat-bath temperature and other system parameters. In our approach, we use "social temperature" T as one of the controlling parameters. Increase of T leads to acceleration of the infectious diseases transfer. The "blockage" effect for the infectious diseases transfer has been demonstrated in the case when peak values (in the population density) are equal to one and under condition that the "social temperature" is low. Existence of such effect essentially depends from environment "activity" (social and prophylactic). Results of our modeling qualitatively meet the tuberculosis dynamic spread d...

Krevchik, V D; Dahnovsky, Yu I; Semenov, M B; Shcherbakova, E V; Yamamoto, Kenji

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Sci Protek Signs Licensing Deal for Technology that Reduces Plant Disease |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sci Protek Signs Licensing Deal for Technology that Reduces Plant Disease Sci Protek Signs Licensing Deal for Technology that Reduces Plant Disease January 06, 2011 A California based small business, Sci Proteck, Inc, has recently licensed technology developed at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Chicago (UChicago) to protect plants from crop diseases. Research on this new method for inducing plant pathogen resistance began in 2005 following a grant from the National Science Foundation and research support from the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy. Principal developers include Timothy Tschaplinski at ORNL and Drs. Jean Greenberg and Ho Won Jung at the UChicago. ORNL and UChicago entered into an Inter-Institutional Agreement for licensing, patent prosecution, and royalty sharing.

473

Geek-Up[04.01.2011]: A Discovery to Fight Cancer and Other Diseases |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4.01.2011]: A Discovery to Fight Cancer and Other Diseases 4.01.2011]: A Discovery to Fight Cancer and Other Diseases Geek-Up[04.01.2011]: A Discovery to Fight Cancer and Other Diseases April 1, 2011 - 5:52pm Addthis Two structures of the Mre11-Rad50 complex were solved independently and overlaid, further revealing a flexible hinge in Rad50 near the Mre11 binding site | Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Two structures of the Mre11-Rad50 complex were solved independently and overlaid, further revealing a flexible hinge in Rad50 near the Mre11 binding site | Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Researchers discovered that a cell's speedy ability to repair damaged DNA relies on the remarkable flexibility of a molecular motor.

474

A Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating the Pathogen-Host Research Paradigm  

SciTech Connect

The 20th century was marked by extraordinary advances in our understanding of microbes and infectious disease, but pandemics remain, food and water borne illnesses are frequent, multi-drug resistant microbes are on the rise, and the needed drugs and vaccines have not been developed. The scientific approaches of the past—including the intense focus on individual genes and proteins typical of molecular biology—have not been sufficient to address these challenges. The first decade of the 21st century has seen remarkable innovations in technology and computational methods. These new tools provide nearly comprehensive views of complex biological systems and can provide a correspondingly deeper understanding of pathogen-host interactions. To take full advantage of these innovations, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases recently initiated the Systems Biology Program for Infectious Disease Research. As participants of the Systems Biology Program we think that the time is at hand to redefine the pathogen-host research paradigm.

Aderem, Alan; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Galagan, James; Kaiser, Shari; Korth, Marcus J.; Law, G. L.; McDermott, Jason E.; Proll, Sean; Rosenberger, Carrie; Schoolnik, Gary; Katze, Michael G.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Gas Bubble Disease Monitoring and Research of Juvenile Salmonids : Annual Report 1996.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the project activities 1996--1997 contract year. This report is composed of three chapters which contain data and analyses of the three main elements of the project: field research to determine the vertical distribution of migrating juvenile salmonids, monitoring of juvenile migrants at dams on the Snake and Columbia rivers, and laboratory experiments to describe the progression of gas bubble disease signs leading to mortality. The major findings described in this report are: A miniature pressure-sensitive radio transmitter was found to be accurate and precise and, after compensation for water temperature, can be used to determine the depth of tagged-fish to within 0.32 m of the true depth (Chapter 1). Preliminary data from very few fish suggest that depth protects migrating juvenile steelhead from total dissolved gas supersaturation (Chapter 1). As in 1995, few fish had any signs of gas bubble disease, but it appeared that prevalence and severity increased as fish migrated downstream and in response to changing gas supersaturation (Chapter 2). It appeared to gas bubble disease was not a threat to migrating juvenile salmonids when total dissolved gas supersaturation was < 120% (Chapter 2). Laboratory studies suggest that external examinations are appropriate for determining the severity of gas bubble disease in juvenile salmonids (Chapter 3). The authors developed a new method for examining gill arches for intravascular bubbles by clamping the ventral aorta to reduce bleeding when arches were removed (Chapter 3). Despite an outbreak of bacterial kidney disease in the experimental fish, the data indicate that gas bubble disease is a progressive trauma that can be monitored (Chapter 3).

Maule, Alec G.; Beeman, John W.; Hans, Karen M.; Mesa, M.G.; Haner, P.; Warren, J.J. [Geological Survey, Cook, WA (United States). Columbia River Research Lab.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Integrating domain knowledge with statistical and data mining methods for high-density genomic SNP disease association analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Genome-wide association studies can help identify multi-gene contributions to disease. As the number of high-density genomic markers tested increases, however, so does the number of loci associated with disease by chance. Performing a brute-force test ... Keywords: Data integration, Data mining, False discovery rate (FDR), Genome-wide association (GWA), Pathway-based disease association, Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP)

Valentin Dinu; Hongyu Zhao; Perry L. Miller

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Predicting Conversion from Mild Cognitive Impairment to Alzheimer’s Disease using Partially Ordered Models of Neuopsychological Measurements.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Background: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a risk factor for conversion to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Objectives: To identify predictors of the conversion of MCI to… (more)

Yang, Yan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 17 Vitamin A in Health and Disease in Developing Countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 17 Vitamin A in Health and Disease in Developing Countries Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   ...

479

Discovering genes-diseases associations from specialized literature using the grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a novel method for text mining on the Grid, aimed at pointing out hidden relationships for hypothesis generation and suitable for semi-interactive querying. The method is based on unsupervised clustering and the outputs are visualized ... Keywords: Grid, genes-diseases association, knowledge discovery, text mining, unsupervised clustering

Alberto Faro; Daniela Giordano; Francesco Maiorana; Concetto Spampinato

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions  

SciTech Connect

This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N = 235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.30), angina or CHO (OR = 1.29, 95% C1 = 1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR = 1.19, 95% C1 = 1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standards established as indicated.

Hendryx, M.; Zullig, K.J. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Community Medicine

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hospital chronic disease" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

DISMON: Using Social Web and Semantic Technologies to Monitor Diseases in Limited Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information technology and, more precisely, the internet represent challenges and opportunities for medicine. Technology-driven medicine has changed how practitioners perform their roles in and medical information systems have recently gained momentum ... Keywords: Crawler, Diseases, Limited Environments, Medical Prediction, Ontology, Semantic Technologies, Social Web

Ricardo Colomo-Palacios; Ángel García-Crespo; Juan Miguel Gómez-Berbís; Ángel M. Lagares-Lemos; Miguel Lagares-Lemos

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

A set of ontologies to drive tools for the control of vector-borne diseases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are developing a set of ontologies dealing with vector-borne diseases as well as the arthropod vectors that transmit them. After building ontologies for mosquito and tick anatomy we continued this project with an ontology of insecticide resistance ... Keywords: Anatomy, Arthropod vector, Database, Decision support system, Insecticide resistance, Malaria, Mosquito, Tick, Transmission

Pantelis Topalis; Emmanuel Dialynas; Elvira Mitraka; Elena Deligianni; Inga Siden-Kiamos; Christos Louis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Fracture, aging, and disease in bone J.W. Ager III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fracture, aging, and disease in bone J.W. Ager III Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley-known increase with age in fracture risk of human bone is essential. This also represents a challenge from accompanying the process of aging using appropriate multiscale experimental methods and relating them

Ritchie, Robert

484

Genomics-enabled sensor platform for rapid detection of viruses related to disease outbreak.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioweapons and emerging infectious diseases pose growing threats to our national security. Both natural disease outbreak and outbreaks due to a bioterrorist attack are a challenge to detect, taking days after the outbreak to identify since most outbreaks are only recognized through reportable diseases by health departments and reports of unusual diseases by clinicians. In recent decades, arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) have emerged as some of the most significant threats to human health. They emerge, often unexpectedly, from cryptic transmission foci causing localized outbreaks that can rapidly spread to multiple continents due to increased human travel and trade. Currently, diagnosis of acute infections requires amplification of viral nucleic acids, which can be costly, highly specific, technically challenging and time consuming. No diagnostic devices suitable for use at the bedside or in an outbreak setting currently exist. The original goals of this project were to 1) develop two highly sensitive and specific diagnostic assays for detecting RNA from a wide range of arboviruses; one based on an electrochemical approach and the other a fluorescent based assay and 2) develop prototype microfluidic diagnostic platforms for preclinical and field testing that utilize the assays developed in goal 1. We generated and characterized suitable primers for West Nile Virus RNA detection. Both optical and electrochemical transduction technologies were developed for DNA-RNA hybridization detection and were implemented in microfluidic diagnostic sensing platforms that were developed in this project.

Brozik, Susan Marie; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Edwards, Thayne L.; Anderson, John Moses; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant; Branch, Darren W.; Wheeler, David Roger; Polsky, Ronen; Lopez, DeAnna M.; Ebel, Gregory D. [Colorado State University; Prasad, Abhishek N. [Colorado State University; Brozik, James A. [Washington State University; Rudolph, Angela R. [Washington State University; Wong, Lillian P. [Washington State University

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Scintigraphic evaluation of Lyme disease: Gallium-67 imaging of Lyme myositis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A patient suffering from Lyme disease had cardiac conduction abnormalities, symptoms of arthritis, and myalgia. A Ga-67 image showed evidence of endomyocarditis, but intense skeletal muscle uptake pointed to Lyme myositis. Reference is made to two other case reports of Lyme myositis.

Kengen, R.A.; v.d. Linde, M.; Sprenger, H.G.; Piers, D.A. (Univ. Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Discovery of temporal variation of arsenic in a historical blackfoot disease territory by time series analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time series analysis is useful tool for extracting interesting pattern from ordered sequence of observations. The Chianan Blackfoot disease region was selected as study area, and the monitoring data of arsenic in groundwater during the period of 2003 ... Keywords: arsenic, data mining, groundwater management, time series analysis, water quality

Jan-Yee Lee; Ting-Nien Wu

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Discovery of Temporal Variation of Arsenic in a Historical Blackfoot Disease Territory by Time Series Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time series analysis is useful tool for extracting interesting pattern from ordered sequence of observations. The Chianan Blackfoot disease region was selected as study area, and the monitoring data of arsenic in groundwater during the period of 2003 ... Keywords: groundwater management, data mining, time series analysis, arsenic, water quality

Jan-Yee Lee; Ting-Nien Wu

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z